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Sample records for volume method fvm

  1. FEM and FVM compound numerical simulation of aluminum extrusion processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周飞; 苏丹; 彭颖红; 阮雪榆

    2003-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM) numerical simulation methods have been widely used in forging industries to improve the quality of products and reduce the costs. Because of very concentrative large deformation during the aluminum extrusion processes, it is very difficult to simulate the whole forming process only by using either FEM or FVM. In order to solve this problem, an FEM and FVM compound simulation method was proposed. The theoretical equations of the compound simulation method were given and the key techniques were studied. Then, the configuration of the compound simulation system was established. The tube extrusion process was simulated successfully so as to prove the validity of this approach for aluminum extrusion processes.

  2. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see...... in this presentation is focused on a prototype model for topology optimization of steady heat diffusion. This allows for a study of the basic ingredients in working with FVM methods when dealing with topology optimization problems. The FVM and FEM based formulations differ both in how one computes the design...... $, where $\\tilde{\\mathbf K}$ is different from $\\mathbf K $; in a FEM scheme these matrices are equal following the principle of virtual work. Using a staggered mesh and averaging procedures consistent with the FVM the checkerboard problem is eliminated. Two averages are compared to FE solutions, being...

  3. Modeling of drag reduction in turbulent channel flow with hydrophobic walls by FVM method and weakly-compressible flow equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Ming-Shun Yuan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the effects of hydrophobic wall on skin-friction drag in the channel flow are investigated through large eddy simulation on the basis of weaklycompressible flow equations with the MacCormack's scheme on collocated mesh in the FVM framework. The slip length model is adopted to describe the behavior of the slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the hydrophobic wall and turbulent channel flow. Simulation results are presented by analyzing flow behaviors over hydrophobic wall with the Smagorinky subgrid-scale model and a dynamic model on computational meshes of different resolutions. Comparison and analysis are made on the distributions of timeaveraged velocity, velocity fluctuations, Reynolds stress as well as the skin-friction drag. Excellent agreement between the present study and previous results demonstrates the accuracy of the simple classical second-order scheme in representing turbulent vertox near hydrophobic wall. In addition, the relation of drag reduction efficiency versus time-averaged slip velocity is established. It is also found that the decrease of velocity gradient in the close wall region is responsible for the drag reduction. Considering its advantages of high calculation precision and efficiency, the present method has good prospect in its application to practical projects.

  4. Direct FVM Simulation for Sound Propagation in an Ideal Wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sound propagation in a wedge-shaped waveguide with perfectly reflecting boundaries is one of the few range-dependent problems with an analytical solution. This provides a benchmark for the theoretical and computational studies on the simulation of ocean acoustic applications. We present a direct finite volume method (FVM simulation for the ideal wedge problem, and both time and frequency domain results are analyzed. We also study the broadband problem with large-scale parallel simulations. The results presented in this paper validate the accuracy of the numerical techniques and show that the direct FVM simulation could be applied to large-scale complex acoustic applications with a high performance computing platform.

  5. Topology optimization of heat conduction problems using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    This note addresses the use of the finite volume method (FVM) for topology optimization of a heat conduction problem. Issues pertaining to the proper choice of cost functions, sensitivity analysis and example test problems are used to illustrate the effect of applying the FVM as an analysis tool...... checkerboards do not form during the topology optimization process....

  6. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see......, e.g. [2]) in order to develop methods for topology design for applications where conservation laws are critical such that element--wise conservation in the discretized models has a high priority. This encompasses problems involving for example mass and heat transport. The work described...... in this presentation is focused on a prototype model for topology optimization of steady heat diffusion. This allows for a study of the basic ingredients in working with FVM methods when dealing with topology optimization problems. The FVM and FEM based formulations differ both in how one computes the design...

  7. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see...... in this presentation is focused on a prototype model for topology optimization of steady heat diffusion. This allows for a study of the basic ingredients in working with FVM methods when dealing with topology optimization problems. The FVM and FEM based formulations differ both in how one computes the design...... derivative of the system matrix K and in how one computes the discretized version of certain objective functions. Thus for a cost function for minimum dissipated energy (like minimum compliance for an elastic structure) one obtains an expression c = u^\\T \\tilde{K}u $, where \\tilde{K} is different from K...

  8. Investigations of high power laser beam interaction with material by means of hybrid FVM-FEM and digital image correlation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawińska, M.; Łapka, P.; Malesa, M.; Malowany, K.; Prasek, M.; Marczak, J.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the new approach to the analysis of interaction between a high power laser beam and matter. The method relies on the combined experimental-numerical spatio-temporal analysis of temperature, displacement and strain maps which are generated at a surface of an object illuminated by a high power laser beam. Transient heat transfer numerical simulations were carried out applying the FVM, while the quasi-transient structural analyses were performed with the aid of the FEM. The displacement maps were captured by means of 3D Digital Image Correlation method, and temperature maps were provided by a high speed IR camera. The experimental data are compared to the initial model of laser induced heat transfer in an object and resulting displacements/strains. The first approach to hybrid experimental-numerical method which aims in indirect determination of laser beam profile is described. The monitoring of displacement/strain maps directly at an illuminated object may be also used for a structural integrity analysis of a target. In the paper at first the numerical simulations applied to model laser beam thermal interaction with solid bodies are presented. Next the laboratory experimental stand is described and the results of the initial tests performed at aluminum and bronze samples are shown and compared with numerical simulations. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed methodology are discussed in relation to the two applications mentioned above.

  9. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see...... the well known Reuss lower bound. [1] Bendsøe, M.P.; Sigmund, O. 2004: Topology Optimization - Theory, Methods, and Applications. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag [2] Versteeg, H. K.; W. Malalasekera 1995: An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics: the Finite Volume Method. London: Longman......, e.g. [2]) in order to develop methods for topology design for applications where conservation laws are critical such that element--wise conservation in the discretized models has a high priority. This encompasses problems involving for example mass and heat transport. The work described...

  10. The finite volume method in computational fluid dynamics an advanced introduction with OpenFOAM and Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Moukalled, F; Darwish, M

    2016-01-01

    This textbook explores both the theoretical foundation of the Finite Volume Method (FVM) and its applications in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Readers will discover a thorough explanation of the FVM numerics and algorithms used for the simulation of incompressible and compressible fluid flows, along with a detailed examination of the components needed for the development of a collocated unstructured pressure-based CFD solver. Two particular CFD codes are explored. The first is uFVM, a three-dimensional unstructured pressure-based finite volume academic CFD code, implemented within Matlab. The second is OpenFOAM®, an open source framework used in the development of a range of CFD programs for the simulation of industrial scale flow problems. With over 220 figures, numerous examples and more than one hundred exercise on FVM numerics, programming, and applications, this textbook is suitable for use in an introductory course on the FVM, in an advanced course on numerics, and as a reference for CFD programm...

  11. FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR SIMULATION OF VISCOELASTIC FLOW THROUGH A EXPANSION CHANNEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Chun-quan; JIANG Hai-mei; YIN Hong-jun; SU Yu-chi; ZENG Ye-ming

    2009-01-01

    A finite volume method for the numerical solution of viscoelastic flows is given. The flow of a differential Upper-Convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid through an abrupt expansion has been chosen as a prototype example. The conservation and constitutive equations are solved using the Finite Volume Method (FVM) in a staggered grid with an upwind scheme for the viscoelastic stresses and a hybrid scheme for the velocities. An enhanced-in-speed pressure-correction algorithm is used and a method for handling the source term in the momentum equations is employed. Improved accuracy is achieved by a special discretization of the boundary conditions. Stable solutions are obtained for higher Weissenberg number (We), further extending the range of simulations with the FVM. Numerical results show the viscoelasticity of polymer solutions is the main factor influencing the sweep efficiency.

  12. Development of a CA-FVM Model with Weakened Mesh Anisotropy and Application to Fe–C Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiling Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to match the growth of the decentered square and the evolution of the interface cell in a two-dimensional cellular automaton-finite volume method (CA-FVM model with decentered square algorithm, the present work first alters the determination of the half length of the square diagonal according to the preferential growth orientation, and then modifies the interface evolution considering the contribution of neighboring solid cells. Accordingly, the sharp interface (physical basis of the model, the growth orientation, and the growth consistence are reasonably guaranteed. The CA-FVM model presents some capabilities in predicting the free growth of equiaxed dendrites. With the increase of the cooling rate, the solidification structure gradually changes from cell to dendrite, and the solute segregation becomes more severe. Meanwhile, the predicted solute segregation under the intensive cooling condition is consistent with the calculation by Ueshima model at the initial solidification stage. The predicted competition behavior of columnar dendrites is qualitatively consistent with the observation in the continuously cast steel billet. The predicted dendrite arm spacings are close to the measurements.

  13. Static and dynamic analysis of Timoshenko beam model based on the finite volume method%Timoshenko梁静力学和动力学问题有限体积法求解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    井丽龙; 张文平; 明平剑; 付丽荣; 刘晓刚

    2015-01-01

    为探究Timoshenko梁模型数值计算方法,开展了基于有限体积法的Timoshenko梁数值计算方法研究. 利用有限体积法对考虑剪切变形的梁进行了离散,并进行了静力学分析和动力学分析,通过几个经典算例将此方法所得到的数值解与解析解及有限元解进行了对比,结果证明,有限体积法有较高精度. 与此同时利用有限体积法离散Timoshenko梁时当梁为细长梁时不存在剪切自锁现象. 有限体积法可以应用于Timoshenko梁模型静力弯曲分析、固有特性和动力响应分析.%In order to explore a numerical simulation method based on the Timoshenko beam model, a study was done on beam numerical simulation using the Timoshenko beam model, based on the finite volume method ( FVM) . In order to examine the beam's shear deformation, the beam model was discretized by FVM, and static and dynamic analyses were conducted. After first calculating some typical examples, the derived numerical results and the analyt-ic solutions with FVM, a comparison was made with the solution by FVM. It is shown that FVM provides high preci-sion analysis, with no shear-locking phenomenon for thin and long beams when discretizing Timoshenko beam based on FVM. This validates FVM for analyzing Timoshenko beam static bending, inherent characteristics, and dynamic response problems.

  14. Non-gray combined conduction and radiation heat transfer by using FVM and SLW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujia; Zhang, Xiaobing; Howell, John R.

    2017-08-01

    To investigate non-gray combined conduction and radiation problems, this paper uses the FVM to solve the energy equation and radiative transfer equation and the SLW method to model the effect of gas spectral properties in a 2D geometry. Carbon dioxide, water vapor and carbon monoxide are considered as the participating media. The effects of gas species, gas mixture ratios and wall emissivities on the temperature and heat flux were investigated. The accuracy of the gray gas model is also analyzed compared to the SLW method.

  15. The element-based finite volume method applied to petroleum reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordazzo, Jonas; Maliska, Clovis R.; Silva, Antonio F.C. da; Hurtado, Fernando S.V. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2004-07-01

    In this work a numerical model for simulating petroleum reservoirs using the Element-based Finite Volume Method (EbFVM) is presented. The method employs unstructured grids using triangular and/or quadrilateral elements, such that complex reservoir geometries can be easily represented. Due to the control-volume approach, local mass conservation is enforced, permitting a direct physical interpretation of the resulting discrete equations. It is demonstrated that this method can deal with the permeability maps without averaging procedures, since this scheme assumes uniform properties inside elements, instead inside of control volumes, avoiding the need of weighting the permeability values at the control volumes interfaces. Moreover, it is easy to include the full permeability tensor in this method, which is an important issue in simulating heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs. Finally, a comparison among the results obtained using the scheme proposed in this work in the EbFVM framework with those obtained employing the scheme commonly used in petroleum reservoir simulation is presented. It is also shown that the scheme proposed is less susceptible to the grid orientation effect with the increasing of the mobility ratio. (author)

  16. Generalized source Finite Volume Method for radiative transfer equation in participating media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Xu, Chuan-Long; Wang, Shi-Min

    2017-03-01

    Temperature monitoring is very important in a combustion system. In recent years, non-intrusive temperature reconstruction has been explored intensively on the basis of calculating arbitrary directional radiative intensities. In this paper, a new method named Generalized Source Finite Volume Method (GSFVM) was proposed. It was based on radiative transfer equation and Finite Volume Method (FVM). This method can be used to calculate arbitrary directional radiative intensities and is proven to be accurate and efficient. To verify the performance of this method, six test cases of 1D, 2D, and 3D radiative transfer problems were investigated. The numerical results show that the efficiency of this method is close to the radial basis function interpolation method, but the accuracy and stability is higher than that of the interpolation method. The accuracy of the GSFVM is similar to that of the Backward Monte Carlo (BMC) algorithm, while the time required by the GSFVM is much shorter than that of the BMC algorithm. Therefore, the GSFVM can be used in temperature reconstruction and improvement on the accuracy of the FVM.

  17. A Finite Volume Method with Unstructured Triangular Grids for Numerical Modeling of Tidal Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hong-da; LIU zhen

    2005-01-01

    The finite volume method (FVM) has many advantages in 2-D shallow water numerical simulation. In this study, the finite volume method is used with unstructured triangular grids to simulate the tidal currents. The Roe scheme is applied in the calculation of the intercell numerical flux, and the MUSCL method is introduced to improve its accuracy. The time integral is a two-step scheme of forecast and revision. For the verification of the present method, the Stoker's problem is calculated and the result is compared with the mathematically analytic solutions. The comparison indicates that the method is feasible. A sea area of a port is used as an example to test the method established here. The result shows that the present computational method is satisfactory, and it could be applied to the engineering fields.

  18. Physically-Based One-Dimensional Distributed Rainfall-Runoff Model Using the Finite Volume Method and Grid Network Flow Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seok Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work develops a grid based rainfall-runoff model (GRM, which is a physically based and spatially distributed model. Surface flow was analyzed using a kinematic wave model with the governing equations discretized using the finite volume method (FVM. This paper suggests a grid network flow analysis technique using variable rainfall intensity according to the flow directions to analyze one-dimensional flows between the grids. The model was evaluated by applying it to the Wuicheon watershed, a tributary of the Nakdonggang (Riv., in Korea. The results showed that the grid-based, one-dimensional kinematic wave model adopted the FVM and the grid network flow analysis technique well. The simulation results showed good agreement with the observed hydrographs and the initial soil saturation ratio was most sensitive to the modeling results.

  19. Discretized Volumes in Numerical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, Miklós

    2007-01-01

    We present two techniques novel in numerical methods. The first technique compiles the domain of the numerical methods as a discretized volume. Congruent elements are glued together to compile the domain over which the solution of a boundary value problem is sought. We associate a group and a graph to that volume. When the group is symmetry of the boundary value problem under investigation, one can specify the structure of the solution, and find out if there are equispectral volumes of a given type. The second technique uses a complex mapping to transplant the solution from volume to volume and a correction function. Equation for the correction function is given. A simple example demonstrates the feasibility of the suggested method.

  20. Fresnel Volume Migration of the ISO89-3D data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hloušek, F.; Buske, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the capabilities of Fresnel Volume Migration (FVM) for 3-D single-component seismic data in a crystalline environment. We show its application to the ISO89-3D data set, which was acquired in 1989 at the German continental deep drilling site (KTB) near Windischeschenbach (Southeast Germany). A key point in FVM is the derivation of the emergent angle for the recorded wavefield. This angle is used as the initial condition of the ray-tracing-algorithm within FVM. In order to limit the migration operator to the physically relevant part of a reflector, it is restricted to the Fresnel-volume around the backpropagated ray. We discuss different possibilities for an adequate choice of the used aperture for a local slant-stack algorithm using the semblance as a measure of the coherency for different emergent angles. Furthermore, we reduce the number of used receivers for this procedure using the Voronoi diagram, thereby leading to a more equal distribution of the receivers within the selected aperture. We demonstrate the performance of these methods for a simple 3-D synthetic example and show the results for the ISO89-3D data set. For the latter, our approach yields images of significantly better quality compared to previous investigations and allows for a detailed characterization of the subsurface. Even in migrated single shot gathers, structures are clearly visible due to the focusing achieved by FVM.

  1. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY PROBLEM AND STUDY OF APPROACH BASED ON FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Sherina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been aimed to carry out a study of peculiarities that arise in a numerical simulation of the electrical impedance tomography (EIT problem. Static EIT image reconstruction is sensitive to a measurement noise and approximation error. A special consideration has been given to reducing of the approximation error, which originates from numerical implementation drawbacks. This paper presents in detail two numerical approaches for solving EIT forward problem. The finite volume method (FVM on unstructured triangular mesh is introduced. In order to compare this approach, the finite element (FEM based forward solver was implemented, which has gained the most popularity among researchers. The calculated potential distribution with the assumed initial conductivity distribution has been compared to the analytical solution of a test Neumann boundary problem and to the results of problem simulation by means of ANSYS FLUENT commercial software. Two approaches to linearized EIT image reconstruction are discussed. Reconstruction of the conductivity distribution is an ill-posed problem, typically requiring a large amount of computation and resolved by minimization techniques. The objective function to be minimized is constructed of measured voltage and calculated boundary voltage on the electrodes. A classical modified Newton type iterative method and the stochastic differential evolution method are employed. A software package has been developed for the problem under investigation. Numerical tests were conducted on simulated data. The obtained results could be helpful to researches tackling the hardware and software issues for medical applications of EIT.

  2. A hybrid vertex-centered finite volume/element method for viscous incompressible flows on non-staggered unstructured meshes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gao; Ru-Xun Liu; Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid vertex-centered finite volume/finite element method for sol ution of the two dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids.An incremental pressure fractional step method is adopted to handle the velocity-pressure coupling.The velocity and the pressure are collocated at the node of the vertex-centered control volume which is formed by joining the centroid of cells sharing the common vertex.For the temporal integration of the momentum equations,an implicit second-order scheme is utilized to enhance the computational stability and eliminate the time step limit due to the diffusion term.The momentum equations are discretized by the vertex-centered finite volume method (FVM) and the pressure Poisson equation is solved by the Galerkin finite element method (FEM).The momentum interpolation is used to damp out the spurious pressure wiggles.The test case with analytical solutions demonstrates second-order accuracy of the current hybrid scheme in time and space for both velocity and pressure.The classic test cases,the lid-driven cavity flow,the skew cavity flow and the backward-facing step flow,show that numerical results are in good agreement with the published benchmark solutions.

  3. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of a fuel rod by finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Rhayanne Y.N.; Silva, Mario A.B. da; Lira, Carlos A.B. de O., E-mail: ryncosta@gmail.com, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamaento de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In a nuclear reactor, the amount of power generation is limited by thermal and physic limitations rather than by nuclear parameters. The operation of a reactor core, considering the best heat removal system, must take into account the fact that the temperatures of fuel and cladding shall not exceed safety limits anywhere in the core. If such considerations are not considered, damages in the fuel element may release huge quantities of radioactive materials in the coolant or even core meltdown. Thermal analyses for fuel rods are often accomplished by considering one-dimensional heat diffusion equation. The aim of this study is to develop the first paper to verify the temperature distribution for a two-dimensional heat transfer problem in an advanced reactor. The methodology is based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM), which considers a balance for the property of interest. The validation for such methodology is made by comparing numerical and analytical solutions. For the two-dimensional analysis, the results indicate that the temperature profile agree with expected physical considerations, providing quantitative information for the development of advanced reactors. (author)

  4. Simulation of aerolian sand transp ort with SPH-FVM coupled metho d%风沙运动问题的SPH-FVM耦合方法数值模拟研究*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈福振; 强洪夫; 高巍然

    2014-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of discrete particle model (DPM) and Euler-Euler two-fluid model (TFM) in solving gas-solid two phase flow, a new method called SPH-FVM coupled method is presented, and then it is used to simulate aerolian sand transport problems. Based on a pseudo fluid model the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to solve the discrete particle phase by tracing the movement of each individual particle, and the finite volume method (FVM) is used to discretize the continuum flow field on the stationary mesh by capturing fluid characteristics. Two phases are coupled through contributions due to the effects of drag, pressure gradient and volume fraction, and then the coupled framework of SPH-FVM is established. The properties of SPH are redesigned to be suited for the discrete phase named SDPH. The relationship between SPH particles and discrete particles is illustrated, and the SPH discrete equations of pseudo fluid are derived. Saltation processes of sands in aerolian sand transport, sand movement under free-air wind, and creeping processes of dune, are simulated; while the particle trajectories, the distribution characteristics of mean downwind velocity, and the changes of gas velocity under the sand reaction are analyzed. Through comparison with experiments, it is shown that the accuracy of the new method is high, and it can also reduce the computational cost. This indicates that the new method can be applied to aerolian sand transport even to other gas-solid multiphase flows.%针对离散颗粒模型和欧拉-欧拉双流体模型在求解气粒两相流动问题中存在的不足,提出了一种新方法--SPH-FVM耦合方法,并应用于风沙运动过程的数值模拟计算。新方法基于拟流体模型,采用光滑粒子流体动力学方法(SPH)对离散颗粒相进行求解,追踪单颗粒运动轨迹,采用有限体积法(FVM)求解连续气体相,捕捉流场特性,两相间通过曳力、压力梯度、体积分数

  5. A Second Order Thermal and Momentum Immersed Boundary Method for Conjugate Heat Transfer in a Cartesian Finite Volume Solver

    CERN Document Server

    Crocker, Ryan; Desjardins, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer (CHT) immersed boundary (IB and CHTIB) method is developed for use with laminar and turbulent flows with low to moderate Reynolds numbers. The method is validated with the canonical flow of two co-annular rotating cylinders at $Re=50$ which shows second order accuracy of the $L_{2}$ and $L_{\\infty}$ error norms of the temperature field over a wide rage of solid to fluid thermal conductivities, $\\kappa_{s}/\\kappa_{f} = \\left(9-100\\right)$. To evaluate the CHTIBM with turbulent flow a fully developed, heated, turbulent channel $\\left(Re_{u_{\\tau}}=150\\text{ and } \\kappa_{s}/\\kappa_{f}=4 \\right)$ is used which shows near perfect correlation to previous direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. The CHTIB method is paired with a momentum IB method (IBM), both of which use a level set field to define the wetted boundaries of the fluid/solid interfaces and are applied to the flow solver implicitly with rescaling of the difference operators of the finite volume (FV) method (FVM).

  6. Analysis of the Properties of Adjoint Equations and Accuracy Verification of Adjoint Model Based on FVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaodeng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two different approaches on how to formulate adjoint numerical model (ANM. Aiming at the disputes arising from the construction methods of ANM, the differences between nonlinear shallow water equation and its adjoint equation are analyzed; the hyperbolicity and homogeneity of the adjoint equation are discussed. Then, based on unstructured meshes and finite volume method, a new adjoint model was advanced by getting numerical model of the adjoint equations directly. Using a gradient check, the correctness of the adjoint model was verified. The results of twin experiments to invert the bottom friction coefficient (Manning’s roughness coefficient indicate that the adjoint model can extract the observation information and produce good quality inversion. The reason of disputes about construction methods of ANM is also discussed in the paper.

  7. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  8. Solving hyperbolic equations with finite volume methods

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez-Cendón, M Elena

    2015-01-01

    Finite volume methods are used in numerous applications and by a broad multidisciplinary scientific community. The book communicates this important tool to students, researchers in training and academics involved in the training of students in different science and technology fields. The selection of content is based on the author’s experience giving PhD and master courses in different universities. In the book the introduction of new concepts and numerical methods go together with simple exercises, examples and applications that contribute to reinforce them. In addition, some of them involve the execution of MATLAB codes. The author promotes an understanding of common terminology with a balance between mathematical rigor and physical intuition that characterizes the origin of the methods. This book aims to be a first contact with finite volume methods. Once readers have studied it, they will be able to follow more specific bibliographical references and use commercial programs or open source software withi...

  9. An Improved Velocity Volume Processing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nan; WEI Ming; TANG Xiaowen; PAN Yujie

    2007-01-01

    Velocity volume processing (VVP) retrieval of single Doppler radar is an effective method which can be used to obtain many wind parameters. However, due to the problem of an ill-conditioned matrix arising from the coefficients of equations not being easily resolved, the VVP method has not been applied adequately and effectively in operation. In this paper, an improved scheme, SVVP (step velocity volume processing), based on the original method, is proposed. The improved algorithm retrieves each group of components of the wind field through a stepwise procedure, which overcomes the problem of an ill-conditioned matrix, which currently limits the application of the VVP method. Variables in a six-parameter model can be retrieved even if the analysis volume is very small. In addition, the source and order of errors which exist in the traditional method are analyzed. The improved method is applied to real cases, which show that it is robust and has the capability to obtain the wind field structure of the local convective system. It is very helpful for studying severe storms.

  10. Fast variation method for elastic strip calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, Sergey V

    2002-05-01

    A new, fast, variation method (FVM) for determining an elastic strip response to stresses arbitrarily distributed on the flat side of the strip is proposed. The remaining surface of the strip may have an arbitrary form, and it is free of stresses. The FVM, as well as the well-known finite element method (FEM), starts with the variational principle. However, it does not use the meshing of the strip. A comparison of FVM results with the exact analytical solution in the special case of shear stresses and a rectangular strip demonstrates an excellent agreement.

  11. Direct volume rendering methods for cell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martišek, Dalibor; Martišek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The study of the complicated architecture of cell space structures is an important problem in biology and medical research. Optical cuts of cells produced by confocal microscopes enable two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of observed cells. This paper discuses new possibilities for direct volume rendering of these data. We often encounter 16 or more bit images in confocal microscopy of cells. Most of the information contained in these images is unsubstantial for the human vision. Therefore, it is necessary to use mathematical algorithms for visualization of such images. Present software tools as OpenGL or DirectX run quickly in graphic station with special graphic cards, run very unsatisfactory on PC without these cards and outputs are usually poor for real data. These tools are black boxes for a common user and make it impossible to correct and improve them. With the method proposed, more parameters of the environment can be set, making it possible to apply 3D filters to set the output image sharpness in relation to the noise. The quality of the output is incomparable to the earlier described methods and is worth increasing the computing time. We would like to offer mathematical methods of 3D scalar data visualization describing new algorithms that run on standard PCs very well.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann Method used for the aircraft characteristics computation at high angle of attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Traditional Finite Volume Method(FVM)and Lattice Boltzmann Method(LBM)are both used to compute the high angle attack aerodynamic characteristics of the benchmark aircraft model named CT-1.Even though the software requires flow on the order of Ma<0.4,simulation at Ma=0.5 is run in PowerFLOW after theoretical analysis.The consistency with the wind tunnel testing is satisfied,especially for the LBM which can produce perfect results at high angle attack.PowerFLOW can accurately capture the detail of flows because it is inherently time-dependent and parallel and suits large-scale computation very well.

  13. MORTAR FINITE VOLUME METHOD WITH ADINI ELEMENT FOR BIHARMONIC PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-jia Bi; Li-kang Li

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we construct and analyse a mortar finite volume method for the dis-cretization for the biharmonic problem in R2. This method is based on the mortar-type Adini nonconforming finite element spaces. The optimal order H2-seminorm error estimate between the exact solution and the mortar Adini finite volume solution of the biharmonic equation is established.

  14. Cellwise conservative unsplit advection for the volume of fluid method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    We present a cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) advection scheme for the volume of fluid method (VOF) in 2D. Contrary to other schemes based on explicit calculations of the flux balances, the CCU advection adopts a cellwise approach where the pre-images of the control volumes are traced backward......We present a cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) advection scheme for the volume of fluid method (VOF) in 2D. Contrary to other schemes based on explicit calculations of the flux balances, the CCU advection adopts a cellwise approach where the pre-images of the control volumes are traced...

  15. Device overlay method for high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Youngsik; Kim, Myoungsoo; Heo, Hoyoung; Jeon, Sanghuck; Choi, DongSub; Nabeth, Jeremy; Brinster, Irina; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    Advancing technology nodes with smaller process margins require improved photolithography overlay control. Overlay control at develop inspection (DI) based on optical metrology targets is well established in semiconductor manufacturing. Advances in target design and metrology technology have enabled significant improvements in overlay precision and accuracy. One approach to represent in-die on-device as-etched overlay is to measure at final inspection (FI) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Disadvantages to this approach include inability to rework, limited layer coverage due to lack of transparency, and higher cost of ownership (CoO). A hybrid approach is investigated in this report whereby infrequent DI/FI bias is characterized and the results are used to compensate the frequent DI overlay results. The bias characterization is done on an infrequent basis, either based on time or triggered from change points. On a per-device and per-layer basis, the optical target overlay at DI is compared with SEM on-device overlay at FI. The bias characterization results are validated and tracked for use in compensating the DI APC controller. Results of the DI/FI bias characterization and sources of variation are presented, as well as the impact on the DI correctables feeding the APC system. Implementation details in a high volume manufacturing (HVM) wafer fab will be reviewed. Finally future directions of the investigation will be discussed.

  16. SET OPERATOR-BASED METHOD OF DENOISING MEDICAL VOLUME DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程兵; 郑南宁; 袁泽剑

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate impulsive noise suppression of medical volume data. Methods The volume data is represented as level sets and a special set operator is defined and applied to filtering it. The small connected components, which are likely to be produced by impulsive noise, are eliminated after the filtering process. A fast algorithm that uses a heap data structure is also designed. Results Compared with traditional linear filters such as a Gaussian filter, this method preserves the fine structure features of the medical volume data while removing noise, and the fast algorithm developed by us reduces memory consumption and improves computing efficiency. The experimental results given illustrate the efficiency of the method and the fast algorithm. Conclusion The set operator-based method shows outstanding denoising properties in our experiment, especially for impulsive noise. The method has a wide variety of applications in the areas of volume visualization and high dimensional data processing.

  17. [A hybrid volume rendering method using general hardware].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Mao, Zongyuan

    2008-06-01

    In order to improve the effect and efficiency of the reconstructed image after hybrid volume rendering of different kinds of volume data from medical sequential slices or polygonal models, we propose a hybrid volume rendering method based on Shear-Warp with economical hardware. First, the hybrid volume data are pre-processed by Z-Buffer method and RLE (Run-Length Encoded) data structure. Then, during the process of compositing intermediate image, a resampling method based on the dual-interpolation and the intermediate slice interpolation methods is used to improve the efficiency and the effect. Finally, the reconstructed image is rendered by the texture-mapping technology of OpenGL. Experiments demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method.

  18. Research on Canal System Operation Based on Controlled Volume Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Ding

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An operating simulation mode based on storage volume control method for multireach canal system in series was established. In allusion to the deficiency of existing controlled volume algorithm, the improved algorithm was proposed, that is the controlled volume algorithm of whole canal pools, the simulation results indicate that the storage volume and water level of each canal pool can be accurately controlled after the improved algorithm was adopted. However, for some typical discharge demand change operating conditions of canal, if the controlled volume algorithm of whole canal pool is still adopted, then it certainly will cause some unnecessary regulation, and consequently increases the disturbed canal reaches. Therefor, the idea of controlled volume operation method of continuous canal pools was proposed, and its algorithm was designed. Through simulation to practical project, the results indicate that the new controlled volume algorithm proposed for typical operating condition can comparatively obviously reduce the number of regulated check gates and disturbed canal pools for some typical discharge demand change operating conditions of canal, thus the control efficiency of canal system was improved. The controlled volume method of operation is specially suitable for large-scale water delivery canal system which possesses complex operation requirements.

  19. Palatine tonsil volume estimation using different methods after tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağıroğlu, Ayşe; Acer, Niyazi; Okuducu, Hacı; Ertekin, Tolga; Erkan, Mustafa; Durmaz, Esra; Aydın, Mesut; Yılmaz, Seher; Zararsız, Gökmen

    2016-06-15

    This study was carried out to measure the volume of the palatine tonsil in otorhinolaryngology outpatients with complaints of adenotonsillar hypertrophy and chronic tonsillitis who had undergone tonsillectomy. To date, no study has investigated palatine tonsil volume using different methods and compared with subjective tonsil size in the literature. For this purpose, we used three different methods to measure palatine tonsil volume. The correlation of each parameter with tonsil size was assessed. After tonsillectomy, palatine tonsil volume was measured by Archimedes, Cavalieri and Ellipsoid methods. Mean right-left palatine tonsil volumes were calculated as 2.63 ± 1.34 cm(3) and 2.72 ± 1.51 cm(3) by the Archimedes method, 3.51 ± 1.48 cm(3) and 3.37 ± 1.36 cm(3) by the Cavalieri method, and 2.22 ± 1.22 cm(3) and 2.29 ± 1.42 cm(3) by the Ellipsoid method, respectively. Excellent agreement was found among the three methods of measuring volumetric techniques according to Bland-Altman plots. In addition, tonsil grade was correlated significantly with tonsil volume.

  20. FINITE VOLUME METHOD OF MODELLING TRANSIENT GROUNDWATER FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Muyinda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of computational fluid dynamics, the finite volume method is dominant over other numerical techniques like the finite difference and finite element methods because the underlying physical quantities are conserved at the discrete level. In the present study, the finite volume method is used to solve an isotropic transient groundwater flow model to obtain hydraulic heads and flow through an aquifer. The objective is to discuss the theory of finite volume method and its applications in groundwater flow modelling. To achieve this, an orthogonal grid with quadrilateral control volumes has been used to simulate the model using mixed boundary conditions from Bwaise III, a Kampala Surburb. Results show that flow occurs from regions of high hydraulic head to regions of low hydraulic head until a steady head value is achieved.

  1. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Z. L.; Ishak, M. H. H.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Khor, Soon Fuat

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the three dimensional (3D) simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA) to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM) code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced. PMID:27454872

  3. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Aizat; Gan, Z L; Ishak, M H H; Abdullah, M Z; Khor, Soon Fuat

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the three dimensional (3D) simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA) to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM) code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizat Abas

    Full Text Available This paper studies the three dimensional (3D simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced.

  5. Computational Methods in Stochastic Dynamics Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanou, George; Papadopoulos, Vissarion

    2013-01-01

    The considerable influence of inherent uncertainties on structural behavior has led the engineering community to recognize the importance of a stochastic approach to structural problems. Issues related to uncertainty quantification and its influence on the reliability of the computational models are continuously gaining in significance. In particular, the problems of dynamic response analysis and reliability assessment of structures with uncertain system and excitation parameters have been the subject of continuous research over the last two decades as a result of the increasing availability of powerful computing resources and technology.   This book is a follow up of a previous book with the same subject (ISBN 978-90-481-9986-0) and focuses on advanced computational methods and software tools which can highly assist in tackling complex problems in stochastic dynamic/seismic analysis and design of structures. The selected chapters are authored by some of the most active scholars in their respective areas and...

  6. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  7. On-line Measuring Method for Shell Chamber Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-zhong; WANG De-min; JIANG Tao; CAO Guo-hua; WANG Qi

    2005-01-01

    Using the ideal gas state equation, an on-line measuring method for the shell chamber volume is studied in this paper. After analyzing how various measurement parameters affect the measurement accuracy, the system parameters are optimized in this method. Because the shape and volume of the tested items are similar, the method of using "tamping" to raise the accuracy and speed of the measurement is put forward. Based on the work above, a prototype of the testing instrument for shell chamber volume was developed, automatically testing and controlling. Compared with the method of "water weight", this method is more accurate, quicker and more automotive, so it is adaptable for the use of on-line detection.

  8. Comparison of methods to quantify volume during resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Jeffrey M; McCaulley, Grant O; Cormie, Prue; Nuzzo, James L; Cavill, Michael J; Triplett, N Travis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare 4 different methods of calculating volume when comparing resistance exercise protocols of varying intensities. Ten Appalachian State University students experienced in resistance exercise completed 3 different resistance exercise protocols on different days using a randomized, crossover design, with 1 week of rest between each protocol. The protocols included 1) hypertrophy: 4 sets of 10 repetitions in the squat at 75% of a 1-repetition maximum (1RM) (90-second rest periods); 2) strength: 11 sets of 3 repetitions at 90% 1RM (5-minute rest periods); and 3) power: 8 sets of 6 repetitions of jump squats at 0% 1RM (3-minute rest periods). The volume of resistance exercise completed during each protocol was determined with 4 different methods: 1) volume load (VL) (repetitions [no.] x external load [kg]); 2) maximum dynamic strength volume load (MDSVL) (repetitions [no.] x [body mass--shank mass (kg) + external load (kg)]); 3) time under tension (TUT) (eccentric time +milliseconds] + concentric time +milliseconds]); and 4) total work (TW) (force [N] x displacement [m]). The volumes differed significantly (p , 0.05) between hypertrophy and strength in comparison with the power protocol when VL and MDSVL were used to determine the volume of resistance exercise completed. Furthermore, significant differences in TUT existed between all 3 resistance exercise protocols. The TW calculated was not significantly different between the 3 protocols. These data imply that each method examined results in substantially different values when comparing various resistance exercise protocols involving different levels of intensity.

  9. Volume Sculpting Using the Level-Set Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Christensen, Niels Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of the Level--Set Method as the underlying technology of a volume sculpting system. The main motivation is that this leads to a very generic technique for deformation of volumetric solids. In addition, our method preserves a distance field volume representation....... A scaling window is used to adapt the Level--Set Method to local deformations and to allow the user to control the intensity of the tool. Level--Set based tools have been implemented in an interactive sculpting system, and we show sculptures created using the system....

  10. High order finite volume methods for singular perturbation problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ZhongYing; HE ChongNan; WU Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we establish a high order finite volume method for the fourth order singular perturbation problems. In conjunction with the optimal meshes, the numerical solutions resulting from the method have optimal convergence order. Numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical estimates.

  11. The volume of fluid method in spherical coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.M.C.; Dijk, P.E.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) method is a numerical technique to track the developing free surfaces of liquids in motion. This method can, for example, be applied to compute the liquid flow patterns in a rotating cone reactor. For this application a spherical coordinate system is most suited. The novel

  12. Method for measuring anterior chamber volume by image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Gaoshou; Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Ruichang; Wang, Bingsong; Wang, Ningli

    2007-12-01

    Anterior chamber volume (ACV) is very important for an oculist to make rational pathological diagnosis as to patients who have some optic diseases such as glaucoma and etc., yet it is always difficult to be measured accurately. In this paper, a method is devised to measure anterior chamber volumes based on JPEG-formatted image files that have been transformed from medical images using the anterior-chamber optical coherence tomographer (AC-OCT) and corresponding image-processing software. The corresponding algorithms for image analysis and ACV calculation are implemented in VC++ and a series of anterior chamber images of typical patients are analyzed, while anterior chamber volumes are calculated and are verified that they are in accord with clinical observation. It shows that the measurement method is effective and feasible and it has potential to improve accuracy of ACV calculation. Meanwhile, some measures should be taken to simplify the handcraft preprocess working as to images.

  13. A FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR THERMAL CONVECTION PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮洪兴

    2004-01-01

    Consider the finite volume element method for the thermal convection problem with the infinite Prandtl number. The author uses a conforming piecewise linear function on a fine triangulation for velocity and temperature, and a piecewise constant function on a coarse triangulation for pressure. For general triangulation the optimal order H1 norm error estimates are given.

  14. Different partial volume correction methods lead to different conclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Douglas N; Salat, David H; Bowen, Spencer L

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional group study of the effects of aging on brain metabolism as measured with (18)F-FDG-PET was performed using several different partial volume correction (PVC) methods: no correction (NoPVC), Meltzer (MZ), Müller-Gärtner (MG), and the symmetric geometric transfer matrix (SGTM) usin...

  15. Modeling of composite piezoelectric structures with the finite volume method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolborici, Valentin; Dawson, Francis P; Pugh, Mary C

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric devices, such as piezoelectric traveling- wave rotary ultrasonic motors, have composite piezoelectric structures. A composite piezoelectric structure consists of a combination of two or more bonded materials, at least one of which is a piezoelectric transducer. Piezoelectric structures have mainly been numerically modeled using the finite element method. An alternative approach based on the finite volume method offers the following advantages: 1) the ordinary differential equations resulting from the discretization process can be interpreted directly as corresponding circuits; and 2) phenomena occurring at boundaries can be treated exactly. This paper presents a method for implementing the boundary conditions between the bonded materials in composite piezoelectric structures modeled with the finite volume method. The paper concludes with a modeling example of a unimorph structure.

  16. Modelling the Hydraulic Behaviour of Growing Media with the Explicit Finite Volume Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carbone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing imperviousness of urban areas reduces the infiltration and evapotranspiration capacity of urban catchments and results in increased runoff. In the last few decades, several solutions and techniques have been proposed to prevent such impacts by restoring the hydrological cycle. A limiting factor in spreading the use of such systems is the lack of proper modelling tools for design, especially for the infiltration processes in a growing medium. In this research, a physically-based model, employing the explicit Finite Volume Method (FVM, is proposed for modelling infiltration into growing media. The model solves a modified version of the Richards equation using a formulation which takes into account the main characteristics of green infrastructure substrates. The proposed model was verified against the HYDRUS-1D software and the comparison of results confirmed the suitability of the proposed model for correctly describing the hydraulic behaviour of soil substrates.

  17. Spectral (Finite) Volume Method for One Dimensional Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Consider a mesh of unstructured triangular cells. Each cell is called a Spectral Volume (SV), denoted by Si, which is further partitioned into subcells named Control Volumes (CVs), indicated by C(sub i,j). To represent the solution as a polynomial of degree m in two dimensions (2D) we need N = (m+1)(m+2)/2 pieces of independent information, or degrees of freedom (DOFs). The DOFs in a SV method are the volume-averaged mean variables at the N CVs. For example, to build a quadratic reconstruction in 2D, we need at least (2+1)(3+1)/2 = 6 DOFs. There are numerous ways of partitioning a SV, and not every partition is admissible in the sense that the partition may not be capable of producing a degree m polynomial. Once N mean solutions in the CVs of a SV are given, a unique polynomial reconstruction can be obtained.

  18. Finite volume method for investigating anisotrooic conductivitv in EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel finite volume method is presented to investigate the effect of anisotropic conductivity on the potential distribution of the scalp. The second-order interpolation of the tetrahedral mesh is used to avoid employing the secondary element. The calculation precision is enhanced by using the Gaussian integration. To avoid the geometric singularity, the triangular prism is employed in place of the conventional hexahedron mesh. With the method, the spherical models as well as the realistic head models are simulated. The calculation results indicate that the anisotropic ratio and the position of dipole sources have great influence on the potential distribution in the electroencephalogram.

  19. Finite Volume Evolution Galerkin Methods for Nonlinear Hyperbolic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, M.; Saibertová, J.; Warnecke, G.

    2002-12-01

    We present new truly multidimensional schemes of higher order within the frame- work of finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. These methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of the multidimensional hyperbolic system, such that all of the infinitely many directions of wave propagation are taken into account. Following our previous results for the wave equation system, we derive approximate evolution operators for the linearized Euler equations. The integrals along the Mach cone and along the cell interfaces are evaluated exactly, as well as by means of numerical quadratures. The influence of these numerical quadratures will be discussed. Second-order resolution is obtained using a conservative piecewise bilinear recovery and the midpoint rule approximation for time integration. We prove error estimates for the finite volume evolution Galerkin scheme for linear systems with constant coefficients. Several numerical experiments for the nonlinear. Euler equations, which confirm the accuracy and good multidimensional behavior of the FVEG schemes, are presented as well.

  20. An Inverse Method for Simultaneous Estimation of Thermal Properties of Orthotropic Materials using Gaussian Process Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K. S.; Somasundharam, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) involving the simultaneous estimation of principal thermal conductivities (kxx,kyy,kzz ) and specific heat capacity of orthotropic materials is solved by using surrogate forward model. Uniformly distributed random samples for each unknown parameter is generated from the prior knowledge about these parameters and Finite Volume Method (FVM) is employed to solve the forward problem for temperature distribution with space and time. A supervised machine learning technique- Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) is used to construct the surrogate forward model with the available temperature solution and randomly generated unknown parameter data. The statistical and machine learning toolbox available in MATLAB R2015b is used for this purpose. The robustness of the surrogate model constructed using GPR is examined by carrying out the parameter estimation for 100 new randomly generated test samples at a measurement error of ±0.3K. The temperature measurement is obtained by adding random noise with the mean at zero and known standard deviation (σ = 0.1) to the FVM solution of the forward problem. The test results show that Mean Percentage Deviation (MPD) of all test samples for all parameters is < 10%.

  1. Development op finite volume methods for fluid dynamics; Developpement de methodes de volumes finis pour la mecanique des fluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delcourte, S

    2007-09-15

    We aim to develop a finite volume method which applies to a greater class of meshes than other finite volume methods, restricted by orthogonality constraints. We build discrete differential operators over the three staggered tessellations needed for the construction of the method. These operators verify some analogous properties to those of the continuous operators. At first, the method is applied to the Div-Curl problem, which can be viewed as a building block of the Stokes problem. Then, the Stokes problem is dealt with with various boundary conditions. It is well known that when the computational domain is polygonal and non-convex, the order of convergence of numerical methods is deteriorated. Consequently, we have studied how an appropriate local refinement is able to restore the optimal order of convergence for the Laplacian problem. At last, we have discretized the non-linear Navier-Stokes problem, using the rotational formulation of the convection term, associated to the Bernoulli pressure. With an iterative algorithm, we are led to solve a saddle-point problem at each iteration. We give a particular interest to this linear problem by testing some pre-conditioners issued from finite elements, which we adapt to our method. Each problem is illustrated by numerical results on arbitrary meshes, such as strongly non-conforming meshes. (author)

  2. Infrared radiation simulation of exhaust system by coupling FVM with narrow band k-distribution%Infrared radiation simulation of exhaust system by coupling FVM with narrow band k-distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xi-juan; Eriqitai; LI Xi-xi; WANG Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional infrared radiation code for exhaust system was developed by the finite vol- ume method coupled with narrow band k-distribution in non-gray absorbing-emitting media. The final infrared signature had considered the atmosphere effect, and the simulation values were favorably consistent with tes- ting ones. The results indicate that the relative errors considering the effect of atmosphere compared with that of the contrary condition reduce by 31%, it shows that when simulating the infrared radiation of the target which is received by the infrared detectors, even the calculation band is in atmospheric windows 3--5 μm, the effect of atmospheric transmission on infrared signature of the target should not be neglected.

  3. Application of vector finite volume method for electromagnetic flow simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, T.; Murashige, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Yamaguchi, A. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    A vector finite volume method (VFVM) has been developed for an electromagnetic flow analysis. In the VFVM, the governing equations of magnetic flux density and electric field intensity are solved separately so as to reduce the computational cost caused by an iterative procedure that is required to satisfy the solenoidal condition. In the present paper, a suppression of temperature fluctuation of liquid sodium after a T-junction has also been investigated with a simplified two dimensional numerical analysis by adding an obstacle (turbulence promoter) or a magnetic field after the junction. (author)

  4. New Approach for Error Reduction in the Volume Penalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Iwakami-Nakano, Wakana; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Hattori, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The volume penalization method offers an efficient way to numerically simulate flows around complex-shaped bodies which move and/or deform in general. In this method a penalization term which has permeability eta and a mask function is added to a governing equation as a forcing term in order to impose different dynamics in solid and fluid regions. In this paper we investigate the accuracy of the volume penalization method in detail. We choose the one-dimensional Burgers' equation as a governing equation since it enables us extensive study and it has a nonlinear term similar to the Navier-Stokes equations. It is confirmed that the error which consists of the discretization/truncation error, the penalization error, the round-off error, and others has the same features as those in previous results when we use the standard definition of the mask function. As the number of grid points increases, the error converges to a non-zero constant which is equal to the penalization error. We propose a new approach for reduc...

