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Sample records for volume respiratory frequency

  1. Measurement of ventilatory threshold by respiratory frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabetani, Teru; Ueda, Takeshi; Teramoto, Keisuke

    2002-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether respiratory frequency can be used as a valid parameter for estimating ventilatory threshold and for examining differences in exercise modes such as a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 24 men and 12 women performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer and on a treadmill. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, pulmonary ventilation, ventilatory frequency, and heart rate were measured continuously every 30 sec. during the test. Three different and independent reviewers detected the ventilatory threshold point and break point of respiratory rate, which were then compared. Analysis indicated that (1) ventilatory threshold was well correlated with break point of respiratory rate for both cycle (r=.88, pcycle) or 88% (treadmill) of break point of respiratory rate. (2) The regression equation for treadmill exercise was more accurate than that for cycling, but the detected data samples were smaller. The break point of respiratory rate was more easily detected for the cycle ergometer test 33 of 36 subjects) than for the treadmill test (only 15 of 36). The cycle ergometer test identified the break point of respiratory rate more easily than did the treadmill test. (3) There was an association between physical fitness and whether the break point of respiratory rate was detectable, and the more fit the subject (above average), the more likely the break point was to be undetected. Our study demonstrates that the break point of respiratory rate is closely associated with ventilatory threshold and that the cycle ergometer test is more conducive than the treadmill test to the detectability of break point of respiratory rate.

  2. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

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    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    patterns of higher frequency and amplitude motion. Larger volume differences (>10%) and inconsistencies between the relative positions of objects were detected in image studies acquired without respiratory control. Increasing the 3DCT rotation period caused a higher distortion in structures without obtaining their envelope. Simulated data showed that the slice acquisition time should be at least twice the breath period to average object movement. Conclusions: Respiratory 4DCT images provide accurate volume and position of organs affected by breath motion detecting higher volume discrepancies as amplitude length or breath frequency are increased. For 3DCT acquisitions, a CT should be considered slow enough to include lesion envelope as long as the slice acquisition time exceeds twice the breathing period. If this requirement cannot be satisfied, a fast CT (along with breath-hold inhale and exhale CTs to estimate roughly the ITV) is recommended in order to minimize structure distortion. Even with an awareness of a patient's respiratory cycle, its coupling with 3DCT acquisition cannot be predicted since patient anatomy is not accurately known.

  3. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth; Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    frequency and amplitude motion. Larger volume differences (>10%) and inconsistencies between the relative positions of objects were detected in image studies acquired without respiratory control. Increasing the 3DCT rotation period caused a higher distortion in structures without obtaining their envelope. Simulated data showed that the slice acquisition time should be at least twice the breath period to average object movement. Respiratory 4DCT images provide accurate volume and position of organs affected by breath motion detecting higher volume discrepancies as amplitude length or breath frequency are increased. For 3DCT acquisitions, a CT should be considered slow enough to include lesion envelope as long as the slice acquisition time exceeds twice the breathing period. If this requirement cannot be satisfied, a fast CT (along with breath-hold inhale and exhale CTs to estimate roughly the ITV) is recommended in order to minimize structure distortion. Even with an awareness of a patient's respiratory cycle, its coupling with 3DCT acquisition cannot be predicted since patient anatomy is not accurately known. © 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Multiple window correlation analysis of HRV power and respiratory frequency.

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    Hansson-Sandsten, Maria; Jönsson, Peter

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the correlation estimate, based on multiple window spectrum analysis, between the respiratory center frequency and the high-frequency band of the heartrate variability (HRV) power. One aim is to examine whether a more restricted frequency range would better capture respiratory related HR variation, especially when the HR variation is changing rapidly. The respiratory peak is detected and a narrow-banded measure of the high-frequency (HF) band of the HRV is defined as the respiratory frequency +/-0.05 Hz. We compare the mean square error of the correlation estimate between the frequency of the respiratory peak and the power of the HRV with the power in the usual 0.12-0.4 Hz frequency band. Different multiple window spectrum techniques are used for the estimation of the respiratory frequency as well as for the power of the HRV. We compare the peak-matched multiple windows with the Welch method while evaluating the two different HF-power estimates mentioned above. The results show that using a more narrow band for the power estimation gives stronger correlation which indicates that the estimate of the power is more robust.

  5. Paranatal oxygen consumption and respiratory frequency in the Laysan Albatross.

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    Whittow, G C

    2003-12-16

    The oxygen consumption and respiratory frequency of Laysan Albatross eggs were measured during the different phases of pipping (paranatal period) and in hatchlings. The initial phase of pipping--penetration of the aircell of the egg by the embryonic beak--coincided with the beginning of pulmonary ventilation, the embryo rebreathing aircell gas, but it did not result in a statistically significant increase in oxygen consumption. The second phase of pipping--star-fracture of the shell (external pipping)--was the shortest (25 h) of the three phases of pipping, and it did not result in a significant increase in either oxygen consumption or respiratory frequency. The longest phase of pipping (65 h)--the pip-hole phase--represented 54% of the total duration of pipping, and it was accompanied by significant increases in oxygen consumption and respiratory frequency. When the eggs hatched, the oxygen consumption increased further but respiratory frequency diminished significantly. It was calculated that the paranatal period, which represented 7.9% of the total incubation period of the egg, accounted for 37.2% of the total oxygen consumption of the egg.

  6. Dynamics of the locomotor-respiratory coupling at different frequencies.

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    Hoffmann, Charles P; Bardy, Benoît G

    2015-05-01

    The locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC) is a universal phenomenon reported for various forms of rhythmic exercise. In this study, we investigated the effect of movement and respiratory frequencies on LRC. Participants were instructed to cycle or breath in synchrony with a periodic auditory stimulation at preferred and non-preferred frequencies. LRC stability was assessed by frequency and phase coupling indexes using the theory of nonlinear coupled oscillators through the sine circle map model, and the Farey tree. Results showed a stabilizing effect of sound on LRC for all frequencies and for the two systems paced. The sound-induced effect was more prominent when the rhythm of the stimulation corresponded to the preferred frequencies. The adoption of cycling or respiratory frequencies far off preferential ones led to a loss of stability in LRC. Contrary to previous findings, our results suggest that LRC is not unidirectional-from locomotion onto respiration-but bidirectional between the two systems. They also suggest that auditory information plays an important role in the modulation of LRC.

  7. Frequency dependence of lung volume changes during superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation and high-frequency jet ventilation.

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    Sütterlin, R; Priori, R; Larsson, A; LoMauro, A; Frykholm, P; Aliverti, A

    2014-01-01

    Superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation (SHFJV) has proved to be safe and effective in clinical practice. However, it is unclear which frequency range optimizes ventilation and gas exchange. The aim of this study was to systematically compare high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) with HFJV by assessing chest wall volume variations (ΔEEV(CW)) and gas exchange in relation to variable high frequency. SHFJV or HFJV were used alternatively to ventilate the lungs of 10 anaesthetized pigs (21-25 kg). The low-frequency component was kept at 16 min(-1) in SHFJV. In both modes, high frequencies ranging from 100 to 1000 min(-1) were applied in random order and ventilation was maintained for 5 min in all modalities. Chest wall volume variations were obtained using opto-electronic plethysmography. Airway pressures and arterial blood gases were measured repeatedly. SHFJV increased ΔEEV(CW) compared with HFJV; the difference ranged from 43 to 68 ml. Tidal volume (V(T)) was always >240 ml during SHFJV whereas during HFJV ranged from 92 ml at the ventilation frequency of 100 min(-1) to negligible values at frequencies >300 min(-1). We observed similar patterns for Pa(O₂) and Pa(CO₂). SHFJV provided generally higher, frequency-independent oxygenation (Pa(O₂) at least 32.0 kPa) and CO₂ removal (Pa(CO₂) ∼5.5 kPa), whereas HFJV led to hypoxia and hypercarbia at higher rates (Pa(O₂) 10 kPa at f(HF)>300 min(-1)). In a porcine model, SHFJV was more effective in increasing end-expiratory volume than single-frequency HFJV, but both modes may provide adequate ventilation in the absence of airway obstruction and respiratory disease, except for HFJV at frequencies ≥300 min(-1).

  8. Quantification of respiratory depression during pre-operative administration of midazolam using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor

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    Gonzalez Castro, Luis N.; Mehta, Jaideep H.; Brayanov, Jordan B.; Mullen, Gary J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Pre-operative administration of benzodiazepines can cause hypoventilation—a decrease in minute ventilation (MV)—commonly referred to as “respiratory compromise or respiratory depression.” Respiratory depression can lead to hypercarbia and / or hypoxemia, and may heighten the risk of other respiratory complications. Current anesthesia practice often places patients at risk for respiratory complications even before surgery, as respiratory monitoring is generally postponed until the patient is in the operating room. In the present study we examined and quantified the onset of respiratory depression following the administration of a single dose of midazolam in pre-operative patients, using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor that reports MV, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate (RR). Methods Impedance-based Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) data were collected and analyzed from 30 patients prior to undergoing orthopedic or general surgical procedures. All patients received 2.0 mg of midazolam intravenously at least 20 minutes prior to the induction of anesthesia and the effects of midazolam on the patient's respiratory function were analyzed. Results Within 15 minutes of midazolam administration, we noted a significant decrease in both MV (average decrease of 14.3% ± 5.9%, pbenzodiazepines affect primarily TV rather than RR. Such respiratory monitoring data provide the opportunity for individualizing dosing and adjustment of clinical interventions, especially important in elderly patients. With additional respiratory data, clinicians may be able to better identify and quantify respiratory depression, reduce adverse effects, and improve overall patient safety. PMID:28235069

  9. Frequency and management of respiratory incidents in invasive home ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Sven; George, Sandhya; Priegnitz, Christina; Hagmeyer, Lars; Randerath, Winfried

    2013-08-01

    There has been a rise in the number of patients requiring long-term ventilation, both in the in-hospital and the out-of-hospital setting. Despite this, little is known about the subsequent clinical course of these patients following hospital discharge. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and management of respiratory incidents in patients with invasive out-of-hospital ventilation living in a nursing home allied to a weaning centre. We evaluated retrospectively the protocols that are used to monitor the patients over a period of 2 months. The average time from hospital discharge was 386 ± 330 days. Of the total 17 patients, 9 (53%) patients remained free from any respiratory incidents, while the remaining 8 (47%) patients were responsible for a total of 95 respiratory incidents. Patients that suffered respiratory incidents had been ventilated at home for an average of 194 days, while the others were receiving out-of-hospital ventilation for an average of 557 days. Desaturation (17), dyspnoea (17) and reduced general condition (10) were the most common respiratory incidents. Also, the use of an Ambu bag (bag valve mask; 17), request for a pneumologist review (12) and replacement of the tracheal cannula (7) were the most common interventions. Respiratory incidents are common in invasive home mechanical ventilation, and so home mechanical ventilation needed to be organized safely. Being allied to a weaning centre helps to organize invasive home mechanical ventilation in a safe manner over the long-term ventilation.

  10. Quantification of respiratory depression during pre-operative administration of midazolam using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Castro, Luis N; Mehta, Jaideep H; Brayanov, Jordan B; Mullen, Gary J

    2017-01-01

    Pre-operative administration of benzodiazepines can cause hypoventilation-a decrease in minute ventilation (MV)-commonly referred to as "respiratory compromise or respiratory depression." Respiratory depression can lead to hypercarbia and / or hypoxemia, and may heighten the risk of other respiratory complications. Current anesthesia practice often places patients at risk for respiratory complications even before surgery, as respiratory monitoring is generally postponed until the patient is in the operating room. In the present study we examined and quantified the onset of respiratory depression following the administration of a single dose of midazolam in pre-operative patients, using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor that reports MV, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate (RR). Impedance-based Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) data were collected and analyzed from 30 patients prior to undergoing orthopedic or general surgical procedures. All patients received 2.0 mg of midazolam intravenously at least 20 minutes prior to the induction of anesthesia and the effects of midazolam on the patient's respiratory function were analyzed. Within 15 minutes of midazolam administration, we noted a significant decrease in both MV (average decrease of 14.3% ± 5.9%, pmidazolam administration on clinically significant respiratory parameters (MV, TV and RR) using a non-invasive RVM, uncovering that the respiratory depressive effect of benzodiazepines affect primarily TV rather than RR. Such respiratory monitoring data provide the opportunity for individualizing dosing and adjustment of clinical interventions, especially important in elderly patients. With additional respiratory data, clinicians may be able to better identify and quantify respiratory depression, reduce adverse effects, and improve overall patient safety.

  11. Changes in the planning target volume and liver volume dose based on the selected respiratory phase in respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Baek, Seong-Min

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the changes in the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume dose based on the respiratory phase to identify the optimal respiratory phase for respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on the standardized procedure for respiratory-gated radiation therapy, we performed a 4-dimensional computed tomography simulation for 0 ˜ 90%, 30 ˜ 70%, and 40 ˜ 60% respiratory phases to assess the respiratory stability (S R ) and the defined PTV i for each respiratory phase i. A treatment plan was established, and the changes in the PTV i and dose volume of the liver were quantitatively analyzed. Most patients (91.5%) passed the respiratory stability test (S R = 0.111 ± 0.015). With standardized respiration training exercises, we were able to minimize the overall systematic error caused by irregular respiration. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis to identify the optimal respiratory phase revealed that when a short respiratory phase (40 ˜ 60%) was used, the changes in the PTV were concentrated inside the center line; thus, we were able to obtain both a PTV margin accounting for respiration and a uniform radiation dose within the PTV.

  12. High-Frequency Percussive Ventilation: Pneumotachograph Validation and Tidal Volume Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Meredith Pride for their invaluable research efforts. Table 3. Mean Difference in High-Frequency VT* Relative to Test- Lung VT† Difference in High...respiratory gas on pneumotachographic measurement of ventilation in newborn infants. Biomed Tech 1994;39(4):85-92. 15. Jackson AC, Vinegar A. A technique...for measuring frequency re- sponse of pressure, volume, and flow transducers. J Appl Physiol 1979;47(2):462-467. 16. Finucane KE, Egan BA, Dawson SV

  13. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Molgat-Seon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW. Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12 and healthy controls (n=12 underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p0.05. LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05. During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05. LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  14. The effect of body temperature on the dynamic respiratory system compliance-breathing frequency relationship in the rat.

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    Rubini, Alessandro; Bosco, Gerardo

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical inhomogeneity of the respiratory system is frequently investigated by measuring the frequency dependence of dynamic compliance, but no data are currently available describing the effects of body temperature variations. The aim of the present report was to study those effects in vivo. Peak airway pressure was measured during positive pressure ventilation in eight anesthetized rats while breathing frequency (but not tidal volume) was altered. Dynamic compliance was calculated as the tidal volume/peak airway pressure, and measurements were taken in basal conditions (mean rectal temperature 37.3 °C) as well as after total body warming (mean rectal temperature 39.7 °C). Due to parenchymal mechanical inhomogeneity and stress relaxation-linked effects, the normal rat respiratory system exhibited frequency dependence of dynamic lung compliance. Even moderate body temperature increments significantly reduced the decrements in dynamic compliance linked to breathing rate increments. The results were analyzed using Student's and Wilcoxon's tests, which yielded the same results (p temperature variations are known to influence respiratory mechanics. The frequency dependence of dynamic compliance was found, in the experiments described, to be temperature-dependent as temperature variations affected parenchymal mechanical inhomogeneity and stress relaxation. These results suggest that body temperature variations should be taken into consideration when the dynamic compliance-breathing frequency relationship is being examined during clinical assessment of inhomogeneity of lung parenchyma in patients.

  15. Estimating energetics in cetaceans from respiratory frequency: why we need to understand physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fahlman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accurate estimation of field metabolic rates (FMR in wild animals is a key component of bioenergetic models, and is important for understanding the routine limitations for survival as well as individual responses to disturbances or environmental changes. Several methods have been used to estimate FMR, including accelerometer-derived activity budgets, isotope dilution techniques, and proxies from heart rate. Counting the number of breaths is another method used to assess FMR in cetaceans, which is attractive in its simplicity and the ability to measure respiration frequency from visual cues or data loggers. This method hinges on the assumption that over time a constant tidal volume (VT and O2 exchange fraction (ΔO2 can be used to predict FMR. To test whether this method of estimating FMR is valid, we measured breath-by-breath tidal volumes and expired O2 levels of bottlenose dolphins, and computed the O2 consumption rate (V̇O2 before and after a pre-determined duration of exercise. The measured V̇O2 was compared with three methods to estimate FMR. Each method to estimate V̇O2 included variable VT and/or ΔO2. Two assumption-based methods overestimated V̇O2 by 216-501%. Once the temporal changes in cardio-respiratory physiology, such as variation in VT and ΔO2, were taken into account, pre-exercise resting V̇O2 was predicted to within 2%, and post-exercise V̇O2 was overestimated by 12%. Our data show that a better understanding of cardiorespiratory physiology significantly improves the ability to estimate metabolic rate from respiratory frequency, and further emphasizes the importance of eco-physiology for conservation management efforts.

  16. Inclusion of Respiratory Frequency Information in Heart Rate Variability Analysis for Stress Assessment.

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    Hernando, Alberto; Lazaro, Jesus; Gil, Eduardo; Arza, Adriana; Garzon, Jorge Mario; Lopez-Anton, Raul; de la Camara, Concepcion; Laguna, Pablo; Aguilo, Jordi; Bailon, Raquel

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory rate and heart rate variability (HRV) are studied as stress markers in a database of young healthy volunteers subjected to acute emotional stress, induced by a modification of the Trier Social Stress Test. First, instantaneous frequency domain HRV parameters are computed using time-frequency analysis in the classical bands. Then, the respiratory rate is estimated and this information is included in HRV analysis in two ways: 1) redefining the high-frequency (HF) band to be centered at respiratory frequency; 2) excluding from the analysis those instants where respiratory frequency falls within the low-frequency (LF) band. Classical frequency domain HRV indices scarcely show statistical differences during stress. However, when including respiratory frequency information in HRV analysis, the normalized LF power as well as the LF/HF ratio significantly increase during stress ( p-value 0.05 according to the Wilcoxon test), revealing higher sympathetic dominance. The LF power increases during stress, only being significantly different in a stress anticipation stage, while the HF power decreases during stress, only being significantly different during the stress task demanding attention. Our results support that joint analysis of respiration and HRV obtains a more reliable characterization of autonomic nervous response to stress. In addition, the respiratory rate is observed to be higher and less stable during stress than during relax ( p-value 0.05 according to the Wilcoxon test) being the most discriminative index for stress stratification (AUC = 88.2 % ).

  17. Effects of respiratory rate and tidal volume on gas exchange in total liquid ventilation.

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    Bull, Joseph L; Tredici, Stefano; Fujioka, Hideki; Komori, Eisaku; Grotberg, James B; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2009-01-01

    Using a rabbit model of total liquid ventilation (TLV), and in a corresponding theoretical model, we compared nine tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations to identify a ventilator strategy to maximize gas exchange, while avoiding choked flow, during TLV. Nine different ventilation strategies were tested in each animal (n = 12): low [LR = 2.5 breath/min (bpm)], medium (MR = 5 bpm), or high (HR = 7.5 bpm) respiratory rates were combined with a low (LV = 10 ml/kg), medium (MV = 15 ml/kg), or high (HV = 20 ml/kg) tidal volumes. Blood gases and partial pressures, perfluorocarbon gas content, and airway pressures were measured for each combination. Choked flow occurred in all high respiratory rate-high volume animals, 71% of high respiratory rate-medium volume (HRMV) animals, and 50% of medium respiratory rate-high volume (MRHV) animals but in no other combinations. Medium respiratory rate-medium volume (MRMV) resulted in the highest gas exchange of the combinations that did not induce choke. The HRMV and MRHV animals that did not choke had similar or higher gas exchange than MRMV. The theory predicted this behavior, along with spatial and temporal variations in alveolar gas partial pressures. Of the combinations that did not induce choked flow, MRMV provided the highest gas exchange. Alveolar gas transport is diffusion dominated and rapid during gas ventilation but is convection dominated and slow during TLV. Consequently, the usual alveolar gas equation is not applicable for TLV.

  18. Respiratory mechanics during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: a physical model and preterm infant study.

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    Singh, Rachana; Courtney, Sherry E; Weisner, Michael D; Habib, Robert H

    2012-04-01

    Accurate mechanics measurements during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) facilitate optimizing ventilator support settings. Yet, these are influenced substantially by endotracheal tube (ETT) contributions, which may dominate when leaks around uncuffed ETT are present. We hypothesized that 1) the effective removal of ETT leaks may be confirmed via direct comparison of measured vs. model-predicted mean intratracheal pressure [mPtr (meas) vs. mPtr (pred)], and 2) reproducible respiratory system resistance (Rrs) and compliance (Crs) may be derived from no-leak oscillatory Ptr and proximal flow. With the use of ETT test-lung models, proximal airway opening (Pao) and distal (Ptr) pressures and flows were measured during slow-cuff inflations until leaks are removed. These were repeated for combinations of HFOV settings [frequency, mean airway pressure (Paw), oscillation amplitudes (ΔP), and inspiratory time (%t(I))] and varying test-lung Crs. Results showed that leaks around the ETT will 1) systematically reduce the effective distending pressures and lung-delivered oscillatory volumes, and 2) derived mechanical properties are increasingly nonphysiologic as leaks worsen. Mean pressures were systematically reduced along the ventilator circuit and ETT (Paw > Pao > Ptr), even for no-leak conditions. ETT size-specific regression models were then derived for predicting mPtr based on mean Pao (mPao), ΔP, %t(I), and frequency. Next, in 10 of 11 studied preterm infants (0.77 ± 0.24 kg), no-to-minimal leak was confirmed based on excellent agreement between mPtr (meas) and mPtr (pred), and consequently, their oscillatory respiratory mechanics were evaluated. Infant resistance at the proximal ETT (R(ETT); resistance airway opening = R(ETT) + Rrs; P mechanical properties that can objectively guide ventilatory management of HFOV-treated preterm infants.

  19. Quantitative prediction of respiratory tidal volume based on the external torso volume change: a potential volumetric surrogate

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    Li Guang; Arora, Naveen C; Xie Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Kaushal, Aradhana; Zach, Leor; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lu Wei; Low, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110 (United States)], E-mail: ligeorge@mail.nih.gov

    2009-04-07

    An external respiratory surrogate that not only highly correlates with but also quantitatively predicts internal tidal volume should be useful in guiding four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), as well as 4D radiation therapy (4DRT). A volumetric surrogate should have advantages over external fiducial point(s) for monitoring respiration-induced motion of the torso, which deforms in synchronization with a patient-specific breathing pattern. This study establishes a linear relationship between the external torso volume change (TVC) and lung air volume change (AVC) by validating a proposed volume conservation hypothesis (TVC = AVC) throughout the respiratory cycle using 4DCT and spirometry. Fourteen patients' torso 4DCT images and corresponding spirometric tidal volumes were acquired to examine this hypothesis. The 4DCT images were acquired using dual surrogates in cine mode and amplitude-based binning in 12 respiratory stages, minimizing residual motion artifacts. Torso and lung volumes were calculated using threshold-based segmentation algorithms and volume changes were calculated relative to the full-exhalation stage. The TVC and AVC, as functions of respiratory stages, were compared, showing a high correlation (r = 0.992 {+-} 0.005, p < 0.0001) as well as a linear relationship (slope = 1.027 {+-} 0.061, R{sup 2} = 0.980) without phase shift. The AVC was also compared to the spirometric tidal volumes, showing a similar linearity (slope = 1.030 {+-} 0.092, R{sup 2} = 0.947). In contrast, the thoracic and abdominal heights measured from 4DCT showed relatively low correlation (0.28 {+-} 0.44 and 0.82 {+-} 0.30, respectively) and location-dependent phase shifts. This novel approach establishes the foundation for developing an external volumetric respiratory surrogate.

  20. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  1. High frequency chest compression effects on cardio-respiratory interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong Wan; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we present a quantitative approach to the analysis of the HFCC effect on heart rate changes in the respiratory stage according to different pulsation conditions with HFCC pulsation and without HFCC pulsation. We have shown that the heart rate increases with higher pressure settings revealing different patterns depending on the respiration stages. For our interaction study of how the heart and lungs were affected by HFCC, phase synchronization was considered and compared under different conditions which determine the real biological phenomenon for nonlinear or linear oscillatory coupling. The subject for this study was young and healthy, so these preliminary results should be verified with more detailed studies from abundant subjects to increase HFCC efficacy for lung disease patients. Interestingly, the indication or tracking of heart rate changes, respiration rate changes, or synchronization epoch can be the standard index for how much the cardiac and respiratory system improve using HFCC during therapy time or after therapy time.

  2. Volume and Pressure Delivery During Pediatric High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ronald; Deakers, Timothy; Hotz, Justin; Khemani, Robinder G; Ross, Patrick A; Newth, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Identify variables independently associated with delivered tidal volume (VT) and measured mean airway pressure during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation across the range of pediatric endotracheal tube sizes. In vitro study. Research laboratory. An in vitro bench model of the intubated pediatric respiratory system during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation was used to obtain delivered VT and mean airway pressure (in the distal lung) for various endotracheal tube sizes. Measurements were taken at different combinations of ventilator set mean airway pressure (Paw), amplitude (ΔP), frequency, and test lung compliance. Multiple regression analysis was used to construct multivariable models predicting delivered VT and mean airway pressure. Variables independently associated with higher delivered VT for all endotracheal tube sizes include higher ΔP (p frequency (p frequency and ΔP magnifies the delivered VT when ΔP is high and frequency is low (p frequency increases (p frequency in delivered VT and the effect of ΔP and frequency on delivered mean airway pressure. These results demonstrate the need to measure or estimate VT and delivered pressures during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and may be useful in determining optimal strategies for lung protective ventilation during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

  3. A MATLAB toolbox for correcting within-individual effects of respiration rate and tidal volume on respiratory sinus arrhythmia during variable breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Stefan M; Ayala, Erica; Dahme, Bernhard; Ritz, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is a common estimator of vagal outflow to the heart, dependent on parasympathetic activity. During variable breathing, both respiration rate and tidal volume contribute substantially to within-individual RSA variance. A respiratory control method allows for within-individual correction of the time-domain index of RSA. rsaToolbox is a set of MATLAB programs for scoring respiration-corrected RSA using measurements of cardiac interbeat intervals, respiratory-cycle times, and tidal volumes, recorded at different paced-breathing frequencies. The within-individual regression of RSA divided by tidal volume upon total respiratory cycle time is then used to estimate the baseline vagal tone for each breath of a given total respiratory-cycle time. During a subsequent analysis, the difference between the observed RSA (divided by the tidal volume at each breath) and the RSA divided by the tidal volume that was predicted by the baseline equation serves as an estimate of changes in vagal tone. rsaToolbox includes a graphical user interface for intuitive handling. Modular implementation of the algorithm also allows for flexible integration within other analytic strategies or for batch processing.

  4. A Comparison of Measurements of Change in Respiratory Status in Spontaneously Breathing Volunteers by the ExSpiron Noninvasive Respiratory Volume Monitor Versus the Capnostream Capnometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George W; George, Christy A; Harvey, Brian C; Freeman, Jenny E

    2017-01-01

    Current respiratory monitoring technologies such as pulse oximetry and capnography have been insufficient to identify early signs of respiratory compromise in nonintubated patients. Pulse oximetry, when used appropriately, will alert the caregiver to an episode of dangerous hypoxemia. However, desaturation lags significantly behind hypoventilation and alarm fatigue due to false alarms poses an additional problem. Capnography, which measures end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) and respiratory rate (RR), has not been universally used for nonintubated patients for multiple reasons, including the inability to reliably relate EtCO2 to the level of impending respiratory compromise and lack of patient compliance. Serious complications related to respiratory compromise continue to occur as evidenced by the Anesthesiology 2015 Closed Claims Report. The Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation has stressed the need to improve monitoring modalities so that "no patient will be harmed by opioid-induced respiratory depression." A recently available, Food and Drug Administration-approved noninvasive respiratory volume monitor (RVM) can continuously and accurately monitor actual ventilation metrics: tidal volume, RR, and minute ventilation (MV). We designed this study to compare the capabilities of capnography versus the RVM to detect changes in respiratory metrics. Forty-eight volunteer subjects completed the study. RVM measurements (MV and RR) were collected simultaneously with capnography (EtCO2 and RR) using 2 sampling methods (nasal scoop cannula and snorkel mouthpiece with in-line EtCO2 sensor). For each sampling method, each subject performed 6 breathing trials at 3 different prescribed RRs (slow [5 min], normal [12.6 ± 0.6 min], and fast [25 min]). All data are presented as mean ± SEM unless otherwise indicated. Following transitions in prescribed RRs, the RVM reached a new steady state value of MV in 37.7 ± 1.4 seconds while EtCO2 changes were notably slower, often failing to reach a

  5. Respiratory influence on left atrial volume calculation with 3D-echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper J; Ismail, Hafsa;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left atrial volume (LAV) estimation with 3D echocardiography has been shown to be more accurate than 2D volume calculation. However, little is known about the possible effect of respiratory movements on the accuracy of the measurement. METHODS: 100 consecutive patients admitted...... with chest pain were examined with 3D echocardiography and LAV was quantified during inspiratory breath hold, expiratory breath hold and during free breathing. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients, only 65 had an echocardiographic window that allowed for 3D echocardiography in the entire respiratory cycle. Mean...

  6. Neonatal total liquid ventilation: is low-frequency forced oscillation technique suitable for respiratory mechanics assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Dominick; Beaulieu, Alexandre; Avoine, Olivier; Micheau, Philippe; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to implement low-frequency forced oscillation technique (LFFOT) in neonatal total liquid ventilation (TLV) and to provide the first insight into respiratory impedance under this new modality of ventilation. Thirteen newborn lambs, weighing 2.5 + or - 0.4 kg (mean + or - SD), were premedicated, intubated, anesthetized, and then placed under TLV using a specially design liquid ventilator and a perfluorocarbon. The respiratory mechanics measurements protocol was started immediately after TLV initiation. Three blocks of measurements were first performed: one during initial respiratory system adaptation to TLV, followed by two other series during steady-state conditions. Lambs were then divided into two groups before undergoing another three blocks of measurements: the first group received a 10-min intravenous infusion of salbutamol (1.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) after continuous infusion of methacholine (9 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)), while the second group of lambs was chest strapped. Respiratory impedance was measured using serial single-frequency tests at frequencies ranging between 0.05 and 2 Hz and then fitted with a constant-phase model. Harmonic test signals of 0.2 Hz were also launched every 10 min throughout the measurement protocol. Airway resistance and inertance were starkly increased in TLV compared with gas ventilation, with a resonant frequency ventilation. We show that LFFOT is an effective tool to track respiratory mechanics under TLV.

  7. Locomotor-respiratory coupling patterns and oxygen consumption during walking above and below preferred stride frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Joseph; Hamill, Joseph; McDermott, William J; Remelius, Jebb G; Van Emmerik, Richard E A

    2012-03-01

    Locomotor respiratory coupling patterns in humans have been assessed on the basis of the interaction between different physiological and motor subsystems; these interactions have implications for movement economy. A complex and dynamical systems framework may provide more insight than entrainment into the variability and adaptability of these rhythms and their coupling. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between steady state locomotor-respiratory coordination dynamics and oxygen consumption [Formula: see text] of the movement by varying walking stride frequency from preferred. Twelve male participants walked on a treadmill at a self-selected speed. Stride frequency was varied from -20 to +20% of preferred stride frequency (PSF) while respiratory airflow, gas exchange variables, and stride kinematics were recorded. Discrete relative phase and return map techniques were used to evaluate the strength, stability, and variability of both frequency and phase couplings. Analysis of [Formula: see text] during steady-state walking showed a U-shaped response (P = 0.002) with a minimum at PSF and PSF - 10%. Locomotor-respiratory frequency coupling strength was not greater (P = 0.375) at PSF than any other stride frequency condition. The dominant coupling across all conditions was 2:1 with greater occurrences at the lower stride frequencies. Variability in coupling was the greatest during PSF, indicating an exploration of coupling strategies to search for the coupling frequency strategy with the least oxygen consumption. Contrary to the belief that increased strength of frequency coupling would decrease oxygen consumption; these results conclude that it is the increased variability of frequency coupling that results in lower oxygen consumption.

  8. A study of respiratory rate, tidal volume, inspiratory capacity and inspiratory reserve volume in different trimesters of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Teli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anatomical, physiological and biochemical adaptations in pregnancy are profound. Many of these changes begin soon after fertilization and continue throughout the gestation and changes in the respiratory system are part of the same process. However there is insufficient information regarding the changes in respiratory parameters in different trimesters of pregnancy. Aims: The aim of the study was designed to evaluate the pulmonary function tests in 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd trimesters of pregnancy and compare them with non-pregnant control group. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried in 200 healthy women in the age range of 19-35 years. The subjects were distributed in four groups, as control (non-pregnant group and 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd trimester pregnant groups. Number of subjects in each group was 50. Respiratory parameters in control and study groups were recorded. Statistical Analysis: By ′Z ′ test. Results: There was gradual significant increase in respiratory rate in all trimesters of pregnancy. There was a gradual decrease in tidal volume in 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd trimesters of pregnancy when compared to non pregnant women. There was significant decrease in Inspiratory Reserve Volume and Inspiratory Capacity. Conclusion: The changes in pulmonary function are attributed to major adaptations in the maternal respiratory system and are influenced by the mechanical pressure of enlarging gravid uterus, elevating the diaphragm and restricting the movements of lungs thus hampering the forceful expiration and also might be due to decline in alveolar Pco 2 caused by hyperventilation which acts as bronchoconstrictor; in addition to sensitization of respiratory center due to progesterone

  9. Entrainment of respiratory frequency to exercise rhythm during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, D J; Wood, G A; Marshall, R N; Morton, A R; Harrison, A B

    1987-05-01

    Breathing frequency (f) is often reported as having an integer-multiple relationship to limb movement (entrainment) during rhythmic exercise. To investigate the strength of this coupling while running under hypoxic conditions, two male Caucasians and four male Nepalese porters were tested in the Annapurna region of the Himalayas at altitudes of 915, 2,135, 3,200, 4,420, and 5,030 m. In an additional study in a laboratory at sea level, three male and four female subjects inspired various O2-N2 mixtures [fraction of inspired O2 (FIO2) = 20.93, 17.39, 14.40, 11.81%] that were administered in a single-blind randomized fashion during a treadmill run (40% FIO2 maximum O2 consumption). Breathing and gait signals were stored on FM tape and later processed on a PDP 11/73 computer. The subharmonic relationships between these signals were determined from Fourier analysis (power spectrum), and the coincidence of coupling occurrence was statistically modeled. Entrainment decreased linearly during increasing hypoxia (P less than 0.01). Moreover, a significant linear increase in f occurred during hypoxia (P less than 0.05), whereas stride frequency and metabolic rate remained constant, suggesting that hypoxic-induced increases in f decreased the degree of entrainment.

  10. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (Pevaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  11. Enteral nutrition volume is not correlated with lower respiratory tract infection in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomar, A; Guardiola, B; Llompart-Pou, J A; Ayestarán, I; Rodríguez-Pilar, J; Ferreruela, M; Raurich, J M

    To evaluate the effect of enteral nutrition volume, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive drug upon the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). A retrospective secondary analysis was carried out. The Intensive Care Unit of a University Hospital. Patients≥18-years-old expected to need MV for more than four days, and receiving enteral nutrition by nasogastric tube within 24h of starting MV. We correlated enteral nutrition volume administered during the first 10 days, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive therapy with the episodes of lower respiratory tract infection up until day 28. Cox proportional hazards ratios in univariate and adjusted multivariate models were used. Statistical significance was considered for p<0.05. Lower respiratory tract infection episodes. Sixty-six out of 185 patients (35.7%) had infection; 27 patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia; and 39 presented ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Uninfected and infected groups were similar in terms of enteral nutrition volume (54±12 and 54±9mL/h; p=0.94) and caloric intake (19.4±4.9 and 19.6±5.2kcal/kg/d; p=0.81). The Cox proportional hazards model showed neurological indication of MV to be the only independent variable related to infection (p=0.001). Enteral nutrition volume, the type of acid suppressive therapy, and the use of prokinetic agents were not significantly correlated to infection. Enteral nutrition volume and caloric intake, gastrointestinal dysfunction and the type of acid suppressive therapy used were not associated to lower respiratory tract infection in patients on MV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Validation of Respiratory Inductance Plethysmography for Measuring Tidal Volume in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Measuring tidal volume (VT) in nonintubated swine or swine with leaking breathing circuits is challenging. The aim of this study was to validate respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) for measuring VT in swine that are comparable in size to adult humans. To determine calibration curves, VT and RIP readings were obtained from anesthetized swine (n = 8; weight, 46–50 kg) during positive-pressure (mechanical) ventilation and spontaneous breathing. For positive-pressure ventilation, 6 pigs ...

  13. HIGH-VOLUME RESISTANCE TRAINING SESSION ACUTELY DIMINISHES RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Hackett

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of a high-volume compared to a low-volume resistance training session on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP. Twenty male subjects with resistance training experience (6.2 ± 3.2 y, in a crossover trial, completed two resistance training protocols (high-volume: 5 sets per exercise; low-volume: 2 sets per exercise and a control session (no exercise on 3 separate occasions. MIP and MEP decreased by 13.6% (p < 0.01 and 14.7% (p < 0.01 respectively from pre-session MIP and MEP, following the high-volume session. MIP and MEP were unaffected following the low-volume or the control sessions. MIP returned to pre-session values after 40 minutes, whereas MEP remained significantly reduced after 60 minutes post-session by 9.2% compared to pre-session (p < 0.01. The findings suggest that the high-volume session significantly decreased MIP and MEP post-session, implicating a substantially increased demand on the respiratory muscles and that adequate recovery is mandatory following this mode of training.

  14. Effects of High Frequency Chest Compression on Respiratory System Mechanics in Normal Subjects and Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Jones

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the short term effects of high frequency chest compression (HFCC on several indices of respiratory system mechanics in normal subjects and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF.

  15. Instantaneous responses to high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute pneumonic respiratory failure receiving mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chai-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endotracheal intubation and prolonged immobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation may reduce expectoration function. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) may ameliorate airway secretion movement; however, the instantaneous changes in patients’ cardiopulmonary responses are unknown. Moreover, HFCWO may influence ventilator settings by the vigorous oscillation. The aim of this study was to investigate these issues. Methods: Seventy-three patients (52 men) aged 71.5 ± 13.4 years who were intubated with mechanical ventilation for pneumonic respiratory failure were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups (HFCWO group, n = 36; and control group who received conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT, n = 37). HFCWO was applied with a fixed protocol, whereas CCPT was conducted using standard protocols. Both groups received sputum suction after the procedure. Changes in ventilator settings and the subjects’ responses were measured at preset intervals and compared within groups and between groups. Results: Oscillation did not affect the ventilator settings (all P > 0.05). The mean airway pressure, breathing frequency, and rapid shallow breathing index increased, and the tidal volume and SpO2 decreased (all P < 0.05). After sputum suction, the peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and minute ventilation decreased (all P < 0.05). The HFCWO group had a lower tidal volume and SpO2 at the end of oscillation, and lower Ppeak and tidal volume after sputum suction than the CCPT group. Conclusions: HFCWO affects breathing pattern and SpO2 but not ventilator settings, whereas CCPT maintains a steadier condition. After sputum suction, HFCWO slightly improved Ppeak compared to CCPT, suggesting that the study extends the indications of HFCWO for these patients in intensive care unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02758106, retrospectively registered.) PMID:28248854

  16. To investigate the dose difference by respiratory motion using overlap volume histogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Seok; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Cho, Min Seok; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Four-dimensional dose (4D dose) which uses deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images can consider dosimetric effect by respiratory motions. The dose difference between 3D dose and 4D dose can be varied according to geometrical relationship between a planning target volume (PTV) and an organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose difference between 3D and 4D dose using overlap volume histogram (OVH) which is an indicator that quantifies the geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. The tendency of dose difference variation was verified according to OVH. OVH is seems to be an indicator that has a potential to predict the dose difference between 4D and 3D dose.

  17. Direct Visuo-Haptic 4D Volume Rendering Using Respiratory Motion Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmeier, Dirk; Wilms, Matthias; Mastmeyer, Andre; Handels, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    This article presents methods for direct visuo-haptic 4D volume rendering of virtual patient models under respiratory motion. Breathing models are computed based on patient-specific 4D CT image data sequences. Virtual patient models are visualized in real-time by ray casting based rendering of a reference CT image warped by a time-variant displacement field, which is computed using the motion models at run-time. Furthermore, haptic interaction with the animated virtual patient models is provided by using the displacements computed at high rendering rates to translate the position of the haptic device into the space of the reference CT image. This concept is applied to virtual palpation and the haptic simulation of insertion of a virtual bendable needle. To this aim, different motion models that are applicable in real-time are presented and the methods are integrated into a needle puncture training simulation framework, which can be used for simulated biopsy or vessel puncture in the liver. To confirm real-time applicability, a performance analysis of the resulting framework is given. It is shown that the presented methods achieve mean update rates around 2,000 Hz for haptic simulation and interactive frame rates for volume rendering and thus are well suited for visuo-haptic rendering of virtual patients under respiratory motion.

  18. Respiratory-gated electrical impedance tomography: a potential technique for quantifying stroke volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Saaid H.; Murphy, Ethan K.; Halter, Ryan J.

    2016-03-01

    Telemonitoring is becoming increasingly important as the proportion of the population living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) increases. Currently used health parameters in the suite of telemonitoring tools lack the sensitivity and specificity to accurately predict heart failure events, forcing physicians to play a reactive versus proactive role in patient care. A novel cardiac output (CO) monitoring device is proposed that leverages a custom smart phone application and a wearable electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system. The purpose of this work is to explore the potential of using respiratory-gated EIT to quantify stroke volume (SV) and assess its feasibility using real data. Simulations were carried out using the 4D XCAT model to create anatomically realistic meshes and electrical conductivity profiles representing the human thorax and the intrathoracic tissue. A single 5-second period respiration cycle with chest/lung expansion was modeled with end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart volumes to evaluate how effective EIT-based conductivity changes represent clinically significant differences in SV. After establishing a correlation between conductivity changes and SV, the applicability of the respiratory-gated EIT was refined using data from the PhysioNet database to estimate the number of useful end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart events attained over a 3.3 minute period. The area associated with conductivity changes was found to correlate to SV with a correlation coefficient of 0.92. A window of 12.5% around peak exhalation was found to be the optimal phase of the respiratory cycle from which to record EIT data. Within this window, ~47 useable ED and ES were found with a standard deviation of 28 using 3.3 minutes of data for 20 patients.

  19. Resonant frequency does not predict high-frequency chest compression settings that maximize airflow or volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, Sarah K; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Weiner, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is a therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF). We hypothesized that the resonant frequency (f(res)), as measured by impulse oscillometry, could be used to determine what HFCC vest settings produce maximal airflow or volume in pediatric CF patients. In 45 subjects, we studied: f(res), HFCC vest frequencies that subjects used (f(used)), and the HFCC vest frequencies that generated the greatest volume (f(vol)) and airflow (f(flow)) changes as measured by pneumotachometer. Median f(used) for 32 subjects was 14 Hz (range, 6-30). The rank order of the three most common f(used) was 15 Hz (28%) and 12 Hz (21%); three frequencies tied for third: 10, 11, and 14 Hz (5% each). Median f(res) for 43 subjects was 20.30 Hz (range, 7.85-33.65). Nineteen subjects underwent vest-tuning to determine f(vol) and f(flow). Median f(vol) was 8 Hz (range, 6-30). The rank order of the three most common f(vol) was: 8 Hz (42%), 6 Hz (32%), and 10 Hz (21%). Median f(flow) was 26 Hz (range, 8-30). The rank order of the three most common f(flow) was: 30 Hz (26%) and 28 Hz (21%); three frequencies tied for third: 8, 14, and 18 Hz (11% each). There was no correlation between f(used) and f(flow) (r(2)  = -0.12) or f(vol) (r(2) = 0.031). There was no correlation between f(res) and f(flow) (r(2)  = 0.19) or f(vol) (r(2) = 0.023). Multivariable analysis showed no independent variables were predictive of f(flow) or f(vol). Vest-tuning may be required to optimize clinical utility of HFCC. Multiple HFCC frequencies may need to be used to incorporate f(flow) and f(vol).

  20. Correlation between transition percentage of minute volume (TMV%) and outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chung-Kan; Wu, Shu-Fen; Yang, Shih-Hsing; Hsieh, Chuan-Fa; Huang, Chung-Chih; Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Wu, Chin-Pyng

    2017-06-01

    We have previously shown in patients receiving adaptive support ventilation (ASV) that there existed a Transition %MinVol (TMV%) where the patient's work of breathing began to reduce. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that higher TMV% would be associated with poorer outcome in patients with acute respiratory failure. In this prospective observational study, we recruited patients with acute respiratory failure on ASV between December 2012 and September 2013 in a mixed ICU. The TMV% was determined by adjusting % MinVol until mandatory respiratory frequency was between 0 and 1breath/min. TMV% was measured on the first two days of mechanical ventilation. A total of 337 patients (age: 70±16years) were recruited. In patients whose TMV% increased between Day 1 and Day 2, aOR for mortality was 7.0 (95%CI=2.7-18.3, pTMV% decreased. In patients whose TMV% was unchanged between Day 1 and Day2, aOR for mortality was 3.91 (95%CI=1.80-8.22, pTMV% from Day 1 to Day 2 was associated with higher risk of in-hospital death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of Respiratory Inductance Plethysmography for Measuring Tidal Volume in Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenbo; Oto, Jun; Wang, Jingwen; Kimball, William R; Chenelle, Christopher T; Kacmarek, Robert M; King, David R; Jiang, Yandong; Duggan, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Measuring tidal volume (VT) in nonintubated swine or swine with leaking breathing circuits is challenging. The aim of this study was to validate respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) for measuring VT in swine that are comparable in size to adult humans. To determine calibration curves, VT and RIP readings were obtained from anesthetized swine (n = 8; weight, 46-50 kg) during positive-pressure (mechanical) ventilation and spontaneous breathing. For positive-pressure ventilation, 6 pigs were mechanically ventilated by using the pressure-control mode. The 2 pigs in the spontaneously breathing cohort each received a single intravenous bolus dose of propofol to abolish spontaneous breathing; VT was measured during gradual return of their respiratory drive. A flow-volume sensor was placed between the proximal end of the endotracheal tube and breathing circuit for the recording of inspiratory and expiratory VT. RIP readings were recorded by using 2 bands, which simultaneously measured ribcage and abdominal excursions. The data revealed that VT was linearly correlated with the movements of both ribcage and abdomen as measured by using plethysmography over a large range of tidal volume (44 to 1065 mL). In addition, the intercept of the linear equation was small or even negative during spontaneous breathing but increased significantly (maximum, 145 mL, 59.2 ± 35.1 mL) during positive pressure ventilation. Our results indicate that VT in swine can be calculated by using a simple univariate linear regression equation with RIP readings obtained during either mechanical ventilation or spontaneous breathing.

  2. Detecting changes in respiratory patterns in high frequency chest compression therapy by single-channel blind source separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Parhi, Keshab K; Warwick, Warren J

    2009-01-01

    High Frequency Chest Compression (HFCC) is used as a method to remove the mucus in the airway for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. As the characteristics of the tracheal sound reflect the conditions of airways, in this paper, we propose a novel method to evaluate the respiratory patterns in HFCC therapy by using single channel tracheal sounds only. The difficulty of analyzing tracheal sounds lies in that it has a wider frequency band than the air flow at the mouth, and is always corrupted by other biomedical signals and noises. During HFCC therapy, the tracheal sound is also affected by the HFCC machine noise. For this reason, it is difficult to extract respiratory patterns and other related features by traditional filtering techniques. In this paper, we demonstrate use of single-channel independent component analysis to extract respiratory patterns from the tracheal sounds before, during and after HFCC therapy, and use basis features in the tracheal sound to detect the change in respiratory patterns.

  3. Frequency of fungi in respiratory samples from Turkish cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Ozge; Tamay, Zeynep; Güler, Nermin; Erturan, Zayre

    2013-03-01

    An increased isolation of fungi from the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been reported. The prevalence of different fungi in CF patients from Turkey is not known. Our aim was to determine the frequency of fungi in the respiratory tract of Turkish CF patients. We investigated a total of 184 samples from 48 patients. Samples were inoculated on Medium B+ and CHROMagar Candida. Candida albicans was the predominant yeast isolated [30 patients (62.5%)], followed by C. parapsilosis [6 (12.5%)] and C. dubliniensis 5 (10.4%). Aspergillus fumigatus was the most common filamentous fungus [5 (10.4%)] and non-fumigatus Aspergillus species were isolated from four (8.3%) patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently detected bacterium in C. albicans positive samples (53.57%). A. fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa or S. aureus were detected together in 75% of A. fumigatus positive samples each. No statistically significant relationship was detected between growth of yeast and moulds and age, gender, the use of inhaled corticosteroids or tobramycin. No significant correlation was found between the isolation of C. albicans, A. fumigatus and P. aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia or S. aureus, and the isolation of C. albicans and Haemophilus influenzae. Other factors which may be responsible for the increased isolation of fungi in CF need to be investigated.

  4. Induced respiratory system modeling by high frequency chest compression using lumped system identification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong Wan; O'Clock, George; Zhu, Xiaoming; Parhi, Keshab K; Warwick, Warren J

    2009-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) treatment systems are used to promote mucus transport and mitigate pulmonary system clearance problems to remove sputum from the airways in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and at risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Every HFCC system consists of a pump generator, one or two hoses connected to a vest, to deliver the pulsation. There are three different waveforms in use; symmetric sine, the asymmetric sine and the trapezoid waveforms. There have been few studies that compared the efficacy of a sine waveform with the HFCC pulsations. In this study we present a model of the respiratory system for a young normal subject who is one of co-authors. The input signal is the pressure applied by the vest to chest, at a frequency of 6Hz. Using the system model simulation, the effectiveness of different source waveforms is evaluated and compared by observing the waveform response associated with air flow at the mouth. Also the study demonstrated that the ideal rectangle wave produced the maximum peak air flow, and followed by the trapezoid, triangle and sine waveform. The study suggests that a pulmonary system evaluation or modeling effort for CF patient might be useful as a method to optimize frequency and waveform structure choices for HFCC therapeutic intervention.

  5. Nature and frequency of respiratory involvement in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Cuppen, F.; Engelen, B.G. van

    2011-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a relatively common mitochondrial disorder. Weakness of the extra-ocular, limb girdle and laryngeal muscles are established clinical features. Respiratory muscle involvement however has never been studied systematically, even though respiratory

  6. Effect of limb muscle fatigue on perception of respiratory effort in healthy subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonello Grippo; Riccardo Carrai; Linda Chiti; Giulia Innocenti Bruni; Giorgio Scano; Roberto Duranti

    2010-01-01

    .... During the loaded breathing, while subjects mimicked the quiet breathing pattern using a visual feedback, ventilation, tidal volume, respiratory frequency, pleural pressure swings, arterial oxygen...

  7. High frequency jet ventilation in acute respiratory failure: which ventilator settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, H; Rouby, J J; Benhamou, D; Viars, P

    1986-01-01

    Seven hypoxaemic patients with acute respiratory failure were ventilated with HFJV (Ventilator VS 600). Arterial oxygenation was improved in each patient by the increases induced in mean airway pressure (PAW) (to 20 cm H2O) using three different ventilatory settings applied in a random order: technique A: I:E ratio 0.43, driving pressure 2.9 bar, no PEEP; technique B: I:E ratio 1.0, driving pressure 1.9 bar, no PEEP; technique C: I:E ratio 0.43, driving pressure 1.8 bar, PEEP 11 cm H2O. Respiratory frequency was maintained at 250 b.p.m. throughout the study. There were no significant differences in PaO2 (FlO2 = 1) or Qs/Qt between the three techniques. In contrast, carbon dioxide elimination was markedly affected by the method used to increase PAW:PaCO2 was significantly higher during technique C (8.5 +/- 3.6 kPa) and technique B (6.6 +/- 2.1 kPa) than during technique A (4.8 +/- 0.9 kPa). Significant increases in cardiac index, heartrate, mean pulmonary arterial pressure and a decrease in the arterio-venous oxygen content difference were observed when PaCO2 increased. We conclude that, to obtain the PAW necessary to improve pulmonary oxygen exchange, more effective carbon dioxide elimination is achieved by increasing the driving pressure, rather than by increasing the I:E ratio, or using a PEEP valve.

  8. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Peláez-Coca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}% and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%. The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration.

  9. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Coca, M. D.; Orini, M.; Lázaro, J.; Bailón, R.; Gil, E.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}%) and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%). The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration. PMID:24363777

  10. Elective high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cools, F.; Askie, L.M.; Offringa, M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite the considerable amount of evidence from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, uncertainty remains regarding the efficacy and safety of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation as compared to conventional ventilation in the early treatment of respiratory distres

  11. Detecting variations of blood volume shift due to heart beat from respiratory inductive plethysmography measurements in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecave-Jallon, J; Videlier, B; Baconnier, P; Tanguy, S; Calabrese, P; Guméry, P-Y

    2013-09-01

    The simultaneous study of the cardiac and respiratory activities and their interactions is of great physiological and clinical interest. For this purpose, we want to investigate if respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) can be used for cardiac functional exploration. We propose a system, based on RIP technology and time-scale approaches of signal processing, for the extraction of cardiac information. This study focuses on the monitoring of blood volume shift due to heart beat, noted ▵Vtr_c and investigates RIP for the detection of ▵Vtr_c variations by comparison to stroke volume (SV) variations estimated by impedance cardiography (IMP). We proposed a specific respiratory protocol assumed to induce significant variations of the SV. Fifteen healthy volunteers in the seated and supine positions were asked to alternate rest respiration and maneuvers, consisting in blowing into a manometer. A multi-step treatment including a variant of empirical mode decomposition was applied on RIP signals to extract cardiac volume signals and estimate beat-to-beat ▵Vtr_c. These were averaged in quasi-stationary states at rest and during the respiratory maneuvers, and analysed in view of SV estimations from IMP signals simultaneously acquired. Correlation and statistical tests over the data show that RIP can be used to detect variations of the cardiac blood shift in healthy young subjects.

