WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume ptv coverage

  1. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädinger, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Wulf, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3% +/- 2.3% (lung), 95.0% +/- 4.5% (liver), and 92.1% +/- 5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73 +/- 0.09 (lung), 0.77 +/- 0.10 (liver), and 0.70 +/- 0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields.

  2. Effect of lung and target density on small-field dose coverage and PTV definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Patrick D., E-mail: higgi010@umn.edu; Ehler, Eric D.; Cho, Lawrence C.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    2015-04-01

    We have studied the effect of target and lung density on block margin for small stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) targets. A phantom (50 × 50 × 50 cm{sup 3}) was created in the Pinnacle (V9.2) planning system with a 23-cm diameter lung region of interest insert. Diameter targets of 1.6, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were placed in the lung region of interest and centered at a physical depth of 15 cm. Target densities evaluated were 0.1 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, whereas the surrounding lung density was varied between 0.05 and 0.6 g/cm{sup 3}. A dose of 100 cGy was delivered to the isocenter via a single 6-MV field, and the ratio of the average dose to points defining the lateral edges of the target to the isocenter dose was recorded for each combination. Field margins were varied from none to 1.5 cm in 0.25-cm steps. Data obtained in the phantom study were used to predict planning treatment volume (PTV) margins that would match the clinical PTV and isodose prescription for a clinical set of 39 SBRT cases. The average internal target volume (ITV) density was 0.73 ± 0.17, average local lung density was 0.33 ± 0.16, and average ITV diameter was 2.16 ± 0.8 cm. The phantom results initially underpredicted PTV margins by 0.35 cm. With this offset included in the model, the ratio of predicted-to-clinical PTVs was 1.05 ± 0.32. For a given target and lung density, it was found that treatment margin was insensitive to target diameter, except for the smallest (1.6-cm diameter) target, for which the treatment margin was more sensitive to density changes than the larger targets. We have developed a graphical relationship for block margin as a function of target and lung density, which should save time in the planning phase by shortening the design of PTV margins that can satisfy Radiation Therapy Oncology Group mandated treatment volume ratios.

  3. Planning target volume (PTV) definition and its effects in the radiotherapy; Definicao do volume de planejamento do alvo (PTV) e seu efeito na radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Maria Esmeralda Ramos

    2007-07-01

    Tills work intends to study the margins required to define a planning target volume (PTV) for adequate treatment of the mobile tumors such as prostate or those located in areas with less mobility as the ones in head and neck region, in the absence of daily localization imaging based. It is also intends to evaluate the impact caused by the PTV, in terms of dose, to the critical structures surrounding the PTV and its influence when inverse planning is used in the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Data from 387 prostate patients were analyzed retrospectively. Every patient in the study received daily pre-treatment localization with 2D ultrasound resulting in a total of 10,327 localizations, each comprising of an isocenter displacement in 3 directions: anterior-posterior (AP), right-left lateral (RL), and superior-inferior (SI). The mean displacement and standard deviation (SD) for each direction for each patient was computed from daily treatment records. The uncertainties (SD) in the target position were 4.4 mm (AP), 3.6 mm (RL), and 4.5 mm (SI). A study of the uncertainties in the daily positioning of 78 head and neck patients who used thermoplastic mask to immobilize them, evaluated with electronic portal imaging device (EPID), showed variations (SD) in the isocenter treatment position of 3.1 mm (AP), 1.5 mm (RL), and 4.5 mm (SI). By applying these shifts in an anthropomorphic phantom it was studied the dose-volume histograms resultant of the isocenter displacement in the daily treatment. The result showed the importance of putting margins in the clinical target volume to assure an adequate treatment and also showed that isocenter daily variation can cause an increase to the dose greater than the tolerance level to the critical organs. (author)

  4. Study of limiting dosimetric parameters on lung pathology. Differences in the use of the lung-gtv and lung-ptv volumes; Estudio de los parametros dosimetricos limitantes en la patologia de pulmon diferencias en ul uso de los volumenes pulmon-gtv y pulmo-ptv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Garcia Hernanez, T.; Vicedo gonzalez, A.; Brualla, L.; Hernandez, A.; Solera, C.; Serrano, A.; Rosello, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study the differences between the use of the volume of lung-GTV and lung-PTV to assess pulmonary toxicity and also to study the relationships between parameters V13, V20, V30, and mean dose of volumes lung, lung-PTV and lung-GTV. It was studied also the possible relationship between volumes of GTV, PTV and volume of lung with the dosimetric parameters described above. (Author)

  5. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  6. Volume study pre and post-implant brachytherapy prostate for establishment of PTV margins; Estudio de volumenes pre y post-implante en braquiterapia de prostata para establecimiento de margenes del PTV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Dominguez, M.; Carrasco Herrera, M.; Baeza Trujillo, M.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2011-07-01

    Treatment of prostate cancer by permanent implantation of radioactive seeds is now a good alternative to radical surgery or radiotherapy, as it provides a good tumor control while the risk is reduced by a lower complication irradiation of adjacent healthy organs. The large volume change during seed implantation occurs in the prostate of the patient, makes it important to consider margins around the organs of interest both to ensure optimal coverage and minimal tumor irradiation of healthy tissue. Analyze how the volume varies during and after implantation and establish a margin around the prostate to the practice of our hospital are the two objectives of this work.

  7. Respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy planning of lower oesophageal carcinoma: feasibility and impact on planning target volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew; Ward, Gillian; Murray, Patrick; Goody, Rebecca; Marshall, Karen; McDermott, Garry; Prestwich, Robin; Radhakrishna, Ganesh

    2017-10-04

    To assess the feasibility and potential impact on target delineation of respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced (18)Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT), in the treatment planning position, for a prospective cohort of patients with lower third oesophageal cancer. Fifteen patients were recruited into the study. Imaging included 4D PET-CT, 3D PET-CT, endoscopic ultrasound and planning 4D CT. Target volume delineation was performed on 4D CT, 4D CT with co-registered 3D PET and 4D PET-CT. Planning target volumes (PTV) generated with 4D CT (PTV4DCT), 4D CT co-registered with 3D PET-CT (PTV3DPET4DCT) and 4D PET-CT (PTV4DPETCT) were compared with multiple positional metrics. Mean PTV4DCT, PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT were 582.4 ± 275.1 cm(3), 472.5 ± 193.1 cm(3) and 480.6 ± 236.9 cm(3) respectively (no significant difference). Median DICE similarity coefficients comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.85 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.85 (range 0.69-0.9) and 0.88 (range 0.79-0.9) respectively. The median sensitivity index for overlap comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.78 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.79 (range 0.65-0.9) and 0.89 (range 0.68-0.94) respectively. Planning 4D PET-CT is feasible with careful patient selection. PTV generated using 4D CT, 3D PET-CT and 4D PET-CT were of similar volume, however, overlap analysis demonstrated that approximately 20% of PTV3DPETCT and PTV4DPETCT are not included in PTV4DCT, leading to under-coverage of target volume and a potential geometric miss. Additionally, differences between PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT suggest a potential benefit for 4D PET-CT. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier - NCT02285660 (Registered 21/10/2014).

  8. SU-E-T-492: Influence of Clipping PTV in Build-Up Region On IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S; Manigandan, D; Sahai, P; Biswas, A; Subramani, V; Chander, S; Julkha, P; Rath, G [Fortis Hospital, Mohali, Punjab (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the influence of clipping PTV from body contour on plan quality and deliverability in build-up region for superficial target. Methods: Five previously treated patients of post-operative carcinoma of parotid were re-planned for IMRT (6MV X-rays, sliding window technique, five fields and 60Gy/30 fractions) using eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by keeping dose volume constraints and all other parameters constant, only PTV was clipped from body contour by 0mm, 1mm, 2mm and 3mm respectively. Planned fluence was transferred to previously scanned solid water phantom by placing I’matriXX array at 0.5cm depth (2mm slab+3mm inherent). Fluence was delivered by Varian CL2300C/D linac at 99.5cm source to detector distance. Measured fluence was compared with TPS dose plane using 2D gamma evaluation using 3%/3mm DTA criteria. Total MU (monitor unit) required to deliver a plan was also noted. For plan quality, PTV, maximum-dose, minimum-dose, coverage index (CI=PTV volume covered by prescription dose/PTV) and heterogeneity index HI=D5/D95 were analyzed using dose volume histogram (DVH). Results: The Result of gamma function analysis for I’matriXX and TPS were 97.63±1.79%, 97.48±0.99, 98.08±0.89% and 98.01±0.78% at 0.5cm build-up depth for 0, 1, 2 and 3mm PTV clipping, respectively. I’matriXX measured dose was higher compared to TPS. Total MU required for delivering a plan were 552±61, 503±47, 436±24 and 407±22. Maximum-dose to PTV was 6635.80±62.01cGy, 6635.80±40.60cGy, 6608.43±51.07cGy and 6564.20±28.51cGy. Similarly, minimum-dose to PTV was 3306.23±458.56cGy, 3546.57±721.01cGy, 4591.43±298.81cGy and 4861.90±412.40cGy. CI was 0.9347±0.020, 0.9398±0.021, 0.9448±0.022 and 0.9481±0.021. Similarly, HI was 1.089±0.015, 1.084±0.014, 1.078±0.009 and 1.074±0.008 for 0, 1, 2 and 3mm PTV clipping, respectively. Conclusion: Gamma function analysis resulted in almost similar results. However, I’matriXX was overestimating the dose

  9. 4D-Listmode-PET-CT and 4D-CT for optimizing PTV margins in gastric lymphoma. Determination of intra- and interfractional gastric motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinartz, Gabriele; Haverkamp, Uwe; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lehrich, Philipp; Kriz, Jan; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Buether, Florian [University of Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging (EIMI), Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Klaus [University of Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging (EIMI), Muenster (Germany); DFG EXC 1003, Cluster of Excellence ' Cells in Motion' , Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Michael [University of Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging (EIMI), Muenster (Germany); University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); DFG EXC 1003, Cluster of Excellence ' Cells in Motion' , Muenster (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    New imaging protocols for radiotherapy in localized gastric lymphoma were evaluated to optimize planning target volume (PTV) margin and determine intra-/interfractional variation of the stomach. Imaging of 6 patients was explored prospectively. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning was based on 4D/3D imaging of computed tomography (CT) and positron-emission tomography (PET)-CT. Static and motion gross tumor volume (sGTV and mGTV, respectively) were distinguished by defining GTV (empty stomach), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm margin), PTV (GTV + 10/15/20/25 mm margins) plus paraaortic lymph nodes and proximal duodenum. Overlap of 4D-Listmode-PET-based mCTV with 3D-CT-based PTV (increasing margins) and V95/D95 of mCTV were evaluated. Gastric shifts were determined using online cone-beam CT. Dose contribution to organs at risk was assessed. The 4D data demonstrate considerable intra-/interfractional variation of the stomach, especially along the vertical axis. Conventional 3D-CT planning utilizing advancing PTV margins of 10/15/20/25 mm resulted in rising dose coverage of mCTV (4D-Listmode-PET-Summation-CT) and rising D95 and V95 of mCTV. A PTV margin of 15 mm was adequate in 3 of 6 patients, a PTV margin of 20 mm was adequate in 4 of 6 patients, and a PTV margin of 25 mm was adequate in 5 of 6 patients. IMRT planning based on 4D-PET-CT/4D-CT together with online cone-beam CT is advisable to individualize the PTV margin and optimize target coverage in gastric lymphoma. (orig.) [German] Zur Optimierung des Sicherheitsabstandes beim Planungszielvolumen (PTV) und zur Erfassung der intra-/interfraktionellen Variation des Magens wurden neue Protokolle fuer die Bildverarbeitung in der Radiotherapie lokalisierter Magenlymphome evaluiert. Die Bildgebung von 6 Patienten wurde prospektiv untersucht. Die Planung der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) basierte auf 4D-/3D-Bildgebung von Computertomographie (CT) und Positronenemissionstomographie

  10. SU-F-R-47: Quantitative Shape Relationship Analysis of PTV Modification for Critical Anatomy Sparing and Its Impact On Pathologic Response for Neoadjuvant Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Rosati, L; Chen, L; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Peng, L; Mian, O; Narang, A; Hacker-Prietz, A; Herman, J; McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) may be used to increase surgery candidacy in borderline resectable (BRPC) and locally advanced (LAPC) pancreatic cancer. However, the planning target volume (PTV) may need to be limited to avoid toxicity when the gross tumor volume (GTV) is anatomically involved with surrounding critical structures. Our study aims to characterize the coverage of GTV and investigate the association between modified PTV and pathologic (pCR) or near pathologic (npCR) complete response rates determined from the surgical specimen. Methods: Patients treated with neoadjuvant pancreas SBRT followed by surgery from 2010–2015 were selected from Oncospace. Overlap volume histogram (OVH) analysis was performed to determine the extent of compromise of the PTV from both the GTV and a standard target (GTV+3mm). Subsequently, normalized overlap volume (%) was calculated for: (1) GTV-PTV, and (2) GTV+3mm expansion-PTV. A logistic regression model was used to identify the association between the overlap ratios and ≥ npCR(pCR/npCR) stratified by active breathing control (ABC) versus free-breathing status. Results: Eighty-one (BRPC: n=42, LAPC: n=39) patients were available for analysis. Nearly 40% (31/81) had ≥npCR and 75% (61/81) were able to complete ABC. Mean coverage of the GTV-PTV was 92.6% (range, 59.9%–100%, SD = 8.68) and coverage of the GTV+3mm expansion-PTV was 85. 2% (range, 59.9% −100.0%, SD= 8.67). Among the patients with ABC, every 10% increase in GTV coverage doubled the odds to have ≥npCR (OR = 1.82, p=0.06). Coverage of GTV+3mm expansion was not associated with ≥npCR regardless of ABC status. Conclusion: Preferential sparing of critical anatomy over GTV-PTV coverage with ABC management suggests worse ≥npCR rates for neoadjuvant SBRT in BRPC and LAPC. Limiting the GTV and GTV+3mm expansion in free-breathing patients was not associated with pathologic response perhaps due to larger GTV definitions as a result of motion

  11. Comparison of planning target volumes based on three-dimensional and four-dimensional CT imaging of thoracic esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Fan, Tingyong; Wang, Jinzhi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the definition of planning target volumes (PTVs) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) compared with conventional PTV definition and PTV definition using asymmetrical margins for thoracic primary esophageal cancer. Forty-three patients with esophageal cancer underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing. The motions of primary tumors located in the proximal (group A), middle (group B), and distal (group C) thoracic esophagus were obtained from the 4DCT scans. PTV3D was defined on 3DCT using the tumor motion measured based on 4DCT, PTV conventional (PTVconv) was defined on 3DCT by adding a 1.0 cm margin to the clinical target volume, and PTV4D was defined as the union of the target volumes contoured on the ten phases of the 4DCT images. The centroid positions, volumetric differences, and dice similarity coefficients were evaluated for all PTVs. The median centroid shifts between PTV3D and PTV4D and between PTVconv and PTV4D in all three dimensions were groups. The median size ratios of PTV4D to PTV3D were 0.80, 0.88, and 0.71, and PTV4D to PTVconv were 0.67, 0.73, and 0.76 (χ (2)=-3.18, -2.98, and -3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The dice similarity coefficients were 0.87, 0.90, and 0.81 between PTV4D and PTV3D and 0.80, 0.84, and 0.83 between PTV4D and PTVconv (χ (2) =-3.18, -2.98, and -3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The difference between the degree of inclusion of PTV4D in PTV3D and that of PTV4D in PTVconv was groups. Compared with PTVconv, the amount of irradiated normal tissue for PTV3D was decreased by 11.81% and 11.86% in groups A and B, respectively, but was increased by 2.93% in group C. For proximal and middle esophageal cancer, 3DCT-based PTV using asymmetrical margins provides good coverage of PTV4D; however, for distal esophageal cancer, 3DCT-based PTV using conventional margins provides ideal conformity with PTV4D.

  12. SU-E-T-642: PTV Is the Voxel-Wise Worst-Case of CTV in Prostate Photon Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, D; Schild, S; Wong, W; Vora, S; Liu, W [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution as the worst-case representation of clinical target volume (CTV) dose distribution in prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: Ten intact prostate cancer cases treated by VMAT at our institution were randomly selected. Isocenter was shifted in the three cardinal directions by a displacement equal to the PTV expansion on the CTV (±3 mm) for a total of six shifted plans per original plan. Rotationally-perturbed plans were generated with a couch rotation of ±1° to simulate patient yaw. The eight perturbed dose distributions were recalculated in the treatment planning system using the same, fixed fluence map as the original plan. The voxel-wise worst-case CTV dose distribution was constructed from the minimum value per voxel from the eight perturbed doses. The resulting dose volume histograms (DVH) were evaluated for statistical correlation between the worst-case CTV and nominal PTV dose distributions based on D95% by Wilcoxon signed-rank test with significance level p ≤ 0.05. Results: Inspection demonstrates the PTV DVH in the nominal dose distribution is bounded by the CTV DVH in the worst-case dose distribution. Comparison of D95% for the two dose distributions by Wilcoxon signed-rank test gives p = 0.131. Therefore the null hypothesis cannot be rejected since the difference in median values is not statistically significant. Conclusion: The assumption that the nominal dose distribution for PTV represents the worst-case dose distribution for CTV appears valid for the ten plans under examination. Although the worst-case dose distribution is unphysical since the dose per voxel is chosen independently, it serves as a lower bound for the possible CTV coverage. Furthermore, this is consistent with the unphysical nature of the PTV. Minor discrepancies between the two dose distributions are expected since the dose cloud is not strictly static. Funding Support

  13. Shielding in whole brain irradiation in the multileaf collimator era: Dosimetric evaluation of coverage using SFOP guidelines against in-house guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Compare the planning target volume (PTV coverage in three different shielding techniques in cranial irradiation. Settings and Design : Tertiary care center, prospective study. Materials and Methods : The whole brain and meninges were contoured in ten planning CT scans, and expanded by 5 mm for the PTV. Shielding was designed using the French Society of Pediatric Oncology (SFOP guidelines (SFOP plan, in-house recommendation (with 1 cm margin from the orbital roof and sphenoid wing on a igitally Reconstructed Radiograph (DRR and a third plan was generated using a 3D conformal radiation technique (3DCRT. The coverage of the PTV was noted using the isodose covering 95% of the PTV(D95, minimum dose within the PTV(D min , and maximum dose within the PTV(D max . The location of PTV not covered by the 95% isodose curve was noted. The median dose and maximum dose (D max to both eyes and maximum dose D max for the lens were noted. Statistical Analysis : General linear model method repeated the measure of analysis of variance test (ANOVA. Results : PTV coverage was significantly poorer in the SFOP and in-house plans as compared to 3DCRT plan (P=0.04. Median volume of PTV not covered by 95% isodose curve was 4.18 cc, 1.01 cc, and 0 cc in SFOP, in-house, and 3DCRT plan, respectively. Conclusions : In the absence of volumetric planning techniques, SFOP guidelines lead to inadequate coverage and the in-house method is recommended.

  14. Wide coverage by volume CT: benefits for cardiac imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Cesmeli, Erdogan; Mintandjian, Laura; Adda, Olivier; Dessalles-Martin, Diane

    2005-04-01

    With the development of new technologies, computed tomography (CT) is becoming a strong candidate for non-invasive imaging based tool for cardiac disease assessment. One of the challenges of cardiac CT is that a typical scan involves a breath hold period consisting of several heartbeats, about 20 sec with scanners having a longitudinal coverage of 2 cm, and causing the image quality (IQ) to be negatively impacted since beat to beat variation is high likely to occur without any medication, e.g. beta blockers. Because of this and the preference for shorter breath hold durations, a CT scanner with a wide coverage without the compromise in the spatial and temporal resolution of great clinical value. In this study, we aimed at determining the optimum scan duration and the delay relative to beginning of breath hold, to achieve high IQ. We acquired EKG data from 91 consecutive patients (77 M, 14 F; Age: 57 +/- 14) undergoing cardiac CT exams with contrast, performed on LightSpeed 16 and LightSpeed Pro16. As an IQ metric, we adopted the standard deviation of "beat-to-beat variation" (stdBBV) within a virtual scan period. Two radiologists evaluated images by assigning a score of 1 (worst) to 4 best). We validated stdBBV with the radiologist scores, which resulted in a population distribution of 9.5, 9.5, 31, and 50% for the score groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Based on the scores, we defined a threshold for stdBBV and identified an optimum combination of virtual scan period and a delay. With the assumption that the relationship between the stdBBV and diagnosable scan IQ holds, our analysis suggested that the success rate can be improved to 100% with scan durations equal or less than 5 sec with a delay of 1 - 2 sec. We confirmed the suggested conclusion with LightSpeed VCT (GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI), which has a wide longitudinal coverage, fine isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution, e.g. 40 mm coverage per rotation of 0.35 sec

  15. Multi-scenario based robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans can account for set-up errors more effectively in terms of normal tissue sparing than planning target volume (PTV) based intensity-modulated photon plans in the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuschke, Martin; Kaiser, Andreas; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Pöttgen, Christoph; Levegrün, Sabine; Farr, Jonathan

    2013-06-18

    In a previous report, we compared the conformity of robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans with that of helical tomotherapy plans for re-irradiations of head and neck carcinomas using a fixed set-up error of 2 mm. Here, we varied the maximum set-up errors between 0 and 5 mm and compared the robust IMPT-plans with planning target volume (PTV) based intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Seven patients were treated with a PTV-based tomotherapy plan. Set-up margins of 0, 2, and 5 mm were subtracted from the PTV to generate target volumes (TV) TV(0mm), TV(2mm), and TV(5mm), for which robust IMPT-plans were created assuming range uncertainties of ±3.5% and using worst case optimization assuming set-up errors of 0, 2, and 5 mm, respectively. Robust optimization makes use of the feature that set-up errors in beam direction alone do not affect the distal and proximal margin for that beam. With increasing set-up errors, the body volumes that were exposed to a selected minimum dose level between 20% and 95% of the prescribed dose decreased. In IMPT-plans with 0 mm set-up error, the exposed body volumes were on average 6.2% ± 0.9% larger than for IMPT-plans with 2 mm set-up error, independent of the considered dose level (p plans accounting for 5 mm set-up error, the exposed body volumes were by 11.9% ± 0.8% smaller than for IMPT-plans with 2 mm set-up error at a fixed minimum dose (p plans corresponding to the same IMRT-plan led to a decrease in the mean dose to the temporal lobes and the cerebellum, and in the D2% of the brain stem or spinal cord with increasing set-up errors considered during robust IMPT-planning. For recurrent head and neck cancer, robust IMPT-plan optimization led to a decrease in normal tissue exposure with increasing set-up error for target volumes corresponding to the same PTV.

  16. Improvements on digital inline holographic PTV for 3D wall-bounded turbulent flow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Mallery, Kevin; Hong, Jiarong

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) provide the most comprehensive flow information for unraveling the physical phenomena in a wide range of fluid problems, from microfluidics to wall-bounded turbulent flows. Compared with other 3D PIV techniques, such as tomographic PIV and defocusing PIV, the digital inline holographic PTV (DIH-PTV) provides 3D flow measurement solution with high spatial resolution, low cost optical setup, and easy alignment and calibration. Despite these advantages, DIH-PTV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, small sampling volume and expensive computations, limiting its broad use for 3D flow measurements. In this study, we present our latest developments on minimizing these challenges, which enables high-fidelity DIH-PTV implementation to larger sampling volumes with significantly higher particle seeding densities suitable for wall-bounded turbulent flow measurements. The improvements include: (1) adjustable window thresholding; (2) multi-pass 3D tracking; (3) automatic wall localization; and (4) continuity-based out-of-plane velocity component computation. The accuracy of the proposed DIH-PTV method is validated with conventional 2D PIV and double-view holographic PTV measurements in smooth-wall turbulent channel flow experiments. The capability of the technique in characterization of wall-bounded turbulence is further demonstrated through its application to flow measurements for smooth- and rough-wall turbulent channel flows. In these experiments, 3D velocity fields are measured within sampling volumes of 14.7  ×  50.0  ×  14.4 mm3 (covering the entire depth of the channel) with a velocity resolution of  presented DIH-PTV method and measurements highlight the

  17. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  18. SU-E-T-36: An Investigation of the Margin From CTV to PTV Using Retraction Method for Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D; Chen, J; Hao, Y; Liao, C; Huang, Y; Mo, Y; Wei, Y [The People' s Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Nanning, Guangxi (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work employs the retraction method to compute and evaluate the margin from CTV to PTV based on the influence of target dosimetry of setup errors during cervical carcinoma patients treatment. Methods: Sixteen patients with cervical cancer were treated by Elekta synergy and received a total of 305 KV-CBCT images. The iso-center of the initial plans were changed according to the setup errors to simulate radiotherapy and then recalculated the dose distribution using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans. The margin from CTV to PTV will be concluded both by the method of retracting (Fixed the PTV of the original plan, and retract PTV a certain distance defined as simulative organization CTVnx. The minimum distance value from PTV to CTVnx which get specified doses, namely guarantee at least 99% CTV volume can receive the dose of 95%, is the margin CTV to PTV we found) and the former formula method. Results: (1)The setup errors of 16 patients in X, Y and Z directions were(1.13±2.94) mm,(−1.63±7.13) mm,(−0.65±2.25) mm. (2) The distance between CTVx and PTV was 5, 9 and 3mm in X, Y and Z directions According to 2.5+0.7σ. (3) Transplantation plans displayed 99% of CTVx10- CTVx7 and received 95% of prescription dose, but CTVx6- CTVx3 departed from standard of clinic.In order to protect normal tissues, we selected 7mm as the minimum value of the margin from CTV to PTV. Conclusion: We have test an retraction method for the margin from CTV to PTV evaluation. The retraction method is more reliable than the formula method for calculating the margin from the CTV to the PTV, because it represented practice of treatment, and increasing a new method in this field.

  19. Less and less-influence of volume on hand coverage and bactericidal efficacy in hand disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Günter; Ruselack, Sigunde; Eggerstedt, Sven; Nowak, Nicolas; Bashir, Muhammad

    2013-10-10

    Some manufacturers recommend using 1.1 mL per application of alcohol-based handrubs for effective hand disinfection. However, whether this volume is sufficient to cover both hands, as recommended by the World Health Organization, and fulfills current efficacy standards is unknown. This study aimed to determine hand coverage for three handrubs (two gels based on 70% v/v and 85% w/w ethanol and a foam based on 70% v/v ethanol) applied at various volumes. Products were tested at product volumes of 1.1 mL, 2 mL, 2.4 mL as well as 1 and 2 pump dispenser pushes; the foam product was tested in addition at foam volumes of 1.1 mL, 2 mL, and 2.4 mL. Products were supplemented with a fluorescent dye and 15 participants applied products using responsible application techniques without any specific steps but the aim of completely covering both hands. Coverage quality was determined under ultraviolet light by two blinded investigators. Efficacy of the three handrubs was determined according to ASTM E 1174-06 and ASTM E 2755-10. For each experiment, the hands of 12 participants were contaminated with Serratia marcescens and the products applied as recommended (1.1 mL for 70% v/v ethanol products; 2 mL for the 85% w/w ethanol product). Log10-reduction was calculated. Volumes < 2 mL yielded high rates of incomplete coverage (67%-87%) whereas volumes ≥ 2 mL gave lower rates (13%-53%). Differences in coverage were significant between the five volumes tested for all handrubs (p < 0.001; two-way ANOVA) but not between the three handrubs themselves (p = 0.796). Application of 1.1 mL of 70% v/v ethanol rubs reduced contamination by 1.85 log10 or 1.60 log10 (ASTM E 1174-06); this failed the US FDA efficacy requirement of at least 2 log10. Application of 2 mL of the 85% w/w ethanol rub reduced contamination by 2.06 log10 (ASTM E 1174-06), fulfilling the US FDA efficacy requirement. Similar results were obtained according to ASTM E 2755-10. Our data indicated that

  20. Comparison of planning target volumes based on three-dimensional and four-dimensional CT imaging of thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2016-08-01

    for PTV3D was decreased by 11.81% and 11.86% in groups A and B, respectively, but was increased by 2.93% in group C. Conclusion: For proximal and middle esophageal cancer, 3DCT-based PTV using asymmetrical margins provides good coverage of PTV4D; however, for distal esophageal cancer, 3DCT-based PTV using conventional margins provides ideal conformity with PTV4D. Keywords: planning target volume, 4DCT, 3DCT, esophageal carcinoma

  1. High fidelity digital inline holographic PTV for 3D flow measurements: from microfluidics to wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Mallery, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional PIV and PTV provides the most comprehensive flow information for unraveling the physical phenomena in a wide range of fluid problems, from microfluidics to wall-bounded turbulent flows. Compared with other commercialized 3D PIV techniques, such as tomographic PIV and defocusing PIV, the digital inline holographic PTV (namely DIH-PTV) provides 3D flow measurement solution with high spatial resolution, low cost optical setup, and easy alignment and calibration. Despite these advantages, DIH-PTV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, small sampling volume and expensive computations, limiting its broad use for 3D flow measurements. Here we will report our latest work on improving DIH-PTV method through an integration of deconvolution algorithm, iterative removal method and GPU computation to overcome some of abovementioned limitations. We will also present the application of our DIH-PTV for measurements in the following sample cases: (i) flows in bio-filmed microchannel with 50-60 μm vector spacing within sampling volumes of 1 mm (streamwise) x 1 mm (wall-normal) x 1 mm (spanwise); (ii) turbulent flows over smooth and rough surfaces (1.1 mm vector spacing within 15 mm x 50 mm x 15 mm); (iii) 3D distribution and kinematics of inertial particles in turbulent air duct flow.

  2. Comparison of Tomo-PIV and 3D-PTV for microfluidic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Westerweel, Jerry; Elsinga, Gerrit E.

    2013-02-01

    Two 3D-3C velocimetry techniques for micro-scale measurements are compared: tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) and 3D particle-tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). Both methods are applied to experimental data from a confined shear-driven liquid droplet over a moving surface. The droplet has 200 μm height and 2 mm diameter. Micro 3D-PTV and Tomo-PIV are used to obtain the tracer particle distribution and the flow velocity field for the same set of images. It is shown that the reconstructed particle distributions are distinctly different, where Tomo-PIV returns a nearly uniform distribution over the height of the volume, as expected, and PTV reveals a clear peak in the particle distribution near the plane of focus. In Tomo-PIV, however, the reconstructed particle peak intensity decreases in proportion to the distance from the plane of focus. Due to the differences in particle distributions, the measured flow velocities are also different. In particular, we observe Tomo-PIV to be in closer agreement with mass conservation. Furthermore, the random noise level is found to increase with distance to the plane of focus at a higher rate for 3D-PTV as compared to Tomo-PIV. Thus, for a given noise threshold value, the latter method can measure reliably over a thicker volume.

  3. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D; Wu, F [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properly estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  4. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The constraint to the measured temporal derivative of the PTV particle tracks improves the consistency of the reconstructed velocity field. The method is christened as pouring time into space, as it leverages temporal information to increase the spatial resolution of volumetric PTV measurements. This approach becomes relevant in cases where the spatial resolution is limited by the seeding concentration. The method solves an optimization problem to find the vorticity and velocity fields that minimize a cost function, which includes next to instantaneous velocity, also the velocity material derivative. The velocity and its material derivative are related through the vorticity transport equation, and the cost function is minimized using the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. The procedure is assessed numerically with a simulated PTV experiment in a turbulent boundary layer from a direct numerical simulation (DNS). The experimental validation considers a tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment in a similar turbulent boundary layer and the additional case of a jet flow. The proposed technique (`vortex-in-cell plus', VIC+) is compared to tomographic PIV analysis (3D iterative cross-correlation), PTV interpolation methods (linear and adaptive Gaussian windowing) and to vortex-in-cell (VIC) interpolation without the material derivative. A visible increase in resolved details in the turbulent structures is obtained with the VIC+ approach, both in numerical simulations and experiments. This results in a more accurate determination of the turbulent stresses distribution in turbulent boundary layer investigations. Data from a jet

  5. Radiation during deep inspiration allows loco-regional treatment of left breast and axillary-, supraclavicular- and internal mammary lymph nodes without compromising target coverage or dose restrictions to organs at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelstuen, Mari H B; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Vikström, Johan; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar

    2012-03-01

    Loco-regional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer represents a treatment planning challenge when the internal mammary chain (IMC) lymph nodes are included in the target volume. This treatment planning study evaluates the reduction in cardiopulmonary doses when radiation is given during deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). This was achieved without compromising dose coverage to the planning target volume (PTV). Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two computed tomography (CT)-scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio-visual guidance was used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed focusing on good coverage (V95% > 98%) of the PTV. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, lungs and contralateral breast were assessed. With equal PTV coverage, average mean heart dose was reduced from 6.2 Gy to 3.1 Gy in DIBH plans as compared to FB. Average volume receiving 25 Gy or more (V25Gy) was reduced from 6.7% to 1.2%, and the number of patients with V25Gy > 5% was reduced from 8 to 1 utilizing DIBH. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 25.0 Gy to 10.9 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20 Gy or more (V20Gy) was reduced from 44.5% to 32.7% with DIBH. In 11 of the DIBH plans V20Gy was lower than 35%, in accordance with national guidelines, while none of the FB plans fulfilled this recommendation. Respiratory gated radiotherapy during DIBH is a suitable technique for loco-regional breast irradiation even when IMC lymph nodes are included in the PTV. Cardiopulmonary doses are considerably decreased for all dose levels without compromising the dose coverage to PTV.

  6. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Linda X., E-mail: lhong0812@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Kuo, Hsiang-Chi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Mynampati, Dinesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Goddard, Lee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R{sub 50%}); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D{sub 2cm}) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ{sup 2} test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V{sub 100%} {sub PD} ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V{sub 90%} {sub PD} ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D{sub 2cm}, 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives.

  7. Set-up errors analyses in IMRT treatments for nasopharyngeal carcinoma to evaluate time trends, PTV and PRV margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongioj, Valeria (Dept. of Medical Physics, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)), e-mail: valeria.mongioj@istitutotumori.mi.it; Orlandi, Ester (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)); Palazzi, Mauro (Dept. of Radiotherapy, A.O. Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy)) (and others)

    2011-01-15

    Introduction. The aims of this study were to analyze the systematic and random interfractional set-up errors during Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in 20 consecutive nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients by means of Electronic Portal Images Device (EPID), to define appropriate Planning Target Volume (PTV) and Planning Risk Volume (PRV) margins, as well as to investigate set-up displacement trend as a function of time during fractionated RT course. Material and methods. Before EPID clinical implementation, an anthropomorphic phantom was shifted intentionally 5 mm to all directions and the EPIs were compared with the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to test the system's capability to recognize displacements observed in clinical studies. Then, 578 clinical images were analyzed with a mean of 29 images for each patient. Results. Phantom data showed that the system was able to correct shifts with an accuracy of 1 mm. As regards clinical data, the estimated population systematic errors were 1.3 mm for left-right (L-R), 1 mm for superior-inferior (S-I) and 1.1 mm for anterior-posterior (A-P) directions, respectively. Population random errors were 1.3 mm, 1.5 mm and 1.3 mm for L-R, S-I and A-P directions, respectively. PTV margin was at least 3.4, 3 and 3.2 mm for L-R, S-I and A-P direction, respectively. PRV margins for brainstem and spinal cord were 2.3, 2 and 2.1 mm and 3.8, 3.5 and 3.2 mm for L-R, A-P and S-I directions, respectively. Set-up error displacements showed no significant changes as the therapy progressed (p>0.05), although displacements >3 mm were found more frequently when severe weight loss or tumor nodal shrinkage occurred. Discussion. These results enable us to choose margins that guarantee with sufficient accuracy the coverage of PTVs and organs at risk sparing. Collected data confirmed the need for a strict check of patient position reproducibility in case of anatomical changes

  8. Network Awareness in P2P-TV Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Stefano; Leonardi, Emilio; Mellia, Marco; Meo, Michela

    The increasing popularity of applications for video-streaming based on P2P paradigm (P2P-TV) is raising the interest of both broadcasters and network operators. The former see a promising technology to reduce the cost of streaming content over the Internet, while offering a world-wide service. The latter instead fear that the traffic offered by these applications can grow without control, affecting other services, and possibly causing network congestion and collapse. The “Network-Aware P2P-TV Application over Wise Networks” FP7 project aims at studying and developing a novel P2P-TV application offering the chance to broadcast high definition video to broadcasters and to carefully manage the traffic offered by peers to the network, therefore avoiding worries to Internet providers about network overload. In such context, we design a simulator to evaluate performance of different P2P-TV solutions, to compare them both considering end-users’ and network providers’ perspectives, such as quality of service perceived by subscribers and link utilization. In this paper, we provide some results that show how effective can be a network aware P2P-TV system.

  9. Analysis of PTV margin for IMRT and VMAT techniques in prostate cancer using IGRT; Analise de margem de PTV para as tecnicas de IMRT e VMAT em cancer de prostata utilizando IGRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrini, E.S.; Silveira, T.B.; Vieira, D.S.; Anjos, L.E.A.; Lopez, J.C.C.; Batista, D.V.S., E-mail: emmilyfisica@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer Jose de Alencar Gomes da Silva, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Clinical radiotherapy procedures aim at high precision. However, there are many errors sources that act during treatment preparation and execution that limit its accuracy. The use of imaged-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) increases the agreement between the planned dose and the actual dose deposited in the target, at the same time allows to evaluate the uncertainties related to the setup and a possible reduction in the planning target volume (PTV) margin. Thus the aim of this study was to determine the best PTV margin to be used in radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) techniques associated with IGRT. A total of four patients with prostate daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) were analyzed. Systematic and random errors were calculated statistically based on the displacements couch for 128 CBCTs. It was found that a symmetric margin of 0.75 cm from clinical treatment volume (CTV) to PTV is sufficient to encompass the uncertainties inherent to the treatment applying IGRT. Besides without that and maintaining the same tumor control probability, a symmetric margin of 1,24 cm would be necessary. This study showed that using daily image verification the setup errors are reduced, which generates a lower PTV margin. (author)

  10. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, Eelco, E-mail: e.lens@amc.uva.nl; Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V{sub 95%} >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 40Gy}, D{sub mean} and D{sub 2cc} for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D{sub 2cc} of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors.

  11. Large-scale volumetric pressure from tomographic PTV with HFSB tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Caridi, Giuseppe C. A.; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-11-01

    The instantaneous volumetric pressure in the near-wake of a truncated cylinder is measured by use of tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) as tracers. The measurement volume is several orders of magnitude larger than that reported in tomographic experiments dealing with pressure from particle image velocimetry (PIV). The near-wake of a truncated cylinder installed on a flat plate ( Re D = 3.5 × 104) features both wall-bounded turbulence and large-scale unsteady flow separation. The instantaneous pressure is calculated from the time-resolved 3D velocity distribution by invoking the momentum equation. The experiments are conducted simultaneously with surface pressure measurements intended for validation of the technique. The study shows that time-averaged pressure and root-mean-squared pressure fluctuations can be accurately measured both in the fluid domain and at the solid surface by large-scale tomographic PTV with HFSB as tracers, with significant reduction in manufacturing complexity for the wind-tunnel model and circumventing the need to install pressure taps or transducers. The measurement over a large volume eases the extension toward the free-stream regime, providing a reliable boundary condition for the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. The work demonstrates, in the case of the flow past a truncated cylinder, the use of HFSB tracer particles for pressure measurement in air flows in a measurement volume that is two orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional tomographic PIV.

  12. Evaluation of dose-volume histogram parameters (V20 and mean dose) in lung cancer adaptive radiotherapy with design of composite lung volumes (ITV; Evaluacion de parametros del histograma dosis-volumen (V20 y dosis media) en radioterapia adaptada de cancer de pulmon con diseno de volumenes pulmonares compuestos (Internal Target Volume, ITV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroy Anton, J. L.; Solar Tortosa, M.; Lopez Munoz, M.; Navarro Bergada, A.; Estornell gualde, M. A.; Melchor Iniguez, M.

    2013-07-01

    Physiological respiratory motion is a challenge in external radiotherapy for lung tumors. In adaptive radiotherapy, changing position of the target volume should be reflected in the simulation procedure and taken into account in the design of volumes for CTV/PTV proper coverage. This may be achieved through the design of an Internal Target Volume (ITV) as indicated in ICRU-62. However, the Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) evaluation of the doses received by the healthy lung may vary in the case of designing a single lung volume, compared to the composite lung volume obtained with the fusion of normal breathing, inspiration and expiration (ITV{sub l}ung). (Author)

  13. Continuous Monitoring and Intrafraction Target Position Correction During Treatment Improves Target Coverage for Patients Undergoing SBRT Prostate Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, D. Michael, E-mail: lovelocm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Messineo, Alessandra P. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cox, Brett W. [North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the potential benefits of continuous monitoring of prostate position and intervention (CMI) using 2-mm displacement thresholds during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment to those of a conventional image-guided procedure involving single localization prior to treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine patients accrued to a prostate SBRT dose escalation protocol were implanted with radiofrequency transponder beacons. The planning target volume (PTV) margin was 5 mm in all directions, except for 3 mm in the posterior direction. The prostate was kept within 2 mm of its planned position by the therapists halting dose delivery and, if necessary, correcting the couch position. We computed the number, type, and time required for interventions and where the prostate would have been during dose delivery had there been, instead, a single image-guided setup procedure prior to each treatment. Distributions of prostate displacements were computed as a function of time. Results: After the initial setup, 1.7 interventions per fraction were required, with a concomitant increase in time for dose delivery of approximately 65 seconds. Small systematic drifts in prostate position in the posterior and inferior directions were observed in the study patients. Without CMI, intrafractional motion would have resulted in approximately 10% of patients having a delivered dose that did not meet our clinical coverage requirement, that is, a PTV D95 of >90%. The posterior PTV margin required for 95% of the dose to be delivered with the target positioned within the PTV was computed as a function of time. The margin necessary was found to increase by 2 mm every 5 minutes, starting from the time of the imaging procedure. Conclusions: CMI using a tight 2-mm displacement threshold was not only feasible but was found to deliver superior PTV coverage compared with the conventional image-guided procedure in the SBRT setting.

  14. SU-E-J-35: Using CBCT as the Alternative Method of Assessing ITV Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Redler, G; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To study the accuracy of Internal Target Volumes (ITVs) created on cone beam CT (CBCT) by comparing the visible target volume on CBCT to volumes (GTV, ITV, and PTV) outlined on free breathing (FB) CT and 4DCT. Methods A Quasar Cylindrical Motion Phantom with a 3cm diameter ball (14.14 cc) embedded within a cork insert was set up to simulate respiratory motion with a period of 4 seconds and amplitude of 2cm superioinferiorly and 1cm anterioposteriorly. FBCT and 4DCT images were acquired. A PTV-4D was created on the 4DCT by applying a uniform margin of 5mm to the ITV-CT. PTV-FB was created by applying a margin of the motion range plus 5mm, i.e. total of 1.5cm laterally and 2.5cm superioinferiorly to the GTV outlined on the FBCT. A dynamic conformal arc was planned to treat the PTV-FB with 1mm margin. A CBCT was acquired before the treatment, on which the target was delineated. During the treatment, the position of the target was monitored using the EPID in cine mode. Results ITV-CBCT and ITV-CT were measured to be 56.6 and 62.7cc, respectively, with a Dice Coefficient (DC) of 0.94 and disagreement in center of mass (COM) of 0.59 mm. On the other hand, GTV-FB was 11.47cc, 19% less than the known volume of the ball. PTV-FB and PTV-4D were 149 and 116 cc, with a DC of 0.71. Part of the ITV-CT was not enclosed by the PTV-FB despite the large margin. The cine EPID images have confirmed geometrical misses of the target. Similar under-coverage was observed in one clinical case and captured by the CBCT, where the implanted fiducials moved outside PTV-FB. Conclusion ITV-CBCT is in good agreement with ITV-CT. When 4DCT was not available, CBCT can be an effective alternative in determining and verifying the PTV margin.

  15. SU-E-J-164: Estimation of DVH Variation for PTV Due to Interfraction Organ Motion in Prostate VMAT Using Gaussian Error Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, C [Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jiang, R [Grand River Regional Cancer Center, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada); Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We developed a method to predict the change of DVH for PTV due to interfraction organ motion in prostate VMAT without repeating the CT scan and treatment planning. The method is based on a pre-calculated patient database with DVH curves of PTV modelled by the Gaussian error function (GEF). Methods: For a group of 30 patients with different prostate sizes, their VMAT plans were recalculated by shifting their PTVs 1 cm with 10 increments in the anterior-posterior, left-right and superior-inferior directions. The DVH curve of PTV in each replan was then fitted by the GEF to determine parameters describing the shape of curve. Information of parameters, varying with the DVH change due to prostate motion for different prostate sizes, was analyzed and stored in a database of a program written by MATLAB. Results: To predict a new DVH for PTV due to prostate interfraction motion, prostate size and shift distance with direction were input to the program. Parameters modelling the DVH for PTV were determined based on the pre-calculated patient dataset. From the new parameters, DVH curves of PTVs with and without considering the prostate motion were plotted for comparison. The program was verified with different prostate cases involving interfraction prostate shifts and replans. Conclusion: Variation of DVH for PTV in prostate VMAT can be predicted using a pre-calculated patient database with DVH curve fitting. The computing time is fast because CT rescan and replan are not required. This quick DVH estimation can help radiation staff to determine if the changed PTV coverage due to prostate shift is tolerable in the treatment. However, it should be noted that the program can only consider prostate interfraction motions along three axes, and is restricted to prostate VMAT plan using the same plan script in the treatment planning system.

  16. The optimization of intensity modulated radiotherapy in cases where the planning target volume extends into the build-up region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T B; Hoole, A C F; Thomas, S J [Medical Physics Department, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Burnet, N G [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Oncology Centre (Box 193), Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: binh.nguyen-thai@polytechnique.org

    2009-04-21

    A common clinical problem in IMRT, especially when treating head and neck cases, is that the clinical target volume (CTV) stops short of the skin surface, whilst the margin for geometric uncertainties may take the planning target volume (PTV) to the skin surface or beyond. In these cases, optimization leads to over-dosing of the skin, unless the planner resorts to procedural tricks to avoid this, such as the use of pretend bolus or reduction of the PTV followed by adding 'flash' after optimization. This paper describes a method of avoiding the need for these tricks by using a multiple-isocentre CTV-based objective function. This enables plans to be produced that will give good coverage of the CTV for all the geometrical uncertainties that would have been covered by the PTV without causing the problem of over-dosing the skin. Eight isocentre shifts, equally distributed on the surface of a sphere with a radius equal to the CTV-PTV margin, are shown to be adequate for the optimization process. The resulting fluence maps are much simpler than those resulting from PTV optimization and will therefore be simpler to deliver. The method also permits better sparing of organs at risk such as the spinal cord.

  17. The optimization of intensity modulated radiotherapy in cases where the planning target volume extends into the build-up region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. B.; Hoole, A. C. F.; Burnet, N. G.; Thomas, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    A common clinical problem in IMRT, especially when treating head and neck cases, is that the clinical target volume (CTV) stops short of the skin surface, whilst the margin for geometric uncertainties may take the planning target volume (PTV) to the skin surface or beyond. In these cases, optimization leads to over-dosing of the skin, unless the planner resorts to procedural tricks to avoid this, such as the use of pretend bolus or reduction of the PTV followed by adding 'flash' after optimization. This paper describes a method of avoiding the need for these tricks by using a multiple-isocentre CTV-based objective function. This enables plans to be produced that will give good coverage of the CTV for all the geometrical uncertainties that would have been covered by the PTV without causing the problem of over-dosing the skin. Eight isocentre shifts, equally distributed on the surface of a sphere with a radius equal to the CTV-PTV margin, are shown to be adequate for the optimization process. The resulting fluence maps are much simpler than those resulting from PTV optimization and will therefore be simpler to deliver. The method also permits better sparing of organs at risk such as the spinal cord.

  18. Characteristics of seeding particles for PIV/PTV analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Tal; Liberzon, Alexander; Bernhaim, Anne; Gurka, Roi

    2011-11-01

    PIV and PTV are non-intrusive state-of-the-art techniques widely used for flow measurements. Seeding particles are required to be used as tracers to the flow. The accuracy of the velocity measurements is limited by the ability of the tracer particles to adequately follow the instantaneous motion of the continuous phase. In order to follow the flow effectively, the particles should satisfy numerous requirements: size, sphericity, density, high refractive index, concentration and chemical inert. Since seeding particles for liquids are commonly polymer-based particles we probe the influence of their surface coating on the results obtained from optical measurements. Using a canonical lid-driven cavity flow we measured the velocity field using PIV and PTV and compared the results (velocity and acceleration) obtained with the same particles with and without chemical treatment of surfactants. Probability density functions of the results using particles before and after treatment are compared statistically utilizing the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Although the mean values exhibit similar trends, fluctuations and velocity derivatives show some discrepancy in respect to the chemical treatment. The obtained results show a variance of up to 5% between the values obtained for using washed and un-washed particles, for both PIV and PTV experiments with some influence related to the size of the particles.