  5. A volume-based method for denoising on curved surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Biddle, Harry

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate a method for removing noise from images or other data on curved surfaces. Our approach relies on in-surface diffusion: we formulate both the Gaussian diffusion and Perona-Malik edge-preserving diffusion equations in a surface-intrinsic way. Using the Closest Point Method, a recent technique for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) on general surfaces, we obtain a very simple algorithm where we merely alternate a time step of the usual Gaussian diffusion (and similarly Perona-Malik) in a small 3D volume containing the surface with an interpolation step. The method uses a closest point function to represent the underlying surface and can treat very general surfaces. Experimental results include image filtering on smooth surfaces, open surfaces, and general triangulated surfaces. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Teaching Thermal Hydraulics & Numerical Methods: An Introductory Control Volume Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Lucas

    2004-10-01

    A graduate level course for Thermal Hydraulics (T/H) was taught through Idaho State University in the spring of 2004. A numerical approach was taken for the content of this course since the students were employed at the Idaho National Laboratory and had been users of T/H codes. The majority of the students had expressed an interest in learning about the Courant Limit, mass error, semi-implicit and implicit numerical integration schemes in the context of a computer code. Since no introductory text was found the author developed notes taught from his own research and courses taught for Westinghouse on the subject. The course started with a primer on control volume methods and the construction of a Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) (T/H) code. The primer was valuable for giving the students the basics behind such codes and their evolution to more complex codes for Thermal Hydraulics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The course covered additional material including the Finite Element Method and non-equilibrium (T/H). The control volume primer and the construction of a three-equation (mass, momentum and energy) HEM code are the subject of this paper . The Fortran version of the code covered in this paper is elementary compared to its descendants. The steam tables used are less accurate than the available commercial version written in C Coupled to a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The Fortran version and input files can be downloaded at www.microfusionlab.com.

  7. The calculation method of mixing volume in a products pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jing; Wang, Qim [China University of Petroleum, Beijing, (China); Wang, Weidongn [Sinopec South China Sales Company, (China); Guo, Yi [CNPC Oil and Gas pipeline control center, (China)

    2010-07-01

    This paper investigated calculation methods of mixing volume on a pipeline. A method of simulation was developed by combining the Austin-Palfrey empirical formula and field data. The field data were introduced to improve the accuracy of the Austin-Palfrey formula by including other factors such as the terrain, the structure of the pipeline, the characteristics of mixed oil products in pumping stations and the distribution of products along the pipeline. These other factors were collected from field data and analyzed statistically to deduce coefficients. The comparison with field results showed that the formula developed for contamination provided accurate values. The formula achieved more accurate results using the characteristics of the field pipeline. This formula could be used for field application.

  8. Accuracy of a new bedside method for estimation of circulating blood volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Waever Rasmussen, J; Winther Henneberg, S

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a modification of the carbon monoxide method of estimating the circulating blood volume.......To evaluate the accuracy of a modification of the carbon monoxide method of estimating the circulating blood volume....

  9. A finite volume method for fluctuating hydrodynamics of simple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kiran; Samtaney, Ravi; Moran, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics accounts for stochastic effects that arise at mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. We present a finite volume method for numerical solutions of the fluctuating compressible Navier Stokes equations. Case studies for simple fluids are demonstrated via the use of two different equations of state (EOS) : a perfect gas EOS, and a Lennard-Jones EOS for liquid argon developed by Johnson et al. (Mol. Phys. 1993). We extend the fourth order conservative finite volume scheme originally developed by McCorquodale and Colella (Comm. in App. Math. & Comput. Sci. 2011), to evaluate the deterministic and stochastic fluxes. The expressions for the cell-centered discretizations of the stochastic shear stress and stochastic heat flux are adopted from Espanol, P (Physica A. 1998), where the discretizations were shown to satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. A third order Runge-Kutta scheme with weights proposed by Delong et al. (Phy. Rev. E. 2013) is used for the numerical time integration. Accuracy of the proposed scheme will be demonstrated. Comparisons of the numerical solution against theory for a perfect gas as well as liquid argon will be presented. Regularizations of the stochastic fluxes in the limit of zero mesh sizes will be discussed. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  10. Lens array fabrication method with volume expansion property of PDMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, WonJae; Kim, Junoh; Lee, Muyoung; Lee, Jooho; Bang, Yousung; Won, Yong Hyub

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, poly (dimethylsiloxane) lens array is fabricated by replica molding. In this paper, we describe simple method for fabricating lens array with expanding property of PDMS. The PDMS substrate is prepared by spin coating on cleaned glass. After spin coating PDMS, substrate is treated with O2 plasma to promote adhesion between PDMS substrate and photoresist pattern on it. Positive photoresist az-4330 and AZ 430K developer is used for patterning on PDMS. General photolithography process is used to patterning. Then patterned PDMS substrate is dipped to 1- Bromododecane bath. During this process, patterned photoresist work as a barrier and prevent blocked PDMS substrate from reaction with 1-Bromododecane. Unblocked part of PDMS directly react with 1-Bromododecane and results in expanded PDMS volume. The expansion of PDMS is depends on absorbed 1-Bromododecane volume, dipping time and ratio of block to open area. The focal length of lens array is controlled by those PDMS expansion factors. Scale of patterned photoresist determine a diameter of each lens. The expansion occurs symmetrically at center of unblocked PDMS and 1-Bromododecane interface. As a result, the PDMS lens array is achieved by this process.

  11. PERTURBATION FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR CONVECTIVE-DIFFUSION INTEGRAL EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi; YANG Guowei

    2004-01-01

    A perturbation finite volume (PFV) method for the convective-diffusion integral equation is developed in this paper. The PFV scheme is an upwind and mixed scheme using any higher-order interpolation and second-order integration approximations, with the least nodes similar to the standard three-point schemes, that is, the number of the nodes needed is equal to unity plus the face-number of the control volume. For instance, in the two-dimensional (2-D) case, only four nodes for the triangle grids and five nodes for the Cartesian grids are utilized, respectively. The PFV scheme is applied on a number of 1-D linear and nonlinear problems, 2-D and 3-D flow model equations. Comparing with other standard three-point schemes, the PFV scheme has much smaller numerical diffusion than the first-order upwind scheme (UDS). Its numerical accuracies are also higher than the second-order central scheme (CDS), the power-law scheme (PLS) and QUICK scheme.

  12. A finite volume method for numerical grid generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, S. B.

    1999-07-01

    A novel method to generate body-fitted grids based on the direct solution for three scalar functions is derived. The solution for scalar variables , and is obtained with a conventional finite volume method based on a physical space formulation. The grid is adapted or re-zoned to eliminate the residual error between the current solution and the desired solution, by means of an implicit grid-correction procedure. The scalar variables are re-mapped and the process is reiterated until convergence is obtained. Calculations are performed for a variety of problems by assuming combined Dirichlet-Neumann and pure Dirichlet boundary conditions involving the use of transcendental control functions, as well as functions designed to effect grid control automatically on the basis of boundary values. The use of dimensional analysis to build stable exponential functions and other control functions is demonstrated. Automatic procedures are implemented: one based on a finite difference approximation to the Cristoffel terms assuming local-boundary orthogonality, and another designed to procure boundary orthogonality. The performance of the new scheme is shown to be comparable with that of conventional inverse methods when calculations are performed on benchmark problems through the application of point-by-point and whole-field solution schemes. Advantages and disadvantages of the present method are critically appraised. Copyright

  13. Historical volume estimation and a structured method for calculating habitable volume for in-space and surface habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Bobskill, M. R.; Wilhite, A.

    2012-11-01

    Habitable volume is an important spacecraft design figure of merit necessary to determine the required size of crewed space vehicles, or habitats. In order to design habitats for future missions and properly compare the habitable volumes of future habitat designs with historical spacecraft, consistent methods of both defining the required amount of habitable volume and estimating the habitable volume for a given layout are required. This paper provides a brief summary of historical habitable volume requirements and describes the appropriate application of requirements to various types of missions, particularly highlighting the appropriate application for various gravity environments. Then the proposed "Marching Grid Method", a structured automatic, numerical method to calculate habitable volume for a given habitat design, is described in detail. This method uses a set of geometric Boolean tests applied to a discrete set of points within the pressurized volume to numerically estimate the functionally usable and accessible space that comprises the habitable volume. The application of this method to zero gravity and nonzero gravity environments is also discussed. This proposed method is then demonstrated by calculating habitable volumes using two conceptual-level layouts of habitat designs, one for each type of gravity environment. These include the US Laboratory Module on ISS and the Scenario 12.0 Pressurized Core Module from the recent NASA Lunar Surface Systems studies. Results of this study include a description of the effectiveness of this method for various resolutions of the investigated grid, and commentary highlighting the use of this method to determine the overall utility of interior configurations for automatically evaluating interior layouts.

  14. Fast method for dynamic thresholding in volume holographic memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael S.; Mitkas, Pericles A.

    1998-11-01

    It is essential for parallel optical memory interfaces to incorporate processing that dynamically differentiates between databit values. These thresholding points will vary as a result of system noise -- due to contrast fluctuations, variations in data page composition, reference beam misalignment, etc. To maintain reasonable data integrity it is necessary to select the threshold close to its optimal level. In this paper, a neural network (NN) approach is proposed as a fast method of determining the threshold to meet the required transfer rate. The multi-layered perceptron network can be incorporated as part of a smart photodetector array (SPA). Other methods have suggested performing the operation by means of histogram or by use of statistical information. These approaches fail in that they unnecessarily switch to a 1-D paradigm. In this serial domain, global thresholding is pointless since sequence detection could be applied. The discussed approach is a parallel solution with less overhead than multi-rail encoding. As part of this method, a small set of values are designated as threshold determination data bits; these are interleaved with the information data bits and are used as inputs to the NN. The approach has been tested using both simulated data as well as data obtained from a volume holographic memory system. Results show convergence of the training and an ability to generalize upon untrained data for binary and multi-level gray scale datapage images. Methodologies are discussed for improving the performance by a proper training set selection.

  15. ACARP Project C10059. ACARP manual of modern coal testing methods. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurovs, R.; Creelman, R.; Pohl, J.; Juniper, L. [CSIRO Energy Technology, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    The Manual summarises the purpose, applicability, and limitations of a range of standard and modern coal testing methods that have potential to assist the coal company technologist to better evaluate coal performance. It is presented in two volumes. This second volume provides more detailed information regarding the methods discussed in Volume 1.

  16. Temperature and thermal stress evolutions in sapphire crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wencheng; Zhao, Wenhan; Wu, Ming; Ding, Guoqiang; Liu, Lijun

    2017-09-01

    Transient numerical calculations were carried out to predict the evolutions of temperature and thermal stress in sapphire single crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method (HEM). Internal radiation in the semitransparent sapphire crystal was taken into account using the finite volume method (FVM) in the global heat transfer model. The numerical results seem to indicate that the narrow bottom region of the sapphire crystal is subjected to high thermal stress during the cooling process, which could be responsible for the seed cracking of the as-grown crystal, while the thermal stress is relatively small in the central main body of the crystal, and is less than 10 MPa during the whole cooling process. The fast decrease of the thermal stress in the bottom region of the crystal during the initial stage of cooling process is dominated by the reduction of the cooling helium gas in the heat exchanger shaft, and is not significantly affected by the heating power reduction rate.

  17. A new electric method for non-invasive continuous monitoring of stroke volume and ventricular volume-time curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konings Maurits K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper a new non-invasive, operator-free, continuous ventricular stroke volume monitoring device (Hemodynamic Cardiac Profiler, HCP is presented, that measures the average stroke volume (SV for each period of 20 seconds, as well as ventricular volume-time curves for each cardiac cycle, using a new electric method (Ventricular Field Recognition with six independent electrode pairs distributed over the frontal thoracic skin. In contrast to existing non-invasive electric methods, our method does not use the algorithms of impedance or bioreactance cardiography. Instead, our method is based on specific 2D spatial patterns on the thoracic skin, representing the distribution, over the thorax, of changes in the applied current field caused by cardiac volume changes during the cardiac cycle. Since total heart volume variation during the cardiac cycle is a poor indicator for ventricular stroke volume, our HCP separates atrial filling effects from ventricular filling effects, and retrieves the volume changes of only the ventricles. Methods ex-vivo experiments on a post-mortem human heart have been performed to measure the effects of increasing the blood volume inside the ventricles in isolation, leaving the atrial volume invariant (which can not be done in-vivo. These effects have been measured as a specific 2D pattern of voltage changes on the thoracic skin. Furthermore, a working prototype of the HCP has been developed that uses these ex-vivo results in an algorithm to decompose voltage changes, that were measured in-vivo by the HCP on the thoracic skin of a human volunteer, into an atrial component and a ventricular component, in almost real-time (with a delay of maximally 39 seconds. The HCP prototype has been tested in-vivo on 7 human volunteers, using G-suit inflation and deflation to provoke stroke volume changes, and LVot Doppler as a reference technique. Results The ex-vivo measurements showed that ventricular filling

  18. Finite volume methods for submarine debris flows and generated waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihwan; Løvholt, Finn; Issler, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Submarine landslides can impose great danger to the underwater structures and generate destructive tsunamis. Submarine debris flows often behave like visco-plastic materials, and the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model is known to be appropriate for describing the motion. In this work, we develop numerical schemes for the visco-plastic debris flows using finite volume methods in Eulerian coordinates with two horizontal dimensions. We provide parameter sensitivity analysis and demonstrate how common ad-hoc assumptions such as including a minimum shear layer depth influence the modeling of the landslide dynamics. Hydrodynamic resistance forces, hydroplaning, and remolding are all crucial terms for underwater landslides, and are hence added into the numerical formulation. The landslide deformation is coupled to the water column and simulated in the Clawpack framework. For the propagation of the tsunamis, the shallow water equations and the Boussinesq-type equations are employed to observe how important the wave dispersion is. Finally, two cases in central Norway, i.e. the subaerial quick clay landslide at Byneset in 2012, and the submerged tsunamigenic Statland landslide in 2014, are both presented for validation. The research leading to these results has received funding from the Research Council of Norway under grant number 231252 (Project TsunamiLand) and the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement 603839 (Project ASTARTE).

  19. Test methods for evaluating solid waste. Volume 1A through 1C, and Volume 2. Field manual physical/chemical methods (3rd edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    This manual provides test procedures that may be used to evaluate those properties of a solid waste that determine whether the waste is a hazardous waste within the definition of Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (PL 94-580). These methods are approved for obtaining data to satisfy the requirement of 40 CFR Part 261, Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste. Volume IA deals with quality control, selection of appropriate test methods, and analytical methods for metallic species. Volume IB consists of methods for organic analytes. Volume IC includes a variety of test methods for miscellaneous analytes and properties for use in evaluating the waste characteristics. Volume II deals with sample acquisition and includes quality control, sampling-plan design and implementation, and field-sampling methods.

  20. Finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for hyperbolic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Morton, K.W.; Warnecke, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the derivation and analysis of new multidimensional, high-resolution, finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes for systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. Our approach couples a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of the multidimensional hyperbolic system, such that all of the infinitely many directions of wave propagation are taken into account. In particular, we p...

  1. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  2. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  3. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  4. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  5. Volume calculation of the spur gear billet for cold precision forging with average circle method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangjun Cheng; Chengzhong Chi; Yongzhen Wang; Peng Lin; Wei Liang; Chen Li

    2014-01-01

    Forging spur gears are widely used in the driving system of mining machinery and equipment due to their higher strength and dimensional accuracy. For the purpose of precisely calculating the volume of cylindrical spur gear billet in cold precision forging, a new theoretical method named average circle method was put forward. With this method, a series of gear billet volumes were calculated. Comparing with the accurate three-dimensional modeling method, the accuracy of average circle method by theoretical calculation was estimated and the maximum relative error of average circle method was less than 1.5%, which was in good agreement with the experimental results. Relative errors of the calculated and the experimental for obtaining the gear billet volumes with reference circle method are larger than those of the average circle method. It shows that average circle method possesses a higher calculation accuracy than reference circle method (traditional method), which should be worth popularizing widely in calculation of spur gear billet volume.

  6. Well-balanced finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for the shallow water equations

    OpenAIRE

    Medvidová, Maria Lukáčová -; Noelle, Sebastian; Kraft, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    We present a new well-balanced finite volume method within the framework of the finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. The methodology will be illustrated for the shallow water equations with source terms modelling the bottom topography and Coriolis forces. Results can be generalized to more complex systems of balance laws. The FVEG methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of multidimensio...

  7. Well-balanced finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for the shallow water equations

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Kraft, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    We present a new well-balanced finite volume method within the framework of the finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. The methodology will be illustrated for the shallow water equations with source terms modelling the bottom topography and Coriolis forces. Results can be generalized to more complex systems of balance laws. The FVEG methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of the multidime...

  8. A Novel Method to Compute Breathing Volumes via Motion Capture Systems: Design and Experimental Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Cassetta, Eugenio; Silvestri, Sergio

    2017-03-24

    Respiratory assessment can be carried out by using motion capture systems. A geometrical model is mandatory in order to compute the breathing volume as a function of time from the markers trajectories. This study describes a novel model to compute volume changes and calculate respiratory parameters by using a motion capture system. The novel method, i.e. prism-based method, computes the volume enclosed within the chest by defining 82 prisms from the 89 markers attached to the subject chest. Volumes computed with this method are compared to spirometry volumes and to volumes computed by a conventional method based on the tetrahedrons decomposition of the chest wall and integrated in a commercial motion capture system. Eight healthy volunteers were enrolled and 30 seconds quiet breathing collected from each of them. Results show a better agreement between volumes computed by the prism-based method and the spirometry (discrepancy of 2.23%, R(2)=0.94) compared to the agreement between volumes computed by the conventional method and the spirometry (discrepancy of 3.56%, R(2)=0.92). The proposed method also showed better performances in the calculation of respiratory parameters. Our findings open up prospects for the further use of the new method in the breathing assessment via motion capture systems.

  9. Supplier Portfolio Selection and Optimum Volume Allocation: A Knowledge Based Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, Romana; Hillegersberg, van Jos

    2010-01-01

    Selection of suppliers and allocation of optimum volumes to suppliers is a strategic business decision. This paper presents a decision support method for supplier selection and the optimal allocation of volumes in a supplier portfolio. The requirements for the method were gathered during a case stud

  10. Archimedes Revisited: A Faster, Better, Cheaper Method of Accurately Measuring the Volume of Small Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2005-01-01

    A little-known method of measuring the volume of small objects based on Archimedes' principle is described, which involves suspending an object in a water-filled container placed on electronic scales. The suspension technique is a variation on the hydrostatic weighing technique used for measuring volume. The suspension method was compared with two…

  11. Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment for irregularly shaped food product volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswantoro, Joko; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Abdullah, Azizi; Idrus, Bahari

    2014-01-01

    Volume measurement plays an important role in the production and processing of food products. Various methods have been proposed to measure the volume of food products with irregular shapes based on 3D reconstruction. However, 3D reconstruction comes with a high-priced computational cost. Furthermore, some of the volume measurement methods based on 3D reconstruction have a low accuracy. Another method for measuring volume of objects uses Monte Carlo method. Monte Carlo method performs volume measurements using random points. Monte Carlo method only requires information regarding whether random points fall inside or outside an object and does not require a 3D reconstruction. This paper proposes volume measurement using a computer vision system for irregularly shaped food products without 3D reconstruction based on Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment. Five images of food product were captured using five cameras and processed to produce binary images. Monte Carlo integration with heuristic adjustment was performed to measure the volume based on the information extracted from binary images. The experimental results show that the proposed method provided high accuracy and precision compared to the water displacement method. In addition, the proposed method is more accurate and faster than the space carving method.

  12. On Third-Order Limiter Functions for Finite Volume Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidtmann, Birte; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose a finite volume limiter function for a reconstruction on the three-point stencil. Compared to classical limiter functions in the MUSCL framework, which yield $2^{\\text{nd}}$-order accuracy, the new limiter is $3^\\text{rd}$-order accurate for smooth solutions. In an earlier work, such a $3^\\text{rd}$-order limiter function was proposed and showed successful results [2]. However, it came with unspecified parameters. We close this gap by giving information on these parameters.

  13. Generalized Navier Boundary Condition for a Volume Of Fluid approach using a Finite-Volume method

    CERN Document Server

    Boelens, A M P

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an analytical Volume Of Fluid (VOF) implementation of the Generalized Navier Boundary Condition is presented based on the Brackbill surface tension model. The model is validated by simulations of droplets on a smooth surface in a planar geometry. Looking at the static behavior of the droplets, it is found that there is a good match between the droplet shape resolved in the simulations and the theoretically predicted shape for various values of the Young's angle. Evaluating the spreading of a droplet on a completely wetting surface, the Voinov-Tanner-Cox law ($\\theta \\propto \\text{Ca}^{1/3}$) can be observed. At later times scaling follows $r \\propto t^{1/2}$, suggesting spreading is limited by inertia. These observations are made without any fitting parameters except the slip length.

  14. Protection Parameters against the Cracks by the Method of Volume Compensation Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulatov Georgiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides estimates the parameters of protection from cracking dam due to volume compensation method. This article discusses the method of compensation dam volume. This method allows calculating the settings of security causing cracks the dam. Presents graphs of horizontal deformations of elongation calculated surface along the length of the construction and in time. Showing horizontal stress distribution diagram in the ground around the pile in plan and in section. Given all the necessary formulas for the method of compensation of the dam volume.

  15. Comparative analysis of two methods for measuring sales volumes during malaria medicine outlet surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Patouillard, Edith; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Hanson, Kara; Pok, Sochea; Palafox, Benjamin; Tougher, Sarah; O’Connell, Kate; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increased interest in using commercial providers for improving access to quality malaria treatment. Understanding their current role is an essential first step, notably in terms of the volume of diagnostics and anti-malarials they sell. Sales volume data can be used to measure the importance of different provider and product types, frequency of parasitological diagnosis and impact of interventions. Several methods for measuring sales volumes are available, yet all have met...

  16. Comparative analysis of two methods for measuring sales volumes during malaria medicine outlet surveys.

    OpenAIRE

    Patouillard, E; Kleinschmidt, I.; Hanson, K.; Pok, S; Palafox, B; Tougher, S; O Connell, K.; Goodman, C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is increased interest in using commercial providers for improving access to quality malaria treatment. Understanding their current role is an essential first step, notably in terms of the volume of diagnostics and anti-malarials they sell. Sales volume data can be used to measure the importance of different provider and product types, frequency of parasitological diagnosis and impact of interventions. Several methods for measuring sales volumes are available, yet all have met...

  17. High-speed volume measurement system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Michael H.; Doyle, Jr., James L.; Brinkman, Michael J.

    2015-11-24

    Disclosed is a volume sensor having first, second, and third laser sources emitting first, second, and third laser beams; first, second, and third beam splitters splitting the first, second, and third laser beams into first, second, and third beam pairs; first, second, and third optical assemblies expanding the first, second, and third beam pairs into first, second, and third pairs of parallel beam sheets; fourth, fifth, and sixth optical assemblies focusing the first, second, and third beam sheet pairs into fourth, fifth, and sixth beam pairs; and first, second, and third detector pairs receiving the fourth, fifth, and sixth beam pairs and converting a change in intensity of at least one of the beam pairs resulting from an object passing through at least one of the first, second, and third parallel beam sheets into at least one electrical signal proportional to a three-dimensional representation of the object.

  18. Feasibility of the left ventricular volume measurement by acoustic quantification method. Comparison with ultrafast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomimoto, Shigehiro; Nakatani, Satoshi; Tanaka, Norio; Uematsu, Masaaki; Beppu, Shintaro; Nagata, Seiki; Hamada, Seiki; Takamiya, Makoto; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic quantification (AQ: the real-time automated boundary detection system) allows instantaneous measurement of cardiac chamber volumes. The feasibility of this method was evaluated by comparing the left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with AQ to those derived from ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT), which enables accurate measurements of LV volumes even in the presence of LV asynergy, in 23 patients (8 with ischemic heart disease, 5 with cardiomyopathy, 3 with valvular heart disease). Both LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes obtained with the AQ method were in good agreement with those obtained with UFCT (y=1.04{chi}-16.9, r=0.95; y=0.87{chi}+15.7, r=0.91; respectively). AQ was reliable even in the presence of LV asynergy. Interobserver variability for the AQ measurement was 10.2%. AQ provides a new, clinically useful method for real-time accurate estimation of the left ventricular volume. (author).

  19. Mortar Upwind Finite Volume Element Method with Crouzeix-Raviart Element for Parabolic Convection Diffusion Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element method with the Crouzeix-Raviart element for the parabolic convection diffusion problems.It is proved that the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element approximations derived are convergent in the H1- and L2-norms.

  20. Critical length sampling: a method to estimate the volume of downed coarse woody debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    G& #246; ran St& #229; hl; Jeffrey H. Gove; Michael S. Williams; Mark J. Ducey

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, critical length sampling for estimating the volume of downed coarse woody debris is presented. Using this method, the volume of downed wood in a stand can be estimated by summing the critical lengths of down logs included in a sample obtained using a relascope or wedge prism; typically, the instrument should be tilted 90° from its usual...

  1. Variation in Measurements of Transtibial Stump Model Volume A Comparison of Five Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, A.; de Boer-Wilzing, V. G.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Emmelot, C. H.; Baars, E. C. T.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the right moment for fitting the first prosthesis, it is necessary to know when the volume of the stump has stabilized. The aim of this study is to analyze variation in measurements of transtibial stump model volumes using the water immersion method, the Design TT system, the

  2. Urban Run-off Volumes Dependency on Rainfall Measurement Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L.; Jensen, N. E.; Rasmussen, Michael R.;

    2005-01-01

    Urban run-off is characterized with fast response since the large surface run-off in the catchments responds immediately to variations in the rainfall. Modeling such type of catchments is most often done with the input from very few rain gauges, but the large variation in rainfall over small area...... resolutions and single gauge rainfall was fed to a MOUSE run-off model. The flow and total volume over the event is evaluated.......Urban run-off is characterized with fast response since the large surface run-off in the catchments responds immediately to variations in the rainfall. Modeling such type of catchments is most often done with the input from very few rain gauges, but the large variation in rainfall over small areas...... suggests that rainfall needs to be measured with a much higher spatial resolution (Jensen and Pedersen, 2004). This paper evaluates the impact of using high-resolution rainfall information from weather radar compared to the conventional single gauge approach. The radar rainfall in three different...

  3. Development of production methods of volume source by the resinous solution which has hardening

    CERN Document Server

    Motoki, R

    2002-01-01

    Volume sources is used for standard sources by radioactive measurement using Ge semiconductor detector of environmental sample, e.g. water, soil and etc. that require large volume. The commercial volume source used in measurement of the water sample is made of agar-agar, and that used in measurement of the soil sample is made of alumina powder. When the plastic receptacles of this two kinds of volume sources were damaged, the leakage contents cause contamination. Moreover, if hermetically sealing performance of volume source made of agar-agar fell, volume decrease due to an evaporation off moisture gives an error to radioactive measurement. Therefore, we developed the two type methods using unsaturated polyester resin, vinilester resin, their hardening agent and acrylicresin. The first type is due to dispersing the hydrochloric acid solution included the radioisotopes uniformly in each resin and hardening the resin. The second is due to dispersing the alumina powder absorbed the radioisotopes in each resin an...

  4. Inter-Method Discrepancies in Brain Volume Estimation May Drive Inconsistent Findings in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuwal, Gajendra J.; Baum, Stefi A.; Cahill, Nathan D.; Dougherty, Chase C.; Evans, Eli; Evans, David W.; Moore, Gregory J.; Michael, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies applying automatic preprocessing methods on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI) report inconsistent neuroanatomical abnormalities in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In this study we investigate inter-method differences as a possible cause behind these inconsistent findings. In particular, we focus on the estimation of the following brain volumes: gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and total intra cranial volume (TIV). T1-weighted sMRIs of 417 ASD subjects and 459 typically developing controls (TDC) from the ABIDE dataset were estimated using three popular preprocessing methods: SPM, FSL, and FreeSurfer (FS). Brain volumes estimated by the three methods were correlated but had significant inter-method differences; except TIVSPM vs. TIVFS, all inter-method differences were significant. ASD vs. TDC group differences in all brain volume estimates were dependent on the method used. SPM showed that TIV, GM, and CSF volumes of ASD were larger than TDC with statistical significance, whereas FS and FSL did not show significant differences in any of the volumes; in some cases, the direction of the differences were opposite to SPM. When methods were compared with each other, they showed differential biases for autism, and several biases were larger than ASD vs. TDC differences of the respective methods. After manual inspection, we found inter-method segmentation mismatches in the cerebellum, sub-cortical structures, and inter-sulcal CSF. In addition, to validate automated TIV estimates we performed manual segmentation on a subset of subjects. Results indicate that SPM estimates are closest to manual segmentation, followed by FS while FSL estimates were significantly lower. In summary, we show that ASD vs. TDC brain volume differences are method dependent and that these inter-method discrepancies can contribute to inconsistent neuroimaging findings in general. We suggest cross-validation across methods and emphasize the

  5. RGB imaging volumes alignment method for color holographic displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaperty, Weronika; Kozacki, Tomasz; Gierwiało, Radosław; Kujawińska, Małgorzata

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in holographic displays include increased interest in multiplexing techniques, which allow for extension of viewing angle, hologram resolution increase, or color imaging. In each of these situations, the image is obtained by a composition of a several light wavefronts and therefore some wavefront misalignment occurs. In this work we present a calibration method, that allows for correction of these misalignments by a suitable numerical manipulation of holographic data. For this purpose, we have developed an automated procedure that is based on a measurement of positions of reconstructed synthetic hologram of a target object with focus at two different reconstruction distances. In view of relatively long reconstruction distances in holographic displays, we focus on angular deviations of light beams, which result in a noticeable mutual lateral shift and inclination of the component images in space. A method proposed in this work is implemented in a color holographic display unit (single Spatial Light Modulator - SLM) utilizing Space- Division Method (SDM). In this technique, also referred as Aperture Field Division (AFD) method, a significant wavefront inclination is introduced by a color filter glass mosaic plate (mask) placed in front of the SLM. It is verified that an accuracy of the calibration method, obtained for reconstruction distance 700mm, is 34.5 μm and 0.02°, for the lateral shift and for the angular compensation, respectively. In the final experiment the presented method is verified through real-world object color image reconstruction.

  6. 3D photography is a reliable method of measuring infantile haemangioma volume over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sarah A; Kimble, Roy M; Storey, Kristen J; Gee Kee, Emma L; Stockton, Kellie A

    2016-09-01

    Infantile haemangiomas are common lesions of infancy. With the development of novel treatments utilised to accelerate their regression, there is a need for a method of assessing these lesions over time. Volume is an ideal assessment method because of its quantifiable nature. This study investigated whether 3D photography is a valid tool for measuring the volume of infantile haemangiomas over time. Thirteen children with infantile haemangiomas presenting to the Vascular Anomalies Clinic, Royal Children's Hospital/Lady Cilento Children's Hospital treated with propranolol were included in the study. Lesion volume was assessed using 3D photography at presentation, one month and three months follow up. Intrarater reliability was determined by retracing all images several months after the initial mapping. Interrater reliability of the 3D camera software was determined by two investigators, blinded to each other's results, independently assessing infantile haemangioma volume. Lesion volume decreased significantly between presentation and three-month follow-up (p<0.001). Volume intra- and interrater reliability were excellent with ICC 0.991 (95% CI 0.982, 0.995) and 0.978 (95% CI 0.955, 0.989), respectively. This study demonstrates images taken with the 3D LifeViz™ camera and lesion volume calculated with Dermapix® software is a reliable method for assessing infantile haemangioma volume over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wang

    2012-10-01

    A new finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution is proposed in this paper with detailed derivation. The calculation results of this new method are compared with the traditional second-order finite volume method. The newly proposed method is more accurate than conventional ones, even though the discretized expression of this proposed method is slightly more complex than the second-order central finite volume method, making it cost more calculation time on the same grids. Numerical result shows that the total CPU time of the new method is significantly less than conventional methods for achieving the same level of accuracy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Segmentation of MRI Volume Data Based on Clustering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we analyze the difficulties of segmentation without tag line of left ventricle MR images, and propose an algorithm for automatic segmentation of left ventricle (LV internal and external profiles. Herein, we propose an Incomplete K-means and Category Optimization (IKCO method. Initially, using Hough transformation to automatically locate initial contour of the LV, the algorithm uses a simple approach to complete data subsampling and initial center determination. Next, according to the clustering rules, the proposed algorithm finishes MR image segmentation. Finally, the algorithm uses a category optimization method to improve segmentation results. Experiments show that the algorithm provides good segmentation results.

  9. Limb volume measurement: from the past methods to optoelectronic technologies, bioimpedance analysis and laser based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavezzi, A; Schingale, F; Elio, C

    2010-10-01

    Accurate measurement of limb volume is considered crucial to lymphedema management. Various non-invasive methods may be used and have been validated in recent years, though suboptimal standardisation has been highlighted in different publications.

  10. Method for Determining Language Objectives and Criteria. Volume II. Methodological Tools: Computer Analysis, Data Collection Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-25

    This volume presents (1) Methods for computer and hand analysis of numerical language performance data (includes examples) (2) samples of interview, observation, and survey instruments used in collecting language data. (Author)

  11. Numerical simulation of shallow-water flooding using a two-dimensional finite volume model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Bing; SUN Jian; YUAN De-kui; TAO Jian-hua

    2013-01-01

    A 2-D Finite Volume Model (FVM) is developed for shallow water flows over a complex topography with wetting and drying processes.The numerical fluxes are computed using the Harten,Lax,and van Leer (HLL) approximate Riemann solver.Second-order accuracy is achieved by employing the MUSCL reconstruction method with a slope limiter in space and an explicit two-stage Runge-Kutta method for time integration.A simple and efficient method is introduced to deal with the wetting and drying processes without any correction of the numerical flux term or the source term.In this new method,a switch of alternative schemes is used to compute the water depths at the cell interface to obtain the numerical flux.The model is verified against benchmark tests with analytical solutions and laboratory experimental data.The numerical results show that the model can simulate different types of flood waves from the ideal flood wave to cases over complex terrains.The satisfactory performance indicates an extensive application prospect of the present model in view of its simplicity and effectiveness.

  12. CASCADIC MULTIGRID FOR FINITE VOLUME METHODS FOR ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-ci Shi; Xue-jun Xu; Hong-ying Man

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, some effective cascadic multigrid methods are proposed for solving the large scale symmetric or nonsymmetric algebraic systems arising from the finite volumemethods for second order elliptic problems. Its is shown that these algorithms are optimal in both accuracy and computational complexity. Numerical expermients are repored to support out theory.

  13. Effect of the curing method and composite volume on marginal and internal adaptation of composite restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; de Souza-Régis, Marcos Ribeiro; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; de Freitas, Anderson Pinheiro; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Cunha, Leonardo Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of curing methods and composite volumes on the marginal and internal adaptation of composite restoratives. Two cavities with different volumes (Lower volume: 12.6 mm(3); Higher volume: 24.5 mm(3)) were prepared on the buccal surface of 60 bovine teeth and restored using Filtek Z250 in bulk filling. For each cavity, specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the curing method (n=10): 1) continuous light (CL: 27 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)); 2) soft-start (SS: 10 seconds at 150 mW/cm(2)+24 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)); and 3) pulse delay (PD: five seconds at 150 mW/cm(2)+three minutes with no light+25 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)). The radiant exposure for all groups was 16 J/cm(2). Marginal adaptation was measured with the dye staining gap procedure, using Caries Detector. Outer margins were stained for five seconds and the gap percentage was determined using digital images on a computer measurement program (Image Tool). Then, specimens were sectioned in slices and stained for five seconds, and the internal gaps were measured using the same method. Data were submitted to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (pcuring method. For CL groups, restorations with higher volume showed higher marginal gap incidence than did the lower volume restorations. Additionally, the effect of the curing method depended on the volume. Regarding marginal adaptation, SS resulted in a significant reduction of gap formation, when compared to CL, for higher volume restorations. For lower volume restorations, there was no difference among the curing methods. For internal adaptation, the modulated curing methods SS and PD promoted a significant reduction of gap formation, when compared to CL, only for the lower volume restoration. Therefore, in similar conditions of the cavity configuration, the higher the volume of composite, the greater the gap formation. In addition, modulated curing methods (SS and PD) can improve

  14. Finite volume element method for analysis of unsteady reaction-diffusion problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sutthisak Phongthanapanich; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2009-01-01

    A finite volume element method is developed for analyzing unsteady scalar reaction--diffusion problems in two dimensions. The method combines the concepts that are employed in the finite volume and the finite element method together. The finite volume method is used to discretize the unsteady reaction--diffusion equation, while the finite element method is applied to estimate the gradient quantities at cell faces. Robustness and efficiency of the combined method have been evaluated on uniform rectangular grids by using available numerical solutions of the two-dimensional reaction-diffusion problems. The numerical solutions demonstrate that the combined method is stable and can provide accurate solution without spurious oscillation along the highgradient boundary layers.

  15. Two-Level Stabilized Finite Volume Methods for Stationary Navier-Stokes Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Rachid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose two algorithms of two-level methods for resolving the nonlinearity in the stabilized finite volume approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations describing the equilibrium flow of a viscous, incompressible fluid. A macroelement condition is introduced for constructing the local stabilized finite volume element formulation. Moreover the two-level methods consist of solving a small nonlinear system on the coarse mesh and then solving a linear system on the fine mesh. The error analysis shows that the two-level stabilized finite volume element method provides an approximate solution with the convergence rate of the same order as the usual stabilized finite volume element solution solving the Navier-Stokes equations on a fine mesh for a related choice of mesh widths.

  16. Quantification and variability in colonic volume with a novel magnetic resonance imaging method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, M; Sandberg, Thomas Holm; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    -individual and intra-individual variability of segmental colorectal volumes between two observations in healthy subjects and (ii) the change in segmental colorectal volume distribution before and after defecation. Methods: The inter-individual and intra-individual variability of four colorectal volumes (cecum...... observations were detected for any segments (All p > 0.05). Inter-individual variability varied across segments from low correlation in cecum/ascending colon (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.44) to moderate correlation in the descending colon (ICC = 0.61) and high correlation in the transverse...... (p = 0.02). Conclusions & Inferences: Imaging of segmental colorectal volume, morphology, and fecal accumulation is advantageous to conventional methods in its low variability, high spatial resolution, and its absence of contrast-enhancing agents and irradiation. Hence, the method is suitable...

  17. A new method for the measurement of meteorite bulk volume via ideal gas pycnometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijie; Wang, Shijie; Li, Xiongyao; Li, Yang; Liu, Shen; Coulson, Ian M.

    2012-10-01

    To date, of the many techniques used to measure the bulk volume of meteorites, only three methods (Archimedean bead method, 3-D laser imaging and X-ray microtomography) can be considered as nondestructive or noncontaminating. The bead method can show large, random errors for sample sizes of smaller than 5 cm3. In contrast, 3-D laser imaging is a high-accuracy method even when measuring the bulk volumes of small meteorites. This method is both costly and time consuming, however, and meteorites of a certain shape may lead to some uncertainties in the analysis. The method of X-ray microtomography suffers from the same problems as 3-D laser imaging. This study outlines a new method of high-accuracy, nondestructive and noncontaminating measurement of the bulk volume of meteorite samples. In order to measure the bulk volume of a meteorite, one must measure the total volume of the balloon vacuum packaged meteorite and the volume of balloon that had been used to enclose the meteorite using ideal gas pycnometry. The difference between the two determined volumes is the bulk volume of the meteorite. Through the measurement of zero porosity metal spheres and tempered glass fragments, our results indicate that for a sample which has a volume of between 0.5 and 2 cm3, the relative error of the measurement is less than ±0.6%. Furthermore, this error will be even smaller (less than ±0.1%) if the determined sample size is larger than 2 cm3. The precision of this method shows some volume dependence. For samples smaller than 1 cm3, the standard deviations are less than ±0.328%, and these values will fall to less than ±0.052% for samples larger than 2 cm3. The porosities of nine fragments of Jilin, GaoGuenie, Zaoyang and Zhaodong meteorites have been measured using our vacuum packaging-pycnometry method, with determined average porosities of Jilin, GaoGuenie, Zaoyang and Zhaodong of 9.0307%, 2.9277%, 17.5437% and 5.9748%, respectively. These values agree well with the porosities

  18. Volume estimation of the thalamus using freesurfer and stereology: consistency between methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simon S; Gerdes, Jan S; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Kugel, Harald; Deppe, Katja; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Evers, Stefan; Schwindt, Wolfram; Deppe, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Freely available automated MR image analysis techniques are being increasingly used to investigate neuroanatomical abnormalities in patients with neurological disorders. It is important to assess the specificity and validity of automated measurements of structure volumes with respect to reliable manual methods that rely on human anatomical expertise. The thalamus is widely investigated in many neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders using MRI, but thalamic volumes are notoriously difficult to quantify given the poor between-tissue contrast at the thalamic gray-white matter interface. In the present study we investigated the reliability of automatically determined thalamic volume measurements obtained using FreeSurfer software with respect to a manual stereological technique on 3D T1-weighted MR images obtained from a 3 T MR system. Further to demonstrating impressive consistency between stereological and FreeSurfer volume estimates of the thalamus in healthy subjects and neurological patients, we demonstrate that the extent of agreeability between stereology and FreeSurfer is equal to the agreeability between two human anatomists estimating thalamic volume using stereological methods. Using patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy as a model for thalamic atrophy, we also show that both automated and manual methods provide very similar ratios of thalamic volume loss in patients. This work promotes the use of FreeSurfer for reliable estimation of global volume in healthy and diseased thalami.

  19. Research on Controlled Volume Operation Method of Large-scale Water Transfer Canal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Zhiliang; WANG Changde; XU Duo; XIAO Hua

    2011-01-01

    The controlled volume method of operation is especially suitable for large-scale water delivery canal system with complex operation requirements. An operating simulation model based on the storage volume control method for multi-reach canal system in series was established. In allusion to the deficiency of existing controlled volume algorithm, the improved controlled volume algorithm of the whole canal pools was proposed, and the simulation results indicated that the storage volume and water level of each canal pool could be accurately controlled after the improved algorithm had been adopted. However, for some typical discharge demand operating conditions, if the previously mentioned algorithm was adopted, then it certainly would cause some unnecessary gate adjustments, and consequently the disturbed canal pools would be increased. Therefore, the idea of controlled volume operation method of continuous canal pools was proposed, and corresponding algorithm was designed. Through simulating practical project, the results indicated that the new controlled volume algorithm proposed for typical operating conditions could comparatively and obviously reduce the number of regulated check gates and disturb canal pools for some typical discharge demand operating conditions, thus the control efficiency of canal system could be improved.

  20. Comparison of three methods for the estimation of pineal gland volume using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Niyazi; Ilıca, Ahmet Turan; Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Yıldırım, Birdal; Turgut, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of the current paper was to determine the pineal gland volume using stereological methods and by the region of interest (ROI) on MRI. In this paper, the pineal gland volumes were calculated in a total of 62 subjects (36 females, 26 males) who were free of any pineal lesions or tumors. The mean ± SD pineal gland volumes of the point-counting, planimetry, and ROI groups were 99.55 ± 51.34, 102.69 ± 40.39, and 104.33 ± 40.45 mm(3), respectively. No significant difference was found among the methods of calculating pineal gland volume (P > 0.05). From these results, it can be concluded that each technique is an unbiased, efficient, and reliable method, ideally suitable for in vivo examination of MRI data for pineal gland volume estimation.

  1. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

  2. Evaluation of a simple method for determining muscle volume in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantolino, Benjamin W; Challis, John H

    2016-06-14

    The quantification in vivo of muscle volume is important, for example, to understand how muscles change with aging, and respond to rehabilitation. Albracht et al. (2008) suggested that muscle volume can be estimated in vivo from the measurement of muscle cross-sectional area and muscle belly length only. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this proposed relationship for determining muscle volume for both the Vastus Lateralis (VL) and First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) using ultrasound imaging. The cross-sectional area and length of 22 cadaver FDI and 6 VL muscles in cadavers were imaged using ultrasound, these muscles were then dissected and muscle volumes measured directly using the water displacement technique. Estimated muscle volumes were compared with their direct measurement, and for the VL the percentage root mean square error in the estimation of muscle volume was 5.0%, and the Bland-Altman analysis had all volume estimates within the 95% confidence interval, with no evidence of bias (proportional or constant) in the volume estimates. In contrast, percentage root mean square error for the FDI was 18.8%, with the Bland-Altman analysis showing volume estimates outside of the 95% confidence interval and proportional bias. These results indicate that the simple method proposed by Albracht et al. (2008) for the estimation of muscle volume is appropriate the VL but not the FDI using ultrasound imaging. Morphological disparities likely account for these differences, if accurate and fast measures of the volume of the FDI are required other approaches should be explored.

  3. Design of a micro-irrigation system based on the control volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chasseriaux G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A micro-irrigation system design based on control volume method using the back step procedure is presented in this study. The proposed numerical method is simple and consists of delimiting an elementary volume of the lateral equipped with an emitter, called « control volume » on which the conservation equations of the fl uid hydrodynamicʼs are applied. Control volume method is an iterative method to calculate velocity and pressure step by step throughout the micro-irrigation network based on an assumed pressure at the end of the line. A simple microcomputer program was used for the calculation and the convergence was very fast. When the average water requirement of plants was estimated, it is easy to choose the sum of the average emitter discharge as the total average fl ow rate of the network. The design consists of exploring an economical and effi cient network to deliver uniformly the input fl ow rate for all emitters. This program permitted the design of a large complex network of thousands of emitters very quickly. Three subroutine programs calculate velocity and pressure at a lateral pipe and submain pipe. The control volume method has already been tested for lateral design, the results from which were validated by other methods as fi nite element method, so it permits to determine the optimal design for such micro-irrigation network

  4. Comparative analysis of two methods for measuring sales volumes during malaria medicine outlet surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patouillard, Edith; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Hanson, Kara; Pok, Sochea; Palafox, Benjamin; Tougher, Sarah; O'Connell, Kate; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-09-05

    There is increased interest in using commercial providers for improving access to quality malaria treatment. Understanding their current role is an essential first step, notably in terms of the volume of diagnostics and anti-malarials they sell. Sales volume data can be used to measure the importance of different provider and product types, frequency of parasitological diagnosis and impact of interventions. Several methods for measuring sales volumes are available, yet all have methodological challenges and evidence is lacking on the comparability of different methods. Using sales volume data on anti-malarials and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria collected through provider recall (RC) and retail audits (RA), this study measures the degree of agreement between the two methods at wholesale and retail commercial providers in Cambodia following the Bland-Altman approach. Relative strengths and weaknesses of the methods were also investigated through qualitative research with fieldworkers. A total of 67 wholesalers and 107 retailers were sampled. Wholesale sales volumes were estimated through both methods for 62 anti-malarials and 23 RDTs and retail volumes for 113 anti-malarials and 33 RDTs. At wholesale outlets, RA estimates for anti-malarial sales were on average higher than RC estimates (mean difference of four adult equivalent treatment doses (95% CI 0.6-7.2)), equivalent to 30% of mean sales volumes. For RDTs at wholesalers, the between-method mean difference was not statistically significant (one test, 95% CI -6.0-4.0). At retail outlets, between-method differences for both anti-malarials and RDTs increased with larger volumes being measured, so mean differences were not a meaningful measure of agreement between the methods. Qualitative research revealed that in Cambodia where sales volumes are small, RC had key advantages: providers were perceived to remember more easily their sales volumes and find RC less invasive; fieldworkers found it more

  5. Impedance ratio method for urine conductivity-invariant estimation of bladder volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schlebusch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive estimation of bladder volume could help patients with impaired bladder volume sensation to determine the right moment for catheterisation. Continuous, non-invasive impedance measurement is a promising technology in this scenario, although influences of body posture and unknown urine conductivity limit wide clinical use today. We studied impedance changes related to bladder volume by simulation, in-vitro and in-vivo measurements with pigs. In this work, we present a method to reduce the influence of urine conductivity to cystovolumetry and bring bioimpedance cystovolumetry closer to a clinical application.

  6. Left ventricular volume determined from scintigraphy and digital angiography by a semi-automated geometric method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seldin, D.W.; Esser, P.D.; Nichols, A.B.; Ratner, S.J.; Alderson, P.O.