  12. Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography for Overnight Tidal Volume Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To validate the accuracy and consistency of respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) in measuring tidal volume after an overnight sleep, tidal volumes of 18 patients with suspected sleep-disordered breathing and 8 normal volunteers were measured simultaneously with RIP (VTRIP) and with an ultrasonic airflow meter (VTUFM) before and after an unstrained overnight sleep on supine and lateral decubitus. The bias of the VTRIP was expressed as (VTRIP-VTUFM)/ VTUFM*100 %, limits of agreement between VTRIP and VTUFM was measured by averaged bias ±2 s. Results showed that in normal subjects, the bias of RIP before and after overnight sleep was precise and consistent in both supine (0.7 % and -1.6 %) and lateral decubitus (3.7 % and -0.56 %). In these patients, the bias of RIP before and after sleep in supine also remained small (1.9 % and 1.7 %), but it became larger in lateral decubitus (24.5 % and 20.4 %) and 11.5 % exceeded the limits of agreement observed in the evening. The patients′ body mass indices (BMI) were higher than those of normal subjects (median 34.2 vs. 27.8 kg/m2). Pooled data showed that the bias of VTRIP in the morning on lateral decubitus but not on supine was correlated to BMI (Spearman R=0.32, n=52, P=0.02). Thus, we were led to conclude that the accuracy of VTRIP overnight was precise and consistent in normal subjects, but the deviation of VTRIP measured on lateral decubitus in patients especially in those with excessive obesity was greater, thus, the method should not be used for quantitative determination.

  13. [Frequency of sensitization to mites, cockroach and shrimp in adults with respiratory allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rocha, Eunice; Rodríguez-Mireles, Karen; Gaspar-López, Arturo; Del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel; Segura-Méndez, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Sensitization to mites and cockroach are a common cause of respiratory allergy, especially in children. There is little information about its cross-reactivity with shrimp, which is common in adult patients. To determine the frequency of sensitization to house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae) and cockroach species Periplaneta americana, in adult patients attending to a third level hospital and to determine the frequency of sensitization to shrimp in patients with positive skin test to house dust mite and/or cockroach, in patients with clinical manifestations suggestive of allergy to shrimp. A retrospective study was done in which results were reviewed of 672 patients clinical records, attending to the Allergy and Clinical Immunology department in a third level hospital, those patients with positive skin test results to Dermatophagoides and/or Periplaneta americana were investigated for sensitization to shrimp through Prick-to-Prick test. Data from 672 patients were obtained, 69.8% (469) males, with a mean age of 33.5 years. Dermatophagoides positivity was 72.2% (486/672), and its relationship with other invertebrates that also have tropomyosin was 5.6% (4.9% with cockroach and 0.74% with shrimp). In our population, house dust mite sensitization was similar to that reported in the international literature. There was low positivity to cockroach, probably due to geographical conditions. There is very little information about shrimp's cross-reactivity with Dermatophagoides, despite its clinical significance, which requires more specific studies such as measurement of specific IgE to tropomyosin.

  14. Oscillatory behaviour of ventricular action potential duration in heart failure patients at respiratory rate and low frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eHanson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations of arterial pressure occur spontaneously at a frequency of approx. 0.1Hz coupled with synchronous oscillations of sympathetic nerve activity (Mayer waves. This study investigated the extent to which corresponding oscillations may occur in ventricular action potential duration (APD.14 ambulatory (outpatient heart failure patients with biventricular pacing devices were studied while seated upright watching movie clips to maintain arousal. Activation recovery intervals (ARI as a measure of ventricular APD were obtained from unipolar electrograms recorded from the LV epicardial pacing lead during steady state RV pacing from the device. Arterial blood pressure was measured non-invasively (Finapress and respiration monitored. Oscillations were quantified using time frequency and coherence analysis.Oscillatory behaviour of ARI at the respiratory frequency was observed in all subjects. The magnitude of the ARI variation ranged from 2.2 ms to 6.9 ms (mean 5.0 ms. Coherence analysis showed a correlation with respiratory oscillation for an average of 43% of the recording time at a significance level of p < 0.05. Oscillations in systolic blood pressure in the Mayer wave frequency range were observed in all subjects for whom blood pressure was recorded (n=13. ARI oscillation in the Mayer wave frequency range was observed in 6/13 subjects (46% over a range of 2.9ms to 9.2ms. Coherence with Mayer waves at the p < 0.05 significance level was present for an average of 29 % of the recording time. In ambulatory patients with heart failure during enhanced mental arousal, left ventricular epicardial APD (ARI oscillated at the respiratory frequency (approx. 0.25Hz. In 6 patients (46% APD oscillated at the slower Mayer wave frequency (approx. 0.1 Hz. These findings may be important in understanding sympathetic activity-related arrhythmogenesis.

  15. Effects of High Frequency Chest Compression on Respiratory System Mechanics in Normal Subjects and Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Richard L; Richard T Lester; Neil E Brown

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the short term effects of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) on several indices of respiratory system mechanics in normal subjects and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF).DESIGN: Comparative physiological approach. Subjects were blinded to 10 randomized HFCC settings (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Hz) with each applied at the lowest and at the highest background vest pressure.SETTING: Pulmonary function and lung mechanics laboratory, University of Alberta.PARTICIPANTS: Te...

  16. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on respiratory control in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Gelmont, D; Howell, S; Johnson, R; Yang, F; Chang, H K

    1989-05-01

    We studied the spontaneous breathing patterns of 10 normal adult volunteers during high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), accomplished by inflating and deflating a vest worn around each subject's thorax at 2.5 Hz. Tidal volumes generated by HFCWO averaged 100 ml. Mean vest pressure was maintained at approximately 35 cm H2O throughout each experiment, even when HFCWO was not applied. During HFCWO, subjects were instructed occasionally to exhale deeply to obtain end-tidal samples representative of PACO2. HFCWO increased the breath-to-breath variability of spontaneous respiration in all subjects, prolonging expiratory pauses and producing short apneas in some cases. PACO2 decreased significantly (p less than 0.05). The effects on minute ventilation, tidal volume, and inspiratory and expiratory durations remained variable across subjects, even when differences in PACO2 between control and HFCWO states were reduced through inhalation of a low CO2 mixture. None of the changes were statistically significant, although average expiratory duration increased by 29%. Ventilatory responses to CO2 with and without HFCWO were also measured. Normocapnic (PACO2 = 40 mm Hg) ventilatory drive increased significantly (p less than 0.05) in six subjects (Type 1 response) and decreased substantially in the others (Type 2 response); with hypercapnia, the changes in drive were attenuated in both groups. Consequently, CO2 sensitivity decreased in Type 1 subjects and increased in Type 2 subjects. A simple analysis based on this result shows that with HFCWO, Type 2 subjects breathing air will tend to have a lower spontaneous minute ventilation and become hypercapnic. Type 1 subjects will become hypocapnic, but minute ventilation may be higher or lower than control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Morris

    Full Text Available Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT. We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO, a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20 compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT device (n = 15 in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs. HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week. Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003 and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005 groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; p<0.001. Maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; p<0.001 and SHAM-RMT (vs. PRE; p = 0.021 groups. Peak inspiratory flow rate (L.s(-1 achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001 in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading-induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  18. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; pRMT (vs. PRE; p = 0.021) groups. Peak inspiratory flow rate (L.s(-1)) achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001) in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading-induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  19. Growth and Flowering Responses of Cut Chrysanthemum Grown under Restricted Root Volume to Irrigation Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viyachai Taweesak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influences of irrigation frequency on the growth and flowering of chrysanthemum grown under restricted root volume were tested. Chrysanthemum cuttings (Chrysanthemum morifolium “Reagan White” were grown in seedling tray which contained coconut peat in volumes of 73 and 140 cm3. Plants were irrigated with drip irrigation at irrigation frequencies of 4 (266 mL, 6 (400 mL, and 8 (533 mL times/day to observe their growth and flowering performances. There was interaction between irrigation frequency and substrate volume on plant height of chrysanthemum. Plants grown in 140 cm3 substrates and irrigated 6 times/day produced the tallest plant of 109.25 cm. Plants irrigated 6 and 8 times/day had significantly higher level of phosphorus content in their leaves than those plants irrigated 4 times/day. The total leaf area, number of internodes, leaf length, and leaf width of chrysanthemums grown in 140 cm3 substrate were significantly higher than those grown in 73 cm3 substrate. The numbers of flowers were affected by both irrigation frequencies and substrate volumes. Chrysanthemums irrigated 8 times/day had an average of 19.56 flowers while those irrigated 4 times/day had an average of 16.63 flowers. Increasing irrigation frequency can improve the growth and flowering of chrysanthemums in small substrate volumes.

  20. Physical activity and quality of life: assessing the influence of activity frequency, intensity, volume, and motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustyk, M Kathleen B; Widman, Laura; Paschane, Amy A E; Olson, Karen C

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the impact of exercise frequency, intensity, and volume along with exercise motives on quality of life (QOL) reports. The authors assessed exercise habits with the Godin Leisure Time Activity Scale and measured exercise motives with the Reasons for Exercise Inventory. The Quality of Life Inventory assessed satisfaction in 16 domains including health, work, and recreation. High-frequency exercisers reported significantly higher health, helping, and community-related QOL than those who exercised less frequently. The authors noted significantly higher health-related QOL in the heavy volume group compared with the other volume groups. Multiple regression tests revealed that activity intensity and exercise motives significantly predicted QOL reports. The strongest bivariate correlations with QOL existed for mild activity and exercising for fitness and health reasons. Thus, high-frequency activity of mild intensity that produces high kcal utilization and is performed to improve health and fitness has the strongest influence on QOL reports.

  1. Expired tidal volumes measured by hot-wire anemometer during high-frequency oscillation in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimová-Herknerová, Magdalena; Plavka, Richard

    2006-05-01

    We sought to determine the normocapnic values of expiratory tidal volume measured by hot-wire anemometer, and to evaluate how often expiratory tidal volume exceeds estimated anatomical dead space during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) in preterm infants. We also sought to determine the relationship between expiratory tidal volume and other respiratory parameters. The neonatal respiration monitor SLE 2100 VPM, a hot-wire anemometer, was used to measure expired tidal volume (V(T,E)) in patients ventilated by the Sensormedics 3,100A during routine clinical use of HFOV. Two hundred and fourteen simultaneous measurements of PaCO(2), V(T,E), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO(2)), continuous distending pressure (CDP), frequency, and amplitude were obtained from 28 patients. The median birth weight was 852 g (range, 435-3,450 g), and median gestational age was 27.2 weeks (range, 23.3-41.0 weeks). One hundred and eighteen (55%) normocapnic measurements, 42 (20%) hypocapnic measurements, and 54 (25%) hypercapnic measurements were recorded in which the median V(T,E) was 1.67 ml/kg (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.55-1.79), 1.94 ml/kg (95% CI, 1.74-2.14), and 1.54 ml/kg (95% CI, 1.42-1.66), respectively. The measured V(T,E) exceeded 2.0 ml/kg in 30 instances of normocapnic V(T,E) (14%) and 54 of all V(T,E) (25%), and 3 ml/kg only in 7 (3%) and 11 (5%) instances of normocapnic and all V(T,E). There was a significant difference in median normocapnic V(T,E) obtained when FiO(2) was between 0.21-0.35, compared to values obtained when FiO(2) was 0.36-1.0 (1.61 ml/kg (95% CI, 1.52-1.70) vs. 2.06 ml/kg (95% CI, 1.93-2.19), P 47 should predict hypercapnia in 81% of cases. In conclusion, expired tidal volume measurement by heated double-wire anemometer sensor is feasible, provides useful real-time information about tidal volume changes, and may improve the clinical management of HFOV.

  2. A study of finite volume effect on the multiple-frequencies coherence of VHF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    1993-08-01

    In the past few years, the technique of frequency domain interferometry (FDI) has been developed on VHF radar. By using this technique, the characteristics of a very thin atmospheric lay structure, which is embedded in the radar volume and cannot be solved by conventional VHF radar with only one operational frequency, can be determined through the calculation of the coherence and the phase from the two echo signals with different operational frequencies. According to FDI theory, assuming that the range and antenna beam weighting effect can be ignored, the coherence will approach zero if the layer thickness is fairly greater than the radar volume. However, in this study, it will be shown that if a rectangular pulse is transmitted and the atmospheric refractivity irregularities are distributed uniformly in the radar volume, that is, there is no narrow layer structure existing in the scattering volume, the coherence of two signals with different operational frequencies is still high and its behavior can be described by the equation C is approximately equal to Sinc((Delta)k L)/(l + N/S), where C is the coherence, Delta K is the wavenumber difference between two carrier frequencies, L is the effective scale of scattering volume, and N/S is the noise-to-signal power ratio. This feature can be interpreted physically by the finite volume filtering effect on the turbulent wavenumber spectrum. This theoretical prediction has been compared with the FDI experiments carried out by the Chung-Li VHF radar, and the results are quite reasonable. Thus, it is suggested that when the FDI technique is applied to estimate the thickness and the position of a thin layer, the finite volume filtering effect should be taken into account.

  3. Respiratory dynamics and dead space to tidal volume ratio of volume-controlled versus pressure-controlled ventilation during prolonged gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Ming; Zhao, Xiao; Wang, Hong; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2016-12-30

    Laparoscopic operations have become longer and more complex and applied to a broader patient population in the last decades. Prolonged gynecological laparoscopic surgeries require prolonged pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg position, which can influence respiratory dynamics and other measurements of pulmonary function. We investigated the differences between volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) and pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and tried to determine the more efficient ventilation mode during prolonged pneumoperitoneum in gynecological laparoscopy. Twenty-six patients scheduled for laparoscopic radical hysterectomy combined with or without laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy were randomly allocated to be ventilated by either VCV or PCV. Standard anesthesic management and laparoscopic procedures were performed. Measurements of respiratory and hemodynamic dynamics were obtained after induction of anesthesia, at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min after establishing pneumoperitoneum, and at 10 min after return to supine lithotomy position and removal of carbon dioxide. The logistic regression model was applied to predict the corresponding critical value of duration of pneumoperitoneum when the Ppeak was higher than 40 cmH2O. Prolonged pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg position produced significant and clinically relevant changes in dynamic compliance and respiratory mechanics in anesthetized patients under PCV and VCV ventilation. Patients under PCV ventilation had a similar increase of dead space/tidal volume ratio, but had a lower Ppeak increase compared with those under VCV ventilation. The critical value of duration of pneumoperitoneum was predicted to be 355 min under VCV ventilation, corresponding to the risk of Ppeak higher than 40 cmH2O. Both VCV and PCV can be safely applied to prolonged gynecological laparoscopic surgery. However, PCV may become the better choice of ventilation after ruling out of other reasons for Ppeak increasing.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF EXOGENOUS SURFACTANT IN RABBITS WITH SEVERE RESPIRATORY-FAILURE - THE EFFECT OF VOLUME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERBLEEK, J; PLOTZ, FB; VANOVERBEEK, FM; HEIKAMP, A; BEEKHUIS, H; WILDEVUUR, CRH; OKKEN, A; OETOMO, SB

    1993-01-01

    The transient effect of surfactant therapy that is observed in some patients might, at least in part, be explained by a nonhomogeneous distribution. Therefore, we investigated the distribution of a surfactant preparation (Alvofact, 45 g/L) that is used clinically. Rabbits with severe respiratory fai

  5. Respiratory Collapse of the Inferior Vena Cava Reflects Volume Shift and Subsequent Fluid Refill in Acute Heart Failure Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Tomohiro; Nakata, Marohito; Higa, Namio; Manita, Mamoru; Tabata, Kazuhiko; Shimabukuro, Michio

    2016-04-25

    Fluid redistribution rather than fluid accumulation plays an important role in the development of acute heart failure (HF) syndrome. Patients with fluid redistribution develop acute HF without prominent volume overload. We investigated volume status by measuring the diameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and examining variations in hemoglobin and hematocrit. Seventy-four consecutive patients admitted for acute HF syndrome were analyzed. Blood tests and measurement of IVC diameter after stabilization of respiratory distress were performed on admission and were repeated after 24 h. IVC collapsibility index (IVC-CI) was calculated as (maximum IVC-minimum IVC)/maximum IVC. According to the initial IVC-CI, the patients were divided into the collapse group (IVC-CI ≥0.5: n=34) and the non-collapse group (IVC-CI Fluid refill occurs within 24 h after admission. This observation could be helpful in selecting strategies for diuretic use. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1171-1177).

  6. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on lung volumes, respiratory muscle strength, and quality of life in patients with ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Erika; Gimenes, Ana Cristina; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares

    2014-03-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome caused by a mutation of chromosome 11. The clinical features are cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, and progressive loss of muscular coordination, including an inefficient cough secondary to progression of neurological disease. To evaluate the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilation, lung volume, dyspnoea, respiratory muscle strength, and quality of life in patients with AT. A longitudinal study was conducted with 11 AT patients and nine healthy volunteers. Ventilometry, subjective sensation of dyspnoea, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), and quality of life were assessed before and after a 24-week IMT program. The IMT load used was set at 60% of the MIP, and the training was performed for 20 min daily. Patients with AT had lower height and weight and also had lower respiratory muscle strength and lung volume compared with healthy volunteers. Furthermore, patients with AT showed a significant improvement when pre- and post-IMT were compared for ventilatory pattern: Vt (476.5 ± 135 ml vs. 583.3 ± 66 ml, P = 0.015) and f (23.3 ± 6 rpm vs. 20.4 ± 4 rpm, P = 0.018), and VC (1,664 ± 463 ml/kg vs. 2,145 ± 750 ml/kg, P = 0.002). IMT also significantly improved the sensation of dyspnoea (median 0.5; minimum 0; maximum 1.0; P = 0.022) and respiratory muscle strength: MIP (-22.2 ± 2 cmH2O vs. -38 ± 9 cmH2O, P < 0.001) and MEP (29 ± 7 cmH2O vs. 40 ± 8 cmH2O, P = 0.001). The health and vitality domains of the SF-36 also showed significant improvement (P = 0.009 and P = 0.014, respectively) post-IMT. IMT was effective in improving ventilatory pattern, lung volume, respiratory muscle strength, and the health and vitality domains for quality of life in patients with AT. IMT may be an effective adjunct therapy to drug treatment for patients with AT. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The impact of turnover among respiratory care practitioners in a health care system: frequency and associated costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, J K; Orens, D K; Kester, L

    2001-03-01

    Retention of respiratory therapists (RTs) is a desired institutional goal that reflects department loyalty and RTs' satisfaction. When RTs leave a department, services are disrupted and new therapists must undergo orientation and training, which requires time and expense. Despite the widely shared goal of minimal turnover, neither the annual rate nor the associated expense of turnover for RTs has been described. Determine the rate of RT turnover and the costs related to training new staff members. The Cleveland Clinic Health System is composed of 9 participating hospitals, which range from small, community-based institutions to large, tertiary care institutions. To elicit information about annual turnover among RTs throughout the system, we conducted a survey of key personnel in each of the hospitals' respiratory therapy departments. To calculate the costs of training, we reviewed the training schedule for an RT joining the Respiratory Therapy Section at the Cleveland Clinic Hospital. Cost estimates reflect the duration of training by various supervisory RTs, their respective wages (including benefit costs), and educational materials used in training and orientation. Turnover rates ranged from 3% to 18% per year. Five of the 8 institutions from which rates were available reported rates greater than 8% per year. The rate of annual turnover correlated significantly with the ratio of hospital beds to RT staff (Pearson r = 0.784, r(2) = 0.61, p = 0.02). The cost of training an RT at the Cleveland Clinic Hospital totaled $3,447.11. Turnover among respiratory therapists poses a substantial problem because of its frequency and expense. Greater attention to issues affecting turnover and to enhancing retention of RTs is warranted.

  8. Frequency domain volume rendering by the wavelet X-ray transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, Michel A.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a wavelet-based X-ray rendering method in the frequency domain with a smaller time complexity than wavelet splatting. Standard Fourier volume rendering is summarized and interpolation and accuracy issues are briefly discussed. We review the implementation of the fast wavelet transform in

  9. Reference values for frequency volume chart and uroflowmetry parameters in adolescent and adult enuresis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, Ilse; Brinker, Astrid E.; Steffens, Martijn G.; Mulder, Zwaan; van Capelle, Jan Willem; Feitz, Wout F.J.; Blanker, Marco H.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Reference values of Frequency Volume Chart (FVC) and uroflowmetry parameters for adolescent and adult enuresis patients are lacking. In this study, we aim to describe those parameters, in order to interpret findings from FVCs and uroflowmetries in those patients. Methods: Retrospective, descri

  10. [Noninvasive, continuous monitoring of artificial respiration in premature and newborn infants by the constant measurement of respiratory minute volume, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide release].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidig, E; Noller, F; Mentzel, H

    1986-01-01

    A system of instrumentation for the continuous measurement of the respiratory gases during assisted ventilation of neonates and premature infants based upon "breath-by-breath-method" is described. The four respiratory parameters flow (V), ventilation pressure (p), oxygen-concentration and carbon dioxide-concentration are measured. These datas are processed by a computer to generate a continuous display of the respiratory minute volume, the tidal volume, the breath rate, the oxygen consumption and the carbon dioxide production. All parameters are stored and can be displayed or plotted as trends. The flow-measurement is performed using hot-wire-anemometry. The very small flow sensor is adapted directly to the tube. Next to this sensor, the respiratory gas for the analysis of the O2- and CO2- concentration is suctioned off continuously. First clinical experience in mechanically ventilated newborns is characterized.

  11. COORDINATION BETWEEN RIBS MOTION AND THORACOABDOMINAL VOLUMES IN SWIMMERS DURING RESPIRATORY MANEUVERS

    OpenAIRE

    Karine J. Sarro; Barros, Ricardo M.L.; Silvatti, Amanda P.

    2008-01-01

    This work aimed to verify if swimmers present better chest wall coordination during breathing than healthy non-athletes analyzing the correlation between ribs motion and the variation of thoracoabdominal volumes. The results of two up-to-date methods based on videogrammetry were correlated in this study. The first one measured the volumes of 4 separate compartments of the chest wall (superior thorax, inferior thorax, superior abdomen and inferior abdomen) as a function of time. The second cal...

  12. Left ventricular volume measurements with free breathing respiratory self-gated 3-dimensional golden angle radial whole-heart cine imaging - Feasibility and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Karen; Ugander, Martin; Sigfridsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a free breathing respiratory self-gated isotropic resolution technique for left ventricular (LV) volume measurements. A 3D radial trajectory with double golden-angle ordering was used for free-running data acquisition during free breathing in 9 healthy volunteers. A respiratory self-gating signal was extracted from the center of k-space and used with the electrocardiogram to bin all data into 3 respiratory and 25 cardiac phases. 3D image volumes were reconstructed and the LV endocardial border was segmented. LV volume measurements and reproducibility from 3D free breathing cine were compared to conventional 2D breath-held cine. No difference was found between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine with regards to LV ejection fraction, stroke volume, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume (Pcine and 2D breath-held cine (Pcine and conventional 2D breath-held cine showed similar values and test-retest repeatability for LV volumes in healthy volunteers. 3D free breathing cine enabled retrospective sorting and arbitrary angulation of isotropic data, and could correctly measure LV volumes during free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of Bioradiolocation and Respiratory Plethysmography Signals in Time and Frequency Domains on the Base of Cross-Correlation and Spectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Alekhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of bioradiolocation and standard respiratory plethysmography signals during simultaneous registration of different types of the human breathing movements is performed in both time and frequency domains. For all couples of synchronized signals corresponding to bioradiolocation and respiratory plethysmography methods, the cross-correlation and spectral functions are calculated, and estimates of their generalized characteristics are defined. The obtained results consider bioradiolocation to be a reliable remote sensing technique for noncontact monitoring of breathing pattern in medical applications.

  14. Comparative Study of pressure-control ventilation and volume-control ventilation in treating traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨云梅; 黄卫东; 沈美亚; 徐哲荣

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical therapeutic effect and side effect of pressure-control ventilation (PCV) on traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) compared with volume-control ventilation (VCV).Methods: Forty patients with traumatic ARDS were hospitalized in our department from June 1996 to December 2002. Twenty were treated with PCV (PCV group) and 20 with VCV (VCV group). The changes of the peak inflating pressure and the mean pressure of the airway were observed at the very beginning of the mechanical ventilation and the following 12 and 24 hours, respectively. The transcutaneous saturation of oxygen pressure, the pressure of oxygen in artery, the mean blood pressure, the central venous pressure, the heart rate and the incidence of the pressure injury were also monitored before ventilation and 12 hours after ventilation.Results: The pressure of oxygen in artery, the transcutaneous saturation of oxygen pressure, the heart rate and the respiratory rate in the PCV group were obviously improved after ventilation treatment. The peak inflating pressure, the mean pressure of the airway and the central venous pressure in the PCV group were lower than in the VCV group. The incidence of pressure injury was 0 in the PCV group while 10% in the VCV group. Conclusions: The clinical effect of PCV on traumatic ARDS is better and the incidence rate of pressure injury is lower than that of VCV. PCV has minimal effects on the hemodynamics.

  15. COORDINATION BETWEEN RIBS MOTION AND THORACOABDOMINAL VOLUMES IN SWIMMERS DURING RESPIRATORY MANEUVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine J. Sarro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to verify if swimmers present better chest wall coordination during breathing than healthy non-athletes analyzing the correlation between ribs motion and the variation of thoracoabdominal volumes. The results of two up-to-date methods based on videogrammetry were correlated in this study. The first one measured the volumes of 4 separate compartments of the chest wall (superior thorax, inferior thorax, superior abdomen and inferior abdomen as a function of time. The second calculated the rotation angle of the 2nd to the 10th ribs around the quasi-transversal axis also in function of time. The chest wall was represented by 53 markers, attached to the ribs, vertebrae, thorax and abdomen of 15 male swimmers and of 15 non- athletes. A kinematical analysis system equipped with 6 digital video cameras (60Hz was used to obtain the 3D coordinates of the markers. Correlating the curves of ribs rotation angles with the curves of the separate volumes, swimmers presented higher values than non-athletes when the superior and inferior abdomen were considered and the highest correlation values were found in swimmers for the inferior thorax. These results suggest a better coordination between ribs motion and thoracoabdominal volumes in swimmers, indicating the prevalent and coordinated action of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles to inflate and deflate the chest wall. The results further suggest that swimming practice leads to the formation of an optimized breathing pattern and can partially explain the higher lung volumes found in these athletes reported in literature.

  16. [Acute respiratory failure (ARDS) in a young child after drowning accident: therapy with exogenous surfactant and high frequency oscillatory ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, M; Golej, J; Fürst, G; Hermon, M; Trittenwein, G

    1995-01-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children has a very poor prognosis with a mortality risk of between 55 and 85%, in spite of improvements due to the introduction of positive endexpiratory pressure ventilation. We describe the clinical course of a not yet 3 year-old boy with severe ARDS following near-drowing. Treatment with exogenous surfactant and high frequency oscillatory ventilation, a well-established procedure in neonatology, was responsible for the favorable outcome. The high cost of surfactant therapy, however, is the main limiting factor for this kind of treatment in children beyond the neonatal period, but it may be the last therapeutic resort in the management of severe ARDS.

  17. Frequency domain volume rendering by the wavelet X-ray transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, M A; Roerdink, J M

    2000-01-01

    We describe a wavelet based X-ray rendering method in the frequency domain with a smaller time complexity than wavelet splatting. Standard Fourier volume rendering is summarized and interpolation and accuracy issues are briefly discussed. We review the implementation of the fast wavelet transform in the frequency domain. The wavelet X-ray transform is derived, and the corresponding Fourier-wavelet volume rendering algorithm (FWVR) is introduced, FWVR uses Haar or B-spline wavelets and linear or cubic spline interpolation. Various combinations are tested and compared with wavelet splatting (WS). We use medical MR and CT scan data, as well as a 3-D analytical phantom to assess the accuracy, time complexity, and memory cost of both FWVR and WS. The differences between both methods are enumerated.

  18. Guaifenesin has no effect on sputum volume or sputum properties in adolescents and adults with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer-Schaefer, Agathe; Rozycki, Henry J; Yopp, Melissa A; Rubin, Bruce K

    2014-05-01

    Guaifenesin (glyceryl guaiacolate ether [GGE]) has been studied as a cough suppressant and as an expectorant; however, published studies to date have failed to find a consistent benefit. An 8-day multi-center clinical trial was conducted to study the effect of two 600-mg extended-release GGE tablets twice daily for 1 week on cold symptoms, sputum volume, and properties in adolescents and adults with productive cough from an acute respiratory tract infection (RTI). The study enrolled 378 subjects (GGE, n = 188; and placebo, n = 190) who were otherwise healthy and had an RTI for up to 5 days before enrollment. Subjects suffered from at least 2 of 3 symptoms of cough, thickened mucus, and chest congestion. A total of 151 GGE and 144 control subjects completed the full protocol. Single-sputum samples were collected from each subject on days 1, 3, 4, and 8 of the study. The rheology and interfacial tension of sputum were measured, and 24-h collected samples from days 1 and 4 were analyzed for total volume and hydration. Symptoms in both the GGE and placebo groups improved to a similar degree over time. There were no significant differences between the GGE and placebo groups for sputum volume (P = .41), percent solids (P = .69), interfacial tension (P = .88), elasticity (P = .71), viscosity (P = .45), or mechanical impedance (P = .75). The recommended dose of GGE had no measurable effect on sputum volume or properties and is unlikely to be an expectorant or mucolytic when used to treat acute RTI. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT01046136.).

  19. Simple and Fast Continuous Estimation Method of Respiratory Frequency During Sleep using the Number of Extreme Points of Heart Rate Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is reported that frequency component of approximately 0.25Hz of heart rate time series (RSA) is corresponding to the respiratory frequency. In this paper, we proposed that continuous estimation method of respiratory fequency during sleep using the number of extreme points of heart rate time series in real time. Equation for calculation of the method is very simple and the method can continuously calculate frequency by window width of about 18 beats. To evaluate accuracy of proposal method, RSA frequency was calculated using proposal method from the heart rate time series during supine rest. Result, minimum error rate was observed when RSA had time lag for about 11s and error rate was about 13.8%. Result of estimating RSA frequency time series during sleep, it varied regularly during non-REM and varied irregularly during REM. This result is similar as report of previous study about respiratory variability during sleep. Therefore, it is considered that proposal method possible to apply respiratory monitoring system during sleep.

  20. Effects of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation on oxygen metabolism and tissue perfusion in sheep models of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Songqiao; Huang Yingzi; Wang Maohua; Chen Qiuhua; Liu Ling; Xie Jianfeng; Tan Li

    2014-01-01

    Background High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) allows for small tidal volumes at mean airway pressures (mPaw) above that of conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV),but the effect of HFOV on hemodynamics,oxygen metabolism,and tissue perfusion in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unclear.We investigated the effects of HFOV and CMV in sheep models with ARDS.Methods After inducing ARDS by repeated lavage,twelve adult sheep were randomly divided into a HFOV or CMV group.After stabilization,standard lung recruitments (40 cmH2O × 40 seconds) were performed.The optimal mPaw or positive end-expiratory pressure was obtained by lung recruitment and decremental positive end-expiratory pressure titration.The animals were then ventilated for 4 hours.The hemodynamics,tissue perfusion (superior mesenteric artery blood flow,pHi,and Pg-aCO2),oxygen metabolism and respiratory mechanics were examined at baseline before saline lavage,in the ARDS model,after model stabilization,and during hourly mechanical ventilation for up to 4 hours.A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was applied to evaluate differences between the groups.Results The titrated mPaw was higher and the tidal volumes lower in the HFOV group than the positive end-expiratory pressure in the CMV group.There was no significant difference in hemodynamic parameters between the HFOV and CMV groups.There was no difference in the mean alveolar pressure between the two groups.After lung recruitment,both groups showed an improvement in the oxygenation,oxygen delivery,and DO2.Lactate levels increased in both groups after inducing the ARDS model.Compared with the CMV group,the superior mesenteric artery blood flow and pHi were significantly higher in the HFOV group,but the Pg-aCO2 decreased in the HFOV group.Conclusion Compared with CMV,HFOV with optimal mPaw has no significant side effect on hemodynamics or oxygen metabolism,and increases gastric tissue blood perfusion.

  1. Effects of pressure-controlled and volume-controlled ventilation on respiratory mechanics and systemic stress response during prone position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Oznur; Bakan, Mefkur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Aydın, Nurdan; Toptas, Mehmet; Akkoc, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Prone position during general anesthesia for special surgical operations may be related with increased airway pressure, decreased pulmonary and thoracic compliance that may be explained by restriction of chest expansion and compression of abdomen. The optimum ventilation mode for anesthetized patients on prone position was not described and studies comparing volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) and pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) during prone position are limited. We hypothesized that PCV instead of VCV during prone position could achieve lower airway pressures and reduce the systemic stress response. In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of PCV and VCV modes during prone position on respiratory mechanics, oxygenation, and hemodynamics, as well as blood cortisol and insulin levels, which has not been investigated before. Fifty-four ASA I-II patients, 18-70 years of age, who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy on prone position, were randomly selected to receive either the PCV (Group PC, n = 27) or VCV (Group VC, n = 27) under general anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl. Blood sampling was made for baseline arterial blood gases (ABG), cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels. After anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation, patients in Group PC were given pressure support to form 8 mL/kg tidal volume and patients in Group VC was maintained at 8 mL/kg tidal volume calculated using predicted body weight. All patients were maintained with 5 cmH2O PEEP. Respiratory parameters were recorded during supine and prone position. Assessment of ABG and sampling for cortisol, insulin and glucose levels were repeated during surgery and 60 min after extubation. P-peak and P-plateau levels during supine and prone positions were significantly higher and P-mean and compliance levels during prone position were significantly lower in Group VC when compared with Group PC. Postoperative PaO2 level was significantly higher in Group PC compared with Group

  2. The associations of humorous coping styles, affective states, job demands and job control with the frequency of upper respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibe Doosje

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: There is some evidence that job demands and job resources such as job control and humorous coping may contribute to the risk of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI.Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a model including these variables as well as job-related affect, in order to explore their role in the explanation of the frequency of upper respiratory tract infection.Motivation of the study: This study has been conducted in order to extend our understanding of the role of traditional variables like job demands and job control with humorous coping styles and affective variables with regard to the explanation of the frequency of URTI.Research design, approach and method: A sample of 2094 employees filled out questionnaires assessing job demands, job control, generic (MSHS-C, antecedent-focused and responsefocused humorous coping (QOHC and job-related affect (JAWS.Main findings: Job demands were indirectly related to the frequency of upper respiratory tract infections, mediated by their relationships with job control and negative job-related affect. Generic and response-focused humorous coping were less relevant for the explanation of the frequency of upper respiratory tract infections than the presumably ‘healthy’ antecedentfocused humorous coping style. The latter showed a negative association with negative jobrelated affect. The frequency of upper respiratory tract infections was better predicted by job control and negative job-related affect than by humorous coping, in the expected directions.Practical/managerial implication: These findings may have practical relevance for the improvement of stress management interventions in organisations.Contribution/value-add: Although it was shown that healthy humorous coping does contribute to decreases in upper respiratory tract infection, job demands, job resources and negative affective state seem the most important predictors.

  3. Effects of pressure-controlled and volume-controlled ventilation on respiratory mechanics and systemic stress response during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Oznur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Aydın, Nurdan; Toptas, Mehmet; Tutuncu, Ayse Cigdem; Bakan, Mefkur

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) is less frequently employed in general anesthesia. With its high and decelerating inspiratory flow, PCV has faster tidal volume delivery and different gas distribution. The same tidal volume setting, delivered by PCV versus volume-controlled ventilation (VCV), will result in a lower peak airway pressure and reduced risk of barotrauma. We hypothesized that PCV instead of VCV during laparoscopic surgery could achieve lower airway pressures and reduce the systemic stress response. Forty ASA I-II patients were randomly selected to receive either the PCV (Group PC, n = 20) or VCV (Group VC, n = 20) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Blood sampling was made for baseline arterial blood gases (ABG), cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels. General anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl was employed to all patients. After anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation, patients in Group PC were given pressure support to form 8 mL/kg tidal volume and patients in Group VC was maintained at 8 mL/kg tidal volume calculated using predicted body weight. All patients were maintained with 5 cmH2O positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). Respiratory parameters were recorded before and 30 min after pneumoperitonium. Assessment of ABG and sampling for cortisol, insulin and glucose levels were repeated 30 min after pneumoperitonium and 60 min after extubation. The P-peak levels observed before (18.9 ± 3.8 versus 15 ± 2.2 cmH2O) and during (23.3 ± 3.8 versus 20.1 ± 2.9 cmH2O) pneumoperitoneum in Group VC were significantly higher. Postoperative partial arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) values are higher (98 ± 12 versus 86 ± 11 mmHg) in Group PC. Arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) values (41.8 ± 5.4 versus 36.7 ± 3.5 mmHg) during pneumoperitonium and post-operative mean cortisol and insulin levels were higher in Group VC. When compared to VCV mode, PCV mode may improve compliance during pneumoperitoneum

  4. Effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery: respiratory muscle strength, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cangussu Barbalho-Moulim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is able to attenuate the impact of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Meridional Hospital, Cariacica/ES, Brazil. SUBJECTS: Thirty-two obese women undergoing elective open bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle training (inspiratory muscle training group or usual care (control group. MAIN MEASURES: Respiratory muscle strength (maximal static respiratory pressure - maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion. RESULTS: After training, there was a significant increase only in the maximal inspiratory pressure in the inspiratory muscle training group. The maximal expiratory pressure, the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion did not show any significant change with training. In the postoperative period there was a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressure in both the groups. However, there was a decrease of 28% in the inspiratory muscle training group, whereas it was 47% in the control group. The decrease in maximal expiratory pressure and in lung volumes in the postoperative period was similar between the groups. There was a significant reduction in the measures of diaphragmatic excursion in both the groups. CONCLUSION: The preoperative inspiratory muscle training increased the inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure and attenuated the negative postoperative effects of open bariatric surgery in obese women for this variable, though not influencing the lung volumes and the diaphragmatic excursion.

  5. High frequency epidural stimulation across the respiratory cycle evokes phrenic short-term potentiation after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Streeter, Kristi A; Hanna, Marie H; Stamas, Anna C; Reier, Paul J; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2017-06-14

    C2 spinal hemilesion (C2Hx) paralyzes the ipsilateral diaphragm, but recovery is possible through activation of "crossed spinal" synaptic inputs to ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons. We tested the hypothesis that high frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) would potentiate ipsilateral phrenic output after subacute and chronic C2Hx. HF-ES (300 Hz) was applied to the ventrolateral C4 or T2 spinal cord ipsilateral to C2Hx in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats. Stimulus duration was 60-sec and currents ranged from 100-1000 µA. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity and ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve activity were recorded before and after HF-ES. Higher T2 stimulus currents potentiated ipsilateral phasic inspiratory activity at both 2- and 12-wks post-C2Hx, while higher stimulus currents delivered at C4 potentiated ipsilateral phasic phrenic activity only at 12-wks (P=0.028). Meanwhile, tonic output in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve reached 500% of baseline values at the high currents with no difference between 2- and 12-wks. HF-ES did not trigger inspiratory burst frequency changes. Similar responses occurred following T2 HF-ES. Increases in contralateral phrenic and XII nerve output were induced by C4 and T2 HF-ES at higher currents, but the relative magnitude of these changes was small compared to the ipsilateral phrenic response. We conclude that following incomplete cervical SCI, HF-ES of the ventrolateral mid-cervical or thoracic spinal cord can potentiate efferent phrenic motor output with little impact on inspiratory burst frequency. However, the substantial increases in tonic output indicate that the uninterrupted 60-sec stimulation paradigm used here is unlikely to be useful for respiratory muscle activation after spinal injury. Copyright © 2016, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  6. SU-E-T-430: Feasibility Study On Using Overlap Volume Histogram to Predict the Dose Difference by Respiratory Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, D; Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose difference between three-dimensional dose (3D dose) and 4D dose which considers motion due to respiratory can be varied according to geometrical relationship between planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of the study is to investigate the dose difference between 3D and 4D dose using overlap volume histogram (OVH) which is an indicator that quantify geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. Methods: Five liver cancer patients who previously treated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were investigated. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for all patients. ITV-based treatment planning was performed. 3D dose was calculated on the end-exhale phase image as a reference phase image. 4D dose accumulation was implemented from all phase images using dose warping technique used deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm (Horn and Schunck optical flow) in DIRART. In this study OVH was used to quantify geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. OVH between a PTV and a selected OAR was generated for each patient case and compared for all cases. The dose difference between 3D and 4D dose for normal organ was calculated and compared for all cases according to OVH. Results: The 3D and 4D dose difference for OAR was analyzed using dose-volume histogram (DVH). On the basis of a specific point which corresponds to 10% of OAR volume overlapped with expanded PTV, mean dose difference was 34.56% in minimum OVH distance case and 13.36% in maximum OVH distance case. As the OVH distance increased, mean dose difference between 4D and 3D dose was decreased. Conclusion: The tendency of dose difference variation was verified according to OVH. OVH is seems to be indicator that has a potential to predict the dose difference between 4D and 3D dose. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through

  7. Reduction in adverse effects of mechanical ventilation in rabbits with acute respiratory failure by treatment with extracorporeal CO2 removal and a large fluid volume of diluted surfactant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotz, FB; Mook, PH; Jansen, NJG; Oetomo, SB; Wildevuur, CRH

    1997-01-01

    The long-term outcome of infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome can be improved by optimizing surfactant therapy and minimizing the risk for pulmonary barovolutrauma and oxygen toxicity. The authors hypothesized that this may be achieved with low frequency ventilation and extracorporeal C

  8. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N;

    2008-01-01

    measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours...... landmarks and 0.85 cm (+/-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55 cm (+/-0.19) and 0.72 cm (+/-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80......-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were...

  9. An objective analysis of the pressure-volume curve in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R S; Hess, D R; Venegas, J G

    2000-02-01

    To assess the interobserver and intraobserver variability in the clinical evaluation of the quasi-static pressure-volume (P-V) curve, we analyzed 24 sets of inflation and deflation P-V curves obtained from patients with ARDS. We used a recently described sigmoidal equation to curve-fit the P-V data sets and objectively define the point of maximum compliance increase of the inflation limb (P(mci, i)) and the true inflection point of the deflation limb (P(inf,d)). These points were compared with graphic determinations of lower Pflex by seven clinicians. The graphic and curve-fitting methods were also compared for their ability to reproduce the same parameter value in data sets with reduced number of data points. The sigmoidal equation fit the P-V data with great accuracy (R(2) = 0.9992). The average of Pflex determinations was found to be correlated with P(mci,i) (R = 0.89) and P(inf,d) (R = 0.76). Individual determinations of Pflex were less correlated with the corresponding objective parameters (R = 0.67 and 0.62, respectively). Pflex + 2 cm H(2)O was a more accurate estimator of P(inf,d) (2 SD = +/-6.05 cm H(2)O) than Pflex was of P(mci,i) (2 SD = +/-8.02 cm H(2)O). There was significant interobserver variability in Pflex, with a maximum difference of 11 cm H(2)O for the same patient (SD = 1.9 cm H(2)O). Clinicians had difficulty reproducing Pflex in smaller data sets with differences as great as 17 cm H(2)O (SD = 2.8 cm H(2)O). In contrast, the curve-fitting method reproduced P(mci,i) with great accuracy in reduced data sets (maximum difference of 1.5 cm H(2)O and SD = 0.3 cm H(2)O). We conclude that Pflex rarely coincided with the point of maximum compliance increase defined by a sigmoid curve-fit with large differences in Pflex seen both among and within observers. Calculating objective parameters such as P(mci,i) or P(inf,d) from curve-fitted P-V data can minimize this large variability.

  10. Mild hypothermia attenuates changes in respiratory system mechanics and modifies cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during low lung volume ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, P; Senkeřík, M; Pařízková, R; Bareš, D; Zivný, P; Zivná, H; Cerný, V

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia was shown to attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury due to large tidal volumes. It is unclear if the protective effect of hypothermia is maintained under less injurious mechanical ventilation in animals without previous lung injury. Tracheostomized rats were randomly allocated to non-ventilated group (group C) or ventilated groups of normothermia (group N) and mild hypothermia (group H). After two hours of mechanical ventilation with inspiratory fraction of oxygen 1.0, respiratory rate 60 min(-1), tidal volume 10 ml x kg(-1), positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 2 cm H2O or immediately after tracheostomy in non-ventilated animals inspiratory pressures were recorded, rats were sacrificed, pressure-volume (PV) curve of respiratory system constructed, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and aortic blood samples obtained. Group N animals exhibited a higher rise in peak inspiratory pressures in comparison to group H animals. Shift of the PV curve to right, higher total protein and interleukin-6 levels in BAL fluid were observed in normothermia animals in comparison with hypothermia animals and non-ventilated controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was lower in the hypothermia group in comparison with normothermia and non-ventilated groups. Mild hypothermia attenuated changes in respiratory system mechanics and modified cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during low lung volume ventilation in animals without previous lung injury.

  11. Clinical observation on effects of high frequency oscillating ventilation on patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-gang ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of high frequency oscillating ventilation (HFOV on patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and its mechanism. Methods  Through self controlled study, in 25 patients who met criteria of ARDS, their PaO2/FiO2, Paw, arterial blood pH, PaCO2, Cst, cadiac index (CI, heart rate (HR, central venous pressure (CVP, percentage pulmonary shunt (QS/QT, oxygen index (OI and incidence rate of ventilator associated lung injury (VALI, ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP were recorded 1, 3, 5 days before and after HFOV. Results  Five days later, X ray examination showed that all of the patients got better. Seven days later, 3 patients died because of original diseases, but their symptoms of ARDS improved. Three days after HFOV treatment, the value of PaO2/FiO2 (172.5±69.8 and Cst (63.4±10.5 increased compared with baseline (95.5±29.5, 31.5±4.5, P0.05. Conclusion  HFOV can improve oxygenation index and pulmonary complications of patients with early ARDS.

  12. The Use of a Shelter Software a to Track Frequency and Selected Risk Factors for Feline Upper Respiratory Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Therese Kommedal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective—Feline upper respiratory infection (URI is a common, multi-factorial infectious disease syndrome endemic to many animal shelters. Although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in shelter cats, URI is seldom formally monitored in shelter cat populations. Without monitoring, effective control and prevention of this often endemic disease is difficult. We looked at an integrated case management software system a for animal care organizations, widely used in shelters across the United States. Shelter staff routinely enter information regarding individual animals and disease status, but do not commonly use the software system to track frequency of disease. The purpose of this study was to determine if the software system a can be used to track URI frequency and selected risk factors in a population, and to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data as currently collected in a shelter. Design (type of study—Descriptive Survey. Animals (or Sample—317 cats in an animal shelter. Procedures—Reports from the software system a containing data regarding daily inventory, daily intake, animal identification, location, age, vaccination status, URI diagnosis and URI duration were evaluated. The reports were compared to data collected manually by an observer (Ann Therese Kommedal to assess discrepancies, completeness, timeliness, availability and accuracy. Data were collected 6 days a week over a 4 week period. Results—Comparisons between the software system a reports and manually collected reports showed that 93% of inventory reports were complete and of these 99% were accurate. Fifty-two percent of the vaccination reports were complete, of which 97% were accurate. The accuracy of the software system’s age reports was 76%. Two-hundred and twenty-three cats were assigned a positive or negative URI diagnosis by the observer. The predictive value of the URI status in the software system a was below 60% both for positive and

  13. Estimation of peak-frequency relations, flood hydrographs, and volume-duration-frequency relations of ungaged small urban streams in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.

    1994-01-01

    Methods and step-by-step examples are presented to estimate (1) peak-frequency relations, (2) flood hydrographs and volumes, and (3) volume-duration frequency relations of small urban streams in Ohio. The methods were developed to assist planners in the design of hydraulic structures for which hydrograph routing is required or where the temporary storage of water is an important element of the design criteria. The data base for the analyses consisted of rainfall-runoff data collected at 62 small drainage basins distributed throughout Ohio.

  14. Modulation of respiratory frequency by peptidergic input to rhythmogenic neurons in the preBötzinger complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, P A; Rekling, J C; Bocchiaro, C M;

    1999-01-01

    Neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) and mu-opioid receptor (muOR) agonists affected respiratory rhythm when injected directly into the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC), the hypothesized site for respiratory rhythmogenesis in mammals. These effects were mediated by actions on preBötC rhythmogenic neurons...

  15. Effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery: respiratory muscle strength, lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela Cangussu Barbalho-Moulim; Gustavo Peixoto Soares Miguel; Eli Maria Pazzianotto Forti; Flavio do Amaral Campos; Dirceu Costa

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is able to attenuate the impact of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes, and diaphragmatic excursion in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Meridional Hospital, Cariacica/ES, Brazil. SUBJECTS: Thirty-two obese women undergoing elective open bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle trainin...

  16. High frequency mechanical ventilation affects respiratory system mechanics differently in C57BL/6J and BALB/c adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Hélène

    2013-01-15

    We tested the hypothesis that high frequency ventilation affects respiratory system mechanical functions in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice. We measured respiratory mechanics by the forced oscillation technique over 1h in anesthetized, intubated, ventilated BALB/c and C57BL/6J male mice. We did not detect any change in airway resistance, Rn, tissue damping, G, tissue elastance, H and hysteresivity, eta in BALB/c mice during 1h of ventilation at 150 or at 450 breaths/min; nor did we find a difference between BALB/c mice ventilated at 150 breaths/min compared with 450 breaths/min. Among C57BL/6J mice, except for H, all parameters remained unchanged over 1h of ventilation in mice ventilated at 150 breaths/min. However, after 10 and 30 min of ventilation at 450 breaths/min, Rn, and respiratory system compliance were lower, and eta was higher, than their starting value. We conclude that high frequency mechanical ventilation affects respiratory system mechanics differently in C57BL/6J and BALB/c adult mice.

  17. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gitte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Specht, Lena (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (+-0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (+-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (+-0.19) and 0.72cm (+-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos.

  18. Aprospective Randomized Study Comparing Respiratory Efficacy of Percutaneous Transtracheal and Endotracheal, Low-Frequency Jet Ventilation During Microlaryngeal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Lal Dolat Abad

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Transtracheal jet ventilation is an alternative ventilatory approach in airway surgery.The purpose of this study was to compare respiratory efficacy of percutaneous transtracheal with endotracheal,low frequency jet ventilation during microlaryngeal surgery. Methods: Ninety ASA class I-II patients aged between 16 and 70 years undergoing elective microlaryngeal surgery were prospectively studied and randomly assigned to one of two groups: Percutaneous Transtracheal Jet Ventilation (PTJV group or subglottic Endotracheal Jet Ventilation ETJV via the Ben-jet tube group. Results: No significant differences in demographic data between the two study groups were observed. The understudy population included; ETJV=42 (total 25 men, 17 women; PTJV= 48 (total 34 men, 14 women. Age ranges were: ETJV: 43.83 ±11.52 yr, PTJV: 44.92±12.08 yr; weight ranges were ETJV: 69.62±11.66 kg, PTJV: 71.33±11.57 kg; BMI ranges were ETJV: 24.97±2.58,PTJV:25.06±2.71. There were no significant differences between the measured pHa, PaO2, PaCO2 in two study groups at the initiation of operation.Significant differences were observed between measured PHa, PaO2 and PaCO2 during operation in ETJV group as compared with PTJV group.Conclusion:We conclude that ETJV procedure provides regular pulmonary gas exchange during microlaryngeal surgery and carbon dioxide elimination can be better maintained in this group compared to the PTJV group.

  19. Effects of respiratory muscle unloading on leg muscle oxygenation and blood volume during high-intensity exercise in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Carrascosa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Cristino Carneiro; Barroco, Adriano C; Berton, Danilo C; Vilaça, Debora; Lira-Filho, Edgar B; Ribeiro, Dirceu; Nery, Luiz Eduardo; Neder, J Alberto

    2008-06-01

    Blood flow requirements of the respiratory muscles (RM) increase markedly during exercise in chronic heart failure (CHF). We reasoned that if the RM could subtract a fraction of the limited cardiac output (QT) from the peripheral muscles, RM unloading would improve locomotor muscle perfusion. Nine patients with CHF (left ventricle ejection fraction = 26 +/- 7%) undertook constant-work rate tests (70-80% peak) receiving proportional assisted ventilation (PAV) or sham ventilation. Relative changes (Delta%) in deoxy-hemoglobyn, oxi-Hb ([O2Hb]), tissue oxygenation index, and total Hb ([HbTOT], an index of local blood volume) in the vastus lateralis were measured by near infrared spectroscopy. In addition, QT was monitored by impedance cardiography and arterial O2 saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2). There were significant improvements in exercise tolerance (Tlim) with PAV. Blood lactate, leg effort/Tlim and dyspnea/Tlim were lower with PAV compared with sham ventilation (P 0.05). Unloaded breathing, however, was related to enhanced leg muscle oxygenation and local blood volume compared with sham, i.e., higher Delta[O2Hb]% and Delta[HbTOT]%, respectively (P < 0.05). We conclude that RM unloading had beneficial effects on the oxygenation status and blood volume of the exercising muscles at similar systemic O2 delivery in patients with advanced CHF. These data suggest that blood flow was redistributed from respiratory to locomotor muscles during unloaded breathing.

  20. Effects of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Oscillated Volume during High-Frequency Chest Compression in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara F Dosman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP on end-expiratory lung volume (EELV and mean oscillated volume (Vosc during high frequency chest compression (HFCC.

  1. Volume Attenuation and High Frequency Loss as Auditory Depth Cues in Stereoscopic 3D Cinema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolas, Christos; Pauletto, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Assisted by the technological advances of the past decades, stereoscopic 3D (S3D) cinema is currently in the process of being established as a mainstream form of entertainment. The main focus of this collaborative effort is placed on the creation of immersive S3D visuals. However, with few exceptions, little attention has been given so far to the potential effect of the soundtrack on such environments. The potential of sound both as a means to enhance the impact of the S3D visual information and to expand the S3D cinematic world beyond the boundaries of the visuals is large. This article reports on our research into the possibilities of using auditory depth cues within the soundtrack as a means of affecting the perception of depth within cinematic S3D scenes. We study two main distance-related auditory cues: high-end frequency loss and overall volume attenuation. A series of experiments explored the effectiveness of these auditory cues. Results, although not conclusive, indicate that the studied auditory cues can influence the audience judgement of depth in cinematic 3D scenes, sometimes in unexpected ways. We conclude that 3D filmmaking can benefit from further studies on the effectiveness of specific sound design techniques to enhance S3D cinema.

  2. High frequency RNA recombination in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus occurs preferentially between parental sequences with high similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vugt, Joke .J.F.A.; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exist, a North American type and a European type. The co-existence of both types in some countries, such as Denmark, Slovakia and Canada, creates a risk of inter-type recombination. To evaluate this risk, cell cultures were co...