  19. Influence of spray equipment and water volume on coverage of citrus and control of citricola scale, Coccus pseudomagnoliarum (Hemiptera: Coccidae) with mineral oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueca, P; Grafton-Cardwell, E E; Moltó, E

    2009-02-01

    A trial was conducted in a commercial Citrus sinensis L. variety 'Washington' navel orange orchard to compare the coverage and efficacy against citricola scale Coccus pseudomagnoliarum (Kuwana) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) of 45.5 liters/ha of an nC24 agricultural mineral oil treatment applied by two different methods: a conventional air blast sprayer and a rotary atomizer. Three water volumes (2,340, 4,680, and 7,020 liters/ha) were applied with the air blast sprayer to determine the optimal spray volume for that equipment. A single volume (2,340 liters/ha) was applied with the rotary atomizer to compare its effectiveness with that of the air blast sprayer at this same volume. Results demonstrated that all treatments reduced citricola scale densities. Moreover, all treatments conducted with the air blast sprayer provided significantly greater coverage and significantly reduced citricola scale densities compared with the treatment made with the rotary atomizer. Larger water volume applications with the air blast sprayer did not significantly reduce citricola scale densities, although significantly better coverage was attained in the interior of the tree when spraying with 4,680 and 7,020 liters/ha. As a consequence, this study demonstrated that the increased coverage obtained by applying higher water volume with the air blast sprayer was not required for an optimal treatment in August, when the citricola scale population consisted of nymphs inhabiting the outside leaves of the tree.

  20. Empirical coverage of model-based variance estimators for remote sensing assisted estimation of stand-level timber volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbach, Johannes; McRoberts, Ronald E; Astrup, Rasmus

    2016-02-01

    Due to the availability of good and reasonably priced auxiliary data, the use of model-based regression-synthetic estimators for small area estimation is popular in operational settings. Examples are forest management inventories, where a linking model is used in combination with airborne laser scanning data to estimate stand-level forest parameters where no or too few observations are collected within the stand. This paper focuses on different approaches to estimating the variances of those estimates. We compared a variance estimator which is based on the estimation of superpopulation parameters with variance estimators which are based on predictions of finite population values. One of the latter variance estimators considered the spatial autocorrelation of the residuals whereas the other one did not. The estimators were applied using timber volume on stand level as the variable of interest and photogrammetric image matching data as auxiliary information. Norwegian National Forest Inventory (NFI) data were used for model calibration and independent data clustered within stands were used for validation. The empirical coverage proportion (ECP) of confidence intervals (CIs) of the variance estimators which are based on predictions of finite population values was considerably higher than the ECP of the CI of the variance estimator which is based on the estimation of superpopulation parameters. The ECP further increased when considering the spatial autocorrelation of the residuals. The study also explores the link between confidence intervals that are based on variance estimates as well as the well-known confidence and prediction intervals of regression models.

  1. SU-E-J-177: A Computational Approach for Determination of Anisotropic PTV Margins Based On Statistical Shape Analysis for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibayama, Y; Arimura, H; Nakamura, K; Honda, H; Toyofuku, F [Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JP (Japan); Hirose, T; Umezu, Y; Nakamura, Y [Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, JP (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Our aim of this study was to propose a computational approach for determination of anisotropic planning target volume (PTV) margins based on statistical shape analysis with taking into account time variations of clinical target volume (CTV) shapes for the prostate cancer radiation treatment planning (RTP). Methods: Systematic and random setup errors were measured using orthogonal projection and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images for data of 20 patients, who underwent the intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk CTVs were defined as only a prostate, a prostate plus proximal 1-cm seminal vesicles, and a prostate plus proximal 2-cm seminal vesicles, respectively. All CTV regions were registered with a reference CTV region with a median volume to remove the effect of the setup errors, and converted to a point distribution models. The systematic and random errors for translations of CTV regions were automatically evaluated by analyzing the movements of centroids of CTV regions. The random and systematic errors for shape variations of CTV regions were obtained from covariance matrices based on point distributions for the CTV contours on CBCT images of 72 fractions of 10 patients. Anisotropic PTV margins for 6 directions (right, left, anterior, posterior, superior and inferior) were derived by using Yoda’s PTV margin model. Results: PTV margins with and without shape variations were 5.75 to 8.03 mm and 5.23 to 7.67 mm for low-risk group, 5.87 to 8.33 mm and 5.23 to 7.67 mm for intermediate-risk group, and 5.88 to 8.25 mm and 5.29 to 7.82 mm for highrisk group, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed computational approach could be feasible for determination of the anisotropic PTV margins with taking into account CTV shape variations for the RTP.

  2. CT false-profile view of the hip: a reproducible method of measuring anterior acetabular coverage using volume CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needell, Steven D.; Borzykowski, Ross M. [Boca Radiology Group, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Carreira, Dominic S.; Kozy, John [Broward Health Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To devise a simple, reproducible method of using CT data to measure anterior acetabular coverage that results in values analogous to metrics derived from false-profile radiographs. Volume CT images were used to generate simulated false-profile radiographs and cross-sectional false-profile views by angling a multiplanar reformat 115 through the affected acetabulum relative to a line tangential to the posterior margin of the ischial tuberosities. The anterolateral margin of the acetabulum was localized on the CT false-profile view corresponding with the cranial opening of the acetabular roof. Anterior center edge angle (CEA) was measured between a vertical line passing through the center of the femoral head and a line connecting the center of the femoral head with the anterior edge of the condensed line of the acetabulum (sourcil). Anterior CEA values measured on CT false-profile views of 38 symptomatic hips were compared with values obtained on simulated and projection false-profile radiographs. The CT false-profile view produces a cross-sectional image in the same obliquity as false-profile radiographs. Anterior CEA measured on CT false-profile views were statistically similar to values obtained with false-profile radiographs. CT technologists quickly mastered the technique of generating this view. Inter-rater reliability indicated this method to be highly reproducible. The CT false-profile view is simple to generate and anterior CEA measurements derived from it are similar to those obtained using well-positioned false-profile radiographs. Utilization of CT to assess hip geometry enables precise control of pelvic inclination, eliminates projectional errors, and minimizes limitations of image quality inherent to radiography. (orig.)

  3. Radiation during deep inspiration allows loco-regional treatment of left breast and axillary-, supraclavicular- and internal mammary lymph nodes without compromising target coverage or dose restrictions to organs at risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelstuen, Mari H. B.; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Vikstroem, Johan; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar (Department of Hematology and Oncology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger (Norway)), E-mail: hjem@sus.no

    2012-03-15

    Background and purpose. Loco-regional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer represents a treatment planning challenge when the internal mammary chain (IMC) lymph nodes are included in the target volume. This treatment planning study evaluates the reduction in cardiopulmonary doses when radiation is given during deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). This was achieved without compromising dose coverage to the planning target volume (PTV). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two computed tomography (CT)-scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPMTM respiratory gating system. Audio-visual guidance was used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed focusing on good coverage (V95% > 98%) of the PTV. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, lungs and contralateral breast were assessed. Results. With equal PTV coverage, average mean heart dose was reduced from 6.2 Gy to 3.1 Gy in DIBH plans as compared to FB. Average volume receiving 25 Gy or more (V25Gy) was reduced from 6.7% to 1.2%, and the number of patients with V25Gy > 5% was reduced from 8 to 1 utilizing DIBH. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 25.0 Gy to 10.9 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20 Gy or more (V20Gy) was reduced from 44.5% to 32.7% with DIBH. In 11 of the DIBH plans V20Gy was lower than 35%, in accordance with national guidelines, while none of the FB plans fulfilled this recommendation. Conclusion. Respiratory gated radiotherapy during DIBH is a suitable technique for loco-regional breast irradiation even when IMC lymph nodes are included in the PTV. Cardiopulmonary doses are considerably decreased for all dose levels without compromising the dose coverage to PTV

  4. Hybrid PIV-PTV technique for measuring blood flow in rat mesenteric vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-11-01

    The micro-particle tracking velocimetry (μ-PTV) technique is used to obtain the velocity fields of blood flow in the microvasculature under in vivo conditions because it can provide the blood velocity distribution in microvessels with high spatial resolution. The in vivo μ-PTV technique usually requires a few to tens of seconds to obtain a whole velocity profile across the vessel diameter because of the limited number density of tracer particles under in vivo conditions. Thus, the μ-PTV technique alone is limited in measuring unsteady blood flows that fluctuate irregularly due to the heart beating and muscle movement in surrounding tissues. In this study, a new hybrid PIV-PTV technique was established by combining PTV and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques to resolve the drawbacks of the μ-PTV method in measuring blood flow in microvessels under in vivo conditions. Images of red blood cells (RBCs) and fluorescent particles in rat mesenteric vessels were obtained simultaneously. Temporal variations of the centerline blood velocity were monitored using a fast Fourier transform-based cross-correlation PIV method. The fluorescence particle images were analyzed using the μ-PTV technique to extract the spatial distribution of the velocity vectors. Data from the μ-PTV and PIV methods were combined to obtain a better estimate of the velocity profile in actual blood flow. This technique will be useful in investigating hemodynamics in microcirculation by measuring unsteady irregular blood flows more accurately.

  5. AN IMPROVED PTV SYSTEM FOR LARGE-SCALE PHYSICAL RIVER MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To measure the surface flow in a physical river model, an improved system of Large-Scale Particle Tracking Velocimetry (LSPTV) was proposed and the elements of the PTV system were described. Usually the tracer particles of a PTV system seeded on water surface tend to form conglomerates due to surface tension of water. In addition, they can not float on water surface when water flow is shallow. Ellipsoid particles were used to avoid the above problems. Another important issue is particle recognition. In order to eliminate the influence of noise, particles were recognized by the processing of multi-frame images. The kernel of the improved PTV system is the algorithm for particle tracking. A new 3-frame PTV algorithm was developed. The performance of this algorithm was compared with the conventional 4-frame PTV algorithm and 2-frame PTV algorithm by means of computer simulation using synthetically generated images. The results show that the new 3-frame PTV algorithm can recover more velocity vectors and have lower relative error. In addition, in order to attain the whole flow field from individual flow fields, the method of stitching individual flow fields by obvious marks was worked out. Then the improved PTV system was applied to the measurement of surface flow field in Model Yellow River and shows good performance.

  6. Volumetric microscale particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianqi; Aramideh, Soroush; Ardekani, Arezoo M.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2016-11-01

    The steady-state flow through refractive-index-matched glass bead microchannels is measured using microscopic particle tracking velocimetry (μPTV). A novel technique is developed to volumetrically reconstruct particles from oversampled two-dimensional microscopic images of fluorescent particles. Fast oversampling of the quasi-steady-state flow field in the lateral direction is realized by a nano-positioning piezo stage synchronized with a fast CMOS camera. Experiments at different Reynolds numbers are carried out for flows through a series of both monodispersed and bidispersed glass bead microchannels with various porosities. The obtained velocity fields at pore-scale (on the order of 10 μm) are compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS) conducted in the exact same geometries reconstructed from micro-CT scans of the glass bead microchannels. The developed experimental method would serve as a new approach for exploring the flow physics at pore-scale in porous media, and also provide benchmark measurements for validation of numerical simulations.

  7. Dune formation in dilute phase pneumatic transport system: PIV & PTV based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhalani, Sumit; Patankar, Atharva; Makawana, Ajay; Bose, Manaswita

    2017-06-01

    Flow of gas-solid mixture through horizontal conveying section show a large variety of phenomena and is broadly classified into dilute and dense unstable regimes. Different types of instabilities are observed in the dense phase flow and are widely studied in literature; however, clustering instabilities are observed in the very dilute regime of flow with volume fraction 0.001. A recent study has shown that regular, stable dune shaped clusters are formed in a small regime of the dilute phase of conveying. The dunes become unstable as the superficial gas velocity is decreased before it finally leads to the dense mode of conveying. The motivation of the current work is to investigate the velocity distribution on the surface of the stable and unstable dunes and thereby understand the cause behind the formation of the dunes in the conveying section. To that end, particle image and tracking velocimetry techniques are employed with the specific objective to determine the volume fraction and the velocity profile of the solid phase on the stable dune surface. A drastic change in the solid fraction within a few particle diameters from the dune surface suggests that PTV is more appropriate in the bulk whereas PIV is suitable for near surface investigation.

  8. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy for the treatment of a large planning target volume in thoracic esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ahmar S; Moseley, Douglas; Kassam, Zahra; Kim, Sun Mo; Cho, Charles

    2013-05-06

    Recently, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has demonstrated the ability to deliver radiation dose precisely and accurately with a shorter delivery time compared to conventional intensity-modulated fixed-field treatment (IMRT). We applied the hypothesis of VMAT technique for the treatment of thoracic esophageal carcinoma to determine superior or equivalent conformal dose coverage for a large thoracic esophageal planning target volume (PTV) with superior or equivalent sparing of organs-at-risk (OARs) doses, and reduce delivery time and monitor units (MUs), in comparison with conventional fixed-field IMRT plans. We also analyzed and compared some other important metrics of treatment planning and treatment delivery for both IMRT and VMAT techniques. These metrics include: 1) the integral dose and the volume receiving intermediate dose levels between IMRT and VMATI plans; 2) the use of 4D CT to determine the internal motion margin; and 3) evaluating the dosimetry of every plan through patient-specific QA. These factors may impact the overall treatment plan quality and outcomes from the individual planning technique used. In this study, we also examined the significance of using two arcs vs. a single-arc VMAT technique for PTV coverage, OARs doses, monitor units and delivery time. Thirteen patients, stage T2-T3 N0-N1 (TNM AJCC 7th edn.), PTV volume median 395 cc (range 281-601 cc), median age 69 years (range 53 to 85), were treated from July 2010 to June 2011 with a four-field (n = 4) or five-field (n = 9) step-and-shoot IMRT technique using a 6 MV beam to a prescribed dose of 50 Gy in 20 to 25 F. These patients were retrospectively replanned using single arc (VMATI, 91 control points) and two arcs (VMATII, 182 control points). All treatment plans of the 13 study cases were evaluated using various dose-volume metrics. These included PTV D99, PTV D95, PTV V9547.5Gy(95%), PTV mean dose, Dmax, PTV dose conformity (Van't Riet conformation number (CN)), mean lung dose

  9. Simultaneous measurements of jellyfish bell kinematics and flow fields using PTV and PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nicole; Dabiri, John

    2016-11-01

    A better understanding of jellyfish swimming can potentially improve the energy efficiency of aquatic vehicles or create biomimetic robots for ocean monitoring. Aurelia aurita is a simple oblate invertebrate composed of a flexible bell and coronal muscle, which contracts to eject water from the subumbrellar volume. Jellyfish locomotion can be studied by obtaining body kinematics or by examining the resulting fluid velocity fields using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Typically, swim kinematics are obtained by semi-manually tracking points of interest (POI) along the bell in video post-processing; simultaneous measurements of kinematics and flows involve using this semi-manual tracking method on PIV videos. However, we show that both the kinematics and flow fields can be directly visualized in 3D space by embedding phosphorescent particles in animals free-swimming in seeded environments. Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) can then be used to calculate bell kinematics, such as pulse frequency, bell deformation, swim trajectories, and propulsive efficiency. By simultaneously tracking POI within the bell and collecting PIV data, we can further study the jellyfish's natural locomotive control mechanisms in conjunction with flow measurements. NSF GRFP.

  10. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  11. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  12. Rotation Effects on the Target-Volume Margin Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chan, M; Song, Y; Burman, C

    2014-01-01

    Rotational setup errors are usually neglected in most clinical centers. An analytical formula is developed to determine the extra margin between clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) to account for setup errors. The proposed formula corrects for both translational and rotational setup errors and then incorporated into margin determination for PTV.

  13. Characterization of PTV-12, a newly described porcine teschovirus serotype: in vivo infection and cross-protection studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Gómez, Cristina; Fernández-Pinero, Jovita; García-Casado, María Ana; Zell, Roland; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel

    2017-07-01

    Porcine teschoviruses (PTVs) constitute 1 of the 31 genera within the Picornaviridae family, comprising at least 13 genetic types (PTV-1 to PTV-13), of which only 11 (PTV-1 to PTV-11) have been recognized as serotypes to date. Specific for swine and wild boars, most PTVs are usually non-pathogenic, but some viral variants cause severe disorders in the central nervous system (Teschen disease) or milder signs (Talfan disease), as well as reproductive, digestive and respiratory disorders and skin lesions. Previous studies revealed a high diversity of teschoviruses circulating in Spanish pig populations. Phylogenetic analysis performed with these sequences and others available in GenBank disclosed 13 clusters, 11 of which corresponded to the known PTV serotypes, and 1 of 2 additional groups is represented by isolate CC25, whose full-length genomic sequence has been obtained. This group is new to science, and was putatively named PTV-12. Here, a complete characterization of this isolate is presented, including the experimental infection of minipigs to assess tissue tropism and possible pathogenicity in vivo in the host species. In addition, using this experimental animal model, we investigated whether a pre-existing infection with this PTV-12 isolate could confer cross-protection against infection with a heterotypic PTV-1 virulent strain. Based on phylogenetic analysis and serological data, we propose CC25 as the prototype strain of a new teschovirus serotype, PTV-12.

  14. Brain perfusion CT for acute stroke using a 256-slice CT: improvement of diagnostic information by large volume coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, F. [Technical University, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Muenzel, D.; Meier, R.; Rummeny, E.J.; Huber, A. [Technical University, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Poppert, H. [Technical University, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    To compare a 256-slice CT with a simulated standard CT for brain CT perfusion (CTP). CTP was obtained in 51 patients using a 256-slice CT (128 detector rows, flying z-focus, 8-cm detector width, 80 kV, 120mAs, 20 measurements, 1 CT image/2.5 s). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were compared in grey and white matter. Perfusion maps were evaluated for cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in hypoperfused areas and corresponding contralateral regions. Two reconstructed 10-mm slices for simulation of a standard CT (SDCT) were compared with the complete data sets (large-volume CT, LVCT). Adequate image quality was achieved in 50/51 cases. SNR were significantly different in grey and white matter. A perfusion deficit was present in 27 data sets. Differences between the hypoperfusions and the control regions were significant for MTT and CBF, but not for CBV. Three lesions were missed by SDCT but detected by LVCT; 24 lesions were covered incompletely by SDCT, and 6 by LVCT. 21 lesions were detected completely by LVCT, but none by SDCT. CTP imaging of the brain using an increased detector width can detect additional ischaemic lesions and cover most ischaemic lesions completely. (orig.)

  15. 3D-PTV around Operational Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Ian; Dabiri, John

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory studies and numerical simulations of wind turbines are typically constrained in how they can inform operational turbine behavior. Laboratory experiments are usually unable to match both pertinent parameters of full-scale wind turbines, the Reynolds number (Re) and tip speed ratio, using scaled-down models. Additionally, numerical simulations of the flow around wind turbines are constrained by the large domain size and high Re that need to be simulated. When these simulations are preformed, turbine geometry is typically simplified resulting in flow structures near the rotor not being well resolved. In order to bypass these limitations, a quantitative flow visualization method was developed to take in situ measurements of the flow around wind turbines at the Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE) in Lancaster, CA. The apparatus constructed was able to seed an approximately 9m x 9m x 5m volume in the wake of the turbine using artificial snow. Quantitative measurements were obtained by tracking the evolution of the artificial snow using a four camera setup. The methodology for calibrating and collecting data, as well as preliminary results detailing the flow around a 2kW vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT), will be presented.

  16. The Volume Of TV Advertisements During The ACA's First Enrollment Period Was Associated With Increased Insurance Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Wilcock, Andrew; Baum, Laura; Barry, Colleen L; Fowler, Erika Franklin; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Gollust, Sarah E

    2017-04-01

    The launch of the Affordable Care Act was accompanied by major insurance information campaigns by government, nonprofit, political, news media, and private-sector organizations, but it is not clear to what extent these efforts were associated with insurance gains. Using county-level data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey and broadcast television airings data from the Wesleyan Media Project, we examined the relationship between insurance advertisements and county-level health insurance changes between 2013 and 2014, adjusting for other media and county- and state-level characteristics. We found that counties exposed to higher volumes of local insurance advertisements during the first open enrollment period experienced larger reductions in their uninsurance rates than other counties. State-sponsored advertisements had the strongest relationship with declines in uninsurance, and this relationship was driven by increases in Medicaid enrollment. These results support the importance of strategic investment in advertising to increase uptake of health insurance but suggest that not all types of advertisements will have the same effect on the public.

  17. Effects of conidial densities and spray volume of Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana fungal suspensions on conidial viability, droplet size and deposition coverage in bioassay using a novel bioassay spray system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were conducted to study the conidial viability during bioassay spray with different suspensions of Metarhizium anisopliae ATCC 62176 and Beauveria bassiana NI8, and to investigate the effects of conidial density and spray volume on the distribution of droplet size and deposit coverage us...

  18. Verification of PTV margins for IMRT prostate cancer using EPID; Verificacao das margens de PTV para IMRT de cancer de prostata utilizando EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidens, Matheus; Santos, Romulo R.; Estacio, Daniela R. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital Sao Lucas. Servico de Fisica Medica; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: matheus_leidens@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this work is to present the results of a strategy to define the PTV margins for patients with prostate cancer treated with IMRT technique, due to geometrical uncertainties associated with the planned placement. 341 images of 31 patients in supine position, before applying the fractions, were obtained using an EPID attached to a linear accelerator, where only setup errors were studied. The displacements were analyzed in relation to the AP (antero-posterior), SI (superior-inferior) and LR (left-right) directions. The distribution pattern of systematic displacement deviation values were 0.12 cm, 0.06 cm, 0.02 cm and the standard deviation of the distribution of random deviations was 0.62 cm, 0.53 cm, and 0.24 cm in the AP, SI and LR directions, respectively. Data evaluation, according to Stroom and Heijmen’s method, suggests that PTV margins should be 0.66 cm in the AP direction, 0.49 cm in the SI direction and 0.20 cm in the LR direction. These data show a high reproducibility in the positioning of patients, given by a method for the correction of planned relative to the bony anatomy checked with the EPID position. (author)

  19. SU-E-T-318: The Effect of Patient Positioning Errors On Target Coverage and Cochlear Dose in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment of Acoustic Neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellamonica, D.; Luo, G.; Ding, G. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Setup errors on the order of millimeters may cause under-dosing of targets and significant changes in dose to critical structures especially when planning with tight margins in stereotactic radiosurgery. This study evaluates the effects of these types of patient positioning uncertainties on planning target volume (PTV) coverage and cochlear dose for stereotactic treatments of acoustic neuromas. Methods: Twelve acoustic neuroma patient treatment plans were retrospectively evaluated in Brainlab iPlan RT Dose 4.1.3. All treatment beams were shaped by HDMLC from a Varian TX machine. Seven patients had planning margins of 2mm, five had 1–1.5mm. Six treatment plans were created for each patient simulating a 1mm setup error in six possible directions: anterior-posterior, lateral, and superiorinferior. The arcs and HDMLC shapes were kept the same for each plan. Change in PTV coverage and mean dose to the cochlea was evaluated for each plan. Results: The average change in PTV coverage for the 72 simulated plans was −1.7% (range: −5 to +1.1%). The largest average change in coverage was observed for shifts in the patient's superior direction (−2.9%). The change in mean cochlear dose was highly dependent upon the direction of the shift. Shifts in the anterior and superior direction resulted in an average increase in dose of 13.5 and 3.8%, respectively, while shifts in the posterior and inferior direction resulted in an average decrease in dose of 17.9 and 10.2%. The average change in dose to the cochlea was 13.9% (range: 1.4 to 48.6%). No difference was observed based on the size of the planning margin. Conclusion: This study indicates that if the positioning uncertainty is kept within 1mm the setup errors may not result in significant under-dosing of the acoustic neuroma target volumes. However, the change in mean cochlear dose is highly dependent upon the direction of the shift.

  20. SU-C-BRE-05: PTV Margin Determination Based On Tumor Radiobiological Characteristics and Geometric Uncertainties Derived From Daily Cone- Beam CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, J [Inlaks and Budhrani Hospital (India)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine required PTV margins for ≤1% loss in mean population TCP using systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors calculated from daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of head and neck patients. Methods: Daily CBCT images were acquired for 50 head and neck patients. The CBCT image sets acquired at each fraction were registered with planning CT to obtain positional errors for each patient for each fraction. Systematic and random errors were calculated from data collected for 50 patients as described in IPEM On Target report. CTV delineation uncertainty of 2mm is added quadratically to systematic error. Assuming a spherical target volume, the dose in each voxel of target volume is summed for each fraction in the treatment by shifting the dose grid to calculate mean population TCP inclusive of geometric uncertainties using a Monte Carlo method. These simulations were repeated for the set of Σ and σ in each axis for different PTV margins and drop in TCP for each margin are obtained. In order to study the effect of dose-response curve on PTV margins, two different σα of 0.048 Gy-1 and 0.218 Gy-1 representing steep and shallow dose-response curves are studied. Σ were 2.5, 2.5, 2.1 mm and σ were 0.3, 0.3 0.2 mm respectively in x, y and z axis respectively. Results: PTV margins based on tumor radiobiological characteristics are 4.8, 4.8 and 4 mm in x, y and z axis assuming 25 treatment fractions for σα 0.048 Gy-1 (steep) and 4.2,4.2 and 2.2 for σα of 0.218 Gy-1 (shallow). While the TCP-based margins did not differ much in x and y axis, it is considerably smaller in z axis for shallow DRC. Conclusion: TCP based margins are substantially smaller than physical dose-based margin recipes. This study also demonstrates the importance of considering tumor radiobiological characteristics while deriving margins.

  1. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: is there a preferred method?

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated by helical tomotherapy using 2D or 3D margining technique in in prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, 5 mm margin was added not only in lateral/anterior-posterior, but also in superior-inferior to CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between 2D and 3D PTV indices were not significant except for CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant d...

  2. Functional coverages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, H.R.A.; Van Dam, A.

    2011-01-01

    A new Application Programming Interface (API) is presented which simplifies working with geospatial coverages as well as many other data structures of a multi-dimensional nature. The main idea extends the Common Data Model (CDM) developed at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

  3. Differences in absorbed doses at risk organs and target tumoral of planning(PTV) in lung treatments using two algorithms of different calculations; Diferencias en las dosis absorbidas en organos de riesgo y volumen tumoral de planificacion (PTV) en tratamientos de pulmon usando dos algoritmos de calculo diferentes: pencil beam y collpased cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruena Llinares, A.; Santos Rubio, A.; Luis Simon, F. J.; Sanchez Carmona, G.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare, in thirty treatments for lung cancer,the absorbed doses at risk organs and target volumes obtained between the two used algorithms of calculation of our treatment planning system Oncentra Masterplan, that is, Pencil Beams vs Collapsed Cone. For it we use a set of measured indicators (D1 and D99 of tumor volume, V20 of lung, homogeneity index defined as (D5-D95)/D prescribed, and others). Analysing the dta, making a descriptor analysis of the results, and applying the non parametric test of the ranks with sign of Wilcoxon we find that the use of Pencil Beam algorithm underestimates the dose in the zone of the PTV including regions of low density as well as the values of maximum dose in spine cord. So, we conclude that in those treatments in which the spine dose is near the maximum permissible limit or those in which the PTV it includes a zone with pulmonary tissue must be used the Collapse Cone algorithm systematically and in any case an analysis must become to choose between time and precision in the calculation for both algorithms. (Authors)

  4. A Round-based Pricing Scheme for Maximizing Service Provider's Revenue in P2PTV Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bhutani, Gitanjali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze a round-based pricing scheme that encourages favorable behavior from users of real-time P2P applications like P2PTV. In the design of pricing schemes, we consider price to be a function of usage and capacity of download/upload streams, and quality of content served. Users are consumers and servers at the same time in such networks, and often exhibit behavior that is unfavorable towards maximization of social benefits. Traditionally, network designers have overcome this difficulty by building-in traffic latencies. However, using simulations, we show that appropriate pricing schemes and usage terms can enable designers to limit required traffic latencies, and be able to earn nearly 30% extra revenue from providing P2PTV services. The service provider adjusts the prices of individual programs incrementally within rounds, while making relatively large-scale adjustments at the end of each round. Through simulations, we show that it is most beneficial for the service provider to carry out ...

  5. Pressure-field extraction from Lagrangian flow measurements: first experiences with 4D-PTV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeteson, N. J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Rival, D. E.; Michaelis, D.; Schanz, D.; Schröder, A.

    2016-06-01

    As a follow-up to a previous proof-of-principle study, a novel Lagrangian pressure-extraction technique is analytically evaluated, and experimentally validated using dense 4D-PTV data. The technique is analytically evaluated using the semi-three-dimensional Taylor-Green vortex, and it is found that the Lagrangian technique out-performs the standard Eulerian technique when Dirichlet boundary conditions are enforced. However, the Lagrangian technique produces worse estimates of the pressure field when Neumann boundary conditions are enforced on boundaries with strong pressure gradients. The technique is experimentally validated using flow data obtained for the case of a free-falling, index-matched sphere at Re=2100. The experimental data were collected using a four-camera particle tracking velocimetry measurement system, and processed using 4D-PTV. The pressure field is then extracted using both the Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques, and the resulting pressure fields are compared. Qualitatively, the pressure fields agree; however, quantitative differences are found with respect to the magnitude of the pressure minima on the side of the sphere. Finally, the pressure-drag coefficient is estimated using each technique, and the two techniques are found to be in very close agreement. A comparison to a reference value from literature confirms that the drag coefficient estimates are reasonable, demonstrating the validity of the technique.

  6. Verification of the patient positioning for evaluation of PTV margins in radiotherapy of prostate cancer; Verificacao do posicionamento do paciente para a avaliacao das margens de PTV em radioterapia do cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohlich, B.F.; Peron, T.M.; Scheid, A.M.; Cardoso, F.; Alves, F.; Alves, M.S.; Dias, T.M. [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The work aimed to verify the relative displacements between the patient and the isocenters of the device based on the reproducibility of positioning, and estimates a PTV margins of radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. The results of displacements were obtained from a sample of 30 patient and showed values in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions -0.03 ± 0.48 cm, 0.12 ± 0.47 cm and 0.02 ± 0.53 cm, respectively. PTV margins were calculated resulting in 0.97 cm for vertical direction, 0.85 cm for longitudinal, and 0.98 cm for lateral. (author)

  7. Resuspension of particles in an oscillating grid turbulent flow using PIV and 3D-PTV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traugott, H; Liberzon, A [Turbulence Structure Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hayse, T, E-mail: alexlib@eng.tau.ac.il [Department of Civil Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States)

    2011-12-22

    Description of the mechanisms responsible for the initiation of particle motion from a surface and re-entrainment of particles into suspension remains a challenge, partially due to the technical difficulties to quantify the forces applied on the particles and the collection of high resolution data of particle displacements simultaneously. In this study we explore the process of initial entrainment of spherical particles from smooth beds into zero-mean-shear turbulent flow in an oscillating grid chamber. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) are used to correlate in a quantitative manner the turbulent flow properties responsible for pick-up, detachment and re-entrainment of particles. The results are compared to the existing models of critical shear velocity and provide further insight into the resuspension process of spherical particles in the transitional range of particle size Reynolds numbers 2 {<=} Re{sub p} {<=} 500.

  8. Digital holographic PTV analysis of the motile performance of the red-tides alga ``Cochlodinium polykrikoides''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, M.; Lee, S.; Choi, Y.; Seo, G.; Kang, Y.; Kang, Y.

    2009-11-01

    The outbreaks of Cochlodinium polykrikoides causes severe damages to fisheries in Korea and Japan. C. polykrikoides actively makes chains in its exponential and stationary growth phase. The role of the chain formation has not been clearly known yet. In the present study, the motility characteristics of C. polykrikoides was investigated using 3D digital holographic PTV technique. The moving trajectories and average velocities of the single and multi-chained C. polykrikoides were compared to investigate the effect of the chain formation on the motile performance. Most of the multi-chained C. polykrikoides exhibited zigzag or helical trajectory and the translational velocity of the 4-chained C. polykrikoides was at least two-times larger than the single one.

  9. Resolving vorticity and dissipation in a turbulent boundary layer by tomographic PTV and VIC+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio; Elsinga, Gerrit E.

    2017-04-01

    The existing time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements by Jodai and Elsinga (J Fluid Mech 795:611-633; Jodai, Elsinga, J Fluid Mech 795:611-633, 2016) in a turbulent boundary layer ( Re θ = 2038) are reprocessed using tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) and vortex-in-cell-plus (VIC+). The resulting small-scale flow properties, i.e. vorticity and turbulence dissipation, are compared. The VIC+ technique was recently proposed and uses the concept of pouring time into space to increase reconstruction quality of instantaneous velocity. The tomographic PTV particle track measurements are interpolated using VIC+ to a dense grid, making use of both particle velocity and Lagrangian acceleration. Comparison of the vortical structures by visualization of isosurfaces of vorticity magnitude shows that the two methods return similar coherent vortical structures, but their strength in terms of vorticity magnitude is increased when using VIC+, which suggests an improvement in spatial resolution. Further statistical evaluation shows that the root mean square (rms) of vorticity fluctuations from tomographic PIV is approximately 40% lower in comparison to a reference profile available from a DNS simulation, while the VIC+ technique returns rms vorticity fluctuations to within 10% of the reference. The dissipation rate is heavily underestimated by tomographic PIV with approximately 50% damping, whereas the VIC+ analysis yields a dissipation rate to within approximately 5% for y + > 25. The fact that dissipation can be directly measured by a volumetric experiment is novel. It differs from existing approaches that involve 2d measurements combined with isotropic turbulence assumptions or apply corrections based on sub-grid scale turbulence modelling. Finally, the study quantifies the spatial response of VIC+ with a sine-wave lattice analysis. The results indicate a twofold increase of spatial resolution with respect to cross

  10. Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics of pipe flows measured with 3D-PTV at moderate and high Reynolds numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, J.L.G.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) measurements have provided accurate Eulerian and Lagrangian high-order statistics of velocity and acceleration fluctuations and correlations at Reynolds number 10,300, based on the bulk velocity and the pipe diameter. Spatial resolution requir

  11. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Andrea [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John, E-mail: john.atyeo@sydney.edu.au [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Rinks, Marianne [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Radiation Oncology, Cancer Services, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberat, Jatta; Remonda, Luca [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Neuro-radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); McNamara, Jane; Rogers, Susanne [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T{sub 1}-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T{sub 1Gd}), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T{sub 2}-weighted CTV (T{sub 2}-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T{sub 2}-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T{sub 2}-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung (DTI) ist eine MR-Technik, die dank der Erfassung des peritumoralen Bereichs eine Verbesserung bezueglich MRI bringt. Unser Ziel war die Pruefung der Machbarkeit der Verwendung der DTI fuer die Zielvolumenabgrenzung fuer Patienten mit

  13. Simultaneous PIV and PTV measurements of wind and sand particle velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Lee, Sang Joon

    2008-08-01

    Wind-blown sand is a typical example of two-phase particle-laden flows. Owing to lack of simultaneous measured data of the wind and wind-blown sand, interactions between them have not yet been fully understood. In this study, natural sand of 100-125 μm taken from Taklimakan Desert was tested at the freestream wind speed of 8.3 m/s in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. The captured flow images containing both saltating sand and small wind tracer particles, were separated by using a digital phase mask technique. The 2-D PIV (particle imaging velocimetry) and PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) techniques were employed to extract simultaneously the wind velocity field and the velocity field of dispersed sand particles, respectively. Comparison of the mean streamwise wind velocity profile and the turbulence statistics with and without sand transportation reveal a significant influence of sand movement on the wind field, especially in the dense saltating sand layer ( y/ δ < 0.1). The ensemble-averaged streamwise velocity profile of sand particles was also evaluated to investigate the velocity lag between the sand and the wind. This study would be helpful in improving the understanding of interactions between the wind and the wind-blown sand.

  14. BIAS ERRORS INDUCED BY CONCENTRATION GRADIENT IN SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOW MEASUREMENT WITH PTV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dan-xun; LIN Qiu-sheng; ZHONG Qiang; WANG Xing-kui

    2012-01-01

    Sediment-laden flow measurement with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) introduces a series of finite-sized sampling bins along the vertical of the flow.Instantaneous velocities are collected at each bin and a significantly large sample is established to evaluate mean and root mean square (rms) velocities of the flow.Due to the presence of concentration gradient,the established sample for the solid phase inv(o)lves more data from the lower part of the sampling bin than from the upper part.The concentration effect causes bias errors in the measured mean and rms velocities when velocity varies across the bin.These bias errors are analytically quantified in this study based on simplified linear velocity and concentration distributions.Typical bulk flow characteristics from sediment-laden flow measurements are used to demonstrate rough estimation of the error magnitude.Results indicate that the mean velocity is underestimated while the rms velocity is overestimated in the ensemble-averaged measurement.The extent of deviation is commensurate with the bin size and the rate of concentration gradient.Procedures are proposed to assist determining an appropriate sampling bin size in certain error limits.

  15. Fiber tracking algorithm in combined PIV/PTV measurement of fiber suspension flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Afshin Abbasi; Zavareh, Zahra; Lundell, Fredrik; Anderson, Helge I.

    2013-10-01

    A new algorithm for fiber tracking in combined PIV/PTV measurement of fiber suspension flow is proposed based on SOM neural network and is examined by synthetic images of fibers showing 2D suspension flows. There is a new idea in the algorithm to take the orientation of fibers into account for matching as well as their position. In two-phase PIV measurements of fiber-laded suspension flows, fiber tracking has a key role together with PIV measurement of fluid phase. The essential parts of fiber tracking are to correctly identify and match fibers in successive images. The development of a method in order to determine the position and orientation of fibers using steerable filter with a reasonable accuracy have already been done, [3]. The present study is concentrated in the development of an algorithm for pairing fibers in consecutive images. The method used is based on the SOM neural network that finds most likely matching link in images on the basis of feature extraction and clustering. The fundamental concept is finding the corresponding fibers with the nearest characteristics, position and angle in images. It improves not only the robustness against loss-of-pair fibers between two image frames but also reliable matching at large numbers of dispersed fibers image using one more characteristics of fibers in image, namely their orientation, in addition to their coordinate vector.

  16. Drug Coverage (Part D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... insurance Find health & drug plans Drug coverage (Part D) How to get drug coverage Get Medicare prescription drug coverage either from a Part D plan or a Medicare Advantage Plan offering Medicare ...

  17. Medicare Coverage Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Coverage Database (MCD) contains all National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs), local articles, and proposed NCD...

  18. How many fish in a tank? Constructing an automated fish counting system by using PTV analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S.; Takagi, T.; Takehara, K.; Kimura, N.; Hiraishi, T.; Komeyama, K.; Torisawa, S.; Asaumi, S.

    2017-02-01

    Because escape from a net cage and mortality are constant problems in fish farming, health control and management of facilities are important in aquaculture. In particular, the development of an accurate fish counting system has been strongly desired for the Pacific Bluefin tuna farming industry owing to the high market value of these fish. The current fish counting method, which involves human counting, results in poor accuracy; moreover, the method is cumbersome because the aquaculture net cage is so large that fish can only be counted when they move to another net cage. Therefore, we have developed an automated fish counting system by applying particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) analysis to a shoal of swimming fish inside a net cage. In essence, we treated the swimming fish as tracer particles and estimated the number of fish by analyzing the corresponding motion vectors. The proposed fish counting system comprises two main components: image processing and motion analysis, where the image-processing component abstracts the foreground and the motion analysis component traces the individual's motion. In this study, we developed a Region Extraction and Centroid Computation (RECC) method and a Kalman filter and Chi-square (KC) test for the two main components. To evaluate the efficiency of our method, we constructed a closed system, placed an underwater video camera with a spherical curved lens at the bottom of the tank, and recorded a 360° view of a swimming school of Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes). Our study showed that almost all fish could be abstracted by the RECC method and the motion vectors could be calculated by the KC test. The recognition rate was approximately 90% when more than 180 individuals were observed within the frame of the video camera. These results suggest that the presented method has potential application as a fish counting system for industrial aquaculture.

  19. On the rms errors and dynamic ranges of triple- and quadruple-pulse particle tracking velocimetry (PTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liuyang; Adrian, Ronald; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2016-11-01

    Multi-pulse PTV extends conventional dual-pulse PTV by fitting a polynomial to particle locations measured from three or four pulses in a burst, aiming at more accurately resolving a particle short-period trajectory. Particle velocity and acceleration are then evaluated at an optimal time minimizing rms errors. Numerical simulations were performed to completely study the behaviors of position, velocity, and acceleration rms errors of triple- and quadruple-pulse PTV in a 4-D space spanned by four dimensionless variables - normalized time, normalized displacement, normalized particle locating noise, and acceleration factor. We compared three analysis methods - 3-pulse with quadratic fitting, 4-pulse with cubic fitting and 4-pulse with quadratic least-square fitting. In addition, generalized definitions of dynamic spatial range (DSR) and dynamic velocity range (DVR) are proposed for multi-pulse analyses. We calculated DSR ratios and DVR ratios between the multi-pulse and 2-pulse under various flow conditions and noise levels. It is found that the DSR and DVR could be improved by up to 100 times and 10 times, respectively, when the particle trajectory is strongly curved, deceleration is pronounced, and particle locations are accurately determined. This work is supported by ONR N00014-14-C-0095.

  20. Women's Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women's Health Policy Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Oct 21, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email ... of the ACA on women’s coverage. Sources of Health Insurance Coverage Employer-Sponsored Insurance: Approximately 57.5 million ...

  1. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  2. Changes in the planning target volume and liver volume dose based on the selected respiratory phase in respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Baek, Seong-Min

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the changes in the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume dose based on the respiratory phase to identify the optimal respiratory phase for respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on the standardized procedure for respiratory-gated radiation therapy, we performed a 4-dimensional computed tomography simulation for 0 ˜ 90%, 30 ˜ 70%, and 40 ˜ 60% respiratory phases to assess the respiratory stability (S R ) and the defined PTV i for each respiratory phase i. A treatment plan was established, and the changes in the PTV i and dose volume of the liver were quantitatively analyzed. Most patients (91.5%) passed the respiratory stability test (S R = 0.111 ± 0.015). With standardized respiration training exercises, we were able to minimize the overall systematic error caused by irregular respiration. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis to identify the optimal respiratory phase revealed that when a short respiratory phase (40 ˜ 60%) was used, the changes in the PTV were concentrated inside the center line; thus, we were able to obtain both a PTV margin accounting for respiration and a uniform radiation dose within the PTV.

  3. Investigating coarse sediment particles transport using PTV and "smart-pebbles" instrumented with inertial sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Farhadi, Hamed

    2017-04-01

    This study, reports on the analysis of appropriately designed fluvial experiments investigating the transport of coarse bed material using two approaches: particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to extract bulk transport parameters and inertia sensor data (via the use of "smart-pebbles") to obtain refined statistics for the transport of the particle. The purpose of this study is to provide further insight on the use of technologies (optical techniques and inertial sensors) that are complementary one to another, towards producing improved estimates of bedload transport in natural rivers. The experiments are conducted in the Water Engineering Lab at the University of Glasgow on a tilting recirculating flume with 90 cm width. Ten different discharges have been implemented in this study. A couple of fake beds, made of well-packed beads of three different sizes have been set up in the flume. The particle motion is captured by two high-speed commercial cameras, responsible for recording the top view covering the full length of the fake beds over which the "smart-pebble" is allowed to be transported. "Smart-pebbles" of four different densities are initially located at the upstream end of the configuration, fully exposed to the instream flow. These are instrumented with appropriate inertial sensors that allow recording the particle's motion, in the Langrangian frame, in high resolution. Specifically, the "smart-pebble" employ a tri-axial gyroscope, magnetometer and accelerometer, which are utilized to obtain minute linear and angular displacements in high frequency (up to 200Hz). However, these are not enough to accurately reconstruct the full trajectory of the particles rolling downstream. To that goal optical methods are used. In particular, by using particle tracking velocimetry data and image processing techniques, the location, orientation and velocities of the "smart-pebble" are derived. Specific consideration is given to appropriately preprocess the obtained video, as

  4. Data fusion for planning target volume and isodose prediction in prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    In low-dose prostate brachytherapy treatment, a large number of radioactive seeds is implanted in and adjacent to the prostate gland. Planning of this treatment involves the determination of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), followed by defining the optimal number of seeds, needles and their coordinates for implantation. The two major planning tasks, i.e. PTV determination and seed definition, are associated with inter- and intra-expert variability. Moreover, since these two steps are performed in sequence, the variability is accumulated in the overall treatment plan. In this paper, we introduce a model based on a data fusion technique that enables joint determination of PTV and the minimum Prescribed Isodose (mPD) map. The model captures the correlation between different information modalities consisting of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) volumes, PTV and isodose contours. We take advantage of joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) as a linear decomposition technique to obtain a set of joint components that optimally describe such correlation. We perform a component stability analysis to generate a model with stable parameters that predicts the PTV and isodose contours solely based on a new patient TRUS volume. We propose a framework for both modeling and prediction processes and evaluate it on a dataset of 60 brachytherapy treatment records. We show PTV prediction error of 10:02+/-4:5% and the V100 isodose overlap of 97+/-3:55% with respect to the clinical gold standard.

  5. Determination of optimal PTV margin for patients receiving CBCT-guided prostate IMRT: comparative analysis based on CBCT dose calculation with four different margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sukhdeep K; Reddy, Krishna; Campbell, Nina; Chen, Changhu; Pearson, David

    2015-11-08

    Variations in daily setup and rectum/bladder filling lead to uncertainties in the delivery of prostate IMRT. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal PTV margin for CBCT-guided prostate IMRT based on daily CBCT dose calculations using four different margins. Five patients diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer were treated with prostate IMRT to 70 Gy in 28 fractions using daily CBCT for image guidance. The prostate CTV and OARs were contoured on all CBCTs. IMRT plans were created using 1 mm, 3 mm, 5 mm, and 7 mm CTV to PTV expansions. For each delivered fraction, dose calculations were generated utilizing the pretreatment CBCT translational shifts performed and dosimetric analysis was performed. One hundred and forty total treatment fractions (CBCT sessions) were evaluated. The planned prostate CTV V100% was 100% for all PTV margins. Based on CBCT analysis, the actual cumulative CTVs V100% were 96.55% ± 2.94%, 99.49% ± 1.36%, 99.98% ± 0.26%, and 99.99% ± 0.05% for 1, 3, 5, and 7 mm uniform PTV margins, respectively. Delivered rectum and bladder doses were different as compared to expected planned doses, with the magnitude of differences increasing with PTV margin. Daily setup variation during prostate IMRT yields differences in the actual vs. expected doses received by the prostate CTV, rectum, and bladder. The magnitude of these differences is significantly affected by the PTV margin utilized. It was found that when daily CBCT was used for soft-tissue alignment of the prostate, a 3 mm PTV margin allowed for CTV to be covered for 99% of cases.

  6. Can volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams play a role in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver lesions? A volume-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reggiori, Giacomo; Mancosu, Pietro; Castiglioni, Simona; Alongi, Filippo; Pellegrini, Chiara; Lobefalo, Francesca; Catalano, Maddalena; Fogliata, Antonella; Arcangeli, Stefano; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF) beams in patients with hepatic metastases subject to hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods: A planning study on 13 virtual lesions of increasing volume was performed. Two single arc plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using either FFF or FF beams. A second planning study was performed on ten patients treated for liver metastases to validate conclusions. In all cases, a dose of 75 Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and plans were evaluated in terms of coverage, homogeneity, conformity, mean dose to healthy liver and to healthy tissue. For each parameter, results were expressed in relative terms as the percentage ratio between FFF and FF data. Results: In terms of PTV coverage, conformity index favored FFF for targets of intermediate size while FF resulted more suitable for small (<100 cm{sup 3}) and large (>300 cm{sup 3}) targets. Plans optimized with FFF beams resulted in increased sparing of healthy tissue in {approx_equal}85% of cases. Despite the qualitative results, no statistically significant differences were found between FFF and FF results. Plans optimized with un-flattened beams resulted in higher average MU/Gy than plans with FF beams. A remarkable and significant difference was observed in the beam-on time (BOT) needed to deliver plans. The BOT for FF plans was 8.2 {+-} 1.0 min; for FFF plans BOT was 2.2 {+-} 0.2 min. Conclusions: RapidArc plans optimized using FFF were dosimetrically equivalent to those optimized using FF beams, showing the feasibility of SBRT treatments with FFF beams. Some improvement in healthy tissue sparing was observed when using the FFF modality due to the different beam's profile. The main advantage was a considerable reduction of beam-on time, relevant for SBRT techniques.