    1983-12-01

    The utility of a semi-automatic method of measuring left ventricular (LV) volume geometrically from gated blood-pool studies and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was investigated using computerized edge detection and spatial calibration algorithms. LAO LV volumes determined from gated blood-pool studies were compared to volumes obtained from contrast left ventriculograms in 21 patients and the applicability of this method to DSA was evaluated in 25 additional patients who also had conventional left ventriculography. There was excellent correlation between the two, both for radionuclide studies and for DSA. Computer-based geometric determinations of LV volume appear to be rapid, accurate, and less dependent on subjective operator decisions than previously reported geometric approaches.

  7. Compact high order finite volume method on unstructured grids III: Variational reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Ren, Yu-Xin; Pan, Jianhua; Li, Wanai

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a variational reconstruction for the high order finite volume method in solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary unstructured grids. In the variational reconstruction, an interfacial jump integration is defined to measure the jumps of the reconstruction polynomial and its spatial derivatives on each cell interface. The system of linear equations to determine the reconstruction polynomials is derived by minimizing the total interfacial jump integration in the computational domain using the variational method. On each control volume, the derived equations are implicit relations between the coefficients of the reconstruction polynomials defined on a compact stencil involving only the current cell and its direct face-neighbors. The reconstruction and time integration coupled iteration method proposed in our previous paper is used to achieve high computational efficiency. A problem-independent shock detector and the WBAP limiter are used to suppress non-physical oscillations in the simulation of flow with discontinuities. The advantages of the finite volume method using the variational reconstruction over the compact least-squares finite volume method proposed in our previous papers are higher accuracy, higher computational efficiency, more flexible boundary treatment and non-singularity of the reconstruction matrix. A number of numerical test cases are solved to verify the accuracy, efficiency and shock-capturing capability of the finite volume method using the variational reconstruction.

  8. Effect of Water Volume and Biogas Volumetric Flowrate in Biogas Purification Through Water Scrubbing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendry Sakke Tira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy supply is a crucial issue in the world in the last few years. The increase in energy demand caused by population growth and resource depletion of world oil reserves provides determination to produce and to use renewable energies. One of the them is biogas. However, until now the use of biogas has not yet been maximized because of its poor purity. According to the above problem, the research has been carried out using the method of water absorption. Under this method it is expected that the rural community is able to apply it. Therefore, their economy and productivity can be increased. This study includes variations of absorbing water volume (V and input biogas volume flow rate (Q. Raw biogas which is flowed into the absorbent will be analyzed according to the determined absorbing water volume and input biogas volume rate. Improvement on biogas composition through the biogas purification method was obtained. The level of CO2 and H2S was reduced significantly specifically in the early minutes of purification process. On the other hand, the level of CH4 was increased improving the quality of raw biogas. However, by the time of biogas purification the composition of purified biogas was nearly similar to the raw biogas. The main reason for this result was an increasing in pH of absorbent. It was shown that higher water volume and slower biogas volume rate obtained better results in reducing the CO2 and H2S and increasing CH4 compared to those of lower water volume and higher biogas volume rate respectively. The purification method has a good promising in improving the quality of raw biogas and has advantages as it is cheap and easy to be operated.

  9. Effect of Water Volume and Biogas Volumetric Flowrate in Biogas Purification Through Water Scrubbing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendry Sakke Tira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy supply is a crucial issue in the world in the last few years. The increase in energy demand caused by population growth and resource depletion of world oil reserves provides determination to produce and to use renewable energies. One of the them is biogas. However, until now the use of biogas has not yet been maximized because of its poor purity. According to the above problem, the research has been carried out using the method of water absorption. Under this method it is expected that the rural community is able to apply it. Therefore, their economy and productivity can be increased. This study includes variations of absorbing water volume (V and input biogas volume flow rate (Q. Raw biogas which is flowed into the absorbent will be analyzed according to the determined absorbing water volume and input biogas volume rate. Improvement on biogas composition through the biogas purification method was obtained. The level of CO2 and H2S was reduced significantly specifically in the early minutes of purification process. On the other hand, the level of CH4 was increased improving the quality of raw biogas. However, by the time of biogas purification the composition of purified biogas was nearly similar to the raw biogas. The main reason for this result was an increasing in pH of absorbent. It was shown that higher water volume and slower biogas volume rate obtained better results in reducing the CO2 and H2S and increasing CH4 compared to those of lower water volume and higher biogas volume rate respectively. The purification method has a good promising in improving the quality of raw biogas and has advantages as it is cheap and easy to be operated.

  10. Computational Methods for Protein Structure Prediction and Modeling Volume 2: Structure Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Volume 2 of this two-volume sequence focuses on protein structure prediction and includes protein threading, De novo methods, applications to membrane proteins and protein complexes, structure-based drug design, as well as structure prediction as a systems problem. A series of appendices review the biological and chemical basics related to protein structure, computer science for structural informatics, and prerequisite mathematics and statistics.

  11. Does mode mixing matter in EMD-based highlight volume methods for hydrocarbon detection? Experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ya-juan; Cao, Jun-xing; Du, Hao-kun; Zhang, Gu-lan; Yao, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD)-based spectral decomposition methods have been successfully used for hydrocarbon detection. However, mode mixing that occurs during the sifting process of EMD causes the 'true' intrinsic mode function (IMF) to be extracted incorrectly and blurs the physical meaning of the IMF. We address the issue of how the mode mixing influences the EMD-based methods for hydrocarbon detection by introducing mode-mixing elimination methods, specifically ensemble EMD (EEMD) and complete ensemble EMD (CEEMD)-based highlight volumes, as feasible tools that can identify the peak amplitude above average volume and the peak frequency volume. Three schemes, that is, using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are employed in the EMD-, EEMD- and CEEMD-based highlight volume methods. When these methods were applied to seismic data from a tight sandstone gas field in Central Sichuan, China, the results demonstrated that the amplitude anomaly in the peak amplitude above average volume captured by EMD, EEMD and CEEMD combined with Hilbert transforms, whether using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are almost identical to each other. However, clear distinctions can be found in the peak frequency volume when comparing results generated using all IMFs, selected IMFs, or weighted IMFs. If all IMFs are used, the influence of mode mixing on the peak frequency volume is not readily discernable. However, using selected IMFs or a weighted IMFs' scheme affects the peak frequency in relation to the reservoir thickness in the EMD-based method. Significant improvement in the peak frequency volume can be achieved in EEMD-based highlight volumes using selected IMFs. However, if the weighted IMFs' scheme is adopted (i.e., if the undesired IMFs are included with reduced weights rather than excluded from the analysis entirely), the CEEMD-based peak frequency volume provides a more accurate reservoir thickness estimate compared with the other two methods. This

  12. Adaptive Finite Volume Method for the Shallow Water Equations on Triangular Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudi Mungkasi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical entropy production (NEP scheme for two-dimensional shallow water equations on unstructured triangular grids. We implement NEP as the error indicator for adaptive mesh refinement or coarsening in solving the shallow water equations using a finite volume method. Numerical simulations show that NEP is successful to be a refinement/coarsening indicator in the adaptive mesh finite volume method, as the method refines the mesh or grids around nonsmooth regions and coarsens them around smooth regions.

  13. A lattice Boltzmann coupled to finite volumes method for solving phase change problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ganaoui Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical scheme coupling lattice Boltzmann and finite volumes approaches has been developed and qualified for test cases of phase change problems. In this work, the coupled partial differential equations of momentum conservation equations are solved with a non uniform lattice Boltzmann method. The energy equation is discretized by using a finite volume method. Simulations show the ability of this developed hybrid method to model the effects of convection, and to predict transfers. Benchmarking is operated both for conductive and convective situation dominating solid/liquid transition. Comparisons are achieved with respect to available analytical solutions and experimental results.

  14. A control volume based finite difference method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Hansen, Preben

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a novel control volume based FD method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements, i.e. the generalized Navier equations. The method is based on the widely used cv-FDM solution of heat conduction and fluid flow problems involving a staggered grid formulati...

  15. A control volume based finite difference method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Hansen, Preben

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a novel control volume based FD method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements, i.e. the generalized Navier equations. The method is based on the widely used cv-FDM solution of heat conduction and fluid flow problems involving a staggered grid formulation...

  16. Thermal characterization and analysis of microliter liquid volumes using the three-omega method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; Kodama, Takashi; Lingamneni, Srilakshmi; Panzer, Matthew A; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-02-01

    Thermal phenomena in many biological systems offer an alternative detection opportunity for quantifying relevant sample properties. While there is substantial prior work on thermal characterization methods for fluids, the push in the biology and biomedical research communities towards analysis of reduced sample volumes drives a need to extend and scale these techniques to these volumes of interest, which can be below 100 pl. This work applies the 3ω technique to measure the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and heat capacity of de-ionized water, silicone oil, and salt buffer solution droplets from 24 to 80 °C. Heater geometries range in length from 200 to 700 μm and in width from 2 to 5 μm to accommodate the size restrictions imposed by small volume droplets. We use these devices to measure droplet volumes of 2 μl and demonstrate the potential to extend this technique down to pl droplet volumes based on an analysis of the thermally probed volume. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provide guidance for relevant design variables for characterizing properties of interest by investigating the tradeoffs between measurement frequency regime, device geometry, and substrate material. Experimental results show that we can extract thermal conductivity and heat capacity with these sample volumes to within less than 1% of thermal properties reported in the literature.

  17. New finite volume methods for approximating partial differential equations on arbitrary meshes; Nouvelles methodes de volumes finis pour approcher des equations aux derivees partielles sur des maillages quelconques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermeline, F

    2008-12-15

    This dissertation presents some new methods of finite volume type for approximating partial differential equations on arbitrary meshes. The main idea lies in solving twice the problem to be dealt with. One addresses the elliptic equations with variable (anisotropic, antisymmetric, discontinuous) coefficients, the parabolic linear or non linear equations (heat equation, radiative diffusion, magnetic diffusion with Hall effect), the wave type equations (Maxwell, acoustics), the elasticity and Stokes'equations. Numerous numerical experiments show the good behaviour of this type of method. (author)

  18. The discrete ordinate method in association with the finite-volume method in non-structured mesh; Methode des ordonnees discretes associee a la methode des volumes finis en maillage non structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Dez, V.; Lallemand, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Mecanique et d`Aerotechnique (ENSMA), 86 - Poitiers (France); Sakami, M.; Charette, A. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Appliquees

    1996-12-31

    The description of an efficient method of radiant heat transfer field determination in a grey semi-transparent environment included in a 2-D polygonal cavity with surface boundaries that reflect the radiation in a purely diffusive manner is proposed, at the equilibrium and in radiation-conduction coupling situation. The technique uses simultaneously the finite-volume method in non-structured triangular mesh, the discrete ordinate method and the ray shooting method. The main mathematical developments and comparative results with the discrete ordinate method in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are included. (J.S.) 10 refs.

  19. An Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Impact Dynamics of a Thin Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Chen; Yanchun Yu

    2012-01-01

    The examination of an unstructured finite volume method for structural dynamics is assessed for simulations of systematic impact dynamics.A robust display dual-time stepping method is utilized to obtain time accurate solutions.The study of impact dynamics is a complex problem that should consider strength models and state equations to describe the mechanical behavior of materials.The current method has several features.1) Discrete equations of unstructured finite volume method naturally follow the conservation law.2)Display dual-time stepping method is suitable for the analysis of impact dynamic problems of time accurate solutions.3) The method did not produce grid distortion when large deformation appeared.The method is validated by the problem of impact dynamics of an elastic plate with initial conditions and material properties.The results validate the finite element numerical data.

  20. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  1. Finite volume evolution Galerkin method for hyperbolic conservation laws with spatially varying flux functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, K. R.; Kraft, M.; Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, M.; Prasad, Phoolan

    2009-02-01

    We present a generalization of the finite volume evolution Galerkin scheme [M. Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, J. Saibertov'a, G. Warnecke, Finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for nonlinear hyperbolic systems, J. Comp. Phys. (2002) 183 533- 562; M. Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, K.W. Morton, G. Warnecke, Finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for hyperbolic problems, SIAM J. Sci. Comput. (2004) 26 1-30] for hyperbolic systems with spatially varying flux functions. Our goal is to develop a genuinely multi-dimensional numerical scheme for wave propagation problems in a heterogeneous media. We illustrate our methodology for acoustic waves in a heterogeneous medium but the results can be generalized to more complex systems. The finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) method is a predictor-corrector method combining the finite volume corrector step with the evolutionary predictor step. In order to evolve fluxes along the cell interfaces we use multi-dimensional approximate evolution operator. The latter is constructed using the theory of bicharacteristics under the assumption of spatially dependent wave speeds. To approximate heterogeneous medium a staggered grid approach is used. Several numerical experiments for wave propagation with continuous as well as discontinuous wave speeds confirm the robustness and reliability of the new FVEG scheme.

  2. Simulation of pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading using Finite Volume Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian; Hededal, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a finite volume implementation of a porous, nonlinear soil model capable of simulating pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading. The mathematical formulations are based on modified Biot’s coupled theory by substituting the original elastic constitutive model with an adv...... mapping algorithm is used to calculate the stress and strain relation in each control volume level. Test cases show very good performance of the model.......This paper presents a finite volume implementation of a porous, nonlinear soil model capable of simulating pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading. The mathematical formulations are based on modified Biot’s coupled theory by substituting the original elastic constitutive model...... with an advanced elastoplastic model suitable for describing monotonic as well as cyclic loading conditions. The finite volume method is applied to discretize these formulations. The resulting set of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations are then solved by a ’segregated’ solution procedure. An efficient return...

  3. A stencil-like volume of fluid (VOF) method for tracking free interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-wei; FAN Jun-fei

    2008-01-01

    A stencil-like volume of fluid (VOF) method is proposed for tracking free interface. A stencil on a grid cell is worked out according to the normal direction of the interface, in which only three interface positions are possible in 2D cases, and the interface can be reconstructed by only requiring the known local volume fraction information. On the other hand, the fluid-occupying-length is defined on each side of the stencil, through which a unified fluid-occupying volume model and a unified algorithm can be obtained to solve the interface advection equation. The method is suitable for the arbitrary geometry of the grid cell, and is extendible to 3D cases. Typical numerical examples show that the current method can give "sharp" results for tracking free interface.

  4. The finite volume local evolution Galerkin method for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutao; Ren, Yu-Xin

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a finite volume local evolution Galerkin (FVLEG) scheme for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws. The FVLEG scheme is the simplification of the finite volume evolution Galerkin method (FVEG). In FVEG, a necessary step is to compute the dependent variables at cell interfaces at tn + τ (0 FVEG. The FVLEG scheme greatly simplifies the evaluation of the numerical fluxes. It is also well suited with the semi-discrete finite volume method, making the flux evaluation being decoupled with the reconstruction procedure while maintaining the genuine multi-dimensional nature of the FVEG methods. The derivation of the FVLEG scheme is presented in detail. The performance of the proposed scheme is studied by solving several test cases. It is shown that FVLEG scheme can obtain very satisfactory numerical results in terms of accuracy and resolution.

  5. 3D automatic segmentation method for retinal optical coherence tomography volume data using boundary surface enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankui Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, much larger image datasets are routinely acquired compared to what was possible using the previous generation of time-domain OCT. Thus, there is a critical need for the development of three-dimensional (3D segmentation methods for processing these data. We present here a novel 3D automatic segmentation method for retinal OCT volume data. Briefly, to segment a boundary surface, two OCT volume datasets are obtained by using a 3D smoothing filter and a 3D differential filter. Their linear combination is then calculated to generate new volume data with an enhanced boundary surface, where pixel intensity, boundary position information, and intensity changes on both sides of the boundary surface are used simultaneously. Next, preliminary discrete boundary points are detected from the A-Scans of the volume data. Finally, surface smoothness constraints and a dynamic threshold are applied to obtain a smoothed boundary surface by correcting a small number of error points. Our method can extract retinal layer boundary surfaces sequentially with a decreasing search region of volume data. We performed automatic segmentation on eight human OCT volume datasets acquired from a commercial Spectralis OCT system, where each volume of datasets contains 97 OCT B-Scan images with a resolution of 496×512 (each B-Scan comprising 512 A-Scans containing 496 pixels; experimental results show that this method can accurately segment seven layer boundary surfaces in normal as well as some abnormal eyes.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Pressure-volume-Temperature Mass Gauging Method Under Microgravity Condition by Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mansu; Park, Hana; Yoo, DonGyu; Jung, Youngsuk; Jeong, Sangkwon

    Gauging the volume or mass of liquid propellant of a rocket vehicle in space is an important issue for its economic feasibility and optimized design of loading mass. Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging method is one of the most suitable measuring techniques in space due to its simplicity and reliability. This paper presents unique experimental results and analyses of PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition by parabolic flight. A vacuum-insulated and cylindrical-shaped liquid nitrogen storage tank with 9.2 L volume is manufactured by observing regulation of parabolic flight. PVT gauging experiments are conducted under low liquid fraction condition from 26% to 32%. Pressure, temperature, and the injected helium mass into the storage tank are measured to obtain the ullage volume by gas state equation. Liquid volume is finally derived by the measured ullage volume and the known total tank volume. Two sets of parabolic flights are conducted and each set is composed of approximately 10 parabolic flights. In the first set of flights, the short initial waiting time (3 ∼ 5 seconds) cannot achieve sufficient thermal equilibrium condition at the beginning. It causes inaccurate gauging results due to insufficient information of the initial helium partial pressure in the tank. The helium injection after 12 second waiting time at microgravity condition with high mass flow rate in the second set of flights achieves successful initial thermal equilibrium states and accurate measurement results of initial helium partial pressure. Liquid volume measurement errors in the second set are within 11%.

  7. A MULTISTEP FINITE VOLUME METHOD WITH PENALTY FOR THERMAL CONVECTION PROBLEMS IN TWO OR THREE DIMENSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min YANG

    2008-01-01

    The author considers a thermal convection problem with infinite Prandtl number in two or three dimensions. The mathematical model of such problem is described as an initial boundary value problem made up of three partial differential equations. One equation of the convection-dominated diffusion type for the temperature, and another two of the Stokes type for the normalized velocity and pressure. The approximate solution is obtained by a penalty finite volume method for the Stokes equation and a multistep upwind finite volume method for the convection-diffusion equation. Under suitable smoothness of the exact solution, error estimates in some discrete norms are derived.

  8. Computational Methods for Protein Structure Prediction and Modeling Volume 1: Basic Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Volume one of this two volume sequence focuses on the basic characterization of known protein structures as well as structure prediction from protein sequence information. The 11 chapters provide an overview of the field, covering key topics in modeling, force fields, classification, computational methods, and struture prediction. Each chapter is a self contained review designed to cover (1) definition of the problem and an historical perspective, (2) mathematical or computational formulation of the problem, (3) computational methods and algorithms, (4) performance results, (5) existing software packages, and (6) strengths, pitfalls, challenges, and future research directions.

  9. Hybrid Finite Element and Volume Integral Methods for Scattering Using Parametric Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volakis, John L.; Sertel, Kubilay; Jørgensen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    n this paper we address several topics relating to the development and implementation of volume integral and hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetic modeling. Comparisons of volume integral equation formulations with the finite element-boundary integral method are given in terms of accu...... of vanishing divergence within the element but non-zero curl. In addition, a new domain decomposition is introduced for solving array problems involving several million degrees of freedom. Three orders of magnitude CPU reduction is demonstrated for such applications....

  10. High-Order Spectral Volume Method for 2D Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. J.; Zhang, Laiping; Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Spectral Volume (SV) method is extended to the 2D Euler equations. The focus of this paper is to study the performance of the SV method on multidimensional non-linear systems. Implementation details including total variation diminishing (TVD) and total variation bounded (TVB) limiters are presented. Solutions with both smooth features and discontinuities are utilized to demonstrate the overall capability of the SV method.

  11. Small Volume Dissolution Testing as a Powerful Method during Pharmaceutical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Beyssac

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Standard compendia dissolution apparatus are the first choice for development of new dissolution methods. Nevertheless, limitations coming from the amount of material available, analytical sensitivity, lack of discrimination or biorelevance may warrant the use of non compendial methods. In this regard, the use of small volume dissolution methods offers strong advantages. The present study aims primarily to evaluate the dissolution performance of various drug products having different release mechanisms, using commercially available small volume USP2 dissolution equipment. The present series of tests indicate that the small volume dissolution is a useful tool for the characterization of immediate release drug product. Depending on the release mechanism, different speed factors are proposed to mimic common one liter vessel performance. In addition, by increasing the discriminating power of the dissolution method, it potentially improves know how about formulations and on typical events which are evaluated during pharmaceutical development such as ageing or scale–up. In this regard, small volume dissolution is a method of choice in case of screening for critical quality attributes of rapidly dissolving tablets, where it is often difficult to detect differences using standard working conditions.

  12. Well-balanced finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for the shallow water equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, M.; Noelle, S.; Kraft, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new well-balanced finite volume method within the framework of the finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. The methodology will be illustrated for the shallow water equations with source terms modelling the bottom topography and Coriolis forces. Results can be generalized to more complex systems of balance laws. The FVEG methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of multidimensional hyperbolic systems, such that all of the infinitely many directions of wave propagation are taken into account explicitly. We derive a well-balanced approximation of the integral equations and prove that the FVEG scheme is well-balanced for the stationary steady states as well as for the steady jets in the rotational frame. Several numerical experiments for stationary and quasi-stationary states as well as for steady jets confirm the reliability of the well-balanced FVEG scheme.

  13. A numerical study of 2D detonation waves with adaptive finite volume methods on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a framework of adaptive finite volume solutions for the reactive Euler equations on unstructured grids is proposed. The main ingredients of the algorithm include a second order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta method for temporal discretization, and the finite volume method with piecewise linear solution reconstruction of the conservative variables for the spatial discretization in which the least square method is employed for the reconstruction, and weighted essentially nonoscillatory strategy is used to restrain the potential numerical oscillation. To resolve the high demanding on the computational resources due to the stiffness of the system caused by the reaction term and the shock structure in the solutions, the h-adaptive method is introduced. OpenMP parallelization of the algorithm is also adopted to further improve the efficiency of the implementation. Several one and two dimensional benchmark tests on the ZND model are studied in detail, and numerical results successfully show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. P1-NONCONFORMING QUADRILATERAL FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD AND ITS CASCADIC MULTIGRID ALGORITHM FOR ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-ying Man; Zhong-ci Shi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the finite volume element method of P1-nonconforming quadrilateral element for elliptic problems and obtain optimal error estimates for general quadrilateral partition. An optimal cascadic multigrid algorithm is proposed to solve the nonsymmetric large-scale system resulting from such discretization. Numerical experiments are reported to support our theoretical results.

  15. Development of a Solid Phase Extraction Method for Agricultural Pesticides in Large-Volume Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analytical method using solid phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the trace determination of a variety of agricultural pesticides and selected transformation products in large-volume high-elevation lake water sa...

  16. Wind deficit model in a wind farm using finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimanzadeh, Maryam; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    A wind deficit model for wind farms is developed in this work using finite volume method. The main question addressed here is to calculate approximately the wind speed in the vicinity of each wind turbine of a farm. The procedure followed is to solve the governing equations of flow for the whole ...

  17. Constitutive Modelling in Thermomechanical Processes, Using The Control Volume Method on Staggered Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Jesper

    The objective of this thesis has been to improve and further develop the existing staggered grid control volume formulation of the thermomechanical equations. During the last ten years the method has proven to be efficient and accurate even for calculation on large structures. The application of ...

  18. The Meshfree Finite Volume Method with application to multi-phase porous media models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Brody H.; Perré, Patrick; Turner, Ian

    2017-03-01

    Numerical methods form a cornerstone of the analysis and investigation of mathematical models for physical processes. Many classical numerical schemes rely on the application of strict meshing structures to generate accurate solutions, which in some applications are an infeasible constraint. Within this paper we outline a new meshfree numerical scheme, which we call the Meshfree Finite Volume Method (MFVM). The MFVM uses interpolants to approximate fluxes in a disjoint finite volume scheme, allowing for the accurate solution of strong-form PDEs. We present a derivation of the MFVM, and give error bounds on the spatial and temporal approximations used within the scheme. We present a wide variety of applications of the method, showing key features, and advantages over traditional meshed techniques. We close with an application of the method to a non-linear multi-phase wood drying model, showing the potential for solving numerically challenging problems.

  19. Method and system for determining a volume of an object from two-dimensional images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [Knoxville, TN; Schlicher, Bob G [Portsmouth, NH

    2010-08-10

    The invention provides a method and a computer program stored in a tangible medium for automatically determining a volume of three-dimensional objects represented in two-dimensional images, by acquiring at two least two-dimensional digitized images, by analyzing the two-dimensional images to identify reference points and geometric patterns, by determining distances between the reference points and the component objects utilizing reference data provided for the three-dimensional object, and by calculating a volume for the three-dimensional object.

  20. Volume Dispersion of Point Sets and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Measures of irregularity of a point set or sequence, such as discrepancy and dispersion, play a central role in quasi-Monte Carlo methods. In this paper, we introduce and study a new measure of irregularity, called volume dispersion. It is a measure of deviation of point sets from the uniform distribution. We then generalize the concept of volume dispersion to more general cases as measures of representation of point sets for general probability distributions. Various relations among these measures and the traditional discrepancy and dispersion are investigated.

  1. An extension to the Luscher's finite volume method above inelastic threashold (formalism)

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Luscher's finite volume method above inelastic thresholds is proposed. It is fulfilled by extendind the procedure recently proposed by HAL-QCD Collaboration for a single channel system. Focusing on the asymptotic behaviors of the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions (equal-time) near spatial infinity, a coupled channel extension of effective Schrodinger equation is constructed by introducing an energy-independent interaction kernel. Because the NBS wave functions contain the information of T-matrix at long distance, S-matrix can be obtained by solving the coupled channel effective Schrodinger equation in the infinite volume.

  2. Finite Volume Evolution Galerkin Methods for the Shallow Water Equations with Dry Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Bollermann, Andreas; Noelle, Sebastian; Medvidová, Maria Lukáčová -

    2015-01-01

    We present a new Finite Volume Evolution Galerkin (FVEG) scheme for the solution of the shallow water equations (SWE) with the bottom topography as a source term. Our new scheme will be based on the FVEG methods presented in (Luk\\'a\\v{c}ov\\'a, Noelle and Kraft, J. Comp. Phys. 221, 2007), but adds the possibility to handle dry boundaries. The most important aspect is to preserve the positivity of the water height. We present a general approach to ensure this for arbitrary finite volume schemes...

  3. Volume Measurement Algorithm for Food Product with Irregular Shape using Computer Vision based on Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Siswantoro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Volume is one of important issues in the production and processing of food product. Traditionally, volume measurement can be performed using water displacement method based on Archimedes’ principle. Water displacement method is inaccurate and considered as destructive method. Computer vision offers an accurate and nondestructive method in measuring volume of food product. This paper proposes algorithm for volume measurement of irregular shape food product using computer vision based on Monte Carlo method. Five images of object were acquired from five different views and then processed to obtain the silhouettes of object. From the silhouettes of object, Monte Carlo method was performed to approximate the volume of object. The simulation result shows that the algorithm produced high accuracy and precision for volume measurement.

  4. ACARP Project C10059. ACARP manual of modern coal testing methods. Volume 1: The manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurovs, R.; Creelman, R.; Pohl, J.; Juniper, L. [CSIRO Energy Technology, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    The Manual summarises the purpose, applicability, and limitations of a range of standard and modern coal testing methods that have potential to assist the coal company technologist to better evaluate coal performance. The first volume sets out the Modern Coal Testing Methods in summarised form that can be used as a quick guide to practitioners to assist in selecting the best technique to solve their problems.

  5. A new volume conservation enforcement method for PLIC reconstruction in general convex grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J.; Hernández, J.; Gómez, P.; Faura, F.

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study is made of methods for resolving the volume conservation enforcement problem in the PLIC reconstruction of an interface in general 3D convex grids. Different procedures to bracket the solution when solving the problem using previous standard methods are analyzed in detail. A new interpolation bracketing procedure and an improved analytical method to find the interface plane constant are proposed. These techniques are combined in a new method to enforce volume conservation, which does not require the sequential polyhedra truncation operations typically used in standard methods. The new methods have been implemented into existing geometrical routines described in López and Hernández [15], which are further improved by using more efficient formulae to compute areas and volumes of general convex 2 and 3D polytopes. Different tests using regular and irregular cell geometries are carried out to demonstrate the robustness and substantial improvement in computational efficiency of the proposed techniques, which increase the computation speed of the mentioned routines by up to 3 times for the 3D problems considered in this work.

  6. A HIGH RESOLUTION FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR SOLVING SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution finite volume numerical method for solving the shallow water equations is developed in this paper. In order to extend finite difference TVD scheme to finite volume method, a new geometry and topology of control bodies is defined by considering the corresponding relationships between nodes and elements. This solver is implemented on arbitrary quadrilateral meshes and their satellite elements, and based on a second-order hybrid type of TVD scheme in space discretization and a two-step Runge-Kutta method in time discretization. Then it is used to deal with two typical dam-break problems and very satisfactory results are obtained comparied with other numerical solutions. It can be considered as an efficient implement for the computation of shallow water problems, especially concerning those having discontinuities, subcritical and supercritical flows and complex geometries.

  7. A New Class of Non-Linear, Finite-Volume Methods for Vlasov Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A

    2009-11-24

    Methods for the numerical discretization of the Vlasov equation should efficiently use the phase space discretization and should introduce only enough numerical dissipation to promote stability and control oscillations. A new high-order, non-linear, finite-volume algorithm for the Vlasov equation that discretely conserves particle number and controls oscillations is presented. The method is fourth-order in space and time in well-resolved regions, but smoothly reduces to a third-order upwind scheme as features become poorly resolved. The new scheme is applied to several standard problems for the Vlasov-Poisson system, and the results are compared with those from other finite-volume approaches, including an artificial viscosity scheme and the Piecewise Parabolic Method. It is shown that the new scheme is able to control oscillations while preserving a higher degree of fidelity of the solution than the other approaches.

  8. Comparison among methods for the assessment of deadwood volume in a former holm oak coppice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchi L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparison among methods for the assessment of deadwood volume in a former holm oak coppice. The paper aims to compare three methods for the assessment of deadwood volume, i.e., LIS (Line Intersect System, FAS (Fixed Area Sampling, and WM (Weighings Method. The control data are represented by the outputs of Xylometric measurement. The study was carried out in a former holm oak (Quercus ilex L. coppice located in the nature park of Montioni in southern Tuscany. LIS and FAS overestimated significantly the quantity of deadwood (+12% and +50%, respectively. The error become higher as the minimum threshold sampling increases. The WM, besides the operational complexity of its application, led to more promising and precise results.

  9. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Development of the meshless finite volume particle method with exact and efficient calculation of interparticle area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Nathan J.; Lobovský, Libor; Nestor, Ruairi M.

    2014-06-01

    The Finite Volume Particle Method (FVPM) is a meshless method based on a definition of interparticle area which is closely analogous to cell face area in the classical finite volume method. In previous work, the interparticle area has been computed by numerical integration, which is a source of error and is extremely expensive. We show that if the particle weight or kernel function is defined as a discontinuous top-hat function, the particle interaction vectors may be evaluated exactly and efficiently. The new formulation reduces overall computational time by a factor between 6.4 and 8.2. In numerical experiments on a viscous flow with an analytical solution, the method converges under all conditions. Significantly, in contrast with standard FVPM and SPH, error depends on particle size but not on particle overlap (as long as the computational domain is completely covered by particles). The new method is shown to be superior to standard FVPM for shock tube flow and inviscid steady transonic flow. In benchmarking on a viscous multiphase flow application, FVPM with exact interparticle area is shown to be competitive with a mesh-based volume-of-fluid solver in terms of computational time required to resolve the structure of an interface.

  11. A spatial discretization of the MHD equations based on the finite volume - spectral method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Takahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2000-05-01

    Based on the finite volume - spectral method, we present new discretization formulae for the spatial differential operators in the full system of the compressible MHD equations. In this approach, the cell-centered finite volume method is adopted in a bounded plane (poloidal plane), while the spectral method is applied to the differential with respect to the periodic direction perpendicular to the poloidal plane (toroidal direction). Here, an unstructured grid system composed of the arbitrary triangular elements is utilized for constructing the cell-centered finite volume method. In order to maintain the divergence free constraint of the magnetic field numerically, only the poloidal component of the rotation is defined at three edges of the triangular element. This poloidal component is evaluated under the assumption that the toroidal component of the operated vector times the radius, RA{sub {phi}}, is linearly distributed in the element. The present method will be applied to the nonlinear MHD dynamics in an realistic torus geometry without the numerical singularities. (author)

  12. Effect of two volume responsiveness evaluation methods on fluid resuscitation and prognosis in septic shock patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Qianghong; Yan Jing; Cai Guolong; Chen Jin; Li Li; Hu Caibao

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported the effect of different volume responsiveness evaluation methods on volume therapy results and prognosis.This study was carried out to investigate the effect of two volume responsiveness evaluation methods,stroke volume variation (SW) and stroke volume changes before and after passive leg raising (PLR-ASV),on fluid resuscitation and prognosis in septic shock patients.Methods Septic shock patients admitted to the Department of Critical Care Medicine of Zhejiang Hospital,China,from March 2011 to March 2013,who were under controlled ventilation and without arrhythmia,were studied.Patients were randomly assigned to the SVV group or the PLR-ASV group.The SVV group used the Pulse Indication Continuous Cardiac Output monitoring of SW,and responsiveness was defined as SW->12%.The PLR-ASV group used ASV before and after PLR as the indicator,and responsiveness was defined as ASV >15%.Six hours after fluid resuscitation,changes in tissue perfusion indicators (lactate,lactate clearance rate,central venous oxygen saturation (SCVO2),base excess (BE)),organ function indicators (white blood cell count,neutrophil percentage,platelet count,total protein,albumin,alanine aminotransferase,total and direct bilirubin,blood urea nitrogen,serum creatinine,serum creatine kinase,oxygenation index),fluid balance (6-and 24-hour fluid input) and the use of cardiotonic drugs (dobutamine),prognostic indicators (the time and rate of achieving early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) standards,duration of mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit stay,and 28-day mortality) were observed.Results Six hours after fluid resuscitation,there were no significant differences in temperature,heart rate,blood pressure,SpO2,organ function indicators,or tissue perfusion indicators between the two groups (P >0.06).The 6-and 24-hour fluid input was slightly less in the SW group than in the PLR-ASV group,but the difference was not statistically significant (P >0

  13. Know your tools - concordance of different methods for measuring brain volume change after ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [The University of Melbourne, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid [The University of Melbourne, The Florey Institute of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Longitudinal brain volume changes have been investigated in a number of cerebral disorders as a surrogate marker of clinical outcome. In stroke, unique methodological challenges are posed by dynamic structural changes occurring after onset, particularly those relating to the infarct lesion. We aimed to evaluate agreement between different analysis methods for the measurement of post-stroke brain volume change, and to explore technical challenges inherent to these methods. Fifteen patients with anterior circulation stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 1 week of onset and at 1 and 3 months. Whole-brain as well as grey- and white-matter volume were estimated separately using both an intensity-based and a surface watershed-based algorithm. In the case of the intensity-based algorithm, the analysis was also performed with and without exclusion of the infarct lesion. Due to the effects of peri-infarct edema at the baseline scan, longitudinal volume change was measured as percentage change between the 1 and 3-month scans. Intra-class and concordance correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement between the different analysis methods. Reduced major axis regression was used to inspect the nature of bias between measurements. Overall agreement between methods was modest with strong disagreement between some techniques. Measurements were variably impacted by procedures performed to account for infarct lesions. Improvements in volumetric methods and consensus between methodologies employed in different studies are necessary in order to increase the validity of conclusions derived from post-stroke cerebral volumetric studies. Readers should be aware of the potential impact of different methods on study conclusions. (orig.)

  14. Accurate mass replacement method for the sediment concentration measurement with a constant volume container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yunyun; Chen, Tianqin; Yan, Jun; Lei, Tingwu

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of sediment concentration in water is of great importance in soil erosion research and soil and water loss monitoring systems. The traditional weighing method has long been the foundation of all the other measuring methods and instrument calibration. The development of a new method to replace the traditional oven-drying method is of interest in research and practice for the quick and efficient measurement of sediment concentration, especially field measurements. A new method is advanced in this study for accurately measuring the sediment concentration based on the accurate measurement of the mass of the sediment-water mixture in the confined constant volume container (CVC). A sediment-laden water sample is put into the CVC to determine its mass before the CVC is filled with water and weighed again for the total mass of the water and sediments in the container. The known volume of the CVC, the mass of sediment-laden water, and sediment particle density are used to calculate the mass of water, which is replaced by sediments, therefore sediment concentration of the sample is calculated. The influence of water temperature was corrected by measuring water density to determine the temperature of water before measurements were conducted. The CVC was used to eliminate the surface tension effect so as to obtain the accurate volume of water and sediment mixture. Experimental results showed that the method was capable of measuring the sediment concentration from 0.5 up to 1200 kg m‑3. A good liner relationship existed between the designed and measured sediment concentrations with all the coefficients of determination greater than 0.999 and the averaged relative error less than 0.2%. All of these seem to indicate that the new method is capable of measuring a full range of sediment concentration above 0.5 kg m‑3 to replace the traditional oven-drying method as a standard method for evaluating and calibrating other methods.

  15. An Euler-Lagrange method considering bubble radial dynamics for modeling sonochemical reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Rashid; Brenner, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Unsteady numerical computations are performed to investigate the flow field, wave propagation and the structure of bubbles in sonochemical reactors. The turbulent flow field is simulated using a two-equation Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model. The distribution of the acoustic pressure is solved based on the Helmholtz equation using a finite volume method (FVM). The radial dynamics of a single bubble are considered by applying the Keller-Miksis equation to consider the compressibility of the liquid to the first order of acoustical Mach number. To investigate the structure of bubbles, a one-way coupling Euler-Lagrange approach is used to simulate the bulk medium and the bubbles as the dispersed phase. Drag, gravity, buoyancy, added mass, volume change and first Bjerknes forces are considered and their orders of magnitude are compared. To verify the implemented numerical algorithms, results for one- and two-dimensional simplified test cases are compared with analytical solutions. The results show good agreement with experimental results for the relationship between the acoustic pressure amplitude and the volume fraction of the bubbles. The two-dimensional axi-symmetric results are in good agreement with experimentally observed structure of bubbles close to sonotrode.

  16. Connection method of separated luminal regions of intestine from CT volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a connection method of separated luminal regions of the intestine for Crohn's disease diagnosis. Crohn's disease is an inflammatory disease of the digestive tract. Capsule or conventional endoscopic diagnosis is performed for Crohn's disease diagnosis. However, parts of the intestines may not be observed in the endoscopic diagnosis if intestinal stenosis occurs. Endoscopes cannot pass through the stenosed parts. CT image-based diagnosis is developed as an alternative choice of the Crohn's disease. CT image-based diagnosis enables physicians to observe the entire intestines even if stenosed parts exist. CAD systems for Crohn's disease using CT volumes are recently developed. Such CAD systems need to reconstruct separated luminal regions of the intestines to analyze intestines. We propose a connection method of separated luminal regions of the intestines segmented from CT volumes. The luminal regions of the intestines are segmented from a CT volume. The centerlines of the luminal regions are calculated by using a thinning process. We enumerate all the possible sequences of the centerline segments. In this work, we newly introduce a condition using distance between connected ends points of the centerline segments. This condition eliminates unnatural connections of the centerline segments. Also, this condition reduces processing time. After generating a sequence list of the centerline segments, the correct sequence is obtained by using an evaluation function. We connect the luminal regions based on the correct sequence. Our experiments using four CT volumes showed that our method connected 6.5 out of 8.0 centerline segments per case. Processing times of the proposed method were reduced from the previous method.

  17. An hybrid finite volume finite element method for variable density incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaro, Caterina; Creusé, Emmanuel; Goudon, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of variable density incompressible flows, modeled by the Navier-Stokes system. We introduce an hybrid scheme which combines a finite volume approach for treating the mass conservation equation and a finite element method to deal with the momentum equation and the divergence free constraint. The breakthrough relies on the definition of a suitable footbridge between the two methods, through the design of compatibility condition. In turn, the method is very flexible and allows to deal with unstructured meshes. Several numerical tests are performed to show the scheme capabilities. In particular, the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution is carefully investigated.

  18. Modified Method of Characteristics Combined with Finite Volume Element Methods for Incompressible Miscible Displacement Problems in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incompressible miscible displacement problem in porous media is modeled by a coupled system of two nonlinear partial differential equations, the pressure-velocity equation and the concentration equation. In this paper, we present a mixed finite volume element method (FVEM for the approximation of the pressure-velocity equation. Since modified method of characteristics (MMOC minimizes the grid orientation effect, for the approximation of the concentration equation, we apply a standard FVEM combined with MMOC. A priori error estimates in L∞(L2 norm are derived for velocity, pressure and concentration. Numerical results are presented to substantiate the validity of the theoretical results.

  19. A characteristic based volume penalization method for general evolution problems applied to compressible viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Kasimov, Nurlybek; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2014-04-01

    In order to introduce solid obstacles into flows, several different methods are used, including volume penalization methods which prescribe appropriate boundary conditions by applying local forcing to the constitutive equations. One well known method is Brinkman penalization, which models solid obstacles as porous media. While it has been adapted for compressible, incompressible, viscous and inviscid flows, it is limited in the types of boundary conditions that it imposes, as are most volume penalization methods. Typically, approaches are limited to Dirichlet boundary conditions. In this paper, Brinkman penalization is extended for generalized Neumann and Robin boundary conditions by introducing hyperbolic penalization terms with characteristics pointing inward on solid obstacles. This Characteristic-Based Volume Penalization (CBVP) method is a comprehensive approach to conditions on immersed boundaries, providing for homogeneous and inhomogeneous Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin boundary conditions on hyperbolic and parabolic equations. This CBVP method can be used to impose boundary conditions for both integrated and non-integrated variables in a systematic manner that parallels the prescription of exact boundary conditions. Furthermore, the method does not depend upon a physical model, as with porous media approach for Brinkman penalization, and is therefore flexible for various physical regimes and general evolutionary equations. Here, the method is applied to scalar diffusion and to direct numerical simulation of compressible, viscous flows. With the Navier-Stokes equations, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous Neumann boundary conditions are demonstrated through external flow around an adiabatic and heated cylinder. Theoretical and numerical examination shows that the error from penalized Neumann and Robin boundary conditions can be rigorously controlled through an a priori penalization parameter η. The error on a transient boundary is found to converge as O

  20. Methods to assess area and volume of wounds - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Line Bisgaard

    2016-01-01

    . The six approaches for measuring wound area were simple ruler method (10 papers), mathematical models (5 papers), manual planimetry (10 papers), digital planimetry (16 papers), stereophotogrammetry (2 papers) and digital imaging method (20 papers). Of these studies, 10 evaluated accuracy, 15 agreement, 17...... described since 1994. Studies were identified by searching the electronic databases PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library. Of the 12 013 studies identified, 43 were included in the review. A total of 30 papers evaluated techniques for measuring wound area and 13 evaluated techniques for measuring wound volume...... reliability and 25 mentioned feasibility. The number of wounds examined in the studies was highly variable (n = 3-260). Studies evaluating techniques for measuring wound volume included between 1 and 50 wounds and evaluated accuracy (4 studies), agreement (6 studies), reliability (8 studies) and feasibility...

  1. INTERVAL FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR UNCERTAINTY SIMULATION OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL RIVER WATER QUALITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Li; ZENG Guang-ming; HUANG Guo-he; LU Hong-wei

    2004-01-01

    Under the interval uncertainties, by incorporating the discretization form of finite volume method and interval algebra theory, an Interval Finite Volume Method (IFVM) was developed to solve water quality simulation issues for two-dimensional river when lacking effective data of flow velocity and flow quantity. The IFVM was practically applied to a segment of the Xiangjiang River because the Project of Hunan Inland Waterway Multipurpose must be started working after the environmental impact assessment for it. The simulation results suggest that there exist rather apparent pollution zones of BOD5 downstream the Dongqiaogang discharger and that of COD downstream Xiaoxiangjie discharger, but the pollution sources have no impact on the safety of the three water plants located in this river segment. Although the developed IFVM is to be perfected, it is still a powerful tool under interval uncertainties for water environmental impact assessment, risk analysis, and water quality planning, etc. besides water quality simulation studied in this paper.

  2. Finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for three-dimensional wave equation system

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Warnecke, Gerald; Zahaykah, Yousef

    2004-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the derivation of finite volume evolution Galerkin schemes for three-dimensional wave equation system. The aim is to construct methods which take into account all of the infinitely many directions of propagation of bicharacteristics. The idea is to evolve the initial function using the characteristic cone and then to project onto a finite element space. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and the multidimensional behaviour of the solutio...

  3. A novel method for the evaluation of uncertainty in dose volume histogram computation

    CERN Document Server

    Cutanda-Henriquez, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Dose volume histograms are a useful tool in state-of-the-art radiotherapy planning, and it is essential to be aware of their limitations. Dose distributions computed by treatment planning systems are affected by several sources of uncertainty such as algorithm limitations, measurement uncertainty in the data used to model the beam and residual differences between measured and computed dose, once the model is optimized. In order to take into account the effect of uncertainty, a probabilistic approach is proposed and a new kind of histogram, a dose-expected volume histogram, is introduced. The expected value of the volume in the region of interest receiving an absorbed dose equal or greater than a certain value is found using the probability distribution of the dose at each point. A rectangular probability distribution is assumed for this point dose, and a relationship is given for practical computations. This method is applied to a set of dose volume histograms for different regions of interest for 6 brain pat...

  4. Unstructured finite volume method for water impact on a rigid body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yan; MING Ping-jian; DUAN Wen-yang

    2014-01-01

    A new method is presented for the water impact simulation, in which the air-water two phase flow is solved using the pressure-based computational fluid dynamics method. Theoretically, the air effects can be taken into account in the water structure interaction. The key point of this method is the air-water interface capture, which is treated as a physical discontinuity and can be captured by a well-designed high order scheme. According to a normalized variable diagram, a high order discrete scheme on unstructured grids is realised, so a numerical method for the free surface flow on a fixed grid can be established. This method is implemented using an in-house code, the General Transport Equation Analyzer, which is an unstructured grid finite volume solver. The method is verified with the wedge water and structure interaction problem.

  5. An overlapped grid method for multigrid, finite volume/difference flow solvers: MaGGiE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Oktay; Lessard, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to develop a domain decomposition method via overlapping/embedding the component grids, which is to be used by upwind, multi-grid, finite volume solution algorithms. A computer code, given the name MaGGiE (Multi-Geometry Grid Embedder) is developed to meet this objective. MaGGiE takes independently generated component grids as input, and automatically constructs the composite mesh and interpolation data, which can be used by the finite volume solution methods with or without multigrid convergence acceleration. Six demonstrative examples showing various aspects of the overlap technique are presented and discussed. These cases are used for developing the procedure for overlapping grids of different topologies, and to evaluate the grid connection and interpolation data for finite volume calculations on a composite mesh. Time fluxes are transferred between mesh interfaces using a trilinear interpolation procedure. Conservation losses are minimal at the interfaces using this method. The multi-grid solution algorithm, using the coaser grid connections, improves the convergence time history as compared to the solution on composite mesh without multi-gridding.

  6. Methods for Improving Volume Stability of Steel Slag as Fine Aggregate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUN Yunxia; ZilOU Mingkai; CAI Xiao; XU Fang

    2008-01-01

    Suitable methods for enhancing the volume stability of steel slag utilized as fine aggregate were determined. The effects of steam treatment at 100 ℃ and autoclave treatment under 2.0 Mpa on the soundness of steel slag sand were investigated by means of powder ratio, linear expansion, compressive and flexural strength. DTA, EDX, XRD and ethylene glycol methods were employed to analyze both the treated slags and susceptible expansion grains. Experimental results indicate that powder ratio, content of free lime and rate of linear expansion can express the improvement in volume stability of different treated methods. Steam treatment process cannot ultimately prevent specimens from cracking and decrease of strength, but mortar made from autoclave treated slag keeps integration subjected to hot water of 80 ℃ until 28 d and its strength do not show significant decrement. The hydration of over-burn free lime and periclase phase are the main cause for the disintegration or crack of untreated and steam treated steel slag's specimens. Autoclave treatment process is more effective than steam treatment process on enhancement of volume stability of steel slag.