  3. Bivariate at-site frequency analysis of simulated flood peak-volume data using copulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, Ladislav; Viglione, Alberto; Szolgay, Ján.; Blöschl, Günter; Bacigál, Tomáå.¡

    2010-05-01

    In frequency analysis of joint hydro-climatological extremes (flood peaks and volumes, low flows and durations, etc.), usually, bivariate distribution functions are fitted to the observed data in order to estimate the probability of their occurrence. Bivariate models, however, have a number of limitations; therefore, in the recent past, dependence models based on copulas have gained increased attention to represent the joint probabilities of hydrological characteristics. Regardless of whether standard or copula based bivariate frequency analysis is carried out, one is generally interested in the extremes corresponding to low probabilities of the fitted joint cumulative distribution functions (CDFs). However, usually there is not enough flood data in the right tail of the empirical CDFs to derive reliable statistical inferences on the behaviour of the extremes. Therefore, different techniques are used to extend the amount of information for the statistical inference, i.e., temporal extension methods that allow for making use of historical data or spatial extension methods such as regional approaches. In this study, a different approach was adopted which uses simulated flood data by rainfall-runoff modelling, to increase the amount of data in the right tail of the CDFs. In order to generate artificial runoff data (i.e. to simulate flood records of lengths of approximately 106 years), a two-step procedure was used. (i) First, the stochastic rainfall generator proposed by Sivapalan et al. (2005) was modified for our purpose. This model is based on the assumption of discrete rainfall events whose arrival times, durations, mean rainfall intensity and the within-storm intensity patterns are all random, and can be described by specified distributions. The mean storm rainfall intensity is disaggregated further to hourly intensity patterns. (ii) Secondly, the simulated rainfall data entered a semi-distributed conceptual rainfall-runoff model that consisted of a snow routine

  4. Once Nocturia, Always Nocturia? Natural History of Nocturia in Older Men Based on Frequency-Volume Charts : The Krimpen Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Boris; Blanker, Marco H.; Kok, Esther T.; Westers, Paul; Bosch, J. L. H. Ruud

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Nocturia is a highly prevalent and bothersome symptom that might (spontaneously) resolve. However, longitudinal data are not available on the incidence and resolution of nocturia assessed with frequency-volume charts. In this study we determined the prevalence, incidence and resolution

  5. The Effects of TM on Concurrent Heart Rate, Peripheral Blood Pulse Volume, and the Alpha Wave Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Jerome S.

    Through observation of 26 subjects over a 3 month period, this research project measured the effects of transcendental meditation (TM) on concurrent heart rate, peripheral blood pulse volume, and the alpha wave frequency. The subjects were assigned randomly to three groups. One group practiced TM as prescribed by the International Meditation…

  6. Moderate agreement between bladder capacity assessed by frequency volume charts and uroflowmetry, in adolescent and adult enuresis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, Ilse; Brinker, Astrid E.; Steffens, Martijn G.; Feitz, Wout F. J.; Blanker, Marco H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Frequency Volume Charts (FVC) are recommended for the evaluation of enuretic patients. Although this is a good instrument for the assessment of functional bladder capacity, it is known that patient compliance could introduce problems. Therefore, we assessed whether uroflowmetry and post-void r

  7. Micronucleus (MN) frequency in nasal respiratory epithelium cells from young adults living in urban areas with different levels of air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsebatt, M.E.; Valle, M. del; Fourtoul, T. [UNAM, Merida (Mexico)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    Air pollution in the valley of Mexico is a risk to human health due to the high levels of ozone, acidic sulfates, nitrogen oxides, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present. Epidemiologic studies have found an increase incidence of adverse respiratory symptoms among the residents of Mexico City. Histopathologic changes and DNA strand breaks have been observed in the nasal cells of residents of an area with high ozone levels. Since the nasal respiratory epithelium is directly exposed to air pollution we decided to investigate the frequency of MN in this tissue, in a group of 60 young adults (20-25 years old) that live in Mexico City and to compare it with the frequency of MN observed in a similar group of 60 individuals living in Merida, an urban area of the Yucatan peninsula, with lower air pollution. Volunteers completed questionnaires to give information about their health status, smoking habits and previous exposure to confounding factors such as radiation. Nasal cells were obtained by gently scraping the inner turbinate. The cells were smeared on previously coded glass slides, fixed and then stained with Feulgen`s method. 6000 cells were scored for each individual. Results from the analysis of twenty nasal cell samples from Mexico City residents and thirteen samples from Merida residents do not show significant differences in MN prevalence, although Mexico City showed in average a 50% increase in the frequency of MN. The presence of MN was not associated to smoking in either group. Condensed, karyorrhetic and karyolitic nuclei predominated (p<0.05) among the cell samples from Mexico City residents. These changes occur as an response to cellular injury in normal nonkeratinizing epithelium or can be observed in cell undergoing necrosis following injury by agents that cause perturbation of the cellular environment. These preliminary results showed clear cytotoxic effects in the nasal respiratory epithelium of Mexico City residents.

  8. Cerebral gas embolism in a case of Influenza A-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Sebat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old obese asthmatic woman with Influenza A (H1N1-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome died from cerebral artery gas emboli with massive cerebral infarction while being treated with High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in the absence of a right to left intracardiac shunt. We review and briefly discuss other causes of systemic gas emboli (SGE. We review proposed mechanisms of SGE, their relation to our case, and how improved understanding of the risk factors may help prevent SGE in positive pressure ventilated patients.

  9. Differential Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning on Gas Exchanges in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure under Pressure-Controlled and Volume-Controlled Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of open endotracheal suctioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in ARF patients under the modes of PCV or VCV. Ninety-six ARF patients were treated with open endotracheal suctioning and their variations in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange after the suctions were compared. Under PCV mode, compared with the initial level of tidal volume (VT, ARF patients showed 30.0% and 27.8% decrease at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Furthermore, the initial respiratory system compliance (Crs decreased by 29.6% and 28.5% at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under VCV mode, compared with the initial level, 38.6% and 37.5% increase in peak airway pressure (PAP were found at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under PCV mode, the initial PaO2 increased by 6.4% and 10.2 % at 3 min and 10 min, respectively, while 18.9% and 30.6% increase of the initial PaO2 were observed under VCV mode. Summarily, endotracheal suctioning may impair gas exchange and decrease lung compliance in ARF patients receiving mechanical ventilation under both PCV and VCV modes, but endotracheal suctioning effects on gas exchange were more severe and longer-lasting under PCV mode than VCV.

  10. Clinical experience in treatment of five H1N1 flu patients with respiratory failure with high-frequency oscillatory mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-gang ZHANG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the application and safety of high-frequency oscillation ventilation(HFOV in the treatment of patients suffering from H1N1 influenza with respiratory failure.Methods Self-control study was conducted.The treatment of five H1N1 influenza patients with respiratory failure was switched to HFOV after failure of conventional mechanical ventilation(CMV.Blood gas [partial pressure of oxygen(PaO2,partial pressure of carbon dioxide(PCO2,pH],respiratory mechanics indices [oxygen concentration(FiO2,mean airway pressure(Paw,static response(Cst,oxygenation index(PaO2/FiO2] before and after treatment were observed.Lung biopsy and clinical treatment data were also analyzed.Results Oxygenation was improved in 3 patients 6 to 8 hours after HFOV treatment,and marked improvement was observed after 24-48h.48-72h later,HFOV was replaced by CMV,and the patients weaned from mechanical ventilation successfully at 144h.In two patients symptoms were exacerbated after HFOV for 8 hours and the treatment was switched to CMV.Among them one died at 75h,and another one was treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation(ECMO and died at 145h.Conclusions HFOV can significantly improve the outcome of H1N1 flu patients with respiratory failure.The sequential treatment with HFOV followed by CMV can reduce complications and mortality.

  11. High frequency RNA recombination in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus occurs preferentially between parental sequences with high similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vugt, Joke .J.F.A.; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exist, a North American type and a European type. The co-existence of both types in some countries, such as Denmark, Slovakia and Canada, creates a risk of inter-type recombination. To evaluate this risk, cell cultures were co......, but no recombination was detected between the European and North American types. Calculation of the maximum theoretical risk of European-American recombination, based on the sensitivity of the RT-PCR system, revealed that RNA recombination between the European and North American types of PRRSV is at least 10000 times...

  12. Nasopharyngeal microbiota composition of children is related to the frequency of upper respiratory infection and acute sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Clark A; Nagalingam, Nabeetha A; Faruqi, Ali A; DeMuri, Gregory P; Gern, James E; Wald, Ellen R; Lynch, Susan V

    2016-07-01

    Upper respiratory infections (URI) and their complications are a major healthcare burden for pediatric populations. Although the microbiology of the nasopharynx is an important determinant of the complications of URI, little is known of the nasopharyngeal (NP) microbiota of children, the factors that affect its composition, and its precise relationship with URI. Healthy children (n = 47) aged 49-84 months from a prospective cohort study based in Wisconsin, USA, were examined. Demographic and clinical data and NP swab samples were obtained from participants upon entry to the study. All NP samples were profiled for bacterial microbiota using a phylogenetic microarray, and these data were related to demographic characteristics and upper respiratory health outcomes. The composition of the NP bacterial community of children was significantly related prior to the history of acute sinusitis (R (2) = 0.070, P microbiota diversity (P ≤ 0.05). These preliminary data suggest that previous history of acute sinusitis influences the composition of the NP microbiota, characterized by a depletion in relative abundance of specific taxa. Diminished diversity was associated with more frequent URIs.

  13. Interaction between Lung Mechanics and Gas Exchange by Low Volume High Frequency Pulmonary Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-21

    steady flow in a straight tube and experimental results, Levenspiel (25) has attriouted the observed differences to the effects of molecular diffusion...matter in turbulent flow through a pipe. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. (Biol.) A 223: 446, 1954. 25. Levenspiel , 0.: Longitudinal mixing in fluids flowing in

  14. Respiratory Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  15. High Power Compact Single-Frequency Volume Bragg Er-Doped Fiber Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is based on successful results of Phase I project where it was shown that the use of volume Bragg gratings in PTR glass as selectors of transverse and...

  16. Precipitation Frequency for Northern Mariana Islands, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  17. Precipitation Frequency for Northeastern states, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Northeastern states based on precipitation data collected between 1816-2014. This atlas...

  18. High Power Compact Single-Frequency Volume Bragg Er-Doped Fiber Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this NASA SBIR Phase I proposal is to develop the prototype of a compact single-frequency mode one longitudinal and one transverse mode laser...

  19. Precipitation Frequency for Guam, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the...

  20. Precipitation Frequency for Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands is based on precipitation data collected between...

  1. Precipitation Frequency for Republic of the Marshall Islands, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  2. Precipitation Frequency for Yap, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  3. Precipitation Frequency for American Samoa, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  4. Precipitation Frequency for Ulithi, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  5. Precipitation Frequency for Wake Island, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  6. Precipitation Frequency for Pohnpei, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  7. Precipitation Frequency for Woleai, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  8. Precipitation Frequency for Chuuk, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  9. Precipitation Frequency for Palau, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  10. Precipitation Frequency for Nukuoro, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  11. Precipitation Frequency for Semiarid Southwest, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Semiarid Southwest based on precipitation data collected between 1893-2000. This atlas is an...

  12. Precipitation Frequency for Pingelap, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  13. Precipitation Frequency for Kosrae, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  14. Precipitation Frequency for Ohio River Basin, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Ohio River Basin and Surrounding states is based on precipitation data collected between...

  15. Effect of closed endotracheal suction in high-frequency ventilated premature infants measured with electrical impedance tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veenendaal, M.B.; Miedema, M.; de Jongh, F.H.C.; van der Lee, J.H.; Frerichs, I.; van Kaam, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the global and regional changes in lung volume during and after closed endotracheal tube (ETT) suction in high-frequency ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Design: Prospective observational clinical study. Setting: Neonatal intensive care

  16. Myeloid dendritic cells frequencies are increased in children with autism spectrum disorder and associated with amygdala volume and repetitive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breece, Elizabeth; Paciotti, Brian; Nordahl, Christine Wu; Ozonoff, Sally; Van de Water, Judy A; Rogers, Sally J; Amaral, David; Ashwood, Paul

    2013-07-01

    The pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not yet known; however, studies suggest that dysfunction of the immune system affects many children with ASD. Increasing evidence points to dysfunction of the innate immune system including activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages, increases in inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in brain tissue and CSF, and abnormal peripheral monocyte cell function. Dendritic cells are major players in innate immunity and have important functions in the phagocytosis of pathogens or debris, antigen presentation, activation of naïve T cells, induction of tolerance and cytokine/chemokine production. In this study, we assessed circulating frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells (defined as Lin-1(-)BDCA1(+)CD11c(+) and Lin-1(-)BDCA3(+)CD123(-)) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (Lin-1(-)BDCA2(+)CD123(+) or Lin-1(-)BDCA4(+) CD11c(-)) in 57 children with ASD, and 29 typically developing controls of the same age, all of who were enrolled as part of the Autism Phenome Project (APP). The frequencies of dendritic cells and associations with behavioral assessment and MRI measurements of amygdala volume were compared in the same participants. The frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells were significantly increased in children with ASD compared to typically developing controls (pfrequencies of myeloid dendritic cells were positively associated with abnormal right and left amygdala enlargement, severity of gastrointestinal symptoms and increased repetitive behaviors. The frequencies of plasmacytoid dendritic cells were also associated with amygdala volumes as well as developmental regression in children with ASD. Dendritic cells play key roles in modulating immune responses and differences in frequencies or functions of these cells may result in immune dysfunction in children with ASD. These data further implicate innate immune cells in the complex pathophysiology of ASD.

  17. Rinovirus: Frecuencia en niños con infección respiratoria aguda, no internados Rhinoviruses: Frequency in nonhospitalized children with acute respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora N. Marcone

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Los métodos moleculares para diagnosticar rinovirus humanos (RVH han aumentado la sensibilidad de detección. Esto ha permitido documentar la asociación entre los RVH y las infecciones respiratorias agudas (IRA altas y bajas. La infección por RVH durante la infancia se asoció con posterior desarrollo de asma. Se estudió la frecuencia de RVH en 186 niños menores de 6 años ambulatorios con IRA (alta o baja, durante 2 años consecutivos (1/6/2008 - 31/5/2010. Se correlacionó la presencia de RVH con los antecedentes y características clínico-epidemiológicas. La detección de RVH se realizó con una RT-PCR en tiempo real que amplifica parte de la región 5' no codificante del genoma. Los virus respiratorios clásicos se estudiaron por inmunofluorescencia. En el 61% de los niños se detectó etiología viral. Las frecuencias fueron: RVH 27%, virus sincicial respiratorio (VSR 16%, influenza A y B 9%, parainfluenza 8%, metapneumovirus 7% y adenovirus 0.5%. Se observaron coinfecciones duales en 8 casos, siendo RVH el más frecuente (en 4 de ellos. Los RVH circularon durante todo el período estudiado, con picos en invierno y primavera. No se observaron diferencias clínico-epidemiológicas significativas entre pacientes con o sin RVH, excepto un mayor porcentaje de niños afebriles con RVH. Los RVH fueron los virus más detectados en niños ambulatorios, principalmente en menores de 2 años, los segundos virus asociados a bronquiolitis, luego del VSR, y detectados tres veces más en los niños expuestos a tabaquismo pasivo (OR: 2,91; p = 0.012 que en el resto. Fueron identificados como único agente en el 28% de las bronquiolitis.Molecular methods for human rhinoviruses (HRV have increased the sensitivity in their diagnosis. HRV may cause acute respiratory infections (ARI of the upper and lower respiratory tract. HRV infection during childhood is a predictor of asthma development. In this study, the HRV frequency in outpatient children with

  18. Respiratory System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    8.1 Respiratory failure2007204 Comparison of the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers and low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. WANG Xiaozhi(王晓芝),et al. Dept Respir & Intensive Care Unit, Binzhou Med Coll, Binzhou 256603. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(1):44-47. Objective To compare the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(LRM) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, randomized comparison of BiPAP mechanical ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(test group) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation (control group) was conducted in 28 patients with ARDS. FiO2/PaO2 ratio, respiratory system compliance(Cs), central venous pressure (CVP), duration of ventilation support were recorded at 0 h, 48 h and 72 h separately. The ventilation associated lung injury and mortality at 28 d were also recorded. Results The FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (298±16) and (309±16) cm H2O, Cs were (38.4±2.2) and (42.0±1.3) ml/cm H2O, CVP were (13.8±0.8) and (11.6±0.7) cm H2O in the test group at 48 h and 72 h separately. In the control group, FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (212±12) and (246±17) cm H2O, Cs were (29.5±1.3) and (29.0±1.0) ml/cm H2O, CVP were 18.6±1.1 and (16.8±1.0) cm H2O. The results were better in the test group as compared with the control group (t=10.03-29. 68, all P<0.01). The duration of ventilation support in the test group was shorter than the control group [(14±3) d vs (19±3)d, t=4.80, P<0.01]. The mortality in 28 d and ventilation associated lung injury were similar in the two groups. Conclusion The results show that combination of LRM with BiPAP mode ventilation, as compared with the control group, contributes to the improved FiO2/PaO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, stable homodynamic and shorter duration of ventilation support in patients with ARDs.

  19. Joint Coupling of Awake EEG Frequency Activity and MRI Gray Matter Volumes in the Psychosis Dimension: A BSNIP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Pauline; Narayanan, Balaji; Khadka, Sabin; Calhoun, Vince D; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Tamminga, Carol A; Sweeney, John A; Clementz, Brett A; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have examined either electroencephalogram (EEG) frequency activity or gray matter volumes (GMV) in various psychoses [including schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective (SZA), and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP)]. Prior work demonstrated similar EEG and gray matter abnormalities in both SZ and PBP. Integrating EEG and GMV and jointly analyzing the combined data fully elucidates the linkage between the two and may provide better biomarker- or endophenotype-specificity for a particular illness. Joint exploratory investigations of EEG and GMV are scarce in the literature and the relationship between the two in psychosis is even less explored. We investigated a joint multivariate model to test whether the linear relationship or linkage between awake EEG (AEEG) frequency activity and GMV is abnormal across the psychosis dimension and if such effects are also present in first-degree relatives. We assessed 607 subjects comprising 264 probands [105 SZ, 72 SZA, and 87 PBP], 233 of their first degree relatives [82 SZ relatives (SZR), 71 SZA relatives (SZAR), and 80 PBP relatives (PBPR)], and 110 healthy comparison subjects (HC). All subjects underwent structural MRI (sMRI) and EEG scans. Frequency activity and voxel-based morphometric GMV were derived from EEG and sMRI data, respectively. Seven AEEG frequency and gray matter components were extracted using Joint independent component analysis (jICA). The loading coefficients (LC) were examined for group differences using analysis of covariance. Further, the LCs were correlated with psychopathology scores to identify relationship with clinical symptoms. Joint ICA revealed a single component differentiating SZ from HC (p < 0.006), comprising increased posterior alpha activity associated with decreased volume in inferior parietal lobe, supramarginal, parahippocampal gyrus, middle frontal, inferior temporal gyri, and increased volume of uncus and culmen. No components were aberrant in either PBP or SZA or any

  20. Joint Coupling of Awake EEG Frequency Activity and MRI Gray Matter Volumes in the Psychosis Dimension; A BSNIP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline eSoh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have examined either electroencephalogram (EEG frequency activity or gray matter volumes (GMV in various psychoses (including schizophrenia, schizoaffective and psychotic bipolar disorder. Prior work demonstrated similar EEG and gray matter abnormalities in both schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder. Integrating EEG and GMV and jointly analyzing the combined data fully elucidates the linkage between the two and may provide better biomarker- or endophenotype-specificity for a particular illness. Joint exploratory investigations of EEG and GMV are scarce in the literature and the relationship between the two in psychosis is even less explored. We investigated a joint multivariate model to test whether the linear relationship or linkage between awake EEG (AEEG frequency activity and GMV is abnormal across the psychosis dimension and if such effects are also present in first-degree relatives.We assessed 607 subjects comprising 264 probands (105 schizophrenia (SZ, 72 schizoaffective (SZA and 87 psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP, 233 of their first degree relatives (82 SZ relatives (SZR, 71 SZA relatives (SZAR and 80 PBP relatives (PBPR and 110 healthy comparison subjects (HC. All subjects underwent structural MRI (sMRI and EEG scans. Frequency activity and voxel based morphometric GMV were derived from EEG and sMRI data respectively. Seven AEEG frequency and gray matter components were extracted using Joint independent component analysis (jICA. The loading coefficients (LC were examined for group differences using analysis of covariance. Further, the LCs were correlated with psychopathology scores to identify relationship with clinical symptoms. Joint ICA revealed a single component differentiating SZ from HC (p<0.006, comprising increased posterior alpha activity associated with decreased volume in inferior parietal lobe, supra-marginal, parahippocampal gyrus, middle frontal, inferior temporal gyri and increased volume of uncus and

  1. Dose-volume analysis for respiratory toxicity in intrathoracic esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Satoshi; Myojin, Miyako; Shimizu, Shinichi; Fujino, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Shirato, Hiroki; Ito, Yoichi M; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hosokawa, Masao

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the relationship between dosimetric parameters (DPs) and the incidence of radiation pneumonitis (RP) and investigated the feasibility of a proposed treatment planning technique with the potential of reducing RP in esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields. A total of 149 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer were prospectively enrolled for extended-field radiotherapy (EFRT) to three-field regional lymphatics between September 2004 and June 2009. We retrospectively reviewed 86 consecutive patients who were treated with a total dose of 50.4 Gy (plus an optional 9 Gy boost) and were available for dose-volume analysis. Lung DPs of patients in the Grade 0-1 RP (RPG≤1) group and the Grade 2-5 RP (RPG≥2) group were compared. We compared the proposed plan with the conventional plan to 50.4 Gy on DPs for each case. Of these 86 patients, 10 (12%) developed RPG≥2 (Grade 2, n = 2 patients; Grade 3, n = 3; Grade 4, n = 3; Grade 5, n = 2). The patients in the RPG≤1 group showed significantly lower (P RPG≥2 group. There were two advantages gained from the proposed plan for V5 (<55%) and V10 (< 37%) values and the conformity of the PTV. The increase in the volume of the lung exposed to low doses of EFRT was found to be associated with the incidence of RP. Our proposed plan is likely to reduce the incidence of RP.

  2. Sustained inflation and incremental mean airway pressure trial during conventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in a large porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunder Christian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the effect of a sustained inflation followed by an incremental mean airway pressure trial during conventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation on oxygenation and hemodynamics in a large porcine model of early acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Severe lung injury (Ali was induced in 18 healthy pigs (55.3 ± 3.9 kg, mean ± SD by repeated saline lung lavage until PaO2 decreased to less than 60 mmHg. After a stabilisation period of 60 minutes, the animals were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 (Pressure controlled ventilation; PCV: FIO2 = 1.0, PEEP = 5 cmH2O, VT = 6 ml/kg, respiratory rate = 30/min, I:E = 1:1; group 2 (High-frequency oscillatory ventilation; HFOV: FIO2 = 1.0, Bias flow = 30 l/min, Amplitude = 60 cmH2O, Frequency = 6 Hz, I:E = 1:1. A sustained inflation (SI; 50 cmH2O for 60s followed by an incremental mean airway pressure (mPaw trial (steps of 3 cmH2O every 15 minutes were performed in both groups until PaO2 no longer increased. This was regarded as full lung inflation. The mPaw was decreased by 3 cmH2O and the animals reached the end of the study protocol. Gas exchange and hemodynamic data were collected at each step. Results The SI led to a significant improvement of the PaO2/FiO2-Index (HFOV: 200 ± 100 vs. PCV: 58 ± 15 and TAli: 57 ± 12; p 2-reduction (HFOV: 42 ± 5 vs. PCV: 62 ± 13 and TAli: 55 ± 9; p Ali: 6.1 ± 1 vs. T75: 3.4 ± 0.4; PCV: TAli: 6.7 ± 2.4 vs. T75: 4 ± 0.5; p Conclusion A sustained inflation followed by an incremental mean airway pressure trial in HFOV improved oxygenation at a lower mPaw than during conventional lung protective ventilation. HFOV but not PCV resulted in normocapnia, suggesting that during HFOV there are alternatives to tidal ventilation to achieve CO2-elimination in an "open lung" approach.

  3. Ultra-high frequency, high Q/volume micromechanical resonators in a planar AlN phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi Baboly, M.; Alaie, S.; Reinke, C. M.; El-Kady, I.; Leseman, Z. C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the first design and experimental demonstration of an ultrahigh frequency complete phononic crystal (PnC) bandgap aluminum nitride (AlN)/air structure operating in the GHz range. A complete phononic bandgap of this design is used to efficiently and simultaneously confine elastic vibrations in a resonator. The PnC structure is fabricated by etching a square array of air holes in an AlN slab. The fabricated PnC resonator resonates at 1.117 GHz, which corresponds to an out-of-plane mode. The measured bandgap and resonance frequencies are in very good agreement with the eigen-frequency and frequency-domain finite element analyses. As a result, a quality factor/volume of 7.6 × 1017/m3 for the confined resonance mode was obtained that is the largest value reported for this type of PnC resonator to date. These results are an important step forward in achieving possible applications of PnCs for RF communication and signal processing with smaller dimensions.

  4. Nasal high flow oxygen therapy in patients with COPD reduces respiratory rate and tissue carbon dioxide while increasing tidal and end-expiratory lung volumes: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John F; Spooner, Amy J; Dunster, Kimble R; Anstey, Chris M; Corley, Amanda

    2016-08-01

    Patients with COPD using long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) over 15 h per day have improved outcomes. As inhalation of dry cold gas is detrimental to mucociliary clearance, humidified nasal high flow (NHF) oxygen may reduce frequency of exacerbations, while improving lung function and quality of life in this cohort. In this randomised crossover study, we assessed short-term physiological responses to NHF therapy in 30 males chronically treated with LTOT. LTOT (2-4 L/min) through nasal cannula was compared with NHF at 30 L/min from an AIRVO through an Optiflow nasal interface with entrained supplemental oxygen. Comparing NHF with LTOT: transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcCO2) (43.3 vs 46.7 mm Hg, ptranscutaneous oxygen (TcO2) (97.1 vs 101.2 mm Hg, p=0.01), I:E ratio (0.75 vs 0.86, p=0.02) and respiratory rate (RR) (15.4 vs 19.2 bpm, p<0.001) were lower; and tidal volume (Vt) (0.50 vs 0.40, p=0.003) and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) (174% vs 113%, p<0.001) were higher. EELV is expressed as relative change from baseline (%Δ). Subjective dyspnoea and interface comfort favoured LTOT. NHF decreased TcCO2, I:E ratio and RR, with a concurrent increase in EELV and Vt compared with LTOT. This demonstrates a potential mechanistic rationale behind the improved outcomes observed in long-term treatment with NHF in oxygen-dependent patients. ACTRN12613000028707. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Magnitude and Frequency of Rural Floods in the Southeastern United States, 2006: Volume 3, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Toby D.; Gotvald, Anthony J.; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2009-01-01

    A multistate approach was used to update methods for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods in rural, ungaged basins in South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina that are not substantially affected by regulation, tidal fluctuations, or urban development. Annual peak-flow data through September 2006 were analyzed for 943 streamgaging stations having 10 or more years of data on rural streams in South Carolina, Georgia, North Carolina, and adjacent parts of Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia. Flood-frequency estimates were computed for the 943 stations by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows for each station to a Pearson Type III distribution. As part of the computation of flood-frequency estimates for the stations, a new value for the generalized skew coefficient was developed using a Bayesian generalized least-squares regression model. Additionally, basin characteristics for these stations were computed by using a geographical information system and automated computer algorithms. Exploratory regression analyses using ordinary least-squares regression completed on the initial database of 943 gaged stations resulted in defining five hydrologic regions for South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina. Stations with drainage areas less than 1 square mile were removed from the database, and a procedure to examine for basin redundancy (based on drainage area and periods of record) also resulted in the removal of some stations from the regression database. Regional regression analysis, using generalized least-squares regression, was used to develop a set of predictive equations for estimating the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent chance exceedance flows for rural ungaged basins in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Flood-frequency estimates and basin characteristics for 828 streamgaging stations were combined to form the final database used in the regional regression analysis. The final predictive equations are all

  6. Price duration versus trading volume in high-frequency data for selected DAX companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Mitterer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the time series of durations between consecutive trades of a particular stock have been studied by many contributors in the literature of financial econometrics. Among them are highly prominent scientists like Engle (2000 and Gourieroux and Jasiak (2001. The importance of this topic, accompanied by the growing availability of (ultra-high-frequency data, has prompted an increase of contributions in recent years. Intensive research based on high-frequency data has several financial motivations. First of all, it is linked with microstructure theory. Secondly, it contributes to the literature on stochastic time deformation. But the most important need for research on the dynamics of trade durations is the necessity to manage liquidity risk. The reason is that durations between the following trades are a widely accepted measures of market liquidity. In addition, their volatility reflects the liquidity risk.

  7. Magnitude and Frequency of Rural Floods in the Southeastern United States, 2006: Volume 1, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Feaster, Toby D.; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2009-01-01

    A multistate approach was used to update methods for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods in rural, ungaged basins in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina that are not substantially affected by regulation, tidal fluctuations, or urban development. Annual peak-flow data through September 2006 were analyzed for 943 streamgaging stations having 10 or more years of data on rural streams in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and adjacent parts of Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia. Flood-frequency estimates were computed for the 943 stations by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows for each station to a Pearson Type III distribution. As part of the computation of flood-frequency estimates for these streamgaging stations, a new value for the generalized-skew coefficient was developed by using a Bayesian generalized least-squares regression model. Additionally, basin characteristics for the streamgaging stations were computed by using a geographical information system and automated computer algorithms. Regional regression analysis, using generalized least-squares regression, was used to develop a set of predictive equations for estimating the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent chance exceedance flows for rural ungaged basins in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Flood-frequency estimates and basin characteristics for 828 stream-gaging stations were combined to form the final database used in the regional regression analysis. Five hydrologic regions were developed for Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The final predictive equations are all functions of drainage area and percentage of the drainage basin within each hydrologic region. Average standard errors of prediction for these regression equations range from 34.5 to 47.7 percent.

  8. 基于四维CT的肺体积及呼吸运动分析%Four-dimensional CT in the study of lung volume and respiratory movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宗文; 黄晓延; 包勇; 张黎; 黄劭敏; 樊卫; 陈明; 邓小武

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the respiratory movement of the both lungs with four-dimensional CT(4DCT), and determine the optimal respiratory phase series CT images for radiation dose calculation. Methods From November 2005 to November 2006,thirty patients with lung cancer who received 4DCT scan were enrolled,including 15 left and 15 right lung cancer cases,25 men and 5 women. The media age was 55 (35-78) years old. After 4DCT scanning, the image was treated with Advantage 4D workstation,and then transmitted into Pinnacle station( Adac 7.4). The both lungs were automatically outlined using Pinnacle station with CT recognition value of-900 to-200 Hu. Then-the same physician examined the unreasonable parts and revised them. After the delineation was completed,the volume of 10 respiratory phases of lung was obtained. Results The average respiratory phase in inspiratory and expiratory phases was 78.87%±2.71% and 26.32%±3.17% in the tumor located lung,77.55%±2.81% and 24.73%±2.55% in the healthy lung. The maximum and minimum mean volume was 106.48%±3.00% and 94.23%±2.78% in the tumor located lung,107.47%±2.43% and 93.65%±2.32% in the healthy lung. The volume at the end of inspiratory and expiratory was 106.43%±3.07% and 94.63%±2.71% in the tumor located lung, 107.37%±4.62% and 93.98%±2.34% in the healthy lung. Conclusions The series CT images scan on 20% ,30% and 80% respiratory phases are reasonable for radiation dose calculation. The maximum and minimum average lung volumes are almost equal to those at the end of inspiratory and expiratory.%目的 应用四维CT(4DCT)评价肺癌患者肺的运动,并初步选择适合进行剂量计算的呼吸时相.方法 选择30例在中山大学肿瘤医院接受4DCT扫描的肺癌患者,左、右肺患者均为15例;男25例、女5例;中位年龄55岁(35~78岁).CT扫描完成后所得到的影像资料经4D软件处理后传至Pinnacle工作站,应用该软件自动勾画功能勾画双侧肺轮廓,自动怪勾画

  9. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis , ...

  10. Respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy planning of lower oesophageal carcinoma: feasibility and impact on planning target volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew; Ward, Gillian; Murray, Patrick; Goody, Rebecca; Marshall, Karen; McDermott, Garry; Prestwich, Robin; Radhakrishna, Ganesh

    2017-10-04

    To assess the feasibility and potential impact on target delineation of respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced (18)Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT), in the treatment planning position, for a prospective cohort of patients with lower third oesophageal cancer. Fifteen patients were recruited into the study. Imaging included 4D PET-CT, 3D PET-CT, endoscopic ultrasound and planning 4D CT. Target volume delineation was performed on 4D CT, 4D CT with co-registered 3D PET and 4D PET-CT. Planning target volumes (PTV) generated with 4D CT (PTV4DCT), 4D CT co-registered with 3D PET-CT (PTV3DPET4DCT) and 4D PET-CT (PTV4DPETCT) were compared with multiple positional metrics. Mean PTV4DCT, PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT were 582.4 ± 275.1 cm(3), 472.5 ± 193.1 cm(3) and 480.6 ± 236.9 cm(3) respectively (no significant difference). Median DICE similarity coefficients comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.85 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.85 (range 0.69-0.9) and 0.88 (range 0.79-0.9) respectively. The median sensitivity index for overlap comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.78 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.79 (range 0.65-0.9) and 0.89 (range 0.68-0.94) respectively. Planning 4D PET-CT is feasible with careful patient selection. PTV generated using 4D CT, 3D PET-CT and 4D PET-CT were of similar volume, however, overlap analysis demonstrated that approximately 20% of PTV3DPETCT and PTV4DPETCT are not included in PTV4DCT, leading to under-coverage of target volume and a potential geometric miss. Additionally, differences between PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT suggest a potential benefit for 4D PET-CT. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier - NCT02285660 (Registered 21/10/2014).

  11. Combined measurement of fetal lung volume and pulmonary artery resistance index is more accurate for prediction of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm fetuses: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Mohamed; Mansour, Ghada; El-Kotb, Ahmed; Hassanin, Alaa; Laban, Zina; Saleh, Abdelrahman

    2017-10-02

    To estimate optimal cut-off values for mean fetal lung volume (FLV) and pulmonary artery resistance index (PA-RI) as noninvasive measures to predict neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm fetuses. A prospective study conducted at Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital, Egypt from May 2015 to July 2017: eighty eligible women diagnosed with preterm labor were recruited at 32-36 weeks' gestation. Before delivery, three-dimensional ultrasound was used to estimate FLV using virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL), while PA-RI was measured by Doppler ultrasonography. A total of 80 women were examined. 37 (46%) of the newborns developed neonatal RDS. FLV was significantly lower in neonates who developed RDS (p = 0.04), whereas PARI was significantly higher in those who didn't (p = 0.02). Cut-off values of FLV ≤ 27.2 cm(3) and PARI ≥ 0.77 predicted the subsequent development of RDS. Combining both cut-offs generated a more sensitive and specific methodical approach for the prediction of RDS (sensitivity 100%, specificity 88.5%). Measurement of FLV or PA-RI can predict RDS in preterm fetuses. Combined use of both measures bolstered their predictive significance.

  12. Comparison of pyrosequencing, Sanger sequencing, and melting curve analysis for detection of low-frequency macrolide-resistant mycoplasma pneumoniae quasispecies in respiratory specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwok-Hung; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Betsy W K; Li, Clara P Y; Chiu, Susan S; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Ho, Pak-Leung

    2013-08-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is emerging worldwide and has been associated with treatment failure. In this study, we used pyrosequencing to detect low-frequency MRMP quasispecies in respiratory specimens, and we compared the findings with those obtained by Sanger sequencing and SimpleProbe PCR coupled with a melting curve analysis (SimpleProbe PCR). Sanger sequencing, SimpleProbe PCR, and pyrosequencing were successfully performed for 96.7% (88/91), 96.7% (88/91), and 93.4% (85/91) of the M. pneumoniae-positive specimens, respectively. The A-to-G transition at position 2063 was the only mutation identified. Pyrosequencing identified A2063G MRMP quasispecies populations in 78.8% (67/88) of the specimens. Only 38.8% (26/67) of these specimens with the A2063G quasispecies detected by pyrosequencing were found to be A2063G quasispecies by Sanger sequencing or SimpleProbe PCR. The specimens that could be detected by SimpleProbe PCR and Sanger sequencing had higher frequencies of MRMP quasispecies (51% to 100%) than those that could not be detected by those two methods (1% to 44%). SimpleProbe PCR correctly categorized all specimens that were identified as wild type or mutant by Sanger sequencing. The clinical characteristics of the patients were not significantly different when they were grouped by the presence or absence of MRMP quasispecies, while patients with MRMP identified by Sanger sequencing more often required a switch from macrolides to an alternative M. pneumoniae-targeted therapy. The clinical significance of mutant quasispecies should be investigated further with larger patient populations and with specimens obtained before and after macrolide therapy.

  13. Pulmonary hyperinflation and respiratory distress following solvent aspiration in a patient with asthma: expectoration of bronchial casts and clinical improvement with high-frequency chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshihiko; Kawazu, Taketoshi; Iwashita, Kazuo; Yahata, Ritsuko

    2004-11-01

    An 18-year-old student with a history of asthma accidentally inhaled organic solvent during a class, with immediate cough and dyspnea that worsened over several hours. He presented in severe respiratory distress, with hypoxemia and marked pulmonary hyperinflation. Administration of inhaled bronchodilator was ineffective because of agitation, and the patient could not be positioned for chest physiotherapy to treat presumed widespread mucus plugging. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in the sitting position initially caused increased distress but was subsequently tolerated when noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) via nasal mask was initiated. Almost immediately, the patient began expectorating bronchial mucus casts, with concomitant clinical improvement. Endotracheal intubation was avoided, and with aggressive pharmacologic treatment for acute severe asthma and continuation of intermittent HFCWO-NPPV, the patient made a full recovery over the next several days. This case suggests that the combination of HFCWO and NPPV may be helpful in the presence of mucus plugging as a complication of acute inhalation injury or acute severe asthma.

  14. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, Ali, E-mail: ali.gholipour@childrens.harvard.edu; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Department of Radiology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aganj, Iman [Radiology Department, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sahin, Mustafa [Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  15. Clinical efficacy and safety of recruitment maneuver in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome using low tidal volume ventilation: a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Xiu-ming; JIANG Li; ZHU Bo; the RM group

    2010-01-01

    Background The recruitment maneuver (RM) has been shown to improve oxygenation in some patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. But there is a lack of standardization and lack of clinical studies to prove the improvement on clinical outcome. We conducted this study to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of the RM in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) using Iow tidal volume ventilation.Methods We randomly assigned 110 patients with ARDS from 14 Chinese intensive care units (ICUs) at the tertiary teaching hospitals. Patients with PaO2 ≤200 mmHg at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP ≥10 cmH2O were included in the study.Patients were randomized into two groups: control group and RM group. The tidal volume was set to 6-8 mi per kilogram of predicted body weight (PBW) in both groups. RM was performed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) of 40 cmH2O maintained for 40 seconds. RMs was conducted every eight hours for the first five days, or stopped within five days if the patient reached the weaning standard.Results One hundred and ten patients had completed the requirements for the primary study goals, 55 from the RM group and 55 control patients. Baseline characteristics remained similar in the two groups. In the RM group the PaO2/FiO2 was significantly increased compared to baseline at 120 minutes after RM on day one and day two (P=0.007and P=0.001). There were no significant differences between the RM and control group in hospital mortality (41.8% vs.56.4%, P=0.13), 28-day mortality (29.1% vs. 43.6%, P=0.11) and ventilator-free days at day 28 (10.8±10.1 vs. 7.4±10.0,P=0.08). ICU mortality (32.7% vs. 52.7%, P=0.03), the rate of survival with unassisted breathing for at least 48 consecutive hours at day 28 (58.2% vs. 36.2%, P=0.02), and nonpulmonary organ failure-free days at day 28 (17.4±11.1vs. 13.0±12.0, P=0.03) favored the RM group. There was no significant difference in mean blood pressure and heart rate before RM and at 30, 60

  16. An oversampling technique for the multiscale finite volume method to simulate electromagnetic responses in the frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Mata, Luz Angelica Caudillo; Schwarzbach, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the computational cost of the simulation of electromagnetic responses in geophysical settings that involve highly heterogeneous media, we develop a multiscale finite volume method with oversampling for the quasi-static Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain. We assume a coarse mesh nested within a fine mesh that accurately discretizes the problem. For each coarse cell, we independently solve a local version of the original Maxwell's system subject to linear boundary conditions on an extended domain, which includes the coarse cell and a neighborhood of fine cells around it. The local Maxwell's system is solved using the fine mesh contained in the extended domain and the mimetic finite volume method. Next, these local solutions (basis functions) together with a weak-continuity condition are used to construct a coarse-mesh version of the global problem. The basis functions can be used to obtain the fine-mesh details from the solution of the coarse-mesh problem. Our approach leads to a sig...

  17. [Frequency dependance of compliance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayrard, P

    1975-01-01

    Resistance of peripheral or "small" airways is only a small part of the total pulmonary resistance (Raw). Even considerable obstruction in these airways will have little effect on total resistance. Conversely this will lead to inequality in the time constants of units in parallel, and dynamic lung compliance (C dyn) shall fall as respiratory frequence increases. C dyn is measured from simultaneous recordings of transpulmonary pressure (esophageal balloon) and volume obtained from a volume displacement plethysmograph. If Raw and static compliance are found to be normal, the frequency dependance of compliance will result from peripheral airway obstruction only. Early stages of chronic airway obstruction can be established by this method. However this appear not suitable for wide-scale studies.

  18. Respiratory symptoms and lung function among Danish woodworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünssen, Vivi; Schaumburg, Inger; Taudorf, Ebbe; Mikkelsen, Anders B; Sigsgaard, Torben

    2002-01-01

    A cross-sectional study including 54 furniture factories and three control factories was conducted to survey lung function and prevalence of respiratory symptoms among woodworkers. Spirometry was performed on 2423 persons. Questionnaires regarding respiratory symptoms and wood dust exposure were completed by 2033 woodworkers and 474 controls. Personal passive dust measurements were performed on 1579 persons. The arithmetic mean +/- SD for equivalent inhalable dust was relatively low (1.19 +/- 0.86 mg/m3). Woodworkers had increased frequency of coughing with negative interaction between dust exposure and smoking. A dose-response relationship was seen between dust exposure and asthma symptoms, and a positive interaction for asthma was seen between female gender and dust exposure. Increased frequency of wheezing and a cross-shift decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second among workers using pinewood was seen. In conclusion, wood dust exposure might cause respiratory symptoms, despite a relatively low exposure level.

  19. Respiratory function in handicapped children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, C; Fujita, M; Umemoto, H; Taneda, M; Sanae, N; Tazaki, T

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate respiratory function of severely handicapped children. Tidal volumes and respiratory rates were determined in a total of 130 children with different clinical motor abilities. Tidal volume of non-sitters (n = 39) was significantly lower than ambulators (n = 49) or sitters (n = 42) (p less than 0.01). There was no difference in respiratory rate among the three groups. Among 45 children whose vital capacity could be determined, the tidal volumes showed a significant correlation with vital capacity (r = 0.56, p less than 0.001). Among four children whose tidal volume was less than 200 ml and respiratory rate was more than 30 cpm, blood gas analysis revealed hypoxia in three of them. The tidal volumes, therefore, would be a useful guide to estimate respiratory functions. It was concluded that the respiratory function in a non-sitter with reduced tidal volume is impaired, and that preventive measures must be taken against respiratory infection.

  20. Effects of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Oscillated Volume during High-Frequency Chest Compression in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Peter C Zuberbuhler; Tabk, Joan I; Jones, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and mean oscillated volume (Vosc) during high frequency chest compression (HFCC).DESIGN: A clinic-based prospective intervention study.SETTING: Pulmonary function laboratory, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.POPULATION: Nine children with cystic fibrosis with little or no obstructive airway disease who were selected from the outpatient Cystic Fibrosis and Pediatric Pul...

  1. [Respiratory function tests during artificial ventilation. Application in the choice of apparatus settings (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L; Robert, D; Perrin, F

    1978-03-04

    Twenty seven patients on artificial ventilation were studied in terms of gas exchange, respiratory mechanics and haemodynamics. The characteristics of acute respiratory failure (dead space effect, shunt effect, disturbances in respiratory mechanics) may be identified and their severity determined. The effects of adjusting artificial ventilation settings (tidal volume, frequency, inspiration/expiration ratio, inspiratory flow, end expiratory pressure, inspired oxygen fraction) may be studied and better adapted to the individual functional requirements of each patient. An organigram of settings based upon the experience gained in this series is suggested.

  2. Correlation of serum myoglobin levels with high respiratory frequency%血清肌红蛋白水平与高频率呼吸状态的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋蕾; 罗晓菡; 卢英民

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析较高呼吸频率与血肌红蛋白水平的变化规律及临床意义.方法 比较气急患者(380例)不同呼吸频率状态下的血肌红蛋白浓度,即分别比较呼吸频率≥30 次/min 与呼吸频率0.05);呼吸频率≥30次/min的患者:呼吸困难持续时间0.05). In the patient with respiratory frequency more than 30 time per minute, the levels of serum myoglobin increased significantly in the patients with dyspnea persisted more than 24 hour than those less than 24 hour (P<0.01). After treatment, the levels of serum myoglobin in patient with respiratory frequency more than 30 time per minute were significantly decreased, compared with before treatment. Conclusion Higher frequency of respiratory is one of the factors that lead to the increase of serum myoglobin. The detection of serum myoglobin is helpful to the evaluation of the therapeutic effect.

  3. The Effect of Volume Fraction of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Natural Frequencies of Polymer Composite Cone-Shaped Shell Made from Poly(Methyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Meysami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of volume fraction of single-walled carbon nanotubes on natural frequencies of polymer composite cone-shaped shells made from Poly(Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA is studied. In order to determine the characterization of materials reinforced with nanoparticles, the molecular dynamics and mixture rule has been used. The motion equations of composite shell based on the classical thin shells theory using Hamilton’s principle are obtained. Then, using the Ritz method, approximate analytical solution of the natural frequency is presented. Results indicate that the nanotubes have a noticeable effect on the natural frequencies.

  4. Data from frequency-volume charts versus symptom scores and quality of life score in men with lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Venrooij, GEPM; Eckhardt, MD; Gisolf, KWH; Boon, TA

    Objective: The aim is to study the relations between reported data on frequency-volume charts and the American Urological Association (AUA) symptom scores and quality of life score. Methods: Males with lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), were consecutively

  5. Analysis and reliability of data from 24-hour frequency-volume charts in men with lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisolf, KWH; van Venrooij, GEPM; Eckhardt, MD; Boon, TA

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to analyse the data from frequency-volume charts and to study the reliability of these charts in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), Methods: Males with LUTS due to BPH were consecutively included in the

  6. Glottal volume velocity waveform characteristics in subjects with and without vocal training, related to gender, sound intensity, fundamental frequency, and age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, AM; Wit, HP

    1996-01-01

    Glottal volume velocity waveform characteristics of 224 subjects, categorized in four groups according to gender and vocal training, were determined, and their relations to sound-pressure level, fundamental frequency, intra-oral pressure, and age were analyzed. Subjects phonated at three intensity

  7. Analysis and reliability of data from 24-hour frequency-volume charts in men with lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisolf, KWH; van Venrooij, GEPM; Eckhardt, MD; Boon, TA

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to analyse the data from frequency-volume charts and to study the reliability of these charts in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), Methods: Males with LUTS due to BPH were consecutively included in the stud

  8. Improved oxygenation 24 hours after transition to airway pressure release ventilation or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation accurately discriminates survival in immunocompromised pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Nadir; Topjian, Alexis A; Thomas, Neal J; Friess, Stuart H

    2014-05-01

    Children with an immunocompromised condition and requiring invasive mechanical ventilation have high risk of death. Such patients are commonly transitioned to rescue modes of nonconventional ventilation, including airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, for acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation. Our aim was to describe our experience with airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation and to identify factors associated with survival. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care, university-affiliated PICU. Sixty pediatric patients with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation transitioned to either airway pressure release ventilation or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. None. Demographic data, ventilator settings, arterial blood gases, oxygenation index, and PaO(2)/FIO(2) were recorded before transition to either mode of nonconventional ventilation and at predetermined intervals after transition for up to 5 days. Mortality in the entire cohort was 63% and did not differ between patients transitioned to airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. For both airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, improvements in oxygenation index and PaO(2)/FIO(2) at 24 hours expressed as a fraction of pretransition values (oxygenation index(24)/oxygenation index(pre) and PaO(2)/FIO(224)/PaO(2)/FIO(2pre)) reliably discriminated nonsurvivors from survivors, with receiver operating characteristic areas under the curves between 0.89 and 0.95 (p for all curves high-frequency oscillatory ventilation were less than 5% reduction in oxygenation index (100% sensitive, 83% specific) or less than 80% increase in PaO(2

  9. Effects of various extremely low frequency magnetic fields on the free radical processes, natural antioxidant system and respiratory burst system activities in the heart and liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canseven, Ayse Gulnihal; Coskun, Sule; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic fields (MFs) can affect biological systems by increasing the release of free radicals that are able to alter cell defense systems and breakdown tissue homeostasis. In the present study, the effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) were investigated on free radical levels, natural antioxidant systems and respiratory burst system activities in heart and liver tissues of guinea pigs exposed to 50 Hz MFs of 1, 2 and 3 mT for 4 h/day and 8 h/day for 5 days by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), glutathione (GSH) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. A total of sixty-two male guinea pigs, 10-12 weeks old were studied in seven groups as control and exposure groups: Group I (control), II (1 mT, 4 h/day), III (1 mT, 8 h/day), IV (2 mT, 4 h/day), V (2 mT, 8 h/day), VI (3 mT, 4 h/day), and VII (3 mT, 8 h/day). Controls were kept under the same conditions without any exposure to MF. MDA levels increased in liver in groups II and IV, but decreased in group VII for both liver and heart tissues. NOx levels declined in heart in groups II and III and in liver in groups III, V, and VI, but increased in liver in group VII. GSH levels increased in heart in groups II, IV, V, and in liver in groups V and VI and VI, but decreased in groups II and IV in liver. MPO activity decreased in liver in groups III, IV, VI and VII with respect to controls and in heart tissues in groups II, III and IV; however, there was a significant increase MPO activity in heart in group VII. From the results, it can be concluded that the intensity and exposure duration of MFs are among the effective conditions on the formation of free radicals and behaviour of antioxidant enzymes.

  10. Assessing and accounting for the impact of respiratory motion on FDG uptake and viable volume for liver lesions in free-breathing PET using respiration-suspended PET images as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Burger, Irene A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ridge, Carole A.; Solomon, Stephen B. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess and account for the impact of respiratory motion on the variability of activity and volume determination of liver tumor in positron emission tomography (PET) through a comparison between free-breathing (FB) and respiration-suspended (RS) PET images. Methods: As part of a PET/computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous liver ablation procedure performed on a PET/CT scanner, a patient's breathing is suspended on a ventilator, allowing the acquisition of a near-motionless PET and CT reference images of the liver. In this study, baseline RS and FB PET/CT images of 20 patients undergoing thermal ablation were acquired. The RS PET provides near-motionless reference in a human study, and thereby allows a quantitative evaluation of the effect of respiratory motion on PET images obtained under FB conditions. Two methods were applied to calculate tumor activity and volume: (1) threshold-based segmentation (TBS), estimating the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the segmented volume and (2) histogram-based estimation (HBE), yielding the background-subtracted lesion (BSL) activity and associated volume. The TBS method employs 50% of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the threshold for tumors with SUV{sub max} ≥ 2× SUV{sub liver-bkg}, and tumor activity above this threshold yields TLG{sub 50%}. The HBE method determines local PET background based on a Gaussian fit of the low SUV peak in a SUV-volume histogram, which is generated within a user-defined and optimized volume of interest containing both local background and lesion uptakes. Voxels with PET intensity above the fitted background were considered to have originated from the tumor and used to calculate the BSL activity and its associated lesion volume. Results: Respiratory motion caused SUV{sub max} to decrease from RS to FB by −15% ± 11% (p = 0.01). Using TBS method, there was also a decrease in SUV{sub mean} (−18% ± 9%, p = 0.01), but an increase in TLG{sub 50%} (18

  11. Respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, G T; Vaziri, N D; Sassoon, C S

    2001-04-01

    Respiratory alkalosis is an extremely common and complicated problem affecting virtually every organ system in the body. This article reviews the various facets of this interesting problem. Respiratory alkalosis produces multiple metabolic abnormalities, from changes in potassium, phosphate, and calcium, to the development of a mild lactic acidosis. Renal handling of the above ions is also affected. The etiologies may be related to pulmonary or extrapulmonary disorders. Hyperventilation syndrome is a common etiology of respiratory alkalosis in the emergency department setting and is a diagnosis by exclusion. There are many cardiac effects of respiratory alkalosis, such as tachycardia, ventricular and atrial arrhythmias, and ischemic and nonischemic chest pain. In the lungs, vasodilation occurs, and in the gastrointestinal system there are changes in perfusion, motility, and electrolyte handling. Therapeutically, respiratory alkalosis is used for treatment of elevated intracranial pressure. Correction of a respiratory alkalosis is best performed by correcting the underlying etiology.

  12. High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillatory (HFO ventilation using low tidal volume and peak airway pressures is extremely efficient at eliminating carbon dioxide and raising pH in the newborn infant with acute respiratory failure. Improvement in oxygenation requires a strategy of sustained or repetitive inflations to 25 to 30 cm H2O in order to place the lung on the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve. This strategy has also been shown to decrease the amount of secondary lung injury in animal models. Experience of the use of HFO ventilation as a rescue therapy as well as several published controlled trials have shown improved outcomes and a decrease in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when it has been used in newborns.

  13. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    10.1 Respiratory failure2003068 Evaluation of non-invasive ventilation in a-cute respiratory failure with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. GU Jianyong(顾俭勇), et al. Dept E-mergen, Zhongshan Hosp, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Shanghai J Med 2002; 25 (12): 741 - 743.Objective:To observe the effect of non-invasive venti-lation(NIV) in acute respiratory failure with chronic

  14. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  15. Slice-to-volume registration and its potential application to interventional MRI-guided radio-frequency thermal ablation of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Boll, Daniel T; Lewin, Jonathan S; Wilson, David L

    2003-04-01

    In this study, we registered live-time interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) slices with a previously obtained high-resolution MRI volume that in turn can be registered with a variety of functional images, e.g., PET, SPECT, for tumor targeting. We created and evaluated a slice-to-volume (SV) registration algorithm with special features for its potential use in iMRI-guided radio-frequency (RF) thermal ablation of prostate cancer. The algorithm features included a multiresolution approach, two similarity measures, and automatic restarting to avoid local minima. Imaging experiments were performed on volunteers using a conventional 1.5-T MR scanner and a clinical 0.2-T C-arm iMRI system under realistic conditions. Both high-resolution MR volumes and actual iMRI image slices were acquired from the same volunteers. Actual and simulated iMRI images were used to test the dependence of SV registration on image noise, receive coil inhomogeneity, and RF needle artifacts. To quantitatively assess registration, we calculated the mean voxel displacement over a volume of interest between SV registration and volume-to-volume registration, which was previously shown to be quite accurate. More than 800 registration experiments were performed. For transverse image slices covering the prostate, the SV registration algorithm was 100% successful with an error of bladder filling. These preliminary experiments indicate that MR SV registration is sufficiently accurate to aid image-guided therapy.