  7. SU-E-J-30: Benchmark Image-Based TCP Calculation for Evaluation of PTV Margins for Lung SBRT Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M [Wayne State Univeristy, Detroit, MI (United States); Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Zhong, H [Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor control probability (TCP) calculated with accumulated radiation doses may help design appropriate treatment margins. Image registration errors, however, may compromise the calculated TCP. The purpose of this study is to develop benchmark CT images to quantify registration-induced errors in the accumulated doses and their corresponding TCP. Methods: 4DCT images were registered from end-inhale (EI) to end-exhale (EE) using a “demons” algorithm. The demons DVFs were corrected by an FEM model to get realistic deformation fields. The FEM DVFs were used to warp the EI images to create the FEM-simulated images. The two images combined with the FEM DVF formed a benchmark model. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images, created from the EI and simulated images, were used to develop IMRT plans. Two plans with 3 and 5 mm margins were developed for each patient. With these plans, radiation doses were recalculated on the simulated images and warped back to the EI images using the FEM DVFs to get the accumulated doses. The Elastix software was used to register the FEM-simulated images to the EI images. TCPs calculated with the Elastix-accumulated doses were compared with those generated by the FEM to get the TCP error of the Elastix registrations. Results: For six lung patients, the mean Elastix registration error ranged from 0.93 to 1.98 mm. Their relative dose errors in PTV were between 0.28% and 6.8% for 3mm margin plans, and between 0.29% and 6.3% for 5mm-margin plans. As the PTV margin reduced from 5 to 3 mm, the mean TCP error of the Elastix-reconstructed doses increased from 2.0% to 2.9%, and the mean NTCP errors decreased from 1.2% to 1.1%. Conclusion: Patient-specific benchmark images can be used to evaluate the impact of registration errors on the computed TCPs, and may help select appropriate PTV margins for lung SBRT patients.

  8. Infrared and millimeter waves v.14 millimeter components and techniques, pt.V

    CERN Document Server

    Button, Kenneth J

    1985-01-01

    Infrared and Millimeter Waves, Volume 14: Millimeter Components and Techniques, Part V is concerned with millimeter-wave guided propagation and integrated circuits. In addition to millimeter-wave planar integrated circuits and subsystems, this book covers transducer configurations and integrated-circuit techniques, antenna arrays, optoelectronic devices, and tunable gyrotrons. Millimeter-wave gallium arsenide (GaAs) IMPATT diodes are also discussed. This monograph is comprised of six chapters and begins with a description of millimeter-wave integrated-circuit transducers, focusing on vario

  9. Digital holographic PTV for complicated flow in a water by two cameras and refractive index-matching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyasu, Masataka; Aoyagi, Yusuke; Unno, Noriyuki; Satake, Shin-ichi; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Seki, Yohji

    2016-06-01

    A basic heat transfer promoter such as packed beds of spheres is one of the technologies of the promotion of heat transfer using the turbulent mixture. We carried out 3-D visualization of digital holographic PTV to understand the complicated flow in a sphere-packed pipe (SPP) using a refractive index-matching method with a water used as a working fluid, the spheres was made of MEXFLON, whose refractive index is the same as that of a water. To visualize the detail flow structure around the spheres in water, we performed three-dimensional simultaneous measurements of velocity field in a water flow in the SPP are performed by our proposed holography technique with two cameras. The velocity field by two cameras could obtain finer flow structures than that by one camera.

  10. PTV VISSIM SIMULATION SOFTWARE USE FOR PROFESSIONALS IN «TRANSPORT TECHNOLOGIES» AND «AUTOMOBILE TRANSPORT» SPECIALTIES TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr O. Sistuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The prospect of training quality improving of bachelors and masters in «Automobile transport» and «Transport technologies» specialties was considered, basing on the use of simulation software in the educational process. A review of the software products market was prepared, with the result of the component PTV VISSIM pre-selection. The simulation model of a real crossroad was developed to demonstrate its capabilities. Based on the analysis of application functions aptness to the city transport network complex objects simulation requirements, the expediency of the solution use during vocational certificate credit courses of students of Transport Faculty of Kryvyi Rih National University was grounded.

  11. Radiosynthesis of novel pitavastatin derivative ([(18) F]PTV-F1) as a tracer for hepatic OATP using a one-pot synthetic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Yusuke; Arimitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Kazuya; Ikejiri, Kazuaki; Takano, Jun-Ichi; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Shinya; Ono, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Saji, Hideo

    2016-11-01

    Pitavastatin is an antihyperlipidemic agent, a potent inhibitor of 3-hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, which is selectively taken up into the liver mainly via hepatic organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1). OATP1B1 can accept a variety of organic anions, and previous reports indicated that it is responsible for the hepatic clearance of several clinically used anionic drugs. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics and the hepatic distribution of pitavastatin provide an insight into the function of OATP1B1 in humans. For the development of the in vivo evaluation of OATP1B1 function by positron emission tomography imaging, we designed a novel [(18) F]pitavastatin derivative ([(18) F]PTV-F1), in which a [(18) F]fluoroethoxy group is substituted for the [(18) F]fluoro group of [(18) F]pitavastatin, with the aim of convenient radiolabeling protocol and high radiochemical yield. In vitro studies suggested that transport activities of PTV-F1 mediated by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were very similar to those of pitavastatin and PTV-F1 was metabolically stable in human liver microsomes. In the radiosynthesis of [(18) F]PTV-F1 from the tosylate precursor, nucleophilic fluorination and subsequent deprotection were performed using a one-pot procedure. [(18) F]PTV-F1 was obtained with a radiochemical yield of 45% ± 3% (n = 3), and the operating time for the radiosynthesis of [(18) F]PTV-F1 is very short (30 minutes) compared with [(18) F]pitavastatin.

  12. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  13. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  14. Testing Coverage Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarty, Deeparnab

    2012-01-01

    A coverage function f over a ground set [m] is associated with a universe U of weighted elements and m subsets A_1,..., A_m of U, and for any subset T of [m], f(T) is defined as the total weight of the elements in the union $\\cup_{j\\in T} A_j$. Coverage functions are an important special case of submodular functions, and arise in many applications, for instance as a class of utility functions of agents in combinatorial auctions. Set functions such as coverage functions often lack succinct representations, and in algorithmic applications, an access to a value oracle is assumed. In this paper, we ask whether one can test if a given oracle is that of a coverage function or not. We demonstrate an algorithm which makes O(m|U|) queries to an oracle of a coverage function and completely reconstructs it. This gives a polytime tester for succinct coverage functions for which |U$ is polynomially bounded in m. In contrast, we demonstrate a set function which is "far" from coverage, but requires 2^{\\tilde{\\Theta}(m)} que...

  15. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get about Medicare Lost/incorrect Medicare card Report fraud & abuse File a complaint Identity theft: protect yourself ... drug plan How Part D works with other insurance Find health & drug plans Drug plan coverage rules ...

  16. Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors of Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Information in 2012, recently published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  17. Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors of Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Information in 2012, recently published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  18. Interactions of Copepods with Fractal-Grid Generated Turbulence based on Tomo-PIV and 3D-PTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhengzhong; Krizan, Daniel; Longmire, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    A copepod escapes from predation by sensing fluid motion caused by the predator. It is thought that the escape reaction is elicited by a threshold value of the maximum principal strain rate (MPSR) in the flow. The present experimental work attempts to investigate and quantify the MPSR threshold value. In the experiment, copepods interact with turbulence generated by a fractal grid in a recirculating channel. The turbulent flow is measured by time-resolved Tomo-PIV, while the copepod motion is tracked simultaneously through 3D-PTV. Escape reactions are detected based on copepod trajectories and velocity vectors, while the surrounding hydrodynamic information is retrieved from the corresponding location in the 3D instantaneous flow field. Measurements are performed at three locations downstream of the fractal grid, such that various turbulence levels can be achieved. Preliminary results show that the number of escape reactions decreases at locations with reduced turbulence levels, where shorter jump distances and smaller change of swimming orientation are exhibited. Detailed quantitative results of MPSR threshold values and the dynamics of copepod escape will be presented. Supported by NSF-IDBR Grant #0852875.

  19. Extracellular polymeric bacterial coverages as minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, A; Saa, Alberto; Teschke, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces formed by extracellular polymeric substances enclosing individual and some small communities of {\\it Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans} on plates of hydrophobic silicon and hydrophilic mica are analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy imaging. Accurate nanoscale descriptions of such coverage surfaces are obtained. The good agreement with the predictions of a rather simple but realistic theoretical model allows us to conclude that they correspond, indeed, to minimal area surfaces enclosing a given volume associated with the encased bacteria. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first shape characterization of the coverage formed by these biomolecules, with possible applications to the study of biofilms.

  20. Immunisation coverage, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley P; Dey, Aditi; Menzies, Rob I; Brotherton, Julia M; McIntyre, Peter B

    2014-09-30

    This, the 6th annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2012 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) data, and National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Program Register data. These include coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP) and coverage in adolescents and adults. The proportion of Australian children 'fully vaccinated' at 12, 24 and 60 months of age was 91.7%, 92.5% and 91.2%, respectively. For vaccines available on the NIP but not assessed during 2012 for 'fully vaccinated' status or for eligibility for incentive payments (rotavirus and pneumococcal at 12 months and meningococcal C and varicella at 24 months) coverage varied. Although pneumococcal vaccine had similar coverage at 12 months to other vaccines, coverage was lower for rotavirus at 12 months (83.6%) and varicella at 24 months (84.4%). Although 'fully vaccinated' coverage at 12 months of age was lower among Indigenous children than non-Indigenous children in all jurisdictions, the extent of the difference varied, reaching a 15 percentage point differential in South Australia but only a 0.4 percentage point differential in the Northern Territory. Overall, Indigenous coverage at 24 months of age exceeded that at 12 months of age nationally and for all jurisdictions, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations, this represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. The 'fully vaccinated' coverage estimates for vaccinations due by 60 months of age for Indigenous children exceeded 90% at 91% in 2012. Unlike in 2011, at 60 months of age, there was no dramatic variation in coverage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children for individual jurisdictions. As previously documented, vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only, hepatitis A and pneumococcal vaccine, had

  1. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  2. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrehaug, Sten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Gordon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics Core, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheng, Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  3. Evaluation of the programmed temperature vaporiser for large-volume injection of biological samples in gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, M.W J; de Zeeuw, R.A; Franke, J.P.; de Jong, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    The use of a programmed temperature vaporiser (PTV) with a packed liner was evaluated for the injection of large volumes (up to 100 mu l) of plasma extracts in a gas chromatograph. Solvent purity, which is essential when large volumes are injected into the GC system, was determined. Special attentio

  4. Impact of inter- and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors on PTV margins. Different alignment techniques in 3D conformal prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, T.; Doeller, C.; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology; Galle, G. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Urology

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work was to analyze interfraction and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors (RSE) after online repositioning to determine PTV margins for 3 different alignment techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The present prospective study included 44 prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducials treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy. Daily localization was based on skin marks followed by marker detection using kilovoltage (kV) imaging and subsequent patient repositioning. Additionally, in-treatment megavoltage (MV) images were obtained for each treatment field. In an off-line analysis of 7,273 images, interfraction prostate motion, RSE after marker-based prostate localization, prostate position during each treatment session, and the effect of treatment time on intrafraction deviations were analyzed to evaluate PTV margins. Margins accounting for interfraction deviation, RSE and intrafraction motion were 14.1, 12.9, and 15.1 mm in anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) direction for skin mark alignment and 9.6, 8.7, and 2.6 mm for bony structure alignment, respectively. Alignment to implanted markers required margins of 4.6, 2.8, and 2.5 mm. As margins to account for intrafraction motion increased with treatment prolongation PTV margins could be reduced to 3.9, 2.6, and 2.4 mm if treatment time was {<=} 4 min. With daily online correction and repositioning based on implanted fiducials, a significant reduction of PTV margins can be achieved. The use of an optimized workflow with faster treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc techniques (VMAT) could allow for a further decrease. (orig.)

  5. Effect of serum testosterone and percent tumor volume on extra-prostatic extension and biochemical recurrence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have revealed that the preoperative serum testosterone and percent tumor volume (PTV predict extra-prostatic extension (EPE and biochemical recurrence (BCR after radical prostatectomy. This study investigated the prognostic significance of serum testosterone and PTV in relation to EPE and BCR after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. We reviewed 520 patients who underwent LRP between 2004 and 2012. PTV was determined as the sum of all visually estimated tumor foci in every section. BCR was defined as two consecutive increases in the postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA >0.2 ng ml−1 . The threshold for serum total testosterone was 3.0 ng ml−1 . Multivariate logistic regression was used to define the effect of variables on the risk of EPE and BCR. A low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 was associated with a high serum PSA, Gleason score, positive core percentage of the prostate biopsy, PTV, and all pathological variables. On multivariate analysis, similar to previous studies, the serum PSA, biopsy positive core percentage, Gleason score, and pathological variables predicted EPE and BCR. In addition, low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 , adjusted OR, 8.52; 95% CI, 5.04-14.4, P= 0.001 predicted EPE and PTV (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05, P= 0.046 predicted BCR. In addition to previous predictors of EPE and BCR, low serum testosterone and PTV are valuable predictors of EPE and BCR after LRP.

  6. Spherical coverage verification

    CERN Document Server

    Petkovic, Marko D; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of covering hypersphere by a set of spherical hypercaps. This sort of problem has numerous practical applications such as error correcting codes and reverse k-nearest neighbor problem. Using the reduction of non degenerated concave quadratic programming (QP) problem, we demonstrate that spherical coverage verification is NP hard. We propose a recursive algorithm based on reducing the problem to several lower dimension subproblems. We test the performance of the proposed algorithm on a number of generated constellations. We demonstrate that the proposed algorithm, in spite of its exponential worst-case complexity, is applicable in practice. In contrast, our results indicate that spherical coverage verification using QP solvers that utilize heuristics, due to numerical instability, may produce false positives.

  7. Coverage Metrics for Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penix, John; Visser, Willem; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When using model checking to verify programs in practice, it is not usually possible to achieve complete coverage of the system. In this position paper we describe ongoing research within the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames on the use of test coverage metrics to measure partial coverage and provide heuristic guidance for program model checking. We are specifically interested in applying and developing coverage metrics for concurrent programs that might be used to support certification of next generation avionics software.

  8. Marangoni-B'enard instability in microgravity: PTV-analysis of the velocimetry data generated during the BAMBI - FOTON-M2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaeck, Sam; Talvy, Samuel; Rednikov, Alexey; Queeckers, Patrick; Colinet, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    The BAMBI (Bifurcation Anomalies in Marangoni-B'enard Instabilities) experiment has been successfully flown onboard the FOTON-M2 satellite in June 2005. During the 4 days available for the experiment, a 5mm-thick 200 cSt silicone oil layer in a 10x10cm^2 wide container, and in contact with a similarly-sized helium gas layer was heated from "below" and cooled from "above." By varying the heating power applied at each experimental step, a range of temperature differences across the liquid and gas layers was scanned and the onset and evolution of the Marangoni-B'enard instability typical for this type of configuration was examined. The used optical diagnostics were Infrared Thermography of the liquid/gas interface, PTV (multiple views and heights in the liquid layer), Wollaston Interferometry and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry. The present contribution focuses on the velocity results obtained by PTV in the interface plane, and discusses them in relation both with infrared images, and with theory/numerics.

  9. Impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on biological target volume (BTV) definition for treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Dean, Geoffrey; Lisbona, Robert; Parker, William; Kaufman, Chris; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2007-02-01

    This work represents our effort to test feasibility of FDG-based PET/CT on target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment planning of NSCLC patients. Different methods have been developed to enable more precise target outlining using PET: Qualitative Visual Method, CTV=2.5 SUV units, linear SUV threshold function method, and CTV=40% Iso of Maximum Uptake Value. We are proposing reconstruction of three biological target volumes: necrotic BTV (same as PTV created by radiation oncologist using CT data), proliferating BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio 1:3) and hypoxic BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio of 1:19). Two IMRT plans were created and compared to the conventional treatment plan: "conservative" IMRT plan delivers 52.5 Gy to the necrotic BTV and 65 Gy to the hypoxic BTV; "radical" IMRT plan delivers 30 Gy to necrotic BTV, 52.5 Gy to proliferating BTV and 65 Gy to hypoxic BTV. Use of BTVs in IMRT plans is attractive because it increases dose to targets considered to need higher doses. It reduces considerably dose to heart and spinal cord, organs considered to limit dose escalation approaches in NSCLC treatment. "Conservative" IMRT approach can be understood as a PET/CT-based concomitant boost to the tumor expressing the highest FDG uptake. "Radical" plan implies deviation from the traditional uniform dose target coverage approach, with the intention of achieving better surrounding tissue sparing and ultimately allowing for dose escalation protocols relying on biologically based treatment planning.

  10. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  11. Laboratory investigation of the distribution of travel distance and rest period of sediment particles from PTV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui M. L.; Antico, Federica

    2016-04-01

    We analyze paths of sediment particles on cohesionless granular bet subjected to a turbulent open-channel flow. The key objective is to provide further insights on particle dispersion including resting times. Hence, we focus on the spatial and temporal scale identified by Nikora et al. (2002) as the global range, defined as the particle path composed of many intermediate range paths, i.e with several "starts" and "stops". This requires the calculation of the probability distribution functions of particle travel distances and of rest periods. The experimental work was performed at the Hydraulics Laboratory of IST-UL in a 12.5 m long, 0.405 m wide glass-walled flume recirculating water and sediment through independent circuits. The granular bed was a 4.0 m long and 2.5 cm deep reach filled with 5 mm diameter glass beads packed (with some vibration) to a void fraction of 0.356, typical of random packing. Upstream the mobile bed reach the bed was composed of glued particles to ensure the development of a boundary layer with the same roughness. Laboratory tests were run under conditions of weak beadload transport with Shields parameter (θ) in the range 0.007 to 0.030, Froude numbers (Fr) between 0.630 and 0.950 and boundary Reynolds number (Re_ast) in the range 130 to 300. White-coated particles with 5.0 mm diameter were introduced in the flow 3 m upstream the mobile bed reach. Particle motion was registered from above using a high-speed camera AVT Bonito CL-400 with resolution set to 2320 × 1000 px2 and frame rate of 170 fps. The field of view recorded was 77.0 cm long and 38.0 cm wide, covering almost all the width of the flume. The maximum duration of the runs was 20 min, during which more than 500 particle paths, including resting times, were registered. The video footage was subjected to a PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) developed for the problem at hand. The algorithm includes the application of Gaussian filters and thresholding operations to identify the

  12. Effective coverage: a metric for monitoring Universal Health Coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in monitoring universal health coverage (UHC is identifying an indicator that can adequately capture the multiple components underlying the UHC initiative. Effective coverage, which unites individual and intervention characteristics into a single metric, offers a direct and flexible means to measure health system performance at different levels. We view effective coverage as a relevant and actionable metric for tracking progress towards achieving UHC. In this paper, we review the concept of effective coverage and delineate the three components of the metric - need, use, and quality - using several examples. Further, we explain how the metric can be used for monitoring interventions at both local and global levels. We also discuss the ways that current health information systems can support generating estimates of effective coverage. We conclude by recognizing some of the challenges associated with producing estimates of effective coverage. Despite these challenges, effective coverage is a powerful metric that can provide a more nuanced understanding of whether, and how well, a health system is delivering services to its populations.

  13. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT: differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delclos Marc E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1 or node-positive (N = 9, and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005, bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005. We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that

  14. Annual immunisation coverage report, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley; Dey, Aditi; Menzies, Rob; McIntyre, Peter

    2013-03-31

    This, the fourth annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2010 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) data. These include coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). For the first time, coverage from other sources for adolescents and the elderly are included. The proportion of children 'fully vaccinated' at 12, 24 and 60 months of age was 91.6%, 92.1% and 89.1% respectively. For vaccines available on the NIP but not currently assessed for 'fully immunised' status or for eligibility for incentive payments (rotavirus and pneumococcal at 12 months and meningococcal C and varicella at 24 months) coverage varied. Although pneumococcal vaccine had similar coverage at 12 months to other vaccines, coverage was lower for rotavirus at 12 months (84.7%) and varicella at 24 months (83.0%). Overall coverage at 24 months of age exceeded that at 12 months of age nationally and for most jurisdictions, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations, this represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. The 'fully immunised' coverage estimates for immunisations due by 60 months increased substantially in 2009, reaching almost 90% in 2010, probably related to completed immunisation by 60 months of age being introduced in 2009 as a requirement for GP incentive payments. As previously documented, vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only (hepatitis A and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) had suboptimal coverage at around 57%. Delayed receipt of vaccines by Indigenous children at the 60-month milestone age improved from 56% to 62% but the disparity in on-time vaccination between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children at earlier age milestones did not improve. Coverage data for human papillomavirus (HPV)from the national HPV register are consistent with high

  15. Towards Preserving Model Coverage and Structural Code Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimund Kirner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Embedded systems are often used in safety-critical environments. Thus, thorough testing of them is mandatory. To achieve a required structural code-coverage criteria it is beneficial to derive the test data at a higher program-representation level than machine code. Higher program-representation levels include, beside the source-code level, languages of domain-specific modeling environments with automatic code generation. For a testing framework with automatic generation of test data this will enable high retargetability of the framework. In this article we address the challenge of ensuring that the structural code coverage achieved at a higher program representation level is preserved during the code generations and code transformations down to machine code. We define the formal properties that have to be fullfilled by a code transformation to guarantee preservation of structural code coverage. Based on these properties we discuss how to preserve code coverage achieved at source-code level. Additionally, we discuss how structural code coverage at model level could be preserved. The results presented in this article are aimed toward the integration of support for preserving structural code coverage into compilers and code generators.

  16. Assuring Access to Affordable Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Under the Affordable Care Act, millions of uninsured Americans will gain access to affordable coverage through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and improvements in...

  17. [The registration of deaths in Venezuela: an evaluation of coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidegain, G; Lopez, D

    1987-08-01

    "This paper presents six indirect techniques for estimating the degree of death coverage as applied to vital statistics information in Venezuela between 1960 and 1982, collected by two public institutions, namely, the 'Oficina Central de Estadistica e Informatica' (OCEI) and the Ministry of Health and Social Assistance (MSAS).... The results show remarkable improvements in the death registry coverage for both institutions, that amount to 97 or 98 per cent at the beginning of the 80's. Nevertheless, great differences can be observed between them regarding both structure and volume of deaths by sex and age." Among the problems discussed are the impact of immigration and errors in age reporting. (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  18. Elective breast radiotherapy including level I and II lymph nodes: A planning study with the humeral head as planning risk volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Kathrin; van der Leer, Jorien; Branje, Tammy; van der Sangen, Maurice; van Lieshout, Maarten; Hurkmans, Coen W

    2017-01-18

    The aim of this study was to assess the dose to the humeral head planning risk volume with the currently used high tangential fields (HTF) and compare different planning techniques for breast radiotherapy including axillary level I and II lymph nodes (PTVn) while sparing the humeral head. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were enrolled in a planning study with 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy. Four planning techniques were compared: HTF, HTF with sparing of the humeral head, 6-field IMRT with sparing of the humeral head and VMAT with sparing of the humeral head. The humeral head + 10 mm was spared by restricting V40Gy HTF (V40Gy on average 20.7 cc). When sparing the humeral head in HTF, PTVn V90% decreased significantly from 97.9% to 89.4%. 6-field IMRT and VMAT had a PTVn V90% of 98.2% and 99.5% respectively. However, dose to the lungs, heart and especially the contralateral breast increased with VMAT. The humeral head is rarely spared when using HTF. When sparing the humeral head, the 6-field IMRT technique leads to adequate PTV coverage while not increasing the dose to the OARs.

  19. Coverage Related Issues in Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dossena, Marida

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks consisting of great number of cheap and tiny sensor nodes which are used for military environment controlling, natural events recording, traffic monitoring, robot navigation, and etc. Such a networks encounter with various types of challenges like energy consumption, routing, coverage, reliability. The most significant types of these problems are coverage that originated from the nodes energy consumption constrained. In order to dominate this problem different kinds of methods has been presented where the majority of them based on theoretical methods and used unbalanced and calculated distributions. In all of the proposed methods a large numbers of nodes are used. In this paper our attempt is based on using a few numbers of sensors in order to cover the vast area of environment. We proposed an algorithm that divides the desired environment to several areas and in each of these areas by using the genetic algorithm improve the coverage. The proposed method is simulated in MATLAB softwar...

  20. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herschtal, Alan, E-mail: Alan.Herschtal@petermac.org [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Te Marvelde, Luc [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Mengersen, Kerrie [School of Mathematical Sciences, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Caine, Hannah [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  1. Immunisation coverage annual report, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley P; Dey, Aditi; Menzies, Rob I; Brotherton, Julia M; McIntyre, Peter B

    2013-12-31

    This, the 5th annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2011 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register data, and National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Program Register data. The proportion of children 'fully vaccinated' at 12, 24 and 60 months of age was 91.4%, 92.2% and 89.5% respectively. Although pneumococcal vaccine had similar coverage at 12 months to other vaccines, coverage was lower for rotavirus at 12 months (83.8%) and varicella at 24 months (83.9%). By late 2011, the percentage of children who received the 1st dose of DTPa vaccine dose at less than 8 weeks of age was greater than 50% in 3 jurisdictions, the Australian Capital Territory, Victoria, and Queensland and at 70% for New South Wales and Tasmania. Although coverage at 12 months of age was lower among Indigenous children than non-Indigenous children in all jurisdictions, the extent of the difference varied. Overall, coverage at 24 months of age exceeded that at 12 months of age nationally. At 60 months of age, there was dramatic variation between individual jurisdictions, ranging from coverage 8% lower in Indigenous children in South Australia to 6% higher in the Northern Territory. As previously documented, vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only (hepatitis A and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) had suboptimal coverage at 60% and 68%, respectively. On-time receipt (before 49 months of age) of vaccines by Indigenous children at the 60-month milestone age improved between 2010 (18%) and 2011 (19%) but the disparity in on-time vaccination between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children increased at all 3 age milestones. The percentage of vaccine objectors in 2011 (1.7%) has increased from 2007 when it was 1.1%. Coverage data for the 3rd dose of HPV from the national HPV register in the school catch up program was 71% but was substantially lower for the catch-up program for women outside school (39

  2. Mediating Trust in Terrorism Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    Mass mediated risk communication can contribute to perceptions of threats and fear of “others” and/or to perceptions of trust in fellow citizens and society to overcome problems. This paper outlines a cross-disciplinary holistic framework for research in mediated trust building during an acute...... crisis. While the framework is presented in the context of television coverage of a terror-related crisis situation, it can equally be used in connection with all other forms of mediated trust. Key words: National crisis, risk communication, crisis management, television coverage, mediated trust....

  3. Monitoring intervention coverage in the context of universal health coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ties Boerma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring universal health coverage (UHC focuses on information on health intervention coverage and financial protection. This paper addresses monitoring intervention coverage, related to the full spectrum of UHC, including health promotion and disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation. A comprehensive core set of indicators most relevant to the country situation should be monitored on a regular basis as part of health progress and systems performance assessment for all countries. UHC monitoring should be embedded in a broad results framework for the country health system, but focus on indicators related to the coverage of interventions that most directly reflect the results of UHC investments and strategies in each country. A set of tracer coverage indicators can be selected, divided into two groups-promotion/prevention, and treatment/care-as illustrated in this paper. Disaggregation of the indicators by the main equity stratifiers is critical to monitor progress in all population groups. Targets need to be set in accordance with baselines, historical rate of progress, and measurement considerations. Critical measurement gaps also exist, especially for treatment indicators, covering issues such as mental health, injuries, chronic conditions, surgical interventions, rehabilitation, and palliation. Consequently, further research and proxy indicators need to be used in the interim. Ideally, indicators should include a quality of intervention dimension. For some interventions, use of a single indicator is feasible, such as management of hypertension; but in many areas additional indicators are needed to capture quality of service provision. The monitoring of UHC has significant implications for health information systems. Major data gaps will need to be filled. At a minimum, countries will need to administer regular household health surveys with biological and clinical data collection. Countries will also need to improve the

  4. Monitoring intervention coverage in the context of universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Ties; AbouZahr, Carla; Evans, David; Evans, Tim

    2014-09-01

    Monitoring universal health coverage (UHC) focuses on information on health intervention coverage and financial protection. This paper addresses monitoring intervention coverage, related to the full spectrum of UHC, including health promotion and disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation. A comprehensive core set of indicators most relevant to the country situation should be monitored on a regular basis as part of health progress and systems performance assessment for all countries. UHC monitoring should be embedded in a broad results framework for the country health system, but focus on indicators related to the coverage of interventions that most directly reflect the results of UHC investments and strategies in each country. A set of tracer coverage indicators can be selected, divided into two groups-promotion/prevention, and treatment/care-as illustrated in this paper. Disaggregation of the indicators by the main equity stratifiers is critical to monitor progress in all population groups. Targets need to be set in accordance with baselines, historical rate of progress, and measurement considerations. Critical measurement gaps also exist, especially for treatment indicators, covering issues such as mental health, injuries, chronic conditions, surgical interventions, rehabilitation, and palliation. Consequently, further research and proxy indicators need to be used in the interim. Ideally, indicators should include a quality of intervention dimension. For some interventions, use of a single indicator is feasible, such as management of hypertension; but in many areas additional indicators are needed to capture quality of service provision. The monitoring of UHC has significant implications for health information systems. Major data gaps will need to be filled. At a minimum, countries will need to administer regular household health surveys with biological and clinical data collection. Countries will also need to improve the production of

  5. Visualization of the flow profile inside a thinning filament during capillary breakup of a polymer solution via particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV)

    CERN Document Server

    Gier, S

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the flow profile of a polymer solution in a thinning capillary bridge. Fluorescent tracer particles with a diameter of 3$\\mu$m were used to visualize the flow. The cylindrical shape of the filament introduced strong optical abberations that could be corrected for, and we were able to characterize the flow in filaments with a thickness ranging from 150 to 30 $\\mu$m. In the first regime when the filament was still sufficiently large, we used a PIV algorithm to deduce the flow field. At later stages when the number of particles in the observation plane decreased a PTV algorithm was used. The main two results of our measurements are as follows. First, the flow profile at the formation of the cylindrical filament is highly inhomogeneous and there is only flow in the outer parts of the filament. Second, we find that in most parts of the regime, where the temporal radius of the thinning filament can be fitted with an exponential law the flow indeed is purely extensional.

  6. TEST COVERAGE ANALYSIS BASED ON PROGRAM SLICING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhenqiang; Xu Baowen; Guanjie

    2003-01-01

    Coverage analysis is a structural testing technique that helps to eliminate gaps in atest suite and determines when to stop testing. To compute test coverage, this letter proposes anew concept coverage about variables, based on program slicing. By adding powers accordingto their importance, the users can focus on the important variables to obtain higher test coverage.The letter presents methods to compute basic coverage based on program structure graphs. Inmost cases, the coverage obtained in the letter is bigger than that obtained by a traditionalmeasure, because the coverage about a variable takes only the related codes into account.

  7. Desarrollo de un Método de Análisis de Metabolitos de Nitrofuranos en Tejido Animal Empleando el Sistema GC/PTV/EI/MSMS Desarrollo de un Método de Análisis de Metabolitos de Nitrofuranos en Tejido Animal Empleando el Sistema GC/PTV/EI/MSMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Renné Velázquez Chong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available En el análisis de metabolitos de 5-nitrofuranos actualmente se emplean sistemas en fase líquida, acoplados a analizadores de masas/masas LC/MSMS los cuales son muy costosos. En este estudio se presenta un método alternativo en el cual se utiliza un sistema en fase gaseosa, con analizador de masa secuencial de trampa de iones y un sistema de inyección de temperatura programable GC/PTV/EI/MS5, para introducir los metabolitos de 5-nitrofuranos, a baja temperatura y derivatizarlos para evitar la degradación térmica de estos compuestos en el sistema de inyección. La derivatización de los metabolitos con anhídrido heptafl uorobutírico (HFBA en el inyector de temperatura programable (PTV, permite obtener estructuras térmicamente estables y se logra una mayor información estructural. Utilizando este método se obtuvo la caracterización de cuatro derivados heptafl uorobutirilados de metabolitos de nitrofuranos: semicarbazida (SEM, 3-amino-2-oxazolidinona (AOZ, 3-amino-5-morfolinometil-2-oxazolidinona (AMOZ y 1-aminohidantoina (AHD en tejido animal de ganado porcino a un nivel de concentración de 1μg/kg. Currently, liquid phase systems are used in the analysis of metabolites of 5-nitrofuranes, connected to mass/mass LC/MSMS analyzers of which are very expensive. In this studyan alternative method is presented in which a gaseous phase system is used, with an iontrap sequential mass analyzer and a temperature programmable GC/PTV/EI/MS5 injection system, to introduce 5-nitrofuranes metabolites, at low temperature and as derivatized to avoid the thermal degradation of these compounds in the injection system. Thermally stable structures are obtained with by derivitizing the metabolites with heptafluorobutyricanhydride (HFBA in the temperature programmable injection system, and greater structural information is also obtained. Using this method the characterization of four heptafluorobutyrates derivatives of metabolites of 5-nitrofuranes was

  8. To investigate the dose difference by respiratory motion using overlap volume histogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Seok; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Cho, Min Seok; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Four-dimensional dose (4D dose) which uses deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images can consider dosimetric effect by respiratory motions. The dose difference between 3D dose and 4D dose can be varied according to geometrical relationship between a planning target volume (PTV) and an organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose difference between 3D and 4D dose using overlap volume histogram (OVH) which is an indicator that quantifies the geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. The tendency of dose difference variation was verified according to OVH. OVH is seems to be an indicator that has a potential to predict the dose difference between 4D and 3D dose.

  9. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  10. Impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on computed tomography defined target volumes in radiation treatment planning of esophageal cancer: reduction in geographic misses with equal inter-observer variability: PET/CT improves esophageal target definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, L M A; Busz, D M; Paardekooper, G M R M; Beukema, J C; Jager, P L; Van der Jagt, E J; van Dam, G M; Groen, H; Plukker, J Th M; Langendijk, J A

    2010-08-01

    Target volume definition in modern radiotherapy is based on planning computed tomography (CT). So far, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has not been included in planning modality in volume definition of esophageal cancer. This study evaluates fusion of FDG-PET and CT in patients with esophageal cancer in terms of geographic misses and inter-observer variability in volume definition. In 28 esophageal cancer patients, gross, clinical and planning tumor volumes (GTV; CTV; PTV) were defined on planning CT by three radiation oncologists. After software-based emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) fusion, tumor delineations were redefined by the same radiation-oncologists. Concordance indexes (CCI's) for CT and PET/CT based GTV, CTV and PTV were calculated for each pair of observers. Incorporation of PET/CT modified tumor delineation in 17/28 subjects (61%) in cranial and/or caudal direction. Mean concordance indexes for CT-based CTV and PTV were 72 (55-86)% and 77 (61-88)%, respectively, vs. 72 (47-99)% and 76 (54-87)% for PET/CT-based CTV and PTV. Paired analyses showed no significant difference in CCI between CT and PET/CT. Combining FDG-PET and CT may improve target volume definition with less geographic misses, but without significant effects on inter-observer variability in esophageal cancer.

  11. Is Crime News Coverage Excessive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the frequency and manner in which various crime and noncrime news topics were presented in selected newspapers and television newscasts in 1976. Examines news flow data to determine whether news output was inflexible, and whether crime news coverage distorted the amount of real-life crime. (PD)

  12. Toward optimal organ at risk sparing in complex volumetric modulated arc therapy: An exponential trade-off with target volume dose homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tol, Jim P., E-mail: j.tol@vumc.nl; Dahele, Max; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiotherapy typically aims for homogenous dose in the planning target volume (PTV) while sparing organs at risk (OAR). The authors quantified and characterized the trade-off between PTV dose inhomogeneity (IH) and OAR sparing in complex head and neck volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Methods: Thirteen simultaneous integrated boost plans were created per patient, for ten patients. PTV boost{sub (B)}/elective{sub (E)} optimization priorities were systematically increased. IH{sub B} and IH{sub E}, defined as (100% − V95%) + V107%, were evaluated against the average of the mean dose to the combined composite swallowing and combined salivary organs (D-OAR{sub comp}). To investigate the influence of OAR size and position with respect to PTV{sub B/E}, OAR dose was evaluated against a modified Euclidean distance (DM{sub B}/DM{sub E}) between OAR and PTV. Results: Although the achievable D-OAR{sub comp} for a given level of PTV IH differed between patients, excellent logarithmic fits described the D-OAR{sub comp}/IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} relationship in all patients (mean R{sup 2} of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively). Allowing an increase in average IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} over a clinically acceptable range, e.g., from 0.4% ± 0.5% to 2.0% ± 2.0% and 6.9% ± 2.8% to 14.8% ± 2.7%, respectively, corresponded to a decrease in average dose to the composite salivary and swallowing structures from 30.3 ± 6.5 to 23.6 ± 4.7 Gy and 32.5 ± 8.3 to 26.8 ± 9.3 Gy. The increase in PTV{sub E} IH was mainly accounted for by an increase in V107, by on average 5.9%, rather than a reduction in V95, which was on average only 2%. A linear correlation was found between the OAR dose to composite swallowing structures and contralateral parotid and submandibular gland, with DM{sub E} (R{sup 2} = 0.83, 0.88, 0.95). Only mean ipsilateral parotid dose correlated with DM{sub B} (R{sup 2} = 0.87). Conclusions: OAR sparing is highly dependent on the permitted PTV{sub B

  13. -Net Approach to Sensor -Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusco Giordano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensors rely on battery power, and in many applications it is difficult or prohibitive to replace them. Hence, in order to prolongate the system's lifetime, some sensors can be kept inactive while others perform all the tasks. In this paper, we study the -coverage problem of activating the minimum number of sensors to ensure that every point in the area is covered by at least sensors. This ensures higher fault tolerance, robustness, and improves many operations, among which position detection and intrusion detection. The -coverage problem is trivially NP-complete, and hence we can only provide approximation algorithms. In this paper, we present an algorithm based on an extension of the classical -net technique. This method gives an -approximation, where is the number of sensors in an optimal solution. We do not make any particular assumption on the shape of the areas covered by each sensor, besides that they must be closed, connected, and without holes.

  14. Medical coverage of gymnastics competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Suzanne S; Burton, Monique S

    2009-01-01

    Medical coverage of gymnastics competitions can be a challenging task for the sports medicine physician and other medical personnel because of the complexity and aerial nature of the sport. A broad understanding of the six gymnastics disciplines, along with the type of competitions, injury epidemiology, and the common acute gymnastics injuries will help sports medicine professionals in planning and delivering optimal care to the injured or ill gymnast.

  15. Increasing Coverage of Appropriate Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Verughese; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K.; Hopkins, David P.; Morgan, Jennifer Murphy; Pitan, Adesola A.; Clymer, John

    2016-01-01

    Context Population-level coverage for immunization against many vaccine-preventable diseases remains below optimal rates in the U.S. The Community Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended several interventions to increase vaccination coverage based on systematic reviews of the evaluation literature. The present study provides the economic results from those reviews. Evidence acquisition A systematic review was conducted (search period, January 1980 through February 2012) to identify economic evaluations of 12 interventions recommended by the Task Force. Evidence was drawn from included studies; estimates were constructed for the population reach of each strategy, cost of implementation, and cost per additional vaccinated person because of the intervention. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Evidence synthesis Reminder systems, whether for clients or providers, were among the lowest-cost strategies to implement and the most cost effective in terms of additional people vaccinated. Strategies involving home visits and combination strategies in community settings were both costly and less cost effective. Strategies based in settings such as schools and managed care organizations that reached the target population achieved additional vaccinations in the middle range of cost effectiveness. Conclusions The interventions recommended by the Task Force differed in reach, cost, and cost effectiveness. This systematic review presents the economic information for 12 effective strategies to increase vaccination coverage that can guide implementers in their choice of interventions to fit their local needs, available resources, and budget. PMID:26847663

  16. Bundled automobile insurance coverage and accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chu-Shiu; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Peng, Sheng-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of automobile accidents by taking into account two types of automobile insurance coverage: comprehensive vehicle physical damage insurance and voluntary third-party liability insurance. By using a unique data set in the Taiwanese automobile insurance market, we explore the bundled automobile insurance coverage and the occurrence of claims. It is shown that vehicle physical damage insurance is the major automobile coverage and affects the decision to purchase voluntary liability insurance coverage as a complement. Moreover, policyholders with high vehicle physical damage insurance coverage have a significantly higher probability of filing vehicle damage claims, and if they additionally purchase low voluntary liability insurance coverage, their accident claims probability is higher than those who purchase high voluntary liability insurance coverage. Our empirical results reveal that additional automobile insurance coverage information can capture more driver characteristics and driving behaviors to provide useful information for insurers' underwriting policies and to help analyze the occurrence of automobile accidents.

  17. Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage From the National Health Interview Survey Using linked administrative data, to validate Medicare coverage estimates...

  18. Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage From the National Health Interview Survey Using linked administrative data, to validate Medicare coverage estimates...

  19. 36 CFR 1210.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 1210.31 Section 1210.31 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL....31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for...

  20. Closing the Prescription Drug Coverage Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs they make are covered during the coverage gap for that calendar year. This includes prescription drugs on the plan’s formulary ( ... you pay for generic drugs during the coverage gap will decrease each year until it reaches 25% in 2020. The coverage ...

  1. SU-E-T-288: Dose Volume Population Histogram (DVPH): A New Method to Evaluate Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plans With Geometrical Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T; Mai, N [University of Science, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, B [Prowess Inc, Concord, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In Proton therapy, especially intensity modulated proton therapy(IMPT), the dose distribution shape is very sensitive to errors due to sharp dose gradients at the Bragg peaks. The concept of the conventional margin is based on the assumption that dose distribution is shifted rather than deformed due to geometrical uncertainties. The goal of this study is to access the validity of the margin concept as well as propose a new approach using Dose Volume Population Histogram (DVPH) in evaluating IMPT plans. Methods: For a prostate case, an intensity modulated proton therapy is optimized based on the conventional PTV based objective function. The plan is evaluated based on the PTV DVH and CTV DVPH (dose volume population histogram) which explicitly taking into account geometric uncertainties. The DVPH is calculated based on 2197 dose distributions at different CTV possible positions for both random and systematic errors. The DVPH with a 90% confidence level is used for the comparison. Results: The minimum dose of the CTV DVPH with a 90% confidence level is only about 18% of the prescribed dose, while the minimum dose of the PTV is 95%. For bladder DVHs, the D50 and D35 is 26% and 30%, compared to 65% and 70% of the prescribed dose from the bladder DVPH with 90% confidence level. Conclusion: The results showed that the PTV concept for ensuring the prescribed dose actually delivered to the CTV is invalid in proton therapy. The good PTV DVH might Result in an underdose to the target and should not be used for IMPT optimization. For OARs, the conventional evaluation approach underestimates dose volume end points. The new concept DVPH has been proved to provide a more accurate DVH evaluation in proton therapy.

  2. Comparison of planning target volumes based on combination of 18F-FDG PET-CT and 4DCT in thoracic esophageal cancer%PET与四维CT图像结合构建胸段食管癌计划靶体积研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彦康; 郭延娈; 张棚; 李建彬

    2015-01-01

    目的 比较基于三维CT(three-dimensional CT,3DCT)、四维CT (4DCT)与基于正电子发射计算机断层显像(positron emission tomograpay CT,PET-CT)结合4DCT所构建胸段食管癌原发肿瘤计划靶体积(planning target vol-ume,PTV)位置及体积的差异性.方法 选取2012-12-01-2014-02-28在山东省肿瘤医院放疗科序贯完成3DCT、4DCT和脱氧葡萄糖(fluorodeoxyglucose,FDG) PET-CT胸部定位扫描,且PET图像原发肿瘤最大标准化摄取值(max-imum standardized uptake value,SUVmax)≥2.0的18例胸段食管癌患者.将3DCT图像所得大体肿瘤体积(gross tumorvolume,GTV)上下方向外扩30 mm,横向方向外扩5 mm得到临床靶体积(clinical target volume,CTV3D);CTV3D各方向外扩10 mm得到计划靶体积(planning target volume,PTV3D);内肿瘤靶体积(internal target volume,ITV4D)通过4DCT 10个时相CTV获得;将ITV4D各方向外扩5 mm得到PTV4D;基于SUV≥20% SUVmx得到内生物靶体积(inter-nal biological target volume,IBTVPET20%),将ITV4D与IBTVPET20%通过布尔逻辑运算得到ITVPETT;将ITVPT各方向外扩5 mm得到PTV4r.结果 PTV3D显著大于PTV4D和PTVPETT,P值分别为<0.001和0.044;PTVPT显著大于PTV4D,P=0.048.PTV3D对PTVPETT的包含度(degree of inclusion,DI;0.70±0.05)显著大于PTV3D对PTV4D的DI(0.69±0.06),P=0.042;PTV4D对PTV3D的DI(0.96±0.03)与PTVPETT对PTV3D的DI(0.95士0.03)间差异无统计学意义,P=0.118.结论 在构建胸段食管癌靶区时,利用PET与4DCT图像结合不仅改变了肿瘤PTV的大小,而且改变了空间位置及其形状.将二者结合,也许能够为食管癌放疗靶区构建提供借鉴.

  3. Impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on biological target volume (BTV) definition for treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devic, Slobodan [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada)]. E-mail: devic@medphys.mcgill.ca; Tomic, Nada [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Faria, Sergio [Radiation Oncology Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Dean, Geoffrey [Nuclear Medicine Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Lisbona, Robert [Nuclear Medicine Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Parker, William [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Kaufman, Chris [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Podgorsak, Ervin B. [Medical Physics Department, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que. (Canada)

    2007-02-01

    This work represents our effort to test feasibility of FDG-based PET/CT on target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment planning of NSCLC patients. Different methods have been developed to enable more precise target outlining using PET: Qualitative Visual Method, CTV=2.5 SUV units, linear SUV threshold function method, and CTV=40% Iso of Maximum Uptake Value. We are proposing reconstruction of three biological target volumes: necrotic BTV (same as PTV created by radiation oncologist using CT data), proliferating BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio 1:3) and hypoxic BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio of 1:19). Two IMRT plans were created and compared to the conventional treatment plan: 'conservative' IMRT plan delivers 52.5 Gy to the necrotic BTV and 65 Gy to the hypoxic BTV; 'radical' IMRT plan delivers 30 Gy to necrotic BTV, 52.5 Gy to proliferating BTV and 65 Gy to hypoxic BTV. Use of BTVs in IMRT plans is attractive because it increases dose to targets considered to need higher doses. It reduces considerably dose to heart and spinal cord, organs considered to limit dose escalation approaches in NSCLC treatment. 'Conservative' IMRT approach can be understood as a PET/CT-based concomitant boost to the tumor expressing the highest FDG uptake. 'Radical' plan implies deviation from the traditional uniform dose target coverage approach, with the intention of achieving better surrounding tissue sparing and ultimately allowing for dose escalation protocols relying on biologically based treatment planning.

  4. DECISION ANALYSIS IN HEALTH COVERAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Beatriz, Orzuza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2000 the Organization of the United Nations established eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. The fourth objective, reducing child mortality, looks specifically for reducing two thirds of the mortality of children under five years old between 1990 and 2015. One of the specific indicators to measure progress towards this goal is the proportion of children under one year old immunized against measles.In 2001, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP estimated that over 60% of the population who lived in developing nations is far away or losing ground on achievement of the MDGs in reducing rates of infant mortality. This situation is compounded by the lack of progress in deepening the analysis of the issue, the lack of research and indicators to assess features timely coverage of care and health services.This article aims to contribute to the selection of the strategy which would improve health coverage in Misiones, using one of the tools of decision theory, the decision matrix.