  7. A multi-moment constrained finite volume method on arbitrary unstructured grids for incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Xiao, Feng

    2016-12-01

    We proposed a multi-moment constrained finite volume method which can simulate incompressible flows of high Reynolds number in complex geometries. Following the underlying idea of the volume-average/point-value multi-moment (VPM) method (Xie et al. (2014) [71]), this formulation is developed on arbitrary unstructured hybrid grids by employing the point values (PV) at both cell vertex and barycenter as the prognostic variables. The cell center value is updated via an evolution equation derived from a constraint condition of finite volume form, which ensures the rigorous numerical conservativeness. Novel numerical formulations based on the local PVs over compact stencil are proposed to enhance the accuracy, robustness and efficiency of computations on unstructured meshes of hybrid and arbitrary elements. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the present numerical model has nearly 3-order convergence rate with numerical errors much smaller than the VPM method. The numerical dissipation has been significantly suppressed, which facilitates numerical simulations of high Reynolds number flows in complex geometries.

  8. Non Destructive Method for Biomass Prediction Combining TLS Derived Tree Volume and Wood Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hackenberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for predicting the above ground leafless biomass of trees in a non destructive way. We utilize terrestrial laserscan data to predict the volume of the trees. Combining volume estimates with density measurements leads to biomass predictions. Thirty-six trees of three different species are analyzed: evergreen coniferous Pinus massoniana, evergreen broadleaved Erythrophleum fordii and leafless deciduous Quercus petraea. All scans include a large number of noise points; denoising procedures are presented in detail. Density values are considered to be a minor source of error in the method if applied to stem segments, as comparison to ground truth data reveals that prediction errors for the tree volumes are in accordance with biomass prediction errors. While tree compartments with a diameter larger than 10 cm can be modeled accurately, smaller ones, especially twigs with a diameter smaller than 4 cm, are often largely overestimated. Better prediction results could be achieved by applying a biomass expansion factor to the biomass of compartments with a diameter larger than 10 cm. With this second method the average prediction error for Q. petraea could be reduced from 33.84% overestimation to 3.56%. E. fordii results could also be improved reducing the average prediction error from

  9. Comparison of estimates of hardwood bole volume using importance sampling, the centroid method, and some taper equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry V., Jr. Wiant; Michael L. Spangler; John E. Baumgras

    2002-01-01

    Various taper systems and the centroid method were compared to unbiased volume estimates made by importance sampling for 720 hardwood trees selected throughout the state of West Virginia. Only the centroid method consistently gave volumes estimates that did not differ significantly from those made by importance sampling, although some taper equations did well for most...

  10. Volume of Fluid (VOF) type advection methods in two-phase flow: a comparative study

    CERN Document Server

    Aniszewski, Wojciech; Marek, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, four distinct approaches to Volume of Fluid (VOF) computational method are compared. Two of the methods are the 'simplified' VOF formulations, in that they do not require geometrical interface reconstruction. The assessment is made possible by implementing all four approaches into the same code as a switchable options. This allows to rule out possible influence of other parts of numerical scheme, be it the discretisation of Navier-Stokes equations or chosen approximation of curvature, so that we are left with conclusive arguments because only one factor differs the compared methods. The comparison is done in the framework of CLSVOF (Coupled Level Set Volume of Fluid), so that all four methods are coupled with Level Set interface, which is used to compute pressure jump via the GFM (Ghost-Fluid Method). Results presented include static advections, full N-S solutions in laminar and turbulent flows. The paper is aimed at research groups who are implementing VOF methods in their computations or inte...

  11. Evaluating curvature for the volume of fluid method via interface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Fabien; Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend

    2016-11-01

    The volume of fluid method (VOF) is widely adopted for the simulation of interfacial flows. A critical step in VOF modelling is to evaluate the local mean curvature of the fluid interface for the computation of surface tension. Most existing curvature evaluation techniques exhibit errors due to the discrete nature of the field they are dealing with, and potentially to the smoothing of this field that the method might require. This leads to the production of inaccurate or unphysical results. We present a curvature evaluation method which aims at greatly reducing these errors. The interface is reconstructed from the volume fraction field and the curvature is evaluated by fitting local quadric patches onto the resulting triangulation. The patch that best fits the triangulated interface can be found by solving a local minimisation problem. Combined with a partition of unity strategy with compactly supported radial basis functions, the method provides a semi-global implicit expression for the interface from which curvature can be exactly derived. The local mean curvature is then integrated back on the Eulerian mesh. We show a detailed analysis of the associated errors and comparisons with existing methods. The method can be extended to unstructured meshes. Financial support from Petrobras is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Lattice QCD studies on baryon interactions from L\\"uscher's finite volume method and HAL QCD method

    CERN Document Server

    Iritani, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study between the L\\"uscher's finite volume method and the time-dependent HAL QCD method is given for the $\\Xi\\Xi$($^1\\mathrm{S}_0$) interaction as an illustrative example. By employing the smeared source and the wall source for the interpolating operators, we show that the effective energy shifts $\\Delta E_{\\rm eff} (t)$ in L\\"uscher's method do not agree between different sources, yet both exhibit fake plateaux. On the other hand, the interaction kernels $V(\\vec{r})$ obtained from the two sources in the HAL QCD method agree with each other already for modest values of $t$. We show that the energy eigenvalues $\\Delta E(L)$ in finite lattice volumes ($L^3$) calculated by $V(\\vec{r})$ indicate that there is no bound state in the $\\Xi\\Xi(^1\\mathrm{S}_0)$ channel at $m_{\\pi}=0.51$ GeV in 2+1 flavor QCD.

  13. Predicting uncertainty in future marine ice sheet volume using Bayesian statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The marine ice instability can trigger rapid retreat of marine ice streams. Recent observations suggest that marine ice systems in West Antarctica have begun retreating. However, unknown ice dynamics, computationally intensive mathematical models, and uncertain parameters in these models make predicting retreat rate and ice volume difficult. In this work, we fuse current observational data with ice stream/shelf models to develop probabilistic predictions of future grounded ice sheet volume. Given observational data (e.g., thickness, surface elevation, and velocity) and a forward model that relates uncertain parameters (e.g., basal friction and basal topography) to these observations, we use a Bayesian framework to define a posterior distribution over the parameters. A stochastic predictive model then propagates uncertainties in these parameters to uncertainty in a particular quantity of interest (QoI)---here, the volume of grounded ice at a specified future time. While the Bayesian approach can in principle characterize the posterior predictive distribution of the QoI, the computational cost of both the forward and predictive models makes this effort prohibitively expensive. To tackle this challenge, we introduce a new Markov chain Monte Carlo method that constructs convergent approximations of the QoI target density in an online fashion, yielding accurate characterizations of future ice sheet volume at significantly reduced computational cost.Our second goal is to attribute uncertainty in these Bayesian predictions to uncertainties in particular parameters. Doing so can help target data collection, for the purpose of constraining the parameters that contribute most strongly to uncertainty in the future volume of grounded ice. For instance, smaller uncertainties in parameters to which the QoI is highly sensitive may account for more variability in the prediction than larger uncertainties in parameters to which the QoI is less sensitive. We use global sensitivity

  14. Alternating Direction Finite Volume Element Methods for Three-Dimensional Parabolic Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongke

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents alternating direction finite volume element methods for three-dimensional parabolic partial differential equations and gives four computational schemes, one is analogous to Douglas finite difference scheme with second-order splitting error, the other two schemes have third-order splitting error, and the last one is an extended LOD scheme. The L2 norm and H1 semi-norm error estimates are obtained for the first scheme and second one, respectively. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the methods.

  15. Capillary method for measuring near-infrared spectra of microlitre volume liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Bo; MURAYAMA Koichi

    2007-01-01

    The present study theoretically explored the feasibility of the capillary method for measuring near-infrared (NIR) spectra of liquid or solution samples with microlitre volume, which was proposed in our previous studies. Lambert-Beer absorbance rule was applied to establish a model for the integral absorbance of capillary, which was then implemented in numerical analyses of the effects of capillary on various spectral features and dynamic range of absorption measurement. The theoretical speculations indicated that the capillary method might be used in NIR spectroscopy, which was further supported by the empirical data collected from our experiments by comparison between capillary NIR spectra of several organic solvents and cuvette cell NIR spectra.

  16. THE FINITE VOLUME PROJECTION METHOD WITH HYBRID UNSTRUCTURED TRIANGULAR COLLOCATED GRIDS FOR INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Wei; DUAN Ya-li; LIU Ru-xun

    2009-01-01

    In this article a finite volume method is proposed to solve viscous incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in two-dimensional regions with corners and curved boundaries. A hybrid collocated-grid variable arrangement is adopted, in which the velocity and pressure are stored at the centroid and the circumcenters of the triangular control cell, respectively. The cell flux is defined at the mid-point of the cell face. Second-order implicit time integration schemes are used for convection and diffusion terms. The second-order upwind scheme is used for convection fluxes. The present method is validated by results of several viscous flows.

  17. Analysis of flexible aircraft longitudinal dynamics and handling qualities. Volume 1: Analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, M. R.; Schmidt, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    As aircraft become larger and lighter due to design requirements for increased payload and improved fuel efficiency, they will also become more flexible. For highly flexible vehicles, the handling qualities may not be accurately predicted by conventional methods. This study applies two analysis methods to a family of flexible aircraft in order to investigate how and when structural (especially dynamic aeroelastic) effects affect the dynamic characteristics of aircraft. The first type of analysis is an open loop model analysis technique. This method considers the effects of modal residue magnitudes on determining vehicle handling qualities. The second method is a pilot in the loop analysis procedure that considers several closed loop system characteristics. Volume 1 consists of the development and application of the two analysis methods described above.

  18. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Michael W.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2001-01-16

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of

  19. Hybrid Spectral Difference/Embedded Finite Volume Method for Conservation Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Jung J

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid spectral difference/embedded finite volume method is introduced in order to apply a discontinuous high-order method for large scale engineering applications involving discontinuities in flows with complex geometries. In the proposed hybrid approach, structured finite volume (FV) cells are embedded in hexahedral SD elements containing discontinuities, and FV based high-order shock-capturing scheme is employed to overcome Gibbs phenomenon. Thus, discontinuities are captured at the resolution of embedded FV cells within an SD element. In smooth flow regions, the SD method is chosen for its low numerical dissipation and computational efficiency preserving spectral-like solutions. The coupling between the SD elements and the elements with embedded FV cells are achieved by the mortar method. In this paper, the 5th-order WENO scheme with characteristic decomposition is employed as the shock-capturing scheme in the embedded FV cells, and the 5th-order SD method is used in the smooth flow field. The ord...

  20. Hanford environmental analytical methods: Methods as of March 1990. Volume 3, Appendix A2-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    This paper from the analytical laboratories at Hanford describes the method used to measure pH of single-shell tank core samples. Sludge or solid samples are mixed with deionized water. The pH electrode used combines both a sensor and reference electrode in one unit. The meter amplifies the input signal from the electrode and displays the pH visually.

  1. A Matlab library for solving quasi-static volume conduction problems using the boundary element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, M; Mäntynen, V; Nenonen, J

    2007-12-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is commonly used in the modeling of bioelectromagnetic phenomena. The Matlab language is increasingly popular among students and researchers, but there is no free, easy-to-use Matlab library for boundary element computations. We present a hands-on, freely available Matlab BEM source code for solving bioelectromagnetic volume conduction problems and any (quasi-)static potential problems that obey the Laplace equation. The basic principle of the BEM is presented and discretization of the surface integral equation for electric potential is worked through in detail. Contents and design of the library are described, and results of example computations in spherical volume conductors are validated against analytical solutions. Three application examples are also presented. Further information, source code for application examples, and information on obtaining the library are available in the WWW-page of the library: (http://biomed.tkk.fi/BEM).

  2. A Monte Carlo method for critical systems in infinite volume: the planar Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Herdeiro, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a Monte Carlo method for generating finite-domain marginals of critical distributions of statistical models in infinite volume. The algorithm corrects the problem of the long-range effects of boundaries associated to generating critical distributions on finite lattices. It uses the advantage of scale invariance combined with ideas of the renormalization group in order to construct a type of "holographic" boundary condition that encodes the presence of an infinite volume beyond it. We check the quality of the distribution obtained in the case of the planar Ising model by comparing various observables with their infinite-plane prediction. We accurately reproduce planar two-, three- and four-point functions of spin and energy operators. We also define a lattice stress-energy tensor, and numerically obtain the associated conformal Ward identities and the Ising central charge.

  3. Monte Carlo method for critical systems in infinite volume: The planar Ising model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Victor; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we propose a Monte Carlo method for generating finite-domain marginals of critical distributions of statistical models in infinite volume. The algorithm corrects the problem of the long-range effects of boundaries associated to generating critical distributions on finite lattices. It uses the advantage of scale invariance combined with ideas of the renormalization group in order to construct a type of "holographic" boundary condition that encodes the presence of an infinite volume beyond it. We check the quality of the distribution obtained in the case of the planar Ising model by comparing various observables with their infinite-plane prediction. We accurately reproduce planar two-, three-, and four-point of spin and energy operators. We also define a lattice stress-energy tensor, and numerically obtain the associated conformal Ward identities and the Ising central charge.

  4. The enhanced volume source boundary point method for the calculation of acoustic radiation problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiufeng; CHEN Xinzhao; WANG Youcheng

    2003-01-01

    The Volume Source Boundary Point Method (VSBPM) is greatly improved so that it will speed up the VSBPM's solution of the acoustic radiation problem caused by the vibrating body. The fundamental solution provided by Helmholtz equation is enforced in a weighted residual sense over a tetrahedron located on the normal line of the boundary node to replace the coefficient matrices of the system equation. Through the enhanced volume source boundary point analysis of various examples and the sound field of a vibrating rectangular box in a semi-anechoic chamber, it has revealed that the calculating speed of the EVSBPM is more than 10 times faster than that of the VSBPM while it works on the aspects of its calculating precision and stability, adaptation to geometric shape of vibrating body as well as its ability to overcome the non-uniqueness problem.

  5. A Mixed Finite Volume Element Method for Flow Calculations in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jim E.

    1996-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of flow in porous media is the accurate determination of the velocities that drive the flow. The large scale irregularities of the geology, such as faults, fractures, and layers suggest the use of irregular grids in the simulation. Work has been done in applying the finite volume element (FVE) methodology as developed by McCormick in conjunction with mixed methods which were developed by Raviart and Thomas. The resulting mixed finite volume element discretization scheme has the potential to generate more accurate solutions than standard approaches. The focus of this paper is on a multilevel algorithm for solving the discrete mixed FVE equations. The algorithm uses a standard cell centered finite difference scheme as the 'coarse' level and the more accurate mixed FVE scheme as the 'fine' level. The algorithm appears to have potential as a fast solver for large size simulations of flow in porous media.

  6. Finite-volume Hamiltonian method for coupled channel interactions in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Thomas, A W; Young, R D

    2014-01-01

    Within a multi-channel formulation of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering, we investigate the use of the finite-volume Hamiltonian approach to relate lattice QCD spectra to scattering observables. The equivalence of the Hamiltonian approach and the coupled-channel extension of the well-known L\\"uscher formalism is established. Unlike the single channel system, the spectra at a single lattice volume in the coupled channel case do not uniquely determine the scattering parameters. We investigate the use of the Hamiltonian framework as a method to directly fit the lattice spectra and thereby extract the scattering phase shifts and inelasticities. We find that with a modest amount of lattice data, the scattering parameters can be reproduced rather well, with only a minor degree of model dependence.

  7. Advanced Life Analysis Methods. Volume 3. Experimental Evaluation of Crack Growth Analysis Methods for Attachment Lugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-17

    Structural Lugs 10 6.00 TETM TESX, MARI LOCKHEED L𔃼.0 GRUP IIhA AND 2Rii * 2~~~~.0 .RUPINI .01 .05 1 .2 .5. 9 99PROABLTY F*ý,r 1-40 4oprsno R ato nTs rga...monitor loads and perform failsafe functions . A sinewave function generator provides load commands to the servo loop and a calibrated amplitude measurement...Simple Compounding Solution o 2-D Cracked Finite Element Procedure o Green’s Function Method 0 3-D Cracked Finite Element PrTocedure Parameters and

  8. An explicit finite volume element method for solving characteristic level set equation on triangular grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sutthisak Phongthanapanich; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2011-01-01

    Level set methods are widely used for predicting evolutions of complex free surface topologies,such as the crystal and crack growth,bubbles and droplets deformation,spilling and breaking waves,and two-phase flow phenomena.This paper presents a characteristic level set equation which is derived from the two-dimensional level set equation by using the characteristic-based scheme.An explicit finite volume element method is developed to discretize the equation on triangular grids.Several examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method for calculating interface evolutions in time.The proposed level set method is also coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase immiscible incompressible flow analysis with surface tension.The Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem is used to test and evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  9. Adaptive spline autoregression threshold method in forecasting Mitsubishi car sales volume at PT Srikandi Diamond Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, D.; Hartini, E.; Permana, A.

    2017-01-01

    Sale and purchase of the growing competition between companies in Indonesian, make every company should have a proper planning in order to win the competition with other companies. One of the things that can be done to design the plan is to make car sales forecast for the next few periods, it’s required that the amount of inventory of cars that will be sold in proportion to the number of cars needed. While to get the correct forecasting, on of the methods that can be used is the method of Adaptive Spline Threshold Autoregression (ASTAR). Therefore, this time the discussion will focus on the use of Adaptive Spline Threshold Autoregression (ASTAR) method in forecasting the volume of car sales in PT.Srikandi Diamond Motors using time series data.In the discussion of this research, forecasting using the method of forecasting value Adaptive Spline Threshold Autoregression (ASTAR) produce approximately correct.

  10. Second-order accurate finite volume method for well-driven flows

    CERN Document Server

    Dotlić, Milan; Pokorni, Boris; Pušić, Milenko; Dimkić, Milan

    2013-01-01

    We consider a finite volume method for a well-driven fluid flow in a porous medium. Due to the singularity of the well, modeling in the near-well region with standard numerical schemes results in a completely wrong total well flux and an inaccurate hydraulic head. Local grid refinement can help, but it comes at computational cost. In this article we propose two methods to address well singularity. In the first method the flux through well faces is corrected using a logarithmic function, in a way related to the Peaceman correction. Coupling this correction with a second-order accurate two-point scheme gives a greatly improved total well flux, but the resulting scheme is still not even first order accurate on coarse grids. In the second method fluxes in the near-well region are corrected by representing the hydraulic head as a sum of a logarithmic and a linear function. This scheme is second-order accurate.

  11. Constitutive Modelling in Thermomechanical Processes, Using The Control Volume Method on Staggered Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Jesper

    of the method has been focused on high temperature processes such as casting and welding and the interest of using nonlinear constitutive stress-strain relations has grown to extend the applicability of the method. The work of implementing classical plasticity into the control volume formulation has been based...... on the $J_2$ flow theory describing an isotropic hardening material with a temperature dependent yield stress. This work has successfully been verified by comparing results to analytical solutions. Due to the comprehensive implementation in the staggered grid an alternative constitutive stress......-strain relation has been suggested. The intention of this method is to provide fast numerical results with reasonable accuracy in relation to the first order effects of the presented classical plasticity model. Application of the $J_2$ flow theory and the alternative method have shown some agreement...

  12. Interscan reproducibility of quantitative coronary plaque volume and composition from CT coronary angiography using an automated method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Achenbach, Stephan [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Dey, Damini [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Los Angeles (United States); Otaki, Yuka; Slomka, Piotr; Berman, Daniel S. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Imaging and Medicine, Los Angeles (United States); Kral, Brian G.; Lai, Shenghan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Medicine, Devision of Cardiology, Baltimore (United States); Fishman, Elliott K.; Lai, Hong [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Medicine, Devision of Cardiology, Baltimore (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Quantitative measurements of coronary plaque volume may play a role in serial studies to determine disease progression or regression. Our aim was to evaluate the interscan reproducibility of quantitative measurements of coronary plaque volumes using a standardized automated method. Coronary dual source computed tomography angiography (CTA) was performed twice in 20 consecutive patients with known coronary artery disease within a maximum time difference of 100 days. The total plaque volume (TP), the volume of non-calcified plaque (NCP) and calcified plaque (CP) as well as the maximal remodelling index (RI) were determined using automated software. Mean TP volume was 382.3 ± 236.9 mm{sup 3} for the first and 399.0 ± 247.3 mm{sup 3} for the second examination (p = 0.47). There were also no significant differences for NCP volumes, CP volumes or RI. Interscan correlation of the plaque volumes was very good (Pearson's correlation coefficients: r = 0.92, r = 0.90 and r = 0.96 for TP, NCP and CP volumes, respectively). Automated software is a time-saving method that allows accurate assessment of coronary atherosclerotic plaque volumes in coronary CTA with high reproducibility. With this approach, serial studies appear to be possible. (orig.)

  13. Modeling of electrical impedance tomography to detect breast cancer by finite volume methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, K.; Wibowo, R. A.; Soelistiono, S.

    2017-05-01

    The properties of the electrical impedance of tissue are an interesting study, because changes of the electrical impedance of organs are related to physiological and pathological. Both physiological and pathological properties are strongly associated with disease information. Several experiments shown that the breast cancer has a lower impedance than the normal breast tissue. Thus, the imaging based on impedance can be used as an alternative equipment to detect the breast cancer. This research carries out by modelling of Electrical Impedance Tomography to detect the breast cancer by finite volume methods. The research includes development of a mathematical model of the electric potential field by 2D Finite Volume Method, solving the forward problem and inverse problem by linear reconstruction method. The scanning is done by 16 channel electrode with neighbors method to collect data. The scanning is performed at a frequency of 10 kHz and 100 kHz with three objects numeric includes an anomaly at the surface, an anomaly at the depth and an anomaly at the surface and at depth. The simulation has been successfully to reconstruct image of functional anomalies of the breast cancer at the surface position, the depth position or a combination of surface and the depth.

  14. Simulation of Jetting in Injection Molding Using a Finite Volume Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaozhen Hua

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the jetting and the subsequent buckling flow more accurately, a three dimensional melt flow model was established on a viscous, incompressible, and non-isothermal fluid, and a control volume-based finite volume method was employed to discretize the governing equations. A two-fold iterative method was proposed to decouple the dependence among pressure, velocity, and temperature so as to reduce the computation and improve the numerical stability. Based on the proposed theoretical model and numerical method, a program code was developed to simulate melt front progress and flow fields. The numerical simulations for different injection speeds, melt temperatures, and gate locations were carried out to explore the jetting mechanism. The results indicate the filling pattern depends on the competition between inertial and viscous forces. When inertial force exceeds the viscous force jetting occurs, then it changes to a buckling flow as the viscous force competes over the inertial force. Once the melt contacts with the mold wall, the melt filling switches to conventional sequential filling mode. Numerical results also indicate jetting length increases with injection speed but changes little with melt temperature. The reasonable agreements between simulated and experimental jetting length and buckling frequency imply the proposed method is valid for jetting simulation.

  15. Evaluation of bias-correction methods for ensemble streamflow volume forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hashino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble prediction systems are used operationally to make probabilistic streamflow forecasts for seasonal time scales. However, hydrological models used for ensemble streamflow prediction often have simulation biases that degrade forecast quality and limit the operational usefulness of the forecasts. This study evaluates three bias-correction methods for ensemble streamflow volume forecasts. All three adjust the ensemble traces using a transformation derived with simulated and observed flows from a historical simulation. The quality of probabilistic forecasts issued when using the three bias-correction methods is evaluated using a distributions-oriented verification approach. Comparisons are made of retrospective forecasts of monthly flow volumes for a north-central United States basin (Des Moines River, Iowa, issued sequentially for each month over a 48-year record. The results show that all three bias-correction methods significantly improve forecast quality by eliminating unconditional biases and enhancing the potential skill. Still, subtle differences in the attributes of the bias-corrected forecasts have important implications for their use in operational decision-making. Diagnostic verification distinguishes these attributes in a context meaningful for decision-making, providing criteria to choose among bias-correction methods with comparable skill.

  16. A high volume extraction and purification method for recovering DNA from human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Pamela L; Stoljarova, Monika; Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    DNA recovery, purity and overall extraction efficiency of a protocol employing a novel silica-based column, Hi-Flow(®) (Generon Ltd., Maidenhead, UK), were compared with that of a standard organic DNA extraction methodology. The quantities of DNA recovered by each method were compared by real-time PCR and quality of DNA by STR typing using the PowerPlex(®) ESI 17 Pro System (Promega Corporation, Madison, WI) on DNA from 10 human bone samples. Overall, the Hi-Flow method recovered comparable quantities of DNA ranging from 0.8ng±1 to 900ng±159 of DNA compared with the organic method ranging from 0.5ng±0.9 to 855ng±156 of DNA. Complete profiles (17/17 loci tested) were obtained for at least one of three replicates for 3/10 samples using the Hi-Flow method and from 2/10 samples with the organic method. All remaining bone samples yielded partial profiles for all replicates with both methods. Compared with a standard organic DNA isolation method, the results indicated that the Hi-Flow method provided equal or improved recovery and quality of DNA without the harmful effects of organic extraction. Moreover, larger extraction volumes (up to 20mL) can be employed with the Hi-Flow method which enabled more bone sample to be extracted at one time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of two-phase flow solvers using Level Set and Volume of Fluid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, C.; Aboukhedr, M.; Vogiatzaki, K.; Cant, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    Two principal methods have been used to simulate the evolution of two-phase immiscible flows of liquid and gas separated by an interface. These are the Level-Set (LS) method and the Volume of Fluid (VoF) method. Both methods attempt to represent the very sharp interface between the phases and to deal with the large jumps in physical properties associated with it. Both methods have their own strengths and weaknesses. For example, the VoF method is known to be prone to excessive numerical diffusion, while the basic LS method has some difficulty in conserving mass. Major progress has been made in remedying these deficiencies, and both methods have now reached a high level of physical accuracy. Nevertheless, there remains an issue, in that each of these methods has been developed by different research groups, using different codes and most importantly the implementations have been fine tuned to tackle different applications. Thus, it remains unclear what are the remaining advantages and drawbacks of each method relative to the other, and what might be the optimal way to unify them. In this paper, we address this gap by performing a direct comparison of two current state-of-the-art variations of these methods (LS: RCLSFoam and VoF: interPore) and implemented in the same code (OpenFoam). We subject both methods to a pair of benchmark test cases while using the same numerical meshes to examine a) the accuracy of curvature representation, b) the effect of tuning parameters, c) the ability to minimise spurious velocities and d) the ability to tackle fluids with very different densities. For each method, one of the test cases is chosen to be fairly benign while the other test case is expected to present a greater challenge. The results indicate that both methods can be made to work well on both test cases, while displaying different sensitivity to the relevant parameters.

  18. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  19. Finite-volume Hamiltonian method for $\\pi\\pi$ scattering in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Leinweber, Derek B; Thomas, A W; Young, Ross D

    2015-01-01

    Within a formulation of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering, we investigate the use of the finite-volume Hamiltonian approach to resolving scattering observables from lattice QCD spectra. We consider spectra in the centre-of-mass and moving frames for both S- and P-wave cases. Furthermore, we investigate the multi-channel case. Here we study the use of the Hamiltonian framework as a parametrization that can be fit directly to lattice spectra. Through this method, the hadron properties, such as mass, width and coupling, can be directly extracted from the lattice spectra.

  20. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hookey, N.A. [Memorial Univ., Newfoundland (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  1. Applying the dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) design method to low volume roads

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available in one hand and assessing the ?cohesion?. At OMC (damp) the material can be squeezed into a ?sausage? that remains intact. In the very dry state (less than about 25% of OMC), the material is dusty and loose and has absolutely no cohesion. In the dry... state (about 50% of OMC), the material will have no cohesion P. Paige-Green / Applying the Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Design Method to Low Volume Roads 423 when squeezed into a sausage whereas in the moist state (about 75% of OMC), the material may just...

  2. A control-volume method for analysis of unsteady thrust augmenting ejector flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for predicting transient thrust augmenting ejector characteristics is presented. The analysis blends classic self-similar turbulent jet descriptions with a control volume mixing region discretization to solicit transient effects in a new way. Division of the ejector into an inlet, diffuser, and mixing region corresponds with the assumption of viscous-dominated phenomenon in the latter. Inlet and diffuser analyses are simplified by a quasi-steady analysis, justified by the assumptions that pressure is the forcing function in those regions. Details of the theoretical foundation, the solution algorithm, and sample calculations are given.

  3. Viscous liquid sloshing damping in cylindrical container using a volume of fluid method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Liquid sloshing is a kind of very complicated free surface flow and exists widely in many fields.In order to calculate liquid sloshing damping precisely a volume of fluid method based on finite volume scheme is used to simulate free surface flows in partly filled cylindrical containers.A numerical method is pre-sented to simulate the movement of the free surface flow,in which a piecewise linear interface con-struction scheme and an unsplit Lagrangian advection scheme instead of Eulerian advection scheme are used.The damping performance of liquid sloshing in cylindrical containers under fundamental sloshing mode is investigated.There are four factors determining the surface-wave damping:free surface,boundary-layer,interior fluid and contact line.In order to study different contributions from these four factors to whole damping,several examples are simulated.No-slip and slip wall boundary conditions on both side wall and bottom wall of the cylindrical containers are studied to compare with the published results obtained by solving Stokes equations.In the present method the first three main factors can be considered.The simulation results show that the boundary-layer damping contribution increases while the interior fluid damping contribution decreases with increase of Reynolds number.

  4. Viscous liquid sloshing damping in cylindrical container using a volume of fluid method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei; LIU ShuHong; LIN Hong

    2009-01-01

    Liquid sloshing is a kind of very complicated free surface flow and exists widely in many fields. In order to calculate liquid sloshing damping precisely a volume of fluid method based on finite volume scheme is used to simulate free surface flows in partly filled cylindrical containers. A numerical method is pre-sented to simulate the movement of the free surface flow, in which a piecewise linear interface con-struction scheme and an unsplit Lagrangian advection scheme instead of Eulerian advection scheme are used. The damping performance of liquid sloshing in cylindrical containers under fundamental sloshing mode is investigated. There are four factors determining the surface-wave damping: free surface, boundary-layer, interior fluid and contact line. In order to study different contributions from these four factors to whole damping, several examples ere simulated. No-slip and slip wall boundary conditions on both side wall and bottom wall of the cylindrical containers are studied to compare with the published results obtained by solving Stokes equations. In the present method the first three main factors can be considered. The simulation results show that the boundary-layer damping contribution increases while the interior fluid damping contribution decreases with increase of Reynolds number.

  5. Flux-splitting finite volume method for turbine flow and heat transfer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Amano, R. S.

    A novel numerical method was developed to deal with the flow and heat transfer in a turbine cascade at both design and off-design conditions. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized and integrated in a coupled manner. In the present method a time-marching scheme was employed along with the time-integration approach. The flux terms are discretized based on a cell finite volume formulation as well as a flux-difference splitting. The flux-difference splitting makes the scheme rapid convergence and the finite volume technique ensure the governing equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. A hybrid difference scheme for quasi-three-dimensional procedure based on the discretized and integrated Navier-Stokes equations was incorporated in the code. The numerical method possesses the positive features of the explicit and implicit algorithms which provide a rapid convergence process and have a less stability constraint. The computed results were compared with other numerical studies and experimental data. The comparisons showed fairly good agreement with experiments.

  6. Capture chromatography for Mo-99 recovery from uranyl sulfate solutions: minimum-column-volume design method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Lei; Chung, Pei-Lun; Youker, Amanda; Stepinski, Dominique C; Vandegrift, George F; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2013-09-27

    Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), generated from the fission of Uranium-235 (U-235), is the radioactive parent of the most widely used medical isotope, technetium-99m (Tc-99m). An efficient, robust, low-pressure process is developed for recovering Mo-99 from uranyl sulfate solutions. The minimum column volume and the maximum column length for required yield, pressure limit, and loading time are determined using a new graphical method. The method is based on dimensionless groups and intrinsic adsorption and diffusion parameters, which are estimated using a small number of experiments and simulations. The design is tested with bench-scale experiments with titania columns. The results show a high capture yield and a high stripping yield (95±5%). The design can be adapted to changes in design constraints or the variations in feed concentration, feed volume, or material properties. The graph shows clearly how the column utilization is affected by the required yield, loading time, and pressure limit. The cost effectiveness of various sorbent candidates can be evaluated based on the intrinsic parameters. This method can be used more generally for designing other capture chromatography processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Direct and indirect methods for the quantification of leg volume: Comparison between water displacement volumetry, the disk model method and the frustum sign model method, using the correlation coefficient and the limits of agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M.K.S. Kaulesar Sukul (D. M K S); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); T. Johannes (Tanja); R. van Dolder (R.); E. Benda (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractVolume changes can be measured either directly by water-displacement volumetry or by various indirect methods in which calculation of the volume is based on circumference measurements. The aim of the present study was to determine the most appropriate indirect method for lower leg volume

  8. Direct and indirect methods for the quantification of leg volume: Comparison between water displacement volumetry, the disk model method and the frustum sign model method, using the correlation coefficient and the limits of agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M.K.S. Kaulesar Sukul (D. M K S); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); T. Johannes (Tanja); R. van Dolder (R.); E. Benda (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractVolume changes can be measured either directly by water-displacement volumetry or by various indirect methods in which calculation of the volume is based on circumference measurements. The aim of the present study was to determine the most appropriate indirect method for lower leg volume

  9. Finite volume - space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of compressible turbulent flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Česenek Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we deal with numerical simulation of the non-stationary compressible turbulent flow. Compressible turbulent flow is described by the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations. This RANS system is equipped with two-equation k-omega turbulence model. These two systems of equations are solved separately. Discretization of the RANS system is carried out by the space-time discontinuous Galerkin method which is based on piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximation of the sought solution in space and in time. Discretization of the two-equation k-omega turbulence model is carried out by the implicit finite volume method, which is based on piecewise constant approximation of the sought solution. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  10. Methods of Celestial Mechanics Volume II: Application to Planetary System, Geodynamics and Satellite Geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    G. Beutler's Methods of Celestial Mechanics is a coherent textbook for students as well as an excellent reference for practitioners. Volume II is devoted to the applications and to the presentation of the program system CelestialMechanics. Three major areas of applications are covered: (1) Orbital and rotational motion of extended celestial bodies. The properties of the Earth-Moon system are developed from the simplest case (rigid bodies) to more general cases, including the rotation of an elastic Earth, the rotation of an Earth partly covered by oceans and surrounded by an atmosphere, and the rotation of an Earth composed of a liquid core and a rigid shell (Poincaré model). (2) Artificial Earth Satellites. The oblateness perturbation acting on a satellite and the exploitation of its properties in practice is discussed using simulation methods (CelestialMechanics) and (simplified) first order perturbation methods. The perturbations due to the higher-order terms of the Earth's gravitational potential and reso...

  11. Methods to Increase the Robustness of Finite-Volume Flow Models in Thermodynamic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Quoilin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issues linked to simulation failures during integration in finite-volume flow models, especially those involving a two-phase state. This kind of model is particularly useful when modeling 1D heat exchangers or piping, e.g., in thermodynamic cycles involving a phase change. Issues, such as chattering or stiff systems, can lead to low simulation speed, instabilities and simulation failures. In the particular case of two-phase flow models, they are usually linked to a discontinuity in the density derivative between the liquid and two-phase zones. In this work, several methods to tackle numerical problems are developed, described, implemented and compared. In addition, methods available in the literature are also implemented and compared to the proposed approaches. Results suggest that the robustness of the models can be significantly increased with these different methods, at the price of a small increase of the error in the mass and energy balances.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Reionization in Large Cosmological Volumes I: Numerical Methods and Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Michael L; So, Geoffrey C; Harkness, Robsert P

    2013-01-01

    We describe an extension of the {\\em Enzo} code to enable the direct numerical simulation of inhomogeneous reionization in large cosmological volumes. By direct we mean all dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties are solved self-consistently on the same mesh, as opposed to a postprocessing approach which coarse-grains the radiative transfer. We do, however, employ a simple subgrid model for star formation, which we calibrate to observations. The numerical method presented is a modification of an earlier method presented in Reynolds et al. Radiation transport is done in the grey flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation, which is solved by implicit time integration split off from the gas energy and ionization equations, which are solved separately. This results in a faster and more robust scheme for cosmological applications compared to the earlier method. The FLD equation is solved using the {\\em hypre} optimally scalable geometric multigrid solver from LLNL. By treating the ionizing radiation as a gri...

  13. Reduction of blurring in broadband volume holographic imaging using a deconvolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanlu; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Lin; Luo, Yuan; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Volume holographic imaging (VHI) is a promising biomedical imaging tool that can simultaneously provide multi-depth or multispectral information. When a VHI system is probed with a broadband source, the intensity spreads in the horizontal direction, causing degradation of the image contrast. We theoretically analyzed the reason of the horizontal intensity spread, and the analysis was validated by the simulation and experimental results of the broadband impulse response of the VHI system. We proposed a deconvolution method to reduce the horizontal intensity spread and increase the image contrast. Imaging experiments with three different objects, including bright field illuminated USAF test target and lung tissue specimen and fluorescent beads, were carried out to test the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can significantly improve the horizontal contrast of the image acquire by broadband VHI system. PMID:27570703

  14. Numerical modeling of turbulence mixed convection heat transfer in air filled enclosures by finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Safaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, first the turbulent natural convection and then laminar mixed convection of air flow was solved in a room and the calculated outcomes are compared with results of other scientists and after showing validation of calculations, aforementioned flow is solved as a turbulent mixed convection flow, using the valid turbulence models Standard k-ε, RNG k-ε and RSM. To solve governing differential equations for this flow, finite volume method was used. This method is a specific case of residual weighting method. The results show that at high Richardson Numbers, the flow is rather stationary at the center of the enclosure. Moreover, it is distinguished that when Richardson Number increases the maximum of local Nusselt decreases. Therefore, it can be said that less number of Richardson Number, more rate of heat transfer.

  15. An experimental study of rill sediment delivery in purple soil, using the volume-replacement method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Luo, Banglin; Ding, Linqiao; Gong, Chunming

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies provide a basis for understanding the mechanisms of rill erosion and can provide estimates for parameter values in physical models simulating the erosion process. In this study, we investigated sediment delivery during rill erosion in purple soil. We used the volume-replacement method to measure the volume of eroded soil and hence estimate the mass of eroded soil. A 12 m artificial rill was divided into the following sections: 0-0.5 m, 0.5-1 m, 1-2 m, 2-3 m, 3-4 m, 4-5 m, 5-6 m, 6-7 m, 7-8 m, 8-10 m, and 10-12 m. Erosion trials were conducted with three flow rates (2 L/min, 4 L/min, and 8 L/min) and five slope gradients (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°). The eroded rill sections were refilled with water to measure the eroded volume in each section and subsequently calculate the eroded sediment mass. The cumulative sediment mass was used to compute the sediment concentration along the length of the rill. The results show that purple soil sediment concentration increases with rill length before eventually reaching a maximal value; that is, the rate of increase in sediment concentration is greatest at the rill inlet and then gradually slows. Steeper slopes and higher flow rates result in sediment concentration increasing more rapidly along the rill length and the maximum sediment concentration being reached at an earlier location in the rill. Slope gradient and flow rate both result in an increase in maximal sediment concentration and accumulated eroded amount. However, slope gradient has a greater influence on rill erosion than flow rate. The results and experimental method in this study may provide a reference for future rill-erosion experiments.

  16. An experimental study of rill sediment delivery in purple soil, using the volume-replacement method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhan Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies provide a basis for understanding the mechanisms of rill erosion and can provide estimates for parameter values in physical models simulating the erosion process. In this study, we investigated sediment delivery during rill erosion in purple soil. We used the volume-replacement method to measure the volume of eroded soil and hence estimate the mass of eroded soil. A 12 m artificial rill was divided into the following sections: 0–0.5 m, 0.5–1 m, 1–2 m, 2–3 m, 3–4 m, 4–5 m, 5–6 m, 6–7 m, 7–8 m, 8–10 m, and 10–12 m. Erosion trials were conducted with three flow rates (2 L/min, 4 L/min, and 8 L/min and five slope gradients (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°. The eroded rill sections were refilled with water to measure the eroded volume in each section and subsequently calculate the eroded sediment mass. The cumulative sediment mass was used to compute the sediment concentration along the length of the rill. The results show that purple soil sediment concentration increases with rill length before eventually reaching a maximal value; that is, the rate of increase in sediment concentration is greatest at the rill inlet and then gradually slows. Steeper slopes and higher flow rates result in sediment concentration increasing more rapidly along the rill length and the maximum sediment concentration being reached at an earlier location in the rill. Slope gradient and flow rate both result in an increase in maximal sediment concentration and accumulated eroded amount. However, slope gradient has a greater influence on rill erosion than flow rate. The results and experimental method in this study may provide a reference for future rill-erosion experiments.

  17. Simulation of 3D parachute fluid-structure interaction based on nonlinear finite element method and preconditioning finite volume method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yuxin; Xia Jian

    2014-01-01

    A fluid–structure interaction method combining a nonlinear finite element algorithm with a preconditioning finite volume method is proposed in this paper to simulate parachute tran-sient dynamics. This method uses a three-dimensional membrane–cable fabric model to represent a parachute system at a highly folded configuration. The large shape change during parachute infla-tion is computed by the nonlinear Newton–Raphson iteration and the linear system equation is solved by the generalized minimal residual (GMRES) method. A membrane wrinkling algorithm is also utilized to evaluate the special uniaxial tension state of membrane elements on the parachute canopy. In order to avoid large time expenses during structural nonlinear iteration, the implicit Hil-ber–Hughes–Taylor (HHT) time integration method is employed. For the fluid dynamic simula-tions, the Roe and HLLC (Harten–Lax–van Leer contact) scheme has been modified and extended to compute flow problems at all speeds. The lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS) approximate factorization is applied to accelerate the numerical convergence speed. Finally, the test model of a highly folded C-9 parachute is simulated at a prescribed speed and the results show similar characteristics compared with experimental results and previous literature.

  18. Simulation of 3D parachute fluid–structure interaction based on nonlinear finite element method and preconditioning finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuxin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluid–structure interaction method combining a nonlinear finite element algorithm with a preconditioning finite volume method is proposed in this paper to simulate parachute transient dynamics. This method uses a three-dimensional membrane–cable fabric model to represent a parachute system at a highly folded configuration. The large shape change during parachute inflation is computed by the nonlinear Newton–Raphson iteration and the linear system equation is solved by the generalized minimal residual (GMRES method. A membrane wrinkling algorithm is also utilized to evaluate the special uniaxial tension state of membrane elements on the parachute canopy. In order to avoid large time expenses during structural nonlinear iteration, the implicit Hilber–Hughes–Taylor (HHT time integration method is employed. For the fluid dynamic simulations, the Roe and HLLC (Harten–Lax–van Leer contact scheme has been modified and extended to compute flow problems at all speeds. The lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS approximate factorization is applied to accelerate the numerical convergence speed. Finally, the test model of a highly folded C-9 parachute is simulated at a prescribed speed and the results show similar characteristics compared with experimental results and previous literature.

  19. Measurement of hold-up volumes in reverse-phase liquid chromatography Definition and comparison between static and dynamic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Kazakevich, Yuri; Guiochon, Georges

    2007-08-17

    The hold-up volumes, V(M) of two series of RPLC adsorbents were measured using three different approaches. The first method is based on the difference between the volumes of the empty column tube (150x4.6mm) and of the material packed inside the column. It is considered as giving the correct value of V(M). This method combines the results of the BET characterization of the adsorbent before packing (giving the specific pore volume), of carbon element analysis (giving the mass fraction of silica and alkyl bonded chains), of Helium pycnometry (providing silica density), and of inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC) performed on the packed column (yielding the interparticle volume). The second method is static pycnometry, which consists in weighing the masses of the chromatographic column filled with two distinct solvents of different densities. The last method is based on the thermodynamic definition of the hold-up volume and uses the dynamic minor disturbance method (MDM) with binary eluents. The experimental results of these three non-destructive methods are compared. They exhibit significant, systematic differences. Pycnometry underestimates V(M) by a few percent for adsorbents having a high carbon content. The results of the MDM method depend strongly on the choice of the binary solution used and may underestimate or overestimate V(M). The hold-up volume V(M) of the RPLC adsorbents tested is best measured by the MDM method using a mixture of ethanol and water.

  20. A GIS-based method to determine the volume of lahars: Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Salinas, E.; Renschler, C. S.; Palacios, D.

    2009-10-01

    Lahars are flows composed of water and volcanic sediment which are often dangerous for people living near volcanoes. Therefore, a reliable estimation of lahar volume is needed to effectively assess the risk. This paper proposes a new method to calculate the volume of lahar sediments found in channels of volcanic landscapes. The method requires surveys of several cross-sections along a gorge, a Digital Elevation Model of the study area and measurements of the thickness of the lahar deposits. With these data and a Geographical Information System (GIS), the volume is calculated for the erosive section where deposit volume is divided into oblique parallelepipeds and the sedimentary section where deposit volume is divided into polyhedrons. This new method was applied to the 1997 and 2001 lahars that occurred in the channel of a gorge at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico. The estimated volumes are 1.85 × 10 5 and 1.6 × 10 5 m 3, respectively, which is about 40% less than those obtained by the traditional method that multiplies lahar flow-path length, sediment width and sediment depth. This observation suggests that the traditional method tends to overestimate volumes.

  1. HIGH ACCURACY FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM OF SECOND ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王同科

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy finite volume element method is presented for two-point boundary value problem of second order ordinary differential equation, which differs fromthe high order generalized difference methods. It is proved that the method has optimal order er-ror estimate O(h3) in H1 norm. Finally, two examples show that the method is effective.

  2. New digital measurement methods for left ventricular volume using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: comparison with electromagnetic flow method and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J. J.; Jones, M.; Shiota, T.; Greenberg, N. L.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Tsujino, H.; Zetts, A. D.; Sun, J. P.; Cardon, L. A.; Odabashian, J. A.; Flamm, S. D.; White, R. D.; Panza, J. A.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of using symmetrically rotated apical long axis planes for the determination of left ventricular (LV) volumes with real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Real-time 3DE was performed in six sheep during 24 haemodynamic conditions with electromagnetic flow measurements (EM), and in 29 patients with magnetic resonance imaging measurements (MRI). LV volumes were calculated by Simpson's rule with five 3DE methods (i.e. apical biplane, four-plane, six-plane, nine-plane (in which the angle between each long axis plane was 90 degrees, 45 degrees, 30 degrees or 20 degrees, respectively) and standard short axis views (SAX)). Real-time 3DE correlated well with EM for LV stroke volumes in animals (r=0.68-0.95) and with MRI for absolute volumes in patients (r-values=0.93-0.98). However, agreement between MRI and apical nine-plane, six-plane, and SAX methods in patients was better than those with apical four-plane and bi-plane methods (mean difference = -15, -18, -13, vs. -31 and -48 ml for end-diastolic volume, respectively, Pmeasurement methods of real-time 3DE correlated well with reference standards for calculating LV volumes. Balancing accuracy and required time for these LV volume measurements, the apical six-plane method is recommended for clinical use.