  16. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  17. [Recommendations for respiratory support in the newborn (IV). High frequency ventilation, ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Salinas, Félix; Elorza Fernández, Dolores; Gutiérrez Laso, Antonio; Moreno Hernando, Julio; Bustos Lozano, Gerardo; Gresa Muñoz, Manuel; Miracle Echegoyen, Xavier

    2017-05-29

    The recommendations included in this document will be part a series of updated reviews of the literature on respiratory support in the newborn infant. These recommendations are structured into 12 modules, and in this work module 8 is presented. Each module is the result of a consensus process amongst all members of the Surfactant and Respiratory Group of the Spanish Society of Neonatology. They represent a summary of the published papers on each specific topic, as well as the clinical experience of each one of the members of the group. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of respiratory motion in the delineation of treatment volumes using CT images; Influencia del movimiento respiratorio en la delimiacion de volumenes de tratamiento mediante imagenes TC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Romero, R.; Castro Tejero, P.

    2011-07-01

    The radiation treatments are based on geometric information and density of the CT images obtained for each patient. As a result of the motion blur produced in the imaging studies, the sizes, shapes and densities of the structures can be altered. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of these variations caused by respiratory motion in the CT study according to the conditions of image acquisition.

  19. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic function on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, Dwain L; Cooke, William H; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Buckey, Jay C; Pawelczyk, James A; Ertl, Andrew C; Cox, James F; Kuusela, Tom A; Tahvanainen, Kari U O; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Levine, Benjamin D; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Robertson, David; Blomqvist, C Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    We studied healthy supine astronauts on Earth with electrocardiogram, non-invasive arterial pressure, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations, breathing depth and sympathetic nerve recordings. The null hypotheses were that heart beat interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are baroreflex mediated, that they persist during apnoea, and that autonomic responses to apnoea result from changes of chemoreceptor, baroreceptor or lung stretch receptor inputs. R-R interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are unlikely to be baroreflex mediated, and disappear during apnoea. The subjects' responses to apnoea could not be attributed to changes of central chemoreceptor activity (hypocapnia prevailed); altered arterial baroreceptor input (vagal baroreflex gain declined and muscle sympathetic nerve burst areas, frequencies and probabilities increased, even as arterial pressure climbed to new levels); or altered pulmonary stretch receptor activity (major breathing frequency and tidal volume changes did not alter vagal tone or sympathetic activity). Apnoea responses of healthy subjects may result from changes of central respiratory motoneurone activity. We studied eight healthy, supine astronauts on Earth, who followed a simple protocol: they breathed at fixed or random frequencies, hyperventilated and then stopped breathing, as a means to modulate and expose to view important, but obscure central neurophysiological mechanisms. Our recordings included the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal volume, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. Arterial pressure, vagal tone and muscle sympathetic outflow were comparable during spontaneous and controlled-frequency breathing. Compared with spontaneous, 0.1 and 0.05 Hz breathing, however, breathing at usual frequencies (∼0.25 Hz) lowered arterial baroreflex gain, and provoked smaller arterial pressure and R-R interval

  20. Changes in Hippocampal Volume are Correlated with Cell Loss but Not with Seizure Frequency in Two Chronic Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Roberson S; Malheiros, Jackeline M; Dos Santos, Renan; Hamani, Clement; Longo, Beatriz M; Tannús, Alberto; Mello, Luiz E; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) or pilocarpine (PILO) have been used in rats to model human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) but the distribution and severity of structural lesions between these two models may differ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have used quantitative measurements of hippocampal T2 (T2HP) relaxation time and volume, but simultaneous comparative results have not been reported yet. The aim of this study was to compare the MRI T2HP and volume with histological data and frequency of seizures in both models. KA- and PILO-treated rats were imaged with a 2 T MRI scanner. T2HP and volume values were correlated with the number of cells, mossy fiber sprouting, and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) frequency over the 9 months following status epilepticus (SE). Compared to controls, KA-treated rats had unaltered T2HP, pronounced reduction in hippocampal volume and concomitant cell reduction in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3 at 3 months post SE. In contrast, hippocampal volume was unchanged in PILO-treated animals despite detectable increased T2HP and cell loss in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3. In the following 6 months, MRI hippocampal volume remained stable with increase of T2HP signal in the KA-treated group. The number of CA1 and CA3 cells was smaller than age-matched CTL group. In contrast, PILO group had MRI volumetric reduction accompanied by reduction in the number of CA1 and CA3 cells. In this group, T2HP signal was unaltered at 6 or 9 months after status. Reductions in the number of cells were not progressive in both models. Notably, the SRS frequency was higher in PILO than in the KA model. The volumetry data correlated well with tissue damage in the epileptic brain, suggesting that MRI may be useful for tracking longitudinal hippocampal changes, allowing the assessment of individual variability and disease progression. Our results indicate that the temporal changes in hippocampal morphology are distinct for both models of TLE and that

  1. Changes in Hippocampal Volume are Correlated with Cell Loss but Not with Seizure Frequency in Two Chronic Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Roberson S.; Malheiros, Jackeline M.; dos Santos, Renan; Hamani, Clement; Longo, Beatriz M.; Tannús, Alberto; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) or pilocarpine (PILO) have been used in rats to model human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) but the distribution and severity of structural lesions between these two models may differ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have used quantitative measurements of hippocampal T2 (T2HP) relaxation time and volume, but simultaneous comparative results have not been reported yet. The aim of this study was to compare the MRI T2HP and volume with histological data and frequency of seizures in both models. KA- and PILO-treated rats were imaged with a 2 T MRI scanner. T2HP and volume values were correlated with the number of cells, mossy fiber sprouting, and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) frequency over the 9 months following status epilepticus (SE). Compared to controls, KA-treated rats had unaltered T2HP, pronounced reduction in hippocampal volume and concomitant cell reduction in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3 at 3 months post SE. In contrast, hippocampal volume was unchanged in PILO-treated animals despite detectable increased T2HP and cell loss in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3. In the following 6 months, MRI hippocampal volume remained stable with increase of T2HP signal in the KA-treated group. The number of CA1 and CA3 cells was smaller than age-matched CTL group. In contrast, PILO group had MRI volumetric reduction accompanied by reduction in the number of CA1 and CA3 cells. In this group, T2HP signal was unaltered at 6 or 9 months after status. Reductions in the number of cells were not progressive in both models. Notably, the SRS frequency was higher in PILO than in the KA model. The volumetry data correlated well with tissue damage in the epileptic brain, suggesting that MRI may be useful for tracking longitudinal hippocampal changes, allowing the assessment of individual variability and disease progression. Our results indicate that the temporal changes in hippocampal morphology are distinct for both models of TLE and that

  2. Respiratory diseases in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases are one of the major indirect causes of maternal deaths. Pregnancy is a unique physiological state during which changes occur in all systems of the body to meet metabolic needs of both the mother and growing foetus. Enlarging uterus and increasing hormonal levels cause changes in volumes and mechanics of lungs. Understanding the basic physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory changes during pregnancy along with the pathology of disease processes are vital in makin...

  3. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004494 Respiratory control in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. WANG Wei (王玮), et al. Instit Respir Dis, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Limy, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Intern Med 2004; 43 (9): 647-650.

  4. Design aspects of a compact, single-frequency, permanent magnet ECR ion source with a large uniformly distributed resonant plasma volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Alton, G.D.; Mills, G.D.; Reed, C.A.; Haynes, D.L.

    1997-09-01

    A compact, all-permanent-magnet single-frequency ECR ion source with a large uniformly distributed ECR plasma volume has been designed and is presently under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The central region of the field is designed to achieve a flat-field (constant mod-B) which extends over the length of the central field region along the axis of symmetry and radially outward to form a uniformly distributed ECR plasma volume. The magnetic field design strongly contrasts with those used in conventional ECR ion sources where the central field regions are approximately parabolic and the consequent ECR zones are surfaces. The plasma confinement magnetic field mirror has a mirror ratio B{sub max}/B{sub ECR} of slightly greater than two. The source is designed to operate at a nominal RF frequency of 6 GHz. The central flat magnetic field region can be easily adjusted by mechanical means to tune the source to the resonant conditions within the limits of 5.5 to 6.8 GHz. The RF injection system is broadband to ensure excitation of transverse electric (TE) modes so that the RF power is largely concentrated in the resonant plasma volume which lies along and surrounds the axis of symmetry of the source. Because of the much larger ECR zone, the probability for absorption of microwave power is dramatically increased thereby increasing the probability for acceleration of electrons, the electron temperature of the plasma and, consequently, the hot electron population within the plasma volume of the source. The creation of an ECR volume rather than a surface is commensurate with higher charge states and higher beam intensities within a particular charge state.

  5. [Respiratory distress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, D; Garfunkel, A; Elad, S; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Findler, M; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Dental treatment is usually conducted in the oral cavity and in very close proximity to the upper respiratory airway. The possibility of unintentionally compromising this airway is high in the dental environment. The accumulation of fluid (water or blood) near to the upper respiratory airway or the loosening of teeth fragmentations and fallen dental instruments can occur. Also, some of the drugs prescribed in the dental practice are central nervous system depressants and some are direct respiratory drive depressors. For this reason, awareness of the respiratory status of the dental patient is of paramount importance. This article focuses on several of the more common causes of respiratory distress, including airway obstruction, hyperventilation, asthma, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism and cardiac insufficiency. The common denominator to all these conditions described here is that in most instances the patient is conscious. Therefore, on the one hand, valuable information can be retrieved from the patient making diagnosis easier than when the patient is unconscious. On the other hand, the conscious patient is under extreme apprehension and stress under such situations. Respiratory depression which occurs during conscious sedation or following narcotic analgesic medication will not be dealt with in this article. Advanced pain and anxiety control techniques such as conscious sedation and general anesthesia should be confined only to operators who undergo special extended training.

  6. Non-invasive ventilation with intelligent volume-assured pressure support versus pressure-controlled ventilation: effects on the respiratory event rate and sleep quality in COPD with chronic hypercapnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilius, Georg; Katamadze, Nato; Domanski, Ulrike; Schroeder, Maik; Franke, Karl-Josef

    2017-01-01

    COPD patients who develop chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure have a poor prognosis. Treatment of choice, especially the best form of ventilation, is not well known. This study compared the effects of pressure-controlled (spontaneous timed [ST]) non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and NIV with intelligent volume-assured pressure support (IVAPS) in chronic hypercapnic COPD patients regarding the effects on alveolar ventilation, adverse patient/ventilator interactions and sleep quality. This prospective, single-center, crossover study randomized patients to one night of NIV using ST then one night with the IVAPS function activated, or vice versa. Patients were monitored using polysomnography (PSG) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure (PtcCO2) measurement. Patients rated their subjective experience (total score, 0-45; lower scores indicate better acceptability). Fourteen patients were included (4 females, age 59.4±8.9 years). The total number of respiratory events was low, and similar under pressure-controlled (5.4±6.7) and IVAPS (8.3±10.2) conditions (P=0.064). There were also no clinically relevant differences in PtcCO2 between pressure-controlled and IVAPS NIV (52.9±6.2 versus 49.1±6.4 mmHg). Respiratory rate was lower under IVAPS overall; between-group differences reached statistical significance during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Ventilation pressures were 2.6 cmH2O higher under IVAPS versus pressure-controlled ventilation, resulting in a 20.1 mL increase in breathing volume. Sleep efficiency was slightly higher under pressure-controlled ventilation versus IVAPS. Respiratory arousals were uncommon (24.4/h [pressure-controlled] versus 25.4/h [IVAPS]). Overall patient assessment scores were similar, although there was a trend toward less discomfort during IVAPS. Our results show that IVAPS NIV allows application of higher nocturnal ventilation pressures versus ST without affecting sleep quality or inducing ventilation- associated events.

  7. Non-invasive ventilation with intelligent volume-assured pressure support versus pressure-controlled ventilation: effects on the respiratory event rate and sleep quality in COPD with chronic hypercapnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilius G

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Georg Nilius,1,2 Nato Katamadze,1,2 Ulrike Domanski,1 Maik Schroeder,1 Karl-Josef Franke1,2 1HELIOS Klinik Hagen-Ambrock, 2Internal Medicine I, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany Background: COPD patients who develop chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure have a poor prognosis. Treatment of choice, especially the best form of ventilation, is not well known. Objectives: This study compared the effects of pressure-controlled (spontaneous timed [ST] non-invasive ventilation (NIV and NIV with intelligent volume-assured pressure support (IVAPS in chronic hypercapnic COPD patients regarding the effects on alveolar ventilation, adverse patient/ventilator interactions and sleep quality. Methods: This prospective, single-center, crossover study randomized patients to one night of NIV using ST then one night with the IVAPS function activated, or vice versa. Patients were monitored using polysomnography (PSG and transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure (PtcCO2 measurement. Patients rated their subjective experience (total score, 0–45; lower scores indicate better acceptability. Results: Fourteen patients were included (4 females, age 59.4±8.9 years. The total number of respiratory events was low, and similar under pressure-controlled (5.4±6.7 and IVAPS (8.3±10.2 conditions (P=0.064. There were also no clinically relevant differences in PtcCO2 between pressure-controlled and IVAPS NIV (52.9±6.2 versus 49.1±6.4 mmHg. Respiratory rate was lower under IVAPS overall; between-group differences reached statistical significance during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Ventilation pressures were 2.6 cmH2O higher under IVAPS versus pressure-controlled ventilation, resulting in a 20.1 mL increase in breathing volume. Sleep efficiency was slightly higher under pressure-controlled ventilation versus IVAPS. Respiratory arousals were uncommon (24.4/h [pressure-controlled] versus 25.4/h [IVAPS]. Overall patient assessment scores were similar

  8. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 4 - Atlas of temperature / salinity frequency distributions (2 disc set) (NODC Accession 0101473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas presents more than 80,000 plots of the empirical frequency distributions of temperature and salinity for each 5-degree square area of the North Atlantic...

  9. Effects of Changes in Lung Volume on Oscillatory Flow Rate During High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Butcher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc. Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.

  10. Effects of changes in lung volume on oscillatory flow rate during high-frequency chest wall oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Scott J Butcher; Pasiorowski, Michal P; Jones, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc). Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.OBJECTIVES: To examine effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on Fosc at two oscillation frequencies in healthy subjects and patients with airway obstruction.METHODS: Five healthy subjects and six patients with airway obstruction underwent 1...

  11. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...

  12. Late swallowing dysfunction and dysphagia after radiotherapy for pharynx cancer: frequency, intensity and correlation with dose and volume parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Lambertsen, Karin; Grau, Cai

    2007-01-01

    sphincter resulted in a low risk of aspiration. DISCUSSION: Both subjective and objective swallowing problems were frequent and severe after radiotherapy for pharynx cancer. Swallowing dysfunction was correlated with dose and volume parameters of the upper aerodigestive tract. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct...... function after radiotherapy and examine its correlation with irradiated volume and dose. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All recurrence free patients treated for pharynx cancer with radical radiotherapy at our institution, between 1998 and 2002, were invited to participate, 35 (55% of eligible) agreed. Patients were...... in 88%, penetration in 59% and aspiration in 18% of patients. Several significant correlations were found between both subjective and objective swallowing problems and DVH parameters of the upper aerodigestive tract. Doses less than 60 Gy to the supraglottic region, the larynx and upper esophageal...

  13. Respiratory mechanics in sedated and nonsedated adult llamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Kara M; Hoffman, Andrew M; Mazan, Melissa R; Bedenice, Daniela

    2007-06-01

    To validate the use of noninvasive pulmonary function testing in sedated and nonsedated llamas and establish reference range parameters of respiratory mechanical function. 10 healthy adult llamas. Pulmonary function testing in llamas included the following: measurement of functional residual capacity (FRC) via helium dilution, respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) to assess breathing pattern and flow limitations, esophageal-balloon pneumotachography, and a monofrequency forced oscillatory technique (FOT; 1 to 7 Hz) before and after IM administration of xylazine (0.2 mg/kg). The following mean +/- SD measurements of respiratory function were obtained in nonsedated llamas: FRC (5.60 +/- 1.24 L), tidal volume (1.03 +/- 0.3 L), dynamic compliance (0.83 +/- 0.4 L/cm H(2)O), pulmonary resistance (R(L); 1.42 +/- 0.54 cm H(2)O/L/s), and respiratory system resistance (2.4 +/- 0.9, 2.3 +/- 0.7, 2.2 +/- 0.6, 2.7 +/- 0.7, and 2.5 +/- 0.5 cm H(2)O/L/s at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 Hz, respectively) by use of FOT. Measurements of flow limitations via RIP were comparable to other species. Sedation with xylazine induced significant increases in R(L) and maximum change in transpulmonary pressure. Following sedation, a mean 127% increase in R(L) and mean 116% increase in respiratory system resistance were observed across 1 to 7 Hz. The magnitude of change in respiratory system resistance increased with decreasing impulse frequency, suggesting bronchoconstriction. Noninvasive pulmonary function testing is well tolerated in untrained unsedated llamas. These techniques have clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract disease, although testing should not be performed after sedation with xylazine.

  14. Respiratory Allergy and Inflammation Due to Ambient Particles (RAIAP) Collection of Particulate Matter samples from 5 European sites with High Volume Cascade Impactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee FR; Fokkens PHB; Leseman DLAC; Bloemen HJTh; Boere AJF; MGO

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this deliverable was to perform an European-wide collection of particulate samples. With the aid of two high-volume Cascade impactor (HVCI), coarse (2.5-10 mu m ) and fine (0.1-2.5 mu m) particulate samples were collected in Amsterdam, Lodz, Oslo, Rome and the Dutch sea-side (De Zilk) dur

  15. Respiratory Allergy and Inflammation Due to Ambient Particles (RAIAP) Collection of Particulate Matter samples from 5 European sites with High Volume Cascade Impactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee FR; Fokkens PHB; Leseman DLAC; Bloemen HJTh; Boere AJF; MGO

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this deliverable was to perform an European-wide collection of particulate samples. With the aid of two high-volume Cascade impactor (HVCI), coarse (2.5-10 mu m ) and fine (0.1-2.5 mu m) particulate samples were collected in Amsterdam, Lodz, Oslo, Rome and the Dutch sea-side (De Zilk)

  16. Respiratory effects of kynurenic acid microinjected into the ventromedullary surface of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Tolentino-Silva

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies demonstrate that, within the ventral medullary surface (VMS, excitatory amino acids are necessary components of the neural circuits involved in the tonic and reflex control of respiration and circulation. In the present study we investigated the cardiorespiratory effects of unilateral microinjections of the broad spectrum glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid (2 nmol/200 nl along the VMS of urethane-anesthetized rats. Within the VMS only one region was responsive to this drug. This area includes most of the intermediate respiratory area, partially overlapping the rostral ventrolateral medulla (IA/RVL. When microinjected into the IA/RVL, kynurenic acid produced a respiratory depression, without changes in mean arterial pressure or heart rate. The respiratory depression observed was characterized by a decrease in ventilation, tidal volume and mean inspiratory flow and an increase in respiratory frequency. Therefore, the observed respiratory depression was entirely due to a reduction in the inspiratory drive. Microinjections of vehicle (200 nl of saline into this area produced no significant changes in breathing pattern, blood pressure or heart rate. Respiratory depression in response to the blockade of glutamatergic receptors inside the rostral VMS suggests that neurons at this site have an endogenous glutamatergic input controlling the respiratory cycle duration and the inspiratory drive transmission.

  17. The Effect of Inhalation Volume and Breath-Hold Duration on the Retention of Nicotine and Solanesol in the Human Respiratory Tract and on Subsequent Plasma Nicotine Concentrations During Cigarette Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armitage AK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of inhalation depth and breath-hold duration on the retention of nicotine and solanesol in the human respiratory tract and on nicotine uptake was studied in ten cigarette smokers. In a first series of experiments, the subjects took seven puffs from a 10 mg ‘tar’ yield, test cigarette and a fixed volume of air (0, 75, 250, 500 or 1000 mL, as required by the protocol was inhaled after each puff in order to give a controlled ‘depth’ of inhalation. The inhalation was drawn from a bag containing the required volume of air. Following a 2 s breath-hold, subjects exhaled normally, with the first exhalation after each puff passing through a single acidified filter pad for collection of the non-retained nicotine and solanesol. Blood samples were taken before and at intervals during and after smoking for the sessions with 0, 75 and 500 mL inhalation volumes for determination of plasma nicotine and carboxyhaemoglobin levels. Another series of experiments was conducted with a fixed inhalation volume (500 mL and two further breath-hold durations (0 and 10 s in addition to 2 s from above. Nicotine and solanesol retentions were measured for each breath-hold condition. The amounts of nicotine retained within the respiratory system, expressed as a percentage of the amount taken into the mouth, were consistently higher than the corresponding values for solanesol in all five inhalation conditions (0-1000 mL, 2 s breath-hold. Nicotine retention increased from 46.5% at zero inhalation to 99.5% at 1000 mL inhalation (2 s breath-hold and from 98.0% at zero breath-hold to 99.9% at 10 s breath-hold (500 mL inhalation. Solanesol retention increased from 34.2% at zero inhalation volume to 71.9% at 1000 mL inhalation (2 s breath-hold and from 51.8% at zero breath-hold to 87.6% at 10 s breath-hold (500 mL inhalation. Plasma nicotine decreased from pre-smoking levels after zero inhalation indicating that the nicotine retained within the mouth was poorly

  18. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970318 A study on evoked potentials in cor pul-monale patients with chronic respiratory failure.QIAO Hui(乔慧), et al. Beijing Neurosurg Instit,Beijing, 100050. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 43-45. Objective: Evoked protential was used to detect thechange of brain function in cor pulmonale patients with

  19. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    6.1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2004073 A study on the heterogenous apoptosis of lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils from peripheral blood of asthmatic patients. LIU Chuntao (刘春涛), et al. West China Hosp, Sichuan Univ, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2003; 26(10):610 - 614.

  20. Test Methods for Telemetry Systems and Subsystems. Volume 2: Test Methods for Telemetry Radio Frequency (RF) Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    interference test is to measure the effect on bit error probability ( BEP ) of signals in adjacent frequency slots. The results will be a function of...is to have the two interfering signals 20 dB larger than the victim signal. Vary the attenuator that is common to the two interferers until the BEP ...measurement of bit error probability ( BEP ) improvement (or degradation) when signals are combined as compared with single channel operation. The BEP is

  1. Compilation of 1986 annual reports of the Navy ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    The U.S. Navy is conducting a long-term program to monitor for possible effects from the operation of its Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System to resident biota and their ecological relationships. This report documents progress of the following studies: soil amoeba; soil and litter arthropoda and earthworm studies; biological studies on pollinating insects: megachilid bees; and small vertebrates: small mammals and nesting birds.

  2. Impacts of Prescribed Fire Frequency on Coarse Woody Debris Volume, Decomposition and Termite Activity in the Longleaf Pine Flatwoods of Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale D. Wade

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris ecosystems have been reduced dramatically throughout their range. Prescribed burning is considered the best way to restore and maintain plant communities associated with longleaf pine, but little is known about its effects on coarse woody debris and associated organisms. We conducted a 5-year study on the Osceola National Forest in northeastern Florida to determine how dormant-season prescribed burns at different frequencies (annual, biennial, quadrennial or unburned applied over a 40-year period affected coarse woody debris volume, decomposition and nitrogen content, and subterranean termite (Reticulitermes spp. activity. Burn frequency had no effect on standing dead tree or log volumes. However, freshly cut longleaf pine logs placed in the plots for four years lost significantly less mass in annually burned plots than in unburned plots. The annual exponential decay coefficient estimate from all logs was 0.14 yr−1 (SE = 0.01, with the estimated times for 50 and 95% loss being 5 and 21.4 years, respectively. Termite presence was unaffected by frequent burning, suggesting they were able to survive the fires underground or within wood, and that winter burning did not deplete their food resources.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Anja; Khan, Muhammad K; Lippert, Burkard M

    2014-06-05

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a benign condition of the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract. It is characterised by recurrent papillomatous lesions and is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Frequent recurrence and rapid papilloma growth are common and in part responsible for the onset of potentially life-threatening symptoms. Most patients afflicted by the condition will require repeated surgical treatments to maintain their airway, and these may result in scarring and voice problems. Photodynamic therapy introduces a light-sensitising agent, which is administered either orally or by injection. This substance (called a photo-sensitiser) is selectively retained in hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue, including papilloma. It is then activated by light of a specific wavelength and may be used as a sole or adjuvant treatment for RRP. To assess the effects of photodynamic therapy in the management of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) in children and adults. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 27 January 2014. Randomised controlled trials utilising photodynamic therapy as sole or adjuvant therapy in participants of any age with proven RRP versus control intervention. Primary outcome measures were symptom improvement (respiratory distress/dyspnoea and voice quality), quality of life improvement and recurrence-free interval. Secondary outcomes included reduction in the frequency of surgical intervention, reduction in disease volume and adverse effects of treatment.   We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Meta-analysis was not possible and results are presented descriptively. We included one trial with a total of 23

  4. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  5. Measurement of respiratory mechanics in a mechanically ventilated infant lung simulator: effects of variations in the frequency response of the flow measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M J; MacLeod, I M; Rothberg, A D

    1994-01-01

    The frequency responses of systems used to measure flow and pressure in ventilated infants may differ, and hence affect estimates of resistance and compliance. We estimated resistance and compliance in 16 ventilated mechanical lung models using linear regression while varying the frequency response of the flow measurement system. Lung models comprised combinations of four sections of tubing and four bottles filled with steel wool. The cut-off frequencies of a filter in the flow measurement system were chosen to yield time delays of 0, +/-3, +/-6, and +/-9 ms relative to the pressure signal. When the phase lags in the measurement systems were not equal at 10 Hz, a bias in resistance approximately (relative delay) x (elastance) ensued. The bias in the resistance estimate when resistance is 5 Pa ml-1 s and compliance is 2 ml kPa-1 is approximately 28% per ms of delay mismatch. Time-shifting the flow data to eliminate the phase discrepancy reduced the resistance bias by 85%. The residual resistance bias was assumed to be due to inappropriate amplitude response. Compliance measurements were affected by less than 8% and less than 2% after time correction of the flow data. Pressure and flow signals must be synchronized to within 1 ms at 10 Hz and the amplitude responses of the measurement systems must be adequate for reliable resistance measurement.

  6. Respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, R

    2001-09-01

    This article was written as an introduction to a special issue of Behavior Modification dedicated to studies in the field of respiratory psychophysiology. Although the invited articles that constitute this special issue cover a fairly broad range of topics, priority was given to articles that focus on the role of respiration in panic disorder. Attention is directed to the fundamental role of breathing in applied psychophysiology and to the encouragement of research in the modification of breathing behavior. The connection between respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification is explained by reference to (a) a recent article on Pavlovian and operant control of breathing behavior and (b) four published volumes of selected articles dedicated exclusively to the field of respiratory psychophysiology. The present special issue of Behavior Modification marks the fifth volume.

  7. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy for a patient with severe respiratory dysfunction and annuloaortic ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, Masakazu; Ohzeki, Hajime; Namura, Osamu; Hayashi, Jun-ichi

    2003-08-01

    A 23-year-old man with Marfan syndrome, who had undergone surgery for pectus excavatum and scoliosis and who had severe respiratory dysfunction, was referred for surgical repair of annuloaortic ectasia. The preoperative pulmonary function test revealed severe obstructive and restrictive respiratory dysfunction, with forced expiratory volume in one second of 650 ml and vital capacity of 1,220 ml. These parameters improved after 4 months respiratory physiotherapy. A modified Bentall's procedure was performed after respiratory physiotherapy. A tracheostomy made on the 7th postoperative day (POD) appeared to improve respiratory condition and he was weaned off mechanical ventilation on the 14th POD. The lower limits of pulmonary function for open heart surgery have not been established clearly; however, our case will help elucidate these limits of respiratory function for open heart surgery. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy improved parameters of pulmonary function test and may decrease the morbidity of postoperative pulmonary complications in a patient with severe respiratory dysfunction.

  8. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Background High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways. HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15–57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20–30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing. The aim of this stu...

  9. Respiratory Therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Cardiosurgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Zagorodnyaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present investigation was to improve the outcomes of intensive care in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome after cardiac surgery under extracorporeal circulation.Materials and methods. Respiratory therapy was analyzed in 43 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome after surgery under extracorporeal circulation. According to the procedure of artificial ventilation (AV, the patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 those who had undergone routine tracheal intubation (n=23 AND 2 THOSE who had received noninvasive intubation through a nasal mask (n=20. The respiratory parameters, blood gas composition, central hemodynamic parameters, respiratory support time, and the pattern of complications were analyzed.Results. Noninvasive artificial ventilation permits one to make the patients active in earlier periods and take a spontaneous breath, recovers the respiratory index earlier, reduces the level of positive end-expiratory pressure, the frequency of infectious complications of the tracheobronchial tree, and length of stay in an intensive care unit as compared with endotracheal AV.Conclusion. The findings suggest that noninvasive AV is highly effective and yields better results of treatment in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  10. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    7.1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2003306 Effects of vaccae on airway contraction and inflammation in asthmatic guinea pigs. ZHAO Xiao(赵晓燕), et al. Zhejiang Respir Drug Res Lab Med Sch, Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310031. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2003;26(4):218-222.Objective: To study the effects of Mycobacterium vaccae(M. vaccae)on the lung function, airway hyper-

  11. Evaluating the cost implications of a radio frequency identification feeding system for early detection of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfger, Barbara; Manns, Braden J; Barkema, Herman W; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, Karen S; Dorin, Craig; Orsel, Karin

    2015-03-01

    New technologies to identify diseased feedlot cattle in early stages of illness have been developed to reduce costs and welfare impacts associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). However, the economic value of early BRD detection has never been assessed. The objective was to simulate cost differences between two BRD detection methods during the first 61 d on feed (DOF) applied in moderate- to large-sized feedlots using an automated recording system (ARS) for feeding behavior and the current industry standard, pen-checking (visual appraisal confirmed by rectal temperature). Economic impact was assessed with a cost analysis in a simple decision model. Scenarios for Canadian and US feedlots with high- and low-risk cattle were modeled, and uncertainty was estimated using extensive sensitivity analyses. Input costs and probabilities were mainly extracted from publicly accessible market observations and a large-scale US feedlot study. In the baseline scenario, we modeled high-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 20% within the first 61 DOF in a feedlot of >8000 cattle in Canada. Early BRD detection was estimated to result in a relative risk of 0.60 in retreatment and 0.66 in mortality compared to pen-checking (based on previously published estimates). The additional cost of monitoring health with ARS in Canadian dollar (CAD) was 13.68 per steer. Scenario analysis for similar sized US feedlots and low-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 8% were included to account for variability in costs and probabilities in various cattle populations. Considering the cost of monitoring, all relevant treatment costs and sale price, ARS was more costly than visual appraisal during the first 61 DOF by CAD 9.61 and CAD 9.69 per steer in Canada and the US, respectively. This cost difference increased in low-risk cattle in Canada to CAD 12.45. Early BRD detection with ARS became less expensive if the costs for the system decreased to less than CAD 4.06/steer, or if the underlying true

  12. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W R; Plötz, Frans B; Markhors, Dick G

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conventional gas on respiratory system resistance, air-trapping and CO2 removal. Mechanically ventilated, sedated and paralyzed infants with proven RSV were enrolled within 24 hours after paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission. At T = 0, respiratory system mechanics including respiratory system compliance and resistance, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured with the AVEA ventilator. The measurements were repeated at each interval (after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox, after 30 minutes of ventilation with nitrox and again after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox). Indices of gas exchange (ventilation and oxygenation index) were calculated at each interval. Air-trapping (defined by relative change in end-expiratory lung volume) was determined by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at each interval. Thirteen infants were enrolled. In nine, EIT measurements were performed. Mechanical ventilation with heliox significantly decreased respiratory system resistance. This was not accompanied by an improved CO2 elimination, decreased peak expiratory flow rate or decreased end-expiratory lung volume. Importantly, oxygenation remained unaltered throughout the experimental protocol. Respiratory system resistance is significantly decreased by mechanical ventilation with heliox (ISCRTN98152468).

  13. Medida da freqüência respiratória e do volume corrente para prever a falha na extubação de recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso em ventilação mecânica Evaluation of respiratory rate and tidal volume to predict extubation failure in mechanically ventilated very low birth weight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josy Davidson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar se a freqüência respiratória (FR, o volume corrente (VC e a relação FR/VC poderiam prever a falha na extubação em recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso submetidos à ventilação mecânica. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo, observacional, de recém-nascidos com idade gestacional OBJECTIVE: To verify if respiratory rate (RR, tidal volume (TV and respiratory rate and tidal volume ratio (RR/TV could predict extubation failure in very low birth weight infants submitted to mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This prospective observational study enrolled newborn infants with gestational age <37 weeks and birth weight <1,500g, mechanically ventilated from birth during 48 hours to 30 days and thought to be ready for extubation. As soon as the physicians decided for extubation, the neonates received endotracheal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP for 10 minutes while spontaneous RR, TV and RR/TV were measured using a fixed-orifice pneumotachograph positioned between the endotracheal tube and the ventilator circuit. Thereafter, the neonates were extubated to nasal CPAP. Extubation failure was defined as the need for reintubation within 48 hours. RESULTS: Of the 35 studied infants, 20 (57% were successfully extubated and 15 (43% required reintubation. RR and RR/TV before extubation had a trend to be higher in unsuccessfully extubated infants. TV was similar in both groups. Sensitivity and specificity of these parameters as predictors of extubation failure were 50 and 67% respectively for RR, 40 and 67% for TV and 40 and 73% for RR/TV. CONCLUSIONS: RR, TV and RR/TV showed low sensitivity and specificity to predict extubation failure in mechanically ventilated very low birth weight infants.

  14. Development of a balloon volume sensor for pulsating balloon catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Timothy D C; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2004-01-01

    Helium pulsed balloons are integral components of several cardiovascular devices, including intraaortic balloon pumps (IABP) and a novel intravenous respiratory support catheter. Effective use of these devices clinically requires full inflation and deflation of the balloon, and improper operating conditions that lead to balloon under-inflation can potentially reduce respiratory or cardiac support provided to the patient. The goal of the present study was to extend basic spirographic techniques to develop a system to dynamically measure balloon volumes suitable for use in rapidly pulsating balloon catheters. The dynamic balloon volume sensor system (DBVSS) developed here used hot wire anemometry to measure helium flow in the drive line from console to catheter and integrated the flow to determine the volume delivered in each balloon pulsation. An important component of the DBVSS was an algorithm to automatically detect and adjust flow signals and measured balloon volumes in the presence of gas composition changes that arise from helium leaks occurring in these systems. The DBVSS was capable of measuring balloon volumes within 5-10% of actual balloon volumes over a broad range of operating conditions relevant to IABP and the respiratory support catheter. This includes variations in helium concentration from 70-100%, pulsation frequencies from 120-480 beats per minute, and simulated clinical conditions of reduced balloon filling caused by constricted vessels, increased driveline, or catheter resistance.

  15. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  16. Volume, frequency and participation in plain drinking water consumption by third and fourth-grade schoolchildren in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Raquel; Montenegro-Bethancourt, Gabriela; Vossenaar, Marieke; Doak, Colleen M; Solomons, Noel W

    2009-01-01

    Water intake was described and quantified in samples of urban Guatemalan schoolchildren stratified by gender and socio-economic status. The frequency of consumption and quantity of plain water drinking was estimated from one-day pictorial registries of all beverages, foods and snacks consumed over a 24-h period collected from 449 3rd and 4th graders from two social classes: 230 from higher SES and 219 from lower SES. Plain water was reported by 28.1% of participants on the day of registry. Quantities consumed ranged from 250 to 2250 ml. For the 449 one-day intake records, a cumulative total of 62,000 mL of water consumption was reported. This constitutes an average of 138+/-289 ml across all participants but, when divided by for water consumers only, the mean is 492+/-352 ml. Given the relatively low percentage of children consuming water, more attention is needed to ensure freely available, safe, drinking water in the school environment.

  17. Effect of closed endotracheal suction in high-frequency ventilated premature infants measured with electrical impedance tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. van Veenendaal; M. Miedema; F.H.C. de Jongh; J.H. van der Lee; I. Frerichs; A.H. van Kaam

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the global and regional changes in lung volume during and after closed endotracheal tube (ETT) suction in high-frequency ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Design: Prospective observational clinical study. Setting: Neonatal intensive care uni

  18. The Influence of Fundamental Frequency and Sound Pressure Level Range on Breathing Patterns in Female Classical Singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Sally; Thorpe, C. William; Callaghan, Jean; Davis, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the influence of fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) range on respiratory behavior in classical singing. Method: Five trained female singers performed an 8-s messa di voce (a crescendo and decrescendo on one F0) across their musical F0 range. Lung volume (LV) change was estimated, and…

  19. The Influence of Fundamental Frequency and Sound Pressure Level Range on Breathing Patterns in Female Classical Singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Sally; Thorpe, C. William; Callaghan, Jean; Davis, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the influence of fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) range on respiratory behavior in classical singing. Method: Five trained female singers performed an 8-s messa di voce (a crescendo and decrescendo on one F0) across their musical F0 range. Lung volume (LV) change was estimated, and…

  20. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    7.1 Upper Respiratory Tract Diesase And Bronchial Asthma 2007072 Dysfunction of releasing adrenaline in asthmatic adrenaline medullary chromaffin cells due to functional redundancy primed by nerve growth factor. WANG Jun(汪俊), et al. Dept Resp Dis Xiangya Hosp Central South Univ, Changsha 410008. Chin J Tuberc Dis 2006;29(12):812-815. Objective To investigate the possible causes of the dysfunction of adrenaline release in asthma rats and to identify the role of nerve growth factor(NGF) in this process.

  1. 高频振荡通气治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征的疗效评价%The Curative Effect Evaluation of High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李忠良; 刘玉娟; 王守叶; 高桂香

    2015-01-01

    [ ABSTRACT] Objective To evaluate the effects and security of high frequency oscillatory ventilation on neonatal respiratory dis -tress syndrome.Methods A total of 61 infants with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome from January 2010 to December 2013 in our NICU accorded with the inclusion criteria were selected and divided into two groups by the mechanical ventilation ,the high frequency oscillatory ventilation group(HFOV) and the conventional mechanical ventilation group (CMV).A statistical analysis on the general situation ,clinical treatment and curative effect evaluation of the two groups was performed .Results The arterial carbon dioxide tension ( PaCO2 ) ,fraction of in-spired oxygen(FiO2) and oxygenation index (OI) after high frequency oscillatory ventilation were declined before that ,however the arterial oxygen tension ( PaO2 ) and arterial-alveolar oxygen ratio ( a/APO2 ) were rised before high frequency oscillatory ventilation .Compared to the arterial carbon dioxide tension ( PaCO2 ) ,fraction of inspired oxygen ( FiO2 ) ,oxygenation index ( OI) ,arterial oxygen tension ( PaO2 ) and arte-rial-alveolar oxygen ratio(a/APO2) of the CMV groups after mechanical ventilation ,those of HFOV groups were statistically different(P<0. 05).The occurance of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and pulmonary air-leak in HFOV groups was lower than that in CMV groups (P<0.05),but the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) was no statistically significant difference .The length of mechanical ventilation ,ox-ygen therapy and hospital stays of survival in HFOV groups were shorter than that in the CMV groups (P<0.01).Conclusion There is nodoubt that the high frequency oscillatory ventilation can be used in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome .The HFOV groups can improve the pulmonary oxygenation function with NRDS faster and better .Their ventilation effect ,duration and the incidence of complica-tions and so on are obviously better than the CMV

  2. Derivation of the respiratory rate from directly and indirectly measured respiratory signals using autocorrelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrumpf Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of respiratory rates from contineous respiratory signals is commonly done using either fourier transformation or the zero-crossing method. This paper introduces another method which is based on the autocorrelation function of the respiratory signal. The respiratory signals can be measured either directly using a flow sensor or chest strap or indirectly on the basis of the electrocardiogram (ECG. We compare our method against other established methods on the basis of real-world ECG signals and use a respiration-based breathing frequency as a reference. Our method achieved the best agreement between respiration rates derived from directly and indirectly measured respiratory signals.

  3. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  4. Effect of Switching between Pressure-controlled and Volume-controlled Ventilation on Respiratory Mechanics and Hemodynamics in Obese Patients during Abdominoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messeha, Medhat Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Background: The ideal intraoperative ventilation strategy in obese patients remains obscure. This prospective, randomized study was designed to evaluate the effect of pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) before or after volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and hemodynamics variables in obese patients subjected to abdominoplasty operation. Patients and Methods: The study included forty patients with body mass index 30–45 kg/m2 subjected to abdominoplasty. All patients were randomly allocated in two groups after the induction of general anesthesia (twenty patients each), according to intraoperative ventilatory strategy. Group I (P-V): started with PCV until the plication of rectus muscle changes into VCV till the end of surgery. Group II (V-P): started with VCV until the plication of rectus muscle changes into PCV till the end of surgery. Lung mechanics, hemodynamics variables (heart rate and mean blood pressure), and arterial blood gases (ABGs) were recorded. Results: No significant difference in the hemodynamics and ABGs were recorded between the studied groups. The use of PCV after VCV induced the improvement of lung mechanics. Conclusion: Switching from VCV to PCV is preferred to improve intraoperative oxygenation and lung compliance without adverse hemodynamic effects in obese patients.

  5. Undergraduate students' misconceptions about respiratory physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, J A; Richardson, D; Rovick, A; Modell, H; Bruce, D; Horwitz, B; Hudson, M; Silverthorn, D; Whitescarver, S; Williams, S

    1999-12-01

    Approximately 700 undergraduates studying physiology at community colleges, a liberal arts college, and universities were surveyed to determine the prevalence of our misconceptions about respiratory phenomena. A misconception about the changes in breathing frequency and tidal volume (physiological variables whose changes can be directly sensed) that result in increased minute ventilation was found to be present in this population with comparable prevalence (approximately 60%) to that seen in a previous study. Three other misconceptions involving phenomena that cannot be experienced directly and therefore were most likely learned in some educational setting were found to be of varying prevalence. Nearly 90% of the students exhibited a misconception about the relationship between arterial oxygen partial pressure and hemoglobin saturation. Sixty-six percent of the students believed that increasing alveolar oxygen partial pressure leads to a decrease in alveolar carbon dioxide partial pressure. Nearly 33% of the population misunderstood the relationship between metabolism and ventilation. The possible origins of these respiratory misconceptions are discussed and suggestions for how to prevent and/or remediate them are proposed.

  6. Effect of Cadence on Respiratory Response During Unloaded Cycling in Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jastrzębska Agnieszka D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to establish the respiratory response to unloaded cycling at different cadences. Methods. Eleven healthy participants performed a maximal graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer to assess aerobic fitness (maximal oxygen consumption: 46.27 ± 5.41 ml · min-1 · kg-1 and eight 10-min unloaded pedaling (0 W bouts at a constant cadence (from 40 to 110 rpm. Respiratory data were measured continuously during each effort and then averaged over 30 s. Blood samples were collected before and 2 min after each effort to monitor changes in acid-base balance. Results. The efforts were performed at an intensity of 16.5-37.5% VO2peak. Respiratory response was not differentiated in cadences of 40, 50, 60 rpm. From 70 rpm, an increase in cadence was significantly associated with increased minute ventilation (F = 168.11, p < 0.000 and oxygen consumption (F = 214.86 p < 0.000 and, from 80 rpm, respiratory frequency (F = 16.06, p < 0.001 and tidal volume (F = 54.67, p < 0.000. No significant changes in acid-base balance were observed as a result of difference cadences. Conclusions. Unloaded cycling at a cadence of 70 rpm or above has a significant effect on respiratory function and may be associated with the involvement of large muscle ergoreceptors (mechanoreceptors stimulated by the frequency of muscle contractions.

  7. Is high-frequency oscillatory ventilation more effective and safer than conventional protective ventilation in adult acute respiratory distress syndrome patients? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensively evaluating the efficacy and safety of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is important to allow clinicians who are using or considering this intervention to make appropriate decisions. Methods To find randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing HFOV with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) as an initial treatment for adult ARDS patients, we searched electronic databases (including PubMed, MedLine, Springer Link, Elsevier Science Direct, ISI web of knowledge, and EMBASE) with the following terms: “acute respiratory distress syndrome”, “acute lung injury”, and “high frequency oscillation ventilation”. Additional sources included reference lists from the identified primary studies and relevant meta-analyses. Two investigators independently screened articles and extracted data. Meta-analysis was conducted using random-effects models. Results We included 6 RCTs with a total of 1,608 patients in this meta-analysis. Compared with CMV, HFOV did not significantly reduce the mortality at 30 or 28 days. The pooled relative risk (RR) was 1.051 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.813 to 1.358). ICU mortality was also not significantly reduced in HFOV group, with a pooled RR of 1.218 (95% CI 0.925 to 1.604). The pooled effect sizes of HFOV for oxygenation failure, ventilation failure and duration of mechanical ventilation were 0.557 (95% CI 0.351 to 0.884), 0.892 (95% CI 0.435 to 1.829) and 0.079 (95% CI −0.045 to 0.203), respectively. The risk of barotrauma and hypotension were similar between the CMV group and HFOV group, with a RR of 1.205 (95% CI 0.834 to 1.742) and a RR of 1.326 (95% CI 0.271 to 6.476), respectively. Conclusions Although HFOV seems not to increase the risk of barotrauma or hypotension, and reduces the risk of oxygenation failure, it does not improve survival in adult acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. PMID:24887179

  8. Contribution of respiratory muscle blood flow to exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the greater degree of exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue previously reported in highly trained athletes in hypoxia (compared with normoxia) could have a contribution from limited respiratory muscle blood flow. Seven trained cyclists completed three constant load 5 min...... exercise tests at inspired O(2) fractions (FIO2) of 0.13, 0.21 and 1.00 in balanced order. Work rates were selected to produce the same tidal volume, breathing frequency and respiratory muscle load at each FIO2 (63 +/- 1, 78 +/- 1 and 87 +/- 1% of normoxic maximal work rate, respectively). Intercostals......(-1) and 95.1 +/- 7.8 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). Neither IMBF was different across hypoxia, normoxia and hyperoxia (53.6 +/- 8.5, 49.9 +/- 5.9 and 52.9 +/- 5.9 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). We conclude that when respiratory muscle energy requirement is not different between...

  9. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930118 Facial or nasal mask pressure supportventilation in managing acute exacerbation ofchronic respiratory failure in COPD patients.CHEN Rongchang(陈荣昌),et al.GuangzhouInstit Respir Dis,Guangzhou 510120.Chin Tu-berc & Respir Dis 1992;15(5)285-287.Eleven COPD patients(age:65±9 yrs)withacute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure(PaCO2 11.3±1.1kPa)were treated with maskpressure support ventilation,another 10 similarpatients(age:68±12yrs)served as controls.Bi-PAP ventilator was used with the followingmodifications:(1)Non-rehreathing valve set-in proximal to mask;(2)5 LPM oxygen flow de-livered into mask to reduce the dead space ef-fect.Mask ventilation was given 2-3 hours ev-ery time and 1-2 times daily for 7 days.Syn-

  10. Assessment of Respiratory lmpedance During Deep-Slow Breathing with lmpulse Oscillometry in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁永杰; 蔡映云

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the relationship of deep-slow respiratory pattern and respiratory impedance(RI) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: RI under normal respiration and during deep-slow respiration was measured one after the other with impulse oscillometry for 8 patients with COPD and for 9 healthy volunteers as control. Results: When respiration was changed from normal pattern to the deep-slow pattern, the tidal volume increased and respiratory frequency significantly decreased in both groups (P<0.01), the total respiratory impedance (Z respir) showed a decreasing trend in COPD group, but with no obvious change in the control group. No change in the resonant frequency (fres) was found in both groups, and the respiratory viscous resistance obviously decreased in the COPD group(R5: P=0.0168; R20: P=0.0498; R5-R20: P=0.0388),though in the control group it was unchanged. Conclusion: IOS detection could reflect the response heterogeneity of different compartments of respiratory system during tidal breathing. During deep-slow respiration, the viscous resistance in both central airway and peripheral airway was decreased in patients with COPD. RI measurement by impulse oscillometry may be a convenient pathophysiological method for studying the application of breathing exercise in patients with COPD.

  11. Respiratory Motion Prediction in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Sastry

    Active respiratory motion management has received increasing attention in the past decade as a means to reduce the internal margin (IM) component of the clinical target volume (CTV)—planning target volume (PTV) margin typically added around the gross tumor volume (GTV) during radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Engineering and technical developments in linear accelerator design and respiratory motion monitoring respectively have made the delivery of motion adaptive radiation therapy possible through real-time control of either dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion (gantry based linear accelerator design) or robotic arm motion (robotic arm mounted linear accelerator design).

  12. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... share with twitter share with linkedin Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is a ... States. Why Is the Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) a Priority for NIAID? In the United ...

  13. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  14. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaudi, L R [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Rossi, E [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Mantaras, M C [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Perrone, M S [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Siri, L Nicola [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  15. Clinical Study of High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in the Treatment of Newborn Respiratory Distress Syndrome%高频振荡通气治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾丽宏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efficiency of high frequency oscillatory ventilation in the treatment of newborn respiratory distress syndrome. Methods We enrolled 40 new born baby who was diagnosis as neonatal respiratory distress, and divided into 2 groups randomly, group A was HFOV group, group B was CMV group. Then observed dynamic blood gas analysis and oxygenation index (OI) and fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2) change before and 48h after treatment in two groups, and evaluation of changes of outcome and complications and disease. Results PaO2 were signiifcantly higher than those before treatment in both group after the treatment, two groups of patients with PaCO2, FiO2 and OI were signiifcantly lower than before treatment, the difference was signiifcantly P=0.00. PaO2 in group A was signiifcantly higher than group B after treatment,PaCO2, FiO2, OI in groups A was signiifcantly lower than group B after treatment, The complication of A group was significantly lower than that of B group, P=0.00. Conclusion HFOV is more efifciency in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome then CMV, effectively reduce the incidence of complications, HFOV is a safe, effective ventilation mode.%目的:研究高频振荡通气治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫的临床疗效。方法选取符合新生儿呼吸窘迫诊断的患儿40例,随机分为A组HFOV组和B组CMV组,观察治疗前后A组和B组患儿治疗前、治疗48 h后的动态血气分析以及氧合指数(OI)及吸入氧分数(FiO2)变化,并评价患儿合并症以及病情转归的变化。结果治疗后两组患儿PaO2高于治疗前,治疗后两组患儿PaCO2、FiO2和OI低于治疗前,差异显著P=0.00。A组患儿治疗后PaO2高于B组,A组患儿PaCO2、FiO2、OI低于B组;A组并发症低于B组,P=0.00。结论HFOV治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征,通气效果优于CMV,有效减少并发症的发生,是一种安全、有效的通气模式。

  16. Effect of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation for treatment of respiratory failure in neonates%高频振荡通气治疗新生儿呼吸衰竭疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱其周; 肖毅; 刘仁红; 杨梦雅; 史学凯; 吴时光

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨高频振荡通气(HFOV)治疗新生儿呼吸衰竭的疗效及安全性.方法 分析HFOV和常频机械通气(CMV)对45例呼吸衰竭新生儿的治疗效果,对比分析两种通气方式对患儿的肺通气氧合功能及并发症的差异.结果 两组患儿二氧化碳分压(PaCO2)、吸入氧浓度(FiO2)、氧合指数(OI)、动脉/肺泡氧分压比值(PaO2/PAO2)在机械通气0h比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);HFOV组治疗后1、6、12、24、48 h PaCO2、FiO2、OI低于CMV组,PaO2/PAO2高于CMV组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01);HFOV组气胸、慢性肺部疾病的发生率低于CMV组(P<0.05),两组颅内出血的发生率差异无统计学意义(P >0.05).结论 HFOV治疗新生儿呼吸衰竭安全、有效,并能更好、更快地改善呼吸衰竭患儿的肺通气氧合功能.%Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) for treatment of respiratory failure in neonates.Methods The clinical effect for the treatment of respiratory failure was retrospectively evaluated in 22 neonates with HFOV and 23 neonates with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV)by comparing the oxygenate function and complications.Results There were no statistical differences before treatment in the PaCO2,FiO2,OI,and PaO2/PAO2between two groups (P >0.05).PaCO2,FiO2,and OI were lower and PaO2/PAO2 was higher at 1,6,12,24,and 48 h after treatment in HFOV group compared to those in CMV group (P <0.05).The incidence of pneumothorax and chronic lung disease was lower in HFOV group compared to that in CMV group (P < 0.05).There were no statistical differences in the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage between two groups (P > 0.05).Conclusions HFOV may be relatively safe and effective for the treatment of respiratory failure in neonates.

  17. Dose reduction in dynamic perfusion CT of the brain: effects of the scan frequency on measurements of cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesmann, Martin [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Muenchen (Germany); Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen - Grosshadern, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Berg, Scott; Stoeckelhuber, B.M. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiology, Luebeck (Germany); Bohner, G.; Klingebiel, R. [University Medicine Berlin, Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Schoepf, V.; Yousry, I.; Linn, J. [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Muenchen (Germany); Missler, U. [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duisburg-Nord, Department of Neuroradiology, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    The influence of the frequency of computed tomography (CT) image acquistion on the diagnostic quality of dynamic perfusion CT (PCT) studies of the brain was investigated. Eight patients with clinically suspected acute ischemia of one hemisphere underwent PCT, performed on average 3.4 h after the onset of symptoms. Sixty consecutive images per slice were obtained with individual CT images obtained at a temporal resolution of two images per second. Eight additional data sets were reconstructed with temporal resolutions ranging from one image per second to one image per 5 s. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) measurements were performed in identical regions of interest. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the PCT images visually to identify areas of abnormal perfusion. Perfusion images created up to a temporal resolution of one image per 3 s were rated to be diagnostically equal to the original data. Even at one image per 4 s, all areas of infarction were identified. Quantitative differences of CBF, CBV and MTT measurements were {<=}10% up to one image per 3 s. For PCT of the brain, temporal resolution can be reduced to one image per 3 s without significant compromise in image quality. This significantly reduces the radiation dose of the patient. (orig.)