  5. In-cylinder flow field in a spark-ignited natural gas engine. 1st Report. In-cylinder flow visualization by PTV; Hibana tenkashiki tennen gas kikan no nenshoshitsunai ni okeru ryudo tokusei. 1. PTV ni yoru ryudoba no kashika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukano, Y.; Hisaki, H.; Kida, S. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Kadota, T. [University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-02-25

    In-cylinder flow field in a spark-ignited natural gas engine was investigated by the laser light sheet PTV method, which can analyze flow field in a short time. Using a single-cylinder visualization engine, flow field was measured right below and 10 mm, 20 mm, and 40 mm below cylinder head, at various crank angles in intake, compression, and expansion strokes. The results showed that induction-generated swirl was getting concentric to the cylinder center in compression stroke, and was shifted to the outward radial direction in expansion stroke. Swirl velocity increases with the lapse of time, showing its maximum around 20deg BTDC during compression stroke, and varies from cycle to cycle within {+-}5% to its maximum velocity. Squish velocity shows its inward maximum and outward maximum around 20deg BTDC and 20deg ATDC, respectively, and varies from cycle to cycle within {+-}8% to its maximum outward velocity. The maximum outward squish velocity in expansion stroke is about twice as large as the maximum inward squish velocity in compression stroke. 11 refs.

  6. A predictive model to guide management of the overlap region between target volume and organs at risk in prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Lee, Jennifer C.; Einaiem, Sara; Guirguis, Adel; Ikoro, N. C.; Ashamalla Hani [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The goal of this study is to determine whether the magnitude of overlap between planning target volume (PTV) and rectum (Rectum{sub overlap}) or PTV and bladder (Bladder{sub overlap}) in prostate cancer volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is predictive of the dose-volume relationships achieved after optimization, and to identify predictive equations and cutoff values using these overlap volumes beyond which the Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) dose-volume constraints are unlikely to be met. Fifty-seven patients with prostate cancer underwent VMAT planning using identical optimization conditions and normalization. The PTV (for the 50.4 Gy primary plan and 30.6 Gy boost plan) included 5 to 10 mm margins around the prostate and seminal vesicles. Pearson correlations, linear regression analyses, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to correlate the percentage overlap with dose-volume parameters. The percentage Rectum{sub overlap} and Bladder{sub overlap} correlated with sparing of that organ but minimally impacted other dose-volume parameters, predicted the primary plan rectum V{sub 45} and bladder V{sub 50} with R{sup 2} = 0.78 and R{sup 2} = 0.83, respectively, and predicted the boost plan rectum V{sub 30} and bladder V{sub 30} with R{sup 2} = 0.53 and R{sup 2} = 0.81, respectively. The optimal cutoff value of boost Rectumoverlap to predict rectum V75 >15% was 3.5% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%, p < 0.01), and the optimal cutoff value of boost Bladder{sub overlap} to predict bladder V{sub 80} >10% was 5.0% (sensitivity 83%, specificity 100%, p < 0.01). The degree of overlap between PTV and bladder or rectum can be used to accurately guide physicians on the use of interventions to limit the extent of the overlap region prior to optimization.

  7. Sideline coverage of youth football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzone, Katie; Diamond, Alex; Gregory, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Youth football is a popular sport in the United States and has been for some time. There are currently more than 3 million participants in youth football leagues according to USA Football. While the number of participants and overall injuries may be higher in other sports, football has a higher rate of injuries. Most youth sporting events do not have medical personnel on the sidelines in event of an injury or emergency. Therefore it is necessary for youth sports coaches to undergo basic medical training in order to effectively act in these situations. In addition, an argument could be made that appropriate medical personnel should be on the sideline for collision sports at all levels, from youth to professional. This article will discuss issues pertinent to sideline coverage of youth football, including coaching education, sideline personnel, emergency action plans, age and size divisions, tackle versus flag football, and injury prevention.

  8. Collaborative Mobile Charging and Coverage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰

    2014-01-01

    Wireless energy charging using mobile vehicles has been a viable research topic recently in the area of wireless networks and mobile computing. This paper gives a short survey of recent research conducted in our research group in the area of collaborative mobile charging. In collaborative mobile charging, multiple mobile chargers work together to accomplish a given set of ob jectives. These ob jectives include charging sensors at different frequencies with a minimum number of mobile chargers and reaching the farthest sensor for a given set of mobile chargers, subject to various constraints, including speed and energy limits of mobile chargers. Through the process of problem formulation, solution construction, and future work extension for problems related to collaborative mobile charging and coverage, we present three principles for good practice in conducting research. These principles can potentially be used for assisting graduate students in selecting a research problem for a term project, which can eventually be expanded to a thesis/dissertation topic.

  9. Asymmetric k-Center with Minimum Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we give approximation algorithms and inapproximability results for various asymmetric k-center with minimum coverage problems. In the k-center with minimum coverage problem, each center is required to serve a minimum number of clients. These problems have been studied by Lim et al. [A....... Lim, B. Rodrigues, F. Wang, Z. Xu, k-center problems with minimum coverage, Theoret. Comput. Sci. 332 (1–3) (2005) 1–17] in the symmetric setting....

  10. Post Auction Coverage Baseline 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — FINAL TELEVISION CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT INFORMATION RELATED TO INCENTIVE AUCTION REPACKING. NOTE: This file provides new baseline coverage and population data for all...

  11. Calculation of Lung Cancer Volume of Target Based on Thorax Computed Tomography Images using Active Contour Segmentation Method for Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra Yosandha, Fiet; Adi, Kusworo; Edi Widodo, Catur

    2017-06-01

    In this research, calculation process of the lung cancer volume of target based on computed tomography (CT) thorax images was done. Volume of the target calculation was done in purpose to treatment planning system in radiotherapy. The calculation of the target volume consists of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the target volume was done by adding the target area on each slices and then multiply the result with the slice thickness. Calculations of area using of digital image processing techniques with active contour segmentation method. This segmentation for contouring to obtain the target volume. The calculation of volume produced on each of the targets is 577.2 cm3 for GTV, 769.9 cm3 for CTV, 877.8 cm3 for PTV, 618.7 cm3 for OAR 1, 1,162 cm3 for OAR 2 right, and 1,597 cm3 for OAR 2 left. These values indicate that the image processing techniques developed can be implemented to calculate the lung cancer target volume based on CT thorax images. This research expected to help doctors and medical physicists in determining and contouring the target volume quickly and precisely.

  12. Virtual lymph node analysis to evaluate axillary lymph node coverage provided by tangential breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, In Kyu [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    To investigate the coverage of axillary lymph node with tangential breast irradiation fields by using virtual lymph node (LN) analysis. Forty-eight women who were treated with whole breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery were analyzed. The axillary and breast volumes were delineated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) contouring atlas. To generate virtual LN contours, preoperative fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scans with identifiable LN were fused with the CT scans, and the virtual LN contour were delineated on the CT. The median level I and II axillary volume coverage percentages at the VD95% line were 33.5% (range, 5.3% to 90.4%) and 0.6% (range, 0.0% to 14.6%), respectively. Thirty-one LNs in 18 patients were delineated (26 in level I and 5 in level II). In the level I axilla, 84.6% of virtual LNs were encompassed by the 95% isodose line. In the level II axilla, by contrast, none of the virtual LNs were encompassed by the 95% isodose volumes. There was a substantial discrepancy between the RTOG contouring atlas-based axillary volume analysis and the virtual LN analysis, especially for the level I axillary coverage. The axillary volume coverage was associated with the body mass index (BMI) and breast volume. The tangential breast irradiation did not deliver adequate therapeutic doses to the axillary region, particularly those in the level II axilla. Patients with small breast volumes or lower BMI showed reduced axillary coverage from the tangential breast fields. For axillary LN irradiation, individualized anatomy-based radiation fields for patients would be necessary.

  13. Impact of invitation schemes on screening coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Katja Kemp; von Euler Chelpin, My; Vejborg, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The porpuse of mammography screening is to decrease breast cancer mortality. To achieve this a high coverage by examination is needed. Within an organized screening programme, we examined the impact of changes in the invitation schedule on the interplay between coverage and participat...

  14. CDMA coverage under mobile heterogeneous network load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saban, D.; van den Berg, Hans Leo; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Endrayanto, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    We analytically investigate coverage (determined by the uplink) under non-homogeneous and moving traffic load of third generation UMTS mobile networks. In particular, for different call assignment policies, we investigate cell breathing and the movement of the coverage gap occurring between cells

  15. CDMA coverage under mobile heterogeneous network load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saban, Dorin; Berg, van den Hans; Boucherie, Richard J.; Endrayanto, Irwan

    2002-01-01

    We analytically investigate coverage (determined by the uplink) under non-homogeneous and moving traffic load of third generation UMTS mobile networks. In particular, for different call assignment policies, we investigate cell breathing and the movement of the coverage gap occurring between cells wh

  16. 5 CFR 531.402 - Employee coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee coverage. 531.402 Section 531... GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.402 Employee coverage. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, this subpart applies to employees who— (1) Are classified and paid under...

  17. 5 CFR 610.101 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 610.101 Section 610.101 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF DUTY Weekly and Daily Scheduling of Work § 610.101 Coverage. This subpart applies to each employee to whom subpart A of part...

  18. Influence of V2O5 Addition on Reduction of NO by C3H6 over Pt/V2O5/Al2O3 Monolithic Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Shoufang; Jiang Zheng; Yu Junjie; Hao Zhengping

    2004-01-01

    Pt/V2O5/Al2O3 and Pt/Al2O3 monolithic catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation method, and the influence of V2 O5 addition on the catalytic activity for NO reduction by C3 H6 under lean burn condition was investigated in detail.The results show that Pt/V2O5/Al2O3 has better activity of NO reduction than Pt/Al2O3 , adding V2O5 to Pt catalyst makes the temperature window of NO reduction shift further to a lower temperature region.The activity of NO reduction decreases and there is a similar degree of deactivation over the two catalysts in the presence of SO2 in feed gas.Moreover, adding V2 O5 to Pt catalyst resulted in improvement of resistance to SO2 oxidation, which decreases the emission of sulfate particulate.Thermal aging treatment counteractes the promoting effect of V2O5 on NO reduction.

  19. Immunization Coverage Among Juvenile Justice Detainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Gregory L; Glanz, Jason M; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Anoshiravani, Arash

    2015-07-01

    This study sought to (1) quantify the baseline immunization coverage of adolescents entering the juvenile justice system and (2) assess the effect of detention-based care on immunization coverage in youth. A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was performed of 279 adolescents detained at a large juvenile detention facility. Only 3% of adolescents had received all study immunizations prior to detention. Before detention, immunization coverage was significantly lower than that for the general adolescent population for all vaccines except the first doses of hepatitis A and varicella-zoster virus vaccines. Subsequent to detention, most individual immunization coverage levels increased and were significantly higher than in the general adolescent population. The routine administration of immunizations in the juvenile justice setting can help detained youth achieve levels of immunization coverage similar to their nondetained peers.

  20. Newspaper coverage of the breast implant controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, A

    1999-01-01

    Newspaper coverage of the silicone breast implant controversy from 1992 through 1996 was analyzed to determine whether women in the United States were provided with a fair and balanced account. The paper also addressed whether or not Dow Corning's public relations campaign impacted newspaper coverage. All stories from the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune and the Wall Street Journal were analyzed. Findings suggested that early coverage of the controversy focused on the health risks of silicone breast implants while later coverage focused on the financial situations of the implant manufacturers. The most-interviewed sources were spokespersons for the implant manufacturers, while the least-interviewed sources were women with implants. The findings suggested that reporting patterns were influenced by the public relations efforts of the implant manufacturer, raising questions concerning the coverage of health care controversies involving large corporations seeking refuge from litigation.

  1. SU-E-J-119: What Effect Have the Volume Defined in the Alignment Clipbox for Cervical Cancer Using Automatic Registration Methods for Cone- Beam CT Verification?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W; Yang, H; Wang, Y; Jia, H; Xie, Y [Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of different clipbox volumes with automated registration techniques using commercially available software with on board volumetric imaging(OBI) for treatment verification in cervical cancer patients. Methods: Fifty cervical cancer patients received daily CBCT scans(on-board imaging v1.5 system, Varian Medical Systems) during the first treatment week and weekly thereafter were included this analysis. A total of 450 CBCT scans were registered to the planning CTscan using pelvic clipbox(clipbox-Pelvic) and around PTV clip box(clipbox- PTV). The translations(anterior-posterior, left-right, superior-inferior) and the rotations(yaw, pitch and roll) errors for each matches were recorded. The setup errors and the systematic and random errors for both of the clip-boxes were calculated. Paired Samples t test was used to analysis the differences between clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV. Results: . The SD of systematic error(σ) was 1.0mm, 2.0mm,3.2mm and 1.9mm,2.3mm, 3.0mm in the AP, LR and SI directions for clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV, respectively. The average random error(Σ)was 1.7mm, 2.0mm,4.2mm and 1.7mm,3.4mm, 4.4mm in the AP, LR and SI directions for clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV, respectively. But, only the SI direction was acquired significantly differences between two image registration volumes(p=0.002,p=0.01 for mean and SD). For rotations, the yaw mean/SD and the pitch SD were acquired significantly differences between clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV. Conclusion: The defined volume for Image registration is important for cervical cancer when 3D/3D match was used. The alignment clipbox can effect the setup errors obtained. Further analysis is need to determine the optimal defined volume to use the image registration in cervical cancer. Conflict of interest: none.

  2. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Orange, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  3. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hresko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related and pharmacogenetic (PGx tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  4. Insurance coverage policies for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hresko, Andrew; Haga, Susanne B

    2012-10-30

    Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related) and pharmacogenetic (PGx) tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less) of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  5. SU-E-T-430: Feasibility Study On Using Overlap Volume Histogram to Predict the Dose Difference by Respiratory Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, D; Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose difference between three-dimensional dose (3D dose) and 4D dose which considers motion due to respiratory can be varied according to geometrical relationship between planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of the study is to investigate the dose difference between 3D and 4D dose using overlap volume histogram (OVH) which is an indicator that quantify geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. Methods: Five liver cancer patients who previously treated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were investigated. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for all patients. ITV-based treatment planning was performed. 3D dose was calculated on the end-exhale phase image as a reference phase image. 4D dose accumulation was implemented from all phase images using dose warping technique used deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm (Horn and Schunck optical flow) in DIRART. In this study OVH was used to quantify geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. OVH between a PTV and a selected OAR was generated for each patient case and compared for all cases. The dose difference between 3D and 4D dose for normal organ was calculated and compared for all cases according to OVH. Results: The 3D and 4D dose difference for OAR was analyzed using dose-volume histogram (DVH). On the basis of a specific point which corresponds to 10% of OAR volume overlapped with expanded PTV, mean dose difference was 34.56% in minimum OVH distance case and 13.36% in maximum OVH distance case. As the OVH distance increased, mean dose difference between 4D and 3D dose was decreased. Conclusion: The tendency of dose difference variation was verified according to OVH. OVH is seems to be indicator that has a potential to predict the dose difference between 4D and 3D dose. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through

  6. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  7. A Survey on Coverage Control Protocols in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Coverage control algorithms play an important role in Wireless sensor network. Effective coverage control algorithms sense its coverage area with less energy spent. These coverage control models falls under various approaches like clustering, evolutionary, mobility based approaches. This paper makes a detailed survey on coverage control protocols coming under various classifications. In addition, it also discussed several protocols working mechanism with its evaluation metrics.

  8. Measuring populations to improve vaccination coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Nita; Djibo, Ali; Tatem, Andrew J.; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Ferrari, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    In low-income settings, vaccination campaigns supplement routine immunization but often fail to achieve coverage goals due to uncertainty about target population size and distribution. Accurate, updated estimates of target populations are rare but critical; short-term fluctuations can greatly impact population size and susceptibility. We use satellite imagery to quantify population fluctuations and the coverage achieved by a measles outbreak response vaccination campaign in urban Niger and compare campaign estimates to measurements from a post-campaign survey. Vaccine coverage was overestimated because the campaign underestimated resident numbers and seasonal migration further increased the target population. We combine satellite-derived measurements of fluctuations in population distribution with high-resolution measles case reports to develop a dynamic model that illustrates the potential improvement in vaccination campaign coverage if planners account for predictable population fluctuations. Satellite imagery can improve retrospective estimates of vaccination campaign impact and future campaign planning by synchronizing interventions with predictable population fluxes.

  9. 44 CFR 17.610 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... are deemed to control with respect to the implementation of drug-free workplace requirements... SECURITY GENERAL GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) § 17.610 Coverage. (a) This...

  10. Continuous Eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — States have the option to provide children with 12 months of continuous coverage through Medicaid and CHIP, even if the family experiences a change in income during...

  11. 24 CFR 320.11 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GUARANTY OF MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.11 Insurance coverage. The issuer shall maintain...

  12. 5 CFR 9701.402 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.402 Coverage. (a) This subpart applies to eligible...

  13. Measuring populations to improve vaccination coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Nita; Djibo, Ali; Tatem, Andrew J.; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Ferrari, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    In low-income settings, vaccination campaigns supplement routine immunization but often fail to achieve coverage goals due to uncertainty about target population size and distribution. Accurate, updated estimates of target populations are rare but critical; short-term fluctuations can greatly impact population size and susceptibility. We use satellite imagery to quantify population fluctuations and the coverage achieved by a measles outbreak response vaccination campaign in urban Niger and compare campaign estimates to measurements from a post-campaign survey. Vaccine coverage was overestimated because the campaign underestimated resident numbers and seasonal migration further increased the target population. We combine satellite-derived measurements of fluctuations in population distribution with high-resolution measles case reports to develop a dynamic model that illustrates the potential improvement in vaccination campaign coverage if planners account for predictable population fluctuations. Satellite imagery can improve retrospective estimates of vaccination campaign impact and future campaign planning by synchronizing interventions with predictable population fluxes. PMID:27703191

  14. Coverage for SCS Pre-1941 Aerial Photography

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This shapefile was generated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) at the New Mexico State Office to show the coverage for the Pre-1941 aerial photography...

  15. Broadcast Network Coverage with Multicell Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiang Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicell cooperation has been identified as one of the underlying principles for future wireless communication systems. This paper studies the benefits of multicell cooperation in broadcast TV network from an information theoretical perspective. We define outage capacity as the figure of merit and derive the broadcast coverage area to evaluate such system. Specifically, we calculate the broadcast coverage area with given common information rate and outage probabilities when multiple base stations collaboratively transmit the broadcast signals. For the general MIMO case where receivers have multiple antennas, we provide simulation results to illustrate the expanded coverage area. In all cases, our results show that the coverage of a TV broadcast network can be significantly improved by multicell cooperation.

  16. Length and coverage of inhibitory decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Authors present algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. Inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute ≠ value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. Paper contains also comparison of length and coverage of inhibitory rules constructed by a greedy algorithm and by the dynamic programming algorithm. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  17. National EPI coverage survey report in Ethiopia, 2006'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The survey showed a 10 percentage point of increment in DPT3 coverage compared to 2001 survey coverage. ..... administrative coverage reported in 2004/2005 (14). This ..... Deming MS, Roungou JB, Kristiansen M, et al.

  18. Cooperative Cloud Service Aware Mobile Internet Coverage Connectivity Guarantee Protocol Based on Sensor Opportunistic Coverage Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the Internet coverage ratio and provide connectivity guarantee, based on sensor opportunistic coverage mechanism and cooperative cloud service, we proposed the coverage connectivity guarantee protocol for mobile Internet. In this scheme, based on the opportunistic covering rules, the network coverage algorithm of high reliability and real-time security was achieved by using the opportunity of sensor nodes and the Internet mobile node. Then, the cloud service business support platform is created based on the Internet application service management capabilities and wireless sensor network communication service capabilities, which is the architecture of the cloud support layer. The cooperative cloud service aware model was proposed. Finally, we proposed the mobile Internet coverage connectivity guarantee protocol. The results of experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has excellent performance, in terms of the security of the Internet and the stability, as well as coverage connectivity ability.

  19. Impact of (18)F-Fluciclovine PET on Target Volume Definition for Postprostatectomy Salvage Radiotherapy: Initial Findings from a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Ashesh B; Schreibmann, Eduard; Rossi, Peter J; Shelton, Joseph; Godette, Karen; Nieh, Peter; Master, Viraj A; Kucuk, Omer; Goodman, Mark; Halkar, Raghuveer; Cooper, Sherrie; Chen, Zhengjia; Schuster, David M

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the synthetic amino acid PET radiotracer (18)F-fluciclovine in modifying the defined clinical and treatment-planning target volumes in postprostatectomy patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy and to evaluate the resulting dosimetric consequences to surrounding organs at risk. Methods: Ninety-six patients were enrolled in a randomized, prospective intention-to-treat clinical trial for potential salvage radiotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy. The initial treatment plan was based on the results from conventional abdominopelvic CT and MRI. The 45 patients in the experimental arm also underwent abdominopelvic (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT, and the images were registered with the conventional images to determine whether the results would modify the initial treatment plan. The 51 patients in the control arm did not undergo (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT. For each patient, the clinical and treatment-planning target volumes that would have been treated before (18)F-fluciclovine registration were compared with those after registration. For organs at risk (rectum, bladder, and penile bulb), the volumes receiving 40 Gy and 65 Gy before registration were compared with those after registration. Statistical comparisons were made using the paired t test. Acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was compared between the control and experimental arms using the χ(2) test. Results: In 24 cases, radiotherapy was planned to a clinical target volume consisting of the prostate bed alone (CTV) (64.8-66.6 Gy). In 21 cases, radiotherapy was planned to a clinical target volume consisting of the pelvis (CTV1) (45.0 Gy) followed by a boost to the prostate bed (CTV2) (19.8-25.2 Gy). In each case, the respective treatment-planning target volume expansion (PTV, PTV1, or PTV2) was 0.8 cm (0.6 cm posterior). With the exception of PTV2, all postregistration volumes were

  20. Polar constellations design for discontinuous coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Salvatore; Graziano, Maria Daniela; D'Errico, Marco

    2016-10-01

    A novel constellation design method is developed for discontinuous coverage of the globe and polar caps. It integrates and extends the applicability of the coverage regions and mitigates the limitations of the existing techniques based on streets-of-coverage (SOC) theory. In particular, the visibility conditions of the targets are mapped in the (Ω, u)-domain to identify the number of satellites per plane and the distance between successive orbits, whereas the planes are arranged around the equator exploiting satellites both in ascending and descending phase. The proposed approach is applied to design potential space segments in polar LEO supporting the existing maritime surveillance services over the globe and on the future polar routes. Results show they require a smaller total number of satellites with respect to the SOC-based configurations for revisit times less than one hour and wide range of swaths. In details, it is observed a reduction between 6% and 22% for global coverage and between 24% and 33% for the coverage of polar caps.

  1. 29 CFR 779.259 - What is included in annual gross volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is included in annual gross volume. 779.259 Section... Coverage Annual Gross Volume of Sales Made Or Business Done § 779.259 What is included in annual gross volume. (a) The annual gross volume of sales made or business done of an enterprise consists of its...

  2. Resolution, coverage, and geometry beyond traditional limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ferber, Ralf

    1998-12-31

    The presentation relates to the optimization of the image of seismic data and improved resolution and coverage of acquired data. Non traditional processing methods such as inversion to zero offset (IZO) are used. To realize the potential of saving acquisition cost by reducing in-fill and to plan resolution improvement by processing, geometry QC methods such as DMO Dip Coverage Spectrum (DDCS) and Bull`s Eyes Analysis are used. The DDCS is a 2-D spectrum whose entries consist of the DMO (Dip Move Out) coverage for a particular reflector specified by it`s true time dip and reflector normal strike. The Bull`s Eyes Analysis relies on real time processing of synthetic data generated with the real geometry. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Perplexity analysis of obesity news coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Delano J; Elhadad, Noémie; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-11-14

    An important task performed during the analysis of health news coverage is the identification of news articles that are related to a specific health topic (e.g. obesity). This is often done using a combination of keyword searching and manual encoding of news content. Statistical language models and their evaluation metric, perplexity, may help to automate this task. A perplexity study of obesity news was performed to evaluate perplexity as a measure of the similarity of news corpora to obesity news content. The results of this study showed that perplexity increased as news coverage became more general relative to obesity news (obesity news approximately 187, general health news approximately 278, general news approximately 378, general news across multiple publishers approximately 382). This indicates that language model perplexity can measure the similarity news content to obesity news coverage, and could be used as the basis for an automated health news classifier.

  4. Conceptualising the lack of health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J B

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the lack of health insurance coverage in the US as a public policy issue. It first compares the problem of health insurance coverage to the problem of unemployment to show that in terms of the numbers of individuals affected lack of health insurance is a problem comparable in importance to the problem of unemployment. Secondly, the paper discusses the methodology involved in measuring health insurance coverage, and argues that the current method of estimation of the uninsured underestimates the extent that individuals go without health insurance. Third, the paper briefly introduces Amartya Sen's functioning and capabilities framework to suggest a way of representing the extent to which individuals are uninsured. Fourth, the paper sketches a means of operationalizing the Sen representation of the uninsured in terms of the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) measure.

  5. African media coverage of tobacco industry corporate social responsibility initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Cadman, Brie; Malone, Ruth E

    2016-03-07

    Guidelines for implementing the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) recommend prohibiting tobacco industry corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, but few African countries have done so. We examined African media coverage of tobacco industry CSR initiatives to understand whether and how such initiatives were presented to the public and policymakers. We searched two online media databases (Lexis Nexis and Access World News) for all news items published from 1998 to 2013, coding retrieved items through a collaborative, iterative process. We analysed the volume, type, provenance, slant and content of coverage, including the presence of tobacco control or tobacco interest themes. We found 288 news items; most were news stories published in print newspapers. The majority of news stories relied solely on tobacco industry representatives as news sources, and portrayed tobacco industry CSR positively. When public health voices and tobacco control themes were included, news items were less likely to have a positive slant. This suggests that there is a foundation on which to build media advocacy efforts. Drawing links between implementing the FCTC and prohibiting or curtailing tobacco industry CSR programmes may result in more public dialogue in the media about the negative impacts of tobacco company CSR initiatives.

  6. Rodeo medicine: considerations in event coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot J; Markey, Keith L

    2010-01-01

    Rodeo is an increasingly popular but dangerous sport, with injury rates higher than any other sport. While there are several organizations that oversee many of the rodeo competitions in the U.S., most events are non-sanctioned. Several factors contribute to the risk for injury, and medical coverage is usually volunteer-based. This article describes the common events that occur in most rodeo competitions, highlights the injuries most often documented in rodeo injury reporting, and suggests guidelines for preparation of medical coverage of a typical rodeo event.

  7. Contraceptive Coverage and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschann, Mary; Soon, Reni

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is reducing healthcare spending by shifting the focus of healthcare toward preventive care. Preventive services, including all FDA-approved contraception, must be provided to patients without cost-sharing under the ACA. No-cost contraception has been shown to increase uptake of highly effective birth control methods and reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion; however, some institutions and corporations argue that providing contraceptive coverage infringes on their religious beliefs. The contraceptive coverage mandate is evolving due to legal challenges, but it has already demonstrated success in reducing costs and improving access to contraception.

  8. Extreme sports: injuries and medical coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Craig C

    2002-10-01

    Extreme sports (including in-line skating, snowboarding, mountain bicycling, extreme skiing, rock climbing, indoor tackle football, kickboxing, skateboarding, and ultra-endurance racing) are growing in popularity. Often these sports are designed to expose athletes to greater thrills and risks than are found in traditional sporting activities. Despite this increased risk of injury, athletes competing in these sports often have little or no formal medical coverage. This article reviews what is known about this emerging area of sports medicine to assist physicians in preparing for medical coverage of these athletes and their competitions.

  9. Validation of Planning Target Volume Margins by Analyzing Intrafractional Localization Errors for 14 Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Three-Dimensional Cross-Correlation between the Prostate Images of Planning CT and Intrafraction Cone-Beam CT during Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenshiro Shiraishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-averaged intreatment prostate localization errors were calculated, for the first time, by three-dimensional prostate image cross-correlation between planning CT and intrafraction kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT. The intrafraction CBCT volume was reconstructed by an inhouse software after acquiring cine-mode projection images during VMAT delivery. Subsequently, the margin between a clinical target volume and a planning target volume (PTV was obtained by applying the van Herk and variant formulas using the calculated localization errors. The resulting PTV margins were approximately 2 mm in lateral direction and 4 mm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions, which are consistent with the margin prescription employed in our facility.

  10. 42 CFR 457.1010 - Purchase of family coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase of family coverage. 457.1010 Section 457... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1010 Purchase of family coverage. A State may purchase family coverage that includes coverage for targeted low-income children if the State establishes that— (a) Purchase...

  11. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.330 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark coverage is...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1412 - Compensation quarters of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation quarters of coverage. 404.1412... the Railroad Retirement Program § 404.1412 Compensation quarters of coverage. As used in this subpart, a compensation quarter of coverage is any quarter of coverage computed with respect to...

  13. 29 CFR 2.13 - Audiovisual coverage prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audiovisual coverage prohibited. 2.13 Section 2.13 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.13 Audiovisual coverage prohibited. The Department shall not permit audiovisual coverage of...

  14. Coverage of axillary lymph nodes with high tangential fields in breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alço, G; Iğdem, S I; Ercan, T; Dinçer, M; Sentürk, R; Atilla, S; Oral Zengin, F; Okkan, S

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the coverage of axillary nodal volumes with high tangent fields (HTF) in breast radiotherapy and to determine the utility of customised blocking. The treatment plans of 30 consecutive patients with early breast cancer were evaluated. The prescription dose was 50 Gy to the whole breast. Axillary level I-II lymph node volumes were delineated and the cranial border of the tangential fields was set just below the humeral head to create HTF. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to calculate the doses received by axillary nodal volumes. In a second planning set, HTF were modified with multileaf collimators (MLC-HTF) to obtain an adequate dose coverage of axillary nodes. The mean doses of the axillary nodes, the ipsilateral lung and heart were compared between the two plans (HTF vs MLC-HTF) using a paired sample t-test. The doses received by 95% of the breast volumes were not significantly different for the two plans. The doses received by 95% of the level I and II axillary volumes were 16.79 Gy and 11.59 Gy, respectively, for HTF, increasing to 47.2 Gy and 45.03 Gy, respectively, for MLC-HTF. Mean lung doses and per cent volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy (V20) were also increased from 6.47 Gy and 10.47%, respectively, for HTF, to 9.56 Gy and 16.77%, respectively, for MLC-HTF. Our results suggest that HTF do not adequately cover the level I and II axillary lymph node regions. Modification of HTF with MLC is necessary to obtain an adequate coverage of axillary levels without compromising healthy tissue in the majority of the patients.

  15. Coverage analysis for sensor networks based on Clifford algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE WeiXin; CAO WenMing; MENG Shan

    2008-01-01

    The coverage performance is the foundation of information acquisition in distrib-uted sensor networks. The previously proposed coverage work was mostly based on unit disk coverage model or ball coverage model in 2D or 3D space, respectively. However, most methods cannot give a homogeneous coverage model for targets with hybrid types. This paper presents a coverage analysis approach for sensor networks based on Clifford algebra and establishes a homogeneous coverage model for sensor networks with hybrid types of targets. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated with examples.

  16. Quality of coverage: conformity measures for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q-R Jackie; Wessels, B W; Einstein, D B; Maciunas, R J; Kim, E Y; Kinsella, T J

    2003-01-01

    In radiosurgery, conformity indices are often used to compare competing plans, evaluate treatment techniques, and assess clinical complications. Several different indices have been reported to measure the conformity of the prescription isodose to the target volume. The PITV recommended in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiosurgery guidelines, defined as the ratio of the prescription isodose volume (PI) over the target volume (TV), is probably the most frequently quoted. However, these currently used conformity indices depend on target size and shape complexity. The objectives of this study are to systematically investigate the influence of target size and shape complexity on existing conformity indices, and to propose a different conformity index-the conformity distance index (CDI). The CDI is defined as the average distance between the target and the prescription isodose line. This study examines five case groups with volumes of 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10.0, and 30.0 cm(3). Each case group includes four simulated shapes: a sphere, a moderate ellipsoid, an extreme ellipsoid, and a concave "C" shape. Prescription dose coverages are generated for three simplified clinical scenarios, i.e., the PI completely covers the TV with 1 and 2 mm margins, and the PI over-covers one half of the TV with a 1 mm margin and under-covers the other half with a 1 mm margin. Existing conformity indices and the CDI are calculated for these five case groups as well as seven clinical cases. When these values are compared, the RTOG PITV conformity index and other similar conformity measures have much higher values than the CDI for smaller and more complex shapes. With the same quality of prescription dose coverage, the CDI yields a consistent conformity measure. For the seven clinical cases, we also find that the same PITV values can be associated with very different conformity qualities while the CDI predicts the conformity quality accurately. In summary, the proposed CDI provides

  17. A planning study of radiotherapy dose escalation of PET-active tumour volumes in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloth Moeller, Ditte; Hoffmann, Lone (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)), e-mail: dittmoel@rm.dk; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Marquard Knap, Marianne (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)); Muren, Ludvig Paul (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2011-08-15

    Background. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have poor prognosis partly because of high local failure rates. Escalating the dose to the tumour may decrease the local failure rates and thereby, improve overall survival, but the risk of complications will limit the possibility to dose-escalate a broad range of patients. Escalating only PET-active areas of the tumour may increase the potential for reaching high doses for a variety of tumour sizes and locations. Material and methods. Ten patients were randomly chosen for a dose escalation planning study. A planning target volume (PTV) was defined on the mid-ventilation scan of a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scan and a boost planning target volume (PTV-boost) was defined based on a positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. Treatment plans were created aiming to reach the highest achievable of 74 Gy, 78 Gy or 82 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction prescribed to the PTV-boost without compromising normal tissue constraints and with the PTV prescribed in all cases a biological equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions of 66 Gy. Results. Nine of ten patients could be escalated to the highest dose level (82 Gy), while one patient was limited by the oesophagus dose constraint and could only reach 74 Gy. Four patients could be dose-escalated above 82 Gy without compromising normal tissue constraints. Conclusion. Dose-escalating only the PET-active areas of lung tumours to doses of 82 Gy while respecting normal tissue constraints is feasible, also in a series of unselected patients including cases with relatively large tumours

  18. A Survey on Coverage Control Protocols in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Nivedhitha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Coverage control algorithms play an important role in Wireless sensor network. Effective coverage control algorithms sense its coverage area with less energy spent. These coverage control models falls under various approaches like clustering, evolutionary, mobility based approaches. This paper makes a detailed survey on coverage control protocols coming under various classifications. In addition, it also discussed several protocols working mechanism with its evaluation metrics.

  19. Spatial Coverage Planning for Exploration Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Daniel; Estlin, Tara; Chouinard, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for an onboard planning and execution technology to support the exploration and characterization of geological features by autonomous rovers. A rover that is capable of deciding which observations are more important relieves the engineering team from much of the burden of attempting to make accurate predictions of what the available rover resources will be in the future. Instead, the science and engineering teams can uplink a set of observation requests that may potentially oversubscribe resources and let the rover use observation priorities and its current assessment of available resources to make decisions about which observations to perform and when to perform them. The algorithm gives the rover the ability to model spatial coverage quality based on data from different scientific instruments, to assess the impact of terrain on coverage quality, to incorporate user-defined priorities among subregions of the terrain to be covered, and to update coverage quality rankings of observations when terrain knowledge changes. When the rover is exploring large geographical features such as craters, channels, or boundaries between two different regions, an important factor in assessing the quality of a mission plan is how the set of chosen observations spatially cover the area of interest. The algorithm allows the rover to evaluate which observation to perform and to what extent the candidate observation will increase the spatial coverage of the plan.

  20. True Public Access Defibrillator Coverage is Overestimated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Christopher L.F.; Demirtas, Derya; Brooks, Steven C.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Chan, Timothy C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur at all times of the day and night. Immediate access to an AED increases survival. However, most public-location AEDs are placed in buildings without 24 hour access. Objective: To measure fixed-location public AED coverage of OHCAs by time

  1. 5 CFR 730.103 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) NOTIFICATION OF POST-EMPLOYMENT RESTRICTIONS § 730.103 Coverage. (a) The following individuals are subject to the post-employment conflict-of-interest restrictions in 18 U.S.C. 207(c), as amended by section 1125... executive, who is paid at a rate of basic pay equal to or greater than 86.5 percent of the rate for level...

  2. 5 CFR 890.102 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL... appointment established under § 772.102 of this chapter. (e) The Office of Personnel Management makes the... his/her coverage or the determination of when 365 days in nonpay status ends....

  3. 45 CFR 2543.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage. 2543.31 Section 2543.31 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT...

  4. Immunization coverage: role of sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhuwan; Mahajan, Hemant; Velhal, G D

    2013-01-01

    Children are considered fully immunized if they receive one dose of BCG, three doses of DPT and polio vaccine each, and one measles vaccine. In India, only 44% of children aged 12-23 months are fully vaccinated and about 5% have not received any vaccination at all. Even if national immunization coverage levels are sufficiently high to block disease transmission, pockets of susceptibility may act as potential reservoirs of infection. This study was done to assess the immunization coverage in an urban slum area and determine various sociodemographic variables affecting the same. A total of 210 children were selected from study population using WHO's 30 cluster sampling method. Coverage of BCG was found to be the highest (97.1%) while that of measles was the lowest. The main reason for noncompliance was given as child's illness at the time of scheduled vaccination followed by lack of knowledge regarding importance of immunization. Low education status of mother, high birth order, and place of delivery were found to be positively associated with low vaccination coverage. Regular IEC activities (group talks, role plays, posters, pamphlets, and competitions) should be conducted in the community to ensure that immunization will become a "felt need" of the mothers in the community.

  5. 5 CFR 630.602 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 630.602 Section 630.602 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Home Leave... Code, for the accumulation of a maximum of 45 days of annual leave earns and may be granted home...

  6. 77 FR 16453 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... is appropriately sold to students--for instance, foreign students studying for only one semester in... students' family income levels would disqualify them for subsidies. Several commenters requested that... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Parts 144, 147, and 158 CMS-9981-F RIN 0938-AQ95 Student Health Insurance Coverage...

  7. Dynamic Coverage of Mobile Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Benyuan; Nain, Philippe; Towsley, Don

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamic aspects of the coverage of a mobile sensor network resulting from continuous movement of sensors. As sensors move around, initially uncovered locations are likely to be covered at a later time. A larger area is covered as time continues, and intruders that might never be detected in a stationary sensor network can now be detected by moving sensors. However, this improvement in coverage is achieved at the cost that a location is covered only part of the time, alternating between covered and not covered. We characterize area coverage at specific time instants and during time intervals, as well as the time durations that a location is covered and uncovered. We further characterize the time it takes to detect a randomly located intruder. For mobile intruders, we take a game theoretic approach and derive optimal mobility strategies for both sensors and intruders. Our results show that sensor mobility brings about unique dynamic coverage properties not present in a stationary sens...

  8. 5 CFR 930.103 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 930.103 Section 930.103 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED... ensure the safe and efficient operation of such vehicles....

  9. Open Problem: Analyzing Ant Robot Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Efficient and inefficient ant coverage methods. Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence, 31, 41–76. The proofs can be found in the technical...Wagner, I., & Bruckstein, A. (2001). Special issue on ant robotics. Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence, 31. Wagner, I., Lindenbaum, M

  10. Binning metagenomic contigs by coverage and composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alneberg, J.; Bjarnason, B.S.; Bruijn, de I.; Schirmer, M.; Quick, J.; Ijaz, U.Z.; Lahti, L.M.; Loman, N.J.; Andersson, A.F.; Quince, C.

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun sequencing enables the reconstruction of genomes from complex microbial communities, but because assembly does not reconstruct entire genomes, it is necessary to bin genome fragments. Here we present CONCOCT, a new algorithm that combines sequence composition and coverage across multiple sam

  11. 29 CFR 1603.101 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Administrative Process § 1603.101 Coverage. Section 304 of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 applies to employment, which includes application for employment,...

  12. 5 CFR 610.304 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF DUTY Administrative Dismissals of Daily, Hourly, and Piecework Employees § 610.304 Coverage. This subpart applies to regular employees of the Federal Government paid at daily, hourly, or piecework rates. This subpart does not apply...

  13. 5 CFR 734.401 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... United States Customs Service; (12) The Office of Law Enforcement of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Employees in Certain Agencies and Positions § 734.401 Coverage....

  14. Determinants of vaccination coverage in rural Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meurice Francois P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood immunization is a cost effective public health strategy. Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI services have been provided in a rural Nigerian community (Sabongidda-Ora, Edo State at no cost to the community since 1998 through a privately financed vaccination project (private public partnership. The objective of this survey was to assess vaccination coverage and its determinants in this rural community in Nigeria Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in September 2006, which included the use of interviewer-administered questionnaire to assess knowledge of mothers of children aged 12–23 months and vaccination coverage. Survey participants were selected following the World Health Organization's (WHO immunization coverage cluster survey design. Vaccination coverage was assessed by vaccination card and maternal history. A child was said to be fully immunized if he or she had received all of the following vaccines: a dose of Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG, three doses of oral polio (OPV, three doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (DPT, three doses of hepatitis B (HB and one dose of measles by the time he or she was enrolled in the survey, i.e. between the ages of 12–23 months. Knowledge of the mothers was graded as satisfactory if mothers had at least a score of 3 out of a maximum of 5 points. Logistic regression was performed to identify determinants of full immunization status. Results Three hundred and thirty-nine mothers and 339 children (each mother had one eligible child were included in the survey. Most of the mothers (99.1% had very positive attitudes to immunization and > 55% were generally knowledgeable about symptoms of vaccine preventable diseases except for difficulty in breathing (as symptom of diphtheria. Two hundred and ninety-five mothers (87.0% had a satisfactory level of knowledge. Vaccination coverage against all the seven childhood vaccine preventable diseases was 61.9% although it

  15. International measles incidence and immunization coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert; Jolley, Damien

    2011-07-01

    Measles is exquisitely sensitive to immunization programs. We investigated the decline in measles incidence after immunization with 1 or 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine (MCV), with or without supplementary immunization activities (SIAs). Using data from the World Health Organization, we modeled the impact of measles immunization using a negative binomial regression model. All countries offer measles immunization, and 192 of 193 countries offer a second dose of MCV (MCV2), using either a routine second dose, SIAs, or both. The incidence of measles fell from a median of 70.9 cases/100,000/year when coverage with a first dose of MCV (MCV1) was in the range of 0%-39% to a median of .9 cases/100,000/year when MCV1 coverage was 90%-100%, in both cases with no MCV2. Further reductions followed the introduction of MCV2 and SIAs. Modeling showed that each 1% increase in MCV1 coverage was followed by a 2.0% decrease in incidence in the same and following years (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0%-1.9%, and 2.1%-1.9%, respectively). For a second dose, a rise of 1% in MCV2 coverage was followed by a decrease in measles incidence by .4% (95% CI, .3%-.5%) in the same year and .3% (95% CI, .2%-.5%) in the following year. SIAs were followed by decreases of measles incidence by 40.3% (95% CI, 46.3%-33.8%) in the same year and 45.2% (95% CI, 51.1%-48.7%) in the following year. A herd immunity effect was demonstrated with MCV1 coverage of >80%, and SIAs are an extraordinarily effective strategy for measles control.

  16. IMPACT OF TEHNICAL SPRAYING FACTORS ON LEAF AREA COVERAGE IN PERMANENT CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Tadić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches are conducted in vineyard and apple orchard with two different types of mist blowers, axial (Hardi Zaturn and radial (Hardi Arrow. The influence of major technical spraying factors (type of nozzle, working speed and spray volume were observed on coverage of the treated area, average droplet diameter, number of droplets per cm2 and drift. The working speed of sprayer was set at 6 and 8 km/h, and spray volume on 250, 325 and 400 l/ha for apple orchard and 250, 300 and 350 l/ha for vineyard. Researchers used Lechler blue (TR 8003, yellow (TR 8002 and green (TR 80015 nozzles. The research was set as three - factorial field experiment with 18 treatments in 4 repetitions, for different type of sprayer and permanent crops. We used 60 water sensitive papers for that treatment, which were processed with digital image analysis and ImageJ software. In addition to the main features of the research, research showed leaf area index and density, speed and flow of air current, working pressure, orientation of the nozzles and weather conditions, which were monitored during the study. Before the research, mist blowers are tested according to the European standard 13790. By decreasing the ISO number of nozzles and by increasing the working speed and spray volume, we found increase of area coverage, number of droplets per cm2and drift, and decrease of average droplet diameter. Also, by comparing the results of research exploitation by axial and radial mist blower in the vineyards and apple orchards, better results are achieved with radial mist blower (Hardi Arrow in both cases. The best relationship of area coverage and liquid drift in vineyard were achieved with 64.22% area coverage and 17.11% of liquid drift (green nozzle, working speed of 6 km/h, spray volume of 350 l/ha, and working pressure of 10.99 bar. In apple orchard the best relationship of area coverage and liquid drift were achieved with 59.55% area coverage and 21.10% of liquid drift (green

  17. Estimated cost of universal public coverage of prescription drugs in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Steven G.; Law, Michael; Daw, Jamie R.; Abraham, Liza; Martin, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Background: With the exception of Canada, all countries with universal health insurance systems provide universal coverage of prescription drugs. Progress toward universal public drug coverage in Canada has been slow, in part because of concerns about the potential costs. We sought to estimate the cost of implementing universal public coverage of prescription drugs in Canada. Methods: We used published data on prescribing patterns and costs by drug type, as well as source of funding (i.e., private drug plans, public drug plans and out-of-pocket expenses), in each province to estimate the cost of universal public coverage of prescription drugs from the perspectives of government, private payers and society as a whole. We estimated the cost of universal public drug coverage based on its anticipated effects on the volume of prescriptions filled, products selected and prices paid. We selected these parameters based on current policies and practices seen either in a Canadian province or in an international comparator. Results: Universal public drug coverage would reduce total spending on prescription drugs in Canada by $7.3 billion (worst-case scenario $4.2 billion, best-case scenario $9.4 billion). The private sector would save $8.2 billion (worst-case scenario $6.6 billion, best-case scenario $9.6 billion), whereas costs to government would increase by about $1.0 billion (worst-case scenario $5.4 billion net increase, best-case scenario $2.9 billion net savings). Most of the projected increase in government costs would arise from a small number of drug classes. Interpretation: The long-term barrier to the implementation of universal pharmacare owing to its perceived costs appears to be unjustified. Universal public drug coverage would likely yield substantial savings to the private sector with comparatively little increase in costs to government. PMID:25780047

  18. Oil adsorption ability of three-dimensional epicuticular wax coverages in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Elena V.; Hofmann, Philipp; Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2017-04-01

    Primary aerial surfaces of terrestrial plants are very often covered with three-dimensional epicuticular waxes. Such wax coverages play an important role in insect-plant interactions. Wax blooms have been experimentally shown in numerous previous studies to be impeding locomotion and reducing attachment of insects. Among the mechanisms responsible for these effects, a possible adsorption of insect adhesive fluid by highly porous wax coverage has been proposed (adsorption hypothesis). Recently, a great decrease in insect attachment force on artificial adsorbing materials was revealed in a few studies. However, adsorption ability of plant wax blooms was still not tested. Using a cryo scanning electron microscopy approach and high-speed video recordings of fluid drops behavior, followed by numerical analysis of experimental data, we show here that the three-dimensional epicuticular wax coverage in the waxy zone of Nepenthes alata pitcher adsorbs oil: we detected changes in the base, height, and volume of the oil drops. The wax layer thickness, differing in samples with untreated two-layered wax coverage and treated one-layered wax, did not significantly affect the drop behavior. These results provide strong evidence that three-dimensional plant wax coverages due to their adsorption capability are in general anti-adhesive for insects, which rely on wet adhesion.