  3. Partial volume correction using structural-functional synergistic resolution recovery: comparison with geometric transfer matrix method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Euitae; Shidahara, Miho; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; McGinnity, Colm J; Kwon, Jun Soo; Howes, Oliver D; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2013-06-01

    We validated the use of a novel image-based method for partial volume correction (PVC), structural-functional synergistic resolution recovery (SFS-RR) for the accurate quantification of dopamine synthesis capacity measured using [(18)F]DOPA positron emission tomography. The bias and reliability of SFS-RR were compared with the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method. Both methodologies were applied to the parametric maps of [(18)F]DOPA utilization rates (ki(cer)). Validation was first performed by measuring repeatability on test-retest scans. The precision of the methodologies instead was quantified using simulated [(18)F]DOPA images. The sensitivity to the misspecification of the full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the scanner point-spread-function on both approaches was also assessed. In the in-vivo data, the ki(cer) was significantly increased by application of both PVC procedures while the reliability remained high (intraclass correlation coefficients >0.85). The variability was not significantly affected by either PVC approach (<10% variability in both cases). The corrected ki(cer) was significantly influenced by the FWHM applied in both the acquired and simulated data. This study shows that SFS-RR can effectively correct for partial volume effects to a comparable degree to GTM but with the added advantage that it enables voxelwise analyses, and that the FWHM used can affect the PVC result indicating the importance of accurately calibrating the FWHM used in the recovery model.

  4. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  5. Measuring tree height and preparation volume table using an innovative method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfalian, Majid; Nouri, Zahra; Kooch, Yahya; Zobeiri, Mahmoud

    2007-10-15

    Zarbin (Cupressus sempervirence var. horizontalis) with its unique characteristics is one of the worthiest species which can be found in the central area of Alborz in the North of Iran. Especially in the Roodbar-manjil area, Chaloos-Hassanabad valley as well as it extends from Zarringol area to Gorgan. Although the distribution areas of this species have been protected, these forests have been invaded by the villagers who use this useful wood. For this reason in the Roodbar area, trees with DBH>30 cm are extremely rare. To recognize and to be aware of the stand quantity, the current research tries to calculate the species volume table in Roodbar area, to be the basis for any calculation of the volume of stand in the region. For this purpose, trees have been sampled using the line sampling method. After estimating the form factor, Tarif table have been prepared. In this study, a new method for measuring tree height is presented, in which, instead of measuring slope distance from observer to tree (which is difficult in young conifers because of existence branches in lower height) distance between the eye level of observer to tree butt is measured. Which doing of it is easier, time of field work is decreased and accuracy of measurement and calculation is increased.

  6. Comparing volume of fluid and level set methods for evaporating liquid-gas flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    This presentation demonstrates three numerical strategies for simulating liquid-gas flows undergoing evaporation. The practical aim of this work is to choose a framework capable of simulating the combustion of liquid fuels in an internal combustion engine. Each framework is analyzed with respect to its accuracy and computational cost. All simulations are performed using a conservative, finite volume code for simulating reacting, multiphase flows under the low-Mach assumption. The strategies used in this study correspond to different methods for tracking the liquid-gas interface and handling the transport of the discontinuous momentum and vapor mass fractions fields. The first two strategies are based on conservative, geometric volume of fluid schemes using directionally split and un-split advection, respectively. The third strategy is the accurate conservative level set method. For all strategies, special attention is given to ensuring the consistency between the fluxes of mass, momentum, and vapor fractions. The study performs three-dimensional simulations of an isolated droplet of a single component fuel evaporating into air. Evaporation rates and vapor mass fractions are compared to analytical results.

  7. An implicit control-volume finite element method for well-reservoir modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Salinas, Pablo; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Here a novel implicit approach (embodied within the IC-Ferst) is presented for modelling wells with potentially a large number of laterals within reservoirs. IC-Ferst is a conservative and consistent, control-volume finite element method (CV-FEM) model and fully unstructured/geology conforming meshes with anisotropic mesh adaptivity. As far as the wells are concerned, a multi-phase/multi-well approach, where well systems are represented as phases, is taken here. Phase volume fraction conservation equations are solved for in both the reservoir and the wells, in addition, the field within wells is also solved for. A second novel aspect of the work is the combination of modelling and resolving of the motherbore and laterals. In this case wells do not have to be explicitly discretised in space. This combination proves to be accurate (in many situations) as well as computationally efficient. The method is applied to a number of multi-phase reservoir problems in order to gain an insight into the effectiveness, in terms of production rate, of perforated laterals. Model results are compared with semi-analytical solutions for simple cases and industry-standard codes for more complicated cases. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  8. An integrated approach to seismic event location: 1. Evaluating how method of location affects the volume of groups of hypocenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Clifford A.

    1992-11-01

    When seismic events occur in spatially compact clusters, the volume and geometric characteristics of these clusters often provides information about the relative effectiveness of different location methods, or about physical processes occurring within the hypocentral region. This report defines and explains how to determine the convex polyhedron of minimum volume (CPMV) surrounding a set of points. We evaluate both single-event and joint hypocenter determination (JHD) relocations for three rather different clusters of seismic events: (1) nuclear explosions from Muroroa relocated using P and PKP phases reported by the ISC; (2) intermediate depth earthquakes near Bucaramanga, Colombia, relocated using P and PKP phases reported by the ISC; and (3) shallow earthquakes near Vanuatu (formerly, the New Hebrides), relocated using P and S phases from a local station network. This analysis demonstrates that different location methods markedly affect the volume of the CPMV, however, volumes for JHD relations are not always smaller than volumes for single-event relocations.

  9. A finite-volume numerical method to calculate fluid forces and rotordynamic coefficients in seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method to calculate rotordynamic coefficients of seals is presented. The flow in a seal is solved by using a finite-volume formulation of the full Navier-Stokes equations with appropriate turbulence models. The seal rotor is perturbed along a diameter such that the position of the rotor is a sinusoidal function of time. The resulting flow domain changes with time, and the time-dependent flow in the seal is solved using a space conserving moving grid formulation. The time-varying fluid pressure reaction forces are then linked with the rotor center displacement, velocity and acceleration to yield the rotordynamic coefficients. Results for an annular seal are presented, and compared with experimental data and other more simplified numerical methods.

  10. Technical Report: Modeling of Composite Piezoelectric Structures with the Finite Volume Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bolborici, Valentin; Pugh, Mary C

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric devices, such as piezoelectric traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motors, have composite piezoelectric structures. A composite piezoelectric structure consists of a combination of two or more bonded materials, where at least one of them is a piezoelectric transducer. Numerical modeling of piezoelectric structures has been done in the past mainly with the finite element method. Alternatively, a finite volume based approach offers the following advantages: (a) the ordinary differential equations resulting from the discretization process can be interpreted directly as corresponding circuits and (b) phenomena occurring at boundaries can be treated exactly. This report extends the work of IEEE Transactions on UFFC 57(2010)7:1673-1691 by presenting a method for implementing the boundary conditions between the bonded materials in composite piezoelectric structures. The report concludes with one modeling example of a unimorph structure.

  11. Gas permeation measurement under defined humidity via constant volume/variable pressure method

    KAUST Repository

    Jan Roman, Pauls

    2012-02-01

    Many industrial gas separations in which membrane processes are feasible entail high water vapour contents, as in CO 2-separation from flue gas in carbon capture and storage (CCS), or in biogas/natural gas processing. Studying the effect of water vapour on gas permeability through polymeric membranes is essential for materials design and optimization of these membrane applications. In particular, for amine-based CO 2 selective facilitated transport membranes, water vapour is necessary for carrier-complex formation (Matsuyama et al., 1996; Deng and Hägg, 2010; Liu et al., 2008; Shishatskiy et al., 2010) [1-4]. But also conventional polymeric membrane materials can vary their permeation behaviour due to water-induced swelling (Potreck, 2009) [5]. Here we describe a simple approach to gas permeability measurement in the presence of water vapour, in the form of a modified constant volume/variable pressure method (pressure increase method). © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Precision of a new bedside method for estimation of the circulating blood volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Eriksen, B; Henneberg, S W

    1993-01-01

    The present study is a theoretical and experimental evaluation of a modification of the carbon monoxide method for estimation of the circulating blood volume (CBV) with respect to the precision of the method. The CBV was determined from measurements of the CO-saturation of hemoglobin before...... and after ventilation with a gas mixture containing 20-50 ml of CO for a period of 10-15 min. A special Water's to and fro system was designed in order to avoid any leakage when measuring during intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). Blood samples were taken before and immediately after......, determination of CBV can be performed with an amount of CO that gives rise to a harmless increase in the carboxyhemoglobin concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  13. A practical method for randoms subtraction in volume imaging PET from detector singles countrate measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.J.; Karp, J.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-06-01

    Randoms subtraction in a volume imaging PET scanner is a significant problem due to the high singles countrates experienced. The delayed coincidence method requires double counting of randoms events and results in a lowered countrate capability. Calculations based on detector singles countrates require complex corrections for countrate dependent livetime and event acceptance due to the camera coincidence processing between the detector and rebinned randoms countrates. The profile distribution method has been used to estimate and subtract both scatter and randoms background but this method is a compromise and couples these 2 sources of background together. In order to avoid these problems and provide accurate subtraction of both the distribution and magnitude of randoms contamination in the scan data the authors have developed an alternative singles based method. The singles distributions are measured across the detectors and are used to construct a randoms distribution sinogram. This distribution is scaled to the appropriate rebinned randoms countrate by means of a lookup table of randoms countrate vs detector singles countrate, generated from phantom calibrations. The advantages of performing randoms subtraction by this method are: (1) there is no increase in camera deadtime, (2) the method compensates for nonuniformities in randoms distributions due to both the activity distribution and nonuniform geometric response of the camera for on and off bankpairs, and (3) it deals with randoms subtraction independently of scatter so that different scatter correction routines may then be applied to the data.

  14. Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion analysis of nodal expansion method for steady convection diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiafeng, E-mail: zhou-xf11@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Guo, Jiong, E-mail: guojiong12@tsinghua.edu.cn; Li, Fu, E-mail: lifu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • NEMs are innovatively applied to solve convection diffusion equation. • Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion for NEM are analyzed for the first time. • Stability and numerical diffusion depend on the NEM expansion order and its parity. • NEMs have higher accuracy than both second order upwind and QUICK scheme. • NEMs with different expansion orders are integrated into a unified discrete form. - Abstract: The traditional finite difference method or finite volume method (FDM or FVM) is used for HTGR thermal-hydraulic calculation at present. However, both FDM and FVM require the fine mesh sizes to achieve the desired precision and thus result in a limited efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient and accurate numerical method needs to be developed. Nodal expansion method (NEM) can achieve high accuracy even on the coarse meshes in the reactor physics analysis so that the number of spatial meshes and computational cost can be largely decreased. Because of higher efficiency and accuracy, NEM can be innovatively applied to thermal-hydraulic calculation. In the paper, NEMs with different orders of basis functions are successfully developed and applied to multi-dimensional steady convection diffusion equation. Numerical results show that NEMs with three or higher order basis functions can track the reference solutions very well and are superior to second order upwind scheme and QUICK scheme. However, the false diffusion and unphysical oscillation behavior are discovered for NEMs. To explain the reasons for the above-mentioned behaviors, the stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion properties of NEM are analyzed by the Fourier analysis, and by comparing with exact solutions of difference and differential equation. The theoretical analysis results show that the accuracy of NEM increases with the expansion order. However, the stability and numerical diffusion properties depend not only on the order of basis functions but also on the parity of

  15. The event-driven constant volume method for particle coagulation dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method, which tracks small numbers of the dispersed simulation parti- cles and then describes the dynamic evolution of large numbers of real particles, consti- tutes an important class of methods for the numerical solution of population balance modeling. Particle coagulation dynamics is a complex task for MC. Event-driven MC ex- hibits higher accuracy and efficiency than time-driven MC on the whole. However, these available event-driven MCs track the "equally weighted simulation particle population" and maintain the number of simulated particles within bounds at the cost of "regulating" com- putational domain, which results in some constraints and drawbacks. This study designed the procedure of "differently weighted fictitious particle population" and the corresponding coagulation rule for differently weighted fictitious particles. And then, a new event-driven MC method was promoted to describe the coagulation dynamics between differently weighted fictitious particles, where "constant number scheme" and "stepwise constant number scheme" were developed to maintain the number of fictitious particles within bounds as well as the constant computational domain. The MC is named event-driven constant volume (EDCV) method. The quantitative comparison among several popular MCs shows that the EDCV method has the advantages of computational precision and computational efficiency over other available MCs.

  16. The event-driven constant volume method for particle coagulation dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO HaiBo; ZHENG ChuGuang

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method, which tracks small numbers of the dispersed simulation parti-cles and then describes the dynamic evolution of large numbers of real particles, consti-tutes an important class of methods for the numerical solution of population balance modeling. Particle coagulation dynamics is a complex task for MC. Event-driven MC ex-hibits higher accuracy and efficiency than time-driven MC on the whole. However, these available event-driven MCs track the "equally weighted simulation particle population" and maintain the number of simulated particles within bounds at the cost of "regulating" com-putational domain, which results in some constraints and drawbacks. This study designed the procedure of "differently weighted fictitious particle population" and the corresponding coagulation rule for differently weighted fictitious particles. And then, a new event-driven MC method was promoted to describe the coagulation dynamics between differently weighted fictitious particles, where "constant number scheme" and "stepwise constant number scheme" were developed to maintain the number of fictitious particles within bounds as well as the constant computational domain. The MC is named event-driven constant volume (EDCV) method. The quantitative comparison among several popular MCs shows that the EDCV method has the advantages of computational precision and computational efficiency over other available MCs.

  17. Comparison of Total Kidney Volume Quantification Methods in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease for a Comprehensive Disease Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Dario; Busutti, Marco; Mignani, Renzo; Magistroni, Riccardo; Corsi, Cristiana

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, the scientific community has been showing increasing interest in the treatments aimed at slowing the progression of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Therefore, in this paper, we test and evaluate the performance of several available methods for total kidney volume (TKV) computation in ADPKD patients - from echography to MRI - in order to optimize patient classification. Two methods based on geometric assumptions (mid-slice [MS], ellipsoid [EL]) and a third one on true contour detection were tested on 40 ADPKD patients at different disease stage using MRI. The EL method was also tested using ultrasound images in a subset of 14 patients. Their performance was compared against TKVs derived from reference manual segmentation of MR images. Patient clinical classification was also performed based on computed volumes. Kidney volumes derived from echography significantly underestimated reference volumes. Geometric-based methods applied to MR images had similar acceptable results. The highly automated method showed better performance. Volume assessment was accurate and reproducible. Importantly, classification resulted in 79, 13, 10, and 2.5% of misclassification using kidney volumes obtained from echo and MRI applying the EL, the MS and the highly automated method respectively. Considering the fact that the image-based technique is the only approach providing a 3D patient-specific kidney model and allowing further analysis including cyst volume computation and monitoring disease progression, we suggest that geometric assumption (e.g., EL method) should be avoided. The contour-detection approach should be used for a reproducible and precise morphologic classification of the renal volume of ADPKD patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Simulation method for cardiac stroke volume estimation by intracardiac electrical impedance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, C; Leviatan, Y; Inbar, G F; Hoekstein, K N

    1992-09-01

    Using the electrical impedance measurement technique to investigate stroke volume estimation, three models of the ventricle were simulated. A four-electrode impedance catheter was used; two electrodes to set up an electric field in the model and the other two to measure the potential difference. A new approach, itself an application of the quasi-static case of a method used to solve electromagnetic field problems, was used to solve the electric field in the model. The behaviour of the estimation is examined with respect to the electrode configuration on the catheter and to catheter location with respect to the ventricle walls. Cardiac stroke volume estimation was found to be robust to catheter location generating a 10 per cent error for an offset of 40 per cent of the catheter from the chamber axis and rotation of 20 degrees with respect to the axis. The electrode configuration has a dominant effect on the sensitivity and accuracy of the estimation. Certain configurations gave high accuracy, whereas in others high sensitivity was found with lower accuracy. This led to the conclusion that the electrode configuration should be carefully chosen according to the desired criteria.

  19. A new method for volume segmentation of PET images, based on possibility theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewalle-Vignion, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Lopes, Renaud; Huglo, Damien; Stute, Simon; Vermandel, Maximilien

    2011-02-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG PET) has become an essential technique in oncology. Accurate segmentation and uptake quantification are crucial in order to enable objective follow-up, the optimization of radiotherapy planning, and therapeutic evaluation. We have designed and evaluated a new, nearly automatic and operator-independent segmentation approach. This incorporated possibility theory, in order to take into account the uncertainty and inaccuracy inherent in the image. The approach remained independent of PET facilities since it did not require any preliminary calibration. Good results were obtained from phantom images [percent error =18.38% (mean) ± 9.72% (standard deviation)]. Results on simulated and anatomopathological data sets were quantified using different similarity measures and showed the method was efficient (simulated images: Dice index =82.18% ± 13.53% for SUV =2.5 ). The approach could, therefore, be an efficient and robust tool for uptake volume segmentation, and lead to new indicators for measuring volume of interest activity.

  20. Advanced Methods for Robot-Environment Interaction towards an Industrial Robot Aware of Its Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Romanelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental aspect of robot-environment interaction in industrial environments is given by the capability of the control system to model the structured and unstructured environment features. Industrial robots have to perform complex tasks at high speeds and have to satisfy hard cycle times while maintaining the operations extremely precise. The capability of the robot to perceive the presence of environmental objects is something still missing in the real industrial context. Although anthropomorphic robot producers have faced problems related to the interaction between robot and its environment, there is not an exhaustive study on the capabilities of the robot being aware of its volume and on the tools eventually mounted on its flange. In this paper, a solution to model the environment of the robot in order to make it capable of perceiving and avoiding collisions with the objects in its surroundings is shown. Furthermore, the model will be extended to take also into account the volume of the robot tool in order to extend the perception capabilities of the entire system. Testing results will be showed in order to validate the method, proving that the system is able to cope with complex real surroundings.

  1. SU-E-J-35: Using CBCT as the Alternative Method of Assessing ITV Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Redler, G; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To study the accuracy of Internal Target Volumes (ITVs) created on cone beam CT (CBCT) by comparing the visible target volume on CBCT to volumes (GTV, ITV, and PTV) outlined on free breathing (FB) CT and 4DCT. Methods A Quasar Cylindrical Motion Phantom with a 3cm diameter ball (14.14 cc) embedded within a cork insert was set up to simulate respiratory motion with a period of 4 seconds and amplitude of 2cm superioinferiorly and 1cm anterioposteriorly. FBCT and 4DCT images were acquired. A PTV-4D was created on the 4DCT by applying a uniform margin of 5mm to the ITV-CT. PTV-FB was created by applying a margin of the motion range plus 5mm, i.e. total of 1.5cm laterally and 2.5cm superioinferiorly to the GTV outlined on the FBCT. A dynamic conformal arc was planned to treat the PTV-FB with 1mm margin. A CBCT was acquired before the treatment, on which the target was delineated. During the treatment, the position of the target was monitored using the EPID in cine mode. Results ITV-CBCT and ITV-CT were measured to be 56.6 and 62.7cc, respectively, with a Dice Coefficient (DC) of 0.94 and disagreement in center of mass (COM) of 0.59 mm. On the other hand, GTV-FB was 11.47cc, 19% less than the known volume of the ball. PTV-FB and PTV-4D were 149 and 116 cc, with a DC of 0.71. Part of the ITV-CT was not enclosed by the PTV-FB despite the large margin. The cine EPID images have confirmed geometrical misses of the target. Similar under-coverage was observed in one clinical case and captured by the CBCT, where the implanted fiducials moved outside PTV-FB. Conclusion ITV-CBCT is in good agreement with ITV-CT. When 4DCT was not available, CBCT can be an effective alternative in determining and verifying the PTV margin.

  2. A three-dimensional volume-of-fluid method for reconstructing and advecting three-material interfaces forming contact lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a piecewise-linear, volume-of-fluid method for reconstructing and advecting three-dimensional interfaces and contact lines formed by three materials. The new method employs a set of geometric constructs that can be used in conjunction with any volume-tracking scheme. In this work, we used the mass-conserving scheme of Youngs to handle two-material cells, perform interface reconstruction in three-material cells, and resolve the contact line. The only information required by the method is the available volume fraction field. Although the proposed method is order dependent and requires a priori information on material ordering, it is suitable for typical contact line applications, where the material representing the contact surface is always known. Following the reconstruction of the contact surface, to compute the interface orientation in a three-material cell, the proposed method minimizes an error function that is based on volume fraction distribution around that cell. As an option, the minimization procedure also allows the user to impose a contact angle. Performance of the proposed method is assessed via both static and advection test cases. The tests show that the new method preserves the accuracy and mass-conserving property of the Youngs method in volume-tracking three materials.

  3. Coupling of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with Finite Volume method for free-surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrone, S.; Di Mascio, A.; Le Touzé, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for the solution of free surface flows with large front deformation and fragmentation is presented. The algorithm is obtained by coupling a classical Finite Volume (FV) approach, that discretizes the Navier-Stokes equations on a block structured Eulerian grid, with an approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, implemented in a Lagrangian framework. The coupling procedure is formulated in such a way that each solver is applied in the region where its intrinsic characteristics can be exploited in the most efficient and accurate way: the FV solver is used to resolve the bulk flow and the wall regions, whereas the SPH solver is implemented in the free surface region to capture details of the front evolution. The reported results clearly prove that the combined use of the two solvers is convenient from the point of view of both accuracy and computing time.

  4. Finite volume methods for submarine debris flow with Herschel-Bulkley rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihwan; Issler, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    Submarine landslides can impose great danger to the underwater structures and generate destructive waves. The Herschel-Bulkley rheological model is known to be appropriate for describing the nonlinear viscoplastic behavior of the debris flow. The numerical implementation of the depth-averaged Herschel-Bulkley models such as BING has so-far been limited to the 1-dimensional Lagrangian coordinate system. In this work, we develop numerical schemes with the finite volume methods in the Eulerian coordinates. We provide parameter sensitivity analysis and demonstrate how common ad-hoc assumptions such as including a minimum shear layer depth influence the modeling of the landslide dynamics. The possibility of adding hydrodynamic resistance forces, hydroplaning, and remolding into this Eulerian framework is also discussed. Finally, the possible extension to a two-dimensional operational model for coupling towards operational tsunami models is discussed.

  5. A solution of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flow using the finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naceur Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the two dimensional numerical modeling of the coupling electromagnetic-hydrodynamic phenomena in a conduction MHD pump using the Finite volume Method. Magnetohydrodynamic problems are, thus, interdisciplinary and coupled, since the effect of the velocity field appears in the magnetic transport equations, and the interaction between the electric current and the magnetic field appears in the momentum transport equations. The resolution of the Maxwell's and Navier Stokes equations is obtained by introducing the magnetic vector potential A, the vorticity z and the stream function y. The flux density, the electromagnetic force, and the velocity are graphically presented. Also, the simulation results agree with those obtained by Ansys Workbench Fluent software.

  6. Fluid structure interaction solver coupled with volume of fluid method for two-phase flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerroni, D.; Fancellu, L.; Manservisi, S.; Menghini, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose to study the behavior of a solid elastic object that interacts with a multiphase flow. Fluid structure interaction and multiphase problems are of great interest in engineering and science because of many potential applications. The study of this interaction by coupling a fluid structure interaction (FSI) solver with a multiphase problem could open a large range of possibilities in the investigation of realistic problems. We use a FSI solver based on a monolithic approach, while the two-phase interface advection and reconstruction is computed in the framework of a Volume of Fluid method which is one of the more popular algorithms for two-phase flow problems. The coupling between the FSI and VOF algorithm is efficiently handled with the use of MEDMEM libraries implemented in the computational platform Salome. The numerical results of a dam break problem over a deformable solid are reported in order to show the robustness and stability of this numerical approach.

  7. Two-dimensional wood drying stress simulation using control-volume mixed finite element methods (CVFEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salinas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available  The work was aimed at simulating two-dimensional wood drying stress using the control-volume finite element method (CVFEM. Stress/strain was modeled by moisture content gradients regarding shrinkage and mechanical sorption in a cross-section of wood. CVFEM was implemented with triangular finite elements and lineal interpolation of the independent variable which were programmed in Fortran 90 language. The model was validated by contrasting results with similar ones available in the specialised literature. The present model’s results came from isothermal (20ºC drying of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides: two-dimensional distribution of stress/strain and water content, 40, 80, 130, 190 and 260 hour drying time and evolution of normal stress (2.5 <σ͓ ͓ < 1.2, MPa, from the interior to the exterior of wood. 

  8. Optimal Placement Method of RFID Readers in Industrial Rail Transport for Uneven Rail Traflc Volume Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmangulov, Aleksandr; Muravev, Dmitri; Mishkurov, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    The issue of operative data reception on location and movement of railcars is significant the constantly growing requirements of the provision of timely and safe transportation. The technical solution for efficiency improvement of data collection on rail rolling stock is the implementation of an identification system. Nowadays, there are several such systems, distinguished in working principle. In the authors' opinion, the most promising for rail transportation is the RFID technology, proposing the equipping of the railway tracks by the stationary points of data reading (RFID readers) from the onboard sensors on the railcars. However, regardless of a specific type and manufacturer of these systems, their implementation is affiliated with the significant financing costs for large, industrial, rail transport systems, owning the extensive network of special railway tracks with a large number of stations and loading areas. To reduce the investment costs for creation, the identification system of rolling stock on the special railway tracks of industrial enterprises has developed the method based on the idea of priority installation of the RFID readers on railway hauls, where rail traffic volumes are uneven in structure and power, parameters of which is difficult or impossible to predict on the basis of existing data in an information system. To select the optimal locations of RFID readers, the mathematical model of the staged installation of such readers has developed depending on the non-uniformity value of rail traffic volumes, passing through the specific railway hauls. As a result of that approach, installation of the numerous RFID readers at all station tracks and loading areas of industrial railway stations might be not necessary,which reduces the total cost of the rolling stock identification and the implementation of the method for optimal management of transportation process.

  9. Comparison of loess and purple rill erosions measured with volume replacement method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-yan; Huang, Yu-han; Zhao, Yu; Mo, Bin; Mi, Hong-xing

    2015-11-01

    Rills are commonly found on sloping farm fields in both the loess and the purple soil regions of China. A comparative study on rill erosion between the two soils is important to increase research knowledge and exchange application experiences. Rill erosion processes of loess and purple soils were determined through laboratory experiments with the volume replacement method. Water was used to refill the eroded rill segments to compute eroded volume before sediment concentration distribution along the rill was computed using the soil bulk density, flow rate, and water flow duration. The experimental loess soil materials were from the Loess Plateau and purple soil from the southwestern part of China, Chongqing City. A laboratory experimental platform was used to construct flumes to simulate rills with 12.0 m length, 0.1 m width, and 0.3 m depth. Soil materials were filled into the flumes at a bulk density of 1.2 g cm-3 to a depth of 20 cm to form rills for experiments on five slope gradients (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°) and three flow rates (2, 4, and 8 L/min). After each experimental run under the given slope gradient and flow rate, the rill segments from the upper slope between 0-0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2, 2-3, …, 7-8, 8-10, and 10-12 m were lined with plastic sheets before be re-filled with water to determine sediment concentration after the eroded volumes was measured. Rill erosion differed between the two soils. As purple soil started to erode at a higher erosive force than loess soil, it possibly exhibits higher resistance to water erosion. The subsequent erosion process in the eroding purple rill was similar to that in the loess rill. However, the total erosion in the eroding loess rill was more than that in the eroding purple rill. The maximum sediment concentration transported by the eroding purple rills was significantly lower, approximately 55% of those transported by the loess rills under the same flow rate and slope gradient. Hence, less purple sediments can

  10. A transient method for measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow using acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow by using an acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) method in a transient way is studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the effects of sizes and locations of a single air bubble in a cylindrical cavity with two open ends on resonant frequencies are investigated numerically. Then, a transient measurement system for ARS is established, and the trends of the resonant frequencies (RFs) and resonant amplitudes (RAs) in the cylindrical cavity with gas flux inside are investigated experimentally. The measurement results by the proposed transient method are compared with those by steady-state ones and numerical ones. The numerical results show that the RFs of the cavity are highly sensitive to the volume of the single air bubble. A tiny bubble volume perturbation may cause a prominent RF shift even though the volume of the air bubble is smaller than 0.1% of that of the cavity. When the small air bubble moves, the RF shift will change and reach its maximum value as it is located at the middle of the cavity. As the gas volume fraction of the two-phase flow is low, both the RFs and RAs from the measurement results decrease dramatically with the increasing gas volume, and this decreasing trend gradually becomes even as the gas volume fraction increases further. These experimental results agree with the theoretical ones qualitatively. In addition, the transient method for ARS is more suitable for measuring the gas volume fraction with randomness and instantaneity than the steady-state one, because the latter could not reflect the random and instant characteristics of the mixed fluid due to the time consumption for frequency sweeping. This study will play a very important role in the quantitative measurement of the gas volume fraction of multiphase flows.

  11. Impact of consensus contours from multiple PET segmentation methods on the accuracy of functional volume delineation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Saarland University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany); Vermandel, M. [U1189 - ONCO-THAI - Image Assisted Laser Therapy for Oncology, University of Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, Lille (France); CHU Lille, Nuclear Medicine Department, Lille (France); Baillet, C. [CHU Lille, Nuclear Medicine Department, Lille (France); Dewalle-Vignion, A.S. [U1189 - ONCO-THAI - Image Assisted Laser Therapy for Oncology, University of Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, Lille (France); Modzelewski, R.; Vera, P.; Gardin, I. [Centre Henri-Becquerel and LITIS EA4108, Rouen (France); Massoptier, L.; Parcq, C.; Gibon, D. [AQUILAB, Research and Innovation Department, Loos Les Lille (France); Fechter, T.; Nestle, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department for Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) Freiburg and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Nemer, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of consensus algorithms on segmentation results when applied to clinical PET images. In particular, whether the use of the majority vote or STAPLE algorithm could improve the accuracy and reproducibility of the segmentation provided by the combination of three semiautomatic segmentation algorithms was investigated. Three published segmentation methods (contrast-oriented, possibility theory and adaptive thresholding) and two consensus algorithms (majority vote and STAPLE) were implemented in a single software platform (Artiview registered). Four clinical datasets including different locations (thorax, breast, abdomen) or pathologies (primary NSCLC tumours, metastasis, lymphoma) were used to evaluate accuracy and reproducibility of the consensus approach in comparison with pathology as the ground truth or CT as a ground truth surrogate. Variability in the performance of the individual segmentation algorithms for lesions of different tumour entities reflected the variability in PET images in terms of resolution, contrast and noise. Independent of location and pathology of the lesion, however, the consensus method resulted in improved accuracy in volume segmentation compared with the worst-performing individual method in the majority of cases and was close to the best-performing method in many cases. In addition, the implementation revealed high reproducibility in the segmentation results with small changes in the respective starting conditions. There were no significant differences in the results with the STAPLE algorithm and the majority vote algorithm. This study showed that combining different PET segmentation methods by the use of a consensus algorithm offers robustness against the variable performance of individual segmentation methods and this approach would therefore be useful in radiation oncology. It might also be relevant for other scenarios such as the merging of expert recommendations in clinical routine and

  12. Marked effects of intracranial volume correction methods on sex differences in neuroanatomical structures: a HUNT MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Wolfgang S Pintzka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To date, there is no consensus whether sexual dimorphism in the size of neuroanatomical structures exists, or if such differences are caused by choice of intracranial volume (ICV correction method. When investigating volume differences in neuroanatomical structures, corrections for variation in ICV are used. Commonly applied methods are the ICV-proportions, ICV-residuals and ICV as a covariate of no interest, ANCOVA. However, these different methods give contradictory results with regard to presence of sex differences. Our aims were to investigate presence of sexual dimorphism in 18 neuroanatomical volumes unrelated to ICV-differences by using a large ICV-matched subsample of 304 men and women from the HUNT-MRI general population study, and further to demonstrate in the entire sample of 966 healthy subjects, which of the ICV-correction methods gave results similar to the ICV-matched subsample. In addition, sex-specific subsamples were created to investigate whether differences were an effect of head size or sex. Most sex differences were related to volume scaling with ICV, independent of sex. Sex differences were detected in a few structures; amygdala, cerebellar cortex, and 3rd ventricle were larger in men, but the effect sizes were small. The residuals and ANCOVA methods were most effective at removing the effects of ICV. The proportions method suffered from systematic errors due to lack of proportionality between ICV and neuroanatomical volumes, leading to systematic mis-assignment of structures as either larger or smaller than their actual size. Adding additional sexual dimorphic covariates to the ANCOVA gave opposite results of those obtained in the ICV-matched subsample or with the residuals method. The findings in the current study explain some of the considerable variation in the literature on sexual dimorphisms in neuroanatomical volumes. In conclusion, sex plays a minor role for neuroanatomical volume differences; most differences are

  13. Cell-centered nonlinear finite-volume methods for the heterogeneous anisotropic diffusion problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, Kirill M.; Mallison, Bradley T.; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-02-01

    We present two new cell-centered nonlinear finite-volume methods for the heterogeneous, anisotropic diffusion problem. The schemes split the interfacial flux into harmonic and transversal components. Specifically, linear combinations of the transversal vector and the co-normal are used that lead to significant improvements in terms of the mesh-locking effects. The harmonic component of the flux is represented using a conventional monotone two-point flux approximation; the component along the parameterized direction is treated nonlinearly to satisfy either positivity of the solution as in [29], or the discrete maximum principle as in [9]. In order to make the method purely cell-centered, we derive a homogenization function that allows for seamless interpolation in the presence of heterogeneity following a strategy similar to [46]. The performance of the new schemes is compared with existing multi-point flux approximation methods [3,5]. The robustness of the scheme with respect to the mesh-locking problem is demonstrated using several challenging test cases.

  14. Adjoint complement to viscous finite-volume pressure-correction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stück, Arthur; Rung, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    A hybrid-adjoint Navier-Stokes method for the pressure-based computation of hydrodynamic objective functional derivatives with respect to the shape is systematically derived in three steps: The underlying adjoint partial differential equations and boundary conditions for the frozen-turbulence Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are considered in the first step. In step two, the adjoint discretisation is developed from the primal, unstructured finite-volume discretisation, such that adjoint-consistent approximations to the adjoint partial differential equations are obtained following a so-called hybrid-adjoint approach. A unified, discrete boundary description is outlined that supports high- and low-Reynolds number turbulent wall-boundary treatments for both the adjoint boundary condition and the boundary-based gradient formula. The third component focused in the development of the industrial adjoint CFD method is the adjoint counterpart to the primal pressure-correction algorithm. The approach is verified against the direct-differentiation method and an application to internal flow problems is presented.

  15. Finite volume method in 3-D curvilinear coordinates with multiblocking procedure for radiative transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, P.; Steven, M.; Issendorff, F.V.; Trimis, D. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics (LSTM), University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstrasse 4, D 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    The finite volume method of radiation is implemented for complex 3-D problems in order to use it for combined heat transfer problems in connection with CFD codes. The method is applied for a 3-D block structured grid in a radiatively participating medium. The method is implemented in non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates so that it can handle irregular structure with a body-fitted structured grid. The multiblocking is performed with overlapping blocks to exchange the information between the blocks. Five test problems are considered in this work. In the first problem, present work is validated with the results of the literature. To check the accuracy of multiblocking, a single block is divided into four blocks and results are validated against the results of the single block simulated alone in the second problem. Complicated geometries are considered to show the applicability of the present procedure in the last three problems. Both radiative and non-radiative equilibrium situations are considered along with an absorbing, emitting and scattering medium. (author)

  16. Blast load estimation using Finite Volume Method and linear heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidner Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view of people and building security one of the main destroying factor is the blast load. Rational estimating of its results should be preceded with knowledge of complex wave field distribution in time and space. As a result one can estimate the blast load distribution in time. In considered conditions, the values of blast load are estimating using the empirical functions of overpressure distribution in time (Δp(t. The Δp(t functions are monotonic and are the approximation of reality. The distributions of these functions are often linearized due to simplifying of estimating the blast reaction of elements. The article presents a method of numerical analysis of the phenomenon of the air shock wave propagation. The main scope of this paper is getting the ability to make more realistic the Δp(t functions. An explicit own solution using Finite Volume Method was used. This method considers changes in energy due to heat transfer with conservation of linear heat transfer. For validation, the results of numerical analysis were compared with the literature reports. Values of impulse, pressure, and its duration were studied.

  17. Hybrid finite-volume/transported PDF method for the simulation of turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Venkatramanan

    A novel computational scheme is formulated for simulating turbulent reactive flows in complex geometries with detailed chemical kinetics. A Probability Density Function (PDF) based method that handles the scalar transport equation is coupled with an existing Finite Volume (FV) Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver. The PDF formulation leads to closed chemical source terms and facilitates the use of detailed chemical mechanisms without approximations. The particle-based PDF scheme is modified to handle complex geometries and grid structures. Grid-independent particle evolution schemes that scale linearly with the problem size are implemented in the Monte-Carlo PDF solver. A novel algorithm, in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) is employed to ensure tractability of complex chemistry involving a multitude of species. Several non-reacting test cases are performed to ascertain the efficiency and accuracy of the method. Simulation results from a turbulent jet-diffusion flame case are compared against experimental data. The effect of micromixing model, turbulence model and reaction scheme on flame predictions are discussed extensively. Finally, the method is used to analyze the Dow Chlorination Reactor. Detailed kinetics involving 37 species and 158 reactions as well as a reduced form with 16 species and 21 reactions are used. The effect of inlet configuration on reactor behavior and product distribution is analyzed. Plant-scale reactors exhibit quenching phenomena that cannot be reproduced by conventional simulation methods. The FV-PDF method predicts quenching accurately and provides insight into the dynamics of the reactor near extinction. The accuracy of the fractional time-stepping technique in discussed in the context of apparent multiple-steady states observed in a non-premixed feed configuration of the chlorination reactor.

  18. Estimate Landslide Volume with Genetic Algorithms and Image Similarity Method from Single Satellite Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting-To

    2013-04-01

    It is important to acquire the volume of landslide in short period of time. For hazard mitigation and also emergency response purpose, the traditional method takes much longer time than expected. Due to the weather limit, traffic accessibility and many regulations of law, it take months to handle these process before the actual carry out of filed work. Remote sensing imagery can get the data as long as the visibility allowed, which happened only few day after the event. While traditional photometry requires a stereo pairs images to produce the post event DEM for calculating the change of volume. Usually have to wait weeks or even months for gathering such data, LiDAR or ground GPS measurement might take even longer period of time with much higher cost. In this study we use one post event satellite image and pre-event DTM to compare the similarity between these by alter the DTM with genetic algorithms. The outcome of smartest guess from GAs shall remove or add exact values of height at each location, which been converted into shadow relief viewgraph to compare with satellite image. Once the similarity threshold been make then the guessing work stop. It takes only few hours to finish the entire task, the computed accuracy is around 70% by comparing to the high resolution LiDAR survey at a landslide, southern Taiwan. With extra GCPs, the estimate accuracy can improve to 85% and also within few hours after the receiving of satellite image. Data of this demonstration case is a 5 m DTM at 2005, 2M resolution FormoSat optical image at 2009 and 5M LiDAR at 2010. The GAs and image similarity code is developed on Matlab at windows PC.

  19. An element-based finite-volume method approach for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcondes, Francisco [Federal University of Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Material Science], e-mail: marcondes@ufc.br; Varavei, Abdoljalil; Sepehrnoori, Kamy [The University of Texas at Austin (United States). Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Dept.], e-mails: varavei@mail.utexas.edu, kamys@mail.utexas.edu

    2010-07-01

    An element-based finite-volume approach in conjunction with unstructured grids for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation is presented. In this approach, both the discrete fracture and the matrix mass balances are taken into account without any additional models to couple the matrix and discrete fractures. The mesh, for two dimensional domains, can be built of triangles, quadrilaterals, or a mix of these elements. However, due to the available mesh generator to handle both matrix and discrete fractures, only results using triangular elements will be presented. The discrete fractures are located along the edges of each element. To obtain the approximated matrix equation, each element is divided into three sub-elements and then the mass balance equations for each component are integrated along each interface of the sub-elements. The finite-volume conservation equations are assembled from the contribution of all the elements that share a vertex, creating a cell vertex approach. The discrete fracture equations are discretized only along the edges of each element and then summed up with the matrix equations in order to obtain a conservative equation for both matrix and discrete fractures. In order to mimic real field simulations, the capillary pressure is included in both matrix and discrete fracture media. In the implemented model, the saturation field in the matrix and discrete fractures can be different, but the potential of each phase in the matrix and discrete fracture interface needs to be the same. The results for several naturally fractured reservoirs are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. (author)

  20. Experimental Validation of Volume of Fluid Method for a Sluice Gate Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Oner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments are conducted for 2D turbulent free surface flow which interacts with a vertical sluice gate. The velocity field, on the centerline of the channel flow upstream of the gate is measured using the particle image velocimetry technique. The numerical simulation of the same flow is carried out by solving the governing equations, Reynolds-averaged continuity and Navier-Stokes equations, using finite element method. In the numerical solution of the governing equations, the standard k-ε turbulence closure model is used to define the turbulent viscosity. The measured horizontal velocity distribution at the inflow boundary of the solution domain is taken as the boundary condition. The volume of fluid (VOF method is used to determine the flow profile in the channel. Taking into account of the flow characteristics, the computational domain is divided into five subdomains, each having different mesh densities. Three different meshes with five subdomains are employed for the numerical model. A grid convergence analysis indicates that the discretization error in the predicted velocities on the fine mesh remains within 2%. The computational results are compared with the experimental data, and, the most suitable mesh in predicting the velocity field and the flow profile among the three meshes is selected.

  1. Modified electrochemical parameter estimation of NCR18650BD battery using implicit finite volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, T. R.; McGordon, A.; Widanage, W. D.; Jennings, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    The Pseudo Two Dimensional (P2D) porous electrode model is less preferred for real time calculations due to the high computational expense and complexity in obtaining the wide range of electro-chemical parameters despite of its superior accuracy. This paper presents a finite volume based method for re-parametrising the P2D model for any cell chemistry with uncertainty in determining precise electrochemical parameters. The re-parametrisation is achieved by solving a quadratic form of the Butler-Volmer equation and modifying the anode open circuit voltage based on experimental values. Thus the only experimental result, needed to re-parametrise the cell, reduces to the measurement of discharge voltage for any C-rate. The proposed method is validated against the 1C discharge data and an actual drive cycle of a NCR18650BD battery with NCA chemistry when driving in an urban environment with frequent accelerations and regenerative braking events. The error limit of the present model is compared with the electro-chemical prediction of LiyCoO2 battery and found to be superior to the accuracy of the model presented in the literature.

  2. A volume of fluid method for simulating fluid/fluid interfaces in contact with solid boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Mahady, Kyle; Kondic, Lou

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to model the fluid/solid interaction forces of a general van der Waals type in a direct solver of the Navier-Stokes equations based on the volume of fluid interface tracking method. The key ingredient of the model is the explicit inclusion of the fluid/solid interaction forces into the governing equations. We show that the interaction forces lead to a partial wetting condition and in particular to a natural definition of an equilibrium contact angle. We present two numerical approaches for the discretization of the interaction forces that enter the model. These two approaches are found to be complementary in terms of convergence properties and complexity. To validate the computational framework, we consider the application of these models to simulate two-dimensional drops at equilibrium, as well as drop spreading. We find that the proposed methods can accurately describe the physics of the considered problems. In general, the model allows for the accurate treatment o...

  3. FINITE VOLUME METHODS AND ADAPTIVE REFINEMENT FOR GLOBAL TSUNAMI PROPAGATION AND LOCAL INUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. George

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The shallow water equations are a commonly accepted approximation governing tsunami propagation. Numerically capturing certain features of local tsunami inundation requires solving these equations in their physically relevant conservative form, as integral con- servation laws for depth and momentum. This form of the equations presents challenges when trying to numerically model global tsunami propagation, so often the best numerical methods for the local inundation regime are not suitable for the global propagation regime. The different regimes of tsunami flow belong to different spatial scales as well, and re- quire correspondingly different grid resolutions. The long wavelength of deep ocean tsunamis requires a large global scale computing domain, yet near the shore the propa- gating energy is compressed and focused by bathymetry in unpredictable ways. This can lead to large variations in energy and run-up even over small localized regions.We have developed a finite volume method to deal with the diverse flow regimes of tsunamis. These methods are well suited for the inundation regime—they are robust in the presence of bores and steep gradients, or drying regions, and can capture the inundating shoreline and run-up features. Additionally, these methods are well-balanced, meaning that they can appropriately model global propagation.To deal with the disparate spatial scales, we have used adaptive refinement algorithms originally developed for gas dynamics, where often steep variation is highly localized at a given time, but moves throughout the domain. These algorithms allow evolving Cartesian sub-grids that can move with the propagating waves and highly resolve local inundation of impacted areas in a single global scale computation. Because the dry regions are part of the computing domain, simple rectangular cartesian grids eliminate the need for complex shoreline-fitted mesh generation.

  4. 3D highly heterogeneous thermal model of pineal gland in-vitro study for electromagnetic exposure using finite volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Wei; Hoppe, Ralph; Lu, Rongbo; Cai, Zhaoquan; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the relationship between electromagnetic power absorption and temperature distributions inside highly heterogeneous biological samples was accurately determinated using finite volume method. An in-vitro study on pineal gland that is responsible for physiological activities was for the first time simulated to illustrate effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Variant of a volume-of-fluid method for surface tension-dominant two-phase flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Biswas

    2013-12-01

    The capabilities of the volume-of-fluid method for the calculation of surface tension-dominant two-phase flows are explained. The accurate calculation of the interface remains a problem for the volume-of-fluid method if the density ratios of the fluids in different phases are high. The simulations of bubble growth is performed in water at near critical pressure for different degrees of superheat using combined levelset and volume-of fluid (CLSVOF) method. The effect of superheat on the frequency of bubble formation was analyzed. A deviation from the periodic bubble release is observed in the case of superheat of 20 K in water. The vapor-jet-like columnar structure is observed. Effect of heat flux on the slender vapor column has also been explained.