  18. Simultaneous frequency stabilization and high-power dense wavelength division multiplexing (HP-DWDM) using an external cavity based on volume Bragg gratings (VBGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengesbach, Stefan; Klein, Sarah; Holly, Carlo; Witte, Ulrich; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Multiplexing technologies enable the development of high-brightness diode lasers for direct industrial applications. We present a High-Power Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexer (HP-DWDM) with an average channel spacing of 1.7 (1.5) nm and a subsequent external cavity mirror to provide feedback for frequency stabilization and multiplexing in one step. The "self-optimizing" multiplexing unit consists of four reflective Volume Bragg Gratings (VBGs) with 99% diffraction efficiency and seven dielectric mirrors to overlay the radiation of five input channels with an adjustable channel spacing of 1-2 nm. In detail, we focus on the analysis of the overall optical efficiency, the change of the beam parameter product and the spectral width. The performance is demonstrated using five 90 μm multimode 9xx single emitters with M2angular intensity distribution changes strongly and the beam parameter product decreases by a factor of 1.2 to 1.9. Thereby the angular intensity distribution is more affected than the width of the beam waist. The spectral width per emitter decreases to 3-200 pm (FWHM) depending on the injection current and the reflectance of the feedback mirror (0.75%, 1.5%, 4%, 6% or 8%). The overall optical multiplexing efficiency ranges between 77% and 86%. With some modifications (e.g. enhanced AR-coatings) we expect 90-95%.

  19. Respiratory problems in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Carla; Fusco, Flavio

    2002-04-01

    Respiratory problems are an important issue in the palliative care setting, not only from a diagnostic and therapeutic point of view but also from emotion-related aspects involving both the patients and their families and also caregivers. In this paper we consider some of the most common respiratory problems, such as dyspnea, infections, hemoptysis, hiccup. A review of the literature was performed with reference to the frequency, diagnosis and management of the above respiratory problems in patients in advanced and terminal stages of the disease. Particular emphasis was given to the importance of communication with the patients and their families, which is considered a crucial point in the care and the cure of such patients.

  20. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  1. Clinical Effect of High - frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in the Adjuvant Treatment of Neonatal Respiratory Failure%高频振荡通气辅助治疗新生儿呼吸衰竭的临床效果研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 郑肖瑾; 张耀

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究高频振荡通气辅助治疗新生儿呼吸衰竭的临床效果。方法选取海口市妇幼保健院2011年6月—2014年12月收治的新生儿呼吸衰竭患儿96例,按入院顺序分为观察组和对照组,每组48例。观察组患儿给予高频振荡呼吸机进行辅助治疗,对照组患儿给予常规婴儿型呼吸机进行辅助治疗。比较两组患儿临床效果及并发症发生情况,治疗前后动脉血氧分压(PaO2)、动脉血二氧化碳分压(PaCO2)、氧合指数(PaO2/ FiO2)、PaO2/ PaCO2。结果观察组患儿临床效果优于对照组( u =2.758,P =0.006)。两组患儿治疗前 PaO2、PaCO2、PaO2/ FiO2、PaO2/PaCO2比较,差异无统计学意义(P ﹥0.05);观察组患儿治疗48 h 后 PaO2、PaO2/ PaCO2高于对照组,PaCO2、PaO2/FiO2低于对照组(P ﹤0.05)。观察组患儿气胸、慢性肺疾病、颅内出血发生率低于对照组(P ﹤0.05)。结论高频振荡通气辅助治疗新生儿呼吸衰竭患儿的临床效果确切,能有效改善患儿氧合情况,且并发症较少。%Objective To investigate the clinical effect of high - frequency oscillatory ventilation in the adjuvant treatment of neonatal respiratory failure. Methods A total of 96 children with neonatal respiratory failure were selected in the Maternal and Child Care Service Center of Haikou from June 2011 to December 2014,and they were divided into control group and observation group according to visiting sequence,each of 48 cases. Children of control group were given routine baby - type breathing machine for adjuvant treatment,while children of observation group were given high - frequency oscillatory ventilation. Clinical effect and incidence of complications,PaO2 ,PaCO2 ,PaO2 / FiO2 and PaO2 / PaCO2 before and after treatment were compared between the two groups. Results The clinical effect of observation group was statistically significantly better than that of control group

  2. Ventilation and respiratory pattern and timing in resting awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D B; Szlyk, P C

    1985-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the variability and patterns of spontaneous respiratory behaviour in awake cats. Respiration was measured in six cats over 80 or 90 min by the plethysmographic technique. In three cats, arterial blood gases were measured. Breath frequency (f) and tidal volume (VT) varied considerably breath-to-breath, although on average, these measurements as well as average ventilation remained relatively constant. The incidence of breath ventilation (VT X 60/TTOT) and VT were distributed unimodally but the incidence of breath f had a bimodal distribution. In the low f range, average f was 22.5 breaths/min, and in the high f range, average f was 41.6 breaths/min. The latter range appeared to be associated with purring. Inspiratory duration (TI) was less than expiratory duration (TE) at low f but exceeded TE at high f. For a given breath ventilation there was a predictable f and VT. At shorter TI (higher f) mean inspiratory flow, an index of central respiratory drive, increased but VT decreased. This study indicates that "normal" control respiratory behaviour in awake cats is better described by the range and pattern of breathing than by average values.

  3. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  4. Acoustic, respiratory kinematic and electromyographic effects of vocal training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ana Paula De Brito Garcia

    The longitudinal effects of vocal training on the respiratory, phonatory and articulatory systems were investigated in this study. During four semesters, fourteen voice major students were recorded while speaking and singing. Acoustic, temporal, respiratory kinematic and electromyographic parameters were measured to determine changes in the three systems as a function of vocal training. Acoustic measures of the speaking voice included fundamental frequency, sound pressure level (SPL), percent jitter and shimmer, and harmonic-to-noise ratio. Temporal measures included duration of sentences, diphthongs and the closure durations of stop consonants. Acoustic measures of the singing voice included fundamental frequency and sound pressure level of the phonational range, vibrato pulses per second, vibrato amplitude variation and the presence of the singer's formant. Analysis of the data revealed that vocal training had a significant effect on the singing voice. Fundamental frequency and SPL of the 90% level and 90--10% of the phonational range increased significantly during four semesters of vocal training. Physiological data was collected from four subjects during three semesters of vocal training. Respiratory kinematic measures included lung volume, rib cage and abdominal excursions extracted from spoken sung samples. Descriptive statistics revealed that rib cage and abdominal excursions increased from the 1st to the 2nd semester and decrease from the 2nd to the 3rd semester of vocal training. Electromyographic measures of the pectoralis major, rectus abdominis and external obliques muscles revealed that burst duration means decreased from the 1st to the 2nd semester and increased from the 2nd to the 3rd semester. Peak amplitude means increased from the 1st to the 2nd and decreased from the 2nd to the 3rd semester of vocal training. Chest wall excursions and muscle force generation of the three muscles increased as the demanding level and the length of the phonatory

  5. Acute Toxicity and Cardio-Respiratory Effects of 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose: A Promising Radio Sensitiser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the acute toxicity of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) by oral (p.o.) and intravenous (i.v.) routes, and also the cardio-respiratory effects following high doses of 2DG in animal models. Methods The LD50 of 2DG (in water)was determined in rats and mice by p.o. route and in mice by i.v. route. The effect of 2-DG (250 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, and 1000mg/kg, i.v.) was studied on various cardio-respiratory parameters viz., mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in anaesthetised rats. The effect of 2DG (500 mg/kg, 1000 mg/kg, and 2000 mg/kg, p.o.) was also studied on various respiratory parameters viz., respiratory rate and tidal volume in conscious rats and mice using a computer program. Results The p.o. LD50 of 2DG was found to be >8000 mg/kg in mice and rats, and at this dose no death was observed. The LD50 in mice by i.v. route was found to be 8000 mg/kg. At this dose 2 out of 4 mice died and the death occurred within 6 h. A significant increase in the body weight was observed after p.o. administration of 2DG in rats at 500 mg/kg, 1000 mg/kg, and 2000 mg/kg doses. There was no significant change in the body weight at 4000 mg/kg and 8000 mg/kg by the p.o. route in rats and up to 8000 mg/kg by p.o. as well as i.v. routes in mice. Intravenous administration of 2DG (250 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, and 1000 mg/kg)in anaesthetised rats showed a time-dependent decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure. There was no change in the heart rate in any of the treatment groups. The tidal volume was not changed significantly by p.o administration in conscious rats, but a significant decrease in the respiratory frequency at 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg doses was observed. In the mice also there was no change in the tidal volume after p.o, administration, but the respiratory frequency decreased significantly at 2000 mg/kg dose.Conclusion 2DG is a safe compound but can cause a fall in the blood pressure and a decrease in respiratory frequency at high doses.

  6. Respiratory difficulties and breathing disorders in achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpaiman, S; Saburi, A; Waters, Karen A

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory difficulties and breathing disorders in achondroplasia are thought to underlie the increased risk for sudden infant death and neuropsychological deficits seen in this condition. This review evaluates literature regarding respiratory dysfunctions and their sequelae in patients with achondroplasia. The limited number of prospective studies of respiratory disease in achondroplasia means that observational studies and case series provide a large proportion of the data regarding the spectrum of respiratory diseases in achondroplasia and their treatments. Amongst clinical respiratory problems described, snoring is the commonest observed abnormality, but the reported incidence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) shows wide variance (10% to 75%). Reported treatments of OSA include adenotonsillectomy, the use of CPAP, and surgical improvement of the airway, including mid-face advancement. Otolaryngologic manifestations are also common. Respiratory failure due to small thoracic volumes is reported, but uncommon. Mortality rate at all ages was 2.27 (CI: 1.7-3.0) with age-specific mortality increased at all ages. Sudden death was most common in infants and children. Cardiovascular events are the main cause of mortality in adults. Despite earlier recognition and treatment of respiratory complications of achondroplasia, increased mortality rates and other complications remain high. Future and ongoing evaluation of the prevalence and impact of respiratory disorders, particularly OSA, in achondroplasia is recommended. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ventilação de alta freqüência em crianças e adolescentes com síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo (impacto sobre o uso de ecmo High-frequency ventilation in children and adolescents with acute respiratory distress syndrome (impact on the use of ecmo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucília Santana Faria

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito da ventilação de alta freqüência (VAF em crianças e adolescentes com síndrome do desconforto respiratório (SDRA por meio de estimativas de sobrevida e tempo de ventilação. Verificar se a VAF reduziu a indicação de oxigenação de membrana extracorpórea (ECMO em crianças e adolescentes com SDRA. MÉTODOS: A técnica empregada foi uma revisão sistemática da literatura médica sobre o uso de VAF e ECMO em crianças e adolescentes com SDRA. O levantamento bibliográfico utilizou os bancos de dados Medline, Lilacs e Embase. Os termos utilizados para pesquisa foram: adult respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS, acute respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory distress syndrome, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, ECMO, high-frequency ventilation, high-frequency jet ventilation e high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Foram procurados ensaios clínicos controlados e randomizados, estudos de coorte e série de casos que comparavam VAF com ventilação mecânica convencional (VMC, ECMO com VMC ou VAF precedendo o uso de ECMO. RESULTADOS: Foram identificadas 289 publicações relacionadas a VAF, SDRA e ECMO. Destas, apenas nove atendiam aos critérios de seleção pré-estabelecidos referindo-se a utilização de VAF e/ou ECMO em crianças e adolescentes com SDRA. CONCLUSÃO: Não foi possível confirmar se o uso de VAF melhora a sobrevida de crianças e adolescentes com SDRA. Quanto ao tempo de ventilação, não houve estudo que comprovasse, com significância estatística, a sua redução ou aumento. Não foi possível verificar se VAF diminui ou não a indicação de ECMO em crianças e adolescentes com SDRA.OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of high-frequency ventilation (HFV in children and adolescents with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS through estimates of survival rate and time of ventilation. To verify whether HFV can reduce the indication for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO in children

  8. Respiratory Development and Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubarth, Lori Baas; Quinn, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory development is crucial for all newborn infants. Premature infants may be born at an early stage of development and lack sufficient surfactant production. This results in respiratory distress syndrome. This article reviews the normal fetal development of the lung as well as the disorder that develops because of an early birth.

  9. Doctrinal Guidelines for Quantitative Vulnerability Assessments of Infrastructure-Related Risks. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    local impact for one year to a bombing event at a shopping mall and the national impact for five years. Nonetheless, they are not meant to limit...so big (e.g., small enough to carry in a shopping bag or backpack) and so the volume is likely limited to a certain, assumable range, and if the... RFID Radio Frequency Identification ROI Return on Investment SARS Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome SCADA Supervisory Control and Data

  10. Technology in respiratory medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Respiratory medicine is the subspecialty in medicine which ... The very nature of respiratory physiology ... of this essential step with resultant loss of accuracy in .... intensity of treatment, or for medicolegal .... likened to trying to manage dia-.

  11. High frequency oscillation ventilation for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome%早期应用高频振荡通气治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁诗光; 邱燕玲; 王冬妹; 刘晓燕; 胡贵珍

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨早期高频振荡通气(HFOV)在新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征治疗中的应用价值及安全性.方法 采用完全随机设计方法,将50例呼吸窘迫综合征早产儿分为观察组与对照组.观察组27例采用HFOV治疗,对照组23例采用常频机械通气并经气管导管单体位(仰卧位)一次性快速滴注猪肺磷脂注射液200 ms/kg.观察2组治疗前后动脉血氧分压、二氧化碳分压、肺泡-动脉氧分压差(A-aDO2)、氧合指数的改变并比较2组间的差异.结果 观察组患儿经HFOV治疗1 h后氧分压明显上升为(71.2±13.6)mm Hg(P<0.05),二氧化碳分压显著下降为(50.9±8.9)mm Hg(P<0.01),氧合指数迅速下降为5.9±2.6(P< 0.05),A-aDO2上升为(0.44±0.12)mm Hg(P<0.05).治疗3、6、12、24 h的氧分压、二氧化碳分压、氧合指数、A-aDO2与对照组比较差异无统计学意义.结论 HFOV早期用于治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征,是一种安全性好、疗效肯定的机械通气方法.%Objective To study the effect of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation for newborn infants with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Infants with neonatal hyaline membrane disease were divided into 2 groups: 27 cases(group A) were treated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and 23 cases (group B) were treated with conventional mechanical ventilation. Meanwhile PS (200 mg/kg) was dropped into the intracheal tube at the beginning group B. Results PaCO2, OI obviously decreased (PaCO2: (50.9±8.9)mm Hg, OI:5.9±2.6) and PaO2, A-aDO2, increased [PaO2±(71.2±13.6)mm Hg, A-aDO2: (0.44±0.12)mm Hg] in group B after therapy (P <0.01, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the PaO2, PaCO2, OI, A-aDO2 between the two groups on 3,6, 12, 24 hours after therapy. Conclusion HFOV can significantly improve pulmonary gas exchange in NRDS patients and reduce the mechanical ventilation and hospitalization time.

  12. Application of the hot-wire anemometer to respiratory measurements in small animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godal, A; Belenky, D A; Standaert, T A; Woodrum, D E; Grimsrud, L; Hodson, W A

    1976-02-01

    A hot-wire anemometer was evaluated to determine its suitability for measurement of small tidal volumes. Used with a constant background flow of gas, the output of the hot-wire anemometer was linear and independent of respiratory frequency, temperature, and humidity. The change in output with CO2 concentration was negligible within the physiologic range. The use of a background flow eliminates the need for one-way valves, minimizes dead space, and maintains the flow velocity past the hot wire within its range of linear response.

  13. Acute toxic effects of nerve agent VX on respiratory dynamics and functions following microinsillation inhalation exposure in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Peter E; Graham, Jacob R; Moran, Theodore S; Gordon, Richard K; Sciuto, Alfred M; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2007-03-01

    Exposure to a chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) leads to severe respiratory distress, respiratory failure, or death if not treated. We investigated the toxic effects of nerve agent VX on the respiratory dynamics of guinea pigs following exposure to 90.4 mug/m3 of VX or saline by microinstillation inhalation technology for 10 min. Respiratory parameters were monitored by whole-body barometric plethysmography at 4, 24, and 48 h, 7 d, 18 d, and 4 wk after VX exposure. VX-exposed animals showed a significant decrease in the respiratory frequency (RF) at 24 and 48 h of recovery (p value .0329 and .0142, respectively) compared to the saline control. The tidal volume (TV) slightly increased in VX exposed animals at 24 and significantly at 48 h (p = .02) postexposure. Minute ventilation (MV) increased slightly at 4 h but was reduced at 24 h and remained unchanged at 48 h. Animals exposed to VX also showed an increase in expiratory (Te) and relaxation time (RT) at 24 and 48 h and a small reduction in inspiratory time (Ti) at 24 h. A significant increase in end expiratory pause (EEP) was observed at 48 h after VX exposure (p = .049). The pseudo lung resistance (Penh) was significantly increased at 4 h after VX exposure and remained slightly high even at 48 h. Time-course studies reveal that most of the altered respiratory dynamics returned to normal at 7 d after VX exposure except for EEP, which was high at 7 d and returned to normal at 18 d postexposure. After 1 mo, all the monitored respiratory parameters were within normal ranges. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 1 mo after exposure showed virtually no difference in protein levels, cholinesterase levels, cell number, and cell death in the exposed and control animals. These results indicate that sublethal concentrations of VX induce changes in respiratory dynamics and functions that over time return to normal levels.

  14. Frecuencia de virus respiratorios y características clínicas de niños que acuden a un hospital en México Frequency of respiratory viruses and clinical characteristics in children attending a care center in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Wong-Chew

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Describir la frecuencia de virus respiratorios y características clínicas en niños con cuadros respiratorios de un hospital de tercer nivel en México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se incluyeron niños con diagnóstico de infección respiratoria y un resultado positivo por inmunofluorescencia de enero 2004 a octubre 2006. RESULTADOS. De 986 muestras nasofaríngeas, 138 (14% fueron positivas. La frecuencia fue: 80% virus sincicial respiratorio (VSR, 8% parainfluenza 1, 5% parainfluenza3, 2% adenovirus, 2% influenza A, 1% parainfluenza 2 y 1% influenza B. CONCLUSIONES. La frecuencia de virus respiratorios fue de 14%. El VSR se identificó asociado con más frecuencia, a neumonía y bronquiolitis en menores de 3 años.OBJECTIVE. To describe the frequency of respiratory viruses and clinical characteristics in children with respiratory signs and symptoms in a tertiary care center in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory infection and a positive immunofluorescence result (Light Diagnostics from January 2004 to October 2006 were included. RESULTS. From the 986 nashopharyngeal samples, 138 (14% were positive by immunofluorescence. The frequency was: 80% RSV, 8% parainfluenza 1, 5% parainfluenza 3, 2% adenovirus, 2% influenza A, 1% parainfluenza 2 and 1% influenza B. CONCLUSIONS. Respiratory viruses were detected in 14% of samples tested. RSV was the most frequently identified virus and was associated with pneumonia and bronchiolitis in children younger than 3 years old.

  15. On the respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillation technique in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Almeida Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary complications are the most common cause of death and morbidity in systemic sclerosis (SSc. The forced oscillation technique (FOT offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that SSc may introduce changes in the resistive and reactive properties of the respiratory system, and that FOT may help the diagnosis of these abnormalities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested these hypotheses in controls (n = 30 and patients with abnormalities classified using spirometry (n = 52 and pulmonary volumes (n = 29. Resistive data were interpreted with the zero-intercept resistance (Ri and the slope of the resistance (S as a function of frequency. Reactance changes were evaluated by the mean reactance between 4 and 32 Hz (Xm and the dynamic compliance (Crs,dyn. The mechanical load was evaluated using the absolute value of the impedance in 4 Hz (Z4Hz. A compartmental model was used to obtain central (R and peripheral (Rp resistances, and alveolar compliance (C. The clinical usefulness was evaluated by investigating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. The presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL was also evaluated. For the groups classified using spirometry, SSc resulted in increased values in Ri, R, Rp and Z4Hz (p0.90. In groups classified by pulmonary volume, SSc resulted in reductions in S, Xm, C and Crs,dyn (p0.80. It was also observed that EFL is not common in patients with SSc. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that the respiratory resistance and reactance are changed in SSc. This analysis provides a useful description that is of particular significance for understanding respiratory pathophysiology and to ease the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in these patients.

  16. The temperature change in an endotracheal tube during high frequency ventilation using an artificial neonatal lung model with Babylog® 8000 plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Ken; Tsuchida, Etsushi; Nohara, Fumikatsu; Okamoto, Toshio; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    There is little available data on airway humidity during high-frequency ventilation (HFV). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the temperature drop in an endotracheal tube (ETT) during HFV. We examined the airway temperature in a neonatal HFV system using Babylog® 8000 plus. We measured the temperature change of inspired gases in the ETT under various oscillatory frequencies and oscillatory volumes with a fixed base flow. The temperatures in the ETT during HFV were compared with the temperatures during conventional intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). As the oscillatory frequency was increased and the oscillatory volume (VThf) decreased, the difference in temperature between the Y piece and the inlet of an artificial lung in the ETT (ETT outside of body) increased. However, as the oscillatory frequency increased, there was no difference in the ETT temperature under constant oscillatory volume. In contrast, as the oscillatory volume was decreased, the difference in temperature in the ETT was greater under constant oscillatory frequency. Moreover, the temperature drop in the ETT with HFV was lower than that in the IPPV temperature with a similar respiratory volume. The temperature change in the ETT was not dependent on the oscillatory frequency when the oscillatory volume was fixed; however, the temperature was dependent on the oscillatory volume when the oscillatory frequency was fixed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Respiratory water loss in free-flying pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaeli, G; Pinshow, B

    2001-11-01

    We assessed respiratory and cutaneous water loss in trained tippler pigeons (Columba livia) both at rest and in free flight. In resting pigeons, exhaled air temperature T(ex) increased with ambient air temperature T(a) (T(ex)=16.3+0.705T(a)) between 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C, while tidal volume V(T) (V(T)=4.7+/-1.0 ml, mean +/- S.D. at standard temperature and pressure dry) and breathing frequency f(R) (f(R)=0.46+/-0.06 breaths s(-1)) were independent of T(a). Respiratory water loss, RWL, was constant over the range of T(a) (RWL=1.2+/-0.4 mg g(-1) h(-1)) used. In flying pigeons, T(ex) increased with T(a) (T(ex)=25.8+0.34T(a)), while f(R) was independent of T(a) (f(R)=5.6+/-1.4 breaths s(-1)) between 8.8 degrees C and 27 degrees C. Breathing frequency varied intermittently between 2 and 8 breaths s(-1) during flight and was not always synchronized with wing-beat frequency. RWL was independent of air temperature (RWL=9.2+/-2.9 mg g(-1) h(-1)), but decreased with increasing inspired air water vapor density (rho(in)) (RWL=12.5-0.362rho(in)), whereas cutaneous water loss, CWL, increased with air temperature (CWL=10.122+0.898T(a)), but was independent of rho(in). RWL was 25.7-32.2 %, while CWL was 67.8-74.3 % of the total evaporative water loss. The data indicate that pigeons have more efficient countercurrent heat exchange in their anterior respiratory passages when at rest than in flight, allowing them to recover more water at rest at lower air temperatures. When evaporative water loss increases in flight, especially at high T(a), the major component is cutaneous rather than respiratory, possibly brought about by reducing the skin water vapor diffusion resistance. Because of the tight restrictions imposed by gas exchange in flight, the amount of water potentially lost through respiration is limited.

  18. High frequency ventilation in the treatment of severe respiratory distress syndrome%高频通气治疗重症新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄绮薇; 张宇鸣; 张国琴; 滕国良; 裘刚

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨高频通气(HFV)治疗重症呼吸窘迫综合征(RDS)的疗效。方法 20例重症RDS患儿的胎龄(33±4)周, 出生体重(2.1±0.8) kg,X线胸片示≥Ⅱ级,需机械通气(CMV)治疗。当所需吸入氧浓度(FiO2)≥0.8和(或)平均气道压(MAP)≥11 cm H2O、动脉血氧饱和度(SaO2)在2 h内仍<0.90者,改用HFV治疗。用HFV治疗者共8例。结果 8例用HFV患儿,用HFV后2 h内SaO2均≥0.90, 动脉肺泡氧分压比(a/A) 较用HFV前有显著改善( 0.08±0.01和0.18±0.06,P<0.05), 氧合指数(OI)较用HFV前明显下降(33±11和14±4,P<0.01),FiO2 亦显著下降(0.90±0.10和0.70±0.20, P<0.05)。至8 h FiO2 继续下降至0.60±0.20。结论 重症RDS用CMV疗效差者,改用HFV可获显效,表现为氧合改善快,短时间内 FiO2可迅速降低。%Objective To explore the effectiveness of high frequency ventilation in the treatment of neonates with severe respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Methods Twenty neonates with≥ gradeⅡRDS confirmed by chest X- ray and needed conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) treatment were enrolled in this study. Patients who failed to maintain SO2 ≥0.90 when FiO2≥0.8 and/or MAP≥11 cmH2O within 2 hours were changed to high freguency ventilation (HFV). Results Twenty cases met the severe RDS criteria, who′s gestational age was (33±4)w and birth weight was (2.1±0.8) kg. Among them 8 cases were assigned to HFV. After 2-hour treatment, SO2 of HFV group increased to>0.90. Arterial to alveoli oxygen ratio (a/A) improved significantly (0.08±0.01 to 0.18±0.05, P<0.01). Oxygenation index (OI) decreased rapidly (33±11 to 14±4, P<0.01). FiO2 decreased rapidly (0.90±0.10 and 0.70±0.20, P<0.01). After 8 hours treatment FiO2 continually decreased to 0.60±0.18. Conclusion The authors concluded that HFV was an effective rescue method for neonates with RDS in whom CMV failed.

  19. Exhaled breath condensate sampling is not a new method for detection of respiratory viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maes Piet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exhaled breath condensate (EBC sampling has been considered an inventive and novel method for the isolation of respiratory viruses. Methods In our study, 102 volunteers experiencing upper airway infection were recruited over the winter and early spring of 2008/2009 and the first half of the winter of 2009/2010. Ninety-nine EBCs were successfully obtained and screened for 14 commonly circulating respiratory viruses. To investigate the efficiency of virus isolation from EBC, a nasal swab was taken in parallel from a subset of volunteers. The combined use of the ECoVent device with the RTube™ allowed the registration of the exhaled volume and breathing frequency during collection. In this way, the number of exhaled viral particles per liter air or per minute can theoretically be estimated. Results Viral screening resulted in the detection of 4 different viruses in EBC and/or nasal swabs: Rhinovirus, Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus B, Influenza A and Influenza B. Rhinovirus was detected in 6 EBCs and 1 EBC was Influenza B positive. We report a viral detection rate of 7% for the EBCs, which is much lower than the detection rate of 46.8% observed using nasal swabs. Conclusion Although very promising, EBC collection using the RTube™ is not reliable for diagnosis of respiratory infections.

  20. Stair climbing test post-stroke: feasibility, convergent validity and metabolic, cardiac, and respiratory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modai, Galia; Sharon, Barak; Bar-Haim, S; Hutzler, Y

    2015-08-01

    The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and treadmill walk tests (TMW) are commonly used to assess post-stroke patients (PSP) aerobic capacity. However, these tests are not without their limitations (e.g. limited sensitivity to change and the use of external pacing). Therefore, there is a need for additional tools to assess PSP aerobic capacity. To establish the feasibility, convergent validity, and metabolic, cardiac, and respiratory responses of a stair climbing test (SC), among chronic PSP. Nineteen chronic PSP conducted SC, TMW, and 6 MWT. Metabolic (oxygen consumption - VO₂), cardiac (heart rate), and respiratory (ventilation volume, breathing frequency, and tidal volume) measures were established. Adverse events were documented. Correlations established the convergent validity of the SC test. A repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the participant's physiological responses at the end of the various tests. SC is feasible and safe, as all participants completed the test with no adverse events. The SC demonstrated convergent validity as numerous associations were found between SC and TMW, and 6 MWT. Metabolic, cardiac, and respiratory responses to the SC were significantly higher than these of the TMW and 6 MWT (e.g. VO₂= 13.43 ± 2.19, 11.01 ± 2.0, and 11.26 ± 1.87 ml/kg/min, respectively) (P stairs is a common community ambulation requirement. Therefore, it is appropriate to incorporate SC test in PSP testing battery.

  1. Validation of respiratory inductive plethysmography (LifeShirt) in obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollier, Carly A; Harmer, Alison R; Maxwell, Lyndal J; Menadue, Collette; Willson, Grant N; Black, Deborah A; Piper, Amanda J

    2014-04-01

    Validation of respiratory inductive plethysmography (LifeShirt system) (RIPLS) for tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (V˙E), and respiratory frequency (fB) was performed among people with untreated obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) and controls. Measures were obtained simultaneously from RIPLS and a spirometer during two tests, and compared using Bland Altman analysis. Among 13 OHS participants (162 paired measures), RIPLS-spirometer agreement was unacceptable for VT: mean difference (MD) 3 mL (1%); limits of agreement (LOA) -216 to 220 mL (±36%); V˙E MD 0.1 L min(-1) (2%); LOA -4.1 to 4.3 L min(-1) (±36%); and fB: MD 0.2 br min(-1) (2%); LOA -4.6 to 5.0 br min(-1) (±27%). Among 13 controls (197 paired measures), RIPLS-spirometer agreement was acceptable for fB: MD -0.1 br min(-1) (-1%); LOA -1.2 to 1.1 br min(-1) (±12%), but unacceptable for VT: MD 5 mL (1%); LOA -160 to 169 mL (±20%) and V˙E: MD 0.1 L min(-1) (1%); LOA -1.4 to 1.5 L min(-1) (±20%). RIPLS produces valid measures of fB among controls but not OHS patients, and is not valid for quantifying respiratory volumes among either group.

  2. Effect of high volume hemofiltration on acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by septic shock%高容量血液滤过对感染性休克所致 ARDS影响的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 赵平; 薛露; 郑瑞强

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨高容量血液滤过(HVHF)对感染性休克所致 ARDS 氧合情况及肺部炎症反应的影响。方法18只健康猪,静脉输注内毒素50μg/kg 诱导感染性休克模型,制模成功后随机分为三组(每组6只):对照组、常规流量血液滤过组(NVHF 组)、HVHF 组均给予机械通气及液体复苏。分别留取造模前、造模成功时、开始血液滤过治疗1 h、2 h、3 h、4 h、5 h、6 h 的动脉血标本以行血气分析及检测血浆中 IL-6和 IL-10水平,观察结束后处死动物留取肺组织,以测定核因子κB (NF-κB)的表达和观察病理。结果动物成模时氧合指数(PaO 2/FiO 2)小于300 mmHg。氧合指数方面,血液滤过治疗第4小时开始, HVHF 组明显高于对照组(P <0.05)和 NVHF 组(P <0.05)。肺血管通透性指数(PVPI)HVHF 组从第3小时开始明显低于对照组(P <0.05)和 NVHF组(P <0.05)。休克模型建立时,IL-6和10炎症因子水平急剧升高(P <0.05),血滤治疗第1小时起,NVHF 和 HVHF 两组炎症因子水平均低于对照组(P <0.05),同时 HVHF 组 IL-10低于NVHF 组(P <0.05),血滤治疗第4小时起, HVHF 组 IL-6明显低于 NVHF 组(P <0.05)。HVHF 组肺组织 NF-κB 表达明显低于对照组和 NVHF 组(P <0.05)。HVHF 组较其他两组肺组织出血、水肿、肺不张、代偿性肺气肿改变明显减轻。结论 HVHF 可能通过减低肺组织局部 NF-κB表达,减少血浆炎症因子,降低局部炎症反应机制,改善感染性休克所致 ARDS 的组织病理改变和氧合状态。%Objective To explore the high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on oxygenation and pulmonary inflammatory response in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by septic shock.Methods 18 healthy pigs were injected endotoxin 50 μg/kg via central vein within 30 minutes. After model establishment,all pigs were randomly divided into three groups (n = 6):control group, normal volume hemofiltration (NVHF) group and HVHF group.All the three

  3. Respiratory virology and microbiology in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Anne-Cathrine; Gubbels, Sophie; Baake, Gerben

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency of 12 common respiratory viruses in patients admitted to intensive care units with respiratory symptoms, evaluate the clinical characteristics and to compare the results to routine microbiological diagnostics. Throat swabs from 122 intensive care-patients >18...

  4. “High Frequency/Small Tidal Volume Differential Lung Ventilation”: A Technique of Ventilating the Nondependent Lung of One Lung Ventilation for Robotically Assisted Thoracic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam M. Shoman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of new techniques and advances in the thoracic surgery fields, challenges to the anesthesia techniques had became increasingly exponential. One of the great improvements that took place in the thoracic surgical field was the use of the robotically assisted thoracic surgical procedure and minimally invasive endoscopic thoracic surgery. One lung ventilation technique represents the core anesthetic management for the success of those surgical procedures. Even with the use of effective one lung ventilation, the patient hemodynamics and respiratory parameters could be deranged and could not be tolerating the procedure that could compromise the end result of surgery. We are presenting our experience in managing one patient who suffered persistent hypoxia and hemodynamic instability with one lung ventilation for robotically assisted thymectomy procedure and how it was managed till the completion of the surgery successfully.

  5. Pesticides and respiratory symptoms among farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Neice Müller Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite the intensive use of pesticides in agriculture there are few studies assessing the risk of respiratory conditions from this exposure. The study aimed at quantifying the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among farmers and evaluating its relationship with occupational use of pesticides and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,379 farmers from two municipalities of Southern Brazil in 1996. Frequency and type of chemical exposure and pesticide poisoning were recorded for both sexes. All subjects aged 15 years or older with at least 15 weekly hours of agricultural activity were interviewed. An adapted questionnaire developed by the American Thoracic Society was used for the assessment of respiratory symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out. RESULTS: More than half (55% of interviewees were male. The prevalence of asthma symptoms was 12% and chronic respiratory disease symptoms was 22%. Higher odds ratios for both asthma (OR=1.51; 95% CI: 1.07-2.14 and chronic respiratory disease (OR=1.34; 95% CI 1.00-1.81 symptoms were found in women. Logistic regression analysis identified associations between many forms of exposure to pesticides and increased respiratory symptoms. Occurrence of pesticide poisoning was associated with higher prevalence of asthma symptoms (OR=1.54; 95% CI: 1.04-2.58 and chronic respiratory disease symptoms (OR=1.57; 95% CI: 1.08-2.28. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of causality limitations, the study results provide evidence that farming exposure to pesticides is associated with higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms, especially when the exposure is above two days per month.

  6. Respiratory Protection against Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Burak; Akbaba, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    Although the respiratory (breathing) system tolerates exposure to a limited degree, some chemicals can impair or destroy portions of it. For many pesticides, the respiratory system is the quickest and most direct route into the circulatory system, allowing rapid transport throughout the body. Thus, it is important to follow the pesticide label and follow directions for control of exposure, especially when respiratory protection is specified. A respirator is a safety device covering at least t...

  7. Current issues in the respiratory care of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orsini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neuromuscular disease, resulting in respiratory muscle weakness, reduced pulmonary volumes, ineffective cough, secretion retention, and respiratory failure. Measures as vital capacity, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, sniff nasal inspiratory pressure, cough peak flow and pulse oximetry are recommended to monitor the respiratory function. The patients should be followed up by a multidisciplinary team, focused in improving the quality of life and deal with the respiratory symptoms. The respiratory care approach includes airway clearance techniques, mechanically assisted cough and noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Vaccination and respiratory pharmacological support are also recommended. To date, there is no enough evidence supporting the inspiratory muscle training and diaphragmatic pacing.

  8. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    described. It was found that the currently used respiratory margin of 5 mm in partial breast irradiation may be overly conservative for many 3DCRT PBI patients. Amplitude alone was found to be insufficient to determine patient-specific margins: individual respiratory trace shape and baseline drift both contributed to the dosimetric target coverage. With respiratory coaching, individualized respiratory margins smaller than the full extent of motion could reduce planning target volumes while ensuring adequate coverage under respiratory motion.

  9. Dielectric properties of agricultural products – fundamental principles, influencing factors, and measurement technirques. Chapter 4. Electrotechnologies for Food Processing: Book Series. Volume 3. Radio-Frequency Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this chapter, definitions of dielectric properties, or permittivity, of materials and a brief discussion of the fundamental principles governing their behavior with respect to influencing factors are presented. The basic physics of the influence of frequency of the electric fields and temperatur...

  10. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia of brainstem lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMario, F J; Bauer, L; Baxter, D

    1999-04-01

    In this pilot study we investigated the hypothesis that intrinsic and extrinsic brainstem lesions situated within the pontomedullary region would effect the integrity of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The study sample consisted of three patients with anatomic brainstem abnormalities associated with isolated Chiari I malformation, Chiari II malformation with syringobulbia, and achondroplasia with cervicomedullary compression. They were compared to an age- and sex-matched control group of nine patients. Each subject's electrocardiogram was recorded in a quiet room and digitized by a personal computer during five 1-minute periods. R-R intervals within each 1-minute period were converted to heart rate in 120 successive 0.5-second intervals. The resultant heartrate time series was converted to its underlying frequency composition by a fast Fourier transform and averaged across minutes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia was defined as the variability in the time series over a frequency range (0.096 to 0.48 Hz) corresponding to a range of respiratory rates from 6 to 30 breaths per minute. Analysis revealed a significant reduction in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (P < .05), defined as the summated area under the curve, with a mean for controls of 35.42+/-28.13 SD and for subjects of 17.20+/-11.50 SD. There was a gradient of abnormality noted, with the mildest deviation in respiratory sinus arrhythmia for the patient with isolated Chiari I malformation and maximum deviation seen in the patient with extrinsic cervicomedullary compression.

  11. Cardiovascular, electrodermal, and respiratory response patterns to fear- and sadness-inducing films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibig, Sylvia D; Wilhelm, Frank H; Roth, Walton T; Gross, James J

    2007-09-01

    Responses to fear- and sadness-inducing films were assessed using a broad range of cardiovascular (heart rate, T-wave amplitude, low- and high-frequency heart rate variability, stroke volume, preejection period, left-ventricular ejection time, Heather index, blood pressure, pulse amplitude and transit time, and finger temperature), electrodermal (level, response rate, and response amplitude), and respiratory (rate, tidal volume and its variability, inspiratory flow rate, duty cycle, and end-tidal pCO(2)) measures. Subjective emotional experience and facial behavior (Corrugator Supercilii and Zygomaticus Major EMG) served as control measures. Results indicated robust differential physiological response patterns for fear, sadness, and neutral (mean classification accuracy 85%). Findings are discussed in terms of the fight-flight and conservation-withdrawal responses and possible limitations of a valence-arousal categorization of emotion in affective space.

  12. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  13. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  14. [Postoperative respiratory insufficiency and its treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösek, V; Wiebe, K

    2015-05-01

    The development of a postoperative respiratory insufficiency is typically caused by several factors and include patient-related risks, the extent of the procedure and postoperative complications. Morbidity and mortality rates in acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are high. It is important to have consistent strategies for prevention and preoperative conditioning is essential primarily for high-risk patients. Treatment of established postoperative lung failure requires early tracheotomy, protective ventilation (tidal volume 6 ml/kg body weight), elevated positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP, 10-20 mmH2O), recurrent bronchoscopy and early patient mobilization. In critical cases an extracorporeal lung assist is considered to be beneficial as a bridge to recovery and for realizing a protective ventilation protocol. Different systems with separate indications are available. The temporary application of a lung assist allows thoracic surgery to be performed safely in patients presenting with insufficient respiratory function.

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... share with twitter share with linkedin Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Treatment Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Respiratory Syncytial ... Specific Aims Outline Your Experiments Know Your Audience Write Your Research Plan Plan Your Budget & Personnel Salary ...

  16. Impacts of Prescribed Fire Frequency on Coarse Woody Debris Volume, Decomposition and Termite Activity in the Longleaf Pine Flatwoods of Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Dale D. Wade; Hanula, James L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystems have been reduced dramatically throughout their range. Prescribed burning is considered the best way to restore and maintain plant communities associated with longleaf pine, but little is known about its effects on coarse woody debris and associated organisms. We conducted a 5-year study on the Osceola National Forest in northeastern Florida to determine how dormant-season prescribed burns at different frequencies (annual, bienni...

  17. Implementation of field cardio-respiratory measurements to assess energy expenditure in Arabian endurance horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goachet, A G; Julliand, V

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of respiratory exchanges in genuine exercise conditions are undoubtedly of interest to further define the energy needs of endurance horses. However, the equine K4b2, the gas exchanges portable device validated for equines, has not been used in Arabian endurance horses yet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to implement field cardio-respiratory measurements in such horses using the equine K4b2 in order to assess energy expenditure (EE). Measurements of heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), respiratory frequency (RF), tidal volume (VT) and minute expired volume (VE) were carried out at rest and during a 20-min submaximal incremental field exercise in five trained Arabian endurance horses equipped with the K4b2 system. The relationship between HR and VO2 was determined for each horse. EE of the exercise session was calculated from direct VO2 measurements and individual HR-VO2 regression. Out of the five horses, four tolerated the equipment. Respiratory and metabolic variables at rest and during exercise, as well as EE measured at the different gaits, were consistent with reported values in exercising horses: VO2 ranged from 4.8 to 54.1 ml/min per kg from rest to canter, respectively, and EE from 82 to 1095 J/min per kg BW. The 20-min exercise session EE accounted for 6258 and 6332 J from direct VO2 measurements and individual HR-VO2 regression, respectively, which did not differ significantly. Providing an adaptation period and several technical adjustments, the present equine K4b2 could be used to assess EE in Arabian endurance horses in a controlled environment. The prediction of EE from the individual VO2-HR relationship might be an alternative method to evaluate EE when VO2 measurements are not possible.

  18. Cardio-respiratory effects of systemic neurotensin injection are mediated through activation of neurotensin NTS₁ receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Szereda-Przestaszewska, Małgorzata

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of our study was to determine the cardio-respiratory pattern exerted by the systemic injection of neurotensin, contribution of neurotensin NTS(1) receptors and the neural pathways mediating the responses. The effects of an intravenous injection (i.v.) of neurotensin were investigated in anaesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats in following experimental schemes: (i) control animals before and after midcervical vagotomy; (ii) in three separate subgroups of rats: neurally intact, vagotomized at supranodosal level and initially midcervically vagotomized exposed to section of the carotid sinus nerves (CSNs); (iii) in the intact rats 2 minutes after blockade of neurotensin NTS(1) receptors with SR 142948. Intravenous injection of 10 μg/kg of neurotensin in the intact rats evoked prompt increase in the respiratory rate followed by a prolonged slowing down coupled with augmented tidal volume. Midcervical vagotomy precluded the effects of neurotensin on the frequency of breathing, while CSNs section reduced the increase in tidal volume. In all the neural states neurotensin caused significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure preceded by prompt hypertensive response. The cardio-respiratory effects of neurotensin were blocked by pre-treatment with NTS(1) receptor antagonist. The results of this study showed that neurotensin acting through NTS(1) receptors augments the tidal component of the breathing pattern in a large portion via carotid body afferentation whereas the respiratory timing response to neurotensin depends entirely on the intact midcervical vagi. Blood pressure effects evoked by an intravenous neurotensin occur outside vagal and CSNs pathways and might result from activation of the peripheral vascular NTS(1) receptors.

  19. Optimization of carbon nanotube volume percentage for enhancement of high frequency magnetic properties of SrFe8MgCoTi2O19/MWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordani, Gholam Reza; Ghasemi, Ali; saidi, Ali

    2014-08-01

    A novel magnetic nanocomposite of multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with SrFe8MgCoTi2O19 nanoparticles have been prepared by a chemical co-precipitation method. The structural, magnetic and electromagnetic properties of samples were studied as a function of volume percentage of MWCNTs by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analysis. The XRD and FTIR results showed that the nanocomposites were synthesized successfully. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs demonstrated that homogeneous and high level of dispersion of MWCNTs and Sr-hexaferrite nanoparticles in nanocomposite samples were obtained. The saturation magnetization of the nanocomposite samples was found to decrease by an increase in volume percentage of MWCNTs up to 5 vol%. The vector network analysis results show that the highest value of reflection loss of nanocomposite was -42.43 dB at 11.13 GHz with an absorption bandwidth of more than of 4 GHz. The results indicate that, these novel types of nanocomposites with appropriate amount of MWCNTs hold great promise for microwave device applications.

  20. Effect of One-lung Ventilation with Pressure Control Ventilation-volume Guarantee on Respiratory Mechanics in Elderly Patients Undergoing Radical Esophageal Cancer Surgery%压力控制通气-容量保证单肺通气模式对老年食管癌根治术患者呼吸力学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    原皓; 邹亮; 孙莉

    2014-01-01

    To explore the effect of one-lung ventilation (OLV ) with pressure control ventilation-volume guarantee(PCV-VG) on respiratory mechanics in elderly patients undergoing radical esophageal cancer sur-gery .[Methods] Totally 40 elderly patients(ASA Ⅰ ~ Ⅱ) undergoing radical esophageal cancer surgery were di-vided into two groups with 20 in each .All patients were given sevoflurane inhalation for maintenance anesthesia and intubated with double lumen endotracheal catheter .Two-lung volume controlled ventilation(VCV) with a tidal volume(VT) of 10ml/kg and frequency(f) of 12 breaths per minute were performed before chest opening .After chest was opened ,OLV was performed .Group A received VCV mode with a VT of 8ml/kg and f of 12 breaths per minute .Group B received PCV-VG mode with the same peak airway pressure (Ppeak) as that during two-lung VCV ,VT of 8ml/kg and f of 12 breaths per minute .The VT ,minute volume(MV) ,Ppeak ,mean airway pres-sure(Pmean) ,end-tidal pressure of carbon dioxide (PET CO2 ) and dynamic lung compliance (Cdyn) before OLA (T1 ) ,30min after OLA(T2 ) ,60min after OLA(T3 ) and 30min after two-lung ventilation(TLA) were observed . Lung effective dynamic compliance(Cdyn) was calculated .[Results]Compared with group A ,Ppeak and Pmean in group B were decreased ,but there was no significant difference in VT ,MV and PET CO2 ,and Cdyn was increased .[Conclusion] PCV-VG mode in OLA for elderly patients undergoing radical esophageal cancer surgery can decrease Ppeak ,ensure ventilatory capacity and improve Cdyn ,so it is good for lung protection in elderly patients .%【目的】探讨压力控制通气-容量保证(PCV-VG)单肺通气(OLV)模式对老年食管癌根治术患者呼吸力学的影响。【方法】将40例行食管癌根治术的老年患者(ASA Ⅰ~Ⅱ级)分为两组,每组20例。所有患者采取七氟烷吸入维持麻醉,插入双腔气管导管。手术进胸前先行双肺定容通气(VCV

  1. Respiratory effort correction strategies to improve the reproducibility of lung expansion measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Christensen, Gary E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Ding, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Bayouth, John E. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can be used to make measurements of pulmonary function longitudinally. The sensitivity of such measurements to identify change depends on measurement uncertainty. Previously, intrasubject reproducibility of Jacobian-based measures of lung tissue expansion was studied in two repeat prior-RT 4DCT human acquisitions. Difference in respiratory effort such as breathing amplitude and frequency may affect longitudinal function assessment. In this study, the authors present normalization schemes that correct ventilation images for variations in respiratory effort and assess the reproducibility improvement after effort correction.Methods: Repeat 4DCT image data acquired within a short time interval from 24 patients prior to radiation therapy (RT) were used for this analysis. Using a tissue volume preserving deformable image registration algorithm, Jacobian ventilation maps in two scanning sessions were computed and compared on the same coordinate for reproducibility analysis. In addition to computing the ventilation maps from end expiration to end inspiration, the authors investigated the effort normalization strategies using other intermediated inspiration phases upon the principles of equivalent tidal volume (ETV) and equivalent lung volume (ELV). Scatter plots and mean square error of the repeat ventilation maps and the Jacobian ratio map were generated for four conditions: no effort correction, global normalization, ETV, and ELV. In addition, gamma pass rate was calculated from a modified gamma index evaluation between two ventilation maps, using acceptance criterions of 2 mm distance-to-agreement and 5% ventilation difference.Results: The pattern of regional pulmonary ventilation changes as lung volume changes. All effort correction strategies improved reproducibility when changes in respiratory effort were greater than 150 cc (p < 0.005 with regard to the gamma pass rate). Improvement of reproducibility was

  2. Intercostal and forearm muscle deoxygenation during respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure: potential role of a respiratory muscle metaboreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A M; Castro, R R T; Silva, B M; Villacorta, H; Sant'Anna Junior, M; Nóbrega, A C L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on intercostal and forearm muscle perfusion and oxygenation in patients with heart failure. Five clinically stable heart failure patients with respiratory muscle weakness (age, 66 ± 12 years; left ventricle ejection fraction, 34 ± 3%) and nine matched healthy controls underwent a respiratory muscle fatigue protocol, breathing against a fixed resistance at 60% of their maximal inspiratory pressure for as long as they could sustain the predetermined inspiratory pressure. Intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume and oxygenation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy with transducers placed on the seventh left intercostal space and the left forearm. Data were compared by two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Respiratory fatigue occurred at 5.1 ± 1.3 min in heart failure patients and at 9.3 ± 1.4 min in controls (P0.05). Respiratory fatigue in heart failure reduced intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume (Pintercostal (heart failure, -2.6 ± 1.6%; controls, +1.6 ± 0.5%; P<0.05) and in forearm muscles (heart failure, -4.5 ± 0.5%; controls, +0.5 ± 0.8%; P<0.05). These results suggest that respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure causes an oxygen demand/delivery mismatch in respiratory muscles, probably leading to a reflex reduction in peripheral limb muscle perfusion, featuring a respiratory metaboreflex.

  3. Postperfusion lung syndrome: Respiratory mechanics, respiratory indices and biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but lethal. Secondary inflammatory response was the popularly accepted theory for the underlying etiology. Respiratory index (RI and arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen can be reliable indices for the diagnosis of this syndrome as X-ray appearance is always insignificant at the early stage of the onset. Evaluations of extravascular lung water content and pulmonary compliance are also helpful in the definite diagnosis. Multiorgan failure and triple acid-base disturbances that might develop secondary to postperfusion lung syndrome are responsible for the poor prognosis and increased mortality rather than postperfusion lung syndrome itself. Mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume (TV and proper positive end-expiratory pressure can be an effective treatment strategy. Use of ulinastatin and propofol may benefit the patients through different mechanisms.

  4. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen.

  5. Development of a Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography Module Supporting Multiple Sensors for Wearable Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengbo Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an RIP module with the features of supporting multiple inductive sensors, no variable frequency LC oscillator, low power consumption, and automatic gain adjustment for each channel. Based on the method of inductance measurement without using a variable frequency LC oscillator, we further integrate pulse amplitude modulation and time division multiplexing scheme into a module to support multiple RIP sensors. All inductive sensors are excited by a high-frequency electric current periodically and momentarily, and the inductance of each sensor is measured during the time when the electric current is fed to it. To improve the amplitude response of the RIP sensors, we optimize the sensing unit with a matching capacitor parallel with each RIP sensor forming a frequency selection filter. Performance tests on the linearity of the output with cross-sectional area and the accuracy of respiratory volume estimation demonstrate good linearity and accurate lung volume estimation. Power consumption of this new RIP module with two sensors is very low. The performance of respiration measurement during movement is also evaluated. This RIP module is especially desirable for wearable systems with multiple RIP sensors for long-term respiration monitoring.

  6. Development of a respiratory inductive plethysmography module supporting multiple sensors for wearable systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengbo; Zheng, Jiewen; Wu, Hao; Wang, Weidong; Wang, Buqing; Liu, Hongyun

    2012-09-27

    In this paper, we present an RIP module with the features of supporting multiple inductive sensors, no variable frequency LC oscillator, low power consumption, and automatic gain adjustment for each channel. Based on the method of inductance measurement without using a variable frequency LC oscillator, we further integrate pulse amplitude modulation and time division multiplexing scheme into a module to support multiple RIP sensors. All inductive sensors are excited by a high-frequency electric current periodically and momentarily, and the inductance of each sensor is measured during the time when the electric current is fed to it. To improve the amplitude response of the RIP sensors, we optimize the sensing unit with a matching capacitor parallel with each RIP sensor forming a frequency selection filter. Performance tests on the linearity of the output with cross-sectional area and the accuracy of respiratory volume estimation demonstrate good linearity and accurate lung volume estimation. Power consumption of this new RIP module with two sensors is very low. The performance of respiration measurement during movement is also evaluated. This RIP module is especially desirable for wearable systems with multiple RIP sensors for long-term respiration monitoring.

  7. Use of 3D Seismic Azimuthal Iso-Frequency Volumes for the Detection and Characterization of High Porosity/Permeability Zones in Carbonate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toelle, Brian E.

    Among the most important properties controlling the production from conventional oil and gas reservoirs is the distribution of porosity and permeability within the producing geologic formation. The geometry of the pore space within these reservoirs, and the permeability associated with this pore space geometry, impacts not only where production can occur and at what flow rates but can also have significant influence on many other rock properties. Zones of high matrix porosity can result in an isotropic response for certain reservoir properties whereas aligned porosity/permeability, such as open, natural fracture trends, have been shown to result in reservoirs being anisotropic in many properties. The ability to identify zones within a subsurface reservoir where porosity/permeability is significantly higher and to characterize them according to their geometries would be of great significance when planning where new boreholes, particularly horizontal boreholes, should be drilled. The detection and characterization of these high porosity/permeability zones using their isotropic and anisotropic responses may be possible through the analysis of azimuthal (also referred to as azimuth-limited) 3D seismic volumes. During this study the porosity/permeability systems of a carbonate, pinnacle reef within the northern Michigan Basin undergoing enhanced oil recovery were investigated using selected seismic attributes extracted from azimuthal 3D seismic volumes. Based on the response of these seismic attributes an interpretation of the geometry of the porosity/permeability system within the reef was made. This interpretation was supported by well data that had been obtained during the primary production phase of the field. Additionally, 4D seismic data, obtained as part of the CO2 based EOR project, supported reservoir simulation results that were based on the porosity/permeability interpretation.