  19. Oil adsorption ability of three-dimensional epicuticular wax coverages in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Elena V.; Hofmann, Philipp; Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2017-01-01

    Primary aerial surfaces of terrestrial plants are very often covered with three-dimensional epicuticular waxes. Such wax coverages play an important role in insect-plant interactions. Wax blooms have been experimentally shown in numerous previous studies to be impeding locomotion and reducing attachment of insects. Among the mechanisms responsible for these effects, a possible adsorption of insect adhesive fluid by highly porous wax coverage has been proposed (adsorption hypothesis). Recently, a great decrease in insect attachment force on artificial adsorbing materials was revealed in a few studies. However, adsorption ability of plant wax blooms was still not tested. Using a cryo scanning electron microscopy approach and high-speed video recordings of fluid drops behavior, followed by numerical analysis of experimental data, we show here that the three-dimensional epicuticular wax coverage in the waxy zone of Nepenthes alata pitcher adsorbs oil: we detected changes in the base, height, and volume of the oil drops. The wax layer thickness, differing in samples with untreated two-layered wax coverage and treated one-layered wax, did not significantly affect the drop behavior. These results provide strong evidence that three-dimensional plant wax coverages due to their adsorption capability are in general anti-adhesive for insects, which rely on wet adhesion. PMID:28367985

  20. Effects of coverage gap reform on adherence to diabetes medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Feng; Patel, Bimal V; Brunetti, Louis

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the impact of Part D coverage gap reform on diabetes medication adherence. Retrospective data analysis based on pharmacy claims data from a national pharmacy benefit manager. We used a difference-in-difference-indifference method to evaluate the impact of coverage gap reform on adherence to diabetes medications. Two cohorts (2010 and 2011) were constructed to represent the last year before Affordable Care Act (ACA) reform and the first year after reform, respectively. Each patient had 2 observations: 1 before and 1 after entering the coverage gap. Patients in each cohort were divided into groups based on type of gap coverage: no coverage, partial coverage (generics only), and full coverage. Following ACA reform, patients with no gap coverage and patients with partial gap coverage experienced substantial drops in copayments in the coverage gap in 2011. Their adherence to diabetes medications in the gap, measured by percentage of days covered, improved correspondingly (2.99 percentage points, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-5.48, P = .019 for patients with no coverage; 6.46 percentage points, 95% CI 3.34-9.58, P gap in 2011. However, their adherence did not increase (-0.13 percentage point, P = .8011). In the first year of ACA coverage gap reform, copayments in the gap decreased substantially for all patients. Patients with no coverage and patients with partial coverage in the gap had better adherence in the gap in 2011.

  1. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant.

  2. Behavioral consequences of conflict-oriented health news coverage: the 2009 mammography guideline controversy and online information seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Brian E; Friedenberg, Laura M; Southwell, Brian G; Slater, Jonathan S

    2012-01-01

    Building on channel complementarity theory and media-system dependency theory, this study explores the impact of conflict-oriented news coverage of health issues on information seeking online. Using Google search data as a measure of behavior, we demonstrate that controversial news coverage of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's November 2009 recommendations for changes in breast cancer screening guidelines strongly predicted the volume of same-day online searches for information about mammograms. We also found that this relationship did not exist 1 year prior to the coverage, during which mammography news coverage did not focus on the guideline controversy, suggesting that the controversy frame may have driven search behavior. We discuss the implications of these results for health communication scholars and practitioners.

  3. Insurance coverage decisions for pediatric proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojerholm, Eric; Hill-Kayser, Christine E

    2017-08-07

    Proton beam therapy (PBT) holds promise for pediatric patients, but level 1 evidence is not available. In this context, we examined insurance coverage decisions at our facility from 2010 to 2015. PBT was initially denied for 11% of pediatric cases. However, nearly all denials were overturned on appeal-a process that often delayed care by more than a week. Despite unfavorable language in coverage policies, real-world decisions were eventual approval in >99% of cases. Payers appear to have largely accepted the current level-of-evidence for pediatric PBT, but all parties spend significant time and resources on appeals. Streamlined approval processes could align incentives among stakeholders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Global Moon Coverage via Hyperbolic Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Brent; Strange, Nathan; Campagnola, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The scientific desire for global coverage of moons such as Jupiter's Galilean moons or Saturn's Titan has invariably led to the design of orbiter missions. These orbiter missions require a large amount of propellant needed to insert into orbit around such small bodies, and for a given launch vehicle, the additional propellant mass takes away from mass that could otherwise be used for scientific instrumentation on a multiple flyby-only mission. This paper will present methods--expanding upon techniques developed for the design of the Cassini prime and extended missions--to obtain near global moon coverage through multiple flybys. Furthermore we will show with proper instrument suite selection, a flyby-only mission can provide science return similar (and in some cases greater) to that of an orbiter mission.

  5. The Role of MRSI in Target Volume Definition for Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Robatjazi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recently, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI, as a functional imaging method, has been used for clinical target volume definition. In this study, we used this method to define the target volume in prostate radiotherapy. Material and Method: In this study, we used images of 20 prostate cancer cases. MRSI and MRI images were fused with CT images. Then, treatment planning was preformed for each patient using three methods: CT, CT+MRI and CT+MRSI planning. Results: The volumes of MRICTV and MRIPTV were on average 12.83% and 8.97% lower than the corresponding CTCTV and CTPTV volumes, respectively. For MRSI, the CTV and PTV volumes were 21% and 27.41% greater than the corresponding CT-based volumes. Maximum dose to rectum showed a 0.58% increase in MRSI relative to CT, and 1.09% reduction in MRI relative to CT. Maximum dose variation in femoral heads showed a 5.4% increase in MRSI relative to CT and 0.67% reduction in MRI relative to CT. Discussion and Conclusion: Application of MRSI for target volume definition of prostate cancer leads to an increase in this volume in comparison to CT planning alone. In this imaging technique, protocol and resolution should be considered to determine the target volume exactly.

  6. Perplexity Analysis of Obesity News Coverage

    OpenAIRE

    McFarlane, Delano J.; Elhadad, Noémie; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    An important task performed during the analysis of health news coverage is the identification of news articles that are related to a specific health topic (e.g. obesity). This is often done using a combination of keyword searching and manual encoding of news content. Statistical language models and their evaluation metric, perplexity, may help to automate this task. A perplexity study of obesity news was performed to evaluate perplexity as a measure of the similarity of news corpora to obesit...

  7. Influenza vaccination coverage among Spanish children, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-de-Andres, Ana; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2009-07-01

    Traditionally, influenza is not considered to be a serious disease in healthy children. However, for vulnerable populations, such as young children and those with chronic medical conditions, influenza can lead to serious complications and even death. This study aimed to assess vaccination coverage among Spanish children under 16 years of age in 2006, and to describe the factors associated with vaccination. Cross-sectional survey. In total, 8851 records of children included in the Spanish National Health Survey for 2006 were analysed. The reply ('yes' or 'no') to the question: 'Did you have a flu shot in the latest campaign?' was used as a dependent variable. Influenza vaccine coverage was calculated as the percentage of individuals aged 6 months to 16 years whose parents reported that they had been vaccinated against influenza in the most recent campaign. The influence of sociodemographic variables on vaccination and the presence of associated chronic diseases (asthma and/or diabetes) were also analysed. Vaccination coverage among Spanish children in 2006 was 6.82%: 19.43% in children with associated conditions (asthma and/or diabetes), and 5.81% in healthy children. The only factor significantly associated with influenza vaccination in children with associated conditions was household income; children with a lower household monthly income were more likely to have been vaccinated against influenza than children with a higher household monthly income (odds ratio 1.96). In children for whom vaccination is not indicated, the probability of being vaccinated against influenza was greater in those whose parents were not university graduates. Influenza vaccination coverage in Spanish children is low. Socio-economic inequalities continue to be a factor at the time of vaccination.

  8. Analyst Coverage and Tax Reporting Aggressiveness

    OpenAIRE

    McInerney, Megan Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The role of analysts in corporate governance has been examined extensively in the accounting literature. Two conflicting representations of the influence of analysts have emerged. Analysts are either viewed as external monitors of corporate behavior, thereby reducing agency costs; or they are viewed as exerting additional pressure on management to meet earnings forecasts, which may contribute to aggressive corporate behavior. Studies exist that examine the impact of analyst coverage in a f...

  9. Measuring Progress towards Universal Health Coverage

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The last few years have seen a growing commitment worldwide to universal health coverage (UHC). Yet there is a lack of clarity on how to measure progress towards UHC. This paper proposes a ‘mashup’ index that captures both aspects of UHC: that everyone—irrespective of their ability-to-pay—gets the health services they need; and that nobody suffers undue financial hardship as a result of re...

  10. The role of delineation education programs for improving interobserver variability in target volume delineation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Cem; Cengiz, Mustafa; Guler, Ozan C; Dolek, Yemliha; Ozkok, Serdar

    2017-05-01

    To assess whether delineation courses for radiation oncologists improve interobserver variability in target volume delineation for post-operative gastric cancer radiotherapy planning. 29 radiation oncologists delineated target volumes in a gastric cancer patient. An experienced radiation oncologist lectured about delineation based on contouring atlas and delineation recommendations. After the course, the radiation oncologists, blinded to the previous delineation, provided delineation for the same patient. The difference between delineated volumes and reference volumes for pre- and post-course clinical target volume (CTV) were 19.8% (-42.4 to 70.6%) and 12.3% (-12.0 to 27.3%) (p = 0.26), respectively. The planning target volume (PTV) differences pre- and post-course according to the reference volume were 20.5% (-40.7 to 93.7%) and 13.1% (-10.6 to 29.5%) (p = 0.30), respectively. The concordance volumes between the pre- and post-course CTVs and PTVs were 467.1 ± 89.2 vs 597.7 ± 54.6 cm(3) (p target volume changes on toxicity and local control should be evaluated for further studies. Advances in knowledge: This study demonstrated that a delineation course based on current recommendations helped physicians delineate smaller and more homogeneous target volumes. Better target volume delineation allows proper target volume irradiation and preventing unnecessary normal tissue irradiation.

  11. Double Barrier Coverage in Dense Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Dong Jiang; Guo-Liang Chen

    2008-01-01

    When a sensor network is deployed to detect objects penetrating a protected region, it is not necessary to have every point in the deployment region covered by a sensor. It is enough if the penetrating objects are detected at some point in their trajectory. If a sensor network guarantees that every penetrating object will be detected by two distinct sensors at the same time somewhere in this area, we say that the network provides double barrier coverage (DBC). In this paper, we propose a new planar structure of Sparse Delaunay Triangulation (SparseDT), and prove some elaborate attributes of it. We develop theoretical foundations for double barrier coverage, and propose efficient algorithms with NS2 simulator using which one can activate the necessary sensors to guarantee double barrier coverage while the other sensors go to sleep. The upper and lower bounds of number of active nodes are determined, and we show that high-speed target will be detected efficiently with this configuration.

  12. Emergency room coverage: an evolving crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Steven P

    2004-08-01

    Historically, a newly graduated plastic surgeon in the United States could build a practice from his or her emergency room coverage. The historical cliche was for the surgeon to be affable, able, and available, and from that basis one's practice would grow. Emergency room exposure was an avenue for starting a practice, developing recognition, and, after that, building a referral pattern. Recently, the cross-shifting influence of management care, rising malpractice insurance costs, and risk ratio are changing this cliche to a crisis. An evaluation of a 2 1/2-year exposure to emergency room coverage has revealed a completely different profile. A total of 300 patient visits resulting in 69 surgical operations were evaluated for insurance and remuneration history. The findings indicated a significant remuneration dilemma for emergency room coverage. Interestingly, a remuneration problem exists in a market different from what one would expect. In this study, a sample from a suburban hospital, rather than an inner-city university hospital, is the greater problem.

  13. Assessing Requirements Quality through Requirements Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Ajitha; Heimdahl, Mats; Woodham, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    In model-based development, the development effort is centered around a formal description of the proposed software system the model. This model is derived from some high-level requirements describing the expected behavior of the software. For validation and verification purposes, this model can then be subjected to various types of analysis, for example, completeness and consistency analysis [6], model checking [3], theorem proving [1], and test-case generation [4, 7]. This development paradigm is making rapid inroads in certain industries, e.g., automotive, avionics, space applications, and medical technology. This shift towards model-based development naturally leads to changes in the verification and validation (V&V) process. The model validation problem determining that the model accurately captures the customer's high-level requirements has received little attention and the sufficiency of the validation activities has been largely determined through ad-hoc methods. Since the model serves as the central artifact, its correctness with respect to the users needs is absolutely crucial. In our investigation, we attempt to answer the following two questions with respect to validation (1) Are the requirements sufficiently defined for the system? and (2) How well does the model implement the behaviors specified by the requirements? The second question can be addressed using formal verification. Nevertheless, the size and complexity of many industrial systems make formal verification infeasible even if we have a formal model and formalized requirements. Thus, presently, there is no objective way of answering these two questions. To this end, we propose an approach based on testing that, when given a set of formal requirements, explores the relationship between requirements-based structural test-adequacy coverage and model-based structural test-adequacy coverage. The proposed technique uses requirements coverage metrics defined in [9] on formal high-level software

  14. Assessing the optimal liquid volume to be sprayed on isolated olive trees according to their canopy volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Fuentes, A; Llorens, J; Rodríguez-Lizana, A; Cuenca, A; Gil, E; Blanco-Roldán, G L; Gil-Ribes, J A

    2016-10-15

    The application of pesticides to traditional and intensive olive orchards in Southern Spain has led to environmental problems. More specifically, the lack of an accurate, useful criterion to regulate the spray volume in relation to canopy characteristics has led to spray drift and runoff, which are threats to local ecosystems. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal relationship between canopy volume and the spray application volume, called specific spray volume, CV, through laboratory and field trials. In the laboratory trial, 6 specific spray volumes (0.05, 0.08, 0.10, 0.12, 0.15, and 0.20Lm(-3)) were tested in a specially designed structure containing small, live olive trees in order to simulate an intensive plantation system. The model aimed to evaluate the coverage of pesticide application on water sensitive paper (WSP) collectors. In the field trial, the three laboratory specific spray volumes that gave the best coverage values were tested on live, intensively managed trees, whose crown volume was manually measured. Food dye E-102 was used to determine the spray deposition on artificial targets (10×10cm absorbent paper pieces), and WSP was used to evaluate spray coverage. The spray penetration and deposit homogeneity inside the canopy were also evaluated. Weather conditions during the field trial were monitored with a weather station. The results of the laboratory trial showed that the three best specific spray volumes were 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12Lm(-3), resulting in mean coverage values of approximately 30%. The ANOVA of the field trial results showed that the 0.12Lm(-3) was the optimal specific spray volume for isolated olive trees. This specific spray volume gave the highest mean deposits, the best efficiency (as measured by the greatest normalized deposit), the most favourable penetration and homogeneity, and the highest coverage values.

  15. 1990 point population coverage for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a point coverage of the 1990 Census of Population and Housing for the conterminous United States. (Alaska and Hawaii are available separately). The coverage...

  16. Exposing Coverage Data to the Semantic Web within the MELODIES project: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechert, Maik; Blower, Jon; Griffiths, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Coverage data, typically big in data volume, assigns values to a given set of spatiotemporal positions, together with metadata on how to interpret those values. Existing storage formats like netCDF, HDF and GeoTIFF all have various restrictions that prevent them from being preferred formats for use over the web, especially the semantic web. Factors that are relevant here are the processing complexity, the semantic richness of the metadata, and the ability to request partial information, such as a subset or just the appropriate metadata. Making coverage data available within web browsers opens the door to new ways for working with such data, including new types of visualization and on-the-fly processing. As part of the European project MELODIES (http://melodiesproject.eu) we look into the challenges of exposing such coverage data in an interoperable and web-friendly way, and propose solutions using a host of emerging technologies like JSON-LD, the DCAT and GeoDCAT-AP ontologies, the CoverageJSON format, and new approaches to REST APIs for coverage data. We developed the CoverageJSON format within the MELODIES project as an additional way to expose coverage data to the web, next to having simple rendered images available using standards like OGC's WMS. CoverageJSON partially incorporates JSON-LD but does not encode individual data values as semantic resources, making use of the technology in a practical manner. The development also focused on it being a potential output format for OGC WCS. We will demonstrate how existing netCDF data can be exposed as CoverageJSON resources on the web together with a REST API that allows users to explore the data and run operations such as spatiotemporal subsetting. We will show various use cases from the MELODIES project, including reclassification of a Land Cover dataset client-side within the browser with the ability for the user to influence the reclassification result by making use of the above technologies.

  17. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1-2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85-6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  18. 42 CFR 435.350 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 435.350 Section 435... ISLANDS, AND AMERICAN SAMOA Optional Coverage of the Medically Needy § 435.350 Coverage for certain aliens... treatment of an emergency medical condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter, to those aliens...

  19. 42 CFR 436.128 - Coverage for certain qualified aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain qualified aliens. 436.128... Mandatory Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.128 Coverage for certain qualified aliens. The agency... § 440.255(c) of this chapter to those aliens described in § 436.406(c) of this subpart. ...

  20. 42 CFR 457.420 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 457.420 Section 457.420 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.420 Benchmark health benefits coverage....

  1. 29 CFR 2.12 - Audiovisual coverage permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audiovisual coverage permitted. 2.12 Section 2.12 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.12 Audiovisual coverage permitted. The following are the types of hearings where the...

  2. 42 CFR 457.475 - Limitations on coverage: Abortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitations on coverage: Abortions. 457.475 Section... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.475 Limitations on coverage: Abortions. (a) General rule. FFP under title XXI is not available in expenditures for an abortion, or in expenditures for...

  3. Extent of Drug Coverage across Generic Drug Discount Programs offered by Community Pharmacies: A look at five Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshali K. Patel, MS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic conditions are expensive to treat because of the ongoing prescription cost burden. Generic drug discount programs (GDDPs that offer generics at discounted price may prove beneficial to reduce pharmacy costs for the same.Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which GDDPs provide drug coverage for five common chronic conditions.Methods: A content analyses of preexisting information was conducted. Extent of coverage based on top 200 generic drugs prescribed during 2008 for the treatment of chronic conditions such as hypertension, mental disorders, arthritis, pulmonary/respiratory conditions, and diabetes were identified. Commonly prescribed medications for these diseases were identified using published peer reviewed clinical guidelines. List of drugs covered under a GDDP for stores, Wal-Mart, Walgreens, CVS, Kroger, HEB, Target, and Randalls were obtained and compared to assess drug coverage by retail dollar sales and sales volume. Descriptive statistics and frequency/percentage of coverage were reported using SAS 9.2.Results: GDDPs covered the highest number of drugs for hypertension (21-27 across different GDDPs and the least (3-5 across different GDDPs for pulmonary/respiratory conditions. Arthritis (5-11, mental disorders (6-11 and diabetes (5-7 had similar coverage. When compared to the top 200 drugs by retail dollars spent during 2008, hypertension (68%-87% and diabetes (63%-88% had the highest coverage followed by respiratory conditions (30%-50%, arthritis (22%-48%, and mental disorders (21%-38%. Similar result was obtained when GDDP coverage was compared with the top 200 generic drugs by sales volume, where diabetes (63-88% and hypertension (57%-74% had the highest coverage and mental disorders remained the lowest (23%-37%.Conclusion/Implications: Drug coverage in GDDPs varied by pharmacies across the five common chronic conditions evaluated which may limit accessibility of these programs for

  4. SU-E-T-170: Characterization of the Location, Extent, and Proximity to Critical Structures of Target Volumes Provides Detail for Improved Outcome Predictions Among Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Moore, J; Rosati, L; Mian, O; Narang, A; Herman, J; McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, size, location and proximity of the target to critical structures influence treatment decisions. It has been shown that proximity of the target predicts dosimetric sparing of critical structures. In addition to dosimetry, precise location of disease has further implications such as tumor invasion, or proximity to major arteries that inhibit surgery. Knowledge of which patients can be converted to surgical candidates by radiation may have high impact on future treat/no-treat decisions. We propose a method to improve our characterization of the location of pancreatic cancer and treatment volume extent with respect to nearby arteries with the goal of developing features to improve clinical predictions and decisions. Methods: Oncospace is a local learning health system that systematically captures clinical outcomes and all aspects of radiotherapy treatment plans, including overlap volume histograms (OVH) – a measure of spatial relationships between two structures. Minimum and maximum distances of PTV and OARs based on OVH, PTV volume, anatomic location by ICD-9 code, and surgical outcome were queried. Normalized distance to center from the left and right kidney was calculated to indicate tumor location and laterality. Distance to critical arteries (celiac, superior mesenteric, common hepatic) is validated by surgical status (borderline resectable, locally advanced converted to resectable). Results: There were 205 pancreas stereotactic body radiotherapy patients treated from 2009–2015 queried. Location/laterality of tumor based on kidney OVH show strong trends between location by OVH and by ICD-9. Compared to the locally advanced group, the borderline resectable group showed larger geometrical distance from critical arteries (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our platform enabled analysis of shape/size-location relationships. These data suggest that PTV volume and attention to distance between PTVs and surrounding OARs and major arteries may be

  5. Chemical information science coverage in Chemical Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, G

    1987-02-01

    For many years Chemical Abstracts has included in its coverage publications on chemical documentation or chemical information science. Although the bulk of those publications can be found in section 20 of Chemical Abstracts, many relevant articles were found scattered among 39 other sections of CA in 1984-1985. In addition to the scattering of references in CA, the comprehensiveness of Chemical Abstracts as a secondary source for chemical information science is called into question. Data are provided on the journals that contributed the most references on chemical information science and on the languages of publication of relevant articles.

  6. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, John P., E-mail: john.kirkpatrick@dm.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Wang, Zhiheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Sampson, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  7. Development of trip coverage analysis methodology - CATHENA trip coverage analysis model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Ho; Ohn, M. Y.; Cho, C. H.; Huh, J. Y.; Na, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, H. H.; Kim, S. W.; Bae, C. J.; Kim, T. M.; Kim, S. R.; Han, B. S.; Moon, B. J.; Oh, M. T. [Korea Power Engineering Co., Yongin (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    This report describes the CATHENA model for trip coverage analysis. This model is prepared based on the Wolsong 2 design data and consist of primary heat transport system, shutdown system, steam and feedwater system, reactor regulating system, heat transport pressure and inventory control system, and steam generator level and pressure control system. The new features and modified parts from the Wolsong 2 CATHENA LOCA Model required for trip coverage analysis is described. this model is tested by simulation of steady state at 100 % FP and at several low powers. Also, the cases of power rundown and power runup are tested. 17 refs., 124 figs., 19 tabs. (Author)

  8. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  9. A Sweep Coverage Scheme Based on Vehicle Routing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As an emerging coverage problem in wireless sensor networks, sweep coverage which introducing mobile sensors to cover points of interest within certain time interval can satisfy monitoring request in some particular application scenarios with less number of nodes than the conventional static coverage approach. In this work, aiming to support dynamical POI coverage and data delivery simultaneously, a novel sweep coverage scheme, named VRPSC(Vehicle Routing Problem based Sweep Coverage, is proposed by modeling the minimum number of required sensors problem in sweep coverage as a Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP. In VRPSC, an insertion algorithm is first introduced to create the initial scanning routes for POIs, and then the Simulated Annealing is employed to optimize these routes. The simulation results show that the VRPSC scheme achieves better performance than existing schemes. 

  10. Monitoring of vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li; Li Li-juan; Liang Li-qiao; Li Jiu-yi

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of vegetation coverage on a small scale is the foundation for the monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage and of the inversion model of monitoring vegetation coverage on a large scale by remote sensing. Using the object-oriented analytical software,Definiens Professional 5,a new method for calculating vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images(aerial photographs or near-surface photography)is proposed. Our research supplies references to remote sensing measurements of vegetation coverage on a small scale and accurate fundamental data for the inversion model of vegetation coverage on a large and intermediatc scale to improve the accuracy of remote sensing monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage.

  11. Armenian media coverage of science topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhitaryan, Marie

    2016-12-01

    The article discusses features and issues of Armenian media coverage on scientific topics and provides recommendations on how to promote scientific topics in media. The media is more interested in social or public reaction rather than in scientific information itself. Medical science has a large share of the global media coverage. It is followed by articles about environment, space, technology, physics and other areas. Armenian media mainly tends to focus on a scientific topic if at first sight it contains something revolutionary. Media primarily reviews whether that scientific study can affect the Armenian economy and only then decides to refer to it. Unfortunately, nowadays the perception of science is a little distorted in media. We can often see headlines of news where is mentioned that the scientist has made "an invention". Nowadays it is hard to see the border between a scientist and an inventor. In fact, the technological term "invention" attracts the media by making illusionary sensation and ensuring large audience. The report also addresses the "Gitamard" ("A science-man") special project started in 2016 in Mediamax that tells about scientists and their motivations.

  12. Worsening of attitudes toward epilepsy following less influential media coverage of epilepsy-related car accidents: An infodemiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Kurahashi, Hirokazu; Takasu, Michihiko; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Nakazawa, Mika; Igarashi, Ayuko; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate changes in the attitudes of nonmedical university students toward epilepsy in 2015, the present study compared the results of questionnaire surveys from four different time periods: before media coverage of epilepsy-related car accidents (2008-2010), during a period of abundant media coverage (2011-2012), after media coverage (2013-2014), and after novel media coverage (2015). The nonmedical students that completed the questionnaire were divided into four groups: 2008-2010, 2011-2012, 2013-2014, and 2015. The rates of students that had read or heard about epilepsy decreased significantly in 2015 compared with those in 2013-2014. Attitudes toward epilepsy had also worsened in 2015. The rates of students that would not oppose their children playing with or attending school alongside children with epilepsy and those who thought that people with epilepsy should be hired in the same way as other people had decreased significantly in 2015 compared with those in 2011-2012 and 2013-2014. Analyses of information-seeking behavior on the Internet showed that the increase in Google search volume and Wikipedia page views was much less in 2015 than in 2011 and 2012. These findings suggest that familiarity with epilepsy had worsened even after media coverage of novel epilepsy-related car accidents. This suggests that media coverage in 2015 was less influential than that in 2011 and 2012. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Biostatistics, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Neurosurgery, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  14. Acta Dermatovenerologica Alpina, Pannonica et Adriatica accepted for coverage in Thomson Reuters' Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Miljković, Jovan; Triglav, Tina

    2016-09-01

    Acta Dermatovenerologica Alpina, Pannonica et Adriatica (Acta Dermatovenerol APA) is the leading journal in dermatology and sexually transmitted infections in the region. Several important steps were taken during the last 25 years to improve the journal's quality, global visibility, and international impact. After a 1-year trial period, Thomson Reuters recently informed the editorial office that they had accepted Acta Dermatovenerol APA for coverage in Thomson Reuters' new index in the Web of Science Core Collection called the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI). The coverage of Acta Dermatovenerol APA begins with the journal content published online in 2016; that is, from volume 25 onwards.

  15. Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James; Buchan, James; Cometto, Giorgio; David, Benedict; Dussault, Gilles; Fogstad, Helga; Fronteira, Inês; Lozano, Rafael; Nyonator, Frank; Pablos-Méndez, Ariel; Quain, Estelle E; Starrs, Ann; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2013-11-01

    Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) involves distributing resources, especially human resources for health (HRH), to match population needs. This paper explores the policy lessons on HRH from four countries that have achieved sustained improvements in UHC: Brazil, Ghana, Mexico and Thailand. Its purpose is to inform global policy and financial commitments on HRH in support of UHC. The paper reports on country experiences using an analytical framework that examines effective coverage in relation to the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality (AAAQ) of HRH. The AAAQ dimensions make it possible to perform tracing analysis on HRH policy actions since 1990 in the four countries of interest in relation to national trends in workforce numbers and population mortality rates. The findings inform key principles for evidence-based decision-making on HRH in support of UHC. First, HRH are critical to the expansion of health service coverage and the package of benefits; second, HRH strategies in each of the AAAQ dimensions collectively support achievements in effective coverage; and third, success is achieved through partnerships involving health and non-health actors. Facing the unprecedented health and development challenges that affect all countries and transforming HRH evidence into policy and practice must be at the heart of UHC and the post-2015 development agenda. It is a political imperative requiring national commitment and leadership to maximize the impact of available financial and human resources, and improve healthy life expectancy, with the recognition that improvements in health care are enabled by a health workforce that is fit for purpose.

  16. Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) involves distributing resources, especially human resources for health (HRH), to match population needs. This paper explores the policy lessons on HRH from four countries that have achieved sustained improvements in UHC: Brazil, Ghana, Mexico and Thailand. Its purpose is to inform global policy and financial commitments on HRH in support of UHC.

  17. DMLC tracking and gating can improve dose coverage for prostate VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvill, E. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Poulsen, P. R. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Booth, J. T. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia and School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); O’Brien, R. T.; Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ng, J. A. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess and compare the dosimetric impact of dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking and gating as motion correction strategies to account for intrafraction motion during conventionally fractionated prostate radiotherapy. Methods: A dose reconstruction method was used to retrospectively assess the dose distributions delivered without motion correction during volumetric modulated arc therapy fractions for 20 fractions of five prostate cancer patients who received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. These delivered dose distributions were compared with the dose distributions which would have been delivered had DMLC tracking or gating motion correction strategies been implemented. The delivered dose distributions were constructed by incorporating the observed prostate motion with the patient's original treatment plan to simulate the treatment delivery. The DMLC tracking dose distributions were constructed using the same dose reconstruction method with the addition of MLC positions from Linac log files obtained during DMLC tracking simulations with the observed prostate motions input to the DMLC tracking software. The gating dose distributions were constructed by altering the prostate motion to simulate the application of a gating threshold of 3 mm for 5 s. Results: The delivered dose distributions showed that dosimetric effects of intrafraction prostate motion could be substantial for some fractions, with an estimated dose decrease of more than 19% and 34% from the planned CTVD{sub 99%} and PTV D{sub 95%} values, respectively, for one fraction. Evaluation of dose distributions for DMLC tracking and gating deliveries showed that both interventions were effective in improving the CTV D{sub 99%} for all of the selected fractions to within 4% of planned value for all fractions. For the delivered dose distributions the difference in rectum V{sub 65%} for the individual fractions from planned ranged from −44% to 101% and for the bladder V{sub 65

  18. The environment in the headlines. Newspaper coverage of climate change and euthropication in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyytimaeki, J.

    2009-07-01

    Media representations are an important part of the dynamics of contemporary socio-ecological systems. The media agenda influences and interacts with the public and the policy agenda and all of these are connected to the changes of the state of the environment. Partly as a result of media debate, some issues are considered serious environmental problems, some risks are amplified while others are attenuated, and some proposals for remedies are highlighted and others downplayed. Research on environmental media coverage has focused predominantly on the English-speaking industrialised countries. This thesis presents an analysis of Finnish environmental coverage, focusing on representations of climate change and eutrophication from 1990- 2010. The main source of material is Helsingin Sanomat (HS), the most widely-read newspaper in Finland. The analysis adopts the perspective of contextual constructivism and the agenda-setting function of the mass media. Selected models describing the evolution of environmental coverage are applied within an interdisciplinary emphasis. The results show that the amount of newspaper content on eutrophication and climate change has generally increased, although both debates have been characterised by intense fluctuations. The volume of the coverage on climate change has been higher than that of eutrophication, especially since 2006. Eutrophication was highlighted most during the late 1990s while the peaks of climate coverage occurred between 2007 and 2009. Two key factors have shaped the coverage of eutrophication. First, the coverage is shaped by ecological factors, especially by the algal occurrences that are largely dependent on weather conditions. Second, the national algal monitoring and communication system run by environmental authorities has provided the media with easy-to-use data on the algal situation during the summertime. The peaks of climate coverage have been caused by an accumulation of several contributing factors. The two

  19. Spatial Coverage Planning for a Planetary Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Daniel M.; Estlin, Tara; Chouinard, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    We are developing onboard planning and execution technologies to support the exploration and characterization of geological features by autonomous rovers. In order to generate high quality mission plans, an autonomous rover must reason about the relative importance of the observations it can perform. In this paper we look at the scientific criteria of selecting observations that improve the quality of the area covered by samples. Our approach makes use of a priori information, if available, and allows scientists to mark sub-regions of the area with relative priorities for exploration. We use an efficient algorithm for prioritizing observations based on spatial coverage that allows the system to update observation rankings as new information is gained during execution.

  20. The adequacy of college health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, M; Brauer, M; Weader, R; Newacheck, P

    1991-01-01

    This analysis of private health insurance plans offered in 100 four-year colleges and universities in 1988 indicates a tremendous diversity in plan options, benefits covered, cost-sharing requirements, and catastrophic protections. Consistent with relatively low premium prices, most student health insurance plans offer limited benefits and expose students to significant out-of-pocket medical cost liabilities. Only a minority of schools use financial incentives, such as preferred provider arrangements, to integrate their health insurance plans with their university health service system. We conclude that universities should carefully reexamine the adequacy of their health insurance plans and their relationship to student health centers. As more students rely on student health insurance as their only source of coverage, the quality of these plans assumes an even greater importance.

  1. [Pilot study on compulsory vaccination coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandolfo, M E; Lauria, L; Medda, E; Bucciarelli, M; Andreozzi, S; Salinetti, S; Sitzia, G; Bernacchia, R

    1999-01-01

    The disappearance of diphtheria and poliomyelitis is the best evidence of the efficacy of the vaccination strategies adopted in Italy. The active offer of the prophylaxis, reinforced by law, has characterised the operational aspects of the strategy. The active surveillance system is the main tool to take under control the effectiveness of health services responsible for vaccination. This system could be more easily implemented if the health services will be given a specific software aiming to handle and evaluate vaccination registers. The present pilot study, performed in the regions Marche and Sardegna, is an example of active surveillance and it is based on the ARVA software produced by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. The results show a good level of coverage (> 95%) within the second year of life. Unsatisfactory results were obtained on the timing of vaccinations, as recommended by the vaccination schedule, mostly for the third doses.

  2. Mobile Geometric Graphs: Detection, Coverage and Percolation

    CERN Document Server

    Peres, Yuval; Sousi, Perla; Stauffer, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    We consider the following dynamic Boolean model introduced by van den Berg, Meester and White (1997). At time 0, let the nodes of the graph be a Poisson point process in R^d with constant intensity and let each node move independently according to Brownian motion. At any time t, we put an edge between every pair of nodes if their distance is at most r. We study three features in this model: detection (the time until a target point---fixed or moving---is within distance r from some node of the graph), coverage (the time until all points inside a finite box are detected by the graph), and percolation (the time until a given node belongs to the infinite connected component of the graph). We obtain precise asymptotics for these features by combining ideas from stochastic geometry, coupling and multi-scale analysis.

  3. Free flaps for pressure sore coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Vincent; Boulanger, Kevin; Heymans, Oliver

    2008-06-01

    Management of pressure sores still represents a major challenge in plastic surgery practice due to recurrence. The surgeon may have to face multiple or recurrent pressure ulcerations without any local flap left. In this very limited indication, free flap surgery appears to be a useful adjunct in the surgical treatment. We reviewed our charts looking for patients operated for a pressure sore of the sacral, ischial, or trochanteric region. We found 88 consecutive patients representing 108 different pressure sores and 141 flap procedures. Among these patients, 6 presented large sores that could not be covered with a pedicled flap and benefited from free flap surgery (4.2% of all procedures). Stable coverage was achieved in 80% of these patients after a mean follow-up of 32 months. Comparison between pedicled and free flaps groups showed a trend in the latest concerning the presence of diabetes, incontinence, paraplegia, and male sex.

  4. Universal health coverage: The way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Jindal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Universal health coverage (UHC is the means to provide accessible and appropriate health services to all citizens without financial hardships. India, an emerging economy with demographic window of opportunity has been facing dual burden of diseases in midst of multiple transitions. Health situation in the country despite quantum improvements in recent past has enormous challenges with urban-rural and interstate differentials. Successful national programs exists, but lack ability to provide and sustain UHC. Achieving UHC require sustained mechanisms for health financing and to provide financial protection through national health packages. There is a need to ensure universal access to medicines, vaccines and emerging technologies along with development of Human Resources for Health (HRH. Health service, management, and institutional reforms are required along with enhanced focus on social determinants of health and citizen engagement. UHC is the way for providing health assurance and enlarging scope of primary health care to nook and corners of the country.

  5. Deflection analysis of rectangular spatial coverage truss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Kirsanov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An elastic spatial statically determinate truss of regular type, simulating the rectangular in plan coverage was considered. In the plane of the base the truss has two axes of symmetry. Four support structures (spherical hinge, cylindrical hinge and two vertical rods are located at its corners. An analytic solution was found for forces in the rods of the truss. Using the Maxwell-Mohr’s formula, the dependence of the deflection of the center was discovered in the truss under the influence of the concentrated force. There are five parameters of the problem in this formula: three linear dimensions, and the numbers of hinges on its lateral sides. To determine the desired patterns by means of the computer mathematics system Maple the recursion task by two parameters was solved. It was shown that dependence of the deflection on the number of panels and height of the truss detects a minimum, allowing optimizing the size of the structure.

  6. Determinants of immunization coverage in Lucknow district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunization remains one of the most important public health interventions and a cost-effective strategy to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases. Over two million deaths are delayed through immunization each year worldwide. Aims: This study sought to identify specific factors associated with immunization coverage in order to advance improved intervention, policies/strategies therefore raising overall immunization coverage. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among a total of 198 children aged 12-23 months at Urban Health and Training Centre (UHTC, Era′s Lucknow Medical College, Lucknow, over a period of 6 months i.e., from July 2012-December 2012. Data were collected, compiled and tabulated using Microsoft Excel and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 version. Results: A total of 198 children of age 12-23 months were included in this study, of which 74.7% of children were fully immunized, 11.1% were partially immunized and 14.1% were not immunized at all. The most common reason for partial or non-immunization was family problems (24% of the respondents followed by lack of knowledge of immunization (20%, and fear of side effects (16%. The odds of risk of partial/non-immunization in illiterate women is 5.78 more than the graduate women (P = 0.039. Conclusions: Although in the present study, majority of the children were immunized, it is still not up to the mark. We have to make it 100%, so that we can reduce mortality due to vaccine-preventable diseases. Increasing awareness and reducing fear of side effects of immunization among parents through health education, counseling, etc. can increase the percentage of immunized children.

  7. The Web Application Test Based on Page Coverage Criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Li-zhi; TONG Wei-qin; YANG Gen-xing

    2008-01-01

    Software testing coverage criteria play an important role in the whole testing process. The current coverage criteria for web applications are based on program or URL. They are not suitable for black-box test or intuitional to use. This paper defines a kind of test criteria based on page coverage sequences only navigated by web application, including Page_Single, Page_Post, Page_Pre,Page_Seq2, Page_SeqK. The test criteria based on page coverage sequences made by interactions between web application and browser are being under consideration after that. In order to avoid ambiguity of natural language, these coverage criteria are depicted using Z formal language. The empirical result shows that the criteria complement traditional coverage and fault detection capability criteria.

  8. Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks with Probabilistic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Anxing; Xu, Xianghua; Cheng, Zongmao

    2016-08-27

    Sensing coverage is a fundamental problem in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which has attracted considerable attention. Conventional research on this topic focuses on the 0/1 coverage model, which is only a coarse approximation to the practical sensing model. In this paper, we study the target coverage problem, where the objective is to find the least number of sensor nodes in randomly-deployed WSNs based on the probabilistic sensing model. We analyze the joint detection probability of target with multiple sensors. Based on the theoretical analysis of the detection probability, we formulate the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem. We prove that the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem is NP-hard and present an approximation algorithm called the Probabilistic Sensor Coverage Algorithm (PSCA) with provable approximation ratios. To evaluate our design, we analyze the performance of PSCA theoretically and also perform extensive simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm.

  9. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  10. 5 CFR 894.603 - Is there an extension of coverage and right to convert when my coverage stops or when a covered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... right to convert when my coverage stops or when a covered family member loses eligibility? 894.603... Coverage § 894.603 Is there an extension of coverage and right to convert when my coverage stops or when a covered family member loses eligibility? No. There is no extension of coverage or right to convert to...

  11. 42 CFR 436.330 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 436.330 Section 436... Coverage of the Medically Needy § 436.330 Coverage for certain aliens. If an agency provides Medicaid to... condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter to those aliens described in § 436.406(c) of this...

  12. MEASURING C PROGRAM COVERAGE BASED ON BINARY DECISION DIAGRAMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Liang; Xu Baowen; Chen Lin

    2005-01-01

    Test coverage analysis is a structural testing technique, which helps to evaluate the sufficiency of software testing. This letter presents two test generation algorithms based on binary decision diagrams to produce tests for the Multiple-Condition Criterion(M-CC) and the Modified Condition/Decision Criterion(MC/DC), and describes the design of the C program Coverage Measurement Tool (CCMT), which can record dynamic behaviors of C programs and quantify test coverage.

  13. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  14. Premium subsidies for health insurance: excessive coverage vs. adverse selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, T M

    1999-12-01

    The tax subsidy for employment-related health insurance can lead to excessive coverage and excessive spending on medical care. Yet, the potential also exists for adverse selection to result in the opposite problem-insufficient coverage and underconsumption of medical care. This paper uses the model of Rothschild and Stiglitz (R-S) to show that a simple linear premium subsidy can correct market failure due to adverse selection. The optimal linear subsidy balances welfare losses from excessive coverage against welfare gains from reduced adverse selection. Indeed, a capped premium subsidy may mitigate adverse selection without creating incentives for excessive coverage.

  15. Dental Care Coverage and Use: Modeling Limitations and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined why older US adults without dental care coverage and use would have lower use rates if offered coverage than do those who currently have coverage. Methods. We used data from the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to estimate a multinomial logistic model to analyze the influence of personal characteristics in the grouping of older US adults into those with and those without dental care coverage and dental care use. Results. Compared with persons with no coverage and no dental care use, users of dental care with coverage were more likely to be younger, female, wealthier, college graduates, married, in excellent or very good health, and not missing all their permanent teeth. Conclusions. Providing dental care coverage to uninsured older US adults without use will not necessarily result in use rates similar to those with prior coverage and use. We have offered a model using modifiable factors that may help policy planners facilitate programs to increase dental care coverage uptake and use. PMID:24328635

  16. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF. This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth.

  17. Expanding the universe of universal coverage: the population health argument for increasing coverage for immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Arijit; Loue, Sana; Galea, Sandro

    2009-12-01

    As the US recession deepens, furthering the debate about healthcare reform is now even more important than ever. Few plans aimed at facilitating universal coverage make any mention of increasing access for uninsured non-citizens living in the US, many of whom are legally restricted from certain types of coverage. We conducted a critical review of the public health literature concerning the health status and access to health services among immigrant populations in the US. Using examples from infectious and chronic disease epidemiology, we argue that access to health services is at the intersection of the health of uninsured immigrants and the general population and that extending access to healthcare to all residents of the US, including undocumented immigrants, is beneficial from a population health perspective. Furthermore, from a health economics perspective, increasing access to care for immigrant populations may actually reduce net costs by increasing primary prevention and reducing the emphasis on emergency care for preventable conditions. It is unlikely that proposals for universal coverage will accomplish their objectives of improving population health and reducing social disparities in health if they do not address the substantial proportion of uninsured non-citizens living in the US.

  18. Correlation between the coverage percentage of prosthesis and postoperative hidden blood loss in primary total knee arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Fuqiang; Guo Wanshou; Sun Wei; Li Zirong; Wang Weiguo; Wang Bailiang; Cheng Liming

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between prosthesis coverage and postoperative hidden blood loss (HBL) in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA).Methods A total of 120 patients who had undergone unilateral TKA from August 2012 to May 2013 were retrospectively studied.The Gross formula was used to calculate the amount of HBL.Routine standard anteroposterior (AP) and lateral x-ray films of the knee joint were taken postoperatively and used to measure the percentages of coronal femoral and of coronal and sagittal tibial prosthetic coverage.Then Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to assess the correlations between the percentages of prosthetic coverage for each AP and lateral position and HBL on the first and third postoperative days.Results The volumes of HBL on the first and third postoperative days after TKA were (786.5±191.6) ml and (1 256.6±205.1) ml,respectively,and lateral x-ray film measurements of percentages of coronal femoral,tibial coronal,and sagittal prosthetic coverage were (87.9±2.5)%,(88.5±2.2)%,and (89.1±2.3)%,respectively.Pearson's correlation analysis showed statistically significant correlations between percentages of total knee prosthetic coverage for each AP and lateral position and volumes of HBL on the first and third postoperative days (P <0.05).Conclusions HBL after TKA correlates with degree of prosthetic coverage.To some extent,the size of the surfaces exposed by osteotomy determines the amount of HBL.Choice of the appropriate prosthesis can significantly reduce postoperative HBL.Designing individualized prostheses would be a worthwhile development in joint replacement surgery.

  19. [Universal coverage of health services in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The reforms made in recent years to the Mexican Health System have reduced inequities in the health care of the population, but have been insufficient to solve all the problems of the MHS. In order to make the right to health protection established in the Constitution a reality for every citizen, Mexico must warrant effective universal access to health services. This paper outlines a long-term reform for the consolidation of a health system that is akin to international standards and which may establish the structural conditions to reduce coverage inequity. This reform is based on a "structured pluralism" intended to avoid both a monopoly exercised within the public sector and fragmentation in the private sector, and to prevent falling into the extremes of authoritarian procedures or an absence of regulation. This involves the replacement of the present vertical integration and segregation of social groups by a horizontal organization with separation of duties. This also entails legal and fiscal reforms, the reinforcement of the MHS, the reorganization of health institutions, and the formulation of regulatory, technical and financial instruments to operationalize the proposed scheme with the objective of rendering the human right to health fully effective for the Mexican people.

  20. Percent area coverage through image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chung M.; Hong, Sung M.; Liu, De-Ling

    2016-09-01

    The notion of percent area coverage (PAC) has been used to characterize surface cleanliness levels in the spacecraft contamination control community. Due to the lack of detailed particle data, PAC has been conventionally calculated by multiplying the particle surface density in predetermined particle size bins by a set of coefficients per MIL-STD-1246C. In deriving the set of coefficients, the surface particle size distribution is assumed to follow a log-normal relation between particle density and particle size, while the cross-sectional area function is given as a combination of regular geometric shapes. For particles with irregular shapes, the cross-sectional area function cannot describe the true particle area and, therefore, may introduce error in the PAC calculation. Other errors may also be introduced by using the lognormal surface particle size distribution function that highly depends on the environmental cleanliness and cleaning process. In this paper, we present PAC measurements from silicon witness wafers that collected fallouts from a fabric material after vibration testing. PAC calculations were performed through analysis of microscope images and compare them to values derived through the MIL-STD-1246C method. Our results showed that the MIL-STD-1246C method does provide a reasonable upper bound to the PAC values determined through image analysis, in particular for PAC values below 0.1.

  1. Approximating Low-Dimensional Coverage Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Badanidiyuru, Ashwinkumar; Lee, Hooyeon

    2011-01-01

    We study the complexity of the maximum coverage problem, restricted to set systems of bounded VC-dimension. Our main result is a fixed-parameter tractable approximation scheme: an algorithm that outputs a $(1-\\eps)$-approximation to the maximum-cardinality union of $k$ sets, in running time $O(f(\\eps,k,d)\\cdot poly(n))$ where $n$ is the problem size, $d$ is the VC-dimension of the set system, and $f(\\eps,k,d)$ is exponential in $(kd/\\eps)^c$ for some constant $c$. We complement this positive result by showing that the function $f(\\eps,k,d)$ in the running-time bound cannot be replaced by a function depending only on $(\\eps,d)$ or on $(k,d)$, under standard complexity assumptions. We also present an improved upper bound on the approximation ratio of the greedy algorithm in special cases of the problem, including when the sets have bounded cardinality and when they are two-dimensional halfspaces. Complementing these positive results, we show that when the sets are four-dimensional halfspaces neither the greedy ...

  2. Salvia officinalis L. coverage on plants development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.T.A. CRUZ-SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Medicinal plants with essential oils in their composition havetypicallybeen shown to be promising in plant control. Sage (Salvia officinalis L. is cited for its allelopathic effects. This study evaluated the allelopathic potential of dried sage leaves in vegetation, soil and the development of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. (tomato, Panicum maximum Jacq. (guinea grass and Salvia hispanica L. (chia plants. Three seedlings were transplanted seven days after germination in 1 kg plastic containers with soil, in a greenhouse. The grinded dry mass of sage was placed at rates of 3.75; 7.5 15 t ha-1, and a control (no mass. After 30 days, the chlorophyll index of tomato and guinea grass plants were inhibited with 7.5 and 15 t ha-1 sage cover crops. Tomato shoot length was inhibited in all tested rates, and guinea grass plants showed some reduction in growth when using the highest rate of sage mass (15 t ha-1. The dry mass of tomato and guinea grass plants was reduced when using the15 t ha-1, and 7.5 and 15 t ha-1 of sage cover crops, respectively. It can be concluded that there was some effect of sage coverage on the soil in tomato and guinea grass, but no effect was observed on chia plants.

  3. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  4. 42 CFR 435.139 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 435.139 Section 435... Aliens § 435.139 Coverage for certain aliens. The agency must provide services necessary for the treatment of an emergency medical condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter, to those aliens...