  6. The ratio of right ventricular volume to left ventricular volume reflects the impact of pulmonary regurgitation independently of the method of pulmonary regurgitation quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śpiewak, Mateusz, E-mail: mspiewak@ikard.pl [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Małek, Łukasz A., E-mail: lmalek@ikard.pl [Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Petryka, Joanna, E-mail: joannapetryka@hotmail.com [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz, Łukasz, E-mail: lmazurkiewicz@ikard.pl [Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Cardiomyopathy, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Miłosz, Barbara, E-mail: barbara-milosz@o2.pl [Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Radiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Biernacka, Elżbieta K., E-mail: kbiernacka@ikard.pl [Department of Congenital Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Kowalski, Mirosław, E-mail: mkowalski@ikard.pl [Department of Congenital Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Hoffman, Piotr, E-mail: phoffman@ikard.pl [Department of Congenital Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Demkow, Marcin, E-mail: mdemkow@ikard.pl [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Miśko, Jolanta, E-mail: jmisko@wp.pl [Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Radiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Rużyłło, Witold, E-mail: wruzyllo@ikard.pl [Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    Background: Previous studies have advocated quantifying pulmonary regurgitation (PR) by using PR volume (PRV) instead of commonly used PR fraction (PRF). However, physicians are not familiar with the use of PRV in clinical practice. The ratio of right ventricle (RV) volume to left ventricle volume (RV/LV) may better reflect the impact of PR on the heart than RV end-diastolic volume (RVEDV) alone. We aimed to compare the impact of PRV and PRF on RV size expressed as either the RV/LV ratio or RVEDV (mL/m{sup 2}). Methods: Consecutive patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot were included (n = 53). PRV, PRF and ventricular volumes were measured with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance. Results: RVEDV was more closely correlated with PRV when compared with PRF (r = 0.686, p < 0.0001, and r = 0.430, p = 0.0014, respectively). On the other hand, both PRV and PRF showed a good correlation with the RV/LV ratio (r = 0.691, p < 0.0001, and r = 0.685, p < 0.0001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that both measures of PR had similar ability to predict severe RV dilatation when the RV/LV ratio-based criterion was used, namely the RV/LV ratio > 2.0 [area under the curve (AUC){sub PRV} = 0.770 vs AUC{sub PRF} = 0.777, p = 0.86]. Conversely, with the use of the RVEDV-based criterion (>170 mL/m{sup 2}), PRV proved to be superior over PRF (AUC{sub PRV} = 0.770 vs AUC{sub PRF} = 0.656, p = 0.0028]. Conclusions: PRV and PRF have similar significance as measures of PR when the RV/LV ratio is used instead of RVEDV. The RV/LV ratio is a universal marker of RV dilatation independent of the method of PR quantification applied (PRF vs PRV)

  7. Validation of hippocampal volumes measured using a manual method and two automated methods (FreeSurfer and IBASPM) in chronic major depressive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tae, Woo Suk; Lee, Kang Uk; Nam, Eui-Cheol; Kim, Keun Woo [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Neuroscience Research Institute, Kangwon (Korea); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Neuroscience Research Institute, Kangwon (Korea); Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kangwon-do (Korea)

    2008-07-15

    To validate the usefulness of the packages available for automated hippocampal volumetry, we measured hippocampal volumes using one manual and two recently developed automated volumetric methods. The study included T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 21 patients with chronic major depressive disorder (MDD) and 20 normal controls. Using coronal turbo field echo (TFE) MRI with a slice thickness of 1.3 mm, the hippocampal volumes were measured using three methods: manual volumetry, surface-based parcellation using FreeSurfer, and individual atlas-based volumetry using IBASPM. In addition, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) was measured manually. The absolute left hippocampal volume of the patients with MDD measured using all three methods was significantly smaller than the left hippocampal volume of the normal controls (manual P=0.029, FreeSurfer P=0.035, IBASPM P=0.018). After controlling for the ICV, except for the right hippocampal volume measured using FreeSurfer, both measured hippocampal volumes of the patients with MDD were significantly smaller than the measured hippocampal volumes of the normal controls (right manual P=0.019, IBASPM P=0.012; left manual P=0.003, FreeSurfer P=0.010, IBASPM P=0.002). In the intrarater reliability test, the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were all excellent (manual right 0.947, left 0.934; FreeSurfer right 1.000, left 1.000; IBASPM right 1.000, left 1.000). In the test of agreement between the volumetric methods, the ICCs were right 0.846 and left 0.848 (manual and FreeSurfer), and right 0.654 and left 0.717 (manual and IBASPM). The automated hippocampal volumetric methods showed good agreement with manual hippocampal volumetry, but the volume measured using FreeSurfer was 35% larger and the agreement was questionable with IBASPM. Although the automated methods could detect hippocampal atrophy in the patients with MDD, the results indicate that manual hippocampal volumetry is still the gold standard

  8. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 2, Sample preparation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for sample preparation methods. Covered are: acid digestion for metals analysis, fusion of Hanford tank waste solids, water leach of sludges/soils/other solids, extraction procedure toxicity (simulate leach in landfill), sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy, acid digestion for radiochemical analysis, leach preparation of solids for free cyanide analysis, aqueous leach of solids for anion analysis, microwave digestion of glasses and slurries for ICP/MS, toxicity characteristic leaching extraction for inorganics, leach/dissolution of activated metal for radiochemical analysis, extraction of single-shell tank (SST) samples for semi-VOC analysis, preparation and cleanup of hydrocarbon- containing samples for VOC and semi-VOC analysis, receiving of waste tank samples in onsite transfer cask, receipt and inspection of SST samples, receipt and extrusion of core samples at 325A shielded facility, cleaning and shipping of waste tank samplers, homogenization of solutions/slurries/sludges, and test sample preparation for bioassay quality control program.

  9. Impact erosion prediction using the finite volume particle method with improved constitutive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguizamón, Sebastián; Jahanbakhsh, Ebrahim; Maertens, Audrey; Vessaz, Christian; Alimirzazadeh, Siamak; Avellan, François

    2016-11-01

    Erosion damage in hydraulic turbines is a common problem caused by the high- velocity impact of small particles entrained in the fluid. In this investigation, the Finite Volume Particle Method is used to simulate the three-dimensional impact of rigid spherical particles on a metallic surface. Three different constitutive models are compared: the linear strainhardening (L-H), Cowper-Symonds (C-S) and Johnson-Cook (J-C) models. They are assessed in terms of the predicted erosion rate and its dependence on impact angle and velocity, as compared to experimental data. It has been shown that a model accounting for strain rate is necessary, since the response of the material is significantly tougher at the very high strain rate regime caused by impacts. High sensitivity to the friction coefficient, which models the cutting wear mechanism, has been noticed. The J-C damage model also shows a high sensitivity to the parameter related to triaxiality, whose calibration appears to be scale-dependent, not exclusively material-determined. After calibration, the J-C model is capable of capturing the material's erosion response to both impact velocity and angle, whereas both C-S and L-H fail.

  10. Aerodynamic Noise Propagation Simulation using Immersed Boundary Method and Finite Volume Optimized Prefactored Compact Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LIU; Keqi WU

    2008-01-01

    Based on the immersed boundary method (IBM) and the finite volume optimized pre-factored compact (FVOPC) scheme, a numerical simulation of noise propagation inside and outside the casing of a cross flow fan is estab-lished. The unsteady linearized Euler equations are solved to directly simulate the aero-acoustic field. In order to validate the FVOPC scheme, a simulation case: one dimensional linear wave propagation problem is carried out using FVOPC scheme, DRP scheme and HOC scheme. The result of FVOPC is in good agreement with the ana-lytic solution and it is better than the results of DRP and HOC schemes, the FVOPC is less dispersion and dissi-pation than DRP and HOC schemes. Then, numerical simulation of noise propagation problems is performed. The noise field of 36 compact rotating noise sources is obtained with the rotating velocity of 1000r/min. The PML absorbing boundary condition is applied to the sound far field boundary condition for depressing the numerical reflection. Wall boundary condition is applied to the casing. The results show that there are reflections on the casing wall and sound wave interference in the field. The FVOPC with the IBM is suitable for noise propagation problems under the complex geometries for depressing the dispersion and dissipation, and also keeping the high order precision.

  11. Study of scattering cross section of a plasma column using Green's function volume integral equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanmoradi, Elmira; Shokri, Babak

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the electromagnetic wave scattering from plasma columns with inhomogeneous electron density distribution is studied by the Green's function volume integral equation method. Due to the ready production of such plasmas in the laboratories and their practical application in various technological fields, this study tries to find the effects of plasma parameters such as the electron density, radius, and pressure on the scattering cross-section of a plasma column. Moreover, the incident wave frequency influence of the scattering pattern is demonstrated. Furthermore, the scattering cross-section of a plasma column with an inhomogeneous collision frequency profile is calculated and the effect of this inhomogeneity is discussed first in this article. These results are especially used to determine the appropriate conditions for radar cross-section reduction purposes. It is shown that the radar cross-section of a plasma column reduces more for a larger collision frequency, for a relatively lower plasma frequency, and also for a smaller radius. Furthermore, it is found that the effect of the electron density on the scattering cross-section is more obvious in comparison with the effect of other plasma parameters. Also, the plasma column with homogenous collision frequency can be used as a better shielding in contrast to its inhomogeneous counterpart.

  12. Study on fluid-structure interaction in liquid oxygen feeding pipe systems using finite volume method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Wei; Bing Sun

    2011-01-01

    The fluid-structure interaction may occur in space launch vehicles,which would lead to bad performance of vehicles,damage equipments on vehicles,or even affect astronauts' health.In this paper,analysis on dynamic behavior of liquid oxygen (LOX) feeding pipe system in a large scale launch vehicle is performed,with the effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) taken into consideration.The pipe system is simplified as a planar FSI model with Poisson coupling and junction coupling.Numerical tests on pipes between the tank and the pump are solved by the finite volume method.Results show that restrictions weaken the interaction between axial and lateral vibrations.The reasonable results regarding frequencies and modes indicate that the FSI affects substantially the dynamic analysis,and thus highlight the usefulness of the proposed model.This study would provide a reference to the pipe test,as well as facilitate further studies on oscillation suppression.

  13. NUMERICAL RESEARCH ON WATER GUIDE BEARING OF HYDRO-GENERATOR UNIT USING FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the consideration of the geometry of tilting pad journal bearing, a new form of the Reynolds equation was derived in this article. The film thickness, the squeeze motion of the journal and the rotation motion of the pad were explicitly contained in the equation. Based on this equation, together with the equilibrium equation of pad pivot, the water guide bearing used in the Gezhouba 10 F hydro-generator unit was numerically researched. The new Reynolds equation for the lubricating film was solved using Finite Volume (FV) discretization, Successive Over-Relaxation (SOR) iteration method and C++ code are included. According to the numerical solution, and the stability of the film and the influences of the film thickness, the journal squeeze effect and the pad rotation effect on film force were discussed. The results indicate that the squeeze effect can not be neglected, although the rotation effect is negligible for both low-speed and high-speed bearings, so the computing time could be greatly reduced.

  14. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  15. A new interpolation method to model thickness, isopachs, extent, and volume of tephra fall deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingyuan; Bursik, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Tephra thickness distribution is the primary piece of information used to reconstruct the histories of past explosive volcanic eruptions. We present a method for modeling tephra thickness with less subjectivity than is the case with hand-drawn isopachs, the current, most frequently used method. The algorithm separates the thickness of a tephra fall deposit into a trend and local variations and models them separately using segmented linear regression and ordinary kriging. The distance to the source vent and downwind distance are used to characterize the trend model. The algorithm is applied to thickness datasets for the Fogo Member A and North Mono Bed 1 tephras. Simulations on subsets of data and cross-validation are implemented to test the effectiveness of the algorithm in the construction of the trend model and the model of local variations. The results indicate that model isopach maps and volume estimations are consistent with previous studies and point to some inconsistencies in hand-drawn maps and their interpretation. The most striking feature noticed in hand-drawn mapping is a lack of adherence to the data in drawing isopachs locally. Since the model assumes a stable wind field, divergences from the predicted decrease in thickness with distance are readily noticed. Hence, wind direction, although weak in the case of Fogo A, was not unidirectional during deposition. A combination of the isopach algorithm with a new, data transformation can be used to estimate the extent of fall deposits. A limitation of the algorithm is that one must estimate "by hand" the wind direction based on the thickness data.

  16. Two-dimensional finite volume method for dam-break flow simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.ALIPARAST

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model based upon a second-order upwind cell-center finite volume method on unstructured triangular grids is developed for solving shallow water equations.The assumption of a small depth downstream instead of a dry bed situation changes the wave structure and the propagation speed of the front which leads to incorrect results.The use of Harten-Lax-vau Leer (HLL) allows handling of wet/dry treatment.By usage of the HLL approximate Riemann solver,also it make possible to handle discontinuous solutions.As the assumption of a very small depth downstream of the dam can change the nature of the dam break flow problem which leads to incorrect results,the HLL approximate Riemann solver is used for the computation of inviscid flux functions,which makes it possible to handle discontinuous solutions.A multidimensional slope-limiting technique is applied to achieve second-order spatial accuracy and to prevent spurious oscillations.To alleviate the problems associated with numerical instabilities due to small water depths near a wet/dry boundary,the friction source terms are treated in a fully implicit way.A third-order Runge-Kutta method is used for the time integration of semi-discrete equations.The developed numerical model has been applied to several test cases as well as to real flows.The tests are tested in two cases:oblique hydraulic jump and experimental dam break in converging-diverging flume.Numerical tests proved the robustness and accuracy of the model.The model has been applied for simulation of dam break analysis of Torogh in Irun.And finally the results have been used in preparing EAP (Emergency Action Plan).

  17. Development of automated extraction method of biliary tract from abdominal CT volumes based on local intensity structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Kusuto; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Hirose, Tomoaki; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Nagino, Masato; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated biliary tract extraction method from abdominal CT volumes. The biliary tract is the path by which bile is transported from liver to the duodenum. No extraction method have been reported for the automated extraction of the biliary tract from common contrast CT volumes. Our method consists of three steps including: (1) extraction of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) candidate regions, (2) extraction of intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) candidate regions, and (3) combination of these candidate regions. The IHBD has linear structures and intensities of the IHBD are low in CT volumes. We use a dark linear structure enhancement (DLSE) filter based on a local intensity structure analysis method using the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix for the IHBD candidate region extraction. The EHBD region is extracted using a thresholding process and a connected component analysis. In the combination process, we connect the IHBD candidate regions to each EHBD candidate region and select a bile duct region from the connected candidate regions. We applied the proposed method to 22 cases of CT volumes. An average Dice coefficient of extraction result was 66.7%.

  18. Multiple Scattering Using Parallel Volume Integral Equation Method: Interaction of SH Waves with Multiple Multilayered Anisotropic Elliptical Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungki Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The parallel volume integral equation method (PVIEM is applied for the analysis of elastic wave scattering problems in an unbounded isotropic solid containing multiple multilayered anisotropic elliptical inclusions. This recently developed numerical method does not require the use of Green’s function for the multilayered anisotropic inclusions; only Green’s function for the unbounded isotropic matrix is needed. This method can also be applied to solve general two- and three-dimensional elastodynamic problems involving inhomogeneous and/or multilayered anisotropic inclusions whose shape and number are arbitrary. A detailed analysis of the SH wave scattering is presented for multiple triple-layered orthotropic elliptical inclusions. Numerical results are presented for the displacement fields at the interfaces for square and hexagonal packing arrays of triple-layered elliptical inclusions in a broad frequency range of practical interest. It is necessary to use standard parallel programming, such as MPI (message passing interface, to speed up computation in the volume integral equation method (VIEM. Parallel volume integral equation method as a pioneer of numerical analysis enables us to investigate the effects of single/multiple scattering, fiber packing type, fiber volume fraction, single/multiple layer(s, multilayer’s shape and geometry, isotropy/anisotropy, and softness/hardness of the multiple multilayered anisotropic elliptical inclusions on displacements at the interfaces of the inclusions.

  19. Systems and methods for the detection of low-level harmful substances in a large volume of fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Michael V.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Lindquist, Alan; Gallardo, Vincente

    2016-03-15

    A method and device for the detection of low-level harmful substances in a large volume of fluid comprising using a concentrator system to produce a retentate and analyzing the retentate for the presence of at least one harmful substance. The concentrator system performs a method comprising pumping at least 10 liters of fluid from a sample source through a filter. While pumping, the concentrator system diverts retentate from the filter into a container. The concentrator system also recirculates at least part of the retentate in the container again through the filter. The concentrator system controls the speed of the pump with a control system thereby maintaining a fluid pressure less than 25 psi during the pumping of the fluid; monitors the quantity of retentate within the container with a control system, and maintains a reduced volume level of retentate and a target volume of retentate.

  20. Pore-scale simulation of fluid flow passing over a porously covered square cylinder located at the middle of a channel, using a hybrid MRT-LBM-FVM approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Mohammad Reza; Taeibi Rahni, Mohammad; Jam, Freydun

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive study was performed to analyze the unsteady laminar flow characteristics around a porously covered, a fully porous, and a solid squared section cylinder located in the middle of a plane channel. In order to simulate fluid flow inside porous media and porous-fluid interface accurately (minimizing modeling error), the porous region was analyzed in pore scale, using LBM. Additionally, to minimize the LBM-related compressibility error through the porous region, a multi-block multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) was used. Also, to decrease CPU time, a Navier-Stokes flow solver, based on finite volume method and SIMPLE algorithm, was coupled with MRT-LBM to simulate flow around the porous obstacle. It should be noted that the flow inside the porous layer is in continuum regime, and hence, the no-slip boundary condition was used to treat the solid walls inside the porous media. In our simulations, we considered variations of porosity and Reynolds number ranging from 0.75 to 0.94 and from 60 to 240, respectively. The effects of porosity and Reynolds number on vortex pattern, mean drag coefficient, amplitude of lift coefficient, and Strouhal number were investigated. Comparison of our results with the ones obtained using Open FOAM, as well as published by others, shows the suitable accuracy of our computations. It is seen that at low Reynolds numbers or at low porosities, where the mean flow does not have large enough momentum to penetrate porous media, the resulting flow field and aerodynamic coefficients are relatively close for three different configurations used. However, as the flow Reynolds number or permeability increases, the mean flow penetrates easier into the porous media and thus provides different shedding characteristics and aerodynamic coefficients for different obstacle shapes.

  1. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa H

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume. The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries.

  2. A region growing method for tumor volume segmentation on PET images for rectal and anal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ellen; Betler, James; Parda, David; Reitz, Bodo; Kirichenko, Alexander; Mohammadi, Seyed; Miften, Moyed

    2009-10-01

    The application of automated segmentation methods for tumor delineation on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images presents an opportunity to reduce the interobserver variability in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. In this work, three segmentation methods were evaluated and compared for rectal and anal cancer patients: (i) Percentage of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV% max), (ii) fixed SUV cutoff of 2.5 (SUV2.5), and (iii) mathematical technique based on a confidence connected region growing (CCRG) method. A phantom study was performed to determine the SUV% max threshold value and found to be 43%, SUV43% max. The CCRG method is an iterative scheme that relies on the use of statistics from a specified region in the tumor. The scheme is initialized by a subregion of pixels surrounding the maximum intensity pixel. The mean and standard deviation of this region are measured and the pixels connected to the region are included or not based on the criterion that they are greater than a value derived from the mean and standard deviation. The mean and standard deviation of this new region are then measured and the process repeats. FDG-PET-CT imaging studies for 18 patients who received RT were used to evaluate the segmentation methods. A PET avid (PETavid) region was manually segmented for each patient and the volume was then used to compare the calculated volumes along with the absolute mean difference and range for all methods. For the SUV43% max method, the volumes were always smaller than the PETavid volume by a mean of 56% and a range of 21%-79%. The volumes from the SUV2.5 method were either smaller or larger than the PETavid volume by a mean of 37% and a range of 2%-130%. The CCRG approach provided the best results with a mean difference of 9% and a range of 1%-27%. Results show that the CCRG technique can be used in the segmentation of tumor volumes on FDG-PET images, thus providing treatment planners with a clinically

  3. Energy-preserving finite volume element method for the improved Boussinesq equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanxiang; Zhang, Zhiyue; Zhang, Xinhua; Zhu, Quanyong

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we design an energy-preserving finite volume element scheme for solving the initial boundary problems of the improved Boussinesq equation. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed numerical schemes can conserve the energy and mass. Numerical experiments are performed to illustrate the efficiency of the scheme and theoretical analysis. While the results demonstrate that the proposed finite volume element scheme is second-order accuracy in space and time. Moreover, the new scheme can conserve mass and energy.

  4. Comparison of Three Methods for the Estimation of Pineal Gland Volume Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Niyazi Acer; Ahmet Turan Ilıca; Ahmet Tuncay Turgut; Özlem Özçelik; Birdal Yıldırım; Mehmet Turgut

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of t...

  5. A Method for Measuring the Volume of Transdermally Extracted Interstitial Fluid by a Three-Electrode Skin Resistance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dachao Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to accurately measure the volume of transdermally extracted interstitial fluid (ISF, which is important for improving blood glucose prediction accuracy. Skin resistance, which is a good indicator of skin permeability, can be used to determine the volume of extracted ISF. However, it is a challenge to realize in vivo longitudinal skin resistance measurements of microareas. In this study, a three-electrode sensor was presented for measuring single-point skin resistance in vivo, and a method for determining the volume of transdermally extracted ISF using this sensor was proposed. Skin resistance was measured under static and dynamic conditions. The correlation between the skin resistance and the permeation rate of transdermally extracted ISF was proven. The volume of transdermally extracted ISF was determined using skin resistance. Factors affecting the volume prediction accuracy of transdermally extracted ISF were discussed. This method is expected to improve the accuracy of blood glucose prediction, and is of great significance for the clinical application of minimally invasive blood glucose measurement.

  6. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications.

  7. Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Method for Advection-Diffusion Equations Subject to Heterogeneous Reactive Boundary Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-10-13

    We present a hybrid scheme for the coupling of macro and microscale continuum models for reactive contaminant transport in fractured and porous media. The transport model considered is the advection-dispersion equation, subject to linear heterogeneous reactive boundary conditions. The Multiscale Finite Volume method (MsFV) is employed to define an approximation to the microscale concentration field defined in terms of macroscopic or \\emph{global} degrees of freedom, together with local interpolator and corrector functions capturing microscopic spatial variability. The macroscopic mass balance relations for the MsFV global degrees of freedom are coupled with the macroscopic model, resulting in a global problem for the simultaneous time-stepping of all macroscopic degrees of freedom throughout the domain. In order to perform the hybrid coupling, the micro and macroscale models are applied over overlapping subdomains of the simulation domain, with the overlap denoted as the handshake subdomain $\\Omega^{hs}$, over which continuity of concentration and transport fluxes between models is enforced. Continuity of concentration is enforced by posing a restriction relation between models over $\\Omega^{hs}$. Continuity of fluxes is enforced by prolongating the macroscopic model fluxes across the boundary of $\\Omega^{hs}$ to microscopic resolution. The microscopic interpolator and corrector functions are solutions to local microscopic advection-diffusion problems decoupled from the global degrees of freedom and from each other by virtue of the MsFV decoupling ansatz. The error introduced by the decoupling ansatz is reduced iteratively by the preconditioned GMRES algorithm, with the hybrid MsFV operator serving as the preconditioner.

  8. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry--a novel method to quantify blood volume in experimental models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Foerch, Christian; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud

    2013-02-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10% of all strokes and has a significantly higher mortality than cerebral ischemia. For decades, ICH has been neglected by experimental stroke researchers. Recently, however, clinical trials on acute blood pressure lowering or hyperacute supplementation of coagulation factors in ICH have spurred an interest to also design and improve translational animal models of spontaneous and anticoagulant-associated ICH. Hematoma volume is a substantial outcome parameter of most experimental ICH studies. We present graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) as a suitable method to precisely quantify hematoma volumes in rodent models of ICH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Numerical modeling of subsidence in saturated porous media: A mass conservative method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Roza; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a second order accurate cell-centered finite volume method (FVM) is coupled with a finite element method (FEM) to solve the deformation of a saturated porous layer based on Biot's consolidation model. The proposed numerical technique is applied to the fully unstructured triangular grids to simulate actual geological formations. To reconstruct the pressure gradient at control volume faces, the diamond scheme is implemented as a multipoint flux approximation method. Also the least square algorithm is used to interpolate pressure at the vertices from the cell-center values. The stability of this numerical model is studied in comparison to the different FEMs through various examples. It is shown that, although the Taylor-Hood FEM has been introduced as a remedy for violation of the inf-sup condition, it does not entirely remove the non-physical oscillations. Contrary to the linear and Taylor-Hood FEMs, the proposed discretization model provides monotonic solution without imposing any restriction on the mesh or time step size. Compared to the mixed FEM, the method achieves local mass balance with fewer degrees of freedom. To couple the flow and mechanical sub-problems, the fixed-stress operator split is implemented as an iterative sequential method, due to its unconditional stability, accuracy and high rate of convergence. The accuracy of the proposed model is verified via a range of examples including analytical and numerical solutions. The performance of this methodology is assessed through modeling of subsidence in an aquifer-interbed system. This problem illustrates the capability of the model in providing stable solution in heterogeneous domains with complicated shapes.

  10. A new approach for volume reconstruction in TomoPIV with the alternating direction method of multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, Ioana; Herzet, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    We adapt and import into the TomoPIV scenery a fast algorithm for solving the volume reconstruction problem. Our approach is based on the reformulation of the volume reconstruction task as a constrained optimization problem and the resort to the ‘alternating directions method of multipliers’ (ADMM). The inherent primal-dual algorithm is summarized in this article to solve the optimization problem related to the TomoPIV. In particular, the general formulation of the volume reconstruction problem considered in this paper allows one to: (i) take explicitly into account the level of the noise affecting the data; (ii) account for both the nonnegativity and the sparsity of the solution. Experiments on a numerical TomoPIV benchmark show that the proposed framework is a serious contender for the state-of-the-art.

  11. A conservative finite volume method for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined nested Cartesian grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifounakis, Adamandios; Lee, Sangseung; You, Donghyun

    2016-12-01

    A second-order-accurate finite-volume method is developed for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined nested Cartesian grids. Numerical accuracy and stability on locally refined nested Cartesian grids are achieved using a finite-volume discretization of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations based on higher-order conservation principles - i.e., in addition to mass and momentum conservation, kinetic energy conservation in the inviscid limit is used to guide the selection of the discrete operators and solution algorithms. Hanging nodes at the interface are virtually slanted to improve the pressure-velocity projection, while the other parts of the grid maintain an orthogonal Cartesian grid topology. The present method is straight-forward to implement and shows superior conservation of mass, momentum, and kinetic energy compared to the conventional methods employing interpolation at the interface between coarse and fine grids.

  12. Body fluid volumes measurements by impedance: A review of bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) and bioimpedance analysis (BIA) methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrin, Michel Y; Morel, Hélène

    2008-12-01

    This paper reviews various bioimpedance methods permitting to measure non-invasively, extracellular, intracellular and total body water (TBW) and compares BIA methods based on empirical equations of the wrist-ankle resistance or impedance at 50 kHz, height and weight with BIS methods which rely on an electrical model of tissues and resistances measured at zero and infinite frequencies. In order to compare these methods, impedance measurements were made with a multifrequency Xitron 4200 impedance meter on 57 healthy subjects which had undergone simultaneously a Dual X-ray absorptiometry examination (DXA), in order to estimate their TBW from their fat-free-mass. Extracellular (ECW) and TBW volumes were calculated for these subjects using the original BIS method and modifications of Matthie[Matthie JR. Second generation mixture theory equation for estimating intracellular water using bioimpedance spectroscopy. J Appl Physiol 2005;99:780-1], Jaffrin et al. [Jaffrin MY, Fenech M, Moreno MV, Kieffer R. Total body water measurement by a modification of the bioimpédance spectroscopy method. Med Bio Eng Comput 2006;44:873-82], Moissl et al. [Moissl UM, Wabel P, Chamney PW, Bosaeus I, Levin NW, et al. Body fluid volume determination via body composition spectroscopy in health and disease. Physiol Meas 2006;27:921-33] and their TBW resistivities were compared and discussed. ECW volumes were calculated by BIA methods of Sergi et al. [Sergi G, Bussolotto M, Perini P, Calliari I, et al. Accuracy of bioelectrical bioimpedance analysis for the assessment of extracellular space in healthy subjects and in fluid retention states. Ann Nutr Metab 1994;38(3):158-65] and Hannan et al. [Hannan WJ, Cowen SJ, Fearon KC, Plester CE, Falconer JS, Richardson RA. Evaluation of multi-frequency bio-impedance analysis for the assessment of extracellular and total body water in surgical patients. Clin Sci 1994;86:479-85] and TBW volumes by BIA methods of Kushner and Schoeller [Kushner RF

  13. How To Use Qualitative Methods in Evaluation. CSE Program Evaluation Kit, Volume 4. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    The "CSE Program Evaluation Kit" is a series of nine books intended to assist people conducting program evaluations. This volume, the fourth in the kit, explains the basic assumptions underlying qualitative procedures, suggests evaluation situations where qualitative designs are useful, and provides guidelines for designing qualitative…

  14. Validation of a New Method for Stroke Volume Variation Assessment: a Comparaison with the PiCCO Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Papelier, Yves; Cottin, François; Van De Louw, Andry

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel, simple and minimally invasive method for stroke volume variation assessment using arterial blood pressure measurements. The arterial blood pressure signal is reconstructed using a semi-classical signal analysis method allowing the computation of a parameter, called the first systolic invariant INVS1. We show that INVS1 is linearly related to stroke volume. To validate this approach, a statistical comparaison between INVS1 and stroke volume measured with the PiCCO technique was performed during a 15-mn recording in 21 mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care. In 94% of the whole recordings, a strong correlation was estimated by cross-correlation analysis (mean coefficient=0.9) and linear regression (mean coefficient=0.89). Once the linear relation had been verified, a Bland-Altman test showed the very good agreement between the two approaches and their interchangeability. For the remaining 6%, INVS1 and the PiCCO stroke volume were not correlated at all, and this discrepa...

  15. Cálculo do volume na equação de van der Waals pelo método de cardano Volume calculation in van der Waals equation by the cardano method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson H. T. Lemes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Analytical solutions of a cubic equation with real coefficients are established using the Cardano method. The method is first applied to simple third order equation. Calculation of volume in the van der Waals equation of state is afterwards established. These results are exemplified to calculate the volumes below and above critical temperatures. Analytical and numerical values for the compressibility factor are presented as a function of the pressure. As a final example, coexistence volumes in the liquid-vapor equilibrium are calculated. The Cardano approach is very simple to apply, requiring only elementary operations, indicating an attractive method to be used in teaching elementary thermodynamics.

  16. A volume-amending method to improve mass conservation of level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XiangYang; WANG YueFa; YU GengZhi; YANG Chao; MAO ZaiSha

    2008-01-01

    A volume-amending method is developed both to keep the level set function as an algebraic distance function and to preserve the bubble mass in a level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows with the significantly deformed free interface. After the traditional reinitialization procedure, a vol-ume-amending method is added for correcting the position of the interface according to mass loss/gain error until the mass error falls in the allowable range designated in advance. The level set approach with this volume-amending method incorporated has been validated by three test cases: the motion of a single axisymmetrical bubble or drop in liquid, the motion of a two-dimensional water drop falling through the air into a water pool, and the interactional motion of two buoyancy-driven three-dimensional deformable bubbles. The computational results with this volume-amending method in-corporated are in good agreement with the reported experimental data and the mass is well preserved in all cases.

  17. A volume-amending method to improve mass conservation of level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A volume-amending method is developed both to keep the level set function as an algebraic distance function and to preserve the bubble mass in a level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows with the significantly deformed free interface. After the traditional reinitialization procedure, a vol-ume-amending method is added for correcting the position of the interface according to mass loss/gain error until the mass error falls in the allowable range designated in advance. The level set approach with this volume-amending method incorporated has been validated by three test cases: the motion of a single axisymmetrical bubble or drop in liquid, the motion of a two-dimensional water drop falling through the air into a water pool, and the interactional motion of two buoyancy-driven three- dimensional deformable bubbles. The computational results with this volume-amending method in-corporated are in good agreement with the reported experimental data and the mass is well preserved in all cases.

  18. Dual-mixed finite elements for the three-field Stokes model as a finite volume method on staggered grids

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-06-09

    In this paper, a new three-field weak formulation for Stokes problems is developed, and from this, a dual-mixed finite element method is proposed on a rectangular mesh. In the proposed mixed methods, the components of stress tensor are approximated by piecewise constant functions or Q1 functions, while the velocity and pressure are discretized by the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas element and the piecewise constant functions, respectively. Using quadrature rules, we demonstrate that this scheme can be reduced into a finite volume method on staggered grid, which is extensively used in computational fluid mechanics and engineering.

  19. Determination of respirable mass concentration using a high volume air sampler and a sedimentation method for fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.

    1995-12-31

    A preliminary study of a new method for determining respirable mass concentration is described. This method uses a high volume air sampler and subsequent fractionation of the collected mass using a particle sedimentation technique. Side-by-side comparisons of this method with cyclones were made in the field and in the laboratory. There was good agreement among the samplers in the laboratory, but poor agreement in the field. The effect of wind on the samplers` capture efficiencies is the primary hypothesized source of error among the field results. The field test took place at the construction site of a hazardous waste landfill located on the Hanford Reservation.

  20. Magnetic Helicity Estimations in Models and Observations of the Solar Magnetic Field. Part I: Finite Volume Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, Gherardo; Pariat, Etienne; Anfinogentov, Sergey; Chen, Feng; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Guo, Yang; Liu, Yang; Moraitis, Kostas; Thalmann, Julia K.; Yang, Shangbin

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity of ideal magneto-hydrodynamics characterized by an inverse turbulent cascade. Accordingly, it is often invoked as one of the basic physical quantities driving the generation and structuring of magnetic fields in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We provide here the first systematic comparison of six existing methods for the estimation of the helicity of magnetic fields known in a finite volume. All such methods are reviewed, benchmarked, and compared with each other, and specifically tested for accuracy and sensitivity to errors. To that purpose, we consider four groups of numerical tests, ranging from solutions of the three-dimensional, force-free equilibrium, to magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Almost all methods are found to produce the same value of magnetic helicity within few percent in all tests. In the more solar-relevant and realistic of the tests employed here, the simulation of an eruptive flux rope, the spread in the computed values obtained by all but one method is only 3 %, indicating the reliability and mutual consistency of such methods in appropriate parameter ranges. However, methods show differences in the sensitivity to numerical resolution and to errors in the solenoidal property of the input fields. In addition to finite volume methods, we also briefly discuss a method that estimates helicity from the field lines' twist, and one that exploits the field's value at one boundary and a coronal minimal connectivity instead of a pre-defined three-dimensional magnetic-field solution.

  1. Solution of the square lid-driven cavity flow of a Bingham plastic using the finite volume method

    CERN Document Server

    Syrakos, Alexandros; Alexandrou, Andreas N

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the performance of the finite volume method in solving viscoplastic flows. The creeping square lid-driven cavity flow of a Bingham plastic is chosen as the test case and the constitutive equation is regularised as proposed by Papanastasiou [J. Rheol. 31 (1987) 385-404]. It is shown that the convergence rate of the standard SIMPLE pressure-correction algorithm, which is used to solve the algebraic equation system that is produced by the finite volume discretisation, severely deteriorates as the Bingham number increases, with a corresponding increase in the non-linearity of the equations. It is shown that using the SIMPLE algorithm in a multigrid context dramatically improves convergence, although the multigrid convergence rates are much worse than for Newtonian flows. The numerical results obtained for Bingham numbers as high as 1000 compare favourably with reported results of other methods.

  2. A Novel Method for Extracting Respiration Rate and Relative Tidal Volume from Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gregory F.; Gatto, Rodolfo G.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In psychophysiological research, measurement of respiration has been dependent on transducers having direct contact with the participant. The current study provides empirical data demonstrating that a noncontact technology, infrared video thermography, can accurately estimate breathing rate and relative tidal volume across a range of breathing patterns. Video tracking algorithms were applied to frame-by-frame thermal images of the face to extract time series of nostril temperature and to generate breath-by-breath measures of respiration rate and relative tidal volume. The thermal indices of respiration were contrasted with criterion measures collected with inductance plethysmography. The strong correlations observed between the technologies demonstrate the potential use of facial video thermography as a noncontact technology to monitor respiration. PMID:21214587

  3. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: Code structure, system models, and solution methods. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling, approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. RELAP5/MOD3 code documentation is divided into seven volumes: Volume I provides modeling theory and associated numerical schemes.

  4. A Review of Electrical Impedance Spectrometry Methods for Parametric Estimation of Physiologic Fluid Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewberry, B.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectrometry involves measurement of the complex resistance of a load at multiple frequencies. With this information in the form of impedance magnitude and phase, or resistance and reactance, basic structure or function of the load can be estimated. The "load" targeted for measurement and estimation in this study consisted of the water-bearing tissues of the human calf. It was proposed and verified that by measuring the electrical impedance of the human calf and fitting this data to a model of fluid compartments, the lumped-model volume of intracellular and extracellular spaces could be estimated, By performing this estimation over time, the volume dynamics during application of stimuli which affect the direction of gravity can be viewed. The resulting data can form a basis for further modeling and verification of cardiovascular and compartmental modeling of fluid reactions to microgravity as well as countermeasures to the headward shift of fluid during head-down tilt or spaceflight.

  5. Third order finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for two-dimensional wave equation system

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Warnecke, Gerald; Zahaykah, Yousef

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the derivation and analysis of third order finite volume evolution Galerkin schemes for the two-dimensional wave equation system. To achieve this the first order approximate evolution operator is considered. A recovery stage is carried out at each level to generate a piecewise polynomial approximation from the piecewise constants, to feed into the calculation of the fluxes. We estimate the truncation error and give numerical examples to demonstrate the higher order...

  6. Development of volume reduction method of cesium contaminated soil with magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukumatsu, Kazuki; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we developed a new volume reduction technique for cesium contaminated soil by magnetic separation. Cs in soil is mainly adsorbed on clay which is the smallest particle constituent in the soil, especially on paramagnetic 2:1 type clay minerals which strongly adsorb and fix Cs. Thus selective separation of 2:1 type clay with a superconducting magnet could enable to reduce the volume of Cs contaminated soil. The 2:1 type clay particles exist in various particle sizes in the soil, which leads that magnetic force and Cs adsorption quantity depend on their particle size. Accordingly, we examined magnetic separation conditions for efficient separation of 2:1 type clay considering their particle size distribution. First, the separation rate of 2:1 type clay for each particle size was calculated by particle trajectory simulation, because magnetic separation rate largely depends on the objective size. According to the calculation, 73 and 89 % of 2:1 type clay could be separated at 2 and 7 T, respectively. Moreover we calculated dose reduction rate on the basis of the result of particle trajectory simulation. It was indicated that 17 and 51 % of dose reduction would be possible at 2 and 7 T, respectively. The difference of dose reduction rate at 2 T and 7 T was found to be separated a fine particle. It was shown that magnetic separation considering particle size distribution would contribute to the volume reduction of contaminated soil.

  7. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: is there a preferred method?

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated by helical tomotherapy using 2D or 3D margining technique in in prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, 5 mm margin was added not only in lateral/anterior-posterior, but also in superior-inferior to CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between 2D and 3D PTV indices were not significant except for CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant d...

  8. Description and characterization of a novel method for partial volume simulation in software breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyu; Bakic, Predrag R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Jensen, Shane T; Shi, Xiquan; Pokrajac, David D

    2015-10-01

    A modification to our previous simulation of breast anatomy is proposed to improve the quality of simulated x-ray projections images. The image quality is affected by the voxel size of the simulation. Large voxels can cause notable spatial quantization artifacts; small voxels extend the generation time and increase the memory requirements. An improvement in image quality is achievable without reducing voxel size by the simulation of partial volume averaging in which voxels containing more than one simulated tissue type are allowed. The linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of voxels is, thus, the sum of the linear attenuation coefficients weighted by the voxel subvolume occupied by each tissue type. A local planar approximation of the boundary surface is employed. In the two-material case, the partial volume in each voxel is computed by decomposition into up to four simple geometric shapes. In the three-material case, by application of the Gauss-Ostrogradsky theorem, the 3D partial volume problem is converted into one of a few simpler 2D surface area problems. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed methodology on simulated x-ray projections. An efficient encoding scheme is proposed for the type and proportion of simulated tissues in each voxel. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the quantitative error of our approximation algorithms.

  9. Ultrasonic methods for measuring liquid viscosity and volume percent of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes two ultrasonic techniques under development at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the tank-waste transport effort undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy in treating low-level nuclear waste. The techniques are intended to provide continuous on-line measurements of waste viscosity and volume percent of solids in a waste transport line. The ultrasonic technique being developed for waste-viscosity measurement is based on the patented ANL viscometer. Focus of the viscometer development in this project is on improving measurement accuracy, stability, and range, particularly in the low-viscosity range (<30 cP). A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the laboratory. Better than 1% accuracy in liquid density measurement can be obtained by using either a polyetherimide or polystyrene wedge. To measure low viscosities, a thin-wedge design has been developed and shows good sensitivity down to 5 cP. The technique for measuring volume percent of solids is based on ultrasonic wave scattering and phase velocity variation. This report covers a survey of multiple scattering theories and other phenomenological approaches. A theoretical model leading to development of an ultrasonic instrument for measuring volume percent of solids is proposed, and preliminary measurement data are presented.

  10. A new microscopic method to analyse desiccation-induced volume changes in aeroterrestrial green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajos, K; Mayr, S; Buchner, O; Blaas, K; Holzinger, A

    2016-08-01

    Aeroterrestrial green algae are exposed to desiccation in their natural habitat, but their actual volume changes have not been investigated. Here, we measure the relative volume reduction (RVRED ) in Klebsormidium crenulatum and Zygnema sp. under different preset relative air humidities (RH). A new chamber allows monitoring RH during light microscopic observation of the desiccation process. The RHs were set in the range of ∼4 % to ∼95% in 10 steps. RVRED caused by the desiccation process was determined after full acclimation to the respective RHs. In K. crenulatum, RVRED (mean ± SE) was 46.4 ± 1.9%, in Zygnema sp. RVRED was only 34.3 ± 2.4% at the highest RH (∼95%) tested. This indicates a more pronounced water loss at higher RHs in K. crenulatum versus Zygnema sp. By contrast, at the lowest RH (∼4%) tested, RVRED ranged from 75.9 ± 2.7% in K. crenulatum to 83.9 ± 2.2% in Zygnema sp. The final volume reduction is therefore more drastic in Zygnema sp. These data contribute to our understanding of the desiccation process in streptophytic green algae, which are considered the closest ancestors of land plants.

  11. Functional Data Analysis in NTCP Modeling: A New Method to Explore the Radiation Dose-Volume Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine, E-mail: mohamedamine.benadjaoud@gustaveroussy.fr [Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) INSERM 1018 Radiation, Epidemiology Group, Villejuif (France); Université Paris sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blanchard, Pierre [Université Paris sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Schwartz, Boris [Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) INSERM 1018 Radiation, Epidemiology Group, Villejuif (France); Université Paris sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Champoudry, Jérôme [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHU de la Timone, Marseille (France); Bouaita, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Department of Radiation Physics, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Deutsch, Eric [Université Paris sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); INSERM 1030, Molecular Radiotherapy, Villejuif (France); Diallo, Ibrahima [Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) INSERM 1018 Radiation, Epidemiology Group, Villejuif (France); Université Paris sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Cardot, Hervé [Institut de Mathématiques de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); and others

    2014-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To describe a novel method to explore radiation dose-volume effects. Functional data analysis is used to investigate the information contained in differential dose-volume histograms. The method is applied to the normal tissue complication probability modeling of rectal bleeding (RB) for patients irradiated in the prostatic bed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Kernel density estimation was used to estimate the individual probability density functions from each of the 141 rectum differential dose-volume histograms. Functional principal component analysis was performed on the estimated probability density functions to explore the variation modes in the dose distribution. The functional principal components were then tested for association with RB using logistic regression adapted to functional covariates (FLR). For comparison, 3 other normal tissue complication probability models were considered: the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, logistic model based on standard dosimetric parameters (LM), and logistic model based on multivariate principal component analysis (PCA). Results: The incidence rate of grade ≥2 RB was 14%. V{sub 65Gy} was the most predictive factor for the LM (P=.058). The best fit for the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was obtained with n=0.12, m = 0.17, and TD50 = 72.6 Gy. In PCA and FLR, the components that describe the interdependence between the relative volumes exposed at intermediate and high doses were the most correlated to the complication. The FLR parameter function leads to a better understanding of the volume effect by including the treatment specificity in the delivered mechanistic information. For RB grade ≥2, patients with advanced age are significantly at risk (odds ratio, 1.123; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.22), and the fits of the LM, PCA, and functional principal component analysis models are significantly improved by including this clinical factor. Conclusion: Functional

  12. A novel method for the angiographic estimation of the percentage of spleen volume embolized during partial splenic embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Ming-Ching; Chuang, Ming-Tsung [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cheng-Kung University Hospital, No. 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Xi-Zhang [Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng-Kung University Hospital, No. 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Hong-Ming; Chen, Shu-Yuan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cheng-Kung University Hospital, No. 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Yi-Sheng, E-mail: taicheng100704@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cheng-Kung University Hospital, No. 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of estimating the volume of spleen embolized in partial splenic embolization (PSE) by measuring the diameters of the splenic artery and its branches. Materials and methods: A total of 43 liver cirrhosis patients (mean age, 62.19 ± 9.65 years) with thrombocytopenia were included. Among these, 24 patients underwent a follow-up CT scan which showed a correlation between angiographic estimation and measured embolized splenic volume. Estimated splenic embolization volume was calculated by a method based on diameters of the splenic artery and its branches. The diameters of each of the splenic arteries and branches were measured via 2D angiographic images. Embolization was performed with gelatin sponges. Patients underwent follow-up with serial measurement of blood counts and liver function tests. The actual volume of embolized spleen was determined by computed tomography (CT) measuring the volumes of embolized and non-embolized spleen two months after PSE. Results: PSE was performed without immediate major complications. The mean WBC count significantly increased from 3.81 ± 1.69 × 10{sup 3}/mm{sup 3} before PSE to 8.56 ± 3.14 × 10{sup 3}/mm{sup 3} at 1 week after PSE (P < 0.001). Mean platelet count significantly increased from 62.00 ± 22.62 × 10{sup 3}/mm{sup 3} before PSE to 95.40 ± 46.29 × 10{sup 3}/mm{sup 3} 1 week after PSE (P < 0.001). The measured embolization ratio was positively correlated with estimated embolization ratio (Spearman's rho [ρ] = 0.687, P < 0.001). The mean difference between the actual embolization ratio and the estimated embolization ratio was 16.16 ± 8.96%. Conclusions: The method provides a simple method to quantitatively estimate embolized splenic volume with a correlation of measured embolization ratio to estimated embolization ratio of Spearman's ρ = 0.687.

  13. 容积法体积管自动检定装置%Volumetric method volume tube automatic calibration device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周兵

    2014-01-01

    Using standard metal gauge, four-way commutator, PC, PLC as the main hardware, Kingview software development platform, The building Volumetric method volume tube automatic calibration device. According to the verification regulation requirements, To control the flow valve, Device automatically read standard gauge of metal volume value, The automatic temperature and pressure values collected, Automatically calculate the volume tube basic volume, standard error, repeatability, accuracy and repeatability. Realize the visual operation interface, save the test data, print calibration certificate, the notice of verification results, etc.%利用标准金属量器、四通换向器、计算机、PLC 为主要硬件,组态王软件为开发平台,构建容积法体积管自动检定装置。根据检定规程要求,控制流量阀,装置自动读取标准金属量器的容积值、自动采集温度、压力值,自动计算出体积管基本体积、标准误差、重复性、准确度、复现性。实现可视的操作界面、保存检定数据、打印检定证书、检定结果通知书等功能。

  14. Performance of the finite volume method in solving regularised Bingham flows: inertia effects in the lid-driven cavity flow

    CERN Document Server

    Syrakos, Alexandros; Alexandrou, Andreas N

    2016-01-01

    We extend our recent work on the creeping flow of a Bingham fluid in a lid-driven cavity, to the study of inertial effects, using a finite volume method and the Papanastasiou regularisation of the Bingham constitutive model [J. Rheology 31 (1987) 385-404]. The finite volume method used belongs to a very popular class of methods for solving Newtonian flow problems, which use the SIMPLE algorithm to solve the discretised set of equations, and have matured over the years. By regularising the Bingham constitutive equation it is easy to extend such a solver to Bingham flows since all that this requires is to modify the viscosity function. This is a tempting approach, since it requires minimum programming effort and makes available all the existing features of the mature finite volume solver. On the other hand, regularisation introduces a parameter which controls the error in addition to the grid spacing, and makes it difficult to locate the yield surfaces. Furthermore, the equations become stiffer and more difficu...

  15. Test functions for three-dimensional control-volume mixed finite-element methods on irregular grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    2000-01-01

    Numerical methods based on unstructured grids, with irregular cells, usually require discrete shape functions to approximate the distribution of quantities across cells. For control-volume mixed finite-element methods, vector shape functions are used to approximate the distribution of velocities across cells and vector test functions are used to minimize the error associated with the numerical approximation scheme. For a logically cubic mesh, the lowest-order shape functions are chosen in a natural way to conserve intercell fluxes that vary linearly in logical space. Vector test functions, while somewhat restricted by the mapping into the logical reference cube, admit a wider class of possibilities. Ideally, an error minimization procedure to select the test function from an acceptable class of candidates would be the best procedure. Lacking such a procedure, we first investigate the effect of possible test functions on the pressure distribution over the control volume; specifically, we look for test functions that allow for the elimination of intermediate pressures on cell faces. From these results, we select three forms for the test function for use in a control-volume mixed method code and subject them to an error analysis for different forms of grid irregularity; errors are reported in terms of the discrete L2 norm of the velocity error. Of these three forms, one appears to produce optimal results for most forms of grid irregularity.