  8. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We generate strong (1 and weak (2 grade of recommendations based on high (A, moderate (B and low (C grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B and inhaled nitric oxide (1A as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C, and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B. The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B, however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B. In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B. Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A. In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  9. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Jae; Moon, Jae Young; Shin, Ein-Soon; Kim, Je Hyeong; Jung, Hoon; Park, So Young; Kim, Ho Cheol; Sim, Yun Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lim, Jaemin; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Won-Yeon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kang, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  10. Pragmatic circuits frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Eccles, William

    2006-01-01

    Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain goes through the Laplace transform to get from the time domain to topics that include the s-plane, Bode diagrams, and the sinusoidal steady state. This second of three volumes ends with a-c power, which, although it is just a special case of the sinusoidal steady state, is an important topic with unique techniques and terminology. Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain is focused on the frequency domain. In other words, time will no longer be the independent variable in our analysis. The two other volumes in the Pragmatic Circuits series include titles on DC

  11. Avaliação do pico de pressão, do volume corrente e da freqüência respiratória durante ventilação de carneiros prematuros utilizando balão auto-inflável Evaluation of peak inspiratory pressure, tidal volume and respiratory rate during ventilation of premature lambs using a self-inflating bag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson G. Resende

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o pico de pressão inspiratória, o volume corrente e a freqüência respiratória obtidos durante ventilação manual de carneiros prematuros, utilizando balão auto-inflável. MÉTODOS: Estudo experimental descritivo em que cinco duplas de médicos selecionados aleatoriamente entre 35 neonatologistas que trabalham em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal e experientes em reanimação de recém-nascidos ventilaram cinco carneiros prematuros intubados, utilizando balão auto-inflável. Os sinais de pressão e fluxo eram captados, convertidos por meio de transdutores e digitalizados para armazenamento e análise. Foram avaliadas curvas de pressão e de volume corrente, este a partir da integral do fluxo, em suas medidas de pico, nos 50 segundos finais de cada 5 minutos. RESULTADOS: A mediana da pressão foi de 39,8 (IQ25-75% 30,2-47,2 cmH2O; foi menor que 20 em 1,1% das vezes e maior que 40 em 49,1%. Sete em 10 médicos propiciaram mais de seis picos de pressão maiores que 40 cmH2O. A mediana do volume corrente/kg foi de 17,8 (IQ25-75% 14,1-22,4 mL, sendo menor que 5 mL em 0,1% das vezes e igual ou maior que 20 mL em 37,7%. Todos os médicos impuseram cinco ou mais ciclos ventilatórios com volume corrente/kg de 20 mL ou mais. A freqüência situou-se entre 30 e 60 ciclos/minuto em 65,9% das vezes, sendo menor que 30 em 6,8% e maior que 60 em 27,3% das vezes. CONCLUSÃO: Ocorreu grande variabilidade nos valores do pico de pressão inspiratória e do volume corrente/kg, sendo muitas vezes elevados e alcançando níveis indutores de biotrauma; para a freqüência respiratória, os valores foram adequados na maioria das vezes.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the peak inspiratory pressure, tidal volume and respiratory rate achieved during manual ventilation of premature lambs, using a self-inflating bag. METHODS: In this descriptive, experimental study, five pairs of physicians, selected at random among 35 neonatologists working at a

  12. The microbiota of the respiratory tract: gatekeeper to respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wing Ho; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-05-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts as a gatekeeper that provides resistance to colonization by respiratory pathogens. The respiratory microbiota might also be involved in the maturation and maintenance of homeostasis of respiratory physiology and immunity. The ecological and environmental factors that direct the development of microbial communities in the respiratory tract and how these communities affect respiratory health are the focus of current research. Concurrently, the functions of the microbiome of the upper and lower respiratory tract in the physiology of the human host are being studied in detail. In this Review, we will discuss the epidemiological, biological and functional evidence that support the physiological role of the respiratory microbiota in the maintenance of human health.

  13. Advances in respiratory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Bach, Jonathan F; Shaw, Scott P

    2007-09-01

    Effective respiratory therapy depends on obtaining a definitive diagnosis and following established recommendations for treatment. Unfortunately, many respiratory conditions are idiopathic in origin or are attributable to nonspecific inflammation. In some situations, disorders are controlled rather than cured. Recent advances in pulmonary therapeutics include the use of new agents to treat common diseases and application of local delivery of drugs to enhance drug effect and minimize side effects.

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  15. Altered Resting and Exercise Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Obesity, particularly severe obesity, affects both resting and exercise-related respiratory physiology. Severe obesity classically produces a restrictive ventilatory abnormality, characterized by reduced expiratory reserve volume. However, obstructive ventilatory abnormality may also be associated with abdominal obesity. Decreased peak work rates are usually seen among obese subjects in a setting of normal or decreased ventilatory reserve and normal cardiovascular response to exercise. Weight loss may reverse many adverse physiological consequences of severe obesity on the respiratory system. PMID:19700043

  16. Turbidite record of frequency and source of large volume (>100 km3) Canary Island landslides in the last 1.5 Ma: Implications for landslide triggers and geohazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. E.; Wynn, R. B.; Talling, P. J.; Masson, D. G.

    2013-07-01

    During the last two decades, numerous studies have focused on resolving the landslide histories of the Canary Islands. Issues surrounding the preservation and dating of onshore and proximal submarine landslide deposits precludes accurate determination of event ages. However, submarine landslides often disaggregate and generate sediment gravity flows. Volcaniclastic turbidites sampled from Madeira Abyssal Plain piston cores represent a record of eight large-volume failures from the Western Canary Islands in the last 1.5 Ma. During this time, there is a mean recurrence rate of 200 ka, while the islands of El Hierro and Tenerife have individual landslide recurrences of 500 ka and 330 ka, respectively. Deposits from the 15 ka El Golfo landslide from El Hierro and 165 ka Icod landslide from Tenerife are examined. This study also identifies potential deposits associated with the Orotava (535 ka), Güímar (850 ka), and Rogues de García landslides (1.2 Ma) from Tenerife, El Julan (540 ka), and El Tiñor (1.05 Ma) landslides from El Hierro, and the Cumbre Nueva landslide (485 ka) from La Palma. Seven of eight landslides occurred during major deglaciations or subsequent interglacial periods, which represent 55% of the time. However, all of the studied landslides occur during or at the end of periods of protracted island volcanism, which generally represent 60% of the island histories. Although climate may precondition failures, it is suggested that volcanism presents a more viable preconditioning and trigger mechanism for Canary Island landslides.

  17. Impact of exacerbations on respiratory system impedance measured by a forced oscillation technique in COPD: a prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Takahiro; Kaneko, Masahiro; Tomioka, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    Background Forced oscillation technique (FOT) has been reported to be useful in the evaluation and management of obstructive lung disease, including COPD. To date, no data are available concerning long-term changes in respiratory system impedance measured by FOT. Additionally, although exacerbations have been reported to be associated with excessive lung function decline in COPD, the impact of exacerbations on the results of FOT has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal changes in respiratory system impedance and the influence of exacerbations thereon. Methods Between March 2011 and March 2012, outpatients who attended Kobe City Medical Center West Hospital with a diagnosis of COPD were assessed for eligibility. Baseline patient characteristics (age, sex, body mass index, smoking history, current smoking status, COPD stage), lung function (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]), blood tests (neutrophils and eosinophils), FOT, and COPD assessment test results were collected at enrollment. Lung function and FOT were examined every 6 months until March 2016. Annual changes in FEV1 and FOT parameters were obtained from the slope of the linear regression curve. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on exacerbation history. Results Fifty-one of 58 patients with COPD were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up period was 57 (52–59) months. Twenty-five (49%) patients experienced exacerbations. A significant annual decline in FEV1 and respiratory system impedance were shown. Additionally, annual changes in FEV1, respiratory system resistance at 5 Hz, respiratory system reactance at 5 Hz, and resonant frequency were greater in patients with exacerbations than in those without exacerbations. Conclusion Exacerbations of COPD lead not only to a decline in lung function but also to an increase in respiratory system impedance.

  18. Effects of hypercapnia on variability of normal respiratory behavior in awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlyk, P C; Jennings, D B

    1987-03-01

    Resting quiet awake cats breathing air in a steady state have a range of respiratory behavior, and this encompasses nonpurring and purring (D. B. Jennings and P. C. Szlyk, Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 63: 148-154, 1985). On a given study day, individual cats usually breathed in a limited part of their potential respiratory range. Respiratory pattern, such as average breath frequency (f) and average tidal volume (VT) utilized for a given level of ventilation (V), could be predicted when cats breathed air; as well, inspiratory (TI) and expiratory (TE) times were specific for a given breath f. Inhalation of 2% and 4% CO2 in air caused an average increase in ventilation of 16 and 100%, respectively but breath-to-breath variability of V, f, and VT persisted at each fractional concentration of inspired CO2 (FICO2). The range of different V utilized breath to breath when breathing 2% CO2 overlapped with V during air control studies. Substantial overlap with control V also occurred in three of six cats when breathing 4% CO2. The most consistent effect of progressive hypercapnia was to increase VT and decrease f at a given level of V; increase in V during hypercapnia was accounted for by an increase in mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI). Hypercapnia also caused the fraction of breathing cycle devoted to inspiration (TI/TT) to increase at low f but not at high f.

  19. Dynamics of human respiratory system mycoflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Biedunkiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determing the prevalence of individual species of fungi in the respiratory systems of women and men, analysis of the dynamics of the fungi in individual sections of the respiratory system as concerns their quantity and identification of phenology of the isolated fungi coupled with an attempt at identifying their possible preferences for appearing during specific seasons of thc year. During 10 years of studies (1989- 1998. 29 species of fungi belonging: Candida, Geolrichum, Saccharomyces, Saccharomycopsis, Schizosaccharomyces, Torulopsis, Trichosporon and Aspergillus were isolated from the ontocenoses of the respiratory systems of patients at the Independent Public Center for Pulmonology and Oncology in Olsztyn. Candida albicans was a clearly dominating fungus. Individual species appeared individually, in twos or threes in a single patient, they were isolated more frequently in the spring and autumn, less frequently during the winter and summer. The largest number of fungi species were isolated from sputum (29 species, bronchoscopic material (23 species and pharyngeal swabs (15 species. Sacchoromycopsis capsularis and Trichosporon beigelii should be treated as new for the respiratory system. Biodiversity of fungi, their numbers and continous fluctuations in frequency indicate that the respiratory system ontocenose offers the optimum conditions for growth and development of the majority of the majority of yeasts - like fungi.

  20. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  1. Thoracic sympathetic block reduces respiratory system compliance

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    Fábio Ely Martins Benseñor

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA following thoracic surgery presents known analgesic and respiratory benefits. However, intraoperative thoracic sympathetic block may trigger airway hyperreactivity. This study weighed up these beneficial and undesirable effects on intraoperative respiratory mechanics. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized, double-blind clinical study at a tertiary public hospital. METHODS: Nineteen patients scheduled for partial lung resection were distributed using a random number table into groups receiving active TEA (15 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, n = 9 or placebo (15 ml 0.9% saline, n = 10 solutions that also contained 1:200,000 epinephrine and 2 mg morphine. Under general anesthesia, flows and airway and esophageal pressures were recorded. Pressure-volume curves, lower inflection points (LIP, resistance and compliance at 10 ml/kg tidal volume were established for respiratory system, chest wall and lungs. Student’s t test was performed, including confidence intervals (CI. RESULTS: Bupivacaine rose 5 ± 1 dermatomes upwards and 6 ± 1 downwards. LIP was higher in the bupivacaine group (6.2 ± 2.3 versus 3.6 ± 0.6 cmH2O, p = 0.016, CI = -3.4 to -1.8. Respiratory system and lung compliance were higher in the placebo group (respectively 73.3 ± 10.6 versus 51.9 ± 15.5, p = 0.003, CI = 19.1 to 23.7; 127.2 ± 31.7 versus 70.2 ± 23.1 ml/cmH2O, p < 0.001, CI = 61 to 53. Resistance and chest wall compliance showed no difference. CONCLUSION: TEA decreased respiratory system compliance by reducing its lung component. Resistance was unaffected. Under TEA, positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are advisable.

  2. Chronic respiratory diseases and risk factors in 12 regions of the Russian Federation

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    Chuchalin AG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander G Chuchalin,1 Nikolai Khaltaev,2 Nikolay S Antonov,1 Dmitry V Galkin,3 Leonid G Manakov,4 Paola Antonini,5 Michael Murphy,5 Alexander G Solodovnikov,6 Jean Bousquet,7 Marcelo HS Pereira,8 Irina V Demko9 1Institute of Pulmonology, Federal Medical and Biological Agency, Moscow, Russia; 2Global Alliance Against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD, Genève, Switzerland; 3GlaxoSmithKline, Moscow, Russia; 4Far Eastern Scientific Center of Physiology and Pathology of Respiration RAS (Russian Academy of Sciences, Blagoveshchensk, Russia; 5Worldwide Clinical Trials, King of Prussia, PA, USA; 6Worldwide Clinical Trials, Ekaterinburg, Russia; 7Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Montpellier, France; 8Research and Development Chief Medical Office, International Medical, GlaxoSmithKline, London, United Kingdom; 9Krasnoyarsk State Medical University, Krasnoyarsk, Russia Background: Estimation suggests that at least 4 million people die, annually, as a result of chronic respiratory disease (CRD. The Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD was formed following a mandate from the World Health Assembly to address this serious and growing health problem. Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of CRD in Russian symptomatic patients and to evaluate the frequency of major risk factors for CRD in Russia. Methods: A cross-sectional, population-based epidemiological study using the GARD questionnaire on adults from 12 regions of the Russian Federation. Common respiratory symptoms and risk factors were recorded. Spirometry was performed in respondents with suspected CRD. Allergic rhinitis (AR and chronic bronchitis (CB were defined by the presence of related symptoms according to the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma and the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines; asthma was defined based on disease symptoms; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD was defined as a post

  3. Optimization of carbon nanotube volume percentage for enhancement of high frequency magnetic properties of SrFe{sub 8}MgCoTi{sub 2}O{sub 19}/MWCNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordani, Gholam Reza, E-mail: gordani@gmail.com [Department of Materials science and Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Materials Engineering Department, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghasemi, Ali [Materials Engineering Department, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saidi, Ali [Department of Materials science and Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-01

    A novel magnetic nanocomposite of multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with SrFe{sub 8}MgCoTi{sub 2}O{sub 19} nanoparticles have been prepared by a chemical co-precipitation method. The structural, magnetic and electromagnetic properties of samples were studied as a function of volume percentage of MWCNTs by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analysis. The XRD and FTIR results showed that the nanocomposites were synthesized successfully. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs demonstrated that homogeneous and high level of dispersion of MWCNTs and Sr-hexaferrite nanoparticles in nanocomposite samples were obtained. The saturation magnetization of the nanocomposite samples was found to decrease by an increase in volume percentage of MWCNTs up to 5 vol%. The vector network analysis results show that the highest value of reflection loss of nanocomposite was −42.43 dB at 11.13 GHz with an absorption bandwidth of more than of 4 GHz. The results indicate that, these novel types of nanocomposites with appropriate amount of MWCNTs hold great promise for microwave device applications. - Highlights: • We investigate the high frequency properties of Sr-hexaferrite/MWCNTs composite. • Saturation magnetization of nanocomposites is decreased with presence of MWCNTs. • The ferrite/CNTs nanocomposite sample covers whole X-band frequencies (8–12 GHz). • The ferrite/CNTs nanocomposite can be used as a potential magnetic loss material. • Nanocomposite contain 5 vol% of CNTs have shown greater than 99% of reflection loss.

  4. Detection of respiratory viruses by real-time polymerase chain reaction in outpatients with acute respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Bragança Martins Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the major contributors to the morbidity and mortality of upper and lower acute respiratory infections (ARIs for all age groups. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies for a large range of respiratory viruses using a sensitive molecular detection technique in specimens from outpatients of all ages with ARIs. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from 162 individuals between August 2007-August 2009. Twenty-three pathogenic respiratory agents, 18 respiratory viruses and five bacteria were investigated using multiplex real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF. Through IIF, 33 (20.4% specimens with respiratory virus were recognised, with influenza virus representing over half of the positive samples. Through a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay, 88 (54.3% positive samples were detected; the most prevalent respiratory viral pathogens were influenza, human rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. Six cases of viral co-detection were observed, mainly involving RSV. The use of multiplex real-time RT-PCR increased the viral detection by 33.9% and revealed a larger number of respiratory viruses implicated in ARI cases, including the most recently described respiratory viruses [human bocavirus, human metapneumovirus, influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 virus, human coronavirus (HCoV NL63 and HCoV HKU1].

  5. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  6. Clinical effect of lower tidal volume combined with sustained inflation on acute respiratory distress for post operative carcinoma surgery patients%小潮气量结合控制性肺膨胀对肿瘤术后早期急性呼吸窘迫患者的疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨全会; 王保强; 王小亭; 张昊

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical efficiency and possible side effects of lower tidal volume combined with sustained inflation(SI) on acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for post operative carcinoma surgery patients.Methods Fifty one hypoxemia post operative carcinoma surgery patients from Jan.2007 to Dec.2009 in Cancer Hospital and Institute,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College were included.Their cirrculation was stable.Mechanical ventilation could not be removed due to ARDS.Noninvasive continuous artery blood pressure ( NBP),pulse oximetric saturation ( SPO2 ),arterial blood gas ( ABG ) analysis,static compliance of respiratory system (Cst) were monitored and recorded.Patients were ventilated on volume control mode.Tidal volumes (VT) was set to 6 ml/kg.SI were conducted by continuous positive airway pressure of 35 cm H2O,sustaining for 40 seconds.Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP),FiO2,respiratory rate (F),Pplateau inspiratory pressures (Pplat),the peak inspiratory pressures (Ppeak),VT,Cst and ABG before SI applying and at 10 min,24 h,48 h after SI applying were measured.Results The level of PaO2 and FiO2 were significantly lowered,VT and Crs increased significantly,Ppeak,Pplat,and F were improved significantly at 10 min,24 h and 48 h after SI in all cases.No complication occurred.All patients were discharged without adverse event.Conclusions Hypoxemia of ARDS following carcinoma surgery could be improved by lower tidal volume combined with SI.%目的 观察小潮气量结合控制性肺膨胀(SI)对肿瘤术后早期呼吸窘迫(ARD)患者的疗效及可能出现的不良反应.方法 选择中国医学科学院肿瘤医院和北京协和医院2007年1月至2009年12月收治的肿瘤术后早期ARD患者51例,术后循环稳定,因ARD而不能脱离机械通气.监测并记录其持续无创血压(NBP)、脉搏血氧饱和度(SPO2),实行肺保护性通气,予SI治疗,记录SI前及SI后10 min、24 h和48 h的呼吸

  7. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernatowicz, K., E-mail: kingab@student.ethz.ch; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI 5232, Switzerland and Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J., E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Mishra, P. [Brigham and Womens Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  8. Buoyancy under control: underwater locomotor performance in a deep diving seabird suggests respiratory strategies for reducing foraging effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants--as in other families of diving seabirds--of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control.

  9. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  10. Respiratory pattern changes produced by intercostal muscle/rib vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, D C; Lindsey, B G; Shannon, R

    1988-06-01

    Large-amplitude vibration of the intercostal muscles/ribs has an inhibitory effect on inspiratory motor output. This effect has been attributed, in part, to the stimulation of intercostal muscle tendon organs. Intercostal muscle/rib vibration can also produce a decrease or increase in respiratory frequency. Studies were conducted 1) to determine whether, in addition to intercostal tendon organs, costovertebral joint mechanoreceptors (CVJR's) contribute to the inspiratory inhibitory effect of intercostal muscle/rib vibration (IMV) and 2) to explain the different respiratory frequency responses to IMV previously reported. Phrenic (C5) activity was monitored in paralyzed thoracotomized, artificially ventilated cats. Vibration (125 Hz) at amplitudes greater than 1,200 micron of one T6 intercostal space in decerebrated vagotomized rats reduced phrenic activity. This response was still present but weaker in some animals after denervation of the T6 intercostal muscles. Subsequent denervation of the T6 CVJR's by dorsal root sections eliminated this effect. Respiratory frequency decreased during simultaneous vibration (greater than 1,200 micron) of the T5 and T7 intercostal spaces in vagotomized cats. Respiratory frequency increased during IMV of two intercostal spaces (greater than 1,300 micron) in vagal intact cats. The use of different anesthetics (pentobarbital, allobarbital) did not alter these results. We conclude that CVJR's may contribute to the inhibitory effect of IMV on medullary inspiratory activity. The presence or absence of pulmonary vagal afferents can account for the different respiratory frequency responses to IMV, and different anesthetics did not influence these results.

  11. Mean platelet volume, red cell distribution width, platelet-to-lymphocyte and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and their relationships with high-frequency hearing thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozan, Nazim; Alpaycı, Mahmut; Aslan, Mehmet; Cankaya, Hakan; Kıroglu, Ahmet Faruk; Turan, Mahfuz; Ayral, Abdurrahman; Senkoy, Emre; Ilter, Server

    2016-11-01

    The mean platelet volume (MPV), red cell distribution width (RDW) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) comprise laboratory markers in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). There is a controversy in the literature regarding which type of ear involvement is characteristic of AS. The aim of this study was to simultaneously investigate the MPV, RDW, platelet to lymphocyte (PLR) and NLR in patients with AS and their relationships with high-frequency hearing thresholds. Thirty patients with AS and 35 age-matched healthy subjects were included. Each subject was tested with low- (250, 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz) and high- (4000, 8000, 10,000, 12,000, 14,000 and 16,000 Hz) frequency audiometry. Additionally, the case and control groups were evaluated regarding the average hearing thresholds in bone conduction. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. The RDW, MPV, neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelet counts were evaluated with the complete blood count. Furthermore, the NLR and PLR were calculated. The complete blood count, platelet numbers, ESR, CRP and NLR levels were significantly increased in the AS patients compared with the healthy controls (p  0.05) in the AS patients compared with the healthy controls. The BASDAI score and disease duration were not correlated with the ESR, CRP levels, MPV, PLR, RDW or NLR in patients with AS (all; p > 0.05). The AS patients had increased average measurement values for the hearing threshold in both ears at frequencies of 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz; however, there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). The average values of the hearing threshold in both ears at the high frequencies of 4000, 6000, 8000, 10,000, 12,000 and 14,000 Hz were significantly increased in the case group; however, it was not significantly increased at 16,000 Hz. The current study is the first to investigate the PLR, NLR, MPV and RDW levels in acute AS. We identified a significantly increased

  12. Calibration of respiratory inductance plethysmograph in preterm infants with different respiratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeriaud, Guillaume; Eberhard, André; Benchetrit, Gila; Debillon, Thierry; Baconnier, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) is a method for respiratory measurements particularly attractive in infants because it is noninvasive and it does not interfere with the airway. RIP calibration remains controversial in neonates, and is particularly difficult in infants with thoraco-abdominal asynchrony or with ventilatory assist. The objective of this study was to evaluate a new RIP calibration method in preterm infants either without respiratory disease, with thoraco-abdominal asynchrony, or with ventilatory support. This method is based on (i) a specifically adapted RIP jacket, (ii) the least squares method to estimate the volume/motion ribcage and abdominal coefficients, and (iii) an individualized filtering method that takes into account individual breathing pattern. The reference flow was recorded with a pneumotachograph. The accuracy of flow reconstruction using the new method was compared to the accuracy of three other calibration methods, with arbitrary fixed RIP coefficients or with coefficients determined according to qualitative diagnostic calibration method principle. Fifteen preterm neonates have been studied; gestational age was (mean +/- SD) 31.7 +/- 0.8 weeks; birth weight was 1,470 +/- 250 g. The respiratory flow determined with the new method had a goodness of fit at least equivalent to the other three methods in the entire group. Moreover, in unfavorable conditions--breathing asynchrony or ventilatory assist--the quality of fit was significantly higher than with the three other methods (P < 0.05, repeated measures ANOVA). Accuracy of tidal volume measurements was at least equivalent to the other methods, and the breath-by-breath differences with reference volumes were lower, although not significantly, than with the other methods. The goodness of fit of the reconstructed RIP flow with this new method--even in unfavorable respiratory conditions--provides a prerequisite for the study of flow pattern during the neonatal period.

  13. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  14. Respiratory problems in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrant, N J; Gatland, D J

    1990-01-01

    Death from respiratory causes in acromegaly is three times more common than in the general population and is most often the result of upper airways obstruction, although less commonly pulmonary dysfunction and disturbance of the central nervous system may occur. These factors may be found alone or in combination. Despite several reports of laryngeal involvement, upper airway obstruction in acromegaly is usually regarded as being due to macroglossia and pharyngeal soft tissue hypertrophy. We present four cases of acromegaly in which tracheostomy was required for laryngeal obstruction, with a review of the literature concerning the nature of respiratory problems in acromegaly.

  15. RECURRENT RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN AND THE PROGRAM IMMUNOREHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. A. Chebotareva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposed a modern rehabilitation program for children with recurrent infections of the respiratory tract. As a result, it is shown interferon and immunotherapy is an important component of an integrated approach to the rehabilitation of children with recurrent respiratory infections, positively influencing to the nature of the immunological abnormalities. Using this scheme can reduce the frequency of episodes of ARI and increase the duration of clinically successful period after the experimentation. 

  16. Correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman NNAA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nor Najwatul Akmal Ab Rahman,1 Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh,1 Raymond Lee2 1Physiotherapy Programme, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: Aging is associated with alterations in thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function. Research information regarding the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and a comprehensive examination of respiratory function parameters in older adults is limited. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between thoracolumbar curvatures and respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults. Thoracolumbar curvatures (thoracic and lumbar were measured using a motion tracker. Respiratory function parameters such as lung function, respiratory rate, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory muscle thickness (diaphragm and intercostal were measured using a spirometer, triaxial accelerometer, respiratory pressure meter and ultrasound imaging, respectively. Sixty-eight community-dwelling older males and females from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with mean (standard deviation age of 66.63 (5.16 years participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed that mean (standard deviation thoracic curvature angle and lumbar curvature angles were -46.30° (14.66° and 14.10° (10.58°, respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between thoracic curvature angle and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: r=-0.23, P<0.05; forced vital capacity: r=-0.32, P<0.05, quiet expiration intercostal thickness (r=-0.22, P<0.05 and deep expiration diaphragm muscle thickness (r=-0.21, P<0.05. The lumbar curvature angle had a significant negative correlation with respiratory muscle strength (r=-0.29, P<0.05 and diaphragm muscle thickness at deep inspiration (r=-0.22, P<0.05. However, respiratory rate

  17. [Respiratory system elastance and resistance measured by proportional assist ventilation in patients with respiratory muscle weakness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Yasushi; Ogawa, Masafumi; Kawai, Mitsuru

    2004-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilatory therapy has prolonged survival of myopathy patients with hypoventilation. Efficacy of non-invasive ventilation depends on both elastance and resistance of the respiratory system. Although these parameters are important in the prescription of respiratory management, conventional respiratory function test does not show the appropriate answer in patients with severe respiratory muscle weakness. In muscular dystrophy, muscle tends to be shortened due to its fibrosis, when muscle becomes atrophic and weak; fibrosis of respiratory muscle tissues presumably causes high thoracic elastance. We evaluated the total respiratory system elastance and resistance during proportional assist ventilation (PAV) in myopathy patients. In PAV with 100% assist, using BiPAP Vision ventilator, airway pressure exceeds 20 cmH2O or tidal volume exceeds 1.5 liter (run-away phenomenon) when the volume assist or the flow assist is higher than the individual elastance or the resistance, respectively. Twenty myopathy patients with ventilatory failure and 7 healthy controls were evaluated, including 7 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), 2 patients with congenital myopathy (CM), 1 patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LG), 6 patients with myotonic dystrophy (MyD) and 4 patients with acid maltase deficiency (AMD). Seventeen patients used a nasal mask and 3 patients had a tracheostomy tube. Fifteen patients used a pressure-preset ventilator, and 3 patients used a volume-preset ventilator. In all patients with DMD, CM and LG, respiratory system elastance was higher than 20 (cmH2O/L) and than in all patients with AMD and MyD except 1 MyD patient. Follow-up measurement after half a or one year showed increase of respiratory system elastance in 2 DMD patients and 1 CM patient, but almost no change in 3 AMD patients. The elastance measured during PAV was consistent with the clinical impression of muscle shortening. One exceptional MyD patient showed extremely

  18. SU-E-J-48: Development of An Abdominal Compression Device for Respiratory Correlated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T; Kang, S; Kim, D; Suh, T [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level according to the abdominal respiratory motion and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: In this study, we focused on developing the abdominal compression device which could control pressure level at any point of time so the developed device is possible to use a variety of purpose (gating technique or respiratory training system) while maintaining the merit of the existing commercial device. The compression device (air pad form) was designed to be able to compress the front and side of abdomen and the pressure level of the abdomen is controlled by air flow. Pressure level of abdomen (air flow) was determined using correlation data between external abdominal motion and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer. In order to verify the feasibility of the device, it was necessary to confirm the correlation between the abdominal respiratory motion and respiratory volume signal and cooperation with respiratory training system also checked. Results: In the previous study, we could find that the correlation coefficient ratio between diaphragm and respiratory volume signal measured by spirometer was 0.95. In this study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion measured by belt-transducer (correlation coefficient ratio was 0.92) and used the correlated respiratory volume data as an abdominal pressure level. It was possible to control the pressure level with negligible time delay and respiratory volume data based guiding waveforms could be properly inserted into the respiratory training system. Conclusion: Through this feasibility study, we confirmed the correlation between the respiratory volume signal and the external abdominal motion. Also initial assessment of the device and its compatibility with the respiratory training system were verified. Further study on application in respiratory gated

  19. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, J; Baeuerle, T; Semmler, W; Bartling, S H [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dinkel, J [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zwick, S [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg University (Germany); Grasruck, M [Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Kiessling, F [Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen (Germany); Gupta, R [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: j.kuntz@dkfz.de

    2010-04-07

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  20. Obesity and respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Christopher; Liddicoat, Helen; Moonsie, Ian; Makker, Himender

    2010-10-20

    The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.

  1. Respiratory Issues in OI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... capacity. Other problems include ineffective cough, poor secretion clearance, airway diseases such as asthma, sleep apnea, and low oxygen. These problems affect people of all ages and all types of OI. Respiratory infection, poor ... good secretion clearance by staying well hydrated and speaking to your ...

  2. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  3. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  4. American Association for Respiratory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NBRC Credentials Congress News & Highlights Clinician Training on Tobacco Dependence for Respiratory Therapists Increase your skill with ... 12 Dad’s Struggle with ALS Inspires Respiratory Therapy Student Read More Oct 12 RSV Experience Leads Member ...

  5. Respiratory Resistance In Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael J.

    1975-01-01

    Patients' respiratory problems may interfere with their talking in therapy sessions. Interventions by the therapist must be based on an understanding of the underlying dynamics which produced the respiratory problem. (Author)

  6. Respiratory manifestations in amyloidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ling; CAI Bai-qiang; ZHONG Xu; ZHU Yuan-jue

    2005-01-01

    Background Amyloidosis is a collection of diseases in which different proteins are deposited. Amyloid deposits occur in systemic and organ-limited forms. In both systemic and localized forms of the disease, lung can be involved. The aim of this study was to explore the different respiratory manifestations of amyloidosis. Methods Chest radiology, clinical presentations, bronchoscopic/laryngoscopic findings and lung function data of 59 patients with amyloidosis involving respiratory tract collected during January 1986 to March 2005, were analysed.Results Of the 16 cases with localized respiratory tract amyloidosis, 8 had the lesions in the trachea and the bronchi, 2 in the larynx and the trachea, 5 in the larynx and/or the pharynx, and 1 in the lung parenchyma. Of 43 systemic amyloidosis with respiratory tract involvement, 3 had the lesions in bronchi, 13 in lung parenchyma, 33 in pleura, 8 in mediastina, 1 in nose and 1 in pharynx. Chest X-rays were normal in most cases of tracheobronchial amyloidosis. CT, unlike chest X-rays, showed irregular luminal narrowing, airway wall thickening with calcifications and soft tissue shadows in airway lumen. Localized lung parenchymal amyloidosis presented as multiple nodules. Multiple nodular opacities, patch shadows and reticular opacities were the main radiological findings in systemic amyloidosis with lung parenchymal involvement. In pleural amyloidosis, pleural effusions and pleural thickening were detected. Mediastinal and/or hilar adenopathy were also a form of lung involvement in systemic amyloidosis. The major bronchoscopic findings of tracheobronchial amyloidosis were narrowing of airway lumen, while nodular, 'tumour like' or 'bubble like' masses, with missing or vague cartilaginous rings, were detected in about half of the patients.Conclusions Localized respiratory tract amyloidosis mostly affects the trachea and the bronchi. Chest X-rays are not sensitive to detect these lesions. Systemic amyloidosis often involves

  7. The Effects of Swim Training on Respiratory Aspects of Speech Production in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Amanda Faith; Emes, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Reduced respiratory muscle strength in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) may affect speech respiratory variables such as maximum phonation duration (MPD), initiation volume, and expired mean airflow. Researchers randomly assigned adolescents with DS (N = 28) to either 12 weeks of swim training (DS-ST) or a control group (DS-NT). Repeated…

  8. Respiratory inductive plethysmography accuracy at varying PEEP levels and degrees of acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.G. Markhorst (Dick); M.A. van Van Gestel (Miriam); H.R. van Genderingen (Huibert); J.J. Haitsma (Jack); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard); A.J. van Vught (Adrianus)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground and objective: This study was performed to assess the accuracy of respiratory inductive plethysmographic (RIP) estimated lung volume changes at varying positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP) during different degrees of acute respiratory failure. Methods: Measurements of insp

  9. The Effects of Swim Training on Respiratory Aspects of Speech Production in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Amanda Faith; Emes, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Reduced respiratory muscle strength in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) may affect speech respiratory variables such as maximum phonation duration (MPD), initiation volume, and expired mean airflow. Researchers randomly assigned adolescents with DS (N = 28) to either 12 weeks of swim training (DS-ST) or a control group (DS-NT). Repeated…

  10. Herpesvirus delivery to the murine respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cindy S E; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G

    2014-09-01

    Herpesvirus transmission is sporadic, and infection may be asymptomatic or present only with secondary lesions after dissemination. Consequently host entry remains ill-understood. Experimental infections can be informative, but depend on inoculations that are inherently artificial and so need validation. Mice are a widely used experimental host. Alert mice inhale readily small (5 μl) liquid volumes, and Indian ink, luciferase or radiolabel delivered thus distributed to the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Murid Herpesvirus-4 or Herpes simplex virus type 1 delivered thus infected only the nose, arguing that host entry is nasal rather than oral. Marker or virus delivery to the lung depended on general anesthesia and a large inoculum volume (30 μl), and so needs further validation of physiological relevance. While lungs could be infected at lower doses than the upper respiratory tract, tracking experiments showed that nasal inocula pass mostly into the oropharynx, even when restricted to 1 μl. Thus, the relative inefficiency of experimental upper respiratory tract infection was attributable to limited liquid retention in this site. Nonetheless low volume intranasal delivery to alert mice provides a convenient way to model experimentally an apparently natural mode of herpesvirus host entry.

  11. Antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders and consistency among GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, D.S.Y.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Dijk, L. van; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe specific diagnoses for which systemic antibiotics are prescribed, to assess adherence of antibiotic choice to national guidelines and to assess consistency among general practitioners (GPs) in prescribed volumes of antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders.

  12. Antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders and consistency among GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, D.S.Y.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Dijk, L. van; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe specific diagnoses for which systemic antibiotics are prescribed, to assess adherence of antibiotic choice to national guidelines and to assess consistency among general practitioners (GPs) in prescribed volumes of antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders.

  13. Effects of pneumococcal vaccine in patients with chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Watanuki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, it is very difficult to demonstrate the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccines because the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia is very low. Vaccination against pneumococci infection was advised for 1378 outpatients, over 60 years of age, with chronic respiratory disease for more than one year. Of these patients, those who responded affirmatively to the advice were vaccinated against pneumococci between August and November 2002. The effectiveness of vaccination was evaluated by means of a 2-year cohort-study, comparing the vaccinated group (647 with the non-vaccinated group (731. The variables analyzed were the frequency of onset of bacterial respiratory infection, hospitalization due to bacterial respiratory infection and onset of pneumococcal respiratory infection. The incidence of bacterial respiratory infection and the incidence of pneumococcal respiratory infection to have decreased in the following 2 years (17.4%, 0.9%, as compared to the previous year (25.9%, 3.1%, in the vaccinated group. Conversely, the frequency was higher in the following 2 years (14.4%, 0.9% as compared to the previous year (14.2%, 0.4% in the non-vaccinated group. This inter-group difference was statistically significant. Simultaneous vaccination against pneumococci and influenza virus also resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of bacterial respiratory infection. No decrease was observed in the frequency of hospitalization. These results indicate that pneumococcal vaccine is useful for elderly patients with chronic respiratory disease and that its efficacy may be enhanced by simultaneous vaccination against influenza.

  14. Investigating the complexity of respiratory patterns during the laryngeal chemoreflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curran Aidan K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laryngeal chemoreflex exists in infants as a primary sensory mechanism for defending the airway from the aspiration of liquids. Previous studies have hypothesized that prolonged apnea associated with this reflex may be life threatening and might be a cause of sudden infant death syndrome. Methods In this study we quantified the output of the respiratory neural network, the diaphragm EMG signal, during the laryngeal chemoreflex and eupnea in early postnatal (3–10 days piglets. We tested the hypothesis that diaphragm EMG activity corresponding to reflex-related events involved in clearance (restorative mechanisms such as cough and swallow exhibit lower complexity, suggesting that a synchronized homogeneous group of neurons in the central respiratory network are active during these events. Nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed using the approximate entropy to asses the complexity of respiratory patterns. Results Diaphragm EMG, genioglossal activity EMG, as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume were recorded from 5 unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets. Approximate entropy values of the EMG during cough and swallow were found significantly (p p Conclusion Reduced complexity values of the respiratory neural network output corresponding to coughs and swallows suggest synchronous neural activity of a homogeneous group of neurons. The higher complexity values exhibited by eupneic respiratory activity are the result of a more random behaviour, which is the outcome of the integrated action of several groups of neurons involved in the respiratory neural network.

  15. A noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilator: Achieved by utilizing a blower and a valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, YueYang; Sun, JianGuo; Wang, Baicun; Feng, Pei; Yang, ChongChang

    2016-02-01

    After the High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) has been applied in the invasive ventilator, the new technique of noninvasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (nHFOV) which does not require opening the patient's airway has attracted much attention from the field. This paper proposes the design of an experimental positive pressure-controlled nHFOV ventilator which utilizes a blower and a special valve and has three ventilation modes: spontaneous controlled ventilation combining HFOV, time-cycled ventilation combining HFOV (T-HFOV), and continuous positive airway pressure ventilation combining HFOV. Experiments on respiratory model are conducted and demonstrated the feasibility of using nHFOV through the control of fan and valve. The experimental ventilator is able to produce an air flow with small tidal volume (VT) and a large minute ventilation volume (MV) using regular breath tubes and nasal mask (e.g., under T-HFOV mode, with a maximum tidal volume of 100 ml, the minute ventilation volume reached 14,400 ml). In the process of transmission, there is only a minor loss of oscillation pressure. (Under experimental condition and with an oscillation frequency of 2-10 Hz, peak pressure loss was around 0%-50% when it reaches the mask.).

  16. Vocalization-correlated respiratory movements in the squirrel monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, U

    2000-10-01

    Respiratory abdominal movements associated with vocalization were recorded in awake squirrel monkeys. Several call types, such as peeping, trilling, cackling, and err-chucks, were accompanied by large vocalization-correlated respiratory movements (VCRM) that started before vocalization. During purring, in contrast, only small VCRM were recorded that started later after vocal onset. VCRM during trill calls, a vocalization type with repetitive frequency modulation, showed a modulation in the rhythm of the frequency changes. A correlation with amplitude modulation was also present, but more variable. As high frequencies need a higher lung pressure for production than low frequencies, the modulation of VCRM seems to serve to optimize the lung pressure in relation to the vocalization frequency. The modulation, furthermore, may act as a mechanism to produce different trill variants. During err-chucks and staccato peeps, which show a large amplitude modulation, a nonmodulated VCRM occurred. This indicates the existence of a laryngeal amplitude-controlling mechanism that is independent from respiration.

  17. Respiratory Dynamics and Speech Intelligibility in Speakers with Generalized Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBlance, Gary R.; Rutherford, David R.

    1991-01-01

    This study compared respiratory function during quiet breathing and monologue, in six adult dystonic subjects and a control group of four neurologically intact adults. Dystonic subjects showed a faster breathing rate, less rhythmic breathing pattern, decreased lung volume, and apnea-like periods. Decreased speech intelligibility was related to…

  18. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  19. Dynamic stability of locomotor respiratory coupling during cycling in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, Sébastien; Casties, Jean-François; Mottet, Denis

    2005-08-05

    We explored the locomotor respiratory coupling (LRC) during a 50-min constant-load submaximal cycling exercise. A 4-week recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) treatment improved participants' aerobic capabilities, but did not elicit significant changes in LRC. The distributions of the respiratory frequency over pedalling frequency ratios were systematically bimodal, with a preferred use of 1/3 and 1/2, and a progressive shift of the higher mode from 1/3 towards 1/2 with exercise duration. These results are interpreted in the framework of the sine circle map as the result of coordination dynamics between the physiological subsystems involved in the breathing pedalling cooperation.

  20. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  1. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  2. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  3. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement......% of newly diagnosed patients with overt hypothyroidism, and demonstrated reversibility following treatment. The evidence for or against a direct effect on pulmonary function was ambiguous. However, each of the above mentioned areas were only dealt with in a limited number of studies. Therefore, we refrain...

  4. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  5. [Asbestos and respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpereel, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, and have a global poor outcome. New therapeutic tools (targeted therapies, immunotherapy…) with first promising results are developed. However, it is crucial to obtain a full ban of asbestos use worldwide, and to do a regular follow-up of asbestos-exposed subjects, mostly if they are already diagnosed with benign respiratory diseases. Finally, new cancers (larynx and ovary) were recently added to the list of asbestos-induced tumors.

  6. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  7. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  8. Effects of carbon dioxide and pH variations in vitro on blood respiratory functions, red blood cell volume, transmembrane pH gradients, and sickling in sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Y.; Bookchin, R.M.

    1984-08-01

    An examination was made of the O/sub 2/ affinity, Bohr effect, transmembrane pH gradient, mean cell hemoglobin concentration, and red blood cell sickling at half O/sub 2/ saturation in whole sickle cell (SS) and normal (AA) blood during CO/sub 2/ titration and acid-base titration at three Pco/sub 2/ levels, 10, 40, and 80 mm Hg. The CO/sub 2/-induced Bohr effect of SS blood was considerably larger than normal (maximum, 0.91, referred to cell pH) and similar to that found with acid-base titration at Pco/sub 2/ of 40. In contrast to AA blood, SS blood showed an increased O/sub 2/ affinity when Pco/sub 2/ was raised from 40 to 80, and at half O/sub 2/ saturation showed biphasic or sigmoid Bohr curves, a fall in transmembrane pH gradient with rising Pco/sub 2/, and an absence of the normal cell volume increase at low pH and Pco/sub 2/. Sickling of SS cells at half O/sub 2/ saturation was partly inhibited by increasing Pc/sub 2/, particularly in the higher pH ranges. These complex differences in the behavior of SS blood are interpreted in terms of the balancing of several effects: the lowering of hemoglobin O/sub 2/-affinity by polymerization, low pH and increased CO/sub 2/ binding, inhibition of hemoglobin S polymerization by CO/sub 2/ binding to ..beta../sup s/-chain amino termini, differences between hemoglobin S and A in competitive binding of CO/sub 2/ and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate at different pH levels, and an increased net negative charge exhibited by intracellular deoxyhemoglobin S polymers. From a clinical standpoint, in the absence of hypoxia or acidosis, an increased blood Pco/sub 2/ might have a beneficial effect by inhibiting red blood cell sickling, whereas a metabolic acidosis, with low blood pH and Pco/sub 2/, would be very hazardous.

  9. Etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children: current state of the issue (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bogdanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lower respiratory tract infections are the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality in children under five years. Verification of the etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections is necessary for definition of treatment and direction of prevention. Respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B, parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3 and adenovirus are considered the main reasons of acute lower respiratory tract infections. The importance of different viruses depends on countries, district, seasons and ages of children. Analysis of the results of studies from different regions of the world showed fluctuations in frequency of etiology definition of respiratory viruses from 25 to 90%. Respiratory syncytial virus is the main reason of acute lower respiratory tract infections, especially in the group of children up to 1 year.

  10. Respiratory pattern of diaphragmatic breathing and pilates breathing in COPD subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina M. Cancelliero-Gaiad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diaphragmatic breathing (DB is widely used in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, however it has been little studied in the scientific literature. The Pilates breathing (PB method has also been used in the rehabilitation area and has been little studied in the scientific literature and in COPD. OBJECTIVES: To compare ventilatory parameters during DB and PB in COPD patients and healthy adults. METHOD: Fifteen COPD patients (COPD group and fifteen healthy patients (healthy group performed three types of respiration: natural breathing (NB, DB, and PB, with the respiratory pattern being analyzed by respiratory inductive plethysmography. The parameters of time, volume, and thoracoabdominal coordination were evaluated. After the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, ANOVA was applied followed by Tukey's test (intragroup analysis and Student's t-test (intergroup analysis; p<0.05. RESULTS: DB promoted increase in respiratory volumes, times, and SpO2 as well as decrease in respiratory rate in both groups. PB increased respiratory volumes in healthy group, with no additional benefits of respiratory pattern in the COPD group. With respect to thoracoabdominal coordination, both groups presented higher asynchrony during DB, with a greater increase in the healthy group. CONCLUSIONS: DB showed positive effects such as increase in lung volumes, respiratory motion, and SpO2 and reduction in respiratory rate. Although there were no changes in volume and time measurements during PB in COPD, this breathing pattern increased volumes in the healthy subjects and increased oxygenation in both groups. In this context, the acute benefits of DB are emphasized as a supporting treatment in respiratory rehabilitation programs.

  11. Respiratory pattern of diaphragmatic breathing and pilates breathing in COPD subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelliero-Gaiad, Karina M.; Ike, Daniela; Pantoni, Camila B. F.; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Costa, Dirceu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diaphragmatic breathing (DB) is widely used in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), however it has been little studied in the scientific literature. The Pilates breathing (PB) method has also been used in the rehabilitation area and has been little studied in the scientific literature and in COPD. OBJECTIVES: To compare ventilatory parameters during DB and PB in COPD patients and healthy adults. METHOD: Fifteen COPD patients (COPD group) and fifteen healthy patients (healthy group) performed three types of respiration: natural breathing (NB), DB, and PB, with the respiratory pattern being analyzed by respiratory inductive plethysmography. The parameters of time, volume, and thoracoabdominal coordination were evaluated. After the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, ANOVA was applied followed by Tukey's test (intragroup analysis) and Student's t-test (intergroup analysis; p<0.05). RESULTS: DB promoted increase in respiratory volumes, times, and SpO2 as well as decrease in respiratory rate in both groups. PB increased respiratory volumes in healthy group, with no additional benefits of respiratory pattern in the COPD group. With respect to thoracoabdominal coordination, both groups presented higher asynchrony during DB, with a greater increase in the healthy group. CONCLUSIONS: DB showed positive effects such as increase in lung volumes, respiratory motion, and SpO2 and reduction in respiratory rate. Although there were no changes in volume and time measurements during PB in COPD, this breathing pattern increased volumes in the healthy subjects and increased oxygenation in both groups. In this context, the acute benefits of DB are emphasized as a supporting treatment in respiratory rehabilitation programs. PMID:25075999

  12. High-frequency ultrasonic atomization for drug delivery to rodent animal models - optimal particle size for lung inhalation of difluoromethyl ornithine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guifang; Fandrey, Chris; Naqwi, Amir; Wiedmann, Timothy Scott

    2008-06-01

    A high-(8-MHz) and a low-(1.7-MHz) frequency ultrasonic transducer were compared for delivering aerosols to mouse lung. The aerosol concentration (mass of dry particles/volume of air) rose nonlinearly with solution concentration of difluoromethyl ornithine for both transducers. The particle size was linear with the cube root of the solution concentration, and the slope of the low-frequency transducer was 8 times greater than that of the high-frequency transducer. The deposition fraction assessed by the assayed mass in the lung relative to the calculated inhaled mass was found to decline exponentially with particle size. The lower-frequency transducer provided a higher dose despite a lower deposition fraction, but the high-frequency transducer was more efficient and provides a more selective deposition in the lower respiratory tract while operating with significantly less demands on aerosol drying.

  13. [Hardware and software for EMG recording and analysis of respiratory muscles of human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnushkin, S D; Chakhman, V N; Segizbaeva, M O; Pogodin, M A; Aleksandrov, V G

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new hardware and software system that allows to not only record the EMG of different groups of the respiratory muscles, but also hold its amplitude-frequency analysis, which allows to determine the change in the contribution to the work of breathing of a respiratory muscles and detect early signs of fatigue of the respiratory muscles. Presented complex can be used for functional diagnostics of breath in patients and healthy people and sportsmen.

  14. Lung pressures and gas transport during high-frequency airway and chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Ye, T H; Tran, N H

    1989-09-01

    The major goal of this study was to compare gas exchange, tidal volume (VT), and dynamic lung pressures resulting from high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO) with the corresponding effects in high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). Eight anesthetized paralyzed dogs were maintained eucapnic with HFAO and HFCWO at frequencies ranging from 1 to 16 Hz in the former and 0.5 to 8 Hz in the latter. Tracheal (delta Ptr) and esophageal (delta Pes) pressure swings, VT, and arterial blood gases were measured in addition to respiratory impedance and static pressure-volume curves. Mean positive pressure (25-30 cmH2O) in the chest cuff associated with HFCWO generation decreased lung volume by approximately 200 ml and increased pulmonary impedance significantly. Aside from this decrease in functional residual capacity (FRC), no change in lung volume occurred as a result of dynamic factors during the course of HFCWO application. With HFAO, a small degree of hyperinflation occurred only at 16 Hz. Arterial PO2 decreased by 5 Torr on average during HFCWO. VT decreased with increasing frequency in both cases, but VT during HFCWO was smaller over the range of frequencies compared with HFAO. delta Pes and delta Ptr between 1 and 8 Hz were lower than the corresponding pressure swings obtained with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) applied at 0.25 Hz. delta Pes was minimized at 1 Hz during HFCWO; however, delta Ptr decreased continuously with decreasing frequency and, below 2 Hz, became progressively smaller than the corresponding values obtained with HFAO and CMV.

  15. Cardiac and Respiratory Patterns Synchronize between Persons during Choir Singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2011-01-01

    Dyadic and collective activities requiring temporally coordinated action are likely to be associated with cardiac and respiratory patterns that synchronize within and between people. However, the extent and functional significance of cardiac and respiratory between-person couplings have not been investigated thus far. Here, we report interpersonal oscillatory couplings among eleven singers and one conductor engaged in choir singing. We find that: (a) phase synchronization both in respiration and heart rate variability increase significantly during singing relative to a rest condition; (b) phase synchronization is higher when singing in unison than when singing pieces with multiple voice parts; (c) directed coupling measures are consistent with the presence of causal effects of the conductor on the singers at high modulation frequencies; (d) the different voices of the choir are reflected in network analyses of cardiac and respiratory activity based on graph theory. Our results suggest that oscillatory coupling of cardiac and respiratory patterns provide a physiological basis for interpersonal action coordination. PMID:21957466

  16. [IPPB therapy at home in chronic respiratory insufficiency in France. II. Indications. Technics and surveillance (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, F; Drouet, D; Brille, D; Hatzfeld, C; Liot, F; Kompalitch, M

    1979-01-01

    A survey has been conducted among French chest physicians and physicians involved in intensive care. 296 physicians have prescribed IPPB at home to 3 778 patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency between 1960 and 1977. Acute respiratory failure was the first criteria considered in the indications (57% of the patients); hypercapnia, hypoxemia and right heart failure episode frequency were the other criteria of severity the most often taken into account. Since 1960, the indications among those with airflow obstruction have decreased, whereas they have increased for those with restrictive insufficiencies, expressing the questions raised about the efficacy of IPPB in these two types. 18% of the patients have had IPPB through tracheostomy canula. 70% of the patients have used a pressure cycling respirator and 30% a volume or flow cycling respiratory. This second type was quite always used in the case of IPPB through canula. Oxygen was added for half of the patients. The physicians have regularly followed the patients. Great importance was accorded to home care surveillance.

  17. Bronchodilator responsiveness and reported respiratory symptoms in an adult population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan C Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationship between patient-reported symptoms and objective measures of lung function is poorly understood. AIM: To determine the association between responsiveness to bronchodilator and respiratory symptoms in random population samples. METHODS: 4669 people aged 40 years and older from 8 sites in Canada completed interviewer-administered respiratory questionnaires and performed spirometry before and after administration of 200 ug of inhaled salbutamol. The effect of anthropometric variables, smoking exposure and doctor-diagnosed asthma (DDA on bronchodilator responsiveness in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 and in forced vital capacity (FVC were evaluated. Multiple logistic regression was used to test for association between quintiles of increasing changes in FEV1 and in FVC after bronchodilator and several respiratory symptoms. RESULTS: Determinants of bronchodilator change in FEV1 and FVC included age, DDA, smoking, respiratory drug use and female gender [p<0.005 to p<0.0001 ]. In subjects without doctor-diagnosed asthma or COPD, bronchodilator response in FEV1 was associated with wheezing [p for trend<0.0001], while bronchodilator response for FVC was associated with breathlessness. [p for trend <0.0001]. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchodilator responsiveness in FEV1 or FVC are associated with different respiratory symptoms in the community. Both flow and volume bronchodilator responses are useful parameters which together can be predictive of both wheezing and breathlessness in the general population.

  18. Adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, S; Talboys, R; Paspula, C; Prempeh, E M; Fanous, R; Ail, D

    2017-01-01

    Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has now been described as a sequela to such diverse conditions as burns, amniotic fluid embolism, acute pancreatitis, trauma, sepsis and damage as a result of elective surgery in general. Patients with ARDS require immediate intubation, with the average patient now being ventilated for between 8 and 11 days. While the acute management of ARDS is conducted by the critical care team, almost any surgical patient can be affected by the condition and we believe that it is important that a broader spectrum of hospital doctors gain an understanding of the nature of the pathology and its current treatment.

  19. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabeticketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidityand mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requiresfocused clinical monitoring, careful interpretationof arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditionsthat can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions thatcompromise respiratory function caused by DKA can bedetected at presentation but are usually more prevalentduring treatment. These conditions include deficits ofpotassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic ornon-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not causedby DKA that can worsen respiratory function under theadded stress of DKA include infections of the respiratorysystem, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular diseaseand miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognitionand management of the conditions that can lead torespiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failureand improve mortality from DKA.

  20. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiang Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN to phrenic nerve (PN in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4. Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  1. Cotton dust exposure: Analysis of pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat M Dangi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cotton industry workers are exposed to various hazards in the different departments of textile factories. The major health problems associated with cotton dust are respiratory problems, byssinosis, bronchitis and asthma. Objective: To study the effect of cotton dust exposure on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at cotton mill in the Ahmedabad city. Materials and Methods: One hundred cotton mill workers of the weaving and spinning area participated in this study while 100 age- and gender-matched male subjects living in the residential area served as the control group. A questionnaire was used to inquire about respiratory symptoms and spirometry was done in both the groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test was used to find the difference between spirometric parameters, and Chi-square test was used to find the difference between respiratory symptoms. Results: Respiratory symptoms were statistically significantly more common in the cotton mill workers compared to control group. Cotton mill workers group also showed significant (P < 0.0001 decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1, ratio of FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC and peak expiratory flow rate, and no significant difference of FVC between groups. There was an association of duration of exposure and symptoms with spirometric abnormality. Conclusion: Cotton mill workers showed a significant decrease in spirometric parameters and increase in respiratory symptoms. As the duration of exposure and symptoms increased, spirometric abnormality increased.