  5. US Media Coverage of Tobacco Industry Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Lown, E Anne; Malone, Ruth E

    2017-07-06

    Media coverage of tobacco industry corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives represents a competitive field where tobacco control advocates and the tobacco industry vie to shape public and policymaker understandings about tobacco control and the industry. Through a content analysis of 649 US news items, we examined US media coverage of tobacco industry CSR and identified characteristics of media items associated with positive coverage. Most coverage appeared in local newspapers, and CSR initiatives unrelated to tobacco, with non-controversial beneficiaries, were most commonly mentioned. Coverage was largely positive. Tobacco control advocates were infrequently cited as sources and rarely authored opinion pieces; however, when their voices were included, coverage was less likely to have a positive slant. Media items published in the South, home to several tobacco company headquarters, were more likely than those published in the West to have a positive slant. The absence of tobacco control advocates from media coverage represents a missed opportunity to influence opinion regarding the negative public health implications of tobacco industry CSR. Countering the media narrative of virtuous companies doing good deeds could be particularly beneficial in the South, where the burdens of tobacco-caused disease are greatest, and coverage of tobacco companies more positive.

  6. 47 CFR 22.951 - Minimum coverage requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.951 Minimum coverage requirement. Applications for... toward the minimum coverage requirement. Applications for authority to operate a new cellular system in... reefs only), except for unserved areas in the Gulf of Mexico MSA....

  7. 24 CFR 201.32 - Insurance coverage reserve account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... lender's reserve account to accompany the loan transfers reported by lenders under § 201.30. (1) In all... coverage for the loan under the applicable requirements of this paragraph. (d) Recovery shall not affect... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage reserve account...

  8. Coverage of Islamic Literature in Selected Indexing Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, A.; Rehman, S. ur

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluates bibliographical coverage of Islamic literature provided by four Western indexing services ("Social Sciences Citation Index,""Social Sciences Index,""Humanities Index,""Index Islamicus") by using bibliographical checking method. Highlights include characteristics of literature and bibliographic coverage of literature by type of…

  9. 12 CFR 717.20 - Coverage and definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., direct mail, e-mail, or other form of marketing communication directed to a particular consumer that is... REPORTING Affiliate Marketing § 717.20 Coverage and definitions (a) Coverage. Subpart C of this part applies...) Eligibility information. The term “eligibility information” means any information the communication of which...

  10. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Milovich, Marilyn M.; Moussier, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the coverage of Stanford prison experiment (SPE), including criticisms of the study, in introductory psychology courses through an online survey of introductory psychology instructors (N = 117). Results largely paralleled those of the recently published textbook analyses with ethical issues garnering the most coverage,…

  11. Higher Education Students' Perceptions of Environmental Issues and Media Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinonen, Tuula; Palmberg, Irmeli; Kukkonen, Jari; Yli-Panula, Eija; Persson, Christel; Vilkonis, Rytis

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to find higher education students' perceptions about environmental issues and how the perceptions are related to perceptions of media coverage. This study investigates higher education students' perceptions of the seriousness of environmental issues and their relation to perceptions of media coverage. Higher education students…

  12. 14 CFR 198.5 - Types of insurance coverage available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WAR RISK INSURANCE AVIATION INSURANCE § 198.5 Types of insurance coverage available. Application may be made for insurance against loss or damage to the following persons, property, or interests: (a... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Types of insurance coverage available....

  13. 14 CFR 198.7 - Amount of insurance coverage available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WAR RISK INSURANCE AVIATION INSURANCE § 198.7 Amount of insurance coverage available. (a) For... arising from any risk. In the case of hull insurance, the amount insured may not exceed the reasonable... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amount of insurance coverage available....

  14. New Civil Rights Act Coverages - Progress or Racism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Galen

    1975-01-01

    The growing list of added coverages in state and local civil rights laws is diluting the fight against racial discrimination by weakening enforcement through loading civil rights agencies with many new areas of coverage which are diverting them from their original purpose of ending discrimination against racial and religious minorities. (EH)

  15. 47 CFR 73.684 - Prediction of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Television Broadcast Stations § 73.684 Prediction of coverage. (a) All predictions of coverage made pursuant... the depression angle between the transmitting antenna center of radiation and the radio horizon as... difference in elevation of the antenna center of radiation above the average terrain and the radio...

  16. Explaining socio-economic inequalities in immunization coverage in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataguba, John E; Ojo, Kenneth O; Ichoku, Hyacinth E

    2016-11-01

    Globally, in 2013 over 6 million children younger than 5 years died from either an infectious cause or during the neonatal period. A large proportion of these deaths occurred in developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Immunization is one way to reduce childhood morbidity and deaths. In Nigeria, however, although immunization is provided without a charge at public facilities, coverage remains low and deaths from vaccine preventable diseases are high. This article seeks to assess inequalities in full and partial immunization coverage in Nigeria. It also assesses inequality in the 'intensity' of immunization coverage and it explains the factors that account for disparities in child immunization coverage in the country. Using nationally representative data, this article shows that disparities exist in the coverage of immunization to the advantage of the rich. Also, factors such as mother's literacy, region and location of the child, and socio-economic status explain the disparities in immunization coverage in Nigeria. Apart from addressing these issues, the article notes the importance of addressing other social determinants of health to reduce the disparities in immunization coverage in the country. These should be in line with the social values of communities so as to ensure acceptability and compliance. We argue that any policy that addresses these issues will likely reduce disparities in immunization coverage and put Nigeria on the road to sustainable development.

  17. Higher Education Students' Perceptions of Environmental Issues and Media Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinonen, Tuula; Palmberg, Irmeli; Kukkonen, Jari; Yli-Panula, Eija; Persson, Christel; Vilkonis, Rytis

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to find higher education students' perceptions about environmental issues and how the perceptions are related to perceptions of media coverage. This study investigates higher education students' perceptions of the seriousness of environmental issues and their relation to perceptions of media coverage. Higher education students…

  18. Press Releases vs. Newspaper Coverage of California Supreme Court Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, F. Dennis

    1978-01-01

    A study comparing the coverage in newspapers and press releases regarding one year's decisions of the California Supreme Court revealed that the press releases influenced the kinds of decisions that were reported but not the quantity of coverage by the newspapers. (GT)

  19. 29 CFR 1975.3 - Extent of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) COVERAGE OF EMPLOYERS UNDER THE WILLIAMS-STEIGER OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 § 1975.3 Extent of coverage. (a) Section 2(b) of the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act (Public Law... exercise of its powers to regulate commerce among the several States and with foreign nations and...

  20. Contraceptive Coverage in Doubt Under the Trump Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Women's health advocates are concerned about health coverage guarantees that could disappear as Republicans in Congress and the White House go about dismantling Obamacare. These include everything from contraceptive coverage to breast cancer screenings to equity in the premiums women pay for insurance.

  1. Coverage Accuracy of Confidence Intervals in Nonparametric Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song-xi Chen; Yong-song Qin

    2003-01-01

    Point-wise confidence intervals for a nonparametric regression function with random design points are considered. The confidence intervals are those based on the traditional normal approximation and the empirical likelihood. Their coverage accuracy is assessed by developing the Edgeworth expansions for the coverage probabilities. It is shown that the empirical likelihood confidence intervals are Bartlett correctable.

  2. 7 CFR 457.172 - Coverage Enhancement Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... must: (a) Have an MPCI policy in force for the insured crop (or for citrus fruit, citrus trees, and stone fruit or other crops, as applicable, the insured type) and comply with all terms and conditions of... Federal Crop Insurance Corporation as published at 7 CFR part 457. MPCI coverage level—The coverage...

  3. 12 CFR 334.20 - Coverage and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Affiliate Marketing § 334.20 Coverage and definitions. (a) Coverage. Subpart C of... account numbers, names, or addresses. (4) Pre-existing business relationship. (i) In general. The term “pre-existing business relationship” means a relationship between a person, or a person's...

  4. African-American Press Coverage of Clarence Thomas Nomination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearn-Banks, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Examines pressures facing the African American press by focusing on its coverage of the 1991 nomination of Clarence Thomas to the United States Supreme Court. Discusses the dilemma these newspapers faced in choosing between supporting African Americans and supporting civil rights, with their mixed coverage of the story reflecting this dilemma. (SR)

  5. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( 25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size.

  6. Coverage Effects on the Magnetism of Fe/MgO(001) Ultrathin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Boubeta, C.

    2004-11-04

    Different aspects of the structure-magnetism and morphology-magnetism correlation in the ultrathin limit are studied in epitaxial Fe films grown on MgO(001). In the initial stages of growth the presence of substrate steps, intrinsically higher than an Fe atomic layer, prevent connection between Fe islands and hence the formation of large volume magnetic regions. This is proposed as an explanation to the superparamagnetic nature of ultrathin Fe films grown on MgO in addition to the usually considered islanded, or Vollmer-Weber, growth. Using this model, we explain the observed transition from superparamagnetism to ferromagnetism for Fe coverages above 3 monolayers (ML). However, even though ferromagnetism and magnetocrystalline anisotropy are observed for 4ML, complete coverage of the MgO substrate by the Fe ultrathin films only occurs around 6 ML as determined by polar Kerr spectra and simulations that consider different coverage situations. In annealed 3.5 ML Fe films, shape or configurational anisotropy dominates the intrinsic magnetocrystalline anisotropy, due to an annealing induced continuous to islanded morphological transition. A small interface anisotropy in thicker films is observed, probably due to dislocations observed at the Fe/MgO(001) interface.

  7. Controlling coverage of solution cast materials with unfavourable surface interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2014-03-03

    Creating uniform coatings of a solution-cast material is of central importance to a broad range of applications. Here, a robust and generic theoretical framework for calculating surface coverage by a solid film of material de-wetting a substrate is presented. Using experimental data from semiconductor thin films as an example, we calculate surface coverage for a wide range of annealing temperatures and film thicknesses. The model generally predicts that for each value of the annealing temperature there is a range of film thicknesses leading to poor surface coverage. The model accurately reproduces solution-cast thin film coverage for organometal halide perovskites, key modern photovoltaic materials, and identifies processing windows for both high and low levels of surface coverage. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  8. Actual immunization coverage throughout Europe: are existing data sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopalco, P L; Carrillo Santisteve, P

    2014-05-01

    Assessing vaccine coverage is an essential component of vaccine programme monitoring and evaluation. Vaccine coverage data are available in EU/EEA countries at both national and subnational levels and are used for programmatic purposes at any level. European-wide data collection is performed by WHO through the Centralized Information System for Infectious Diseases, as part of the global data collection jointly conducted with UNICEF. Data quality and comparability are still challenging at an international level. According to available information, vaccination registries are available in 11 countries in the EU/EEA, but only in five countries do they have national coverage. In 2012 ECDC, through the VENICE II network, started the European Vaccination Coverage Collection System (EVACO project), with the final aim of improving the quality of vaccine coverage data at EU level, by defining and implementing standards.

  9. Distributed Multitarget Probabilistic Coverage Control Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of multitarget coverage based on probabilistic detection model. Coverage configuration is an effective method to alleviate the energy-limitation problem of sensors. Firstly, considering the attenuation of node’s sensing ability, the target probabilistic coverage problem is defined and formalized, which is based on Neyman-Peason probabilistic detection model. Secondly, in order to turn off redundant sensors, a simplified judging rule is derived, which makes the probabilistic coverage judgment execute on each node locally. Thirdly, a distributed node schedule scheme is proposed for implementing the distributed algorithm. Simulation results show that this algorithm is robust to the change of network size, and when compared with the physical coverage algorithm, it can effectively minimize the number of active sensors, which guarantees all the targets γ-covered.

  10. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Rachul, Christen

    2012-06-08

    Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People's Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  11. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO. News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND, we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  12. Assuring health coverage for all in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Parikh, Rachana; Nandraj, Sunil; Balasubramaniam, Priya; Narayan, Kavita; Paul, Vinod K; Kumar, A K Shiva; Chatterjee, Mirai; Reddy, K Srinath

    2015-12-12

    Successive Governments of India have promised to transform India's unsatisfactory health-care system, culminating in the present government's promise to expand health assurance for all. Despite substantial improvements in some health indicators in the past decade, India contributes disproportionately to the global burden of disease, with health indicators that compare unfavourably with other middle-income countries and India's regional neighbours. Large health disparities between states, between rural and urban populations, and across social classes persist. A large proportion of the population is impoverished because of high out-of-pocket health-care expenditures and suffers the adverse consequences of poor quality of care. Here we make the case not only for more resources but for a radically new architecture for India's health-care system. India needs to adopt an integrated national health-care system built around a strong public primary care system with a clearly articulated supportive role for the private and indigenous sectors. This system must address acute as well as chronic health-care needs, offer choice of care that is rational, accessible, and of good quality, support cashless service at point of delivery, and ensure accountability through governance by a robust regulatory framework. In the process, several major challenges will need to be confronted, most notably the very low levels of public expenditure; the poor regulation, rapid commercialisation of and corruption in health care; and the fragmentation of governance of health care. Most importantly, assuring universal health coverage will require the explicit acknowledgment, by government and civil society, of health care as a public good on par with education. Only a radical restructuring of the health-care system that promotes health equity and eliminates impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditures will assure health for all Indians by 2022--a fitting way to mark the 75th year of India

  13. Measuring coverage in MNCH: challenges and opportunities in the selection of coverage indicators for global monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Harris Requejo

    Full Text Available Global monitoring of intervention coverage is a cornerstone of international efforts to improve reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health. In this review, we examine the process and implications of selecting a core set of coverage indicators for global monitoring, using as examples the processes used by the Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival and the Commission on Accountability for Women's and Children's Health. We describe how the generation of data for global monitoring involves five iterative steps: development of standard indicator definitions and measurement approaches to ensure comparability across countries; collection of high-quality data at the country level; compilation of country data at the global level; organization of global databases; and rounds of data quality checking. Regular and rigorous technical review processes that involve high-level decision makers and experts familiar with indicator measurement are needed to maximize uptake and to ensure that indicators used for global monitoring are selected on the basis of available evidence of intervention effectiveness, feasibility of measurement, and data availability as well as programmatic relevance. Experience from recent initiatives illustrates the challenges of striking this balance as well as strategies for reducing the tensions inherent in the indicator selection process. We conclude that more attention and continued investment need to be directed to global monitoring, to support both the process of global database development and the selection of sets of coverage indicators to promote accountability. The stakes are high, because these indicators can drive policy and program development at the country and global level, and ultimately impact the health of women and children and the communities where they live.

  14. OMEGA System Performance Assessment and Coverage Evaluation (PACE) Workstation Design and Implementation. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-15

    FSeordhalf ,Dir+Nanr’ 1. 222’) Reset (Fin, 1) ; Rewrite (FFirstHalf , 1); R~ewrite (FSconHalf , 1); FOR’ i :=1 TIO ’rourd(size/blocksize/2) DO begin...an MA or compatible graphics adapter and color * * monitor. Ths work was performed under contract number * * DrX =23-89-C-20008, Task Order 90-0001...shortstringlength); if not(found) and (key <> chr(o)) then begin LogError (’HctKey character (’+key+’) not four in TextButton Name (’+ Name+’)’ ); key := chr

  15. A method to calculate coverage probability from uncertainties in radiotherapy via a statistical shape model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, G J; Moore, C J

    2007-04-07

    In this paper we describe a technique that may be used to model the geometric uncertainties that accrue during the radiotherapy process. Using data from in-treatment cone beam CT scans, we simultaneously analyse non-uniform observer delineation variability and organ motion together with patient set-up errors via the creation of a point distribution model (PDM). We introduce a novel method of generating a coverage probability matrix, that may be used to determine treatment margins and calculate uncertainties in dose, from this statistical shape model. The technique does not assume rigid body motion and can extrapolate shape variability in a statistically meaningful manner. In order to construct the PDM, we generate corresponding surface points over a set of delineations. Correspondences are established at a set of points in parameter space on spherically parameterized and canonical aligned outlines. The method is demonstrated using rectal delineations from serially acquired in-treatment cone beam CT image volumes of a prostate patient (44 image volumes total), each delineated by a minimum of two observers (maximum six). Two PDMs are constructed, one with set-up errors included and one without. We test the normality assumptions of the PDMs and find the distributions to be Gaussian in nature. The rectal PDM variability is in general agreement with data in the literature. The two resultant coverage probability matrices show differences as expected.

  16. The impact of the tax system on health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J

    2001-01-01

    A central question in health economics is the extent to which this tax subsidization matters for the health insurance coverage of the U.S. population. I assess the impact of taxes on health insurance by using the considerable existing variation in tax subsidies, both at a point in time and across time. I do so by putting together data from more than a decade of Current Population Survey (CPS) data sets, and matching to workers in those data sets their tax subsidies to health insurance coverage. I find that the elasticity of insurance eligibility of workers is at least -0.6, and that the elasticity of own insurance coverage is roughly similar; the results imply that most of the impact of taxes on insurance coverage arise through firm offering and eligibility decisions. I also find that higher tax rates induce more private coverage through other sources, but less public coverage, so that overall there is a reduction in the rate of uninsurance that is comparable to the change in own employer-provided insurance coverage.

  17. Periodic Sweep Coverage Scheme Based on Periodic Vehicle Routing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We provide a sweep coverage algorithm for routing mobile sensors that communicate with a central data sink. This algorithm improves on its predecessors by reducing the number of unnecessary scans when different points of interest (POIs have different requirements for the time interval within which they must be scanned (sweep period. Most sweep coverage algorithms seek to minimize the number of sensors required to cover a given collection of POIs. When POIs have different sweep period requirements, existing algorithms will produce solutions in which sensors visit some POIs much more frequently than is necessary. We define this as the POI Over-Coverage problem. In order to address this problem we develop a Periodic Sweep Coverage (PSC scheme based on a well-known solution to the Periodic Vehicle Routing Problem (PVRP. Our algorithm seeks a route for the mobile sensors that minimizes the number of unnecessary visits to each POI. To verify and test the proposed scheme we implemented a C++ simulation and ran scenarios with a variety of POI topologies (number and distribution of the POIs and the speed at which sensors could travel. The simulation results show that the PSC algorithm outperforms other sweep coverage algorithms such as CSweep and Vehicle Routing Problem Sweep Coverage (VRPSC on both the average number of sensors in a solution and in the computational time required to find a solution. Our results also demonstrate that the PSC scheme is more suitable for the sweep coverage scenarios in which higher speed mobile sensors are used.

  18. Automatic magnetometer calibration with small space coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahdan, Ahmed

    The use of a standalone Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has proved to be insufficient when navigating indoors or in urban canyons due to multipath or obstruction. Recent technological advances in low cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) -- based sensors (like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers) enabled the development of sensor-based navigation systems. Although MEMS sensors are low-cost, lightweight, small size, and have low-power consumption, they have complex error characteristics. Accurate computation of the heading angle (azimuth) is one of the most important aspects of any navigation system. It can be computed either by gyroscopes or magnetometers. Gyroscopes are inertial sensors that can provide the angular rate from which the heading can be calculated, however, their outputs drift with time. Moreover, the accumulated errors due to mathematical integration, performed to obtain the heading angle, lead to large heading errors. On the other hand, magnetometers do not suffer from drift and the calculation of heading does not suffer from error accumulation. They can provide an absolute heading from the magnetic north by sensing the earth's magnetic field. However, magnetometer readings are usually affected by magnetic fields, other than the earth magnetic field, and by other error sources; therefore magnetometer calibration is required to use magnetometer as a reliable source of heading in navigation applications. In this thesis, a framework for fast magnetometer calibration is proposed. This framework requires little space coverage with no user involvement in the calibration process, and does not need specific movements to be performed. The proposed techniques are capable of performing both 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) calibration for magnetometers. They are developed to consider different scenarios suitable for different applications, and can benefit from natural device movements. Some applications involve tethering the

  19. Progress toward universal health coverage in ASEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Van Minh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN is characterized by much diversity in terms of geography, society, economic development, and health outcomes. The health systems as well as healthcare structure and provisions vary considerably. Consequently, the progress toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC in these countries also varies. This paper aims to describe the progress toward UHC in the ASEAN countries and discuss how regional integration could influence UHC. Design: Data reported in this paper were obtained from published literature, reports, and gray literature available in the ASEAN countries. We used both online and manual search methods to gather the information and ‘snowball’ further data. Results: We found that, in general, ASEAN countries have made good progress toward UHC, partly due to relatively sustained political commitments to endorse UHC in these countries. However, all the countries in ASEAN are facing several common barriers to achieving UHC, namely 1 financial constraints, including low levels of overall and government spending on health; 2 supply side constraints, including inadequate numbers and densities of health workers; and 3 the ongoing epidemiological transition at different stages characterized by increasing burdens of non-communicable diseases, persisting infectious diseases, and reemergence of potentially pandemic infectious diseases. The ASEAN Economic Community's (AEC goal of regional economic integration and a single market by 2015 presents both opportunities and challenges for UHC. Healthcare services have become more available but health and healthcare inequities will likely worsen as better-off citizens of member states might receive more benefits from the liberalization of trade policy in health, either via regional outmigration of health workers or intra-country health worker movement toward private hospitals, which tend to be located in urban areas. For ASEAN countries, UHC should

  20. Collected Papers on Poverty Issues. Volume 2: Aspects of Low Income in America. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokelson, Doris, Ed.

    Part 1 of the second volume in a four volume collection, this document includes sections on housing, health, crime, and energy and focuses on such topics as: federal policies for low income housing; the future supply of housing; nonaffluent behavior and attitudes related to health and well being; costs, coverage, and issues in medicaid; the…

  1. A localized coverage preserving protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuheng; Pu, Juhua; Zhang, Shuo; Liu, Yunlu; Xiong, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    In a randomly deployed and large scale wireless sensor network, coverage-redundant nodes consume much unnecessary energy. As a result, turning off these redundant nodes can prolong the network lifetime, while maintaining the degree of sensing coverage with a limited number of on-duty nodes. None of the off-duty eligibility rules in the literature, however, are sufficient and necessary conditions for eligible nodes. Hence redundancy or blind points might be incurred. In this paper we propose a complete Eligibility Rule based on Perimeter Coverage (ERPC) for a node to determine its eligibility for sleeping. ERPC has a computational complexity of O(N(2)log(N)), lower than the eligibility rule in the Coverage Control Protocol (CCP), O(N(3)), where N is the number of neighboring nodes. We then present a Coverage Preserving Protocol (CPP) to schedule the work state of eligible nodes. The main advantage of CPP over the Ottawa protocol lies in its ability to configure the network to any specific coverage degree, while the Ottawa protocol does not support different coverage configuration. Moreover, as a localized protocol, CPP has better adaptability to dynamic topologies than centralized protocols. Simulation results indicate that CPP can preserve network coverage with fewer active nodes than the Ottawa protocol. In addition, CPP is capable of identifying all the eligible nodes exactly while the CCP protocol might result in blind points due to error decisions. Quantitative analysis and experiments demonstrate that CPP can extend the network lifetime significantly while maintaining a given coverage degree.

  2. A Localized Coverage Preserving Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuheng Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a randomly deployed and large scale wireless sensor network, coverage-redundant nodes consume much unnecessary energy. As a result, turning off these redundant nodes can prolong the network lifetime, while maintaining the degree of sensing coverage with a limited number of on-duty nodes. None of the off-duty eligibility rules in the literature, however, are sufficient and necessary conditions for eligible nodes. Hence redundancy or blind points might be incurred. In this paper we propose a complete Eligibility Rule based on Perimeter Coverage (ERPC for a node to determine its eligibility for sleeping. ERPC has a computational complexity of O(N2log(N, lower than the eligibility rule in the Coverage Control Protocol (CCP, O(N3, where N is the number of neighboring nodes. We then present a Coverage Preserving Protocol (CPP to schedule the work state of eligible nodes. The main advantage of CPP over the Ottawa protocol lies in its ability to configure the network to any specific coverage degree, while the Ottawa protocol does not support different coverage configuration. Moreover, as a localized protocol, CPP has better adaptability to dynamic topologies than centralized protocols. Simulation results indicate that CPP can preserve network coverage with fewer active nodes than the Ottawa protocol. In addition, CPP is capable of identifying all the eligible nodes exactly while the CCP protocol might result in blind points due to error decisions. Quantitative analysis and experiments demonstrate that CPP can extend the network lifetime significantly while maintaining a given coverage degree.

  3. Physics-Aware Informative Coverage Planning for Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    ICPS MDP (τ, φ) algorithm to smooth the informative coverage path. 6: Run ELIMINATEWAYPOINTS(τ, φ) to remove redundant or uninteresting waypoints. 7: Run...ICPS MDP (τ, φ) algorithm to smooth the informative coverage path. 8: return τ . Algorithm 2 ICPS MDP (τ, φ) Require: An informative coverage path τ and...pi to get to the next waypoint pi+1 must be considered. Given the MDP and its solution, we define a Markov Chain MC = (Xd, T ) on Xd with transition

  4. Expanded managed care liability: what impact on employer coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, D M; Sage, W M; Gresenz, C R; Hensler, D R

    1999-01-01

    Policymakers are considering legislative changes that would increase managed care organizations' exposure to civil liability for withholding coverage or failing to deliver needed care. Using a combination of empirical information and theoretical analysis, we assess the likely responses of health plans and Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) plan sponsors to an expansion of liability, and we evaluate the policy impact of those moves. We conclude that the direct costs of liability are uncertain but that the prospect of litigation may have other important effects on coverage decision making, information exchange, risk contracting, and the extent of employers' involvement in health coverage.

  5. Coverage Options for a Low cost, High Resolution Optical Constellation

    OpenAIRE

    Price, M E; Levett, W.; Graham, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the range of coverage options available to TopSat like small satellites, both singly and in a small constellation. TopSat is a low-cost, high resolution and image quality, optical small satellite, due for launch in October 2004. In particular, the paper considers the use of tuned, repeat ground track orbits to improve coverage for selected ground targets, at the expense of global coverage. TopSat is designed to demonstrate the capabilities of small satellites for high valu...

  6. A novel mathematical model for coverage in wireless sensor network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhen-ya; ZHENG Bao-yu

    2006-01-01

    Coverage problem is one of the fundamental issues in the design of wireless sensor network, which has a great impact on the performance of sensor network. In this article,coverage problem was investigated using a mathematical model named Birth-death process. In this model, sensor nodes joining into networks at every period of time is considered as the rebirth of network and the quitting of sensor nodes from the networks is considered as the death of the network. In the end, an analytical solution is used to investigate the appropriate rate to meet the coverage requirement.

  7. Medicaid expansions and the insurance coverage of poor teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    This article employs a comparison group research design to examine the effects of the Medicaid expansions of the late 1990s on the insurance coverage of poor teenagers. Results suggest that the expansions were associated with a decrease in the likelihood of poor teens experiencing uninsured spells over the course of a calendar year, as measured by spending any part of the prior year uninsured and spending over half of the prior year uninsured. While the expansions were successful in increasing coverage among poor adolescents, they fell far short of facilitating near-universal coverage for this population.

  8. Immunization coverage and infant mortality rate in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimouchi, A; Ozasa, K; Hayashi, K

    1994-01-01

    We examined whether immunization coverage (IMC) is one of the predictors of infant mortality rate (IMR), as a single indicator representing the availability of primary health care (PHC) services in developing countries. Multiple regression analysis showed that partial correlation coefficients for IMR with immunization coverage (-0.224), logarithm of per capita GNP (-0.294), total fertility rate (0.269), and adult literacy rate (-0.325) were all statistically significant (p immunization coverage is one of the main predictors of the infant mortality rate. It represents one of the health intervention components which can be used as a proxy indicator of the availability of PHC service in developing countries.

  9. Distributed coverage games for mobile visual sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Minghui

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by current challenges in data-intensive sensor networks, we formulate a coverage optimization problem for mobile visual sensors as a (constrained) repeated multi-player game. Each visual sensor tries to optimize its own coverage while minimizing the processing cost. We present two distributed learning algorithms where each sensor only remembers its own utility values and actions played during the last plays. These algorithms are proven to be convergent in probability to the set of (constrained) Nash equilibria and global optima of certain coverage performance metric, respectively.

  10. Pertussis: herd immunity and vaccination coverage in St Lucia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, E; Fitch, L

    1983-11-12

    In a single complete epidemic in St Lucia, an island too small to support constant clinical pertussis, the pertussis case rates in small communities (villages and small towns) with differing levels of vaccination coverage of young children were compared. The association between greater vaccination coverage and greater herd immunity was clear, despite the imperfect protection given to individuals. An analysis in terms of population dynamics is evidence against the theory that endemic subclinical pertussis maintains transmission in a highly vaccinated population. We suggest that with a homogeneous vaccination coverage of 80% of 2-year-old children pertussis might be eradicated from the island, and that this is a practicable experiment.

  11. The Coverage-Capacity Analysis of CDMA Wireless Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xufeng; LI Chengshu

    2001-01-01

    The coverage and capacity tradeoff is one of the important characters of CDMA cellular system. In this paper, we investigate the relationship of coverage and capacity of CDMA wireless network. By analyzing the outage probability under softhandoff and providing the soft-handoff probability, we extend the outage probability analysis to the multi-cell environment with soft-handoff. Furthermore, a spatial Poisson process is introduced and both uniform and non-uniform subscriber distribution cases are analyzed. Based on these we make a derivation of the relation between coverage and capacity in single and multi-cell environments.

  12. Location Refinement and Power Coverage Analysis Based on Distributed Antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓楠; 侯春萍; 汪清; 陈华; 浦亮洲

    2016-01-01

    To establish wireless channel suitable for the cabin environment, the power coverage was investigated with distributed antenna system and centralized antenna system based on the actual measurement of channel im-pulse response. The results indicated that the distributed antenna system has more uniform power coverage than the centralized antenna system. The average relative errors of receiving power of both antennas were calculated. The optimal position of the centralized antenna was obtained by Gaussian function refinement, making the system achieve a better transmission power with the same coverage effect, and providing a reference for antenna location in the future real communication in the cabin.

  13. Dorsal hand coverage with free serratus fascia flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotopoulos, Peter; Holmer, Per; Leicht, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    serratus fascia flap, the connective tissue over the serratus muscle, for dorsal hand coverage. The flap consists of thin and well-vascularized pliable tissue, with gliding properties excellent for covering exposed tendons. It is based on the branches of the thoracodorsal artery, which are raised...... in the flap, leaving the long thoracic nerve intact on the serratus muscle. Coverage of the flap with split-thickness skin graft is done immediately. The free serratus fascia flap is an ideal flap for dorsal hand coverage when the extensor tendons are exposed, especially because of low donor-site morbidity....

  14. Hypofractionated Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy with simultaneous Elective Nodal Irradiation is feasible in prostate cancer patients: A single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed W. Hegazy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Hypo-fractionation dose escalation VMAT–SIB–ENI–WPRT using 2 arcs is a feasible technique for intermediate/high risk OC prostate cancer patients, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities, much favorable planning target volume (PTV coverage, and shorter overall treatment time. Prospective randomized controlled trials are encouraged to confirm its equivalence to other fractionation schemes.

  15. The impact of changing glacial coverage on yields of freshwater and nutrients from coastal watersheds with in southeastern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, E.; Scott, D.

    2007-12-01

    Glaciers in southeastern Alaska are particularly sensitive to climate change because of their low elevation and proximity to the coast. Currently, glaciers in this region are experiencing high rates of ice loss resulting in rapid thinning and retreat. We are examining how changing glacial coverage is altering fluxes of freshwater and nutrients from coastal watersheds in southeastern Alaska. Our study includes three adjacent watersheds that range in area from 37 km2 to 230 km2 and span a range of watershed glacier coverage from 0% to 55%. Physical and hydrochemical parameters were sampled weekly to bi-monthly for the period May 2006-April 2007 in the three watersheds. Physical measurements included temperature, suspended sediment and conductivity; and hydrochemical parameters included total and inorganic nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and orthophosphate. During the glacier melt season, glacial coverage within a watershed exerted a strong influence on physiochemical properties. Streamwater temperature and conductivity, as well as nutrient concentrations, were negatively correlated with glacier coverage, while suspended sediment loads were positively correlated with glacial coverage. Changing glacial coverage had a strong impact on watershed yields of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. Watershed yields of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ranged from 4246 to 7646 kg km-2 yr- 1 and were strongly negatively correlated with percent glacier coverage. Watershed yields of dissolved inorganic nitrogen ranged from 180 to 498 kg km-2 yr-1 and were highest in the watershed with intermediate glacier coverage that has a high proportion of transitional nitrogen fixing plant species. Watershed yields of orthophosphate ranged from 19 to 46 kg km-2 yr-1 and were strongly positively correlated with glacier coverage. Our findings suggest that the magnitude and timing of freshwater and nutrient fluxes from coastal watersheds to receiving marine ecosystems will be altered

  16. 20 CFR 404.145 - When you acquire a quarter of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When you acquire a quarter of coverage. 404... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Insured Status and Quarters of Coverage Quarters of Coverage § 404.145 When you acquire a quarter of coverage. If we credit you with a quarter of coverage (QC) for a calendar...

  17. 20 CFR 404.140 - What is a quarter of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a quarter of coverage. 404.140... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Insured Status and Quarters of Coverage Quarters of Coverage § 404.140 What is a quarter of coverage. (a) General. A quarter of coverage (QC) is the basic unit of social...

  18. 42 CFR 457.430 - Benchmark-equivalent health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark-equivalent health benefits coverage. 457... STATES State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.430 Benchmark-equivalent health benefits coverage. (a) Aggregate actuarial value. Benchmark-equivalent coverage is health benefits coverage that...

  19. rapid assessment of cataract surgical coverage in rural zululand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cataract surgical coverage (CSC) is a population-based index describing the proportion of ... visual acuity assessed by the nursing assistant using a modified Snellen 'E' .... Additional benefits of this procedure are high profile advertising of the ...

  20. 1980 point population coverage for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A point coverage was created from the 1980 Master Area Reference File (MARF) of the U.S. Census Bureay. Each point represents the center of a census tract, though...

  1. Newspaper coverage of mental illness in England 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, Amalia; Goulden, Robert; Shefer, Guy; Rhydderch, Danielle; Rose, Diana; Williams, Paul; Thornicroft, Graham; Henderson, Claire

    2013-04-01

    Better newspaper coverage of mental health-related issues is a target for the Time to Change (TTC) anti-stigma programme in England, whose population impact may be influenced by how far concurrent media coverage perpetuates stigma and discrimination. To compare English newspaper coverage of mental health-related topics each year of the TTC social marketing campaign (2009-2011) with baseline coverage in 2008. Content analysis was performed on articles in 27 local and national newspapers on two randomly chosen days each month. There was a significant increase in the proportion of anti-stigmatising articles between 2008 and 2011. There was no concomitant proportional decrease in stigmatising articles, and the contribution of mixed or neutral elements decreased. These findings provide promising results on improvements in press reporting of mental illness during the TTC programme in 2009-2011, and a basis for guidance to newspaper journalists and editors on reporting mental illness.

  2. Medicaid Coverage Of Cessation Treatments And Barriers To Treatments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2016. American Lung Association. Cessation Coverage. Medicaid data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health...

  3. Medicaid Coverage Of Cessation Treatments And Barriers To Treatments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2017. American Lung Association. Cessation Coverage. Medicaid data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health...

  4. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...

  5. Relationships between length and coverage of decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Talha

    2014-02-14

    The paper describes a new tool for study relationships between length and coverage of exact decision rules. This tool is based on dynamic programming approach. We also present results of experiments with decision tables from UCI Machine Learning Repository.

  6. Socio-economic inequality of immunization coverage in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Jørgen; Pradhan, Jalandhar

    2011-08-05

    To our knowledge, the present study provides a first time assessment of the contributions of socioeconomic determinants of immunization coverage in India using the recent National Family Health Survey data. Measurement of socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care, and understanding the determinants of such inequalities in terms of their contributions, are critical for health intervention strategies and for achieving equity in health care. A decomposition approach is applied to quantify the contributions from socio-demographic factors to inequality in immunization coverage. The results reveal that poor household economic status, mother's illiteracy, per capita state domestic product and proportion of illiterate at the state level is systematically related to 97% of predictable socioeconomic inequalities in full immunization coverage at the national level. These patterns of evidence suggest the need for immunization strategies targeted at different states and towards certain socioeconomic determinants as pointed out above in order to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in immunization coverage.JEL Classification: I10, I12.

  7. Medicaid Coverage Of Cessation Treatments And Barriers To Treatments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2016. American Lung Association. Cessation Coverage. Medicaid data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health...

  8. Knowledge About Malaria, and Coverage and Utilization Pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge About Malaria, and Coverage and Utilization Pattern of Mosquito Nets ... This paper reflects on how people in an area of seasonal malaria, perceive the ... (FGDs) and key-informant interviews were employed in the data collection.

  9. Role of Newspaper Coverage and Political Ads in Local Elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttbeg, Norman R.

    1988-01-01

    Characterizes the differences in the content of local newspaper's coverage (including political advertisements) of municipal and school board elections. Finds that local newspapers can raise consciousness of these elections and can increase voter turnout. (RS)

  10. [Gaps in effective coverage by socioeconomic status and poverty condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To analyze, in the context of increased health protection in Mexico, the gaps by socioeconomic status and poverty condition on effective coverage of selected preventive interventions. Data from the National Health & Nutrition Survey 2012 and 2006, using previously defined indicators of effective coverage and stratifying them by socioeconomic (SE) status and multidimensional poverty condition. For vaccination interventions, immunological equity has been maintained in Mexico. For indicators related to preventive interventions provided at the clinical setting, effective coverage is lower among those in the lowest SE quintile and among people living in multidimensional poverty. Comparing 2006 and 2012, there is no evidence on gap reduction. While health protection has significantly increased in Mexico, thus reducing SE gaps, those gaps are still important in magnitude for effective coverage of preventive interventions.

  11. EDITORIAL Universal health coverage: A re-emerging paradigm?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    coverage (UHC) through its health care financing strategy (5) which is a ... were reflections of the overall development thinking at the time, in ... recently, the increasing trends in globalization ... sustainable UHC, at the same time addressing the.

  12. Strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Health insurance has the potential to improve access to health care and protect people from the financial risks of diseases. However, health insurance coverage is often low, particularly for people most in need of protection, including children and other vulnerable populations. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), pa...

  13. Coverage and Connectivity Issue in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachit Trivedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are an emerging area of interest in research and development. It finds use in military surveillance, health care, environmental monitoring, forest fire detection and smart environments. An important research issue in WSNs is the coverage since cost, area and lifetime are directly validated to it.In this paper we present an overview of WSNs and try to refine the coverage and connectivity issues in wireless sensor networks.

  14. Coverage and Connectivity Issue in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachit Trivedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are an emerging area of interest in research and development. It finds use in military surveillance, health care, environmental monitoring, forest fire detection and smart environments. An important research issue in WSNs is the coverage since cost, area and lifetime are directly validated to it.In this paper we present an overview of WSNs and try to refine the coverage and connectivity issues in wireless sensor networks.

  15. A Dosimetric Study of Using Fixed-Jaw Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for the Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Zhe Zhang

    Full Text Available To study the dosimetric difference between fixed-jaw volumetric modulated radiotherapy (FJ-VMAT and large-field volumetric modulated radiotherapy (LF-VMAT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC with cervical lymph node metastasis.Computed tomography (CT datasets of 10 NPC patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy were used to generate LF-VMAT and FJ-VMAT plans in the Eclipse version 10.0 treatment planning system. These two kinds of plans were then compared with respect to planning-target-volume (PTV coverage, conformity index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, organ-at-risk sparing, monitor units (MUs and treatment time (TT.The FJ-VMAT plans provided lower D2% of PGTVnd (PTV of lymph nodes, PTV1 (high-risk PTV and PTV2 (low-risk PTV than did the LF-VMAT plans, whereas no significant differences were observed in PGTVnx (PTV of primary nasopharyngeal tumor. The FJ-VMAT plans provided lower doses delivered to the planning organ at risk (OAR volumes (PRVs of both brainstem and spinal cord, both parotid glands and normal tissue than did the LF-VMAT plans, whereas no significant differences were observed with respect to the oral cavity and larynx. The MUs of the FJ-VMAT plans (683 ± 87 were increased by 22% ± 12% compared with the LF-VMAT plans (559 ± 62. In terms of the TT, no significant difference was found between the two kinds of plans.FJ-VMAT was similar or slightly superior to LF-VMAT in terms of PTV coverage and was significantly superior in terms of OAR sparing, at the expense of increased MUs.

  16. Fragmentation and Coverage Variation in Viral Metagenome Assemblies, and Their Effect in Diversity Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge Francisco; Moya, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic libraries consist of DNA fragments from diverse species, with varying genome size and abundance. High-throughput sequencing platforms produce large volumes of reads from these libraries, which may be assembled into contigs, ideally resembling the original larger genomic sequences. The uneven species distribution, along with the stochasticity in sample processing and sequencing bias, impacts the success of accurate sequence assembly. Several assemblers enable the processing of viral metagenomic data de novo, generally using overlap layout consensus or de Bruijn graph approaches for contig assembly. The success of viral genomic reconstruction in these datasets is limited by the degree of fragmentation of each genome in the sample, which is dependent on the sequencing effort and the genome length. Depending on ecological, biological, or procedural biases, some fragments have a higher prevalence, or coverage, in the assembly. However, assemblers must face challenges, such as the formation of chimerical structures and intra-species variability. Diversity calculation relies on the classification of the sequences that comprise a metagenomic dataset. Whenever the corresponding genomic and taxonomic information is available, contigs matching the same species can be classified accordingly and the coverage of its genome can be calculated for that species. This may be used to compare populations by estimating abundance and assessing species distribution from this data. Nevertheless, the coverage does not take into account the degree of fragmentation, or else genome completeness, and is not necessarily representative of actual species distribution in the samples. Furthermore, undetermined sequences are abundant in viral metagenomic datasets, resulting in several independent contigs that cannot be assigned by homology or genomic information. These may only be classified as different operational taxonomic units (OTUs), sometimes remaining inadvisably unrelated. Thus

  17. Exploring the relationship between population density and maternal health coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanlon Michael

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivering health services to dense populations is more practical than to dispersed populations, other factors constant. This engenders the hypothesis that population density positively affects coverage rates of health services. This hypothesis has been tested indirectly for some services at a local level, but not at a national level. Methods We use cross-sectional data to conduct cross-country, OLS regressions at the national level to estimate the relationship between population density and maternal health coverage. We separately estimate the effect of two measures of density on three population-level coverage rates (6 tests in total. Our coverage indicators are the fraction of the maternal population completing four antenatal care visits and the utilization rates of both skilled birth attendants and in-facility delivery. The first density metric we use is the percentage of a population living in an urban area. The second metric, which we denote as a density score, is a relative ranking of countries by population density. The score’s calculation discounts a nation’s uninhabited territory under the assumption those areas are irrelevant to service delivery. Results We find significantly positive relationships between our maternal health indicators and density measures. On average, a one-unit increase in our density score is equivalent to a 0.2% increase in coverage rates. Conclusions Countries with dispersed populations face higher burdens to achieve multinational coverage targets such as the United Nations’ Millennial Development Goals.

  18. Building high-coverage monolayers of covalently bound magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mackenzie G.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an approach for producing a high-coverage single monolayer of magnetic nanoparticles using "click chemistry" between complementarily functionalized nanoparticles and a flat substrate. This method highlights essential aspects of the functionalization scheme for substrate surface and nanoparticles to produce exceptionally high surface coverage without sacrificing selectivity or control over the layer produced. The deposition of one single layer of magnetic particles without agglomeration, over a large area, with a nearly 100% coverage is confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectroscopic techniques, supplemented by computational predictions, are used to interrogate the chemistry of the attachment and to confirm covalent binding, rather than attachment through self-assembly or weak van der Waals bonding. Density functional theory calculations for the surface intermediate of this copper-catalyzed process provide mechanistic insight into the effects of the functionalization scheme on surface coverage. Based on this analysis, it appears that steric limitations of the intermediate structure affect nanoparticle coverage on a flat solid substrate; however, this can be overcome by designing a functionalization scheme in such a way that the copper-based intermediate is formed on the spherical nanoparticles instead. This observation can be carried over to other approaches for creating highly controlled single- or multilayered nanostructures of a wide range of materials to result in high coverage and possibly, conformal filling.

  19. WE-B-304-02: Treatment Planning Evaluation and Optimization Should Be Biologically and Not Dose/volume Based

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deasy, J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations.

  20. WE-B-304-01: Treatment Planning Evaluation and Optimization Should Be Dose/volume and Not Biologically Based

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayo, C. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations.

  1. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  2. Avaliação da margem do PTV em tumores ginecológicos com irradiação dos gânglios lomboaórticos, que realizaram IMRT

    OpenAIRE

    Barateiro, Andreia Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Mestrado em Radioterapia. Há vários anos atrás, poucos eram os físicos, que punham a possibilidade de modular a fluência do feixe e com esta conseguir um escalonamento de dose no volume alvo e ao mesmo tempo diminuir a dose nos órgãos de risco. Neoplasias do Endométrio e do Colo do Útero sujeitos a irradiação ganglionar lomboaórtica possuem através da IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) a oportunidade de conseguir obter uma melhor conformação de dose ao volume alvo e deste modo mi...

  3. Insurance Coverage and Health Outcomes in Young Adults With Mental Illness Following the Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozloff, Nicole; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2017-07-01

    As a provision of the Affordable Care Act, young adults were able to remain on their parents' health insurance plans until age 26. We examined the impact of the 2010 dependent coverage expansion on insurance coverage and health outcomes among young adults with mental illness. Data are from the 2008-2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual population-based survey of noninstitutionalized US individuals aged 12 and older. We used a difference-in-differences approach to compare young adults with mental illness subject to the provision (aged 19-25 years, n = 19,051) with an older comparison group (aged 26-34 years, n = 7,958) before (2008-2009) and after (2011-2013) the dependent coverage expansion in their insurance coverage, use of health services, and self-reported health. In adjusted analyses, following the dependent coverage expansion, private insurance coverage increased by 11.7 percentage points (95% CI, 8.4-15.1, P health treatment at least monthly on average (+2.0% [95% CI, 0.1% to 4.0%, P = .04]) and a modest decrease in those reporting their overall health as fair or poor (-2.3% [95% CI, -4.6% to -0.0%, P = .05]). Unmet mental health needs due to cost decreased significantly among those with moderate-to-serious mental illness (-12.3% [95% CI, -22.7% to -2.0%, P = .02]), but did not change among those with mild illness. The 2010 dependent coverage expansion was associated with an increase in insurance coverage, several indicators of mental health treatment, and improved self-reported health among young adults with mental illness.

  4. Finding the right coverage: the impact of coverage and sequence quality on single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping error rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Emily D; Pauli, Jonathan N; Reid, Brendan N; Palsbøll, Per J; Peery, M Zachariah

    2016-07-01

    Restriction-enzyme-based sequencing methods enable the genotyping of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in nonmodel organisms. However, in contrast to traditional genetic markers, genotyping error rates in SNPs derived from restriction-enzyme-based methods remain largely unknown. Here, we estimated genotyping error rates in SNPs genotyped with double digest RAD sequencing from Mendelian incompatibilities in known mother-offspring dyads of Hoffman's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni) across a range of coverage and sequence quality criteria, for both reference-aligned and de novo-assembled data sets. Genotyping error rates were more sensitive to coverage than sequence quality and low coverage yielded high error rates, particularly in de novo-assembled data sets. For example, coverage ≥5 yielded median genotyping error rates of ≥0.03 and ≥0.11 in reference-aligned and de novo-assembled data sets, respectively. Genotyping error rates declined to ≤0.01 in reference-aligned data sets with a coverage ≥30, but remained ≥0.04 in the de novo-assembled data sets. We observed approximately 10- and 13-fold declines in the number of loci sampled in the reference-aligned and de novo-assembled data sets when coverage was increased from ≥5 to ≥30 at quality score ≥30, respectively. Finally, we assessed the effects of genotyping coverage on a common population genetic application, parentage assignments, and showed that the proportion of incorrectly assigned maternities was relatively high at low coverage. Overall, our results suggest that the trade-off between sample size and genotyping error rates be considered prior to building sequencing libraries, reporting genotyping error rates become standard practice, and that effects of genotyping errors on inference be evaluated in restriction-enzyme-based SNP studies.