  16. Evaluation of the reconstruction method and effect of partial volume in brain scintiscanning; Avaliacao do metodo de reconstrucao e efeito do volume parcial em cintilografia cerebral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, Monica Araujo

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, on which occurs a progressive and irreversible destruction of neurons. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) 35.6 million people are living with dementia, being recommended that governments prioritize early diagnosis techniques. Laboratory and psychological tests for cognitive assessment are conducted and further complemented by neurological imaging from nuclear medicine exams in order to establish an accurate diagnosis. The image quality evaluation and reconstruction process effects are important tools in clinical routine. In the present work, these quality parameters were studied, and the effects of partial volume (PVE) for lesions of different sizes and geometries that are attributed to the limited resolution of the equipment. In dementia diagnosis, this effect can be confused with intake losses due to cerebral cortex atrophy. The evaluation was conducted by two phantoms of different shapes as suggested by (a) American College of Radiology (ACR) and (b) National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) for Contrast, Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) and Recovery Coefficient (RC) calculation versus lesions shape and size. Technetium-99m radionuclide was used in a local brain scintigraphy protocol, for proportions lesion to background of 2:1, 4:1, 6:1, 8:1 and 10:1. Fourteen reconstruction methods were used for each concentration applying different filters and algorithms. Before the analysis of all image properties, the conclusion is that the predominant effect is the partial volume, leading to errors of measurement of more than 80%. Furthermore, it was demonstrate that the most effective method of reconstruction is FBP with Metz filter, providing better contrast and contrast to noise ratio results. In addition, this method shows the best Recovery Coefficients correction for each lesion. The ACR phantom showed the best results assigned to a more precise reconstruction of a cylinder, which does not

  17. Cost and accuracy comparison between the diffuse interface method and the geometric volume of fluid method for simulating two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjalili, Shahab; Ivey, Christopher Blake; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The diffuse interface(DI) and volume of fluid(VOF) methods are mass conserving front capturing schemes which can handle large interfacial topology changes in realistic two phase flows. The DI method is a conservative phase field method that tracks an interface with finite thickness spread over a few cells and does not require reinitialization. In addition to having the desirable properties of level set methods for naturally capturing curvature and surface tension forces, the model conserves mass continuously and discretely. The VOF method, which tracks the fractional tagged volume in a cell, is discretely conservative by requiring costly geometric reconstructions of the interface and the fluxes. Both methods however, suffer from inaccuracies in calculation of curvature and surface tension forces. We present a quantitative comparison of these methods in terms of their accuracy, convergence rate, memory, and computational cost using canonical 2D two-phase test cases: damped surface wave, oscillating drop, equilibrium static drop, and dense moving drop. We further compared the models in their ability to handle thin films by looking at the impact of a water drop onto a deep water pool. Considering these results, we suggest qualitative guidelines for using the DI and VOF methods. Supported by ONR.

  18. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose-volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yihua; Li, Cunhua; Ren, Haozheng; Zhang, Yong; Min, Zhifang

    2012-10-01

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose-volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose-volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose-volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose-volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head-neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than the dose

  19. Methods for recovering a solvent from a fluid volume and methods of removing at least one compound from a nonpolar solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Wendt, Daniel S.; Petkovic, Lucia M.

    2014-06-10

    A method of removing a nonpolar solvent from a fluid volume that includes at least one nonpolar compound, such as a fat, an oil or a triglyceride, is provided. The method comprises contacting a fluid volume with an expanding gas to expand the nonpolar solvent and form a gas-expanded solvent. The gas-expanded solvent may have a substantially reduced density in comparison to the at least one nonpolar compound and/or a substantially reduced capacity to solubilize the nonpolar compound, causing the nonpolar compounds to separate from the gas-expanded nonpolar solvent into a separate liquid phase. The liquid phase including the at least one nonpolar compound may be separated from the gas-expanded solvent using conventional techniques. After separation of the liquid phase, at least one of the temperature and pressure may be reduced to separate the nonpolar solvent from the expanding gas such that the nonpolar solvent may be recovered and reused.

  20. Coupling of a 3-D vortex particle-mesh method with a finite volume near-wall solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Y.; Lonfils, T.; Duponcheel, M.; Chatelain, P.; Winckelmans, G.

    2011-11-01

    This coupling aims at improving the computational efficiency of high Reynolds number bluff body flow simulations by using two complementary methods and exploiting their respective advantages in distinct parts of the domain. Vortex particle methods are particularly well suited for free vortical flows such as wakes or jets (the computational domain -with non zero vorticity- is then compact and dispersion errors are negligible). Finite volume methods, however, can handle boundary layers much more easily due to anisotropic mesh refinement. In the present approach, the vortex method is used in the whole domain (overlapping domain technique) but its solution is highly underresolved in the vicinity of the wall. It thus has to be corrected by the near-wall finite volume solution at each time step. Conversely, the vortex method provides the outer boundary conditions for the near-wall solver. A parallel multi-resolution vortex particle-mesh approach is used here along with an Immersed Boundary method in order to take the walls into account. The near-wall flow is solved by OpenFOAM® using the PISO algorithm. We validate the methodology on the flow past a sphere at a moderate Reynolds number. F.R.S. - FNRS Research Fellow.

  1. A non-invasive method of quantifying pancreatic volume in mice using micro-MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Paredes

    Full Text Available In experimental models of pancreatic growth and recovery, changes in pancreatic size are assessed by euthanizing a large cohort of animals at varying time points and measuring organ mass. However, to ascertain this information in clinical practice, patients with pancreatic disorders routinely undergo non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of the pancreas using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT. The aim of the current study was to develop a thin-sliced, optimized sequence protocol using a high field MRI to accurately calculate pancreatic volumes in the most common experimental animal, the mouse. Using a 7 Telsa Bruker micro-MRI system, we performed abdominal imaging in whole-fixed mice in three standard planes: axial, sagittal, and coronal. The contour of the pancreas was traced using Vitrea software and then transformed into a 3-dimensional (3D reconstruction, from which volumetric measurements were calculated. Images were optimized using heart perfusion-fixation, T1 sequence analysis, and 0.2 to 0.4 mm thick slices. As proof of principle, increases in pancreatic volume among mice of different ages correlated tightly with increasing body weight. In summary, this is the first study to measure pancreatic volumes in mice, using a high field 7 Tesla micro-MRI and a thin-sliced, optimized sequence protocol. We anticipate that micro-MRI will improve the ability to non-invasively quantify changes in pancreatic size and will dramatically reduce the number of animals required to serially assess pancreatic growth and recovery.

  2. A consistent method for finite volume discretization of body forces on collocated grids applied to flow through an actuator disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan;

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a consistent algorithm for eliminating the numerical wiggles appearing when solving the finite volume discretized Navier-Stokes equations with discrete body forces in a collocated grid arrangement. The proposed method is a modification of the Rhie-Chow algorithm where the force...... in a cell is spread on neighboring cells by applying equivalent pressure jumps at the cell faces. The method shows excellent results when applied for simulating the flow through an actuator disk, which is relevant for wind turbine wake simulations. (c) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. A Freestream-Preserving High-Order Finite-Volume Method for Mapped Grids with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzik, S; McCorquodale, P; Colella, P

    2011-12-16

    A fourth-order accurate finite-volume method is presented for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on mapped grids that are adaptively refined in space and time. Novel considerations for formulating the semi-discrete system of equations in computational space combined with detailed mechanisms for accommodating the adapting grids ensure that conservation is maintained and that the divergence of a constant vector field is always zero (freestream-preservation property). Advancement in time is achieved with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.

  4. An enhanced finite volume method to model 2D linear elastic structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available a locking-free finite volume approx- imation to Mindlin-Reissner plates for both cell-centred and vertex-centred formulations. However, using solid elements, Wenke and Wheel [13] present results that do indicate shear locking with the displacement.... The governing equations for the solid undergoing linear elastic motion, in the absence of any body forces, may be written in strong form as follows: ∂σij ∂xj = ρai, (1) where σij is the stress tensor, ρ is the density and ai is the acceleration. 2...

  5. Neonatal chest wall suspension splint: a novel and noninvasive method for support of lung volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas L; Palmer, Charles; Shaffer, Thomas H; Wolfson, Marla R

    2005-06-01

    Surfactant and musculoskeletal immaturity results in lower compliance of the lung relative to the chest wall, with clinical manifestations of low lung volume, marked chest wall retractions (CWR), and thoracoabdominal asynchrony. Inspiratory efforts are dissipated on distorting the chest wall inward rather than recruiting lung volumes. The current study tests the hypothesis that a novel neonatal chest wall suspension splint (SP), designed to provide stability to the compliant chest wall, would reduce inspiratory chest wall retractions and improve lung volumes. Nine preterm infants (29 +/- 1 SE weeks of gestation; 1.59 +/- 0.27 SE kg study weight) were studied at 16 +/- 5 SE days of life at baseline (BL) and following application of the front plate (FP) and the full SP (Hug n Snug Neonatal Chest Splint, Respironics, Inc.). Phase angle of thoracoabdominal motion, CWR, functional residual capacity (FRC), and pulmonary function were evaluated during spontaneous breathing. Compared to BL, there was a significant decrease in anterior CWR (2.21 +/- 0.91 SE vs. 0.25 +/- 0.09 SE mm; P < 0.05), an increase in FRC (16.6 +/- 2.8 SE vs. 27.8 +/- 5.5 SE ml/kg; P < 0.05) and tidal volume (4.8 +/- 1.5 SE vs. 7.3 +/- 1.4 SE ml/kg; P < 0.05), minimal effect on pulmonary compliance (1.98 +/- 0.50 SE vs. 1.72 +/- 0.30 SE ml/cmH2O/kg), and a trend for a decrease in phase angle (128.4 +/- 10.9 SE vs. 111.8 +/- 19.3 SE) with the application of the splint. FRC correlated inversely with severity of CWR across all conditions (P < 0.05, r = -0.68). Phase angle was directly correlated to anterior CWR (r = 0.72; P < 0.05) and correlated inversely with FRC (P < 0.005; r = -0.56). We speculate that by improving CW stability, the use of this splint may reduce the energetic requirements of breathing and, potentially, the need for more invasive ventilatory support in the neonate.

  6. A Three-Dimensional, Immersed Boundary, Finite Volume Method for the Simulation of Incompressible Heat Transfer Flows around Complex Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Badreddine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development and application of a new finite volume immersed boundary method (IBM to simulate three-dimensional fluid flows and heat transfer around complex geometries. First, the discretization of the governing equations based on the second-order finite volume method on Cartesian, structured, staggered grid is outlined, followed by the description of modifications which have to be applied to the discretized system once a body is immersed into the grid. To validate the new approach, the heat conduction equation with a source term is solved inside a cavity with an immersed body. The approach is then tested for a natural convection flow in a square cavity with and without circular cylinder for different Rayleigh numbers. The results computed with the present approach compare very well with the benchmark solutions. As a next step in the validation procedure, the method is tested for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS of a turbulent flow around a surface-mounted matrix of cubes. The results computed with the present method compare very well with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA measurements of the same case, showing that the method can be used for scale-resolving simulations of turbulence as well.

  7. Comparison of pathogen DNA isolation methods from large volumes of whole blood to improve molecular diagnosis of bloodstream infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne J M Loonen

    Full Text Available For patients suffering from bloodstream infections (BSI molecular diagnostics from whole blood holds promise to provide fast and adequate treatment. However, this approach is hampered by the need of large blood volumes. Three methods for pathogen DNA isolation from whole blood were compared, i.e. an enzymatic method (MolYsis, 1-5 ml, the novel non-enzymatic procedure (Polaris, 1-5 ml, and a method that does not entail removal of human DNA (Triton-Tris-EDTA EasyMAG, 200 µl. These methods were evaluated by processing blood spiked with 0-1000 CFU/ml of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. Downstream detection was performed with real-time PCR assays. Polaris and MolYsis processing followed by real-time PCRs enabled pathogen detection at clinically relevant concentrations of 1-10 CFU/ml blood. By increasing sample volumes, concurrent lower cycle threshold (Ct values were obtained at clinically relevant pathogen concentrations, demonstrating the benefit of using larger blood volumes. A 100% detection rate at a concentration of 10 CFU/ml for all tested pathogens was obtained with the Polaris enrichment, whereas comparatively lower detection rates were measured for MolYsis (50-67% and EasyMAG (58-79%. For the samples with a concentration of 1 CFU/ml Polaris resulted in most optimal detection rates of 70-75% (MolYsis 17-50% and TTE-EasyMAG 20-36%. The Polaris method was more reproducible, less labour intensive, and faster (45 minutes (including Qiagen DNA extraction vs. 2 hours (MolYsis. In conclusion, Polaris and MolYsis enrichment followed by DNA isolation and real-time PCR enables reliable and sensitive detection of bacteria and fungi from 5 ml blood. With Polaris results are available within 3 hours, showing potential for improved BSI diagnostics.

  8. Finite Volume Numerical Methods for Aeroheating Rate Calculations from Infrared Thermographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional finite volume heat conduction techniques for calculating aeroheating rates from measured global surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models was investigated. Both direct and inverse finite volume techniques were investigated and compared with the standard one-dimensional semi-infinite technique. Global transient surface temperatures were measured using an infrared thermographic technique on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air tunnel. In these tests the effectiveness of vortices generated via gas injection for initiating hypersonic transition on the Hyper-X forebody was investigated. An array of streamwise-orientated heating striations was generated and visualized downstream of the gas injection sites. In regions without significant spatial temperature gradients, one-dimensional techniques provided accurate aeroheating rates. In regions with sharp temperature gradients caused by striation patterns multi-dimensional heat transfer techniques were necessary to obtain more accurate heating rates. The use of the one-dimensional technique resulted in differences of 20% in the calculated heating rates compared to 2-D analysis because it did not account for lateral heat conduction in the model.

  9. Prediction method for the volume of the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) following supramaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, D

    2000-01-01

    Short (up to 60 s) supramaximal (about 400 W on the average) exercise is accompanied by specific biochemical processes in the working muscles and by a general increase in energy metabolism. Outwardly, this is manifested by an excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Since its actual measurement is time consuming and associated sometimes with difficulties, we propose a fixed 3-min test for EPOC prediction. The measured volumes of oxygen consumption are related to the corresponding periods in a coordinate system as reciprocal values. The linear equation, whose parameters were calculated by the method of least squares or were determined graphically, provided for prediction of the EPOC volume with satisfactory accuracy and precision. The obtained increase of the predicted values over the actually measured values was below 5%, and the correlation coefficient r = 0.98. Other parameters of the recovery process were also calculated, such as tau (half-time) of EPOC and the rate constant k.

  10. 1D and 2D Numerical Modeling for Solving Dam-Break Flow Problems Using Finite Volume Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Hsien Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to model the flow movement in an idealized dam-break configuration. One-dimensional and two-dimensional motion of a shallow flow over a rigid inclined bed is considered. The resulting shallow water equations are solved by finite volumes using the Roe and HLL schemes. At first, the one-dimensional model is considered in the development process. With conservative finite volume method, splitting is applied to manage the combination of hyperbolic term and source term of the shallow water equation and then to promote 1D to 2D. The simulations are validated by the comparison with flume experiments. Unsteady dam-break flow movement is found to be reasonably well captured by the model. The proposed concept could be further developed to the numerical calculation of non-Newtonian fluid or multilayers fluid flow.

  11. An unstructured finite-volume method to analyze the impact of shape on natural convection and melting inside cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Omari, Kamal El; Guer, Yves Le

    2010-01-01

    The present paper numerically analyzes a passive cooling system using cavities with different geometries filled with thermal conductivity-enhanced phase change material (PCM). A numerical code is developed using an unstructured finite-volume method and an enthalpy-porosity technique to solve for natural convection coupled to a solid-liquid phase change. Five geometries containing the same volume of PCM are compared while cooling the same surface. The unsteady evolution of the melting front and the velocity and temperature fields is detailed. Other indicators of cooling efficiency are monitored, including the maximum temperature reached at the cooled surface. The computational results show the high impact of varying geometry: a maximum temperature difference as high as 40 degrees Celsius is observed between two of the cavities. The best efficiency is obtained for a cavity shifted vertically relative to the cooled surface. Other findings and recommendations are made for the design of PCM-filled cavities.

  12. Investigating the effect of variable gutter technique as a novel method on vertical flow of material in closed die forging processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourbashiri, M.; Sedighi, M. [Iran University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Recently, Variable gutter technique has been introduced as a novel method in order to reduce waste materials in closed-die forging processes. In this paper, the capability of this method is investigated for a family of forged parts that the vertical flow of material is the last stage of forming process. As a case study, using the variable gutter technique, the amount of waste material is decreased about 50% for a sample forged part with a local rising. The results of FVM simulations and experiments confirmed the effectiveness of the variable gutter technique in such forging processes. The vertical flow of material in the die cavity (h parameter), as a criterion, for different gutter width and thickness dimensions was examined by FVM simulations. The results shown that the gutter thickness has more effect on vertical flow of material than the gutter width. By decreasing the gutter thickness and increasing the gutter width, the amount of vertical flow of material is increased about 120% and 29%, respectively. Finally, A/H ratio (A = Max width of sectional area of a forged part, H = Max height of a forged part) is proposed as shape complexity factor of a forged part. The results of FVM simulations are indicated that for the ratio of A/H > 2, the variable gutter thickness technique is more effective and can be successfully used to reduce the amount of waste materials.

  13. Effect of various methods for rectum delineation on relative and absolute dose-volume histograms for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumoto, Chiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ohira, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Miyazaki, Masayoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Isono, Masaru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima-te@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have dealt with correlations of late rectal toxicity with rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for high dose levels. There are 2 techniques to assess rectal volume for reception of a specific dose: relative-DVH (R-DVH, %) that indicates relative volume for a vertical axis, and absolute-DVH (A-DVH, cc) with its vertical axis showing absolute volume of the rectum. The parameters of DVH vary depending on the rectum delineation method, but the literature does not present any standardization of such methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different delineation methods on rectal DVHs. The enrollment for this study comprised 28 patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer, who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the prescription dose of 78 Gy. The rectum was contoured with 4 different methods using 2 lengths, short (Sh) and long (Lg), and 2 cross sections, rectum (Rec) and rectal wall (Rw). Sh means the length from 1 cm above the seminal vesicles to 1 cm below the prostate and Lg the length from the rectosigmoid junction to the anus. Rec represents the entire rectal volume including the rectal contents and Rw the rectal volume of the area with a wall thickness of 4 mm. We compared dose-volume parameters by using 4 rectal contour methods for the same plan with the R-DVHs as well as the A-DVHs. For the high dose levels, the R-DVH parameters varied widely. The mean of V{sub 70} for Sh-Rw was the highest (19.4%) and nearly twice as high as that for Lg-Rec (10.4%). On the contrary, only small variations were observed in the A-DVH parameters (4.3, 4.3, 5.5, and 5.5 cc for Sh-Rw, Lg-Rw, Sh-Rec, and Lg-Rec, respectively). As for R-DVHs, the parameters of V{sub 70} varied depending on the rectal lengths (Sh-Rec vs Lg-Rec: R = 0.76; Sh-Rw vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.85) and cross sections (Sh-Rec vs Sh-Rw: R = 0.49; Lg-Rec vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.65). For A-DVHs, however, the parameters of Sh rectal A-DVHs hardly changed

  14. Applying a new method for direct collection, volume quantification and determination of N2 emission from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhong; Gao, Yan; Wang, Honglian; Guo, Junyao; Yan, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    The emission of N2 is important to remove excess N from lakes, ponds, and wetlands. To investigate the gas emission from water, Gao et al. (2013) developed a new method using a bubble trap device to collect gas samples from waters. However, the determination accuracy of sampling volume and gas component concentration was still debatable. In this study, the method was optimized for in situ sampling, accurate volume measurement and direct injection to a gas chromatograph for the analysis of N2 and other gases. By the optimized new method, the recovery rate for N2 was 100.28% on average; the mean coefficient of determination (R(2)) was 0.9997; the limit of detection was 0.02%. We further assessed the effects of the new method, bottle full of water, vs. vacuum bag and vacuum vial methods, on variations of N2 concentration as influenced by sample storage times of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days at constant temperature of 15°C, using indices of averaged relative peak area (%) in comparison with the averaged relative peak area of each method at 0 day. The indices of the bottle full of water method were the lowest (99.5%-108.5%) compared to the indices of vacuum bag and vacuum vial methods (119%-217%). Meanwhile, the gas chromatograph determination of other gas components (O2, CH4, and N2O) was also accurate. The new method was an alternative way to investigate N2 released from various kinds of aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Applying a new method for direct collection, volume quantification and determination of N2 emission from water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhong Liu; Yan Gao; Honglian Wang; Junyao Guo; Shaohua Yan

    2015-01-01

    The emission of N2 is important to remove excess N from lakes,ponds,and wetlands.To investigate the gas emission from water,Gao et al.(2013) developed a new method using a bubble trap device to collect gas samples from waters.However,the determination accuracy of sampling volume and gas component concentration was still debatable.In this study,the method was optimized for in situ sampling,accurate volume measurement and direct injection to a gas chromatograph for the analysis of N2 and other gases.By the optimized new method,the recovery rate for N2 was 100.28% on average; the mean coefficient of determination (R2) was 0.9997; the limit of detection was 0.02%.We further assessed the effects of the new method,bottle full of water,vs.vacuum bag and vacuum vial methods,on variations of N2 concentration as influenced by sample storage times of 1,2,3,5,and 7 days at constant temperature of 15℃,using indices of averaged relative peak area (%) in comparison with the averaged relative peak area of each method at 0 day.The indices of the bottle full of water method were the lowest (99.5%--108.5%) compared to the indices of vacuum bag and vacuum vial methods (119%-217%).Meanwhile,the gas chromatograph determination of other gas components (O2,CH4,and N2O) was also accurate.The new method was an alternative way to investigate N2 released from various kinds of aquatic ecosystems.

  16. A new high-order finite volume method for 3D elastic wave simulation on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Zhang, Lina

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new efficient high-order finite volume method for 3D elastic wave simulation on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. With the relative coarse tetrahedral meshes, we make subdivision in each tetrahedron to generate a stencil for the high-order polynomial reconstruction. The subdivision algorithm guarantees the number of subelements is greater than the degrees of freedom of a complete polynomial. We perform the reconstruction on this stencil by using cell-averaged quantities based on the hierarchical orthonormal basis functions. Unlike the traditional high-order finite volume method, our new method has a very local property like DG and can be written as an inner-split computational scheme which is beneficial to reducing computational amount. Moreover, the stencil in our method is easy to generate for all tetrahedrons especially in the three-dimensional case. The resulting reconstruction matrix is invertible and remains unchanged for all tetrahedrons and thus it can be pre-computed and stored before time evolution. These special advantages facilitate the parallelization and high-order computations. We show convergence results obtained with the proposed method up to fifth order accuracy in space. The high-order accuracy in time is obtained by the Runge-Kutta method. Comparisons between numerical and analytic solutions show the proposed method can provide accurate wavefield information. Numerical simulation for a realistic model with complex topography demonstrates the effectiveness and potential applications of our method. Though the method is proposed based on the 3D elastic wave equation, it can be extended to other linear hyperbolic system.

  17. Geophysical methods to investigate and survey unstable volumes along a cliff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Clara; Baillet, Laurent; Jongmans, Denis; Mourot, Philippe; Hantz, Didier

    2010-05-01

    We successively instrumented 2 unstable sites along the 300 m high Urgonian cliff of the southern Vercors massif, French Alps. The first site, a rock column of 21000 m3, collapsed in November 2007, 5 months after the beginning of measurements. The experiment showed that information contained in seismic noise can be used for hazard assessment when considering the potential failure of an overhanging rock column. Indeed, the study of seismic noise recorded prior the rock fall revealed that low resonance frequencies follow a precursory pattern, as they decrease significantly, from 3.4 Hz to 2.6 Hz, before the collapse. We successfully reproduced this phenomenon with 2D numerical modelling of rock falls. Numerical simulation results pointed out that this decrease depends on the column-to-mass contact stiffness, which is controlled by the remaining rock bridges. Impulsive signals, which could be attributed to rock fracturing, have also been studied. P and S waves were identified for 40 events, allowing wave polarisation analysis and preliminary event location. Seismic sources able to trigger the vibration of the rock column were located along the broken plane and probably resulted from micro-cracks along rock bridges. From this first site study, we tried to closely follow the evolution of the natural frequencies at the second site, which also consists of a rock column decoupling from the mass with an open fracture in the rear. The value of the first eigenfrequency (about 7.6 Hz in June 2008) shows that the unstable volume is probably much smaller than for the first site. This evaluation is consistent with the estimated volume using DEM derived from LIDAR scan (about 1000 m3). A detailed investigation of the first eigenfrequency shows that its variation is also correlated with temperature and frost. After one year of a rough stability, the average value of the first eigenfrequency clearly shows a drift with the temperature variation pattern and an irreversible decrease of

  18. Calculation of Lung Cancer Volume of Target Based on Thorax Computed Tomography Images using Active Contour Segmentation Method for Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra Yosandha, Fiet; Adi, Kusworo; Edi Widodo, Catur

    2017-06-01

    In this research, calculation process of the lung cancer volume of target based on computed tomography (CT) thorax images was done. Volume of the target calculation was done in purpose to treatment planning system in radiotherapy. The calculation of the target volume consists of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the target volume was done by adding the target area on each slices and then multiply the result with the slice thickness. Calculations of area using of digital image processing techniques with active contour segmentation method. This segmentation for contouring to obtain the target volume. The calculation of volume produced on each of the targets is 577.2 cm3 for GTV, 769.9 cm3 for CTV, 877.8 cm3 for PTV, 618.7 cm3 for OAR 1, 1,162 cm3 for OAR 2 right, and 1,597 cm3 for OAR 2 left. These values indicate that the image processing techniques developed can be implemented to calculate the lung cancer target volume based on CT thorax images. This research expected to help doctors and medical physicists in determining and contouring the target volume quickly and precisely.

  19. Review of methods for predicting in situ volume change movement of expansive soil over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana H. Adem

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The soil movement information over time is required for the design of foundations placed in expansive soils. This information is also helpful for the assessment of pre-wetting and controlled wetting mitigation alternatives for expansive soils. Several researchers during the past fifteen years have proposed different methods for the prediction of the soil movements over time. The available methods can be categorized into (i consolidation theory-based methods, (ii water content-based methods, and (iii suction-based methods. In this paper, a state-of-the-art of the prediction methods is succinctly summarized. The methods are critically reviewed in terms of their predictive capacity along with their strengths and limitations. The review highlights the need for prediction methods that are conceptually simple yet efficient for use in conventional engineering practice for different types of expansive soils.

  20. Review of methods for predicting in situ volume change movement of expansive soil over time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hana H. Adem; Sai K. Vanapalli

    2015-01-01

    The soil movement information over time is required for the design of foundations placed in expansive soils. This information is also helpful for the assessment of pre-wetting and controlled wetting mitigation alternatives for expansive soils. Several researchers during the past fifteen years have proposed different methods for the prediction of the soil movements over time. The available methods can be categorized into (i) consolidation theory-based methods, (ii) water content-based methods, and (iii) suction-based methods. In this paper, a state-of-the-art of the prediction methods is succinctly summarized. The methods are critically reviewed in terms of their predictive capacity along with their strengths and limitations. The review highlights the need for prediction methods that are conceptually simple yet efficient for use in conventional engineering practice for different types of expansive soils.

  1. Non-polynomial ENO and WENO finite volume methods for hyperbolic conservation laws

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jingyang; Jung, Jae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) method is an efficient high order numerical method for solving hyperbolic conservation laws designed to reduce the Gibbs oscillations, if existent, by adaptively choosing the local stencil for the interpolation. The original ENO method is constructed based on the polynomial interpolation and the overall rate of convergence provided by the method is uniquely determined by the total number of interpolation points involved for the approximation. In this pape...

  2. Review of methods for predicting in situ volume change movement of expansive soil over time

    OpenAIRE

    Hana H. Adem; Sai K. Vanapalli

    2015-01-01

    The soil movement information over time is required for the design of foundations placed in expansive soils. This information is also helpful for the assessment of pre-wetting and controlled wetting mitigation alternatives for expansive soils. Several researchers during the past fifteen years have proposed different methods for the prediction of the soil movements over time. The available methods can be categorized into (i) consolidation theory-based methods, (ii) water content-based methods,...

  3. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Mignone, A

    2014-01-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruct...

  4. A parallel multibeam mask writing method and its impact on data volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, N.; Luo, Y.; Savari, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The pattern requirements for mask writers have steadily been growing, and there is considerable interest in multibeam mask writers to handle the throughput and resolution challenges associated with the needs of sub- 10nm technology nodes. The mask writer of the future will process terabits of information per second and deal with petabytes of data. In this paper, we investigate lossless data compression and system parallelism together to address part of the data transfer problem. We explore simple compression algorithms and the effect of parallelism on the total compressed data in a multibeam system architecture motivated by the IMS Nanofabrication multibeam mask writer series eMET. We model the shot assignment problem and beam shot overlap by means of two-dimensional linear spatial filtering on an image. We describe a fast scanning strategy and investigate data volumes for a family of beam arrays with 2N ×(2N -1) beams, where N is an odd integer.

  5. Method for combining fast surface and exact volume visualization techniques in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Haubner, Michael; Foerterer, H. M.; Perzl, W.; Fink, B. K.; Fink, U.

    1994-05-01

    In order to enable the interaction with and manipulation of 3-D data sets in the realm of medical diagnosis and therapy planning we developed a modified Z-merging algorithm that includes transparency and texture mapping features. For this an extended shape based interpolation model creates isotropic grayscale data volume in case of spatial image sequences. Interesting anatomical regions such as soft tissue, organs, and bones are detected by automatic and interactive segmentation procedures. Following that, a fully automatic surface construction algorithm detects the 3-D object boundaries by fitting geometric primitives to the binary data. The surface representations support the user with a fast overview about the structure of the 3D scene. Texture mapping is implemented as the projection of the gray values of the isotropic voxels onto a polygonal surface. Adaptive refinement, Phong's normal interpolation, and transparency are the most important features of this raytracer. The described technique enables the simultaneous display of multimodal 3D image data.

  6. Effect of sample volume size and sampling method on feline longitudinal myocardial velocity profiles from color tissue Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granström, Sara; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Møgelvang, Rasmus; Sogaard, Peter; Willesen, Jakob Lundgren; Koch, Jørgen

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the effect of sample volume (SV) size settings and sampling method on measurement variability and peak systolic (s'), and early (e') and late (a') diastolic longitudinal myocardial velocities using color tissue Doppler imaging (cTDI) in cats. Twenty cats with normal echocardiograms and 20 cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We quantified and compared empirical variance and average absolute values of s', e' and a' for three cardiac cycles using eight different SV settings (length 1,2,3 and 5 mm; width 1 and 2 mm) and three methods of sampling (end-diastolic sampling with manual tracking of the SV, end-systolic sampling without tracking, and random-frame sampling without tracking). No significant difference in empirical variance could be demonstrated between most of the tested SVs. However, the two settings with a length of 1 mm resulted in a significantly higher variance compared with all settings where the SV length exceeded 2 mm (p sampling method on the variability of measurements (p = 0.003) and manual tracking obtained the lowest variance. No difference in average values of s', e' or a' could be found between any of the SV settings or sampling methods. Within the tested range of SV settings, an SV length of 1 mm resulted in higher measurement variability compared with an SV length of 3 and 5 mm, and should therefore be avoided. Manual tracking of the sample volume is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A method to estimate weight and dimensions of aircraft gas turbine engines. Volume 1: Method of analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, R. J.; Onat, E.; Klees, G. W.; Tjonneland, E.

    1977-01-01

    Weight and envelope dimensions of aircraft gas turbine engines are estimated within plus or minus 5% to 10% using a computer method based on correlations of component weight and design features of 29 data base engines. Rotating components are estimated by a preliminary design procedure where blade geometry, operating conditions, material properties, shaft speed, hub-tip ratio, etc., are the primary independent variables used. The development and justification of the method selected, the various methods of analysis, the use of the program, and a description of the input/output data are discussed.

  8. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  9. EFFECTS OF POLYTROPIC EXPONENT ON DATA PROCESSING METHODS USED IN CONSTANT VOLUME DISCHARGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lihong; LIU Chengliang; ZHA Xuanfang

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain the accurate sonic conductance of solenoid valves, the polytropic exponent is used in the data processing of the discharge method for measuring the flow rate characteristics of pneumatic components. Three data processing principles are first introduced, and then the discharge pressure data obtained from the measured solenoid valve are processed to obtain the sonic conductance with three methods: the partial polytropic exponent method, the complete polytropic exponent method and the adiabatic method. By comparison of the obtained results it indicates that the complete polytropic exponent method is the most accurate. However, the partial polytropic exponent method is of a high applicable value, because it is easy and simple to measure and the obtained results are relatively accurate.

  10. Comparison of two flow-based imaging methods to measure individual red blood cell area and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Rossi, Domenico; Caserta, Sergio; Cesarelli, Mario; Guido, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    The red blood cells (RBCs) population is characterized by a high heterogeneity in membrane area, cellular volume, and mechanical properties, mainly due to the variety of mechanical and chemical stresses that a red cell undergoes in its entire life span. Here, we provide the first simultaneous area and volume measurements of RBCs flowing in microcapillaries, by using high-speed video microscopy imaging and quantitative data processing based on image analysis techniques. Both confined and unbounded flow conditions (depending on the relative size of RBCs and microcapillary diameter) are investigated. The results are compared with micropipette experiments from the literature and data from Coulter counter routine clinical blood tests. Good agreement is found for RBC volume, especially in the case of confined flow conditions. Surface area measurements, which are lacking in the routine clinical test, are of special interest being a potential diagnostic parameter of altered cell deformability and aggregability. Overall, our results provide a novel flow methodology suitable for high-throughput measurements of RBC geometrical parameters, allowing one to overcome the limits of classical static methods, such as micropipette aspiration, which are not suitable for handling a large number of cells.

  11. A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method for accurate representation of limiting water wave deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Xiping

    2016-09-01

    A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method is developed to study the sensitive behavior of water waves during breaking. The THINC model is employed to solve the volume-of-fluid function over the entire domain covered by a relatively coarse grid while the phase-field model based on Allen-Cahn equation is applied over the fine grid. A special algorithm that takes into account the sharpness of the diffuse-interface is introduced to correlate the order parameter obtained on the fine grid and the volume-of-fluid function obtained on the coarse grid. The coupled model is then applied to the study of water waves generated by moving pressures on the free surface. The deformation process of the wave crest during the initial stage of breaking is discussed in details. It is shown that there is a significant variation of the free nappe developed at the front side of the wave crest as the wave steepness differs. It is of a plunging type at large wave steepness while of a spilling type at small wave steepness. The numerical results also indicate that breaking occurs later and the duration of breaking is shorter for waves of smaller steepness and vice versa. Neglecting the capillary effect leads to wave breaking with a sharper nappe and a more dynamic plunging process. The surface tension also has an effect to prevent the formation of a free nappe at the front side of the wave crest in some cases.

  12. A coupled ordinates method for solution acceleration of rarefied gas dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shankhadeep; Mathur, Sanjay R.; Alexeenko, Alina; Murthy, Jayathi Y.

    2015-05-01

    Non-equilibrium rarefied flows are frequently encountered in a wide range of applications, including atmospheric re-entry vehicles, vacuum technology, and microscale devices. Rarefied flows at the microscale can be effectively modeled using the ellipsoidal statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (ESBGK) form of the Boltzmann kinetic equation. Numerical solutions of these equations are often based on the finite volume method (FVM) in physical space and the discrete ordinates method in velocity space. However, existing solvers use a sequential solution procedure wherein the velocity distribution functions are implicitly coupled in physical space, but are solved sequentially in velocity space. This leads to explicit coupling of the distribution function values in velocity space and slows down convergence in systems with low Knudsen numbers. Furthermore, this also makes it difficult to solve multiscale problems or problems in which there is a large range of Knudsen numbers. In this paper, we extend the coupled ordinates method (COMET), previously developed to study participating radiative heat transfer, to solve the ESBGK equations. In this method, at each cell in the physical domain, distribution function values for all velocity ordinates are solved simultaneously. This coupled solution is used as a relaxation sweep in a geometric multigrid method in the spatial domain. Enhancements to COMET to account for the non-linearity of the ESBGK equations, as well as the coupled implementation of boundary conditions, are presented. The methodology works well with arbitrary convex polyhedral meshes, and is shown to give significantly faster solutions than the conventional sequential solution procedure. Acceleration factors of 5-9 are obtained for low to moderate Knudsen numbers on single processor platforms.

  13. An adaptive control volume finite element method for simulation of multi-scale flow in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G.; Jackson, M.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase flow in porous media is of importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We present a novel control volume finite element method (CVFEM) to solve for multi-scale flow in heterogeneous geological formations. It employs a node centred control volume approach to discretize the saturation equation, while a control volume finite element method is applied for the pressure equation. We embed the discrete continuity equation into the pressure equation and assure that the continuity is exactly enforced. Anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to accurately model the fine grained features of multiphase flow. The adaptive algorithm uses a metric tensor field based on solution error estimates to locally control the size and shape of elements in the metric. Moreover, it uses metric advection between adaptive meshes in order to predict the future required density of mesh thereby reducing numerical dispersion at the saturation front. The scheme is capable of capturing multi-scale heterogeneity such as those in fractured porous media through the use of several constraints on the element size in different regions of porous media. We show the application of our method for simulation of flow in some challenging benchmark problems. For flow in fractured reservoirs, the scheme adapts the mesh as the flow penetrates through the fracture and the matrix. The constraints for the element size within the fracture are smaller by several orders of magnitude than the generated mesh within the matrix. We show that the scheme captures the key multi-scale features of flow while preserving the geometry. We demonstrate that mesh adaptation can be used to accurately simulate flow in heterogeneous porous media at low computational cost.

  14. The Partition of Unity Method for High-Order Finite Volume Schemes Using Radial Basis Functions Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serena Morigi; Fiorella Sgallari

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the use of partition of unity method for the develop-ment of a high order finite volume discretization scheme on unstructured grids for solv-ing diffusion models based on partial differential equations. The unknown function and its gradient can be accurately reconstructed using high order optimal recovery based on radial basis functions. The methodology proposed is applied to the noise removal prob-lem in functional surfaces and images. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new numerical approach and provide experimental order of convergence.

  15. A new numerical framework to simulate viscoelastic free-surface flows with the finite-volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    A new method for the simulation of 2D viscoelastic flow is presented. Numerical stability is obtained by the logarithmic-conformation change of variable, and a fully-implicit pure-streamfunction flow formulation, without use of any artificial diffusion. As opposed to other simulation results, our...... calculations predict a hydrodynamic instability in the 4:1 contraction geometry at a Weissenberg number of order 4. This new result is in qualitative agreement with the prediction of a non-linear subcritical elastic instability in Poiseuille flow. Our viscoelastic flow solver is coupled with a volume...

  16. A new numerical framework to simulate viscoelastic free-surface flows with the finite-volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    A new method for the simulation of 2D viscoelastic flow is presented. Numerical stability is obtained by the logarithmic-conformation change of variable, and a fully-implicit pure-streamfunction flow formulation, without use of any artificial diffusion. As opposed to other simulation results, our...... calculations predict a hydrodynamic instability in the 4:1 contraction geometry at a Weissenberg number of order 4. This new result is in qualitative agreement with the prediction of a non-linear subcritical elastic instability in Poiseuille flow. Our viscoelastic flow solver is coupled with a volume...

  17. Comparative study on triangular and quadrilateral meshes by a finite-volume method with a central difference scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Guojun

    2012-10-01

    In this article, comparative studies on computational accuracies and convergence rates of triangular and quadrilateral meshes are carried out in the frame work of the finite-volume method. By theoretical analysis, we conclude that the number of triangular cells needs to be 4/3 times that of quadrilateral cells to obtain similar accuracy. The conclusion is verified by a number of numerical examples. In addition, the convergence rates of the triangular meshes are found to be slower than those of the quadrilateral meshes when the same accuracy is obtained with these two mesh types. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  18. Desiccator Volume: A Vital Yet Ignored Parameter in CaCO3 Crystallization by the Ammonium Carbonate Diffusion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Harris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Employing the widely used ammonium carbonate diffusion method, we demonstrate that altering an extrinsic parameter—desiccator size—which is rarely detailed in publications, can alter the route of crystallization. Hexagonally packed assemblies of spherical magnesium-calcium carbonate particles or spherulitic aragonitic particles can be selectively prepared from the same initial reaction solution by simply changing the internal volume of the desiccator, thereby changing the rate of carbonate addition and consequently precursor formation. This demonstrates that it is not merely the quantity of an additive which can control particle morphogenesis and phase selectivity, but control of other often ignored parameters are vital to ensure adequate reproducibility.

  19. Stability analysis of unstructured finite volume methods for linear shallow water flows using pseudospectra and singular value decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beljadid, Abdelaziz; Mohammadian, Abdolmajid; Qiblawey, Hazim

    2016-10-01

    The discretization of the shallow water system on unstructured grids can lead to spurious modes which usually can affect accuracy and/or cause stability problems. This paper introduces a new approach for stability analysis of unstructured linear finite volume schemes for linear shallow water equations with the Coriolis Effect using spectra, pseudospectra, and singular value decomposition. The discrete operator of the scheme is the principal parameter used in the analysis. It is shown that unstructured grids have a large influence on operator normality. In some cases the eigenvectors of the operator can be far from orthogonal, which leads to amplification of solutions and/or stability problems. Large amplifications of the solution can be observed, even for discrete operators which respect the condition of asymptotic stability, and in some cases even for Lax-Richtmyer stable methods. The pseudospectra are shown to be efficient for the verification of stability of finite volume methods for linear shallow water equations. In some cases, the singular value decomposition is employed for further analysis in order to provide more information about the existence of unstable modes. The results of the analysis can be helpful in choosing the type of mesh, the appropriate placements of the variables of the system on the grid, and the suitable discretization method which is stable for a wide range of modes.

  20. Magnetic helicity estimations in models and observations of the solar magnetic field. Part I: Finite volume methods

    CERN Document Server

    Valori, Gherardo; Anfinogentov, Sergey; Chen, Feng; Georgoulis, Manolis K; Guo, Yang; Liu, Yang; Moraitis, Kostas; Thalmann, Julia K; Yang, Shangbin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity of ideal magneto-hydrodynamics characterized by an inverse turbulent cascade. Accordingly, it is often invoked as one of the basic physical quantities driving the generation and structuring of magnetic fields in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We provide here the first systematic comparison of six existing methods for the estimation of the helicity of magnetic fields known in a finite volume. All such methods are reviewed, benchmarked, and compared with each other, and specifically tested for accuracy and sensitivity to errors. To that purpose, we consider four groups of numerical tests, ranging from solutions of the three-dimensional, force-free equilibrium, to magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Almost all methods are found to produce the same value of magnetic helicity within few percent in all tests. In the more solar-relevant and realistic of the tests employed here, the simulation of an eruptive flux rope, the spread in the computed ...

  1. Implicit Finite Volume and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Multicomponent Flow in Unstructured 3D Fractured Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat, Joachim; Soltanian, Mohamad Reza

    2016-01-01

    We present a new implicit higher-order finite element (FE) approach to efficiently model compressible multicomponent fluid flow on unstructured grids and in fractured porous subsurface formations. The scheme is sequential implicit: pressures and fluxes are updated with an implicit Mixed Hybrid Finite Element (MHFE) method, and the transport of each species is approximated with an implicit second-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) FE method. Discrete fractures are incorporated with a cross-flow equilibrium approach. This is the first investigation of all-implicit higher-order MHFE-DG for unstructured triangular, quadrilateral (2D), and hexahedral (3D) grids and discrete fractures. A lowest-order implicit finite volume (FV) transport update is also developed for the same grid types. The implicit methods are compared to an Implicit-Pressure-Explicit-Composition (IMPEC) scheme. For fractured domains, the unconditionally stable implicit transport update is shown to increase computational efficiency by orders of mag...

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HYDRODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS ON AN ARC CROWN WALL USING VOLUME OF FLUID METHOD BASED ON BFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-yan; REN Bing; WANG Guo Yu; WANG Yong-xue

    2011-01-01

    In the present study,a new algorithm based on the Volume Of Fluid (vOF) method is developed to simulate the hydrodynamic characteristics on an arc crown wall.Structured grids are generated by the coordinate transform method in an arbitrary complex region.The Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional incompressible viscous flows are discretized in the Body Fitted Coordinate (BFC) system.The transformed SIMPLE algorithm is proposed to modify the pressure-velocity field and a transformed VOF method is used to trace the free surface.Hydrodynamic characteristics on an arc crown wall are obtained by the improved numerical model based on the BFC system (BFC model).The velocity field,the pressure field and the time profiles of the water surface near the arc crown wall obtained by using the BFC model and the Cartesian model are compared.The BFC model is verified by experimental results.

  3. METHODS OF CHAOTIC DYNAMICS IN SCHEMES OF RESEARCHES FEASIBILITY INTERNALS OF CAR TRAFFIC VOLUMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Kramarenko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of chaotic dynamics methods applied to the topical analysis and forecasting problems of economic and technological properties of wagon streams represented by the related time series are studied. The advisability of using the generalized logistic map method for the construction of time series behavior operational forecasting is also determined.

  4. Dynamic noise correction for IVUS quantitative volume blood flow: methods and numerical validation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupotti, F.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Mastik, F.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a new method to measure transverse blood flow based on the decorrelation of the radio-frequency (RF) signals, has been developed. Transverse blood flow estimation may be influenced by noise. In this paper, we investigated a new correlation-based method for noise correction. The deco

  5. Weibull statistics effective area and volume in the ball-on-ring testing method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2014-01-01

    The ball-on-ring method is together with other biaxial bending methods often used for measuring the strength of plates of brittle materials, because machining defects are remote from the high stresses causing the failure of the specimens. In order to scale the measured Weibull strength...

  6. Modeling droplet vaporization and combustion with the volume of fluid method at a small Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bin ZHANG; Wei ZHANG; Xue-jun ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) formulation is applied to model the combustion process of a single droplet in a hightemperature convective air free stream environment.The calculations solve the flow field for both phases,and consider the droplet deformation based on an axisymmetrical model.The chemical reaction is modeled with one-step finite-rate mechanism and the thcrmo-physica1 properties for the gas mixture are species and temperature dependence.A mass transfer model applicable to the VOF calculations due to vaporization of the liquid phases is developed in consideration with the fluctuation of the liquid surface.The model is validated by examining the burning rate constants at different convective air temperatures,which accord well with experimental data of previous studies.Other phenomena from the simulations,such as the transient history of droplet deformation and flame structure,are also qualitatively accordant with the descriptions of other numerical results.However,a different droplet deformation mechanism for the low Reynolds number is explained compared with that for the high Reynolds number.The calculations verified the feasibility of the VOF computational fluid dynamics (CFD) formulation as well as the mass transfer model due to vaporization.