  2. Respiratory Arrest in an Obese Pregnant Woman with Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Iwashita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant, non-Japanese-speaking Peruvian, and, thus, with communication difficulty, suffered hyperemesis gravidarum and had respiratory arrest, requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The obese pregnant woman (prepregnancy weight: 107 kg had vomited and lost 15 kg in bodyweight over appropriately 2 weeks prior to the arrest but had not complained due to communication difficulty, which, together with her obesity, prevented a Japanese obstetrician from noticing her severe condition. 1,000 mL of low potassium fluid plus thiamine was administered. She became unable to stand, suggesting lower-extremity-proximal-muscle weakness, and then respiratory arrest occurred. Hypopotassemia (2.3 mEq/L, pulseless electrical activity, and muscle weakness suggested the presence of severe potassium deficiency, which may have caused respiratory muscle paralysis, leading to the respiratory arrest. Hypercapnea was severer than expected for compensatory hypoventilation, indicating the presence of concomitant severe hypoventilation, which may also have contributed to respiratory arrest. She recovered with electrolyte and volume replacement. Respiratory arrest can occur with hyperemesis gravidarum, and obesity and communication difficulties can prevent the early detection of severe conditions.

  3. Influence of dietary protein during the pre-breeder period on subsequent reproductive performance of large white turkeys. 3. The effects of semen volume and frequency of insemination on fertility and hatchability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G B; Props, C F; Leighton, A T; Van Krey, H P; Potter, L M

    1980-02-01

    Large White turkey breeders of a commercial variety were used to determine the effects of pre-breeder dietary protein, frequency of insemination, and semen volume on subsequent reproductive performance. Treatments included female dietary protein levels of 10, 12, 14, and 17% fed from 12 to 32 weeks of age and 10, 12, an 14% protein from 20 to 32 weeks of age; male dietary protein levels of 12 and 17% fed from 12 to 56 weeks of age; and artificial insemination (AI) treatments of a) .025 ml of semen at weekly intervals, b) .025 ml of semen at biweekly intervals, and c) .05 ml of semen at biweekly intervals in a factorial arrangement of treatments. Male dietary treatment had no significant effect on fertility or hatchability of fertile eggs. Female pre-breeder protein levels also had no significant effect on fertility but resulted in lower hatchability of fertile eggs during the latter part of the production period when females were fed either the 10 or 12% protein pre-breeder diets. Weekly inseminations with .025 ml of semen resulted in the highest average level of fertility during the production year (90%), followed by biweekly insemination with .05 ml (87%) and .025 ml (85%) of semen, respectively. Hatchability of fertile eggs was significantly higher for hens receiving .05 ml of semen biweekly than for the other two AI treatments during the latter half of the production year only. However, weekly inseminations caused a significant decline (6.7 eggs/hen) in egg production when compared to hens inseminated at biweekly intervals. The average number of fertile eggs was greatest for females inseminated with .05 ml semen biweekly (54.3) compared to those inseminated with .025 ml of semen biweekly (53.0) or .025 ml of semen weekly (50.2).

  4. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  5. NJP VOLUME 41 NO 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-11-24

    Nov 24, 2013 ... sleep. There was also increase in both frequency of uri- nation and volume of urine voided; from1- 2 times to ... phagia, fever, head trauma, chronic cough, weight loss, ... water deprivation at 15Kg. Total volume of urine voided.

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  7. Low-Power Wearable Respiratory Sound Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinko Oletic

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Building upon the findings from the field of automated recognition of respiratory sound patterns, we propose a wearable wireless sensor implementing on-board respiratory sound acquisition and classification, to enable continuous monitoring of symptoms, such as asthmatic wheezing. Low-power consumption of such a sensor is required in order to achieve long autonomy. Considering that the power consumption of its radio is kept minimal if transmitting only upon (rare occurrences of wheezing, we focus on optimizing the power consumption of the digital signal processor (DSP. Based on a comprehensive review of asthmatic wheeze detection algorithms, we analyze the computational complexity of common features drawn from short-time Fourier transform (STFT and decision tree classification. Four algorithms were implemented on a low-power TMS320C5505 DSP. Their classification accuracies were evaluated on a dataset of prerecorded respiratory sounds in two operating scenarios of different detection fidelities. The execution times of all algorithms were measured. The best classification accuracy of over 92%, while occupying only 2.6% of the DSP’s processing time, is obtained for the algorithm featuring the time-frequency tracking of shapes of crests originating from wheezing, with spectral features modeled using energy.

  8. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yáñez Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain, Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans.

  9. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  10. Respiratory Therapy and Respiratory Therapy Technician. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of respiratory therapy and respiratory therapy technician programs. An occupational description and program content are presented. The curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content,…

  11. Immediate effect of manual therapy on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Yelvar GD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gul Deniz Yilmaz Yelvar,1 Yasemin Çirak,2 Yasemin Parlak Demir,3 Murat Dalkilinç,1 Bülent Bozkurt4 1Department of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, 2Department of Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy, 3Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, School of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Turgut Özal University, Ankara, Turkey Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effect of manual therapy (MT on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD.Participants and methods: Thirty patients with severe COPD (eight females and 22 males; mean age 62.4±6.8 years referred to pulmonary physiotherapy were included in this study. The patients participated in a single session of MT to measure the short-term effects. The lung function was measured using a portable spirometer. An electronic pressure transducer was used to measure respiratory muscle strength. Heart rate, breathing frequency, and oxygen saturation were measured with a pulse oximeter. For fatigue and dyspnea perception, the modified Borg rating of perceived exertion scale was used. All measurements were taken before and immediately after the first MT session. The ease-of-breathing visual analog scale was used for rating patients’ symptoms subjectively during the MT session.Results: There was a significant improvement in the forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and vital capacity values (P<0.05. The maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values increased significantly after MT, compared to the pre-MT session (P<0.05. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, respiratory rate (P<0.05, and dyspnea and fatigue perception (P<0.05.Conclusion: A single MT session immediately improved pulmonary function, inspiratory muscle strength, and oxygen saturation and reduced dyspnea, fatigue, and heart and respiratory rates in patients with

  12. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  13. Noninvasive respiratory support of juvenile rabbits by high-amplitude bubble continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diblasi, Robert M; Zignego, Jay C; Tang, Dennis M; Hildebrandt, Jack; Smith, Charles V; Hansen, Thomas N; Richardson, C Peter

    2010-06-01

    Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (B-CPAP) applies small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in airway pressure (DeltaPaw) that may improve gas exchange in infants with respiratory disease. We developed a device, high-amplitude B-CPAP (HAB-CPAP), which provides greater DeltaPaw than B-CPAP provides. We studied the effects of different operational parameters on DeltaPaw and volumes of gas delivered to a mechanical infant lung model. In vivo studies tested the hypothesis that HAB-CPAP provides noninvasive respiratory support greater than that provided by B-CPAP. Lavaged juvenile rabbits were stabilized on ventilator nasal CPAP. The animals were then supported at the same mean airway pressure, bias flow, and fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) required for stabilization, whereas the bubbler angle was varied in a randomized crossover design at exit angles, relative to vertical, of 0 (HAB-CPAP0; equivalent to conventional B-CPAP), 90 (HAB-CPAP90), and 135 degrees (HAB-CPAP135). Arterial blood gases and pressure-rate product (PRP) were measured after 15 min at each bubbler angle. Pao2 levels were higher (p<0.007) with HAB-CPAP135 than with conventional B-CPAP. PaCO2 levels did not differ (p=0.073) among the three bubbler configurations. PRP with HAB-CPAP135 were half of the PRP with HAB-CPAP0 or HAB-CPAP90 (p=0.001). These results indicate that HAB-CPAP135 provides greater respiratory support than conventional B-CPAP does.

  14. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally (the other being enteric disease). The economic impact of respiratory disease is both direct, from the production losses caused by primary disease and indirect from preve...

  15. The seasonality of respiratory viruses in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jesse T; Paula, Flavia E; Proença-Modena, José L; Demarco, Ricardo C; Buzatto, Guilherme P; Saturno, Tamara H; Delcaro, Luana S; Tamashiro, Edwin; Valera, Fabiana C P; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common illness, yet little is known about its pathogenesis, including the role played by respiratory viruses. A transversal prospective study was conducted to analyze the seasonality of CRS using real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect respiratory virus genomes in secretions and tissue samples from patients with CRS with and without nasal polyps. The frequency of viral detection was 41% (31/75). The respiratory virus most frequently detected was human rhinovirus, found in 18 patients (24%), followed by human metapneumovirus, human enterovirus, human respiratory sincicial virus, human adenovirus, human bocavirus, human coronavirus, and human influenza virus, detected in 12 (16%), five (6.6%), four (5.3%), four (5.3%), two (2.6%), two (2.6%), and one (1.3%) patient(s), respectively. Although none of the patients presented symptoms when the samples were collected, there was a peak in detection of the most prevalent virus in the autumn and winter seasons of both years, similar to the pattern that occurs in acute conditions. The pattern of respiratory virus seasonality found in nasal mucosa, polyps, and paranasal sinus samples in patients with CRS reinforces the possibility of asymptomatic respiratory viral infections.

  16. Instantaneous Respiratory Estimation from Thoracic Impedance by Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Tai Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impedance plethysmography provides a way to measure respiratory activity by sensing the change of thoracic impedance caused by inspiration and expiration. This measurement imposes little pressure on the body and uses the human body as the sensor, thereby reducing the need for adjustments as body position changes and making it suitable for long-term or ambulatory monitoring. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD can decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs that disclose nonstationary components as well as stationary components and, similarly, capture respiratory episodes from thoracic impedance. However, upper-body movements usually produce motion artifacts that are not easily removed by digital filtering. Moreover, large motion artifacts disable the EMD to decompose respiratory components. In this paper, motion artifacts are detected and replaced by the data mirrored from the prior and the posterior before EMD processing. A novel intrinsic respiratory reconstruction index that considers both global and local properties of IMFs is proposed to define respiration-related IMFs for respiration reconstruction and instantaneous respiratory estimation. Based on the experiments performing a series of static and dynamic physical activates, our results showed the proposed method had higher cross correlations between respiratory frequencies estimated from thoracic impedance and those from oronasal airflow based on small window size compared to the Fourier transform-based method.

  17. Ventilation and respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, Andrew William; Romer, Lee M

    2012-04-01

    During dynamic exercise, the healthy pulmonary system faces several major challenges, including decreases in mixed venous oxygen content and increases in mixed venous carbon dioxide. As such, the ventilatory demand is increased, while the rising cardiac output means that blood will have considerably less time in the pulmonary capillaries to accomplish gas exchange. Blood gas homeostasis must be accomplished by precise regulation of alveolar ventilation via medullary neural networks and sensory reflex mechanisms. It is equally important that cardiovascular and pulmonary system responses to exercise be precisely matched to the increase in metabolic requirements, and that the substantial gas transport needs of both respiratory and locomotor muscles be considered. Our article addresses each of these topics with emphasis on the healthy, young adult exercising in normoxia. We review recent evidence concerning how exercise hyperpnea influences sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and the effect this might have on the ability to perform muscular work. We also review sex-based differences in lung mechanics.

  18. Changes in Respiratory Parameters and Fin-Swimming Performance Following a 16-Week Training Period with Intermittent Breath Holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou Vasileios

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of training with intermittent breath holding (IBH on respiratory parameters, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 and performance. Twenty-eight fin-swimming athletes were randomly divided into two groups and followed the same training for 16 weeks. About 40% of the distance of each session was performed with self-selected breathing frequency (SBF group or IBH (IBH group. Performance time of 50 and 400 m at maximum intensity was recorded and forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, peak expiratory flow (PEF and SpO2 were measured before and after the 50 m test at baseline and post-training. Posttraining, the respiratory parameters were increased in the IBH but remained unchanged in the SBF group (FEV1: 17 ±15% vs. -1 ±11%; FVC: 22 ±13% vs. 1 ±10%; PEF: 9 ±14% vs. -4 ±15%; p<0.05. Pre compared to post-training SpO2 was unchanged at baseline and decreased post-training following the 50 m test in both groups (p<0.05. The reduction was higher in the IBH compared to the SBF group (p<0.05. Performance in the 50 and 400 m tests improved in both groups, however, the improvement was greater in the IBH compared to the SBF group in both 50 and 400 m tests (p<0.05. The use of IBH is likely to enhance the load on the respiratory muscles, thus, contributing to improvement of the respiratory parameters. Decreased SpO2 after IBH is likely due to adaptation to hypoventilation. IBH favours performance improvement at 50 and 400 m fin-swimming.

  19. Optical oximetry of volume-oscillating vascular compartments: contributions from oscillatory blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of dynamic diffuse optical measurements to obtain oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in volume oscillating compartments. We used a phasor representation of oscillatory hemodynamics at the heart rate and respiration frequency to separate the oscillations of tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (O) and deoxyhemoglobin (D) into components due to blood volume (subscript V) and blood flow (subscript F): O=OV+OF, D=DV+DF. This is achieved by setting the phase angle Arg(OF)-Arg(O), which can be estimated by a hemodynamic model that we recently developed. We found this angle to be -72 deg for the cardiac pulsation at 1 Hz, and -7 deg for paced breathing at 0.1 Hz. Setting this angle, we can obtain the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin of the volume-oscillating vascular compartment, SV=|OV|/(|OV|+|DV|). We demonstrate this approach with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy measurements on healthy volunteers at rest (n=4) and during 0.1 Hz paced breathing (n=3) with a 24-channel system. Rest data at the cardiac frequency were used to calculate the arterial saturation, S(a); over all subjects and channels, we found ==0.96±0.02. In the case of paced breathing, we found =0.66±0.14, which reflects venous-dominated hemodynamics at the respiratory frequency.

  20. Clowns Benefit Children Hospitalized for Respiratory Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Mario; Isola, Elena; Paolone, Giuseppe; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children to the control group (CG). During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings. PMID:21785637

  1. Clowns benefit children hospitalized for respiratory pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Mario; Isola, Elena; Paolone, Giuseppe; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children to the control group (CG). During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings.

  2. Clowns Benefit Children Hospitalized for Respiratory Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bertini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG and 22 children to the control group (CG. During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings.

  3. Climate Change and Air Pollution: Effects on Respiratory Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Pawankar, Ruby; Vitale, Carolina; Lanza, Maurizia; Molino, Antonio; Stanziola, Anna; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Vatrella, Alessandro; D'Amato, Maria

    2016-09-01

    A body of evidence suggests that major changes involving the atmosphere and the climate, including global warming induced by anthropogenic factors, have impact on the biosphere and human environment. Studies on the effects of climate change on respiratory allergy are still lacking and current knowledge is provided by epidemiological and experimental studies on the relationship between allergic respiratory diseases, asthma and environmental factors, such as meteorological variables, airborne allergens, and air pollution. Urbanization with its high levels of vehicle emissions, and a westernized lifestyle are linked to the rising frequency of respiratory allergic diseases and bronchial asthma observed over recent decades in most industrialized countries. However, it is not easy to evaluate the impact of climate changes and air pollution on the prevalence of asthma in the general population and on the timing of asthma exacerbations, although the global rise in asthma prevalence and severity could also be an effect of air pollution and climate change. Since airborne allergens and air pollutants are frequently increased contemporaneously in the atmosphere, an enhanced IgE-mediated response to aeroallergens and enhanced airway inflammation could account for the increasing frequency of respiratory allergy and asthma in atopic subjects in the last 5 decades. Pollen allergy is frequently used to study the relationship between air pollution and respiratory allergic diseases, such as rhinitis and bronchial asthma. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that urbanization, high levels of vehicle emissions, and westernized lifestyle are correlated with an increased frequency of respiratory allergy prevalently in people who live in urban areas in comparison with people living in rural areas. Climatic factors (temperature, wind speed, humidity, thunderstorms, etc.) can affect both components (biological and chemical) of this interaction.

  4. Update on the "Dutch hypothesis" for chronic respiratory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J; Prescott, E

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with chronic obstructive lung disease show increased airways responsiveness to histamine. We investigated the hypothesis that increased airways responsiveness predicts the development and remission of chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: We used data from 24-year follow......-up (1965-90) of 2684 participants in a cohort study in Vlagtwedde and Vlaardingen, Netherlands. Increased airways responsiveness was defined as a PC10 value (concentration of histamine for which challenge led to a 10% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s) of less than 8 mg/ml. Information on respiratory...... of the odds ratio for the development of any of the six symptoms was 1.7 (1.2-2.3). Participants with increased airways responsiveness were less likely than those without this characteristic to show remission of these respiratory symptoms. The estimate of the odds ratio for the remission of any of the six...

  5. Non-invasive assessment of phonatory and respiratory dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBlance, G R; Steckol, K F; Cooper, M H

    1991-10-01

    Evaluation of vocal pathology and the accompanying dysphonia should include an assessment of laryngeal structure and mobility as well as respiratory dynamics. Laryngeal structure is best observed through laryngoscopy which provides an accurate assessment of the tissues and their mobility. Respiratory measures of lung volume, air-flow and pressure, and breathing dynamics are typically determined via spirometry and pneumotachography. While the above are traditional invasive procedures which interfere with normal speech production, recent advances in electronic technology have resulted in the development of non-invasive procedures to assess phonatory and respiratory dynamics. These procedures, when used as an adjunct to laryngoscopy, can provide information that is useful in the diagnosis and management of vocal tract dysfunction. The Laryngograph and Computer-Aided Fluency Establishment Trainer, described here, are examples of this new technology.

  6. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  7. Cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions during anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Shiogai

    Full Text Available General anesthetics are used during medical and surgical procedures to reversibly induce a state of total unconsciousness in patients. Here, we investigate, from a dynamic network perspective, how the cortical and cardiovascular systems behave during anesthesia by applying nonparametric spectral techniques to cortical electroencephalography, electrocardiogram and respiratory signals recorded from anesthetized rats under two drugs, ketamine-xylazine (KX and pentobarbital (PB. We find that the patterns of low-frequency cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions may undergo significant changes in network activity strengths and in number of network links at different depths of anesthesia dependent upon anesthetics used.

  8. New Aspects in Respiratory Epithelium Diagnostics Using Virtual Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan KONIAR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of interest is trajectory analysis of moving object. Object is represented by respiratory epithelium cilium. Cilium trajectory and another parameter – beating frequency – are very important parameters in respiratory apparatus diagnostics. Main method of motion detection is Geometric Matching and gray level variance capturing. Primary experiments were taken on video phantoms simulating cilia movement using two camera systems: Marlin and PONTOS. All the phantoms were processed in LabVIEW development environment. Article focuses on acquisition conditions, preprocessing of videosequences and basic measurement on acquired phantoms.

  9. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  10. EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM PRACTICE OF PRANAYAMA IN HEALTHY ASYMPTOMATIC INDIVIDUALS ON THE RESPIRATORY PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pranayama is an art of controlling the life force of breath. It produces many systemic psycho-physical effects in the body, besides its specific effects on the respiratory functions. It is claimed that practice of ‘pranayama’ is one of the ways to achieve this goal of physical and mental health. ‘Regular practice of pranayama has found to be helpful in developing a healthy body and a sound mind. Several studies have shown the beneficial effects of pranayama practice on respiratory parameters in patients with respiratory disorders, especially asthmatics. The present study was done to find out whether short-term practice of pranayama has any additive effects on respiratory parameters of normal healthy persons. METHODOLOGY: The present study was conducted in Department of Physiology, Vijayanagar Institute of Medical Sciences, Bellary on 200 medical and paramedical students comprising of both males and females, fulfilling the inclusion criteria. In the beginning they were given training in practice of pranayama, after which all the subjects practiced two types of pranayama for a total duration of 12 weeks. Lung parameters like Respiratory rate (R.R, Tidal volume (VT, Inspiratory reserve volume (I.R.V, Expiratory reserve volume (E.R.V, Vital capacity (VT, Forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1 and Peak expiratory flow rate (P.E.F.R were recorded at the beginning and at the end of the 12 weeks study period. RESULTS: The subjects showed improved ventilatory functions, in the form of decrease in respiratory rate (R.R and increase in Vital capacity (VT. Lung volumes like Tidal volume (VT, Inspiratory reserve volume (I.R.V and Expiratory reserve volume (E.R.V also showed significant increase. CONCLUSION: There was a statistically significant increase in all the above lung parameters in the regular yoga practitioners.

  11. Extraction of respiratory signals from the electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram: technical and physiological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Peter H; Bonnici, Timothy; Tarassenko, Lionel; Alastruey, Jordi; Clifton, David A; Beale, Richard; Watkinson, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Breathing rate (BR) can be estimated by extracting respiratory signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) or photoplethysmogram (PPG). The extracted respiratory signals may be influenced by several technical and physiological factors. In this study, our aim was to determine how technical and physiological factors influence the quality of respiratory signals. Using a variety of techniques 15 respiratory signals were extracted from the ECG, and 11 from PPG signals collected from 57 healthy subjects. The quality of each respiratory signal was assessed by calculating its correlation with a reference oral-nasal pressure respiratory signal using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Relevant results informing device design and clinical application were obtained. The results informing device design were: (i) seven out of 11 respiratory signals were of higher quality when extracted from finger PPG compared to ear PPG; (ii) laboratory equipment did not provide higher quality of respiratory signals than a clinical monitor; (iii) the ECG provided higher quality respiratory signals than the PPG; (iv) during downsampling of the ECG and PPG significant reductions in quality were first observed at sampling frequencies of  signals were generally of lower quality in elderly subjects compared to young subjects; (ii) the qualities of 23 out of 26 respiratory signals were reduced at elevated BRs; (iii) there were no differences associated with gender. Recommendations based on the results are provided regarding device designs for BR estimation, and clinical applications. The dataset and code used in this study are publicly available.

  12. Modeling the deposition of bioaerosols with variable size and shape in the human respiratory tract – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sturm

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of bioaerosol particles with various size and shape in the human respiratory tract was simulated by using a probabilistic model of the lung and an almost realistic mathematical approach to particle deposition. Results obtained from the theoretical computations clearly show that biogenic particle deposition in different lung compartments does not only depend on physical particle properties, but also on breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing and inhalative flow rate (=tidal volume × breathing frequency/30. Whilst ultrafine (5 μm particles tend to accumulate in the extrathoracic region and the uppermost airways of the tracheobronchial tree, particles with intermediate size are characterized by higher penetration depth, leading to their possible accumulation in the lung alveoli. Due to their deposition in deep lung regions and insufficient clearance, some bioaerosol particles may induce severe lung diseases ranging from infections, allergies, and toxic reactions to cancer.

  13. Frequency synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, Salvatore; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus Martinus Wilhelmus; Breems, Lucien Johannes; Nauta, Bram

    2016-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  14. Cage Versus Noncage Laying-Hen Housings: Worker Respiratory Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane; Arteaga, Veronica; Armitage, Tracey; Mitloehner, Frank; Tancredi, Daniel; Kenyon, Nicholas; Schenker, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare respiratory health of poultry workers in conventional cage, enriched cage and aviary layer housing on a single commercial facility, motivated by changing requirements for humane housing of hens. Three workers were randomly assigned daily, one to each of conventional cage, enriched cage, and aviary housing in a crossover repeated-measures design for three observation periods (for a total of 123 worker-days, eight different workers). Workers' exposure to particles were assessed (Arteaga et al. J Agromedicine. 2015;20:this issue) and spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, respiratory symptoms, and questionnaires were conducted pre- and post-shift. Personal exposures to particles and endotoxin were significantly higher in the aviary than the other housings (Arteaga et al., 2015). The use of respiratory protection was high; the median usage was 70% of the shift. Mixed-effects multivariate regression models of respiratory cross-shift changes were marginally significant, but the aviary system consistently posted the highest decrements for forced expiratory volume in 1 and 6 seconds (FEV1 and FEV6) compared with the enriched or conventional housing. The adjusted mean difference in FEV1 aviary - enriched cage housing was -47 mL/s, 95% confidence interval (CI): (-99 to 4.9), P = .07. Similarly, for FEV6, aviary - conventional housing adjusted mean difference was -52.9 mL/6 s, 95% CI: (-108 to 2.4), P = .06. Workers adopting greater than median use of respiratory protection were less likely to exhibit negative cross-shift pulmonary function changes. Although aviary housing exposed workers to significantly higher respiratory exposures, cross-shift pulmonary function changes did not differ significantly between houses. Higher levels of mask use were protective; poultry workers should wear respiratory protection as appropriate to avoid health decrements.

  15. Influence of different breathing frequencies on the severity of inspiratory muscle fatigue induced by high-intensity front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; McConnell, Alison K

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of 2 different breathing frequencies on the magnitude of inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity front crawl swimming. The influence of different breathing frequencies on postexercise blood lactate ([La]) and heart rate (HR) was also examined. Ten collegiate swimmers performed 2 x 200-m front crawl swims at 90% of race pace with the following breathing frequencies: 1) 1 breath every second stroke (B2), and 2) 1 breath every fourth stroke (B4). Maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) was measured at the mouth from residual volume before (baseline) and after swimming, in a standing position. The HR and [La] were assessed at rest and immediately at the cessation of swimming. The PImax decreased by 21% after B4 and by 11% after B2 compared with baseline (p inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity swimming. Inspiratory muscle fatigue is, however, greater when breathing frequency is reduced during high-intensity front crawl swimming. Respiratory muscle training should be used to improve respiratory muscle strength and endurance in swimmers.

  16. [Occupational respiratory tract allergies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebohle, E; Wallenstein, G

    1979-04-01

    Professionally conditioned allergoses of the respiratory tract (BK 41) can occur in all industrial regions. The allergoses conditioned by organic dusts of vegetable or animal origin (regions food production, plant production and animal keeping) predominate. Since 1976 the BK 41 has been on the 10th rank of alases, 1977), above all conditioned by an improved establishment. Among the diagnoses bronchial asthma is in the first place. The high proportion of allergoses by cereal constituents is to be led back to the, as a rule, unproblematic allergologic clarification diagnostics. One may conclude that difficulties of the recognition in other allergens condition a considerable dark number, particularly in chemical working materials. The allergoses by cereal constituents are followed by the constituents of the animal epidermis (above all hair of laboratory animals). The remainder -- without any importance of the succession -- belongs to moulds, mites, plant pollen, parasubstituted aromates, chrome and rare allergens. Apart from the slight number of alveolitis diseases the allergoses conditioned by organic dusts belong to the type of early reaction (characteristic representatives: baker's asthma). Problematical are the allergoses of the type of the late reaction. Chemical substances of the hapten type are above all in question (characteristic representative: chrome asthma). Here is most cases expressed irritation effects are present so that this pathogenetic factor is frequently determining without proving any immune-specific effects. The report is based on forgiven criteria of decision.

  17. RESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO EXERCISE IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is a naturally occurring physiological process, where in most control systems of the body are transitorily modified in an attempt to maintain the homeostasis. Exercise is another physiological state in which the bodily systems undergo adaptations, more so in pregnant women. There are many advantages of exercise in pregnant women as in any other individual; from the sense of well-being to prevention of hypertension and diabetes. There are not many studies done on Indian women to know the effect of exercise on the pulmonary function tests. OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of moderate exercise on the respiratory functions in pregnant women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 50 healthy pregnant women in their 2nd trimester of pregnancy were taken as subjects. Minute Ventilation (MV, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC & Forced Expiratory Volume in 1st second were measured in pregnant women who were then compared with age- matched controls. Respiratory parameters were recorded using a computerized spirometry (Medspiror. It was done at two instances once at rest and other after subjecting them to moderate exercise on a motorized treadmill. RESULTS: At rest, Minute ventilation was more in the pregnant group when compared to controls. Increase in MV after exercise was more in the pregnant women. FVC was not statistically different from those of controls at rest, though exercise increased FVC to greater value in pregnant women as compared to controls. Resting FEV1 was less in pregnant women. It decreased after exercise in both the groups; the percentage decrease was not much different between the two groups. CONCLUSION: In our study, changes in respiratory functions to exercise in pregnant women were towards positive side giving the advantage of hyperventilation to the woman and the fetus. Keeping in mind the tremendous advantages of exercise, all healthy pregnant women should be encouraged to make exercise an integral part of their ante-natal care.

  18. 高频震荡通气治疗先天性心脏病术后重症ARDS32例效果观察%Observations on high-frequency oscillatory ventilation effects in pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome after congenital heart surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭; 张燕搏; 曾敏; 段雷雷; 李胜利; 王珊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) in pediatric pa-tients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after congenital heart surgery. Methods Thirty-two pediatric pa-tients were treated with HFOV for failing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) , ventilation and oxygen parameters were adjusted, and lung recruitment maneuvers was applied after tracheal suction. Changes of blood gas indexes, HFOV treating time, changes of cycle indexes during re-ex-pansion of the lung, complications and survival rate were observed. Results After 12 to 48 hs of HFOV, PaO2, PaCO2, FiO2 and PaO2/FiO2 were all improved significantly and remained within the target range thereafter. The mean duration of HFOV was 43-238 ( 128. 5 ±67. 49) hs. Barotrauma necessitating the insertion of the chest tube were appeared in 9 children. Twenty-one children (65. 6% ) were successfully weaned and survived to discharge, 11 children died . Conclusion In pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome failing conventional ventilation, HFOV can improve ventilation and gas exchange in a rapid fashion, and can be used as rescue treatment for some pediatric ARDS patients after congenital heart surgery.%目的 探讨高频震荡通气( HFOV)对小儿心脏手术后重症ARDS的治疗效果.方法 对32例心脏手术后常频通气(CMV)治疗无效的重症ARDS患儿行HFOV治疗,设置相应的参数并行氧合、通气管理,每次吸痰后行肺复张.观察治疗前后血气指标变化、HFOV治疗时间、肺复张期间循环指标变化、整体治疗期间并发症发生情况及患儿存活情况.结果 HFOV治疗后通气及气体交换在较短的时间内改善,12~48 h血气相关指标PaO2、PaCO2、吸人氧浓度(FiO2)、氧合指数(PaO2/FiO2)均明显改善且稳定.HFOV治疗时间43 ~238(128.5±67.49)h,肺复张期间循环指标未出现异常变化,末梢血氧饱和度快速恢复至吸痰前水平,呼吸机

  19. Impact of endotracheal tube size on preextubation respiratory variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sangeeta; Heffer, Matthew J; Maham, Nava; Nelson, David L; Klinger, James R; Levy, Mitchell M

    2010-09-01

    Many parameters have been evaluated to predict successful extubation. These are all affected by extrapulmonary variables. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of endotracheal tube (ETT) size on preextubation predictors of successful extubation. Twenty-two intubated and mechanically ventilated subjects were recruited when ready for extubation. Subjects were ventilated with T-piece, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) of 5 cm H(2)O, and pressure support ventilation (PSV) of 5 cm H(2)O in randomized order for 15 minutes each. Pulmonary mechanics-including respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume (V(T)), f/V(T) ratio, negative change in esophageal pressure, pressure time product (PTP), work of breathing, and the airway occlusion pressure 100 milliseconds after the onset of inspiratory flow-were measured using a microprocessor-based monitor at the end of each interval. After extubation, measurement of pulmonary mechanics was repeated at 15 and 60 minutes. In patients with 7.0- or 7.5-mm ETT compared with patients with 8.0-mm ETT, (1) f was significantly higher during all ventilatory modes and 15 minutes after extubation; (2) V(T) during PSV and CPAP was significantly lower; (3) mean f/V(T) was significantly higher (122 ± 57 vs 69 ± 35, P = .026); and (4) PTP was significantly higher during CPAP, PSV, and 15 minutes after extubation. There was a nonsignificant trend toward increased negative change in esophageal pressure, work of breathing, and airway occlusion pressure 100 milliseconds after the onset of inspiratory flow in the smaller-ETT group. The ETT size has a significant impact on f, V(T), f/V(T) ratio, and PTP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac, respiratory, and locomotor coordination during walking in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niizeki, K; Kawahara, K; Miyamoto, Y

    1996-01-01

    Interactions between locomotor, respiratory, and cardiac rhythms were investigated in human subjects (n = 11) walking on a treadmill. Investigation of the phase relationship between heart rate and gait signals revealed that cardiac rhythms were entrained to locomotor rhythms when both frequencies were close to an integer ratio. Coherence spectra were estimated between heartbeat fluctuation, respiratory, and gait signals, and their magnitudes were evaluated. The results suggest that the respiratory-induced fluctuation in heartbeat would vary depending on the strength of the cardiolocomotor coupling. The synchronization tends to occur for one or two specific phases in an individual subject, but there was some variation among subjects. When the subjects voluntarily synchronized their cadence with the cardiac rhythm, the heart rate and blood pressure varied depending on the phase lag within a cardiac cycle. The coordination of locomotor and cardiac rhythms is discussed.

  1. Our great forgotten, chronic respiratory sufferers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordejé Laguna, María Luisa

    2017-05-08

    Lung’s own properties make that nutritional support, besides covering the requirements can modulate its infl ammatory response. Lung tissue has a low glucose stock. Fatty acids are the main energy producer of type II pneumocytes, which use them in order to form phospholipids, essential for surfactant whose creation and release decrease in acute lung injury (ALI). Glutamine is a good substratum for endocrine cells and type II pneumocytes. Due to high nutritional risk, it is important its assessments in disorders as COPD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ADRS). Indirect calorimetry values the effect of ventilation and nutritional support, avoiding overfeeding. Hypophosphatemia and refeeding syndrome are frequent and need to be avoided because of their morbidity. In critically ill patients, malnutrition can lead to respiratory failure and increasing mechanical ventilation time. To avoid hypercapnia in weaning, glucose levels should be controlled. High lipids/carbohydrates ratio do not show usefulness in COPD neither mechanical ventilation removal. ALI patients beneficiate from an early start and the volume administered. Enteral nutrition with high fatty acids ratio (EPA, DHA and γ-linolenic acid) and antioxidants do not show any superiority. Omega-3 fatty acid in parenteral nutrition could modulate infl ammation and immunosuppression in a positive manner. The use of glutamine, vitamins or antioxidants in these patients could be justified.

  2. Respiratory Information Extraction from Electrocardiogram Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Gamal El Din Fathy

    2010-12-01

    The Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a tool measuring the electrical activity of the heart, and it is extensively used for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases. The ECG signal reflects not only the heart activity but also many other physiological processes. The respiratory activity is a prominent process that affects the ECG signal due to the close proximity of the heart and the lungs. In this thesis, several methods for the extraction of respiratory process information from the ECG signal are presented. These methods allow an estimation of the lung volume and the lung pressure from the ECG signal. The potential benefit of this is to eliminate the corresponding sensors used to measure the respiration activity. A reduction of the number of sensors connected to patients will increase patients’ comfort and reduce the costs associated with healthcare. As a further result, the efficiency of diagnosing respirational disorders will increase since the respiration activity can be monitored with a common, widely available method. The developed methods can also improve the detection of respirational disorders that occur while patients are sleeping. Such disorders are commonly diagnosed in sleeping laboratories where the patients are connected to a number of different sensors. Any reduction of these sensors will result in a more natural sleeping environment for the patients and hence a higher sensitivity of the diagnosis.

  3. [Cannabis use and impairment of respiratory function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C

    2013-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in many countries including France. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but in our country it is mainly smoked in the form of cannabis resin mixed with tobacco. The technique of inhaling cannabis differs from that of tobacco, increasing the time that the smoke spends in contact with the bronchial mucosal and its impact on respiratory function. One cigarette composed of cannabis and tobacco is much more harmful than a cigarette containing only tobacco. In cannabis smokers there is an increased incidence of respiratory symptoms and episodes of acute bronchitis. Cannabis produces a rapid bronchodilator effect; chronic use provokes a reduction in specific conductance and increase in airways resistance. Studies on the decline of Forced Expiratory Volume are discordant. Cannabis smoke and tetrahydrocannabinol irritate the bronchial tree. They bring about histological signs of airways inflammation and alter the fungicidal and antibacterial activity of alveolar macrophages. Inhalation of cannabis smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Stopping smoking cannabis will bring about important benefits for lung function. This should encourage clinicians to offer patients support in quitting smoking.

  4. Respiratory mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Dean R

    2014-11-01

    Respiratory mechanics refers to the expression of lung function through measures of pressure and flow. From these measurements, a variety of derived indices can be determined, such as volume, compliance, resistance, and work of breathing. Plateau pressure is a measure of end-inspiratory distending pressure. It has become increasingly appreciated that end-inspiratory transpulmonary pressure (stress) might be a better indicator of the potential for lung injury than plateau pressure alone. This has resulted in a resurgence of interest in the use of esophageal manometry in mechanically ventilated patients. End-expiratory transpulmonary pressure might also be useful to guide the setting of PEEP to counterbalance the collapsing effects of the chest wall. The shape of the pressure-time curve might also be useful to guide the setting of PEEP (stress index). This has focused interest in the roles of stress and strain to assess the potential for lung injury during mechanical ventilation. This paper covers both basic and advanced respiratory mechanics during mechanical ventilation.

  5. Effects of respiratory muscle training and electrical stimulation of abdominal muscles on respiratory capabilities in tetraplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupan, A; Savrin, R; Erjavec, T; Kralj, A; Karcnik, T; Skorjanc, T; Benko, H; Obreza, P

    1997-08-01

    Thirteen tetraplegic patients were included in the study of the effects of respiratory muscle training and of electrical stimulation of the abdominal muscles on their respiratory capabilities. Each patient was subjected for three 1 month lasting periods of the study: for inspiratory muscle training, expiratory muscle training and for a period without training. The sequence of these three periods was random for each patient. Respiratory tests (RT) measuring forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were conducted before and following each monthly period. Measurements were taken under four sets of conditions: the patients' unassisted efforts, their efforts combined with pressure manually applied by a therapist to the upper part of their abdomen, and their efforts accompanied by electrical stimulation (ES) of the abdominal muscles during the early phase of expirium, once triggered by the therapist and once by the patients themselves. RT values were increasing following respiratory muscle training and inspiratory training apparently had a slightly greater effect than its expiratory counterpart. The increments of values of RT were statistically significant (P muscle training. RT measurements were greater when the patient's voluntary effort was combined with ES of abdominal muscles than when it was not. This study concludes that respiratory muscle training is a potentially effective approach and that ES of the abdominal muscles has potentials to improve coughing in tetraplegic patients.

  6. γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB)-induced respiratory depression: combined receptor-transporter inhibition therapy for treatment in GHB overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Bridget L; Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E

    2012-08-01

    Overdose of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) frequently causes respiratory depression, occasionally resulting in death; however, little is known about the dose-response relationship or effects of potential overdose treatment strategies on GHB-induced respiratory depression. In these studies, the parameters of respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute volume were measured using whole-body plethysmography in rats administered GHB. Intravenous doses of 200, 600, and 1500 mg/kg were administered to assess the dose-dependent effects of GHB on respiration. To determine the receptors involved in GHB-induced respiratory depression, a specific GABA(B) receptor antagonist, (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH50911), and a specific GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline, were administered before GHB. The potential therapeutic strategies of receptor inhibition and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibition were assessed by inhibitor administration 5 min after GHB. The primary effect of GHB on respiration was a dose-dependent decrease in respiratory rate, accompanied by an increase in tidal volume, resulting in little change in minute volume. Pretreatment with 150 mg/kg SCH50911 completely prevented the decrease in respiratory rate, indicating agonism at GABA(B) receptors to be primarily responsible for GHB-induced respiratory depression. Administration of 50 mg/kg SCH50911 after GHB completely reversed the decrease in respiratory rate; lower doses had partial effects. Administration of the MCT inhibitor l-lactate increased GHB renal and total clearance, also improving respiratory rate. Administration of 5 mg/kg SCH50911 plus l-lactate further improved respiratory rate compared with the same dose of either agent alone, indicating that GABA(B) and MCT inhibitors, alone and in combination, represent potential treatment options for GHB-induced respiratory depression.

  7. Prone positioning in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kristy; Dufault, Marlene; Bergeron, Kathy

    2015-08-12

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a condition with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and treatment is often long and costly. Prone positioning is a rarely used intervention for patients with this syndrome, although research suggests it may be effective. A literature search was undertaken to examine the effects of prone positioning on oxygenation, morbidity and mortality in patients with ARDS. It revealed that prone positioning, when used with low tidal volume ventilation over an extended period, may reduce mortality rates in selected patients with severe ARDS. The selection of patients with severe ARDS for prone positioning should be done on a case-by-case basis to maximise benefits and minimise complications. Further research is required on the use of prone positioning in patients with severe ARDS to support or disclaim the therapy's use in practice, and to compare confounding variables such as ideal prone duration and mechanical versus manual pronation.

  8. Lung Volume Measured during Sequential Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes from studying the coordinative relationship between respiratory and swallow subsystems are inconsistent for sequential swallows, and the lung volume at the initiation of sequential swallowing remains undefined. The first goal of this study was to quantify the lung volume at initiation of sequential swallowing ingestion cycles and…

  9. with respiratory symptoms in Lilongwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Audit of outpatient department management of patients with respiratory symptoms ... verbal reports of main symptoms did not match with those recorded on OPD notes. .... palpitations, rheumatism, tonsillitis, general body pains, COAD, difficulty ...

  10. Respiratory Therapy Technology Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the respiratory therapy technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation; Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning);…

  11. Elevated HbA1c Levels Are Associated with the Blunted Autonomic Response Assessed by Heart Rate Variability during Blood Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Miho; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2016-10-01

    A high glycemic status increases the risk for autonomic dysfunction and cardiovascular failure. The aim of this study was to investigate time-dependent changes in the autonomic response and cardiovascular dynamics and the association between the level of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and autonomic response during blood volume reduction. The study population consisted of 26 preoperative participants who were scheduled for autologous blood donation (200-400 mL of whole blood) for intraoperative or postoperative use. These participants without circulatory, respiratory, or brain disease and diabetes mellitus were grouped according to their HbA1c levels: blood pressure (BP) and analyzed heart rate variability (HRV) to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation throughout blood donation. During blood volume reduction, which was about 10% of the circulating blood volume, the BP and heart rate varied within normal ranges in both groups. The high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, significantly decreased and increased with the progression of blood volume reduction, respectively, in the HbA1c blood volume reduction only in the HbA1c blood volume reduction.

  12. The effects of High frequency two -way jet ventilation on the function respiratory and circulation of patients with Trachea and Carinal reconstruction%高频双向喷射通气对气管隆突重建术患者呼吸循环的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹金军; 刘国利

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨高频双向喷射通气对气管隆突重建术患者呼吸循环的影响。方法15例择期肺癌需行气管隆突重建术患者,麻醉诱导插入双腔气管导管且静脉复合麻醉,气管隆突重建时行健侧主支气管高频双向喷射通气,连接一根 Hunsaker 喷射通气导管插入健侧主支气管内3 cm,呼吸频率(RR)120次/min,吸呼比(IE)11,驱动压力0.2~0.25 MPa。且在麻醉前、开胸单肺通气后15 min、高频通气10、20、30 min 及再次单肺通气15 min 时行动脉血气分析,同时监测 MAP、HR、SpO2、PetCO2。结果高频通气时 PaO2较术前的(78.0±10.5)mmHg 显著升高,分别为(161.4±10.2)mmHg、(156.0±15.7)mmHg、(153.0±15.1)mmHg (均 P <0.01);高频通气30 min 时 PaO2较单肺(前)的(165.50±11.3)mmHg 通气降低为(153±15.1)mmHg (P <0.05),均高于100 mmHg;PaCO2在高频通气30 min 内较单肺通气(前)时稍增高,差异无统计学意义(P >0.05)。结论胸外科气管隆突成型重建术用高频双向喷射通气行健侧肺通气是安全可行的方法。%Objective To study the effects of High frequency two -way jet ventilation on the function respiratory and circulation of patients with Trachea and Carinal reconstruction.Methods Fifty patients with lung cancer,who were scheduled for elective trachea and carinal reconstruction,were intubated with double lumen tube following anesthesia induction and general anesthesia.High frequency ventilation was used on the healthful main bronchus during carinal reconstruction,a Hunsaker tube was inserted 3cm into the healthful main bronchus.HFTJV was applied with the respiratory rate of 120 /min,the ratio of inspiration and expiration E =1:1 and drive pressure of 0.2 -0.25Mpa.Blood gas analysis was made before the anesthesia,15 min following one -lung ventilation,10,20, 30 min following HFTJV and 15min

  13. Use of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnosis of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, B W; Marcuse, E K; Foy, H M; Cooney, M K; Allan, I; Brewer, D; Smith, A L

    1986-07-01

    Two immunochemical methods were used to identify Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular antigens in the urine and serum of 162 children with acute lower respiratory tract infection. These methods were compared with standard bacterial blood culture. Viral and mycoplasma cultures of respiratory secretions were obtained simultaneously to determine the frequency of antigenuria at the time of nonbacterial acute lower respiratory tract infection. Urine from groups of well children and children with acute otitis media was tested for capsular antigens to determine the incidence of antigenuria. Antigenuria was found in 24% of children 2 months to 18 years of age with acute lower respiratory tract infection compared with a 2% incidence of bacteremia. Antigenuria was found in 4% of asymptomatic children and 16% of children with acute otitis media. One third of children with symptoms of acute lower respiratory tract infection and viral isolates from the oropharynx had bacterial antigenuria. The sixfold increase in frequency of bacterial antigenuria in children at the time of lower respiratory symptoms suggests that bacterial acute lower respiratory tract infection may be more common than identified by traditional culture techniques. Because bacterial antigen may come from other sites such as the middle ear, further studies are needed to determine the role of antigen detection in the diagnosis of pediatric acute lower respiratory tract infection.

  14. Respiratory Failure Secondary to Human Metapneumovirus Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a 32-Month-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV is a common virus that can cause respiratory problems ranging from mild upper respiratory tract disease to respiratory failure requiring mechanical support. Here, we report a case of a 32-month-old male with a previous history of asthma, who developed respiratory failure two weeks after onset of cough and rhinorrhea and required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO for 9 days after failing high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV. To our knowledge, this is the oldest reported pediatric patient with respiratory failure secondary to human metapneumovirus that did not respond to mechanical ventilation. This case highlights three critical points: the potentially fatal causative role of HMPV in respiratory failure in an older pediatric age group of immunocompetent hosts, the importance of early recognition of impending respiratory failure, and the timely utilization of ECMO.

  15. Urgencias respiratorias Respiratory emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Las urgencias respiratorias en un paciente con cáncer pueden tener su origen en patologías de la vía aérea, del parénquima pulmonar o de los grandes vasos. La causa puede ser el propio tumor o complicaciones concomitantes. La obstrucción de la vía aérea debería ser inicialmente evaluada con procedimientos endoscópicos. En situaciones severas, la cirugía raramente es posible. El emplazamiento endobronquial de stents e isótopos radiactivos (braquiterapia, la ablación tumoral por láser o la terapia fotodinámica, pueden aliviar de forma rápida los síntomas y reestablecer el flujo aéreo. El manejo de la hemoptisis depende de la causa que la provoque y de la cuantía de la misma. La broncoscopia sigue siendo el procedimiento de primera línea en la mayor parte de los casos; aporta información diagnóstica y puede interrumpir el sangrado mediante lavados con suero helado, taponamiento endobronquial o inyecciones tópicas de adrenalina o trombina. La radioterapia externa sigue siendo un procedimiento extraordinariamente útil para tratar la hemoptisis de causa tumoral y en situaciones bien seleccionadas la terapia endobronquial con láser o braquiterapia y la embolización arterial bronquial pueden proporcionar un gran rendimiento paliativo. Las urgencias respiratorias por enfermedad del parénquima pulmonar en un paciente oncológico, pueden tener causa tumoral, iatrogénica o infecciosa. El reconocimiento precoz de cada una de ellas determina la administración del tratamiento específico y las posibilidades de éxito.Respiratory emergencies in a patient with cancer can have their origin in pathologies of the airway, of the pulmonary parenchyma or the large vessels. The cause can be the tumour itself or concomitant complications. Obstruction of the airway should be initially evaluated with endoscopic procedures. Surgery is rarely possible in serious situations. The endobronchial placement of stents or radioactive isotopes

  16. Progression from respiratory dysfunction to failure in late-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kenneth I; Chan, Yinny; Rom, William N; Oppenheimer, Beno W; Goldring, Roberta M

    2016-08-01

    To identify determinants of respiratory disease progression in late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD), we studied relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, gas exchange, and respiratory control. Longitudinal evaluation of 22 LOPD patients (mean age 38 years) was performed at 6-month intervals for 6-24 months. Measurements included vital capacity (VC), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), tidal volume (VT), dead space (VD), and ventilatory response to CO2. Although reduction in VC correlated with MIP and MEP (p respiratory failure, is tightly linked to the degree of respiratory muscle weakness and severity of pulmonary dysfunction in LOPD patients. Reductions in CO2 clearance efficiency and ventilatory responsiveness may contribute to the development of chronic daytime hypercapnia.

  17. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencu, Codruţa; Alexescu, Teodora; Petrulea, Mirela; Lencu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary - cortical, and involuntary - metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthyroidism, patients develop ventilation disorders, obstructive and central sleep apnea, and pleural collection. The respiratory abnormalities in hyperthyroidism as a result of the hypermetabolic action of thyroid hormones are hyperventilation, myopathy and cardiovascular involvement; recent studies have reported pulmonary arterial hypertension in Graves' disease, as a result of the association of several mechanisms. Thyroid hypertrophy can induce through compression of the upper airways dyspnea, stridor, wheezing and cough. The respiratory disorders in acromegaly are ventilatory dysfunction and sleep apnea, which contribute to an unfavorable evolution of the disease. Respiratory changes in parathyroid, adrenal and reproductive system diseases have been described. Respiratory disorders should be recognized, investigated and monitored by medical practitioners of various specialties (family physicians, internists, endocrinologists, pneumologists, cardiologists). They are frequently severe, causing an unfavorable evolution of the associated endocrine and respiratory disease.

  18. Clinical Effect of High - frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in the Adjuvant Treatment of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome%高频振荡通气辅助治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征的临床疗效研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游勇; 王惠珍

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effect of high - frequency oscillatory ventilation in the adjuvant treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Methods A total of 80 newborns with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome were selected in the Central Hospital of Huangshi from June 2010 to December 2012,and they were randomly divided into control group and observation group,each of 40 cases. Newborns of both groups received lung alveolar surfactant and so on before mechanical ventilation, and newborns of control group received conventional mechanical ventilation, while newborns of observation group received high - frequency oscillatory ventilation. Clinical effect,ventilation time,hospital stays,pH,PaO2 , PaCO2 ,MAP,OI and FiO2 before treatment and after 12,24,48 hours of treatment were compared between the two groups. Results No statistically significant differences of clinical effect was found between the two groups( u = 0. 455,P = 0. 324). Ventilation time and hospital stays of observation group were statistically significantly shorter than those of control group( P ﹤0. 05). No statistically significant differences of pH,PaO2 or PaCO2 was found between the two groups before treatment,nor was PaCO2 between the two groups after 12 hours of treatment( P ﹥ 0. 05);pH and PaO2 of observation group were statistically significantly higher than those of control group after 12,24 and 48 hours oftreatment,while PaCO2 of observation group was statistically significantly lower than that of control group after 24 and 48 hours of treatment,respectively( P ﹤ 0. 05). No statistically significant differences of MAP,OI or FiO2 was found between the two groups before treatment,nor was OI between the two groups after 12 or 24 hours of treatment,or was MAP between the two groups after 12 hours of treatment(P ﹥ 0. 05);FiO2 of observation group was statistically significantly lower than that of control group after 12,24,48 hours of treatment, respectively,OI of

  19. Epidemiology of respiratory distress and the illness severity in late preterm or term infants: a prospective multi-center study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-lu; YI Bin; SHI Jing-yun; DU Li-zhong; XU Xue-feng; CHEN Chao; YAN Chao-ying; LIU Ya-ming; LIU Ling; XIONG Hong; SUN Hui-qing; LAI Jian-pu

    2010-01-01

    Background The severity of respiratory distress was associated with neonatal prognosis. This study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics, therapeutic interventions and short-term outcomes of late preterm or term infants who required respiratory support, and compare the usage of different illness severity assessment tools.Methods Seven neonatal intensive care units in tertiary hospitals were recruited. From November 2008 to October 2009, neonates born at ≥34 weeks' gestational age, admitted at <72 hours of age, requiring continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or mechanical ventilation for respiratory support were enrolled. Clinical data including demographic variables, underlying disease, complications, therapeutic interventions and short-term outcomes were collected. All infants were divided into three groups by Acute care of at-risk newborns (ACoRN) Respiratory Score <5, 5-8, and >8.Results During the study period, 503 newborn late preterm or term infants required respiratory support. The mean gestational age was (36.8±2.2) weeks, mean birth weight was (2734.5±603.5) g. The majority of the neonates were male (69.4%), late preterm (63.3%), delivered by cesarean section (74.8%), admitted in the first day of life (89.3%) and outborn (born at other hospitals, 76.9%). Of the cesarean section, 51.1% were performed electively. Infants in the severe group were more mature, had the highest rate of elective cesarean section, Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes and resuscitated with intubation, the in-hospital mortality increased significantly. In total, 58.1% of the patients were supported with mechanical ventilation and 17.3% received high frequency oscillation. Adjunctive therapies were commonly needed.Higher rate of infants in severe group needed mechanical ventilation or high frequency oscillation, volume expansion,bicarbonate infusion or vasopressors therapy (P <0.05). The incidence of complications was also increased significantly in severe group (P

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL FEATURES OF COMBINED RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shkarin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents a review of publications on the problem of combined respiratory infections among children. Viral-bacterial associations are registered  in a group of often ill children in 51.7%. More than half of the patients have herpesvirus infection in various combinations. The presence of a combined acute respiratory viral infection among children in the group from 2 to 6 years was noted in 44.2% of cases, among which, in addition to influenza viruses, RS-, adeno-, etc., metapneumovirus and bocavirus plays an important role.The increase in severity of acute respiratory viral infection with combined  infection, with chlamydia  and mycoplasma infection is shown. A longer and more severe course of whooping cough was observed when combined with respiratory viruses.The revealed facts of frequency of distribution of combined  respiratory infections in children, the severity and duration of their course with the development of various complications and the formation of chronic pathology dictate the need to improve diagnosis and treatment tactics of these forms of infections.

  1. The applicable value of respiratory impedance for the stage 0 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan; XIE Wei; WEI Ping; YU Bao-ping; FANG Ping

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the applicable value of respiratory impedance for the stage 0 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods:Respiratory impedance was measured by impulse oscillometry (IOS) in 41 cases at stage 0 of COPD (NHLBI/WHO, 2001 Standard) and their conventional pulmonary function values were compared with 42 healthy subjects. Both groups had no significant deviation in age, stature and avoirdupois, etc. Master-Screen pulmonary function test system (Jaeger Co, Germany) were used to determine IOS parameters including viscous resistance of 5Hz, 20 Hz and 35Hz (R5, R20, R35), reactance of 5Hz, 35 Hz (X5, X35 ), resonant frequency (Fres) ,total respiratory impedance (Zrs) and routine pulmonary function values including forced expiratory volume in one second to predicted value (FEV1%), forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity ratio( FEV1/FVC%), maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF%),V25% and V50%. Results:Both groups had no significant deviation in FEV1%, FEV1/FVC% and X35 (P>0.05). It was increased significantly in viscous resistance of 5Hz, 20 Hz and 35Hz (R5, R20, R35) in COPD group than that in healthy group (P<0.01). So were Fres and Zrs (P<0.01). MMEF%,V25%,V50% and reactance of 5Hz (X5) in COPD group were marked lower than that in healthy group (P<0.01). The sensitivity of MMEF%, V25%,V50% was higher than others, but its specificity was lower. In parameters of IOS, Fres was the most sensitive index for diagnosis of the small airway function and its specificity was higher than that of MMEF%, V25%,V50%. Conclusion:In the risk case at the stage 0 of COPD, MMEF%, V25% and V50% could be decreased, but Fres, R5,R5-20 could be increased in spite of FEV1% and FEV1/FVC% in normal range.