  5. Statistical Modeling of CTV Motion and Deformation for IMRT of Early-Stage Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, Luiza, E-mail: M.L.Bondar@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Intven, Martijn; Burbach, J.P. Maarten [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budiarto, Eka [Delft Institute of Applied Mathematics, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Kleijnen, Jean-Paul; Philippens, Marielle; Asselen, Bram van; Seravalli, Enrica; Reerink, Onne; Raaymakers, Bas [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To derive and validate a statistical model of motion and deformation for the clinical target volume (CTV) of early-stage rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 16 patients, 4 to 5 magnetic resonance images (MRI) were acquired before each fraction was administered. The CTV was delineated on each MRI. Using a leave-one-out methodology, we constructed a population-based principal component analysis (PCA) model of the CTV motion and deformation of 15 patients, and we tested the model on the left-out patient. The modeling error was calculated as the amount of the CTV motion-deformation of the left-out-patient that could not be explained by the PCA model. Next, the PCA model was used to construct a PCA target volume (PCA-TV) by accumulating motion-deformations simulated by the model. A PCA planning target volume (PTV) was generated by expanding the PCA-TV by uniform margins. The PCA-PTV was compared with uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins. To allow comparison, geometric margins were determined to ensure adequate coverage, and the volume difference between the PTV and the daily CTV (CTV-to-PTV volume) was calculated. Results: The modeling error ranged from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 2.1 mm, corresponding to a reduction of the CTV motion-deformation between 6% and 60% (average, 23% ± 11%). The reduction correlated with the magnitude of the CTV motion-deformation (P<.001, R=0.66). The PCA-TV and the CTV required 2-mm and 7-mm uniform margins, respectively. The nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 4 mm in the left, right, inferior, superior, and posterior directions and 8 mm in the anterior direction. Compared to uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins, the PCA-based PTV significantly decreased (P<.001) the average CTV-to-PTV volume by 128 ± 20 mL (49% ± 4%) and by 35 ± 6 mL (20% ± 3.5%), respectively. Conclusions: The CTV motion-deformation of a new patient can be explained by a population-based PCA model. A PCA model

  6. Analysis of k-Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmi Ranjan Patra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a concept of wireless sensor networks has attracted much attention due to its wide-range of potential applications. Wireless sensor networks also pose a number of challenging optimization problems. One of the fundamental problems in sensor networks is the coverage problem, which reflects the quality of service that can be provided by a particular sensor network. The coverage concept is depending from several points of view due to a variety of sensors and a wide-range of their applications. One fundamental issue in sensor networks is the coverage problem, which reflects how well a sensor network is monitored or tracked by sensors. In this paper, we formulate this problem as a decision problem, whose goal is to determine the degree of coverage of a sensor network, which is covered by at least k sensors, where k is a predefined value. The sensing ranges of sensors can be same or different. Performance evaluation of our protocol indicates that degree of coverage of wireless sensor networks can be determined within small period of time. Therefore energy consumption of the sensor networks can be minimized.

  7. Market Liquidity, Analysts Coverage, and Ownership Concentration: Evidence From ASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majd Iskandrani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the association between analyst coverage, ownership concentration and market liquidity in Amman Stock Exchange (ASE. Using a unique dataset about information asymmetry, several proxies related to the information asymmetry are used to clarify certain aspects of market liquidity. In a sample of 131 companies with comprehensive data collected from company guides and Datastream, information asymmetry measured by analysts’ coverage is found to be an important determinant of market liquidity. In particular, market liquidity is lower where firms have larger analysts coverage and where firms are denoted with high degree of ownership concentration. The effect of analysts coverage is, however, found to be more marked in firms with high levels of ownership concentration. The study provides theoretical and empirical improvement of market liquidity literature towards an understanding of the information asymmetry proxies in ASE. Policymakers, after the 2007-2009 scandal have formed governance codes that highlight the importance of disclosure requirements as key responsibility of financial analysts. The link between analysts coverage and market liquidity established in this research provides evidence for insider investors on the roles and potential effectiveness of analysts in carrying this responsibility.

  8. Surveillance of Vaccination Coverage among Adult Populations - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Walter W; Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa; Kim, David K; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Pilishvili, Tamara; Skoff, Tami H; Nelson, Noele P; Harpaz, Rafael; Markowitz, Lauri E; Rodriguez-Lainz, Alfonso; Fiebelkorn, Amy Parker

    2017-05-05

    Overall, the prevalence of illness attributable to vaccine-preventable diseases is greater among adults than among children. Adults are recommended to receive vaccinations based on their age, underlying medical conditions, lifestyle, prior vaccinations, and other considerations. Updated vaccination recommendations from CDC are published annually in the U.S. Adult Immunization Schedule. Despite longstanding recommendations for use of many vaccines, vaccination coverage among U.S. adults is low. August 2014-June 2015 (for influenza vaccination) and January-December 2015 (for pneumococcal, tetanus and diphtheria [Td] and tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis [Tdap], hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccination). The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a continuous, cross-sectional national household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. In-person interviews are conducted throughout the year in a probability sample of households, and NHIS data are compiled and released annually. The survey objective is to monitor the health of the U.S. population and provide estimates of health indicators, health care use and access, and health-related behaviors. Compared with data from the 2014 NHIS, increases in vaccination coverage occurred for influenza vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years (a 1.6 percentage point increase compared with the 2013-14 season to 44.8%), pneumococcal vaccine among adults aged 19-64 years at increased risk for pneumococcal disease (a 2.8 percentage point increase to 23.0%), Tdap vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years and adults aged 19-64 years (a 3.1 percentage point and 3.3 percentage point increase to 23.1% and to 24.7%, respectively), herpes zoster vaccine among adults aged ≥60 years and adults aged ≥65 years (a 2.7 percentage point and 3.2 percentage point increase to 30.6% and to 34.2%, respectively), and hepatitis B vaccine among health care personnel (HCP) aged

  9. News media outreach and newspaper coverage of tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Linda L; Nelson, David E; Babb, Stephen; London, Joel; Promoff, Gabbi; Pechacek, Terry

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about the impact of media outreach on news media coverage of tobacco control. Media outreach data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office on Smoking and Health (CDC/OSH) from 2003 to 2006; one to six types of outreach activities for 50 scientific publications were performed during 35 discrete time periods. The authors analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively 205 newspaper articles generated based on the CDC/OSH scientific publications. Media coverage of specific CDC/OSH-related tobacco themes was highest for disparities (100%) and tobacco statistics (98%). More outreach activities increased the likelihood of moderate pickup of the number of themes in newspaper articles (odds ratio = 2.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.5-2.8), but there appeared to be a ceiling effect. Certain types of outreach were more strongly associated with front page and headline coverage. The extent and type of outreach were associated with increased newspaper coverage but the relationship is not necessarily straightforward. Additional research is needed to better understand relationships between scientific findings, outreach, and news media coverage of tobacco.

  10. Enhancing Political Will for Universal Health Coverage in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aregbeshola, Bolaji S

    2017-01-01

    Universal health coverage aims to increase equity in access to quality health care services and to reduce financial risk due to health care costs. It is a key component of international health agenda and has been a subject of worldwide debate. Despite differing views on its scope and pathways to reach it, there is a global consensus that all countries should work toward universal health coverage. The goal remains distant for many African countries, including Nigeria. This is mostly due to lack of political will and commitment among political actors and policymakers. Evidence from countries such as Ghana, Chile, Mexico, China, Thailand, Turkey, Rwanda, Vietnam and Indonesia, which have introduced at least some form of universal health coverage scheme, shows that political will and commitment are key to the adoption of new laws and regulations for reforming coverage. For Nigeria to improve people's health, reduce poverty and achieve prosperity, universal health coverage must be vigorously pursued at all levels. Political will and commitment to these goals must be expressed in legal mandates and be translated into policies that ensure increased public health care financing for the benefit of all Nigerians. Nigeria, as part of a global system, cannot afford to lag behind in striving for this overarching health goal.

  11. Beam specific planning target volumes incorporating 4DCT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Liyong; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using +-3% uncertainty in stopping power, and +-3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8X12X10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and...

  12. Dosimetric consequences of tumor volume changes after kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography for non-operative lung cancer during adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Hu; Ximing Xu; Guangjin Yuan; Wei Ge; Liming Xu; Aihua Zhang; Junjian Deng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate tumor volume changes with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and their dosimetric consequences for non-operative lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Eighteen patients with non-operative lung cancer who received IMRT consisting of 1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction and five fractions per week or stereotactic radiotherapy with 5-8 Gy/fraction and three fractions a week were studied. kV-CBCT was performed once per week during IMRT and at every fraction during stereotactic radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on the kV-CBCT images, and adaptive treatment plans were created using merged kV-CBCT and primary planning computed tomogra-phy image sets. Tumor volume changes and dosimetric parameters, including the minimum dose to 95%(D95) or 1% (D1) of the planning target volume (PTV), mean lung dose (MLD), and volume of lung tissue that received more than 5 (V5), 10 (V10), 20 (V20), and 30 (V30) Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The average maximum change in GTV observed during IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radio-therapy was -25.85% (range, -13.09% --56.76%). The D95 and D1 of PTV for the adaptive treatment plans in all patients were not significantly different from those for the initial or former adaptive treatment plans. In patients with tumor volume changes of >20% in the third or fourth week of treatment during IMRT, adap-tive treatment plans offered clinically meaningful decreases in MLD and V5, V10, V20, and V30; however, in patients with tumor volume changes of 20% in the third or fourth week of treatment.

  13. Changes in Newspaper Coverage About Hormone Therapy with the Release of New Medical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jennifer S; Geller, Berta; Miglioretti, Diana L; Buist, Diana SM; Nelson, David E; Kerlikowske, Karla; Carney, Patricia A; Breslau, Erica S; Dash, Sarah; Canales, Mary K; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Results of 2 trials of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) challenged established practice patterns; 1 was not associated with changes in HT use, whereas the other was associated with substantial decline. Differential coverage by lay newspapers may have contributed to the differential impact. OBJECTIVE To examine newspaper coverage of HT before and after the publication of the Heart and Estrogen Replacement Study (HERS) in August 1998, and the main findings of the estrogen plus progestin therapy arm of the Women's Health Initiative (EPT-WHI) in July 2002. DESIGN Longitudinal review of newspaper articles, 1998 to 2003 (n=663). SETTING Twenty local and 6 regional/national newspapers. MEASUREMENTS Number and content of articles about HT. RESULTS The average number of articles about HT published during the month of the publication of the EPT-WHI was at least 8-fold greater than the number of articles published on the topic during any prior period. While the majority of articles in all periods presented information about the potential benefits of HT, information about harms became more common than information about benefits during the 2 months before the publication of the EPT-WHI, when the trial participants were notified of the early termination of the study. The presentation of specific health harms was more common after the publication of the EPT-WHI than after the publication of HERS. Few articles in any period used visual aids. CONCLUSIONS The publication of the EPT-WHI was associated with a change in both the volume and content of newspaper coverage about HT. PMID:16499542

  14. IODP Expedition 360: Analyzing the Media Coverage of a High Profile Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, L.; Martinez, A. O.; Burgio, M.; Zhang, J.; Expedition 360 Scientists, I.

    2016-12-01

    During Expedition 360 of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), the JOIDES Resolution drilled 789 meters of lower crustal gabbro in the Southwest Indian Ocean. This hole began a multi-expedition project with the goal of one day drilling across the crust-mantle boundary for the first time. This simplified narrative of the research objectives struck a chord with media and the project received worldwide coverage in the form of over 50 stories with a total audience in the millions. This expedition is presented as a case study in science communication. A four-member education and outreach team onboard the ship acted as the point of contact for interested reporters. Major outlets that ran stories include the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, British Broadcasting Corporation, Boston Globe, Daily Express, Fox News, Nature, Smithsonian, and Chinese based Xinhua News Agency who sailed a reporter on the ship for the duration of the expedition. The majority of stories published provided accurate and favourable coverage of the project; however, a few contained critical errors and cast the expedition in a less positive light. Public reaction varied greatly depending on the article. Positive themes include interest in the scientific outcomes and encouragement of human exploration. Negative themes include the project being an inefficient use of money and a perceived risk of the drilling triggering an earthquake or volcano. Through a review of published articles and online comments, the successes and challenges faced by Expedition 360 are identified. Despite minimal preparation for media relations, the team successfully maintained a public profile while working in one of the most remote locations on Earth. Interviews were facilitated and videos, articles, and podcasts were produced onboard the ship. A simple, catchy narrative resulted in a large volume of coverage; however, this simplicity also formed the root of a number of misconceptions and issues of public concern.

  15. Coverage in Multi-Antenna Two-Tier Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekhar, Vikram; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2009-01-01

    In two-tier networks -- comprising a conventional cellular network overlaid with shorter range hotspots (e.g. femtocells, distributed antennas, or wired relays) -- with universal frequency reuse, the near-far effect from cross-tier interference creates dead spots where reliable coverage cannot be guaranteed to users in either tier. Equipping the macrocell and femtocells with multiple antennas enhances robustness against the near-far problem. This work derives the maximum number of simultaneously transmitting multiple antenna femtocells meeting a per-tier outage probability constraint. Coverage dead zones are presented wherein cross-tier interference bottlenecks cellular and hotspot coverage. Two operating regimes are shown namely 1) a cellular-limited regime in which femtocell users experience unacceptable cross-tier interference and 2) a hotspot-limited regime wherein both femtocell users and cellular users are limited by hotspot interference. Our analysis accounts for the per-tier transmit powers, the numbe...

  16. Socio-economic inequality in oral healthcare coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinpoor, A R; Itani, L; Petersen, P E

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess socio-economic inequality in oral healthcare coverage among adults with expressed need living in 52 countries. Data on 60,332 adults aged 18 years or older were analyzed from 52 countries participating in the 2002-2004 World Health Survey. Oral healthcare...... wealth quintiles in each country, a wealth-based relative index of inequality was used to measure socio-economic inequality. The index was adjusted for sex, age, marital status, education, employment, overall health status, and urban/rural residence. Pro-rich inequality in oral healthcare coverage...... at global and national levels. To achieve universal coverage in oral healthcare, relevant interventions should reach the poorest population groups....

  17. The Rise of Web Supremacy in Newspaper Coverage of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Gunver Lystbæk

    Quantitative study of science news in Danish national Newspapers 1999 and 2012. This paper demonstrates how the Internet media has altered newspaper coverage of science in terms of quantity, origin and distribution. Although an overall rise in science coverage is observed, content analysis...... of science news material has also shifted the balance in distribution. Coverage in broadsheet print newspapers is decreasing whereas online and tabloid newspapers are steadily embracing science news. This transfer causes new target groups who have not been previously reachable to be included in science...... communication. The paper includes 693 articles from Danish national newspapers between 1999 and 2012 collected from random weeks. As Danish Internet newspapers only gained popularity after 2000 they were only included in the 2012 sample. All journalistic processed articles with a main focus on any field...

  18. Coverage Dependent Assembly of Anthraquinone on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Brad; Deloach, Andrew; Einstein, Theodore; Dougherty, Daniel

    A study of adsorbate-adsorbate and surface state mediated interactions of anthraquinone (AnQ) on Au(111) is presented. We utilize scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to characterize the coverage dependence of AnQ structure formation. Ordered structures are observed up to a single monolayer (ML) and are found to be strongly dependent on molecular surface density. While the complete ML forms a well-ordered close-packed layer, for a narrow range of sub-ML coverages irregular close-packed islands are observed to coexist with a disordered pore network linking neighboring islands. This network displays a characteristic pore size and at lower coverages, the soliton walls of the herringbone reconstruction are shown to promote formation of distinct pore nanostructures. We will discuss these nanostructure formations in the context of surface mediated and more direct adsorbate interactions.

  19. Root coverage using epithelial embossed connective tissue graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ramakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In periodontal practice, root coverage after marginal soft tissue recession requires daily clinical decisions. Numerous longitudinal human studies have been presented to support the efficacy and predictability of different mucogingival surgical techniques for root coverage. Over the years, root coverage procedure using the subepithelial connective tissue graft with variations has emerged as the favorite surgical technique. In the case presented in this report, subepithelial connective tissue graft with embossed epithelium was used to cover Miller′s class II gingival recession in the upper right canine. The design is such that embossed epithelium exactly fits the recession site and the connective tissue portion is tucked below the gingival margin of the recipient site. In this technique, coronal advancement of flap is not needed. Wider zone of attached gingiva at the recipient site was achieved by this technique.

  20. Chemical Abstracts coverage of the preclinical sciences journal literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyer, R K

    1982-02-01

    This study examines Chemical Abstracts (CA) coverage of the journal literature cited by researchers from preclinical science departments affiliated with medical schools. Using references from 70 dissertations written between 1973 and 1977 in the fields of anatomy, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology, coverage of journal articles was studied. Approximately 57% of the cited literature was covered. Biochemistry (83.5%), pharmacology (80.4%), and microbiology (76.2%) were covered the best while pathology (27.8%) was covered the worst. Coverage of anatomy (55.4%), immunology (40.1%), and physiology (42.4%) was dependent upon the research being conducted. With the advent of multidata base searching, Chemical Abstracts should be considered as a source of references for preclinical science researchers.

  1. Coverage and Exposure Paths in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Sheng Huang; Hong-Li Xu; Yang Wang; Jun-Min Wu; Hong Li

    2006-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks have posed a number of challenging problems such as localization, deployment and tracking, etc. One of the interesting problems is the calculation of the coverage and exposure paths for the sensor networks.This paper presents a fully localized algorithm to solve the worst coverage problem first introduced by Meguerdichian et al.The nodes of the sensor network cooperate to construct the worst coverage path only by the one-hop neighbor's information,thus avoiding the massive communication and conserving the energy. The correctness of the proposed algorithm is proved formally under the sensing diminishing model. Moreover, this algorithm can be easily extended to solve the minimal exposure problem with local information as well.

  2. Root coverage with free gingival autografts--a clinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepalakshmi D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the percentage of root coverage with autogenous free gingival grafts. MATERIALS & METHODS: Ten non-smoking patients with Miller′s class I or class II recessions were included in the study. The clinical parameters such as recession depth, recession width, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and width of the keratinized gingiva were recorded at the baseline, at the end of 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the surgical procedure. Autogenous free gingival grafts harvested from the palatal mucosa were used to cover the denuded roots. RESULTS: Four out of ten sites showed 100% root coverage. A mean percentage of 80.3% of root coverage was achieved.

  3. Internet-based media coverage on dengue in Sri Lanka between 2007 and 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies Wilder-Smith

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internet-based media coverage to explore the extent of awareness of a disease and perceived severity of an outbreak at a national level can be used for early outbreak detection. Dengue has emerged as a major public health problem in Sri Lanka since 2009. Objective: To compare Internet references to dengue in Sri Lana with references to other diseases (malaria and influenza in Sri Lanka and to compare Internet references to dengue in Sri Lanka with notified cases of dengue in Sri Lanka. Design: We examined Internet-based news media articles on dengue queried from HealthMap for Sri Lanka, for the period January 2007 to November 2015. For comparative purposes, we compared hits on dengue with hits on influenza and malaria. Results: There were 565 hits on dengue between 2007 and 2015, with a rapid rise in 2009 and followed by a rising trend ever since. These hits were highly correlated with the national epidemiological trend of dengue. The volume of digital media coverage of dengue was much higher than of influenza and malaria. Conclusions: Dengue in Sri Lanka is receiving increasing media attention. Our findings underpin previous claims that digital media reports reflect national epidemiological trends, both in annual trends and inter-annual seasonal variation, thus acting as proxy biosurveillance to provide early warning and situation awareness of emerging infectious diseases.

  4. Land Surface Coverage, Main Vegetation and Physical Soil Characteristics of West Side of Lawu Mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahayu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of catchment area management of a mountain requeres identification the vegetation and condition of the major vegetation. This reserachs purpouse was characterizing major vegetation, coverage and soil properties at 1000 m elevation sea level to the top of Lawu mountain. Survey was started by identification of every vegetation unit followed by taking soil sample that was analyzed in laboratory for identifying the properties. Sampling and identification conducted close by common climbing track line to the top, including Jogorogo and Cemoro Sewu East Java, and Cemoro Kandang and Sukuh Central java. Coverage of vegetation used sattellite immage landsad and was analyzed by Arview software. Results showed that intens and dense forest was 36,22% and the other was rare density forest. Major vegetation of Lawu mountain was Pinus (Pinus merkusii, Cemara (Casuarina equisatifolia, Tanganan (Schleptera sp, Akasia gunung (Acasia decurren, rumput vestuca, Cantigi (Vaccinium sp kayu pasang (Lithocarpus pruinusa and vegetables on agriculture land. Every type of vegetation unit had different soil physycal properties of topsoil, while elevation had effect on soil bulk volume and porocity.

  5. Measles seroprevalence, outbreaks, and vaccine coverage in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruyange, Eric; Gahutu, Jean-Bosco; Mambo Muvunyi, Claude; Uwimana, Zena G; Gatera, Maurice; Twagirumugabe, Theogene; Katare, Swaibu; Karenzi, Ben; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Measles outbreaks are reported after insufficient vaccine coverage, especially in countries recovering from natural disaster or conflict. We compared seroprevalence to measles in blood donors in Rwanda and Sweden and explored distribution of active cases of measles and vaccine coverage in Rwanda. 516 Rwandan and 215 Swedish blood donors were assayed for measles-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Data on vaccine coverage and acute cases in Rwanda from 1980 to 2014 were collected, and IgM on serum samples and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on nasopharyngeal (NPH) swabs from suspected measles cases during 2010-2011 were analysed. The seroprevalence of measles IgG was significantly higher in Swedish blood donors (92.6%; 95% CI: 89.1-96.1%) compared to Rwandan subjects (71.5%; 95% CI: 67.6-75.4%) and more pronounced measles vaccine coverage was concomitant with decrease in measles cases in Rwanda, with the exception of an outbreak in 1995 following the 1994 genocide. 76/544 serum samples were IgM positive and 21/31 NPH swabs were PCR positive for measles, determined by sequencing to be of genotype B3. Measles seroprevalence was lower in Rwandan blood donors compared to Swedish subjects. Despite this, the number of reported measles cases in Rwanda rapidly decreased during the study period, concomitant with increased vaccine coverage. Taken together, the circulation of measles was limited in Rwanda and vaccine coverage was favourable, but seroprevalence and IgG levels were low especially in younger age groups.

  6. Clinical coverage of an archetype repository over SNOMED-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng; Berry, Damon; Bisbal, Jesus

    2012-06-01

    Clinical archetypes provide a means for health professionals to design what should be communicated as part of an Electronic Health Record (EHR). An ever-growing number of archetype definitions follow this health information modelling approach, and this international archetype resource will eventually cover a large number of clinical concepts. On the other hand, clinical terminology systems that can be referenced by archetypes also have a wide coverage over many types of health-care information. No existing work measures the clinical content coverage of archetypes using terminology systems as a metric. Archetype authors require guidance to identify under-covered clinical areas that may need to be the focus of further modelling effort according to this paradigm. This paper develops a first map of SNOMED-CT concepts covered by archetypes in a repository by creating a so-called terminological Shadow. This is achieved by mapping appropriate SNOMED-CT concepts from all nodes that contain archetype terms, finding the top two category levels of the mapped concepts in the SNOMED-CT hierarchy, and calculating the coverage of each category. A quantitative study of the results compares the coverage of different categories to identify relatively under-covered as well as well-covered areas. The results show that the coverage of the well-known National Health Service (NHS) Connecting for Health (CfH) archetype repository on all categories of SNOMED-CT is not equally balanced. Categories worth investigating emerged at different points on the coverage spectrum, including well-covered categories such as Attributes, Qualifier value, under-covered categories such as Microorganism, Kingdom animalia, and categories that are not covered at all such as Cardiovascular drug (product).

  7. Monitoring vaccination coverage: Defining the role of surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, Felicity T; Claquin, Pierre; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Rhoda, Dale A

    2016-07-29

    Vaccination coverage is a widely used indicator of programme performance, measured by registries, routine administrative reports or household surveys. Because the population denominator and the reported number of vaccinations used in administrative estimates are often inaccurate, survey data are often considered to be more reliable. Many countries obtain survey data on vaccination coverage every 3-5years from large-scale multi-purpose survey programs. Additional surveys may be needed to evaluate coverage in Supplemental Immunization Activities such as measles or polio campaigns, or after major changes have occurred in the vaccination programme or its context. When a coverage survey is undertaken, rigorous statistical principles and field protocols should be followed to avoid selection bias and information bias. This requires substantial time, expertise and resources hence the role of vaccination coverage surveys in programme monitoring needs to be carefully defined. At times, programmatic monitoring may be more appropriate and provides data to guide program improvement. Practical field methods such as health facility-based assessments can evaluate multiple aspects of service provision, costs, coverage (among clinic attendees) and data quality. Similarly, purposeful sampling or censuses of specific populations can help local health workers evaluate their own performance and understand community attitudes, without trying to claim that the results are representative of the entire population. Administrative reports enable programme managers to do real-time monitoring, investigate potential problems and take timely remedial action, thus improvement of administrative estimates is of high priority. Most importantly, investment in collecting data needs to be complemented by investment in acting on results to improve performance.

  8. North American Magazine Coverage of Skin Cancer and Recreational Tanning Before and After the WHO/IARC 2009 Classification of Indoor Tanning Devices as Carcinogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-09-01

    The mass media is an influential source of skin cancer information for the public. In 2009, the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer classified UV radiation from tanning devices as carcinogenic. Our objective was to determine if media coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning increased in volume or changed in nature after this classification. We conducted a directed content analysis on 29 North American popular magazines (2007-2012) to investigate the overall volume of articles on skin cancer and recreational tanning and, more specifically, the presence of skin cancer risk factors, UV behaviors, and early detection information in article text (n = 410) and images (n = 714). The volume of coverage on skin cancer and recreational tanning did not increase significantly after the 2009 classification of tanning beds as carcinogenic. Key-related messages, including that UV exposure is a risk factor for skin cancer and that indoor tanning should be avoided, were not reported more frequently after the classification, but the promotion of the tanned look as attractive was conveyed more often in images afterwards (p after the classification (p skin cancer risk factors, other UV behaviors, or early detection information over time. The classification of indoor tanning beds as carcinogenic had no significant impact on the volume or nature of skin cancer and recreational tanning coverage in magazines.

  9. Change of mobile network coverage in France from 29 August

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    The change of mobile network coverage on the French part of the CERN site will take effect on 29 August and not on 11 July as previously announced.    From 29 August, the Swisscom transmitters in France will be deactivated and Orange France will thenceforth provide coverage on the French part of the CERN site.  This switch will result in changes to billing. You should also ensure that you can still be contacted by your colleagues when you are on the French part of the CERN site. Please consult the information and instructions in this official communication.

  10. Multi-Service Coverage Analysis for CDMA Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Peng; LIU Zhi-ping; QIU Hong; YANG Da-cheng

    2004-01-01

    In CDMA network planning, it's important to understand the characteristics of multi-services. A novel method for analyzing the coverage of mixed voice and packet data traffics is presented in this paper. Based upon GIS and Monte-Carlo simulation method, this method can provide more precise but less time-consuming analysis result than before.A practical analysis case using real geographic information and network parameters is applied to verify its performance and find some useful solutions. Simulation results show that this coverage analysis method can provide helpful solution for the radio networks planning.

  11. Television coverage of mental illness in Canada: 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rob; Wang, JiaWei

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess television news coverage of mental illness in Canadian media, including change over time. Data consist of news clips mentioning terms including 'mental illness' (N = 579). These were systematically collected and coded over 3 years (2013-2015) using a media retrieval software. Trend analysis indicated a significant linear increase for positively oriented coverage. In 2013, less than 10% of clips had a positive overall tone, whereas in 2015, this figure reached over 40%. Articles linking mental illness to violence significantly decreased, though these remain over 50%. Improvement may be due to educational initiatives targeted at journalists.

  12. Variability of surface ozone with cloud coverage over Kolkata, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Ghosh; S K Midya; U Sarkar; T Mukherjee

    2015-03-01

    Critical analysis of experimental surface ozone data and cloud coverage is reported over Kolkata during the period January 2011 to December 2011. Significant relationship between these two parameters is observed. Analysis shows that the trend of surface ozone concentration and cloud coverage follow opposite tendency. Some exceptional observations are also reported. Apart from this, seasonal variation of surface ozone with columnar ozone concentration, NO2 and temperature is also examined in relation with cloud cover to obtain a possible explanation of this type of variation.

  13. Feedback-Based Coverage Directed Test Generation: An Industrial Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Charalambos; Barrett, Geoff; Eder, Kerstin

    Although there are quite a few approaches to Coverage Directed test Generation aided by Machine Learning which have been applied successfully to small and medium size digital designs, it is not clear how they would scale on more elaborate industrial-level designs. This paper evaluates one of these techniques, called MicroGP, on a fully fledged industrial design. The results indicate relative success evidenced by a good level of code coverage achieved with reasonably compact tests when compared to traditional test generation approaches. However, there is scope for improvement especially with respect to the diversity of the tests evolved.

  14. Quad-Tree Visual-Calculus Analysis of Satellite Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Martin W.; Hockney, George; Kwan, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of analysis of coverage of areas of the Earth by a constellation of radio-communication or scientific-observation satellites has been developed. This method is intended to supplant an older method in which the global-coverage-analysis problem is solved from a ground-to-satellite perspective. The present method provides for rapid and efficient analysis. This method is derived from a satellite-to-ground perspective and involves a unique combination of two techniques for multiresolution representation of map features on the surface of a sphere.

  15. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Reyna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  16. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A.; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction. PMID:24701150

  17. Communication-Free Distributed Coverage for Networked Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Yazicioglu, A. Yasin

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we present a communication-free algorithm for distributed coverage of an arbitrary network by a group of mobile agents with local sensing capabilities. The network is represented as a graph, and the agents are arbitrarily deployed on some nodes of the graph. Any node of the graph is covered if it is within the sensing range of at least one agent. The agents are mobile devices that aim to explore the graph and to optimize their locations in a decentralized fashion by relying only on their sensory inputs. We formulate this problem in a game theoretic setting and propose a communication-free learning algorithm for maximizing the coverage.

  18. 42 CFR 440.325 - State plan requirements: Coverage and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.325 State plan requirements: Coverage and benefits. Subject to... benefits coverage: (a) Benchmark coverage in accordance with § 440.330. (b) Benchmark-equivalent...

  19. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  20. Skin deep: Coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning in Canadian women's magazines (2000-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-06-18

    Skin cancer is a significant public health problem among Canadians. Knowledge and attitudes about health are informed by mass media. The aim of our study was to describe the volume and nature of coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning in Canadian women's magazines. Directed content analysis on article text and images in six popular Canadian women's magazines (Chatelaine, Canadian Living, Homemakers, Flare, FASHION, ELLE Canada) from 2000-2012 with attention to risk factors, ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure and protection behaviours, and early detection. Six popular American women's magazines were used for a between-country comparison. There were 154 articles (221 images) about skin cancer and tanning published over 13 years. Volume of coverage did not increase in a linear fashion over time. The most common risk factor reported on was UV exposure (39%), with other risk factors less frequently identified. Although 72% of articles promoted sunscreen use, little content encouraged other protection behaviours. Only 15% of articles and 1% of images discouraged indoor tanning, while 41% of articles and 53% of images promoted the tanned look as attractive. Few articles (<11%) reported on early detection. Relative to American magazines, Canadian magazines had a greater proportion of content that encouraged sunscreen use and promoted the tanned look and a lesser proportion of content on risk factors and early detection. Skin cancer and tanning messages in Canadian women's magazines had a narrow focus and provided limited information on risk factors or screening. Conflicting messages about prevention (text vs. images) may contribute to harmful UV behaviours among Canadian women.

  1. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically 'negated' the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 {+-} 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 {+-} 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 {+-} 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p < 0.002), respectively, and for the planning target volume (PTV8100) was 8089 and 7303 cGy (p < 0.001), respectively. The mean V95 values when patient setup was corrected and uncorrected were 99.9% and 87.3%, respectively, for the PTV8100 volume (p < 0.0001). At an individual patient level, the difference in the D95 value for the prostate volume could be >1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35

  2. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is a well-documented side effect of radiation therapy for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only plans in the radiation treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. In total, 13 patients requiring chest wall and supraclavicular nodal irradiation were planned retrospectively using combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only supraclavicular beams. A dose of 50Gy over 25 fractions was prescribed. Chest wall irradiation parameters were fixed for all plans. The goal of this planning effort was to cover 95% of the supraclavicular clinical target volume (CTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume receiving ≥ 105% of the dose. Comparative end points were supraclavicular CTV coverage (volume covered by the 95% isodose line), hotspot volume, maximum radiation dose, contralateral breast dose, mean total lung dose, total lung volume percentage receiving at least 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)), heart volume percentage receiving at least 25 Gy (V(25 Gy)). Electron and photon energies ranged from 8 to 18 MeV and 4 to 6 MV, respectively. The ratio of photon-to-electron fractions in combined beams ranged from 5:20 to 15:10. Supraclavicular nodal coverage was highest in photon-only (mean = 96.2 ± 3.5%) followed closely by combined photon-electron (mean = 94.2 ± 2.5%) and lowest in electron-only plans (mean = 81.7 ± 14.8%, p supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Measuring coverage in MNCH: total survey error and the interpretation of intervention coverage estimates from household surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Eisele

    Full Text Available Nationally representative household surveys are increasingly relied upon to measure maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH intervention coverage at the population level in low- and middle-income countries. Surveys are the best tool we have for this purpose and are central to national and global decision making. However, all survey point estimates have a certain level of error (total survey error comprising sampling and non-sampling error, both of which must be considered when interpreting survey results for decision making. In this review, we discuss the importance of considering these errors when interpreting MNCH intervention coverage estimates derived from household surveys, using relevant examples from national surveys to provide context. Sampling error is usually thought of as the precision of a point estimate and is represented by 95% confidence intervals, which are measurable. Confidence intervals can inform judgments about whether estimated parameters are likely to be different from the real value of a parameter. We recommend, therefore, that confidence intervals for key coverage indicators should always be provided in survey reports. By contrast, the direction and magnitude of non-sampling error is almost always unmeasurable, and therefore unknown. Information error and bias are the most common sources of non-sampling error in household survey estimates and we recommend that they should always be carefully considered when interpreting MNCH intervention coverage based on survey data. Overall, we recommend that future research on measuring MNCH intervention coverage should focus on refining and improving survey-based coverage estimates to develop a better understanding of how results should be interpreted and used.

  4. Evaluation and comparison of New 4DCT based strategies for proton treatment planning for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Patyal, Baldev; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Bush, David

    2013-03-25

    To evaluate different strategies for proton lung treatment planning based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans. Twelve cases, involving only gross tumor volumes (GTV), were evaluated. Single image sets of (1) maximum intensity projection (MIP3) of end inhale (EI), middle exhale (ME) and end exhale (EE) images; (2) average intensity projection (AVG) of all phase images; and (3) EE images from 4DCT scans were selected as primary images for proton treatment planning. Internal target volumes (ITVs) outlined by a clinician were imported into MIP3, AVG, and EE images as planning targets. Initially, treatment uncertainties were not included in planning. Each plan was imported into phase images of 4DCT scans. Relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and mean ipsilateral lung dose of a phase image obtained by averaging the dose in inspiration and expiration phases were used to evaluate the quality of a plan for a particular case. For comparing different planning strategies, the mean of the averaged relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and its standard deviation for each planning strategy for all cases were used. Then, treatment uncertainties were included in planning. Each plan was recalculated in phase images of 4DCT scans. Same strategies were used for plan evaluation except dose-volume histograms of the planning target volumes (PTVs) instead of GTVs were used and the mean and standard deviation of the relative volumes of PTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and the ipsilateral lung dose were used to compare different planning strategies. MIP3 plans without treatment uncertainties yielded 96.7% of the mean relative GTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 5.7% for all cases). With treatment uncertainties, MIP3 plans yielded 99.5% of mean relative PTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 0.7%). Inclusion of treatment uncertainties improved PTV dose coverage but also increased the ipsilateral

  5. Fragmentation and coverage variation in viral metagenome assemblies, and their effect in diversity calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eGarcía-López

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic libraries consist of DNA fragments from diverse species, with varying genome size and abundance. High-throughput sequencing platforms produce large volumes of reads from these libraries which may be assembled into contigs, ideally resembling the original larger genomic sequences. The uneven species distribution, along with the stochasticity in sample processing and sequencing bias, impact the success of accurate sequence assembly. Several assemblers enable the processing of viral metagenomic data de novo, generally using Overlap Layout Consensus or de Bruijn graph approaches for contig assembly. The success of viral genomic reconstruction in these datasets is limited by the degree of fragmentation of each genome in the sample, which is dependent on the sequencing effort and the genome length. Depending on ecological, biological or procedural biases, some fragments have a higher prevalence, or coverage, in the assembly. However, assemblers must face challenges such as the formation of chimerical structures and intra-species variability.Diversity calculation relies on the classification of the sequences that comprise a metagenomic dataset. Whenever the corresponding genomic and taxonomic information is available, contigs matching the same species can be classified accordingly and the coverage of its genome can be calculated for that species. This may be used to compare populations by estimating abundance and assessing species distribution from this data. Nevertheless, the coverage does not take into account the degree of fragmentation, or else genome completeness, and is not necessarily representative of actual species distribution in the samples. Furthermore, undetermined sequences are abundant in viral metagenomic datasets, resulting in several independent contigs that cannot be assigned by homology or genomic information. These may only be classified as different Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs, sometimes remaining inadvisably

  6. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham

    2013-01-01

    cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis...

  7. Coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning in North American magazines before and after the landmark 2006 International Agency for Research on Cancer report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-02-21

    Skin cancer is an increasingly important global public health problem. Mass media is a key source of skin cancer information. We examined how media coverage of skin cancer has changed over time as a consequence of the release of a key public health report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in 2006, which linked ultraviolet (UV) radiation from indoor tanning and skin cancer. A directed content analysis of skin cancer and tanning coverage in 29 popular North American magazines (2001-2012) examined reporting of skin cancer risk factors, UV behaviors, and early detection in article text (n = 761) and images (n = 1267). Chi-square and correlational analyses were used determine whether coverage changed in relation to the 2006 IARC report. The total volume of articles about skin cancer and tanning increased modestly after the IARC report (χ (2) = 4.57, df = 1, p after compared to before the report. There were virtually no changes in the percentage of coverage for both risk factors and early detection information over time. There were some changes in the percentage of coverage about UV behaviors after the IARC report, but these variables were not directly related to the report. Magazines were more likely to encourage sunscreen use (χ (2) = 11.55, df = 1, p after the IARC report. It also became less common for magazines to promote sun avoidance (χ (2) = 6.82, df = 1, p after the report. Despite a modest increase in volume of coverage post-IARC report, key messages from the report were not taken up by the media. While there have been some improvements in magazine reporting, there is a need for more effective dissemination of public health messages about skin cancer and tanning.

  8. 26 CFR 11.410(b)-1 - Minimum coverage requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum coverage requirements. 11.410(b)-1 Section 11.410(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT...

  9. Factors influencing immunisation coverage in Mathare Valley, Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owino, L O; Irimu, G; Olenja, J; Meme, J S

    2009-07-01

    To determine the factors that influence immunisation coverage. Cross section destrictive study. Mathare valley slums in Central district of Nairobi, Kenya. Seven hundred and twelve children aged 12-23 months. Access to immunisation services was excellent at 95.6%. However, utilisation of immunisation services was found to be suboptimal as indicated by the low fully immunised child (FIC) percentage of 69.2% and the high drop out rate between the first and third Pentavalent vaccine coverage by card or history (12.0%). The immunisation status of the study population is significantly influenced by the maternal age (p-value < 0.001), ethnicity (p-value 0.009) and presence of child welfare card at home (p-value < 0.001). Factors that contribute to the low immunisation coverage include ignorance on need for immunisations and on return dates, fear of adverse events following immunisation, negative attitude of health care providers and missed opportunities. The immunisation coverage in the area is low. The immunisation services are accessible but utilisation is poor.

  10. Media coverage of chronic diseases in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wardt, E.M.; van der Wardt, Elly M.; Taal, Erik; Rasker, Hans J.; Wiegman, O.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the quantity or quality of information on rheumatic diseases provided by the mass media. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the media coverage of rheumatic diseases compared with other chronic diseases in the Netherlands. - Materials and Methods:

  11. Does the Market Choose Optimal Health Insurance Coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Consumers, when buying health insurance, do not know the exact value of each treatment that they buy coverage for. This leads them to overvalue some treatments and undervalue others. We show that the insurance market cannot correct these mistakes. This causes research labs to overinvest in

  12. Determinants of the demand for health insurance coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.P.M. Winssen van (Kayleigh)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe health insurance density in the Netherlands is among the highest in the world. This is shown by the fact that, in 2016, only 12 per cent of the Dutch insured opted for a reduction of health insurance coverage in the form of a voluntary deductible, while, at the same time, 84 per

  13. Determinants of the demand for health insurance coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.P.M. Winssen van (Kayleigh)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe health insurance density in the Netherlands is among the highest in the world. This is shown by the fact that, in 2016, only 12 per cent of the Dutch insured opted for a reduction of health insurance coverage in the form of a voluntary deductible, while, at the same time, 84 per

  14. determinants of immunisation coverage among children in mathare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-11-11

    Nov 11, 2001 ... Outcome measures: Level of immunisation coverage among children in the study population and the ... Age, level of education, attitude and knowledge on immunisation among the .... Data collection tools: A structured questionnaire was used to collect ... scale often: Good 6-10, Average 5 and poor 0-4.

  15. 5 CFR 870.1003 - Coverage and amount of insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE PROGRAM Benefits for United States Hostages in... of Basic life insurance for these individuals is the amount specified in § 870.202, subject to the... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage and amount of insurance....

  16. Google Scholar's Coverage of the Engineering Literature: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, John J.; Conkling, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Google Scholar's coverage of the engineering literature is analyzed by comparing its contents with those of Compendex, the premier engineering database. Records retrieved from Compendex were searched in Google Scholar, and a decade by decade comparison was done from the 1950s through 2007. The results show that the percentage of records appearing…

  17. PRINCIPAR An Efficient, Broad-coverage, Principle-based Parser

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D

    1994-01-01

    We present an efficient, broad-coverage, principle-based parser for English. The parser has been implemented in C++ and runs on SUN Sparcstations with X-windows. It contains a lexicon with over 90,000 entries, constructed automatically by applying a set of extraction and conversion rules to entries from machine readable dictionaries.

  18. Coverage of Milgram's Obedience Experiments in Social Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Whitehead, George I., III

    2015-01-01

    Past studies of the treatment of Milgram's obedience experiments in social psychology textbooks from the 1960s to the 1990s discovered an evolving "Milgram-friendly" coverage style (dealing with criticisms of his experiments either summarily, in a pro-Milgram manner, or not at all). We examined 10 current social textbooks to determine…

  19. Media Coverage of a Blizzard: Is the Message Helplessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Lee

    To determine the media's role in hazard awareness, a study analyzed the content of media coverage of the 1982 Denver, Colorado blizzard, the worst storm in that region in 70 years. Data were collected from the two major daily newspapers and from four television stations. The study period began on December 21, about 48 hours before the first real…

  20. 42 CFR 416.44 - Condition for coverage-Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Environment. 416.44 Section... for coverage—Environment. The ASC must have a safe and sanitary environment, properly constructed, equipped, and maintained to protect the health and safety of patients. (a) Standard: Physical...

  1. Assessing water service coverage by placeholders: a social media simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandara, C.G.; Lammeren, van R.J.A.; Niehof, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation of a social media approach to assess village domestic water services coverage by using a combination of known methods to capture placeholders. Placeholder is location based information given by local people who are familiar with a specific area due to a longer

  2. Magazine Coverage of Child Sexual Abuse, 1992-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheit, Ross E.; Shavit, Yael; Reiss-Davis, Zachary

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes trends in the coverage of child sexual abuse in popular magazines since the early 1990s. The article employs systematic analysis to identify and analyze articles in four popular magazines. Articles are analyzed by subject, length, and publication. The results affirm established theories of newsworthiness related to the…

  3. The Role of Practical Advice in Bioterrorism News Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Kristen Alley

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of crisis advice appearing in US news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks. Coverage of any crisis can spark public outrage, including fear, speculation, and contradictory or confusing evidence, especially when the stories do not contain practical advice. Five coders analyzed 833 news stories from 272 major US newspapers, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and 4 major US television networks. Practical advice appeared in only a quarter of the stories, even though practical advice for self-protection was mentioned 3 times more often than the vague advice that simply advised people not to panic. Public health officials provided the most practical advice, while scientists provided the least practical advice. Stories containing practical advice also provided more elucidating information, explaining why the threat was low, reducible, treatable, and detectable. Over the 3 phases of the anthrax crisis, an inverse relationship appeared between the amount of news coverage containing practical advice compared to "outrage rhetoric." Stories mentioned practical advice more often during the post-impact phase than earlier in the crisis. Elucidating, explanatory advice emphasized actions, risk comparisons, and tradeoffs. The findings indicate that when journalists use credible sources to provide practical advice and avoid speculation, their coverage can prevent the spread of misinformation and confusion during a bioterror attack. Also, journalists should provide context and sourcing when discussing advice during the outbreak and impact phases of the crisis, because these explanations could counteract outrage and threat distortion.

  4. Mathematics Content Coverage and Student Learning in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Mimi; Claessens, Amy; Watts, Tyler; Farkas, George

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing data from two nationally representative kindergarten cohorts, we examine the mathematics content teachers cover in kindergarten. We expand upon prior research, finding that kindergarten teachers report emphasizing basic mathematics content. Although teachers reported increased coverage of advanced content between the 1998-1999 and…

  5. 5 CFR 250.201 - Coverage and purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT IN AGENCIES Strategic Human Capital Management § 250.201 Coverage and purpose. The Chief Human... the strategic management of the Federal civil service, and pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 1103, OPM...

  6. Print News Coverage of School-Based HPV Vaccine Mandate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Dana; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based HPV vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding these legislative activities. Messages communicated through the media are an important influence on adolescent and parent understanding of school-based vaccine mandates. METHODS We conducted structured text analysis of newspaper coverage, including quantitative analysis of 169 articles published in mandate jurisdictions from 2005-2009, and qualitative analysis of 63 articles from 2007. Our structured analysis identified topics, key stakeholders and sources, tone, and the presence of conflict. Qualitative thematic analysis identified key messages and issues. RESULTS Media coverage was often incomplete, providing little context about cervical cancer or screening. Skepticism and autonomy concerns were common. Messages reflected conflict and distrust of government activities, which could negatively impact this and other youth-focused public health initiatives. CONCLUSIONS If school health professionals are aware of the potential issues raised in media coverage of school-based health mandates, they will be more able to convey appropriate health education messages, and promote informed decision-making by parents and students. PMID:25099421

  7. Reporting on Radiation: A Content Analysis of Chernobyl Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates how well the media guided readers and viewers through the Chernobyl disaster. Concludes that the press and television did not provide enough radiation and risk information in their coverage of the Chernobyl accident, but what was provided was appropriate, even-handed, and conservative. (NKA)

  8. 42 CFR 409.20 - Coverage of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with the furnishing of that nursing care. (3) Physical, occupational, or speech therapy. (4) Medical... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage of services. 409.20 Section 409.20 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM...

  9. Assessment of vitamin A supplementation coverage and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with childhood illness in Boloso Sore Woreda, Welayta Zone, SNNP Region, ... and to measure the coverage of vitamin A supplementation among children aged ... [AOR=1.15 (95%CI 0.77-1.72)], Eye infection [AOR=1.22 (95%CI 0.78-1.89)], ...

  10. 9 CFR 303.2 - Experimentation: Intensity of inspection coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Experimentation: Intensity of inspection coverage. 303.2 Section 303.2 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION EXEMPTIONS § 303.2 Experimentation: Intensity of...

  11. A Coverage Dominance Approach for Sensor Deployment Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Wireless Networks, 2003. [19] S. Kumar, T. H. Lai, and J. Balogh, On k-coverage in a mostly sleeping sensor network. Wireless Network, no. 14, pp. 277 – 294...Polyhedral Terrain in Polynomial Time. Image and Vision Computing, vol. 18, pp. 773 – 780, 2000. [22] S. Meguerdichian, F. Koushanfar, M. Potkonjak, and M

  12. Alar and Apples: Newspaper Coverage of a Major Risk Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    A study reviewed coverage in 13 newspapers during 1989 of the issue of spraying the pesticide Alar on apples. Using VU/TEXT, a newspaper database, 297 articles in 13 newspapers that included the specified code words "Alar" with or without "apple" or "apples" were retrieved and analyzed using a 33-question coding…

  13. 32 CFR 232.1 - Authority, purpose, and coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... provide additional consumer disclosures for such transactions. (c) Coverage. This part defines the types... amount of all charges, and the types of charges, that may be associated with a covered extension of... provided to consumers under the Federal Truth in Lending Act; (3) Provides for the method creditors...