  2. Respiratory motion in positron emission tomography for oncology applications: Problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France); Bruyant, P. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France); Boussion, N. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France); Cheze Le Rest, C. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France)

    2006-12-20

    The effect of physiological motion in emission tomography is a reduction in overall image contrast and loss of sensitivity. In particular, respiratory motion affects imaging in the thoracic and the upper abdomen area, leading to a reduction in lesion detection as a result of the associated blurring. Furthermore, respiratory motion leads to a compromise in quantitative accuracy in terms of functional volume determination and activity concentration recovery for oncology imaging. This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in the implementation of respiratory motion compensation techniques in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for oncology applications.

  3. An investigation of functional state of the kickboxing athlete respiratory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Volodchenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study of the functional state of the respiratory system of kickboxing athletes. Material & Methods: in study involved 17 athletes – members of the Kharkov region team, age (17,88±0,58 years. Anthropometric studies were carried out according to standard methods, determined: body weight, body length, vital capacity of the lungs. Assessment of physical development, the state of the respiratory system was made with the SPIROCOM program. Results: the physical development of athletes is rated as average and harmonious. An increase in the vital capacity of the lungs was almost doubled in comparison with the standard. A significant increase in actual tidal volume and minute volume of respiration was established in comparison with the proper values. A significant increase in expiration time, a predominance of individuals with a large expiratory volume. Conclusion: established increased functionality of the respiratory system, which is due to the specifics of training in this sportа.

  4. Nonassociative learning promotes respiratory entrainment to mechanical ventilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna M MacDonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patient-ventilator synchrony is a major concern in critical care and is influenced by phasic lung-volume feedback control of the respiratory rhythm. Routine clinical application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP introduces a tonic input which, if unopposed, might disrupt respiratory-ventilator entrainment through sustained activation of the vagally-mediated Hering-Breuer reflex. We suggest that this potential adverse effect may be averted by two differentiator forms of nonassociative learning (habituation and desensitization of the Hering-Breuer reflex via pontomedullary pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested these hypotheses in 17 urethane-anesthetized adult Sprague-Dawley rats under controlled mechanical ventilation. Without PEEP, phrenic discharge was entrained 1:1 to the ventilator rhythm. Application of PEEP momentarily dampened the entrainment to higher ratios but this effect was gradually adapted by nonassociative learning. Bilateral electrolytic lesions of the pneumotaxic center weakened the adaptation to PEEP, whereas sustained stimulation of the pneumotaxic center weakened the entrainment independent of PEEP. In all cases, entrainment was abolished after vagotomy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate an important functional role for pneumotaxic desensitization and extra-pontine habituation of the Hering-Breuer reflex elicited by lung inflation: acting as buffers or high-pass filters against tonic vagal volume input, these differentiator forms of nonassociative learning help to restore respiratory-ventilator entrainment in the face of PEEP. Such central sites-specific habituation and desensitization of the Hering-Breuer reflex provide a useful experimental model of nonassociative learning in mammals that is of particular significance in understanding respiratory rhythmogenesis and coupled-oscillator entrainment mechanisms, and in the clinical management of mechanical ventilation in

  5. Eliminating ultrasonic interference from respiratory muscle EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R S; Kieser, T M; Easton, P A

    1998-05-01

    Fine wire recordings of the respiratory muscle electromyogram are often employed to represent muscle activity, and recently ultrasound-sonomicrometry has become a common method of measuring length of respiratory muscles in both acute and chronic preparations. Although recording both EMG and sonomicrometry simultaneously has become standard practice, there has not been any consideration of the potential confounding influence of ultrasound noise upon the recorded EMG spectrum. Activation of the sonomicrometry-ultrasound tranducer introduces a high frequency, high amplitude voltage pulse plus harmonics, which can contaminate the EMG spectrum directly, as well as through aliasing when EMG is sampled directly digitally. We describe the use of a new, combined, wing stabilized sonomicrometry- and EMG measurement transducer to characterize exactly the influence of ultrasound upon the crural diaphragm EMG spectrum, and the development of digital filtering techniques which effectively eliminate the ultrasound interference. Two alternative methods of avoiding ultrasound-EMG interference are also considered. The isolation and elimination of ultrasound-sonomicrometry signal interference may be important in studies where EMG and length are measured together.

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Pamela A; Seahorn, Thomas

    2004-04-01

    all species that we work with? What do we define as acute onset? Most human ARDS cases occur while patients are in hospital being treated for other problems, whereas many of our patients present already in respiratory distress. If we are unable to ventilate patients for economic or practical reasons, what do we use as the equivalent of the Pao2/Flo, ratio'? Reliance on the pathologist is not reasonable, because many disease processes can look similar to ARDS under the microscope. If anything, ALI and ARDS are clinical diagnoses. It is time for veterinarians to reach a consensus on the definition for ALI and ARDS in our patients. Only when we have a consensus of definition can rational prospective clinical trials of therapies be designed.

  7. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  8. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  9. Interrelation between respiratory and contractile activity of Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2017-06-01

    Different types of endoplasmic oscillatory activity of Physarum polycephalum plasmodium driven by external influences were investigated. Shuttle velocity oscillations of the endoplasm in an isolated plasmodium strand have been analysed using short-time Fourier (STFT) and wavelet transform. Spectral characteristics calculated from the obtained data allowed us to reveal two internal harmonic oscillators with frequencies differing twice with high accuracy (~2%), or one oscillator in which the frequency doubled with the phase shift. The amplitudes and phases of these harmonics only determine contractile activity, self-organisation and migration of the strand. Inhibitors of the cellular respiration (KCN-SHAM) were applied to demonstrate the interrelation between respiratory pathways with contractile activity. Both internal oscillators showed high sensitivity to the respiratory inhibitors: fast cessation of oscillation in the presence of inhibitors and gradual recovery when they have been removed.

  10. Sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome in children with cancer: the respiratory dynamics of a devastating condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Rodrigo Genaro; de Araujo, Orlei Ribeiro; da Silva, Dafne Cardoso Bourguignon; Senerchia, Andreza Almeida; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical course and respiratory parameters of mechanically ventilated children with cancer suffering from sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods This 2-year prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study enrolled 29 children and adolescents. Clinical data, measurements of blood gases and ventilation parameters were collected at four different time points. Fluctuations between measurements as well as differences in estimated means were analyzed by linear mixed models in which death within 28 days from the onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome was the primary endpoint. Results There were 17 deaths within 28 days of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset and another 7 between 29 - 60 days. Only 5 patients survived for more than 60 days. Nine (31%) patients died as a direct consequence of refractory hypoxemia, and the others died of multiple organ failure and catecholamine-refractory shock. In 66% of the measurements, the tidal volume required to obtain oxygen saturation equal to or above 90% was greater than 7mL/kg. The estimated means of dynamic compliance were low and were similar for survivors and non-survivors but with a negative slope between the first and final measurements, accompanied by a negative slope of the tidal volume for non-survivors. Non-survivors were significantly more hypoxemic, with PaO2/FiO2 ratios showing lower estimated means and a negative slope along the four measurements. Peak, expiratory and mean airway pressures showed positive slopes in the non-survivors, who also had more metabolic acidosis. Conclusions In most of our children with cancer, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome progressed with deteriorating ventilation indexes and escalating organic dysfunction, making this triad nearly fatal in children. PMID:28099641

  11. Gene therapy and respiratory neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is a life-sustaining behavior that in mammals is accomplished by activation of dedicated muscles responsible for inspiratory and expiratory forces acting on the lung and chest wall. Motor control is exerted by specialized pools of motoneurons in the medulla and spinal cord innervated by projections from multiple centers primarily in the brainstem that act in concert to generate both the rhythm and pattern of ventilation. Perturbations that prevent the accomplishment of the full range of motor behaviors by respiratory muscles commonly result in significant morbidity and increased mortality. Recent developments in gene therapy and novel targeting strategies have contributed to deeper understanding of the organization of respiratory motor systems. Gene therapy has received widespread attention and substantial progress has been made in recent years with the advent of improved tools for vector design. Genes can be delivered via a variety of plasmids, synthetic or viral vectors and cell therapies. In recent years, adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have become one of the most commonly used vector systems, primarily because of the extensive characterization conducted to date and the versatility in targeting strategies. Recent studies highlight the power of using AAV to selectively and effectively transduce respiratory motoneurons and muscle fibers with promising therapeutic effects. This brief review summarizes current evidence for the use of gene therapy in respiratory disorders with a primary focus on interventions that address motor control and neuroplasticity, including regeneration, in the respiratory system.

  12. HEART DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Babachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between heart disease and infectious pathogens is well known. Despite the high frequency of cardiac pathology in infectious diseases, it is rarely diagnosed because of lack of specific clinical  and  laboratory  symptoms. It is especially  difficult to diagnose in  children. Airborne  infections in the structure of infectious morbidity of children occupy a leading place.The aim of this work was to study the nature of the lesions of the heart  in children suffering from acute infection of the respiratory tract.Materials and  methods: 341 children with acute respiratory infection of moderate severity were surveyed by a method of ECG dispersion mapping. Cardiac  pathology has not previously been determined in these children. Signs of disease of the heart was identified in 76 children (22%. Further study included instrumental (ECG, ECHO-KG,  daily monitoring of ECG, biochemical and  etiological (ELISA, PCR, immunocytochemical research  methods for determining the nature of the damage to the heart and the etiology of the disease.Results. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 2%  of children, a violation of repolarization – in 21%,  heart  rhythm disorders  – in 35%  (AV – blockade in 4%.  Most  often  signs  of heart disease were detected in children with Epstein-Barr virus (32%, streptococcal (28%, cytomegalovirus (25%, herpesvirus type  6 infection (24%. Pathogens from the  group of acute respiratory virus infections were identified in 28%, enterovirus – in  10%,  Haemophilus influenzae – in  10%, Mycoplasma pneumonia – in 10%,  Pneumococcus – in 9%, Chlamydia – in 9%, Parvovirus B19 – in 6%.Conclusion. Sensitive screening test  to  detect cardiac pathology is the method of ECG dispersion mapping. Heart damage in children with respiratory diseases in 60% of cases is associated with  mixed infections. Timely  diagnosis of lesions of the heart in infectious diseases in children allows to adjust the

  13. Pantoea agglomerans in Immunodeficient Patients with Different Respiratory Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Odilia Flores Popoca; Maximino Miranda García; Socorro Romero Figueroa; Aurelio Mendoza Medellín; Horacio Sandoval Trujillo; Hilda Victoria Silva Rojas; Ninfa Ramírez Durán

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine in 32 patients from 4 different Mexican hospitals the frequency of opportunistic bacteria in the 2010 to 2011 time period. The patients were divided in 4 groups. Group 1 included 21 HIV positive patients with acute respiratory syndrome. Four HIV positive patients with tuberculosis symptoms were included in Group 2; two patients with tuberculosis symptoms and one asymptomatic person formed Group 3. Reference Group 4 included 4 patients from whom 4 strains...

  14. Early respiratory microbiota composition determines bacterial succession patterns and respiratory health in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesbroek, G.; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Montijn, R.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Bogaert, D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Many bacterial pathogens causing respiratory infections in children are common residents of the respiratory tract. Insight into bacterial colonization patterns and microbiota stability at a young age might elucidate healthy or susceptible conditions for development of respiratory disease.

  15. Early respiratory microbiota composition determines bacterial succession patterns and respiratory health in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesbroek, G.; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Montijn, R.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Bogaert, D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Many bacterial pathogens causing respiratory infections in children are common residents of the respiratory tract. Insight into bacterial colonization patterns and microbiota stability at a young age might elucidate healthy or susceptible conditions for development of respiratory disease.

  16. [Methodology and Implementation of Forced Oscillation Technique for Respiratory Mechanics Measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengbo; Ni, Lu; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Deyu; Wang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a noninvasive method for respiratory mechanics measurement. For the FOT, external signals (e.g. forced oscillations around 4-40 Hz) are used to drive the respiratory system, and the mechanical characteristic of the respiratory system can be determined with the linear system identification theory. Thus, respiratory mechanical properties and components at different frequency and location of the airway can be explored by specifically developed forcing waveforms. In this paper, the theory, methodology and clinical application of the FOT is reviewed, including measure ment theory, driving signals, models of respiratory system, algorithm for impedance identification, and requirement on apparatus. Finally, the future development of this technique is also discussed.

  17. Respiratory Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James

    2005-11-01

    This brief overview of our groups activities includes liquid plug propagation in single and bifurcating tubes, a subject which pertains to surfactant delivery, liquid ventilation, pulmonary edema, and drowning. As the plug propagates, a variety of flow patterns may emerge depending on the parameters. It splits unevenly at airway bifurcations and can rupture, which reopens the airway to gas flow. Both propagation and rupture may damage the underlying airway wall cells. Another topic is surfactant dynamics and flow in a model of an oscillating alveolus. The analysis shows a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration time periods and the sorption parameter. Vortices, single and multiple, may be achieved, as well as a saddle point configuration. Potential applications are pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. Finally, capillary instabilities which cause airway closure, and strategies for stabilization, will be presented. This involves the core-annular flow of a liquid-lined tube, where the core (air) is forced to oscillate axially. The stabilization mechanism is similar to that of a reversing butter knife, where the core shear wipes the growing liquid bulge, from the Rayleigh instability, back on to the tube wall during the main tidal volume stroke, but allows it to grow back as the stroke and shear turn around.

  18. Free-Breathing Phase Contrast MRI with Near 100% Respiratory Navigator Efficiency using k-space Dependent Respiratory Gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Gulaka, Praveen; Basha, Tamer A.; Ngo, Long H.; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of a novel respiratory motion scheme, where only the center of k-space is gated using respiratory navigators, versus a fully respiratory-gated acquisition for 3D flow imaging. Methods 3D flow images were acquired axially using a GRE sequence in a volume covering the ascending and descending aorta, and the pulmonary artery bifurcation in 12 healthy subjects (33.2±15.8 years; 5 men). For respiratory motion compensation, two gating & tracking strategies were used with a 7mm gating window: 1) All of k-space acquired within the gating window (fully-gated), 2) Central k-space acquired within the gating window, and the remainder of k-space acquired without any gating (center-gated). Each scan was repeated twice. Stroke volume, mean flow, peak velocity and signal-to-noise-ratio measurements were performed both on the ascending and the descending aorta for all acquisitions, which were compared using a linear mixed-effects model and Bland-Altman analysis. Results There were no statistical differences between the fully-gated and center-gated strategies for the quantification of stroke volume, peak velocity and mean flow, as well as the signal-to-noise-ratio measurements. Furthermore, the proposed center-gated strategy had significantly shorter acquisition time compared to the fully-gated strategy (13:19±3:02 vs. 19:35±5:02, P<0.001). Conclusions The proposed novel center-gated strategy for 3D flow MRI allows for markedly shorter acquisition time without any systematic variation in quantitative flow measurements in this small group of healthy volunteers. PMID:23900942

  19. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action...

  20. Neck pain causes respiratory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapreli, Eleni; Vourazanis, Evangelos; Strimpakos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a presumptive mechanism for the development of changes in respiratory function due to chronic neck pain. The patient with neck pain presents a number of factors that could constitute a predisposition of leading to a respiratory dysfunction: (a) the decreased strength of deep neck flexors and extensors, (b) the hyperactivity and increased fatigability of superficial neck flexors, (c) the limitation of range of motion, (d) the decrease in proprioception and disturbances in neuromuscular control, (e) the existence of pain and (f) the psychosocial influence of dysfunction. The possible connection of neck pain and respiratory function could have a great impact on various clinical aspects notably patient assessment, rehabilitation and pharmacological prescription.

  1. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Respiratory distress in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Suzanne; Moser, Chuanpit; Baack, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory distress presents as tachypnea, nasal flaring, retractions, and grunting and may progress to respiratory failure if not readily recognized and managed. Causes of respiratory distress vary and may not lie within the lung. A thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic and laboratory findings will aid in the differential diagnosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, neonatal pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Strong evidence reveals an inverse relationship between gestational age and respiratory morbidity. (1)(2)(9)(25)(26) Expert opinion recommends careful consideration about elective delivery without labor at less than 39 weeks’ gestation. Extensive evidence, including randomized control trials, cohort studies, and expert opinion, supports maternal group B streptococcus screening, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, and appropriate followup of high-risk newborns according to guidelines established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (4)(29)(31)(32)(34) Following these best-practice strategies is effective in preventing neonatal pneumonia and its complications. (31)(32)(34). On the basis of strong evidence, including randomized control trials and Cochrane Reviews, administration of antenatal corticosteroids (5) and postnatal surfactant (6) decrease respiratory morbidity associated with RDS. Trends in perinatal management strategies to prevent MAS have changed. There is strong evidence that amnioinfusion, (49) oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal suctioning at the perineum, (45) or intubation and endotracheal suctioning of vigorous infants (46)(47) do not decrease MAS or its complications. Some research and expert opinion supports endotracheal suctioning of nonvigorous meconium-stained infants (8) and induction of labor at 41 weeks’ gestation (7) to prevent MAS.

  3. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  4. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-04-04

    High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways.HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15-57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20-30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing.The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: - 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; - 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); - 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p airway clearance, this treatment should be included among the principal options in chest physiotherapy. The study was registered as ChiCTR-TRC-12002134 at http://www.chictr.org.

  5. Frequency and severity of reactions to a 325-mg aspirin dose during desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Charles F; Baldwin, James L; Baptist, Alan P

    2017-03-01

    The frequency with which patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) react to 325 mg of aspirin during aspirin desensitization, or fail to react at all, is not fully known. To determine the rate and type of reaction at 325 mg of aspirin during desensitization. A retrospective study of 104 patients who underwent aspirin desensitization from 2010 to 2016 was performed. A standard desensitization protocol (starting at 20-40 mg, progressing through 325 mg, and extinguishing reactions by dose repetition) was used. Reactions were defined by upper respiratory tract symptoms, lower respiratory tract symptoms, and/or forced expiratory volume in 1 second decrease of 15% or greater. Patients who did and did not react were compared by logistic regression. Eighty-four patients reacted (81%) and 20 did not (19%). Seventy-seven patients who had a provoking reaction at 162 mg of aspirin or less subsequently extinguished their reactions before they reached a dose of 325 mg and had no problems at that dose; one subsequent 325-mg reaction occurred during a protocol violation. One initial provoking reaction to 325 mg occurred. Both 325-mg reactions were mild, and neither met the forced expiratory volume in 1 second criterion for a clinically meaningful change. The remaining 5 patients could not complete the protocol because of persistent reactions or social reasons. Reactors were more likely to have had asthma for more than 10 years than nonreactors (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-10.3; P = .05). During aspirin desensitization for AERD, provoking reactions at the 325-mg dose are rare (1%) and mild. Patients who react at 162 mg or less and extinguish their reactions may be able to administer the 325-mg dose at home. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  7. Synthetic cannabis and respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinwala, Felecia N; Gupta, Mayank

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, synthetic cannabis use has been increasing in appeal among adolescents, and its use is now at a 30 year peak among high school seniors. The constituents of synthetic cannabis are difficult to monitor, given the drug's easy accessibility. Currently, 40 U.S. states have banned the distribution and use of some known synthetic cannabinoids, and have included these drugs in the Schedule I category. The depressive respiratory effect in humans caused by synthetic cannabis inhalation has not been thoroughly investigated in the medical literature. We are the first to report, to our knowledge, two cases of self-reported synthetic cannabis use leading to respiratory depression and necessary intubation.

  8. Lung Volume during Swallowing: Single Bolus Swallows in Healthy Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegland, Karen M. Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between swallowing and lung volume initiation in healthy adults during single swallows of boluses differing in volume and consistency. Differences in lung volume according to respiratory phase surrounding the swallow were also assessed. Method: Nine men and 11 women between the ages of 19 and 28 years…

  9. Lung Volume during Swallowing: Single Bolus Swallows in Healthy Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegland, Karen M. Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between swallowing and lung volume initiation in healthy adults during single swallows of boluses differing in volume and consistency. Differences in lung volume according to respiratory phase surrounding the swallow were also assessed. Method: Nine men and 11 women between the ages of 19 and 28 years…

  10. Haemodynamic and respiratory effects of an abdominal compression binder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, M.H.; Bulow, J.; Simonsen, L.

    2008-01-01

    In order to elucidate the circulatory and respiratory effects of a newly developed abdominal compression binder 25 healthy, normal weight subjects were studied. In supine position the central haemodynamics were measured and estimated with a Finapress device. Lower extremity venous haemodynamics...... with or without the abdominal compression binder. The results show that the compression binder significantly increases the venous volume in the lower extremities as showed by a reduction in the venous capacitance in the lower extremities and a reduction in the stroke volume and cardiac output, while it does...... not influence the pulmonary volumes. It is concluded that the applied abdominal binder significantly affects peripheral and central haemodynamics. It should therefore be used with caution when in the supine position for longer periods, as the pooling of blood it induces in the lower extremities may have...

  11. Parameter estimation of an artificial respiratory system under mechanical ventilation following a noisy regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Henrique Victor Júnior

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: This work concerns the assessment of a novel system for mechanical ventilation and a parameter estimation method in a bench test. The tested system was based on a commercial mechanical ventilator and a personal computer. A computational routine was developed do drive the mechanical ventilator and a parameter estimation method was utilized to estimate positive end-expiratory pressure, resistance and compliance of the artificial respiratory system. Methods The computational routine was responsible for establishing connections between devices and controlling them. Parameters such as tidal volume, respiratory rate and others can be set for standard and noisy ventilation regimes. Ventilation tests were performed directly varying parameters in the system. Readings from a calibrated measuring device were the basis for analysis. Adopting a first-order linear model, the parameters could be estimated and the outcomes statistically analysed. Results Data acquisition was effective in terms of sample frequency and low noise content. After filtering, cycle detection and estimation took place. Statistics of median, mean and standard deviation were calculated, showing consistent matching with adjusted values. Changes in positive end-expiratory pressure statistically imply changes in compliance, but not the opposite. Conclusion The developed system was satisfactory in terms of clinical parameters. Statistics exhibited consistent relations between adjusted and estimated values, besides precision of the measurements. The system is expected to be used in animals, with a view to better understand the benefits of noisy ventilation, by evaluating the estimated parameters and performing cross relations among blood gas, ultrasonography and electrical impedance tomography.

  12. Perioperative Respiratory Disorders in Spinal Cord Compressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study external respiration in patients with damage to the spinal cord of various genesis (compression myelopathy at the lower cervical and thoracic levels depending on the degree of its conduction disturbances in order to select an analgesic mode as part of postoperative intensive care. Subjects and methods. Before and 1—3, and 5—7 days after surgery, 30 patients with spinal cord damage at the lower cervical and thoracic levels were examined, by determining external respiratory function (vital capacity (VC, forced VC (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, Gaenslar index, average forced expiratory volume velocity (AFEVV25—75%; by performing cliniconeuro-logical and neurophysiological (electromyography (EMG, needle EMG, and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP studies; according to these indices, the gender- and age-matched patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 those who had complete spinal cord conduction disturbances and 2 those who had incomplete one. According to the postoperative analgesia mode, the following groups were identified: A conventional systemic administration of opioid analgesics (promedol; B prolonged epidural blockade with anecaine solution at the Th2—3 level. External respiration was studied after disconnecting the patient from a respirator before and after analgesia. A control group comprised 18 apparently healthy volunteers. Results. Before surgery, restrictive respiratory disorders were observed in Group 1 and they were absent in Group 2. In the postoperative period, all the patients were found to have mixed disorders that were most pronounced in Group 1. In Group A, the postoperative duration of artificial ventilation was significantly greater and it was 160.0±21.0 minutes whereas it was 90.0±25.0 minutes in Group 2 (p<0.05. With postoperative analgesia, Group A showed 1.7—2.2-fold decreases in VC, FVC, FEV1, and AFEVV25—75% (p<0.05 as compared with the baseline levels. There was a

  13. Respiratory health equality in the United States. The American thoracic society perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celedón, Juan C; Roman, Jesse; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Thomas, Alvin; Samet, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Because the frequency of major risk factors for respiratory diseases (e.g., tobacco use) differs across demographic groups (defined by socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, health care access, occupation, or other characteristics), health disparities are commonly encountered in pediatric and adult pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. As part of its policy on respiratory health disparities, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Executive Committee created a Health Equality Subcommittee of the Health Policy Committee, with an initial mandate of defining respiratory health equality and, as a subsequent task, providing recommendations to the ATS leadership as to how our society may help attain such equality in the United States. After receiving input from the ATS assemblies and committees, the subcommittee developed this document on respiratory health equality. This document defines respiratory health disparities and respiratory health equality, and expands on a recent ATS and European Respiratory Society policy statement on disparities in respiratory health. Attainment of respiratory health equality requires the ending of respiratory health disparities, which can be achieved only through multidisciplinary efforts to eliminate detrimental environmental exposures while promoting a healthy lifestyle, implementing all components of high-quality health care (prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment), and conducting research that will lead to better prevention and management of respiratory diseases for everyone. The ATS recognizes that such efforts must include all stakeholders: members of society at large, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and other professional societies. The ATS urges all of its members and those of sister societies to work to achieve this laudable goal.

  14. Cardio-respiratory function during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, G

    1991-01-01

    Respiratory function undergoes sleep-associated changes which in normal subjects leave it unaffected. However in some cases they may be more marked than usual or may be superimposed on a pre-existing disease, thus giving rise to sleep-related ventilation disorders. These include obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), nocturnal desaturation events of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and restrictive syndromes, as well as nocturnal asthmatic attacks. OSAS is a condition characterized by the frequent recurrence of interruptions of oronasal flow (greater than 10 s.) due to upper airway occlusion induced by a reduction in pharyngeal muscle tone. This phenomenon, particularly prominent in REM sleep, results in oxyhemoglobin desaturation and marked cardiovascular consequences (arrhythmias, increases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure), as well as symptoms (loud intermittent snoring, daytime sleepiness, intellectual deterioration etc.). Obesity is often associated with OSAS or may lead to a sleep-related hypoventilation syndrome. Treatment is based on weight loss, surgery of upper airway abnormalities, if present, and on splinting of the upper airway by the application of nasal continuous positive airway pressure. In COPD and restrictive disorders, nocturnal hypoxemia is mainly due to REM-associated loss of respiratory muscle tone, as well as in the sleep-related exaggeration of functional defects due to COPD (low chemoreceptor sensitivity, high closing volume etc.). Treatment is based on oxygen administration, provided that possible side-effects are carefully monitored. Nocturnal asthma is due to circadian changes in hormonal secretion (catecholamines, cortisol), as well as supine posture, reduced muco-ciliary clearance, gastro-esophageal reflux etc. Sleep itself plays some role through a depressed arousal reaction in slow wave sleep, resulting in more marked and prolonged attacks in this stage. Slow-release theophylline or beta-mimetic medications

  15. Your Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing? If you guessed your lungs, you're right! Your lungs make up one of the largest organs in your body, and they work with your respiratory system to allow you to take in fresh air, get rid of stale air, and even talk. ...

  16. Nasopharyngeal colonization with respiratory pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory (otitis media, pneumonia) and invasive (sepsis, meningitis) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that every year one million children under the age of five die of pneumonia, mainly in developing countries. Elderly are ano

  17. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e...

  18. Respiratory Therapy Technology Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a respiratory therapy technology program. The guide contains four sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining the purpose and objectives, a program…

  19. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and…

  20. Respiratory Therapy Assistant. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judy A.

    This manual is one in a new series of self-contained materials for students enrolled in training with the allied health field. It includes competencies that are associated with the performance of skills by students beginning the study of respiratory therapy assistance. Intended to be used for individualized instruction under the supervision of an…

  1. [Respiratory function in glass blowers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, E; Butković, D; Mustajbegović, J

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic and acute respiratory symptoms and diseases and changes in lung function in a group of 80 glass blowers have been investigated. In addition a group of 80 not exposed workers was used as a control group for respiratory symptoms and diseases. In glass blowers, there was significant increase in prevalence of chronic bronchitis, nasal catarrh, and sinusitis than in the controls. Glass blowers exposed for more and less than 10 years had similar prevalences of respiratory symptoms. A large number of glass blowers complained of acute across-shift symptoms. Significant increase in FVC, FEF50 and FEF25 was documented at the end of the work shift. Comparison with predicted normal values showed that glass blowers had FVC and FEF25 significantly lower than predicted. RV and RV/TLC were significantly increased compared with the predicted normal values. DLCO was within the normal values in most glass blowers. It is concluded that work in the glass blower industry is likely to lead the development of chronic respiratory disorders.

  2. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children with hematologic neoplasms and other causes induced acute hypoxic respiratory failure%高频振荡机械通气在血液肿瘤及多种疾病并发儿童急性低氧性呼吸衰竭中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项龙; 张建; 任宏; 钱娟; 李璧如; 王莹; 胡肖伟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the significance of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation(HFOV) used in acute hypoxic respiratory failure(AHRF) children,failing to conventional ventilation.Methods This was a retrospective study of AHRF children ventilated by HFOV from January 2011 to September,2013.All patients were initially treated by conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV),and changed to be treated by HFOV if the patient met to one of the following criteria after the CMV parameters of PIP > 30 mmH2O(1cmH2O =0.098 kPa) or PEEP > 10 cmH2O with FiO2 100% ∶ (1) SpO2 < 90% or PaO2 < 60 mmHg (1 mmHg =0.133 kPa) ; (2) severe respiratory acidosis (PaCO2 > 80 mmHg) ; (3) serious air leakage (mediastinal emphysema or pneumothorax).The following parameters were recorded:patient's gender,age,living PICU time,CMV ventilation time,HFOV ventilation time.We reviewed ventilation parameter settings (MAP,△P,F,FiO2),oxygenation index(PaO2/FiO2,OI),arterial blood gas,heart rate,blood pressure at different time points including late CMV(H0),2 h after HFOV(H2),6 h after HFOV(H6),12 h after HFOV(H12),24 h after HFOV (H24) and 48 h after HFOV (H48),respectively.Various indexes at different time points were compared between survival group and death group,oncology group and no-oncology group.Results PaO2 at H2 compared with H0 had significant improvement[76.9(61.9 ~ 128.0) mmHg vs 50.1 (49.5 ~68.0) mmHg,P =0.006] . PaO2/FiO2 at H2,H48 had significant improvement compared with those at H0,H24 [94.9(66.8 ~ 138.9) mmHg vs 68.0(49.5 ~86.8) mmHg,P=0.039; 135.0(77.6~240.0) mmHg vs 90.7 (54.6 ~161.7) mmHg,P =0.023)].All children's systolic pressure,diastolic blood pressure,heart rate at various time points had no difference (P >0.05).Compared to death group(n =14),PaO2/FiO2,OI at H6,H12,H24,H48 in survival group (n =9) had significant improvement(P < 0.05).Compared to oncology group (n =10),OI at H2,H6 in no-oncology group(n =10) had significant improvement [(19.2 (13

  3. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  4. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome after near-drowning (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, G; Jelen, S; Forster, B; Gullotta, U; Daum, S

    1977-08-01

    After successful rescue from drowning there may develop a situation which is called secondary drowning, resulting in acute respiratory distress characterized by interstitial pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia, hypercapnia and acidosis during drowning, direct alteration of the alveolar membrane by aspirated water and particulate matters and a volume overloading by adsorption and--not seldom--inept therapy. This situation requires mechanical ventilation and forced diuresis, combined with high doses of steroids, antibiotics and digitalis. We present the case of an eleven year old patient whose clinical course demonstrate the necessity of exact clinical observation after rescue from drowning. After development of acute respiratory distress only the immediate utilization of the therapeutic modalities of an intensive care may result in a satisfactory outcome. Four months later our patient had normal pulmonary function except for a moderate reduction of compliance.

  5. Molecular detection of respiratory viruses: clinical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) cause major morbidity in infants and children. Traditionally, respiratory viruses are detected with conventional tests (viral culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF)), however nowadays viral diagnostics are being revolutionized by the increased implemen

  6. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  7. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COAL WORKERS' HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases Coal mining-related respiratory ...

  8. The first step towards a respiratory motion prediction for natural-breathing by using a motion generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moo-Sub; Jung, Joo-Young; Yoon, Do-Kun; Shin, Han-Back; Suh, Tae Suk; Jung, Jae-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory gated radiation therapy (RGRT) gives accurate results when a patient's breathing is stable and regular. Thus, the patient should be acutely aware during respiratory pattern training before undergoing the RGRT treatment. To bypass the process of respiratory pattern training, we propose a tumor location prediction system for RGRT that uses only the natural respiratory volume, and we confirm its application. In order to verify the proposed tumor location prediction system, we used an in-house phantom set. The set involved a chest phantom with target, external markers and a motion generator. Natural respiratory volume signals were generated using the random function in the MATLAB code. In the chest phantom, the target undergoes linear motion based on the respiratory signal. After a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan of the in-house phantom, the motion trajectory was derived as a linear equation. The accuracy of the linear equation was compared with that of the motion algorithm used by the operating motion generator. In addition, we attempted to predict the tumor's location by using the random respiratory volume values. The correspondence rate of the linear equation derived from the 4DCT images with the motion algorithm of the motion generator was 99.41% ( p > 0.05). Also, the average error rate of the tumor-location prediction was 1.23% for 26 cases. We confirmed the applicability of our proposed tumor location prediction system using the natural respiratory volume for RGRT. If additional clinical studies can be conducted, a more accurate prediction that would not require respiratory pattern training can be realized.

  9. Effects of Breath Training Pattern "End-Inspiratory Pause" on Respiratory Mechanics and Arterial Blood Gas of Patients with COPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁永杰; 蔡映云

    2002-01-01

    Objective:In order to explore the mechanism of Chinese traditional breath training, theeffects of end-inspiratory pause breathing (EIPB) on the respiratory mechanics and arterial blood gas werestudied in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Ten patients in steadystage participating in the study had a breath training of regulating the respiration rhythm as to having apause between the deep and slow inspiration and the slow expiration. Effect of the training was observed byvisual feedback from the screen of the respiratory inductive plethysmograph. The dynamic change of par-tial pressure of oxygen saturation in blood (SpO2) was recorded with sphygmo-oximeter, the pulmonarymechanics and EIPB were determined with spirometer, and the data of arterial blood gases in tranquilizedbreathing and EIPB were analysed. Results: After EIPB training, SpO2 increased progressively, PaO2 in-creased and PaCO2 decreased, and the PaO2 increment was greater than the PaCO2 decrement. Further-more, the tidal volume increased and the frequency of respiration decreased significantly, both inspirationtime and expiration time were prolonged. There was no significant change in both mean inspiration flowrate (VT/Ti) and expiration flow rate (VT/Te). The baselines in spirogram during EIPB training had noraise. Conclusion: EIPB could decrease the ratio of the dead space and tidal volume (VD/VT), cause in-crease of PaO2 more than the decrease of PaCO2, suggesting that this training could improve both the func-tion of ventilation and gaseous exchange in the lung. EIPB training might be a breathing training patternfor rehabilitation of patients with COPD.

  10. Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jina [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngkyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hunjoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inchoen St. Mary' s Hospital College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon 403-720 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Sanghoon [Field Robot R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Ansan 426-910 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungkwang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-896 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hongseok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Youngnam, E-mail: ynkang33@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation treatment requires high accuracy to protect healthy organs and destroy the tumor. However, tumors located near the diaphragm constantly move during treatment. Respiration-gated radiotherapy has significant potential for the improvement of the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion, such as lung and liver tumors. To measure and minimize the effects of respiratory motion, a realistic deformable phantom is required for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a deformable moving lung (DML) phantom, such as simulation, tissue equivalence, and rate of deformation. The rate of change of the lung volume, target deformation, and respiratory signals were measured in this study; they were accurately measured using a realistic deformable phantom. The measured volume difference was 31%, which closely corresponds to the average difference in human respiration, and the target movement was − 30 to + 32 mm. The measured signals accurately described human respiratory signals. This DML phantom would be useful for the estimation of deformable image registration and in respiration-gated radiotherapy. This study shows that the developed DML phantom can exactly simulate the patient's respiratory signal and it acts as a deformable 4-dimensional simulation of a patient's lung with sufficient volume change.

  11. Managing common neonatal respiratory conditions during transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Kristi L; Jamie, Scott F; Baskerville, Rosland M

    2014-10-01

    As neonatal care in the tertiary setting advances, neonatal transport teams are challenged with incorporating these innovations into their work environment. One of the largest areas of advancement over the last decade involves respiratory support and management. Many major respiratory treatments and the equipment required have been adapted for transport, whereas others are not yet feasible. This article reviews the history of respiratory management during neonatal transport and discusses current methodologies and innovations in transport respiratory management.

  12. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

  13. Compilation of 1985 annual reports of the Navy elf (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program. Volume 1. Tabs A-C. Annual progress report, January-December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.; Bruhn, J.; Cattelino, P.; Fuller, L.; Jurgensen, M.

    1986-07-01

    This is the fourth compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of ten studies performed during 1985 at the Wisconsin and Michigan Transmitting Facilities. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships. This volume consists of three reports: Herbaceous Plant Cover and Tree Studies; Litter Decomposition and Microflora; and The Effects of Exposing the Slime MOld Physarum polycephalum to Electromagnetic Fields.

  14. Different frequencies should be prescribed for different high frequency chest compression machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Carlos E; Hansen, Leland G; Warwick, Warren J

    2006-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) is used for treatment and prevention of the lung diseases characterized by impaired mucus clearance and/or cough, where patients are at risk for acquiring acute bronchitis or pneumonia. The HFCC treatment frequencies may be prescribed according to the manufacturers' generic guidelines or may be determined for each individual patient by a "tuning" method that measures, at the mouth, the air volume displacement and the associated airflows produced at each frequency. Tuning is performed while the patient is breathing normally during the HFCC system operation. After measurements for several breaths at one frequency have been collected, the program randomly selects and measures another frequency until the entire frequency range of the machine being tuned has been sampled. Frequencies range from 6 to 21 Hz for the sine waveform machines and from 6 to 25 Hz for the square waveform machines. Each group of flow signals is digitized and analyzed by the program. For each frequency, the HFCC flow velocities and volumes are computed and averaged. These average flows and volumes are rank ordered; the three frequencies with the highest flows and the three frequencies producing the largest volumes are selected for prescription. If the same frequency is selected as one of the three best frequencies for both flow and volume, the next ranked frequency is selected randomly for flow or volume. Significant differences exist between patients and HFCC machines. In a series of 100 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with varying degrees of lung disease, we found that the best-ranked frequencies varied from patient to patient and did not correlate with patients' age, gender, height, weight, or spirometry parameters. With the sine waveform, the highest HFCC airflows were between 13 and 20 Hz 82% of the time and the largest HFCC volumes were between 6 and 10 Hz 83% of the time. With the square waveform, both the highest average HFCC flow rates and the largest

  15. Effects of indacaterol versus tiotropium on respiratory mechanics assessed by the forced oscillation technique in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Naoki; Matsushima, Sayomi; Kato, Shinpei; Yasui, Hideki; Kono, Masato; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Toyoshima, Mikio; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) can measure respiratory mechanics and has attracted attention in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to evaluate the effects of only indacaterol and tiotropium monotherapies on airflow limitation and respiratory impedance. Pulmonary function tests, COPD assessment test (CAT), and multifrequency FOT with MostGraph-01 were performed at the beginning and after 8 weeks of treatment with indacaterol or tiotropium. The resistance index, resistance at 5 Hz (R5), resistance at 20 Hz (R20), reactance index, reactance at 5 Hz (X5), resonant frequency (Fres), and low-frequency reactance area (ALX) were determined at whole-breath, inspiratory, and expiratory phases. Eighty-two patients (mean age: 73 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 61.6%±19.0% predicted) were randomized to indacaterol or tiotropium treatment. Both bronchodilators improved airflow limitation, with mean trough improvements in FEV1 of 165 mL and 80 mL in the indacaterol and tiotropium groups, respectively. The CAT score decreased in the indacaterol group (Pindacaterol significantly improved FEV1, percent predicted FEV1, and CAT score (P=0.042, P=0.008, and P=0.027, respectively). For respiratory impedance, indacaterol and tiotropium changed R5, X5, Fres, and ALX at whole-breath, inspiratory, and expiratory phases. In the indacaterol group, the changes in R5, R5-R20, X5, Fres, and ALX were significantly correlated with the changes in FEV1. The use of the FOT may enable the evaluation of the effects of bronchodilators in addition to FEV1-indicated therapeutic effects in COPD.

  16. Atypical respiratory complications of dengue fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveen Kumar; AK Gadpayle; Deepshikha Trisal

    2013-01-01

    In last decade, dengue has emerged as one of the most important vector born disease.With increasing cases, uncommon presentations and complications are now commonly recognized. Here, we report two cases of rare pattern of respiratory involvement in dengue: acute respiratory distress syndrome and bronchiolitis with respiratory failure.

  17. Effects of Aging on the Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Relates alterations in respiratory system functions occurring with aging to changes in respiratory system structure during the course of life. Main alterations noted include loss of alveolar elastic recoil, alteration in chest wall structure and decreased respiratory muscle strength, and loss of surface area and changes in pulmonary circulation.…

  18. [Chronic respiratory insufficiency and the elderly patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobarzan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic respiratory failure is a complex entity of varied etiology and physio-pathological mechanisms. It is mainly characterised by the respiratory system's difficulty in ensuring correct aeration at rest, resulting initially in insufficient oxygenation of arterial blood. Treatment is adapted to each etiology and aims to compensate for respiratory failure and to ensure the oxygenation of the organism.

  19. Effects of complete dentures on respiratory performance: spirometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskin, Bulent; Sipahi, Cumhur; Karakoc, Omer; Atay, Arzu; Ciftci, Faruk; Tasci, Canturk; Akin, Hakan; Arisan, Volkan; Sevketbeyoglu, Haldun; Turker, Turker

    2014-03-01

    There is a lack of data regarding whether edentulous subjects should remove dentures during spirometric measurements or not. The purpose of this study is to determine influences of complete dentures on spirometric parameters in edentulous subjects. A total of 46 complete denture wearers were included in this study. Respiratory functions of the subjects were evaluated by spirometric tests that were performed in four different oral conditions: without dentures (WOD), with dentures, lower denture only and upper denture only. Forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% were evaluated. The data were analyzed with Friedman, Wilcoxon and paired-samples t tests (α = 0.05). Significant differences were found between spirometric parameters in different oral conditions (p dentures (FVC), and WOD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s) and with upper dentures (forced expiratory volume in 1 s) (p complete dentures may unfavourably affect spirometric values of edentulous subjects. However, current findings need to be confirmed with advanced respiratory function tests. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [The environment and human respiratory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodemowicz, Marian

    2008-01-01

    The process of gas exchange that is breathing is an important element of any person's relation with the environment. What decides about our health and life are the respiratory systems responsible for the breathing process and the quality of the air we breathe. On an average through a person's life 400 millions liters of air flows which carries pollution in the form of constant gases and liquid particles. Particles of about PM-2.5 size get into the deepest structures of the respiratory system from which they are being spread into the whole organism through circulation exerting thier toxic effect on all tissues and organs. The outdoor pollution diffuses but in certain local circumstances it increases. It was so in big ecological disasters such as in 1930 in the Mozy valley in Belgium, in 1948 in the Donory region in the USA and in 1952 smog pollution in London. On an average any human being spends indoors about 60-80% of his time. The increased concentration of pollution occurs indoors and there is a possibility of exposing oneself to ETS- Environmental Tobacco Smoke. The biggest concentration of inhaled pollution takes place when smoking tobacco. Pollution of air causes diseases of the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, tumours and others. Frequent occurrence of COPD in certain areas correlates with the level of air pollution and it significantly increases in tobacco smokers. The number and frequency of bronchial asthma and the need for hospitalization depends on air pollution. Lung cancer cases were rarely described in literature before the area of industrialization and wide spread custom of tobacco smoking. Now it is the most frequently occurred cancer in the whole world. There is an interdependence of the density of population, of the number of smoked cigarettes and of density of pollution with the number lung cancer cases. It is hoped that in the future, smoking habits will be eliminated, the use of crude oil and coal will be replaced by hydroelectric

  1. The traditional diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases: a description from Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Mehdi; Raza, Mohsin

    2009-12-01

    This article presents selected text on respiratory medicine from the famous book of medicine, Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (the Canon of Medicine) by Avicenna (981-1037 AD), which was taught for 600 years as a standard text of medicine across medieval Europe. The authentic manuscript of the Canon of Medicine is located in the Central Library of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and the section on respiratory diseases was studied for the most relevant information - information that would be informative and interesting for present day physicians and pulmonologists. The results of the analysis are presented in the article. Respiratory diseases are discussed in depth in volume 3 of the Canon of Medicine. Avicenna discusses in detail the functional anatomy and physiopathology of the pulmonary diseases that were known in his time. He also describes the signs and symptoms of various respiratory diseases and conditions in the five chapters of volume 3 (breathing, voice, cough and hemoptysis, internal wounds and inflammations and principles of treatments) that are remarkably similar to those of modern pulmonary medicine. In addition, the herbal and nonherbal treatment of respiratory diseases and their signs and symptoms, mentioned in volume 2 of the Canon of Medicine, is also presented. In the time of Avicenna, the presentation of respiratory diseases, their treatment and their prognosis was much different than in modern times. There was more reliance on history, physical examination (which was mostly based on visual observation), individual variation, environmental factors, diet, and so on, for diagnosis and treatment. Nevertheless, going through a popular historic text such as the Canon of Medicine adds to our knowledge of the developments in the area of respiratory medicine at the time of Avicenna.

  2. Effect of obesity on respiratory mechanics during rest and exercise in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ora, Josuel; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Wadell, Karin; Preston, Megan; Webb, Katherine A; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2011-07-01

    The presence of obesity in COPD appears not to be a disadvantage with respect to dyspnea and weight-supported cycle exercise performance. We hypothesized that one explanation for this might be that the volume-reducing effects of obesity convey mechanical and respiratory muscle function advantages. Twelve obese chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OB) [forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) = 60%predicted; body mass index (BMI) = 32 ± 1 kg/m(2); mean ± SD] and 12 age-matched, normal-weight COPD (NW) (FEV(1) = 59%predicted; BMI = 23 ± 2 kg/m(2)) subjects were compared at rest and during symptom-limited constant-work-rate exercise at 75% of their maximum. Measurements included pulmonary function tests, operating lung volumes, esophageal pressure, and gastric pressure. OB vs. NW had a reduced total lung capacity (109 vs. 124%predicted; P exercise endurance times were similar in OB and NW. Pulmonary resistance fell (P exercise in OB but not in NW. Resting inspiratory capacity, dyspnea/ventilation plots, and the ratio of respiratory muscle effort to tidal volume displacement were similar, as was the dynamic performance of the respiratory muscles including the diaphragm. In conclusion, the lack of increase in dyspnea and exercise intolerance in OB vs. NW could not be attributed to improvement in respiratory muscle function. Potential contributory factors included alterations in the elastic properties of the lungs, raised intra-abdominal pressures, reduced lung hyperinflation, and preserved inspiratory capacity.

  3. Clinical analysis of high frequency oscillatory ventilation and magnesium sulfate in treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn%硫酸镁联合高频振荡通气治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征并发新生儿持续肺动脉高压的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏红娟; 邵惠敏; 刘坤; 仇玉桃; 王伟烈

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨硫酸镁(MgSO4)联合高频振荡通气(HFOV)治疗新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征(RDS)并发新生儿持续肺动脉高压(PPHN)的临床效果及安全性。方法选取黑龙江省大庆油田总医院 NICU 2014年8月至2015年12月收治的重度 RDS 并发 PPHN 患儿30例,采用硫酸镁(MgSO4)联合高频振荡通气(HFOV)方法,用自身对照法,在治疗前与治疗后4 h、12 h、24 h、48 h 监测动脉血气,同时监测动脉血压。结果治疗后 pH 值明显改善,PO2、SpO2较前明显上升,PCO2明显下降,差异有统计学意义(P 0. 05).Conclusions Magnesium sulfate ( MgSO4 ) and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation ( HFOV ONLY) in the treatment of severe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn(PPHN) can improve oxygenation, reduce the clinical symptoms, and has no significant effect on mean systemic arterial pressure.

  4. The Respiratory Impedance in an Asymmetric Model of the Lung Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin De Keyser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of the respiratory tree as a recurrent, but asymmetric, structure. The intrinsic properties posed by such a system lead to a multi-fractal structure, i.e. a non-integer order model of the total impedance. The fractional order behavior of the asymmetric tree simulated as a dynamic system is assessed by means of Bode plots, on a wide range of frequencies. The results indicate than in a specific frequency range, both the symmetric
    and asymmetric representation of the respiratory tree lead to similar values in the impedance.

  5. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Vauhkonen, Marko; Schwaiger, Markus; Hakulinen, Mikko A.

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6  ±  3.3 mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4 ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3  ±  1.3 mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3  ±  1.3 mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes.

  6. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia as an Index of Vagal Activity during Stress in Infants: Respiratory Influences and Their Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Thomas; Bosquet Enlow, Michelle; Schulz, Stefan M.; Kitts, Robert; Staudenmayer, John; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is related to cardiac vagal outflow and the respiratory pattern. Prior infant studies have not systematically examined respiration rate and tidal volume influences on infant RSA or the extent to which infants' breathing is too fast to extract a valid RSA. We therefore monitored cardiac activity, respiration, and physical activity in 23 six-month old infants during a standardized laboratory stressor protocol. On average, 12.6% (range 0–58.2%) of analyzed breaths were too short for RSA extraction. Higher respiration rate was associated with lower RSA amplitude in most infants, and lower tidal volume was associated with lower RSA amplitude in some infants. RSA amplitude corrected for respiration rate and tidal volume influences showed theoretically expected strong reductions during stress, whereas performance of uncorrected RSA was less consistent. We conclude that stress-induced changes of peak-valley RSA and effects of variations in breathing patterns on RSA can be determined for a representative percentage of infant breaths. As expected, breathing substantially affects infant RSA and needs to be considered in studies of infant psychophysiology. PMID:23300753

  7. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia as an index of vagal activity during stress in infants: respiratory influences and their control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ritz

    Full Text Available Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA is related to cardiac vagal outflow and the respiratory pattern. Prior infant studies have not systematically examined respiration rate and tidal volume influences on infant RSA or the extent to which infants' breathing is too fast to extract a valid RSA. We therefore monitored cardiac activity, respiration, and physical activity in 23 six-month old infants during a standardized laboratory stressor protocol. On average, 12.6% (range 0-58.2% of analyzed breaths were too short for RSA extraction. Higher respiration rate was associated with lower RSA amplitude in most infants, and lower tidal volume was associated with lower RSA amplitude in some infants. RSA amplitude corrected for respiration rate and tidal volume influences showed theoretically expected strong reductions during stress, whereas performance of uncorrected RSA was less consistent. We conclude that stress-induced changes of peak-valley RSA and effects of variations in breathing patterns on RSA can be determined for a representative percentage of infant breaths. As expected, breathing substantially affects infant RSA and needs to be considered in studies of infant psychophysiology.

  8. Investigation of non-uniform airflow signal oscillation during high frequency chest compression

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Jongwon; Lee Yong W; Warwick Warren J; Sohn Kiwon; Holte James E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background High frequency chest compression (HFCC) is a useful and popular therapy for clearing bronchial airways of excessive or thicker mucus. Our observation of respiratory airflow of a subject during use of HFCC showed the airflow oscillation by HFCC was strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. We used a computational model-based approach to analyse the respiratory airflow during use of HFCC. Methods The computational model, which is based on previous ph...

  9. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract viral disease in infants and young children. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. The virus is therefore responsible for an estimated 160,000 deaths per year worldwide. Despite half a century of dedicated research, there remains no licensed vaccine product. Herein are described past and current efforts to harness innate and adaptive immune potentials to combat RSV. A plethora of candidate vaccine products and strategies are reviewed. The development of a successful RSV vaccine may ultimately stem from attention to historical lessons, in concert with an integral partnering of immunology and virology research fields. PMID:21988307

  11. Immunoprophylaxis of bovine respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogan Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Respiratory Syndrome (BRS is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of infective agents, the environment and the individual immunological response of animals in the herd. Despite five decades of research on BRS, no clear understanding of how environmental factors influence pathogenic outcomes of the disease has been defined. As such, the development of immunoprophylaxis and vaccine programmes to prevent outbreaks of BRS in cattle has not been successful. The current paper discusses vaccination programmes for all categories of cattle and presents a review of existing vaccines being used for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syndrome in cattle and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the currently used vaccines and vaccination programmes. Lastly, a discussion detailing the design of future perfect vaccines is presented.

  12. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases

    OpenAIRE

    LENCU, CODRU?A; ALEXESCU, TEODORA; PETRULEA, MIRELA; LENCU, MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary ? cortical, and involuntary ? metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthy...

  13. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  14. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers.

  15. [Ventilation in acute respiratory distress. Lung-protective strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruells, C S; Rossaint, R; Dembinski, R

    2012-11-01

    Ventilation of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with protective ventilator settings is the standard in patient care. Besides the reduction of tidal volumes, the adjustment of a case-related positive end-expiratory pressure and preservation of spontaneous breathing activity at least 48 h after onset is part of this strategy. Bedside techniques have been developed to adapt ventilatory settings to the individual patient and the different stages of ARDS. This article reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and ventilator-induced lung injury and presents current evidence-based strategies for ventilator settings in ARDS.

  16. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siirala, Waltteri; Korpela, Jaana; Vuori, Arno; Saaresranta, Tarja; Olkkola, Klaus T; Aantaa, Riku

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease causing degeneration of motor neurons, without any curative treatment. The most common cause of death is respiratory arrest due to atrophy of the respiratory musculature. ALS-associated respiratory insufficiency differs in mechanism from the more common causes of dyspnea, such as diseases of pulmonary or cardiac origin. Recognizing the respiratory insufficiency can be challenging for a clinician. It should be possible to predict the development of respiratory insufficiency in order to avoid leaving the treatment decisions concerning respiratory insufficiency to emergency services. Noninvasive ventilatory support can be used to alleviate the patient's dyspnea. It is actually recommended as the first-line treatment of ALS-associated respiratory insufficiency.

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures wr