  14. 26 CFR 54.4980B-5 - COBRA continuation coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employee and spouse who have no children divorce on May 1, 2001, and the spouse elects COBRA continuation... divorce on June 1, 2001, and one of the children remains with the employee. The spouse elects COBRA... other reference in §§ 54.4980B-1 through 54.4980B-10 to coverage in effect immediately before (or on...

  15. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Zimbardo's 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE), one of the most famous studies in psychology, is discussed in most introductory textbooks. The present study is concerned with the nature of this coverage, given that there have been myriad criticisms, especially recently, of the SPE. These criticisms concern both Zimbardo's situationist…

  16. Nursing challenges for universal health coverage: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cabral Schveitzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives to identify nursing challenges for universal health coverage, based on the findings of a systematic review focused on the health workforce' understanding of the role of humanization practices in Primary Health Care. Method systematic review and meta-synthesis, from the following information sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Scielo, Web of Science, PsycInfo, SCOPUS, DEDALUS and Proquest, using the keyword Primary Health Care associated, separately, with the following keywords: humanization of assistance, holistic care/health, patient centred care, user embracement, personal autonomy, holism, attitude of health personnel. Results thirty studies between 1999-2011. Primary Health Care work processes are complex and present difficulties for conducting integrative care, especially for nursing, but humanizing practices have showed an important role towards the development of positive work environments, quality of care and people-centered care by promoting access and universal health coverage. Conclusions nursing challenges for universal health coverage are related to education and training, to better working conditions and clear definition of nursing role in primary health care. It is necessary to overcome difficulties such as fragmented concepts of health and care and invest in multidisciplinary teamwork, community empowerment, professional-patient bond, user embracement, soft technologies, to promote quality of life, holistic care and universal health coverage.

  17. Health Care Coverage among Child Support-Eligible Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Laudan Y.

    Using data from the National Survey of America's Families (a nationally representative survey of the economic, social, and health characteristics of children, adults, and their families), this paper discusses health care coverage among child support eligible children. It begins with a detailed profile of child support eligible children living with…

  18. 26 CFR 54.9801-5 - Evidence of creditable coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... certificate to identify the individual, such as the individual's identification number under the plan and the... demonstrate that a child was covered under any creditable coverage within 30 days after birth, adoption, or... information that the requesting entity reasonably needs in order to determine the individual's...

  19. 29 CFR 2590.701-5 - Evidence of creditable coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... certificate to identify the individual, such as the individual's identification number under the plan and the... demonstrate that a child was covered under any creditable coverage within 30 days after birth, adoption, or... requesting entity may identify specific information that the requesting entity reasonably needs in order...

  20. Chiropractic Use by Urban and Rural Residents with Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Bonnie K.; Diehr, Paula K.; Grembowski, David E.; Lafferty, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of chiropractic care by urban and rural residents in Washington state with musculoskeletal diagnoses, all of whom have insurance coverage for this care. The analyses investigate whether restricting the analyses to insured individuals attenuates previously reported differences in the prevalence of chiropractic use…

  1. Transforming Coverage of Primary Prevention in Abnormal Psychology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, James H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that a comprehensive understanding of abnormal psychology requires coverage of recent advances in primary prevention. Describes a conceptual scheme and recommends resources and teaching methods for instructors. Asserts that clinical and community psychology are conceptually distinct but complementary fields. (CFR)

  2. On models for continuous facility location with partial coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik; Körner, Mark-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept of partial coverage distance, where demand points within a given threshold distance of a new facility are covered in the traditional sense, while non-covered demand points are penalized an amount proportional to their distance to the covered region. Two single fa...

  3. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Minissale

    2014-01-01

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O$_2$) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80 $\\%$ at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-...

  4. Women's Magazines' Coverage of Smoking Related Health Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Lauren

    1989-01-01

    Examines the extent to which women's magazines with a strong interest in health covered various health hazards associated with smoking. Finds that six major women's magazines have virtually no coverage of smoking and cancer. Suggests that self-censorship may have helped determine editorial content more than pressure from tobacco companies. (RS)

  5. Google Scholar's Coverage of the Engineering Literature: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, John J.; Conkling, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Google Scholar's coverage of the engineering literature is analyzed by comparing its contents with those of Compendex, the premier engineering database. Records retrieved from Compendex were searched in Google Scholar, and a decade by decade comparison was done from the 1950s through 2007. The results show that the percentage of records appearing…

  6. Journal Coverage by the Major Chemical Title and Abstract Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehlmann, Eberhard

    1972-01-01

    The journal coverage provided by Chemical Titles,'' Current Contents,'' Science Citation Index,'' Chemischer Informationsdienst,'' and Index Chemicus'' is discussed and compared with the CASSI list of the thousand primary journals most frequently cited by Chemical Abstracts.'' (10 references) (Author/NH)

  7. Vaccination Coverage among Kindergarten Children in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A.; Rivers, Patrick A.; Bae, Sejong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate school immunization records and document the immunization coverage and compliance level of children enrolled in kindergarten in Phoenix during the 2001-2002 school year. The purpose was to obtain information on: 1) immunization status by age two; 2) under-immunization in kindergarten; 3) administration error; and 4)…

  8. 42 CFR 418.204 - Special coverage requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... periods of crisis as necessary to maintain an individual at home. Either homemaker or home health aide... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special coverage requirements. 418.204 Section 418.204 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. Suicide Coverage Continues to Be a Dilemma for the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Dow

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how the adviser of the Hillcrest High School (Dallas, Texas) and the student staff covered the suicide of a fellow student. Notes that the adviser, who is committed to student decision making, made sure the student staff raised the appropriate ethical questions when deciding on the type, amount, and duration of coverage of the suicide.…

  10. Estimating IBD tracts from low coverage NGS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett Vieira, Filipe Jorge; Albrechtsen, Anders; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    that the new method provides a marked increase in accuracy even at low coverage. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The methods presented in this work were implemented in C/C ++ and are freely available for non-commercial use from https://github.com/fgvieira/ngsF-HMM CONTACT: fgvieira@snm.ku.dk SUPPLEMENTARY...

  11. Media disaster coverage over time: Methodological issues and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuttschreuter, M.; Gutteling, J.M.; Martorell, Sebastian; Soares, C. Guedes; Barnett, Julie

    2008-01-01

    In 2000 disaster struck Enschede in The Netherlands. Due to explosions at a fireworks factory, 22 people were killed. This study aims to describe the developments in the media coverage of this disaster. Content analysis was performed on 4928 articles, derived from four distinct newspapers. After a p

  12. 24 CFR 3500.5 - Coverage of RESPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coverage of RESPA. 3500.5 Section 3500.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  13. 29 CFR 1620.7 - “Enterprise” coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... “Enterprise” coverage. (a) The terms “enterprise” and “enterprise engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for commerce” are defined in subsections 3(r) and 3(s) of the FLSA. Under the enterprise concept, if a business is an “enterprise engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for commerce...

  14. Magazine Coverage of Child Sexual Abuse, 1992-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheit, Ross E.; Shavit, Yael; Reiss-Davis, Zachary

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes trends in the coverage of child sexual abuse in popular magazines since the early 1990s. The article employs systematic analysis to identify and analyze articles in four popular magazines. Articles are analyzed by subject, length, and publication. The results affirm established theories of newsworthiness related to the…

  15. Suicide Coverage Continues to Be a Dilemma for the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Dow

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how the adviser of the Hillcrest High School (Dallas, Texas) and the student staff covered the suicide of a fellow student. Notes that the adviser, who is committed to student decision making, made sure the student staff raised the appropriate ethical questions when deciding on the type, amount, and duration of coverage of the suicide.…

  16. Coverage of soft tissue defect in palm with prefabricated flap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gong-lin; CAI Guo-rong; ZHANG Ming; ZHENG Liang-jun; ZHANG Yan

    2008-01-01

    @@ The coverage of large soft tissue defects in palm remains a challenge in the plastic recon-structive surgery. There are many local tissue transfers described for small-sized defects of hand, whereas large defect require regional flaps such as the radial forearm flap or free tissue transfer.1-5

  17. CT following US for possible appendicitis: anatomic coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, Martin E. [University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Hospital, 3-920, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Alharbi, Fawaz [University of Toronto, Toronto General Hospital, NCSB 1C572, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Qassim University, Department of Medical Imaging, Buraydah, Qassim (Saudi Arabia); Chawla, Tanya P. [University of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, Room 567, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moshonov, Hadas [University of Toronto, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    To determine superior-inferior anatomic borders for CT following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US for possible appendicitis. Ninety-nine patients with possible appendicitis and inconclusive/nondiagnostic US followed by CT were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists reviewed CT images and determined superior-inferior anatomic borders required to diagnose or exclude appendicitis and diagnose alternative causes. This ''targeted'' coverage was used to estimate potential reduction in anatomic coverage compared to standard abdominal/pelvic CT. The study group included 83 women and 16 men; mean age 32 (median, 29; range 18-73) years. Final diagnoses were: nonspecific abdominal pain 50/99 (51 %), appendicitis 26/99 (26 %), gynaecological 12/99 (12 %), gastrointestinal 9/99 (10 %), and musculoskeletal 2/99 (2 %). Median dose-length product for standard CT was 890.0 (range, 306.3 - 2493.9) mGy.cm. To confidently diagnose/exclude appendicitis or identify alternative diagnoses, maximum superior-inferior anatomic CT coverage was the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis, for both reviewers. Targeted CT would reduce anatomic coverage by 30-55 % (mean 39 %, median 40 %) compared to standard CT. When CT is performed for appendicitis following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US, targeted CT from the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis can be used resulting in significant reduction in exposure to ionizing radiation compared to standard CT. (orig.)

  18. [Strategies to improve influenza vaccination coverage in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, F; Richart, M J; Serrano, S; Martínez, A M; Pruteanu, D F

    2016-04-01

    Vaccination coverage reached in adults is insufficient, and there is a real need for new strategies. To compare strategies for improving influenza vaccination coverage in persons older than 64 years. New strategies were introduced in our health care centre during 2013-2014 influenza vaccination campaign, which included vaccinating patients in homes for the aged as well as in the health care centre. A comparison was made on vaccination coverage over the last 4 years in 3 practices of our health care centre: P1, the general physician vaccinated patients older than 64 that came to the practice; P2, the general physician systematically insisted in vaccination in elderly patients, strongly advising to book appointments, and P3, the general physician did not insist. These practices looked after P1: 278; P2: 320; P3: 294 patients older than 64 years. Overall/P1/P2/P3 coverages in 2010: 51.2/51.4/55/46.9% (P=NS), in 2011: 52.4/52.9/53.8/50.3% (P=NS), in 2012: 51.9/52.5/55.3/47.6% (P=NS), and in 2013: 63.5/79.1/59.7/52.7 (P=.000, P1 versus P2 and P3; P=NS between P2 and P3). Comparing the coverages in 2012-2013 within each practice P1 (P=.000); P2 (P=.045); P3 (P=.018). In P2 and P3 all vaccinations were given by the nurses as previously scheduled. In P3, 55% of the vaccinations were given by the nurses, 24.1% by the GP, 9.7% rejected vaccination, and the remainder did not come to the practice during the vaccination period (October 2013-February 2014). The strategy of vaccinating in the homes for the aged improved the vaccination coverage by 5% in each practice. The strategy of "I've got you here, I jab you here" in P1 improved the vaccination coverage by 22%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  20. Towards Semantic Web Services on Large, Multi-Dimensional Coverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, P.

    2009-04-01

    Observed and simulated data in the Earth Sciences often come as coverages, the general term for space-time varying phenomena as set forth by standardization bodies like the Open GeoSpatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO. Among such data are 1-d time series, 2-D surface data, 3-D surface data time series as well as x/y/z geophysical and oceanographic data, and 4-D metocean simulation results. With increasing dimensionality the data sizes grow exponentially, up to Petabyte object sizes. Open standards for exploiting coverage archives over the Web are available to a varying extent. The OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS) standard defines basic extraction operations: spatio-temporal and band subsetting, scaling, reprojection, and data format encoding of the result - a simple interoperable interface for coverage access. More processing functionality is available with products like Matlab, Grid-type interfaces, and the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS). However, these often lack properties known as advantageous from databases: declarativeness (describe results rather than the algorithms), safe in evaluation (no request can keep a server busy infinitely), and optimizable (enable the server to rearrange the request so as to produce the same result faster). WPS defines a geo-enabled SOAP interface for remote procedure calls. This allows to webify any program, but does not allow for semantic interoperability: a function is identified only by its function name and parameters while the semantics is encoded in the (only human readable) title and abstract. Hence, another desirable property is missing, namely an explicit semantics which allows for machine-machine communication and reasoning a la Semantic Web. The OGC Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) language, which has been adopted as an international standard by OGC in December 2008, defines a flexible interface for the navigation, extraction, and ad-hoc analysis of large, multi-dimensional raster coverages. It is abstract in that it

  1. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Corry, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  2. Effective cataract surgical coverage: An indicator for measuring quality-of-care in the context of Universal Health Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Jacqueline; Gilbert, Clare E; Lee, Arier C; Ackland, Peter; Limburg, Hans; Foster, Allen

    2017-01-01

    To define and demonstrate effective cataract surgical coverage (eCSC), a candidate UHC indicator that combines a coverage measure (cataract surgical coverage, CSC) with quality (post-operative visual outcome). All Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness (RAAB) surveys with datasets on the online RAAB Repository on April 1 2016 were downloaded. The most recent study from each country was included. By country, cataract surgical outcome (CSOGood, 6/18 or better; CSOPoor, worse than 6/60), CSC (operated cataract as a proportion of operable plus operated cataract) and eCSC (operated cataract and a good outcome as a proportion of operable plus operated cataract) were calculated. The association between CSC and CSO was assessed by linear regression. Gender inequality in CSC and eCSC was calculated. Datasets from 20 countries were included (2005-2013; 67,337 participants; 5,474 cataract surgeries). Median CSC was 53.7% (inter-quartile range[IQR] 46.1-66.6%), CSOGood was 58.9% (IQR 53.7-67.6%) and CSOPoor was 17.7% (IQR 11.3-21.1%). Coverage and quality of cataract surgery were moderately associated-every 1% CSC increase was associated with a 0.46% CSOGood increase and 0.28% CSOPoor decrease. Median eCSC was 36.7% (IQR 30.2-50.6%), approximately one-third lower than the median CSC. Women tended to fare worse than men, and gender inequality was slightly higher for eCSC (4.6% IQR 0.5-7.1%) than for CSC (median 2.3% IQR -1.5-11.6%). eCSC allows monitoring of quality in conjunction with coverage of cataract surgery. In the surveys analysed, on average 36.7% of people who could benefit from cataract surgery had undergone surgery and obtained a good visual outcome.

  3. Delaunay Triangulation as a New Coverage Measurement Method in Wireless Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizari, Hassan; Hosseini, Majid; Poston, Timothy; Razak, Shukor Abd; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan

    2011-01-01

    Sensing and communication coverage are among the most important trade-offs in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) design. A minimum bound of sensing coverage is vital in scheduling, target tracking and redeployment phases, as well as providing communication coverage. Some methods measure the coverage as a percentage value, but detailed information has been missing. Two scenarios with equal coverage percentage may not have the same Quality of Coverage (QoC). In this paper, we propose a new coverage measurement method using Delaunay Triangulation (DT). This can provide the value for all coverage measurement tools. Moreover, it categorizes sensors as ‘fat’, ‘healthy’ or ‘thin’ to show the dense, optimal and scattered areas. It can also yield the largest empty area of sensors in the field. Simulation results show that the proposed DT method can achieve accurate coverage information, and provides many tools to compare QoC between different scenarios. PMID:22163792

  4. Investigation of simple IMRT delivery techniques for non-small cell lung cancer patients with respiratory motion using 4DCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Bodo; Parda, David S; Colonias, Athanasios; Lee, Vincent; Miften, Moyed

    2009-01-01

    Techniques for generating simplified IMRT treatment plans for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with respiratory motion were investigated. To estimate and account for respiratory motion, 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) datasets from 5 patients were used to design 5-field 6-MV ungated step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans delivering a dose of 66 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For each patient, 2 plans were generated using the mean intensity and the maximum intensity of 10 CT datasets from different breathing phases. The plans also utilized different margins around the clinical target volume/internal target volume (CTV/ITV) to account for tumor motion. To reduce the treatment time and ensure accurate dose delivery to moving targets, the number of intensity levels was minimized while maintaining dose coverage to PTV and minimizing dose to organs at risk (OARs). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs), dosimetric metrics, and outcome probabilities were evaluated for all plans. Plans using the averaged CT image dataset were inferior, requiring larger margins around the PTV, with a maximum of 1.5 cm, to ensure coverage of the tumor, and therefore increased the dose to OARs located in proximity of the tumor. The plans based on superimposed CT image datasets achieved full coverage of the tumor, while allowing tight margins around the PTV and minimizing the dose to OARs. A small number of intensity-levels (3 to 5), resulting in IMRT plans with a total of 13 to 30 segments, were sufficient for homogeneous PTV coverage, without affecting the sparing of OARs. In conclusion, a technique involving treatment planning with the superimposed CT scans of all respiratory phases, and the application of IMRT with only a small number of segments was feasible despite significant tumor motion; however, greater patient numbers are needed to support the statistical significance of the results presented in this work.

  5. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, M.L., E-mail: m.bondar@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ahmad, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Programme of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia); Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To design and evaluate individualized nonadaptive and online-adaptive strategies based on a pretreatment established motion model for the highly deformable target volume in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 14 patients, nine to ten variable bladder filling computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired at pretreatment and after 40 Gy. Individualized model-based internal target volumes (mbITVs) accounting for the cervix and uterus motion due to bladder volume changes were generated by using a motion-model constructed from two pretreatment CT scans (full and empty bladder). Two individualized strategies were designed: a nonadaptive strategy, using an mbITV accounting for the full-range of bladder volume changes throughout the treatment; and an online-adaptive strategy, using mbITVs of bladder volume subranges to construct a library of plans. The latter adapts the treatment online by selecting the plan-of-the-day from the library based on the measured bladder volume. The individualized strategies were evaluated by the seven to eight CT scans not used for mbITVs construction, and compared with a population-based approach. Geometric uniform margins around planning cervix-uterus and mbITVs were determined to ensure adequate coverage. For each strategy, the percentage of the cervix-uterus, bladder, and rectum volumes inside the planning target volume (PTV), and the clinical target volume (CTV)-to-PTV volume (volume difference between PTV and CTV) were calculated. Results: The margin for the population-based approach was 38 mm and for the individualized strategies was 7 to 10 mm. Compared with the population-based approach, the individualized nonadaptive strategy decreased the CTV-to-PTV volume by 48% {+-} 6% and the percentage of bladder and rectum inside the PTV by 5% to 45% and 26% to 74% (p < 0.001), respectively. Replacing the individualized nonadaptive strategy by an online-adaptive, two-plan library further decreased the percentage of

  6. Cholera in Haiti: Reproductive numbers and vaccination coverage estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukandavire, Zindoga; Smith, David L.; Morris, J. Glenn, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Cholera reappeared in Haiti in October, 2010 after decades of absence. Cases were first detected in Artibonite region and in the ensuing months the disease spread to every department in the country. The rate of increase in the number of cases at the start of epidemics provides valuable information about the basic reproductive number (). Quantitative analysis of such data gives useful information for planning and evaluating disease control interventions, including vaccination. Using a mathematical model, we fitted data on the cumulative number of reported hospitalized cholera cases in Haiti. varied by department, ranging from 1.06 to 2.63. At a national level, 46% vaccination coverage would result in an () debate on the use of cholera vaccines in endemic and non-endemic regions, our results suggest that moderate cholera vaccine coverage would be an important element of disease control in Haiti.

  7. Platelet-rich-fibrin: A novel root coverage approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilkumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of gingival recession has become an important therapeutic issue due to increasing cosmetic demand. Multiple surgical procedures have been developed to obtain predictable esthetic root coverage. More specifically, after periodontal regenerative surgery, the aim is to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of the periodontal unit. A recent innovation in dentistry is the preparation and use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP, a concentrated suspension of the growth factors, found in platelets. These growth factors are involved in wound healing and postulated as promoters of tissue regeneration. This paper reports the use of PRF membrane for root coverage on the labial surfaces of the mandibular anterior teeth. This was accomplished using laterally displaced flap technique with platelet rich fibrin (PRF membrane at the recipient site.

  8. Failure impact on coverage in linear wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nader; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Jawhar, Imad

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor networks (WSN) are used to monitor long linear structures such as pipelines, rivers, railroads, international borders, and high power transmission cables. In this case a special type of WSN called linear wireless sensor network (LSN) is used. One of the main challenges of using LSN...... between holes may not be able to deliver their sensed information, which negatively affects network's sensing coverage. In this paper, we provide analysis of the different types of node faults in LSN and study their negative impact on the sensing coverage. We develop an analytical model to estimate...... is the reliability of the connections across the nodes. Faults in a few contiguous nodes may cause the creation of holes (segments where nodes on either end of them cannot reach each other), which will result in dividing the network into multiple disconnected segments. As a result, sensor nodes that are located...

  9. Low coverage sequencing of two Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Akbar; Robert, Christelle; Watson, Mick

    2014-01-01

    There are three species of elephant that exist, the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) and two species of African elephant (Loxodonta africana and Loxodonta cyclotis). The populations of all three species are dwindling, and are under threat due to factors, such as habitat destruction and ivory hunting. The species differ in many respects, including in their morphology and response to disease. The availability of elephant genome sequence data from all three elephant species will complement studies of behaviour, genetic diversity, evolution and disease resistance. We present low-coverage Illumina sequence data from two Asian elephants, representing approximately 5X and 2.5X coverage respectively. Both raw and aligned data are available, using the African elephant (L. africana) genome as a reference. The data presented here are an important addition to the available genetic and genomic information on Asian and African elephants.

  10. Directional Bias and Pheromone for Discovery and Coverage on Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-11

    Natural multi-agent systems often rely on “correlated random walks” (random walks that are biased toward a current heading) to distribute their agents over a space (e.g., for foraging, search, etc.). Our contribution involves creation of a new movement and pheromone model that applies the concept of heading bias in random walks to a multi-agent, digital-ants system designed for cyber-security monitoring. We examine the relative performance effects of both pheromone and heading bias on speed of discovery of a target and search-area coverage in a two-dimensional network layout. We found that heading bias was unexpectedly helpful in reducing search time and that it was more influential than pheromone for improving coverage. We conclude that while pheromone is very important for rapid discovery, heading bias can also greatly improve both performance metrics.

  11. An SIRS Epidemic Model Incorporating Media Coverage with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yiping; Dai, Yunxian

    2014-01-01

    An SIRS epidemic model incorporating media coverage with time delay is proposed. The positivity and boundedness are studied firstly. The locally asymptotical stability of the disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium is studied in succession. And then, the conditions on which periodic orbits bifurcate are given. Furthermore, we show that the local Hopf bifurcation implies the global Hopf bifurcation after the second critical value of the delay. The obtained results show that the time delay in media coverage can not affect the stability of the disease-free equilibrium when the basic reproduction number R0 1, the stability of the endemic equilibrium will be affected by the time delay; there will be a family of periodic orbits bifurcating from the endemic equilibrium when the time delay increases through a critical value. Finally, some examples for numerical simulations are also included. PMID:24723967

  12. Flux analysis in plant metabolic networks: increasing throughput and coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Björn H

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative information about metabolic networks has been mainly obtained at the level of metabolite contents, transcript abundance, and enzyme activities. However, the active process of metabolism is represented by the flow of matter through the pathways. These metabolic fluxes can be predicted by Flux Balance Analysis or determined experimentally by (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis. These relatively complicated and time-consuming methods have recently seen significant improvements at the level of coverage and throughput. Metabolic models have developed from single cell models into whole-organism dynamic models. Advances in lab automation and data handling have significantly increased the throughput of flux measurements. This review summarizes advances to increase coverage and throughput of metabolic flux analysis in plants.

  13. Criticality accident detector coverage analysis using the Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zino, J.F.; Okafor, K.C.

    1993-12-31

    As a result of the need for a more accurate computational methodology, the Los Alamos developed Monte Carlo code MCNP is used to show the implementation of a more advanced and accurate methodology in criticality accident detector analysis. This paper will detail the application of MCNP for the analysis of the areas of coverage of a criticality accident alarm detector located inside a concrete storage vault at the Savannah River Site. The paper will discuss; (1) the generation of fixed-source representations of various criticality fission sources (for spherical geometries); (2) the normalization of these sources to the ``minimum criticality of concern`` as defined by ANS 8.3; (3) the optimization process used to determine which source produces the lowest total detector response for a given set of conditions; and (4) the use of this minimum source for the analysis of the areas of coverage of the criticality accident alarm detector.

  14. Bootstrapping A Wide-Coverage CCG from FB-LTAG

    CERN Document Server

    Doran, C F; Doran, Christine

    1994-01-01

    A number of researchers have noted the similarities between LTAGs and CCGs. Observing this resemblance, we felt that we could make use of the wide-coverage grammar developed in the XTAG project to build a wide-coverage CCG. To our knowledge there have been no attempts to construct a large-scale CCG parser with the lexicon to support it. In this paper, we describe such a system, built by adapting various XTAG components to CCG. We find that, despite the similarities between the formalisms, certain parts of the grammatical workload are distributed differently. In addition, the flexibility of CCG derivations allows the translated grammar to handle a number of ``non-constituent'' constructions which the XTAG grammar cannot.

  15. Discrete Partitioning and Coverage Control for Gossiping Robots

    CERN Document Server

    Durham, Joseph W; Frasca, Paolo; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We propose distributed algorithms to automatically deploy a group of mobile robots to partition and provide coverage of a non-convex environment. To handle arbitrary non-convex environments, we represent them as connected graphs. Our partitioning and coverage algorithm requires only short-range, unreliable pairwise "gossip" communication among the agents. The algorithm has two components: (1) a motion protocol to ensure that each robot communicates with its neighbors at least sporadically, and (2) a pairwise partitioning rule to update territory ownership whenever two robots communicate. By studying an appropriate dynamical system on the space of partitions, we show that territory ownership converges to a centroidal Voronoi partition in finite time. Additionally, we characterize the scalability properties for the algorithm and describe how it can be implemented on robots with limited computational resources. Finally, we report on large-scale simulations in complex environments and hardware experiments using t...

  16. Failure impact on coverage in linear wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nader; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Jawhar, Imad

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor networks (WSN) are used to monitor long linear structures such as pipelines, rivers, railroads, international borders, and high power transmission cables. In this case a special type of WSN called linear wireless sensor network (LSN) is used. One of the main challenges of using LSN...... is the reliability of the connections across the nodes. Faults in a few contiguous nodes may cause the creation of holes (segments where nodes on either end of them cannot reach each other), which will result in dividing the network into multiple disconnected segments. As a result, sensor nodes that are located...... between holes may not be able to deliver their sensed information, which negatively affects network's sensing coverage. In this paper, we provide analysis of the different types of node faults in LSN and study their negative impact on the sensing coverage. We develop an analytical model to estimate...

  17. Nuclear liability coverage developments in the United States of America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown II, Omer F.

    1995-12-31

    The availability of such nuclear liability coverage has been a concern of nuclear power plant vendors, suppliers and operators, and public officials in the United States or many years. This paper addresses implications of the Federal Price-Anderson Act (42 U.S.C. 2014, 2020; Sections 11 and 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended); on the financial liability of persons accountable for an accident in the United States. (author).

  18. ASTER cloud coverage reassessment using MODIS cloud mask products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonooka, Hideyuki; Omagari, Kunjuro; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Tachikawa, Tetsushi; Fujita, Masaru; Paitaer, Zaoreguli

    2010-10-01

    In the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) Project, two kinds of algorithms are used for cloud assessment in Level-1 processing. The first algorithm based on the LANDSAT-5 TM Automatic Cloud Cover Assessment (ACCA) algorithm is used for a part of daytime scenes observed with only VNIR bands and all nighttime scenes, and the second algorithm based on the LANDSAT-7 ETM+ ACCA algorithm is used for most of daytime scenes observed with all spectral bands. However, the first algorithm does not work well for lack of some spectral bands sensitive to cloud detection, and the two algorithms have been less accurate over snow/ice covered areas since April 2008 when the SWIR subsystem developed troubles. In addition, they perform less well for some combinations of surface type and sun elevation angle. We, therefore, have developed the ASTER cloud coverage reassessment system using MODIS cloud mask (MOD35) products, and have reassessed cloud coverage for all ASTER archived scenes (>1.7 million scenes). All of the new cloud coverage data are included in Image Management System (IMS) databases of the ASTER Ground Data System (GDS) and NASA's Land Process Data Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) and used for ASTER product search by users, and cloud mask images are distributed to users through Internet. Daily upcoming scenes (about 400 scenes per day) are reassessed and inserted into the IMS databases in 5 to 7 days after each scene observation date. Some validation studies for the new cloud coverage data and some mission-related analyses using those data are also demonstrated in the present paper.

  19. Household Coverage of Fortified Staple Food Commodities in Rajasthan, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Grant J.; Sodani, Prahlad R.; Sankar, Rajan; Fairhurst, John; Siling, Katja; Guevarra, Ernest; Norris, Alison; Myatt, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A spatially representative statewide survey was conducted in Rajasthan, India to assess household coverage of atta wheat flour, edible oil, and salt. An even distribution of primary sampling units were selected based on their proximity to centroids on a hexagonal grid laid over the survey area. A sample of n = 18 households from each of m = 252 primary sampling units PSUs was taken. Demographic data on all members of these households were collected, and a broader dataset was collected about a single caregiver and a child in the first 2 years of life. Data were collected on demographic and socioeconomic status; education; housing conditions; recent infant and child mortality; water, sanitation, and hygiene practices; food security; child health; infant and young child feeding practices; maternal dietary diversity; coverage of fortified staples; and maternal and child anthropometry. Data were collected from 4,627 households and the same number of caregiver/child pairs. Atta wheat flour was widely consumed across the state (83%); however, only about 7% of the atta wheat flour was classified as fortifiable, and only about 6% was actually fortified (mostly inadequately). For oil, almost 90% of edible oil consumed by households in the survey was classified as fortifiable, but only about 24% was fortified. For salt, coverage was high, with almost 85% of households using fortified salt and 66% of households using adequately fortified salt. Iodized salt coverage was also high; however, rural and poor population groups were less likely to be reached by the intervention. Voluntary fortification of atta wheat flour and edible oil lacked sufficient industry consolidation to cover significant portions of the population. It is crucial that appropriate delivery channels are utilized to effectively deliver essential micronutrients to at-risk population groups. Government distribution systems are likely the best means to accomplish this goal. PMID:27760123

  20. Immunization Coverage in WHO Regions: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available   In 1974, the World Health Organization (WHO established the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI to ensure that all children have access to routinely recommended vaccines. Since then, global coverage with the four core vaccines (Bacille calmette guérin vaccine [for protection against tuberculosis], Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine [DTP], Polio vaccine, and Measles vaccine has increased from

  1. Trends in US newspaper and television coverage of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David E; Pederson, Linda L; Mowery, Paul; Bailey, Sarah; Sevilimedu, Varadan; London, Joel; Babb, Stephen; Pechacek, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The news media plays an important role in agenda setting and framing of stories about tobacco control. The purpose of this study was to examine newspaper, newswire and television coverage of tobacco issues in the USA over a 7-year period. Analyses of 2004-2010 news media surveillance system data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office on Smoking and Health, based on content analysis and quantitative methods. Information on extent of news coverage, and types of tobacco-related themes, were examined from articles in 10 newspapers and 2 major newswires, as well as transcripts from 6 national television networks. The overall extent of newspaper, newswire and television stories about tobacco, and level of coverage by specific media outlets, varied over time, especially for newspapers. Nevertheless, there was an average of 3 newspaper stories, 4 newswire stories, and 1 television tobacco-related story each day. Television stories were more likely to contain cessation/addiction or health effects/statistics themes and less likely to contain secondhand smoke or policy/regulation themes than newspaper/newswire stories. There was more variation in the choice of tobacco theme among individual newspapers/newswires than television media outlets. News coverage of tobacco in the USA was relatively constant from 2004 to 2010. Audiences were more likely to be exposed to different tobacco themes in newspapers/newswires than on television. Tracking information about tobacco news stories can be used by advocates, programs and others for planning and evaluation, and by researchers for hypothesis generation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Optimization of inhibitory decision rules relative to length and coverage

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. In contrast with usual rules that have on the right-hand side a relation "attribute ≠ value", inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute = value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Motor vehicle insurance rating with pseudo emissions coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickson, Allister [University of Manitoba Transport Instititute, Winnipeg (Canada)

    2006-06-10

    There is general agreement amongst economists and ecologists that transportation is an important contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Typical proposals to reduce the demand for transportation, and consequently emissions, focus on imposing a fuel tax or a direct fee on vehicles. This paper outlines the method and advantages of treating the environmental risk as additional pseudo coverage rated under existing property and liability motor vehicle insurance systems. (author)

  4. Notes on Averaging Over Acyclic Digraphs and Discrete Coverage Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    2006. Submitted. [18] J. Cortés, S. Mart́ınez, T. Karatas, and F. Bullo, “Coverage control for mobile sensing networks,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics and...Pappas, and V. Kumar, “Leader-to-formation stability,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 443–455, 2004. [21] J. A

  5. XTAG system A Wide Coverage Grammar for English

    CERN Document Server

    Doran, C F; Hockey, B A; Srinivas, B; Zaidel, M; Doran, Christy; Egedi, Dania; Hockey, Beth Ann; Zaidel, Martin

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the XTAG system, a grammar development tool based on the Tree Adjoining Grammar (TAG) formalism that includes a wide-coverage syntactic grammar for English. The various components of the system are discussed and preliminary evaluation results from the parsing of various corpora are given. Results from the comparison of XTAG against the IBM statistical parser and the Alvey Natural Language Tool parser are also given.

  6. Phylogenomics with incomplete taxon coverage: the limits to inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMahon Michelle M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenomic studies based on multi-locus sequence data sets are usually characterized by partial taxon coverage, in which sequences for some loci are missing for some taxa. The impact of missing data has been widely studied in phylogenetics, but it has proven difficult to distinguish effects due to error in tree reconstruction from effects due to missing data per se. We approach this problem using a explicitly phylogenomic criterion of success, decisiveness, which refers to whether the pattern of taxon coverage allows for uniquely defining a single tree for all taxa. Results We establish theoretical bounds on the impact of missing data on decisiveness. Results are derived for two contexts: a fixed taxon coverage pattern, such as that observed from an already assembled data set, and a randomly generated pattern derived from a process of sampling new data, such as might be observed in an ongoing comparative genomics sequencing project. Lower bounds on how many loci are needed for decisiveness are derived for the former case, and both lower and upper bounds for the latter. When data are not decisive for all trees, we estimate the probability of decisiveness and the chances that a given edge in the tree will be distinguishable. Theoretical results are illustrated using several empirical examples constructed by mining sequence databases, genomic libraries such as ESTs and BACs, and complete genome sequences. Conclusion Partial taxon coverage among loci can limit phylogenomic inference by making it impossible to distinguish among multiple alternative trees. However, even though lack of decisiveness is typical of many sparse phylogenomic data sets, it is often still possible to distinguish a large fraction of edges in the tree.

  7. Low level range coverage performance prediction for VHF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschel, H.

    1989-09-01

    A VHF radar frequencies the range coverage is not strictly limited by the quasi-optical horizon like at microwave radar frequencies but is extended due to diffraction propagation. This effect, here called beyond-the-horizon (BTH) detection capability is strongly dependent on the propagation path and thus on the terrain structure. The availability of digital terrain maps gives way to the use of computerized methods for the prediction of radar range coverage in real environment. In combination with wave propagation models suitable for diffraction at terrain structures, digital terrain data can even be used for the prediction of BTH target detectability at VHF radar. Here the digital landmass system (DLSS) terrain database was used in combination with a multiple-knife-edge diffraction model to predict the diffraction attenuation between the radar and the potential target positions, especially beyond the optical horizon. The propagation paths extracted from the database are modeled as a sequence of diffraction screens suited for the application of a Fresnel-Kirchhoff algorithm yielding the knife-edge-diffraction attenuation. This terrain related propagation model was verified by a large number of measurements at different frequencies. Implemented in a fast computer system, this prediction model can be used for mission planning of air operations. Considering hostile VHF radar coverage and terrain condition for flight path optimization or, on the other hand it can assist in siting mobile radars for gap filling according to the actual threat situation. Calculations of the diffraction propagation using the prediction model, yield range coverage patterns in real terrain situations, allowing to quantify the BTH detection advantage of VHF radar compared to microwave radar. An experimental large wavelength radar LARA (VHF) built flying targets beyond the close horizon. Here, especially the detection of hiding helicopters by exploiting diffractive wave propagation was examined

  8. The impact of media coverage of referendums. Recent European experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

    During the last decade a number of national referendums have taken place in Europe, mostly obligatory or government called referendums on European issues. Following these events a growing literature of research has dealt with this important aspect of democracy. In this paper the main results...... of this new literature are reviewed in order to identify the extent to which and under what circumstances the outcome of referendums can be influenced by the media and their coverage of referendums....

  9. Coverage of abortion controversial in both public and private plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollom, T

    1996-09-01

    During 1995-96, 17 of 50 US states used their own resources, either voluntarily or under state court order, to pay for all or most abortions for low-income women. Alaska, Maryland, New York, and Washington are the only states to voluntarily pay for these abortions. Anti-choice legislators in California, Illinois, New York, and West Virginia tried unsuccessfully to cut funding for these abortions. Arkansas is the only state to circumvent direct payment for abortions for low-income women. Alabama, Mississippi, and South Dakota still are not complying with the court order but remain in the Medicaid program. Massachusetts has passed legislation to allow health insurance to cover abortions for state and city employees, thereby undoing a 17-year ban on the use of public funds for abortions for employees or their spouses. On the other hand, Virginia's governor has unilaterally, via an executive order, eliminated health insurance coverage for most abortions for state employees and their dependents. Anti-choice legislators have shepherded legislation that prohibit private insurance coverage for abortion unless women pay an extra premium in Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, and North Dakota. Legislators in Illinois and Minnesota have passed state subsidized health care reform programs that exclude abortion from coverage except when the mother's life is endangered. There appears to be a loophole in the MinnesotaCare program that allows women to obtain state-financed abortions for other reasons, so antifunding lawmakers will introduce a bill in 1997 to close the loophole. The loophole is a result of a conflict between state and federal laws as a result of a 1995 federal waiver granted to Minnesota. The waiver allows pregnant women who earn up to 275% of the federal poverty level to be eligible for either MinnesotaCare or Medicaid. Abortion-rights legislators find MinnesotaCare's exclusion of abortion coverage to be a violation of the court order. They plan to submit a bill in 1997 to

  10. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Román Rodríguez, Juan Luis; Agustín Panadero, Rubén; Alonso Pérez Barquero, Jorge; Fons Font, Antonio; Solá Ruiz, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesi...

  11. The impact of media coverage of referendums. Recent European experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

    During the last decade a number of national referendums have taken place in Europe, mostly obligatory or government called referendums on European issues. Following these events a growing literature of research has dealt with this important aspect of democracy. In this paper the main results of t...... of this new literature are reviewed in order to identify the extent to which and under what circumstances the outcome of referendums can be influenced by the media and their coverage of referendums....

  12. Automatic cloud coverage assessment of Formosat-2 image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kuo-Hsien

    2011-11-01

    Formosat-2 satellite equips with the high-spatial-resolution (2m ground sampling distance) remote sensing instrument. It has been being operated on the daily-revisiting mission orbit by National Space organization (NSPO) of Taiwan since May 21 2004. NSPO has also serving as one of the ground receiving stations for daily processing the received Formosat- 2 images. The current cloud coverage assessment of Formosat-2 image for NSPO Image Processing System generally consists of two major steps. Firstly, an un-supervised K-means method is used for automatically estimating the cloud statistic of Formosat-2 image. Secondly, manual estimation of cloud coverage from Formosat-2 image is processed by manual examination. Apparently, a more accurate Automatic Cloud Coverage Assessment (ACCA) method certainly increases the efficiency of processing step 2 with a good prediction of cloud statistic. In this paper, mainly based on the research results from Chang et al, Irish, and Gotoh, we propose a modified Formosat-2 ACCA method which considered pre-processing and post-processing analysis. For pre-processing analysis, cloud statistic is determined by using un-supervised K-means classification, Sobel's method, Otsu's method, non-cloudy pixels reexamination, and cross-band filter method. Box-Counting fractal method is considered as a post-processing tool to double check the results of pre-processing analysis for increasing the efficiency of manual examination.

  13. Differences in coverage patterns in cervical cytology screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy; Gale, Alastair G.; Wooding, David S.; Purdy, Kevin J.

    2003-05-01

    The visual screening of cervical smears is a complex process requiring appropriate slide coverage to detect any unusual appearances without making any omission errors. In examining a smear the observer has both to move the microscope stage appropriately to bring different slide areas into view, plus visually search the information presented within the binocular visual field. This study examined the patterns of slide coverage by different individuals when they inspected liquid based cervical smears. A binocular microscope was first adapted in order to record both the physical movement of the stage by the observer and also to access the microscope"s visual field. An image of the area of the smear under the microscope was displayed on a PC monitor and observers" eye movements were recorded as they searched this. By manually adjusting the microscope controls they also moved the stage and all stage movements and focussing were also recorded. The behaviour was examined of both novices and an expert screener as they searched a number of test cervical smears. It was found that novices adopted a regular examination pattern, which maximized slide coverage, albeit slowly. In contrast, the experienced screener covered the slides faster and more effectively ensuring more overlap between microscope fields.

  14. Web based geoprocessing tool for coverage data handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K.; Saran, S.

    2014-11-01

    With the advancements in GIS technologies and extensive use of OGC Web Services, geospatial resources and services are becoming progressively copious and convenient over the network. The application of OGC WCS (Web Coverage Service) and WFS (Web Feature Service) standards for geospatial raster and vector data has resulted in an opulent pool of interoperable geodata resources waiting to be used for analytical or modelling purposes. The issue of availing geospatial data processing with the aid of standardised web services was attended to by the OGC WPS (Web Processing Service) 1.0.0 specifications (Schut, 2007) which elucidate WPS as a standard interface which serves for the promulgation of geo-processes and consumption of those processes by the clients. This paper outlines the design and implementation of a geo-processing tool utilizing coverage data. The geo-process selected for application is the calculation of Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI), one of the globally used indices for vegetation cover monitoring. The system is realised using the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Python. The tool accesses the WCS server using the parameters defined in the XML request. The geo-process upon execution, performs the computations over the coverage data and generates the NDVI output. Since open source technology and standards are being used more often, especially in the field of scientific research, so our implementation is also built by using open source tools only.

  15. Pricing of drugs with heterogeneous health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Ida; Missios, Paul

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the role of insurance coverage in explaining the generic competition paradox in a two-stage game involving a single producer of brand-name drugs and n quantity-competing producers of generic drugs. Independently of brand loyalty, which some studies rely upon to explain the paradox, we show that heterogeneity in insurance coverage may result in higher prices of brand-name drugs following generic entry. With market segmentation based on insurance coverage present in both the pre- and post-entry stages, the paradox can arise when the two types of drugs are highly substitutable and the market is quite profitable but does not have to arise when the two types of drugs are highly differentiated. However, with market segmentation occurring only after generic entry, the paradox can arise when the two types of drugs are weakly substitutable, provided, however, that the industry is not very profitable. In both cases, that is, when market segmentation is present in the pre-entry stage and when it is not, the paradox becomes more likely to arise as the market expands and/or insurance companies decrease deductibles applied on the purchase of generic drugs.

  16. The Icelandic media coverage of the constitutional assembly election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guðbjörg Hildur Kolbeins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On November 27, 2010, the people of Iceland elected 25 individuals to the country’s constitutional assembly. As there were 522 candidates for the 25 seats in the assembly, the media were faced with a new dilemma, i.e. how to ensure impartiality and objectivity in their coverage of the candidates and the subject matter. The present study compares the media coverage of the constitutional assembly election to two other national elections; the general election in the spring of 2009 and the municipal election in the spring of 2010. All news stories in the 13 major print, broadcast and online news outlets in Iceland were coded two weeks prior to each election. The results indicate that the national media almost ignored the constitutional assembly election in comparison to the other elections. There were 632 news stories on the general election, 590 stories on the municipal election but only 165 stories on the constitutional assembly election. The lack of coverage of the candidates for the constitutional assembly seems to reveal that the traditional media, i.e. the print and broadcast media, and the online media did not know how to best serve and inform the public in the democratic process.

  17. Read length versus depth of coverage for viral quasispecies reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Zagordi

    Full Text Available Recent advancements of sequencing technology have opened up unprecedented opportunities in many application areas. Virus samples can now be sequenced efficiently with very deep coverage to infer the genetic diversity of the underlying virus populations. Several sequencing platforms with different underlying technologies and performance characteristics are available for viral diversity studies. Here, we investigate how the differences between two common platforms provided by 454/Roche and Illumina affect viral diversity estimation and the reconstruction of viral haplotypes. Using a mixture of ten HIV clones sequenced with both platforms and additional simulation experiments, we assessed the trade-off between sequencing coverage, read length, and error rate. For fixed costs, short Illumina reads can be generated at higher coverage and allow for detecting variants at lower frequencies. They can also be sufficient to assess the diversity of the sample if sequences are dissimilar enough, but, in general, assembly of full-length haplotypes is feasible only with the longer 454/Roche reads. The quantitative comparison highlights the advantages and disadvantages of both platforms and provides guidance for the design of viral diversity studies.

  18. Read length versus depth of coverage for viral quasispecies reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagordi, Osvaldo; Däumer, Martin; Beisel, Christian; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2012-01-01

    Recent advancements of sequencing technology have opened up unprecedented opportunities in many application areas. Virus samples can now be sequenced efficiently with very deep coverage to infer the genetic diversity of the underlying virus populations. Several sequencing platforms with different underlying technologies and performance characteristics are available for viral diversity studies. Here, we investigate how the differences between two common platforms provided by 454/Roche and Illumina affect viral diversity estimation and the reconstruction of viral haplotypes. Using a mixture of ten HIV clones sequenced with both platforms and additional simulation experiments, we assessed the trade-off between sequencing coverage, read length, and error rate. For fixed costs, short Illumina reads can be generated at higher coverage and allow for detecting variants at lower frequencies. They can also be sufficient to assess the diversity of the sample if sequences are dissimilar enough, but, in general, assembly of full-length haplotypes is feasible only with the longer 454/Roche reads. The quantitative comparison highlights the advantages and disadvantages of both platforms and provides guidance for the design of viral diversity studies.

  19. Online Coverage of the 2010 Brazilian Presidential Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza G. Herscovitz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A framing analysis of mainstream on-line organizations and their bloggers and columnists on the 2010 Brazilian Presidential Elections revealed that framing do have the potential to expose ideological elements on how the media position themselves in the public sphere.Thematic and episodic frames dominated the news with a special focus on press freedom, social and economic problems, corruption and abortion. The main-stream media focused their coverage on the Workers’ Party employing primarily a critical/ adversarial tone as opposed to an interpretive analysis tone. Professional ideology mixed with political preferences both by journalists and mediaowners marked the Brazilian online coverage blurring the lines between the private and the public, exactly in the same way that outgoing President Lula da Silva acted during the presidential campaign. Journalism status quo emerged as a main topic in the coverage as a free press under attack quickly reacted with rage causing a rift between news organizations that criticized the outgoing president and those that supported him. Furthermore, a popular president apparently unaffected by corruption scandals and the country’s most powerful media groups confronted each other in an exhaustive and unfinished battle.

  20. Distributed Receding Horizon Coverage Control by Multiple Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mohseni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a distributed receding horizon coverage control algorithm to control a group of mobile robots having linear dynamics with the assumption that the robot dynamics are decoupled from each other. The objective of the coverage algorithm considered here is to maximize the detection of the occurrence of the events. First the authors introduce a centralized receding horizon coverage control and then they introduce a distributed version of it. To avoid the common disadvantages that are associated with the centralized approach, the problem is then decomposed into several RHCC problems, each associated with a particular robot, that are solved using distributed techniques. In order to solve each RHCC, each robot needs to know the trajectories of its neighbors during the optimization time interval. Since this information is not available, an algorithm is presented to estimate the trajectory of the neighboring robots. To minimize the estimation error, a compatibility constraint, which is also a key requirement in the closed-loop stability analysis, is considered. Moreover, the proof of the close-loop stability of this distributed version is provided and shows that the location of the robots will indeed converge to the centroids of a Voronoi partition. Simulation results validate the algorithm and the convergence of the robots to the centroidal Voronoi configuration.