  7. Reliable nanomaterial classification of powders using the volume-specific surface area method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Mielke, Johannes; Bianchin, Alvise; Ghanem, Antoine; Freiberger, Harald; Rauscher, Hubert; Gemeinert, Marion; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2017-02-01

    The volume-specific surface area (VSSA) of a particulate material is one of two apparently very different metrics recommended by the European Commission for a definition of "nanomaterial" for regulatory purposes: specifically, the VSSA metric may classify nanomaterials and non-nanomaterials differently than the median size in number metrics, depending on the chemical composition, size, polydispersity, shape, porosity, and aggregation of the particles in the powder. Here we evaluate the extent of agreement between classification by electron microscopy (EM) and classification by VSSA on a large set of diverse particulate substances that represent all the anticipated challenges except mixtures of different substances. EM and VSSA are determined in multiple labs to assess also the level of reproducibility. Based on the results obtained on highly characterized benchmark materials from the NanoDefine EU FP7 project, we derive a tiered screening strategy for the purpose of implementing the definition of nanomaterials. We finally apply the screening strategy to further industrial materials, which were classified correctly and left only borderline cases for EM. On platelet-shaped nanomaterials, VSSA is essential to prevent false-negative classification by EM. On porous materials, approaches involving extended adsorption isotherms prevent false positive classification by VSSA. We find no false negatives by VSSA, neither in Tier 1 nor in Tier 2, despite real-world industrial polydispersity and diverse composition, shape, and coatings. The VSSA screening strategy is recommended for inclusion in a technical guidance for the implementation of the definition.

  8. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 5; Analytical and Experimental Data Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, W. E.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study presented in this volume is to present the results and data analysis of in-duct transmission loss measurements. Transmission loss testing was performed on full-scale, 1/2-scale, and 115-scale treatment panel samples. The objective of the study was to compare predicted and measured transmission loss for full-scale and subscale panels in an attempt to evaluate the variations in suppression between full- and subscale panels which were ostensibly of equivalent design. Generally, the results indicated an unsatisfactory agreement between measurement and prediction, even for full-scale. This was attributable to difficulties encountered in obtaining sufficiently accurate test results, even with extraordinary care in calibrating the instrumentation and performing the test. Test difficulties precluded the ability to make measurements at frequencies high enough to be representative of subscale liners. It is concluded that transmission loss measurements without ducts and data acquisition facilities specifically designed to operate with the precision and complexity required for high subscale frequency ranges are inadequate for evaluation of subscale treatment effects.

  9. Structural alignment of proteins by a novel TOPOFIT method, as a superimposition of common volumes at a topomax point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Valentin A.; Abyzov, Alexej; Leslin, Chesley M.

    2004-01-01

    Similarity of protein structures has been analyzed using three-dimensional Delaunay triangulation patterns derived from the backbone representation. It has been found that structurally related proteins have a common spatial invariant part, a set of tetrahedrons, mathematically described as a common spatial subgraph volume of the three-dimensional contact graph derived from Delaunay tessellation (DT). Based on this property of protein structures, we present a novel common volume superimposition (TOPOFIT) method to produce structural alignments. Structural alignments usually evaluated by a number of equivalent (aligned) positions (Ne) with corresponding root mean square deviation (RMSD). The superimposition of the DT patterns allows one to uniquely identify a maximal common number of equivalent residues in the structural alignment. In other words, TOPOFIT identifies a feature point on the RMSD Ne curve, a topomax point, until which the topologies of two structures correspond to each other, including backbone and interresidue contacts, whereas the growing number of mismatches between the DT patterns occurs at larger RMSD (Ne) after the topomax point. It has been found that the topomax point is present in all alignments from different protein structural classes; therefore, the TOPOFIT method identifies common, invariant structural parts between proteins. The alignments produced by the TOPOFIT method have a good correlation with alignments produced by other current methods. This novel method opens new opportunities for the comparative analysis of protein structures and for more detailed studies on understanding the molecular principles of tertiary structure organization and functionality. The TOPOFIT method also helps to detect conformational changes, topological differences in variable parts, which are particularly important for studies of variations in active/ binding sites and protein classification. PMID:15215530

  10. A fast 3D surface reconstruction and volume estimation method for grain storage based on priori model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xian-hua; Sun, Wei-dong

    2011-06-01

    Inventory checking is one of the most significant parts for grain reserves, and plays a very important role on the macro-control of food and food security. Simple, fast and accurate method to obtain internal structure information and further to estimate the volume of the grain storage is needed. Here in our developed system, a special designed multi-site laser scanning system is used to acquire the range data clouds of the internal structure of the grain storage. However, due to the seriously uneven distribution of the range data, this data should firstly be preprocessed by an adaptive re-sampling method to reduce the data redundancy as well as noise. Then the range data is segmented and useful features, such as plane and cylinder information, are extracted. With these features a coarse registration between all of these single-site range data is done, and then an Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm is carried out to achieve fine registration. Taking advantage of the structure of the grain storage being well defined and the types of them are limited, a fast automatic registration method based on the priori model is proposed to register the multi-sites range data more efficiently. Then after the integration of the multi-sites range data, the grain surface is finally reconstructed by a delaunay based algorithm and the grain volume is estimated by a numerical integration method. This proposed new method has been applied to two common types of grain storage, and experimental results shown this method is more effective and accurate, and it can also avoids the cumulative effect of errors when registering the overlapped area pair-wisely.

  11. Variable volume loading method: a convenient and rapid method for measuring the initial emittable concentration and partition coefficient of formaldehyde and other aldehydes in building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2011-12-01

    The initial emittable formaldehyde and VOC concentration in building materials (C(0)) is a key parameter for characterizing and classifying these materials. Various methods have been developed to measure this parameter, but these generally require a long test time. In this paper we develop a convenient and rapid method, the variable volume loading (VVL) method, to simultaneously measure C(0) and the material/air partition coefficient (K). This method has the following features: (a) it requires a relatively short experimental time (less than 24 h for the cases studied); and (b) is convenient for routine measurement. Using this method, we determined C(0) and K of formaldehyde, propanal and hexanal in one kind of medium density fiberboard, and repeated experiments were performed to reduce measurement error. In addition, an extended-C-history method is proposed to determine the diffusion coefficient and the convective mass transfer coefficient. The VVL method is validated by comparing model predicted results based on the determined parameters with experimental data. The determined C(0) of formaldehyde obtained via this method is less than 10% of the total concentration using the perforator method recommended by the Chinese National Standard, suggesting that the total concentration may not be appropriate to predict emission characteristics, nor for material classification.

  12. METHODS OF CHAOTIC DYNAMICS IN SCHEMES OF RESEARCHES FEASIBILITY INTERNALS OF CAR TRAFFIC VOLUMES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    H. A. Kramarenko; A. V. Nechay; V. V. Skalozub

    2011-01-01

    The possibilities of chaotic dynamics methods applied to the topical analysis and forecasting problems of economic and technological properties of wagon streams represented by the related time series are studied...

  13. Parallel implementation of a dynamic unstructured chimera method in the DLR finite volume TAU-code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrane, A.; Raichle, A.; Stuermer, A. [German Aerospace Center, DLR, Numerical Methods, Inst. of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: aziz.madrane@dlr.de

    2004-07-01

    Aerodynamic problems involving moving geometries have many applications, including store separation, high-speed train entering into a tunnel, simulation of full configurations of the helicopter and fast maneuverability. Overset grid method offers the option of calculating these procedures. The solution process uses a grid system that discretizes the problem domain by using separately generated but overlapping unstructured grids that update and exchange boundary information through interpolation. However, such computations are complicated and time consuming. Parallel computing offers a very effective way to improve the productivity in doing computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop an efficient parallel computation algorithm for analyzing the flowfield of complex geometries using overset grids method. The strategy adopted in the parallelization of the overset grids method including the use of data structures and communication, is described. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the resulting parallel overset grids method. (author)

  14. Modification of codes NUALGAM and BREMRAD. Volume 3: Statistical considerations of the Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstenberg, H.

    1971-01-01

    The statistics are considered of the Monte Carlo method relative to the interpretation of the NUGAM2 and NUGAM3 computer code results. A numerical experiment using the NUGAM2 code is presented and the results are statistically interpreted.

  15. Finite Volume Methods for Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations on Collocated Grids with Nonconformal Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmogorov, Dmitry

    appearing in the immediate vicinity of a wind turbine rotor makes them invaluable tools in the field of wind energy. Since direct computations of a fully resolved flow around a wind turbine are computationally expensive, a typical requirement for a good CFD method is that it is able to predict the flow...... field efficiently without jeopardizing the accuracy. In this thesis, some fundamental developments of direct CFD methods are presented to provide a platform for the development of sliding grid method for wind turbine computations. As one of the most prospective CFD methods for incompressible wind...... turbine computations, collocated grid-based SIMPLE-like algorithms are developed for computations on block-structured grids with nonconformal interfaces. A technique to enhance both the convergence speed and the solution accuracy of the SIMPLE-like algorithms is presented. The erroneous behavior, which...

  16. Ultrasound as a Noninvasive Method to Assess Changes of Intracranial Volume and Pressure During Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Yost, W. T.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Kawai, Y.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Headaches are commonly experienced by astronauts in microgravity and by subjects undergoing head-down tilt (simulated microgravity on Earth). Exposure to microgravity probably elevates blood pressure and flow in the head which may increase intracranial volume (ICV) and pressure (ICP) and in turn cause headache. Due to the slightly compliant nature of the cranial vault and the encasement of brain and its vasculature within this vault, any increase of ICV will increase ICP and slightly distend the cranium. Previous studies document perivascular edema and increased ICP in rhesus monkeys during head-down tilt. Elevated ICP has also been reported in humans during head-down tilt. ICP measurements in healthy humans are rare because of the invasiveness of currently-available measurement techniques. Therefore, we proposed a noninvasive ultrasound technique to assess changes of ICV and JCP. The ultrasound principle is based on compliance of the cranial vault. A 450 kHz ultrasound stimulus is transmitted through the cranium by a transducer every 7.5-10 msec. The ultrasound wave enters the brain tissue, reflects off the opposite side of the cranium and is received by the same transducer. The detected wave is compared for phase quadrature (90 deg.to transmitted wave). Because the electronic circuitry of the device maintains a 90 deg. phase (phi), any alterations in the detected wave caused by an increase of ICV and ICP will be reflected as a change in the wave frequency. Phase shift is directly proportional to path length of the wave, DELTA x, which is expressed as DELTA x = phi lambda/2 pi where lambda is wavelength. Elevated ICV and ICP expand the cranial vault and increase path length of the wave (a measure of intracranial distance). Increased path length equals reduced frequency of the detected wave. Reduced frequency is then related to elevated ICP. This technique has potential uses for ICP studies of astronauts in space and head trauma patients on Earth.

  17. The equivalence between volume averaging and method of planes definitions of the pressure tensor at a plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, D. M.; Smith, E. R.; Dini, D.; Zaki, T. A.

    2011-07-01

    It is shown analytically that the method of planes (MOP) [Todd, Evans, and Daivis, Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] and volume averaging (VA) [Cormier, Rickman, and Delph, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 99 (2001), 10.1063/1.1328406] formulas for the local pressure tensor, Pα, y(y), where α ≡ x, y, or z, are mathematically identical. In the case of VA, the sampling volume is taken to be an infinitely thin parallelepiped, with an infinite lateral extent. This limit is shown to yield the MOP expression. The treatment is extended to include the condition of mechanical equilibrium resulting from an imposed force field. This analytical development is followed by numerical simulations. The equivalence of these two methods is demonstrated in the context of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of boundary-driven shear flow. A wall of tethered atoms is constrained to impose a normal load and a velocity profile on the entrained central layer. The VA formula can be used to compute all components of Pαβ(y), which offers an advantage in calculating, for example, Pxx(y) for nano-scale pressure-driven flows in the x-direction, where deviations from the classical Poiseuille flow solution can occur.

  18. An oversampling technique for the multiscale finite volume method to simulate electromagnetic responses in the frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Mata, Luz Angelica Caudillo; Schwarzbach, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the computational cost of the simulation of electromagnetic responses in geophysical settings that involve highly heterogeneous media, we develop a multiscale finite volume method with oversampling for the quasi-static Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain. We assume a coarse mesh nested within a fine mesh that accurately discretizes the problem. For each coarse cell, we independently solve a local version of the original Maxwell's system subject to linear boundary conditions on an extended domain, which includes the coarse cell and a neighborhood of fine cells around it. The local Maxwell's system is solved using the fine mesh contained in the extended domain and the mimetic finite volume method. Next, these local solutions (basis functions) together with a weak-continuity condition are used to construct a coarse-mesh version of the global problem. The basis functions can be used to obtain the fine-mesh details from the solution of the coarse-mesh problem. Our approach leads to a sig...

  19. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for a Finite Volume Method for Flow and Transport of Radionuclides in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaziane Brahim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider adaptive numerical simulation of miscible displacement problems in porous media, which are modeled by single phase flow equations. A vertex-centred finite volume method is employed to discretize the coupled system: the Darcy flow equation and the diffusion-convection concentration equation. The convection term is approximated with a Godunov scheme over the dual finite volume mesh, whereas the diffusion-dispersion term is discretized by piecewise linear conforming finite elements. We introduce two kinds of indicators, both of them of residual type. The first one is related to time discretization and is local with respect to the time discretization: thus, at each time, it provides an appropriate information for the choice of the next time step. The second is related to space discretization and is local with respect to both the time and space variable and the idea is that at each time it is an efficient tool for mesh adaptivity. An error estimation procedure evaluates where additional refinement is needed and grid generation procedures dynamically create or remove fine-grid patches as resolution requirements change. The method was implemented in the software MELODIE, developed by the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire. The algorithm is then used to simulate the evolution of radionuclide migration from the waste packages through a heterogeneous disposal, demonstrating its capability to capture complex behavior of the resulting flow.

  20. Finite volume methods for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meese, Ernst Arne

    1998-07-01

    Most solution methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) use structured grids based on curvilinear coordinates for compliance with complex geometries. In a typical industry application, about 80% of the time used to produce the results is spent constructing computational grids. Recently the use of unstructured grids has been strongly advocated. For unstructured grids there are methods for generating them automatically on quite complex domains. This thesis focuses on the design of Navier-Stokes solvers that can cope with unstructured grids and ''low quality grids'', thus reducing the need for human intervention in the grid generation.

  1. Application of probabilistic and decision analysis methods to structural mechanics and materials sciences problems. Volume 1. Planning document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, B.J.; Tagart, S.W. Jr. (eds.)

    1984-08-01

    Volume I presents an overview of the EPRI structural reliability research program. First, perspectives on the probabilistic treatment of uncertainty are presented. A brief explanation is given of why decision analysis methods are part of EPRI's structural reliability project, and how the use of such methods to handle uncertainty can improve decision-making in this area. A more detailed discussion of one approach for dealing with uncertainty about event probabilities is also presented. Next, review of probabilistic risk analysis is presented. This review includes a brief history of its development and application, an overview of the methodology involved, the role of structural reliability assessment in providing input to PRAs, and the treatment of uncertainties in that input. A brief discussion of the relationship between PRA and safety goals is also included.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of the Applicability of Capacitive and Optical Measurement Methods for the Determination of Liquid Hydrogen Volume Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert HOLLER

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a capacitive and a vision-based method for measuring the velocity of cryogenic hydrogen flows. The capacitive sensing principle exploits the spatial frequency signature of perturbations moving through a multi-electrode structure. This setup increases the sensitivity to dielectric permittivity variations compared to a simple two-electrode structure while preserving the ability to detect small perturbations. The vision-based method relies on a high-speed camera system that monitors the liquid hydrogen flow through an optical window yielding the flow velocity by cross-correlating subsequent images of the flow. Although a comprehensive analysis of the obtainable measurement uncertainty was not performed yet, current measurement results show the applicability of both principles for the non-invasive measurement of the volume flow of cryogenic fuels inside conveyor pipes.

  3. FluSI: A novel parallel simulation tool for flapping insect flight using a Fourier method with volume penalization

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    FluSI, a fully parallel open source software for pseudo-spectral simulations of three-dimensional flapping flight in viscous flows, is presented. The computational framework runs on high performance computers with distributed memory architectures. The discretization of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier--Stokes equations is based on a Fourier pseudospectral method with adaptive time stepping. The complex time varying geometry of flapping insects with rigid wings is handled with the volume penalization method. The modules characterizing the insect geometry, the flight mechanics and the wing kinematics are described. Validation tests for different benchmarks illustrate the efficiency and precision of the approach. Finally, computations of a model insect in the turbulent regime give an outlook of the versatility of the software.

  4. The model and the planning method of volume and variety assessment of innovative products in an industrial enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. G.; Anisimov, E. G.; Saurenko, T. N.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the long term, the innovative development strategy efficiency is considered as the most crucial condition for assurance of economic system competitiveness in market conditions. It determines the problem relevance of such justification strategies with regard to specific systems features and conditions of their operation. The problem solution for industrial enterprises can be based on mathematical models of supporting the decision-making on the elements of the innovative manufacturing program. An optimization model and the planning method of innovative products volume and variety are suggested. The feature of the suggested model lies in the nonlinear nature of the objective function. It allows taking into consideration the law of diminishing marginal utility. The suggested method of optimization takes into account the system features and enables the effective implementation of manufacturing capabilities in modern conditions of production organization and sales in terms of market saturation.

  5. Researching Online Foreign Language Interaction and Exchange: Theories, Methods and Challenges. Telecollaboration in Education. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooly, Melinda; O'Dowd, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to some of the methods and theoretical approaches for investigating foreign language (FL) interaction and exchange in online environments. Research approaches which can be applied to Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) are outlined, followed by discussion of the way in which tools and techniques for…

  6. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 1; Overview, Results, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    Scale model fan rigs that simulate new generation ultra-high-bypass engines at about 1/5-scale are achieving increased importance as development vehicles for the design of low-noise aircraft engines. Testing at small scale allows the tests to be performed in existing anechoic wind tunnels, which provides an accurate simulation of the important effects of aircraft forward motion on the noise generation. The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of the fullscale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. The primary objective of this study was to develop methods that will allow scale model fan rigs to be successfully used as acoustic treatment design tools. The study focuses on finding methods to extend the upper limit of the frequency range of impedance prediction models and acoustic impedance measurement methods for subscale treatment liner designs, and confirm the predictions by correlation with measured data. This phase of the program had as a goal doubling the upper limit of impedance measurement from 6 kHz to 12 kHz. The program utilizes combined analytical and experimental methods to achieve the objectives.

  7. A finite-volume method for convection problems with embedded moving boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassen, Y.J.; Koren, B.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate method, using a novel immersed-boundary approach, is presented for numerically solving linear, scalar convection problems. Moving interior boundary conditions are embedded in the fixed-grid fluxes in the direct neighborhood of the moving boundaries. Tailor-made limiters are derived such

  8. On finite volume method implementation of poro-elasto-plasticity soil model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian; Hededal, Ole; Cardiff, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the interactions between the nonlinear soil skeleton and the pore fluid under loading plays a vital role in many geotechnical applications. It is therefore important to develop a numerical method that can effectively capture this nonlinear soil-pore fluid coupling effect. T...

  9. An Application of Cartesian-Grid and Volume-of-Fluid Methods to Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    Dr. Patrick CRC Press, Inc., 1993. Purtell is the program manager. The David Taylor Leonard, B., "Bounded higher-order upwind multidimensional Model...Bell, J., Marcus, D., & Rider, W., "A Colella, P., Graves, D., Modiano , D., Puckett, E., & Sussman, second-order projection method for tracking

  10. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  11. Implicit finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin methods for multicomponent flow in unstructured 3D fractured porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Amooie, Mohammad Amin; Soltanian, Mohamad Reza

    2016-10-01

    We present a new implicit higher-order finite element (FE) approach to efficiently model compressible multicomponent fluid flow on unstructured grids and in fractured porous subsurface formations. The scheme is sequential implicit: pressures and fluxes are updated with an implicit Mixed Hybrid Finite Element (MHFE) method, and the transport of each species is approximated with an implicit second-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) FE method. Discrete fractures are incorporated with a cross-flow equilibrium approach. This is the first investigation of all-implicit higher-order MHFE-DG for unstructured triangular, quadrilateral (2D), and hexahedral (3D) grids and discrete fractures. A lowest-order implicit finite volume (FV) transport update is also developed for the same grid types. The implicit methods are compared to an Implicit-Pressure-Explicit-Composition (IMPEC) scheme. For fractured domains, the unconditionally stable implicit transport update is shown to increase computational efficiency by orders of magnitude as compared to IMPEC, which has a time-step constraint proportional to the pore volume of discrete fracture grid cells. However, when lowest-order Euler time-discretizations are used, numerical errors increase linearly with the larger implicit time-steps, resulting in high numerical dispersion. Second-order Crank-Nicolson implicit MHFE-DG and MHFE-FV are therefore presented as well. Convergence analyses show twice the convergence rate for the DG methods as compared to FV, resulting in two to three orders of magnitude higher computational efficiency. Numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness in modeling compressible multicomponent flow on irregular and fractured 2D and 3D grids, even in the presence of fingering instabilities.

  12. Assessing the accuracy and reliability of ultrasonographic three-dimensional parathyroid volume measurement in a patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism: a comparison with the two-dimensional conventional method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hye You

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of the semi-automated ultrasonographic volume measurement tool, virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL, for measuring the volume of parathyroid glands. Methods Volume measurements for 40 parathyroid glands were performed in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by chronic renal failure. The volume of the parathyroid glands was measured twice by experienced radiologists by two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D methods using conventional sonograms and the VOCAL with 30°angle increments before parathyroidectomy. The specimen volume was also measured postoperatively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs and the absolute percentage error were used for estimating the reproducibility and accuracy of the two different methods. Results The ICC value between two measurements of the 2D method and the 3D method was 0.956 and 0.999, respectively. The mean absolute percentage error of the 2D method and the 3D VOCAL technique was 29.56% and 5.78%, respectively. For accuracy and reliability, the plots of the 3D method showed a more compact distribution than those of the 2D method on the Bland-Altman graph. Conclusion The rotational VOCAL method for measuring the parathyroid gland is more accurate and reliable than the conventional 2D measurement. This VOCAL method could be used as a more reliable follow-up imaging modality in a patient with hyperparathyroidism.

  13. Assessing the accuracy and reliability of ultrasonographic three-dimensional parathyroid volume measurement in a patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism: a comparison with the two-dimensional conventional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of the semi-automated ultrasonographic volume measurement tool, virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL), for measuring the volume of parathyroid glands. Methods Volume measurements for 40 parathyroid glands were performed in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by chronic renal failure. The volume of the parathyroid glands was measured twice by experienced radiologists by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) methods using conventional sonograms and the VOCAL with 30°angle increments before parathyroidectomy. The specimen volume was also measured postoperatively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the absolute percentage error were used for estimating the reproducibility and accuracy of the two different methods. Results The ICC value between two measurements of the 2D method and the 3D method was 0.956 and 0.999, respectively. The mean absolute percentage error of the 2D method and the 3D VOCAL technique was 29.56% and 5.78%, respectively. For accuracy and reliability, the plots of the 3D method showed a more compact distribution than those of the 2D method on the Bland-Altman graph. Conclusion The rotational VOCAL method for measuring the parathyroid gland is more accurate and reliable than the conventional 2D measurement. This VOCAL method could be used as a more reliable follow-up imaging modality in a patient with hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27457337

  14. Methods to Reduce Forest Residue Volume after Timber Harvesting and Produce Black Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest restoration often includes thinning to reduce tree density and improve ecosystem processes and function while also reducing the risk of wildfire or insect and disease outbreaks. However, one drawback of these restoration treatments is that slash is often burned in piles that may damage the soil and require further restoration activities. Pile burning is currently used on many forest sites as the preferred method for residue disposal because piles can be burned at various times of the year and are usually more controlled than broadcast burns. In many cases, fire can be beneficial to site conditions and soil properties, but slash piles, with a large concentration of wood, needles, forest floor, and sometimes mineral soil, can cause long-term damage. We describe several alternative methods for reducing nonmerchantable forest residues that will help remove excess woody biomass, minimize detrimental soil impacts, and create charcoal for improving soil organic matter and carbon sequestration.

  15. Methods to Reduce Forest Residue Volume after Timber Harvesting and Produce Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Matt D.; Archuleta, James G.; McAvoy, Darren; Roussel, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Forest restoration often includes thinning to reduce tree density and improve ecosystem processes and function while also reducing the risk of wildfire or insect and disease outbreaks. However, one drawback of these restoration treatments is that slash is often burned in piles that may damage the soil and require further restoration activities. Pile burning is currently used on many forest sites as the preferred method for residue disposal because piles can be burned at various times of the year and are usually more controlled than broadcast burns. In many cases, fire can be beneficial to site conditions and soil properties, but slash piles, with a large concentration of wood, needles, forest floor, and sometimes mineral soil, can cause long-term damage. We describe several alternative methods for reducing nonmerchantable forest residues that will help remove excess woody biomass, minimize detrimental soil impacts, and create charcoal for improving soil organic matter and carbon sequestration. PMID:28377830

  16. Method for Detecting a Random Process in a Convex Hull Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    1), pp. 66-87 (March 1943) . [0014] Wald , A. and J. Wolfowitz . "On a test whether two samples are from the same population." The Annals of...Method A ( Wald - Wolfowitz Independent Sample Runs Test Procedure) [0052] An initial statistical test on input distributions is performed to evaluate...two-valued data sequence and is well known to those skilled in the art [ Wald , A. 14 and J. Wolfowitz . "On a test whether two samples are from the

  17. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  18. Aeromechanics and Vehicle Configuration Demonstrations. Volume 3: A Hybrid Probabilistic Method for Estimate Design Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Employs empiricism • Employs experience/competency • Provides probabilistic estimating results. The first three items of this list deal with the...this list address particular inputs to the margin estimating technique. The first is that methods to estimate margin should employ empiricism . This can...experience becomes more critical to the success of the estimation if the methodology employed utilizes a smaller amount of empiricism . [1] The

  19. Nonlinear Hyperbolic Equations - Theory, Computation Methods, and Applications. Volume 24. Note on Numerical Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    smooth parts of the flow; randomness is a feature of the method (for details about RCM see Refs. 2-7). Randomness is not an important issue in homo ...equation C1) then we obtain inequalities for quadratic form ST G . A+S ( -G-A- 0 0 ecc --- 3S < eA + . Substituting GA4 . by S T C-G-A-)S in the first

  20. Design of the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial (VENT: a non-surgical method of lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noppen Marc

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung volume reduction surgery is effective at improving lung function, quality of life, and mortality in carefully selected individuals with advanced emphysema. Recently, less invasive bronchoscopic approaches have been designed to utilize these principles while avoiding the associated perioperative risks. The Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema PalliatioN Trial (VENT posits that occlusion of a single pulmonary lobe through bronchoscopically placed Zephyr® endobronchial valves will effect significant improvements in lung function and exercise tolerance with an acceptable risk profile in advanced emphysema. Methods The trial design posted on Clinical trials.gov, on August 10, 2005 proposed an enrollment of 270 subjects. Inclusion criteria included: diagnosis of emphysema with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 100%; residual volume > 150% predicted, and heterogeneous emphysema defined using a quantitative chest computed tomography algorithm. Following standardized pulmonary rehabilitation, patients were randomized 2:1 to receive unilateral lobar placement of endobronchial valves plus optimal medical management or optimal medical management alone. The co-primary endpoint was the mean percent change in FEV1 and six minute walk distance at 180 days. Secondary end-points included mean percent change in St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire score and the mean absolute changes in the maximal work load measured by cycle ergometry, dyspnea (mMRC score, and total oxygen use per day. Per patient response rates in clinically significant improvement/maintenance of FEV1 and six minute walk distance and technical success rates of valve placement were recorded. Apriori response predictors based on quantitative CT and lung physiology were defined. Conclusion If endobronchial valves improve FEV1 and health status with an acceptable safety profile in advanced emphysema, they would offer a novel intervention for this progressive and

  1. Influence of applied volume on efficacy of 3-minute surgical reference disinfection method prEN 12791.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Günter; Ostermeyer, Christiane

    2004-12-01

    For assessment of the efficacy of surgical hand disinfection, European reference method prEN 12791 prescribes that the hands must be kept wet with the reference alcohol for 3 min regardless of the applied volume. The aim of this study was to determine whether the applied volume of the reference disinfectant n-propanol (60%, vol/vol) influences the effect on the resident hand flora. Ten experiments with 200 reference disinfections were analyzed. Hands were washed for 1 min with soap. The bacterial prevalue was obtained by rubbing fingertips in tryptic soy broth for 1 min. After this, each subject treated the hands with n-propanol (60%, vol/vol) by using as many portions as necessary to keep hands wet for a total of 3 min. Bacterial postvalues (immediate effect) were obtained for one hand, and the other hand was gloved for 3 h. After the gloves were taken off, a second postvalue was obtained (sustained effect). Most surgical reference disinfections (73%) were achieved with 9 ml of the reference alcohol, followed by 12 ml (24%) and 6 ml (3%). There was no significant difference between the mean log10 reduction values for the three treatment groups, both in terms of the immediate effect (P = 0.333, as determined by analysis of variance) and in terms of the sustained effect (P = 0.442). A higher number of portions did not correlate with a higher reduction factor (for immediate effect, Pearson's correlation coefficient = -0.028 [P = 0.689]; for sustained effect, Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.059 [P = 0.404]). If the hands were kept wet with the reference alcohol for the total application time, the applied volume could vary, but this did not alter the efficacy.

  2. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume I. Eastern United States: TRY data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  3. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  4. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  5. A robust method for pulse peak determination in a digital volume pulse waveform with a wandering baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Farooq, Umar; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a robust method for pulse peak determination in a digital volume pulse (DVP) waveform with a wandering baseline. A proposed new method uses a modified morphological filter (MMF) to eliminate a wandering baseline signal of the DVP signal with minimum distortion and a slope sum function (SSF) with an adaptive thresholding scheme to detect pulse peaks from the baseline-removed DVP signal. Further in order to cope with over-detected and missed pulse peaks, knowledge based rules are applied as a postprocessor. The algorithm automatically adjusts detection parameters periodically to adapt to varying beat morphologies and fluctuations. Compared with conventional methods (highpass filtering, linear interpolation, cubic spline interpolation, and wavelet adaptive filtering), our method performs better in terms of the signal-to-error ratio, the computational burden (0.125 seconds for one minute of DVP signal analysis with the Intel Core 2 Quad processor @ 2.40 GHz PC), the true detection rate (97.32% with an acceptance level of 4 ms ) as well as the normalized error rate (0.18%). In addition, the proposed method can detect true positions of pulse peaks more accurately and becomes very useful for pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse rate variability (PRV) analyses.

  6. A two-step finite volume method to discretize heterogeneous and anisotropic pressure equation on general grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Al Kobaisi, Mohammed

    2017-10-01

    A novel Two-Step cell-centered Finite Volume Method (TSFVM) is developed in this work to discretize the heterogeneous and anisotropic pressure equation on triangular and quadrilateral grids in 2D and hexahedral and tetrahedral grids in 3D. Physical properties such as permeability and porosity are piece-wise constant on each grid cell. In the first step, the Galerkin Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilized to compute pressure solutions at all cell vertices. In the second step, pressure values at cell vertices are used to derive continuous two-point flux stencils for cell faces. Mass conservation equations are then written for each cell to obtain a system of linear equations that can be solved for pressure at cell centers. Extensive numerical experiments are carried out to test the performance of our TSFVM. In particular, we compare TSFVM with the classical Multipoint Flux Approximation (MPFA-O) method as well as a more recently developed MPFA method with full pressure support called enhanced MPFA (eMPFA). The results show that the TSFVM compares well with eMPFA for challenging test cases for which MPFA-O breaks down. Specifically, and as a significant step forward, our TSFVM is quite robust for challenging problems involving heterogeneous and highly anisotropic permeability tensors when both MPFA-O and eMPFA suffer from unphysical oscillations. Finally, the numerical convergence study demonstrates that TSFVM has comparable convergence behavior to MPFA-O method for both homogeneous and discontinuous permeability fields.

  7. A dual coordinate system finite difference method for forward and inverse solutions of the volume conductor problem in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, S; Maynard, D E

    1997-03-01

    Finite difference methods for the volume conductor problem have used a single coordinate system for the mesh and made approximations of Laplace's equation. This method is simple but has two major problems. Firstly, to deal with boundary conditions properly, the normal potential gradient at the boundary must be known. However it is complicated to compute at a curved surface point. Secondly, for an inverse solution the equation on a curved boundary is difficult to reverse since more than one inner mesh node appears in the approximation equation for each surface point. The new method developed in this paper is a dual coordinate system. One system serves as a frame mesh, the other is a sub-coordinate system in which surface points become mesh points (regular nodes). The equation at each surface point is then directly reversible since only one inner point appears in the equation. The forward solution is applied to both centric and eccentric bone models and uses the conventional successive over-relaxation (SOR) method. Noise is added to this solution for input to the inverse procedure which is a direct step-in non-iterative method. Low pass filtering was effective in reducing the effects of noise. In the examples given, only one coordinate subsystem is used but, for complex shape boundaries, multiple subsystems would be necessary.

  8. Assessing the accuracy and reliability of ultrasonographic three-dimensional parathyroid volume measurement in a patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism: a comparison with the two-dimensional conventional method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sung Hye; Son, Gyu Ri; Lee, Nam Joon [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Sangil; Ryoo, In Seon; Seol, Hae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of the semi-automated ultrasonographic volume measurement tool, virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL), for measuring the volume of parathyroid glands. Volume measurements for 40 parathyroid glands were performed in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by chronic renal failure. The volume of the parathyroid glands was measured twice by experienced radiologists by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) methods using conventional sonograms and the VOCAL with 30°angle increments before parathyroidectomy. The specimen volume was also measured postoperatively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the absolute percentage error were used for estimating the reproducibility and accuracy of the two different methods. The ICC value between two measurements of the 2D method and the 3D method was 0.956 and 0.999, respectively. The mean absolute percentage error of the 2D method and the 3D VOCAL technique was 29.56% and 5.78%, respectively. For accuracy and reliability, the plots of the 3D method showed a more compact distribution than those of the 2D method on the Bland-Altman graph. The rotational VOCAL method for measuring the parathyroid gland is more accurate and reliable than the conventional 2D measurement. This VOCAL method could be used as a more reliable follow-up imaging modality in a patient with hyperparathyroidism.

  9. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: Advanced special functions models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. B.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Sections Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analyses of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components.

  10. Piping benchmark problems. Volume 1. Dynamic analysis uniform support motion response spectrum method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.; Reich, M.

    1980-08-01

    A set of benchmark problems and solutions have been developed for verifying the adequacy of computer programs used for dynamic analysis and design of nuclear piping systems by the Response Spectrum Method. The problems range from simple to complex configurations which are assumed to experience linear elastic behavior. The dynamic loading is represented by uniform support motion, assumed to be induced by seismic excitation in three spatial directions. The solutions consist of frequencies, participation factors, nodal displacement components and internal force and moment components. Solutions to associated anchor point motion static problems are not included.

  11. A Finite Volume Backward Euler Difference Method for Nonlinear Parabolic Integral-differential Equation%非线性抛物型积分-微分方程的向后Euler差分有限体积元方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王波; 王强

    2009-01-01

    The Finite volume backward Euler difference method is established to discuss two-dimensional parabolic integro-differential equations.These results are new for finite volume element methods for parabolic integro-differential equations.

  12. 3D flow study in a mildly stenotic coronary artery phantom using a whole volume PIV method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, J; Mongrain, R; Laurier, J; Galaz, R; Tardif, J C

    2008-11-01

    Blood flow dynamics has an important role in atherosclerosis initiation, progression, plaque rupture and thrombosis eventually causing myocardial infarction. In particular, shear stress is involved in platelet activation, endothelium function and secondary flows have been proposed as possible variables in plaque erosion. In order to investigate these three-dimensional flow characteristics in the context of a mild stenotic coronary artery, a whole volume PIV method has been developed and applied to a scaled-up transparent phantom. Experimental three-dimensional velocity data was processed to estimate the 3D shear stress distributions and secondary flows within the flow volume. The results show that shear stress reaches values out of the normal and atheroprotective range at an early stage of the obstructive pathology and that important secondary flows are also initiated at an early stage of the disease. The results also support the concept of a vena contracta associated with the jet in the context of a coronary artery stenosis with the consequence of higher shear stresses in the post-stenotic region in the blood domain than at the vascular wall.

  13. Conventional versus pre-balanced forms of the shallow-water equations solved using finite-volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinhua; Xie, Shengbai

    2016-05-01

    In the existing literature, various forms of governing equations have been proposed to solve the shallow-water equations (SWEs). Recently, attention has been dedicated to the so-called "pre-balanced" form, because finite-volume schemes that are designed on this basis satisfy the well-balanced property. In this study, we theoretically investigate the relationship between numerical schemes devised using approximate Riemann solvers in the framework of finite-volume methods for solving the conventional form of the SWEs and its "pre-balanced" variant. We find that the numerical schemes for solving these two forms of the SWEs turn out to be identical when some widely employed upwind or centered approximate Riemann solvers are adopted for the numerical flux evaluations, such as the HLL (Harten, Lax, and van Leer), HLLC (HLL solver with restoring the contact surface), FORCE (first-order centered), and SLIC (slope limited centered) schemes. Some numerical experiments are performed, which verify the validity of the result of our theoretical analysis. The theoretical and numerical results suggest that the "pre-balanced" SWEs variant is not superior to the conventional one for solving the SWEs using approximate Riemann solvers.

  14. Numerical study of impeller-driven von Karman flows via a volume penalization method

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzahler, Sebastian; Homann, Holger; Ponty, Yannick; Grauer, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of impeller-driven flows in cylindrical geometry are performed via direct numerical simulations (DNS) and compared to flows obtained in the von Karman flow experiments. The geometry of rotating impellers assembled of several basic geometric objects is modeled via a penalization method and implemented in a massive parallel pseudo-spectral Navier-Stokes solver. We performed simulations of impellers with different curvature of blades, especially one resembling the so-called TM28 configuration used in water experiments. The decomposition into poloidal, toroidal components and the mean velocity fields from our simulations are quantitatively in agreement with experimental results. We analyzed the flow structure close to the impeller blades and found different vortex topologies.

  15. Simple and inexpensive hardware and software method to measure volume changes in Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Ricardo; Ozu, Marcelo; Parisi, Mario

    2007-04-15

    Water channels (aquaporins) family members have been identified in central nervous system cells. A classic method to measure membrane water permeability and its regulation is to capture and analyse images of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing them. Laboratories dedicated to the analysis of motion images usually have powerful equipment valued in thousands of dollars. However, some scientists consider that new approaches are needed to reduce costs in scientific labs, especially in developing countries. The objective of this work is to share a very low-cost hardware and software setup based on a well-selected webcam, a hand-made adapter to a microscope and the use of free software to measure membrane water permeability in Xenopus oocytes. One of the main purposes of this setup is to maintain a high level of quality in images obtained at brief intervals (shorter than 70 ms). The presented setup helps to economize without sacrificing image analysis requirements.

  16. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance.

  17. Simulation of dissolution in porous media in three dimensions with lattice Boltzmann, finite-volume, and surface-rescaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, F.; Cen, J.; Boek, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a pore-scale dissolution model for the simulation of reactive transport in complex porous media such as those encountered in carbon-storage injection processes. We couple a lattice Boltzmann model for flow calculation with a finite-volume method for solving chemical transport equations, and allow the computational grid to change as mineral surfaces are dissolved according to first-order reaction kinetics. We appraise this scheme for use with high Péclet number flows in three-dimensional geometries and show how the popular first-order convection scheme is affected by severe numerical diffusion when grid Péclet numbers exceed unity, and confirm that this can be overcome relatively easily by using a second-order method in conjunction with a flux-limiter function. We then propose a surface rescaling method which uses parabolic elements to counteract errors in surface area exposed by the Cartesian grid and avoid the use of more complex embedded surface methods when surface reaction kinetics are incorporated. Finally, we compute dissolution in an image of a real porous limestone rock sample injected with HCl for different Péclet numbers and obtain dissolution patterns in concordance with theory and experimental observation. A low injection flow rate was shown to lead to erosion of the pore space concentrated at the face of the rock, whereas a high flow rate leads to wormhole formation.

  18. Numerical study on modeling of liquid film flow under countercurrent flow limitation in volume of fluid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Taro, E-mail: watanabe_t@qe.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-7895 (Japan); Takata, Takashi, E-mail: takata.takashi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-chou, Oarai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 331-1393 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Akira, E-mail: yamaguchi@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Thin liquid film flow under CCFL was modeled and coupled with the VOF method. • The difference of the liquid flow rate in experiments of CCFL was evaluated. • The proposed VOF method can quantitatively predict CCFL with low computational cost. - Abstract: Countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL) in a heat transfer tube at a steam generator (SG) of pressurized water reactor (PWR) is one of the important issues on the core cooling under a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In order to improve the prediction accuracy of the CCFL characteristics in numerical simulations using the volume of fluid (VOF) method with less computational cost, a thin liquid film flow in a countercurrent flow is modeled independently and is coupled with the VOF method. The CCFL characteristics is evaluated analytically in condition of a maximizing down-flow rate as a function of a void fraction or a liquid film thickness considering a critical thickness. Then, we have carried out numerical simulations of a countercurrent flow in a vertical tube so as to investigate the CCFL characteristics and compare them with the previous experimental results. As a result, it has been concluded that the effect of liquid film entrainment by upward gas flux will cause the difference in the experiments.

  19. Application of probabilistic and decision analysis methods to structural mechanics and materials sciences problems. Volume 2. Resource document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, B.J.; Tagart, S.W. Jr. (eds.)

    1984-08-01

    This volume presents background resource material on the field of structural reliability assessment and its relationship to the discipline of probabilistic risk analysis and decision analysis. First, general background material is presented on the field of structural reliability assessment. Next, some sample applications of probabilistic and decision analysis methods are presented. A hypothetical example illustrates how a probabilistic approach could be used in structural design, and a brief description is given of how the results of structural reliability analyses can be used as input to a PRA. A case study is described on the use of decision analysis to select strategies for dealing with intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The use of decision analysis to evaluate the merits of different possible research tasks is also discussed. A discussion of decision analysis is then presented. Finally, the document presents a discussion of open issues in the area of structural reliability.

  20. A finite volume method and experimental study of a stator of a piezoelectric traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolborici, V; Dawson, F P; Pugh, M C

    2014-03-01

    Piezoelectric traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motors are motors that generate torque by using the friction force between a piezoelectric composite ring (or disk-shaped stator) and a metallic ring (or disk-shaped rotor) when a traveling wave is excited in the stator. The motor speed is proportional to the amplitude of the traveling wave and, in order to obtain large amplitudes, the stator is excited at frequencies close to its resonance frequency. This paper presents a non-empirical partial differential equations model for the stator, which is discretized using the finite volume method. The fundamental frequency of the discretized model is computed and compared to the experimentally-measured operating frequency of the stator of Shinsei USR60 piezoelectric motor.

  1. Integrative method in lithofacies characteristics and 3D velocity volume of the Permian igneous rocks in H area, Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Haijun; Liu Yongfu; Xie Huiwen; Xu Yongzhong; Sun Qi; Wang Shuangshuang

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces horizon control,seismic control,logging control and facies control methods through the application of the least squares fitting of logging curves,seismic inversion and facies-controlled techniques.Based on the microgeology and thin section analyses,the lithology,lithofacies and periods of the Permian igneous rocks are described in detail.The seismic inversion and facies-controlled techniques were used to find the distribution characteristics of the igneous rocks and the 3D velocity volume.The least squares fitting of the logging curves overcome the problem that the work area is short of density logging data.Through analysis of thin sections,the lithofacies can be classified into eruption airfall subfacies,eruption pyroclastic flow subfacies and eruption facies.

  2. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 3, Inorganic instrumental methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The methods cover: C in solutions, F (electrode), elements by atomic emission spectrometry, inorganic anions by ion chromatography, Hg in water/solids/sludges, As, Se, Bi, Pb, data calculations for SST (single shell tank?) samples, Sb, Tl, Ag, Pu, O/M ratio, ignition weight loss, pH value, ammonia (N), Cr(VI), alkalinity, U, C sepn. from soil/sediment/sludge, Pu purif., total N, water, C and S, surface Cl/F, leachable Cl/F, outgassing of Ge detector dewars, gas mixing, gas isotopic analysis, XRF of metals/alloys/compounds, H in Zircaloy, H/O in metals, inpurity extraction, reduced/total Fe in glass, free acid in U/Pu solns, density of solns, Kr/Xe isotopes in FFTF cover gas, H by combustion, MS of Li and Cs isotopes, MS of lanthanide isotopes, GC operation, total Na on filters, XRF spectroscopy QC, multichannel analyzer operation, total cyanide in water/solid/sludge, free cyanide in water/leachate, hydrazine conc., ICP-MS, {sup 99}Tc, U conc./isotopes, microprobe analysis of solids, gas analysis, total cyanide, H/N{sub 2}O in air, and pH in soil.

  3. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Håkan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Methods Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Results Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Conclusion Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking

  4. A Time-Accurate Upwind Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Compressible Flow with Cure of Pathological Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2007-01-01

    A time-accurate, upwind, finite volume method for computing compressible flows on unstructured grids is presented. The method is second order accurate in space and time and yields high resolution in the presence of discontinuities. For efficiency, the Roe approximate Riemann solver with an entropy correction is employed. In the basic Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme, many concepts of high order upwind schemes are adopted: the surface flux integrals are carefully treated, a Cauchy-Kowalewski time-stepping scheme is used in the time-marching stage, and a multidimensional limiter is applied in the reconstruction stage. However even with these up-to-date improvements, the basic upwind scheme is still plagued by the so-called "pathological behaviors," e.g., the carbuncle phenomenon, the expansion shock, etc. A solution to these limitations is presented which uses a very simple dissipation model while still preserving second order accuracy. This scheme is referred to as the enhanced time-accurate upwind (ETAU) scheme in this paper. The unstructured grid capability renders flexibility for use in complex geometry; and the present ETAU Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme is capable of handling a broad spectrum of flow regimes from high supersonic to subsonic at very low Mach number, appropriate for both CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and CAA (computational aeroacoustics). Numerous examples are included to demonstrate the robustness of the methods.

  5. Finite volume - space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the numerical simulation of compressible turbulent flow in time dependent domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česenek, Jan

    The article is concerned with the numerical simulation of the compressible turbulent flow in time dependent domains. The mathematical model of flow is represented by the system of non-stationary Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The motion of the domain occupied by the fluid is taken into account with the aid of the ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) formulation of the RANS equations. This RANS system is equipped with two-equation k - ω turbulence model. These two systems of equations are solved separately. Discretization of the RANS system is carried out by the space-time discontinuous Galerkin method which is based on piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximation of the sought solution in space and in time. Discretization of the two-equation k - ω turbulence model is carried out by the implicit finite volume method, which is based on piecewise constant approximation of the sought solution. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  6. Simplified methods for assessment of renal function as the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to extracellular fluid volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Brøchner-Mortensen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background: Instead of scaling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to a body surface area of 1.73m2, it has been suggested to scale GFR to extracellular fluid volume (ECV). The ratio GFR/ECV has physiological meaning in that it indicates how often ‘that which is to be regulated’ (i.e. ECV) comes...... into contact with the ‘regulator’ (i.e. the kidneys). Aim: The aim of the present study was as follows: to analyse two published calculation methods for determining ECV and GFR/ECV; to develop a new simple and accurate formula for determining ECV; and to compare and evaluate these methods. Materials...... and methods: GFR was determined as 51Cr-EDTA clearance. The study comprised 128 individuals (35 women, 66 men and 27 children) with a full 51Cr-EDTA plasma concentration curve, determined from injection until 4–5 h p.i. Reference values for GFR and ECV were calculated from the full curve. One...

  7. Estimating alcohol content of traditional brew in Western Kenya using culturally relevant methods: the case for cost over volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Wamalwa, Emmanuel S; Okumu, Thomas O; Bryant, Kendall L; Goulet, Joseph L; Maisto, Stephen A; Braithwaite, R Scott; Justice, Amy C

    2010-08-01

    Traditional homemade brew is believed to represent the highest proportion of alcohol use in sub-Saharan Africa. In Eldoret, Kenya, two types of brew are common: chang'aa, spirits, and busaa, maize beer. Local residents refer to the amount of brew consumed by the amount of money spent, suggesting a culturally relevant estimation method. The purposes of this study were to analyze ethanol content of chang'aa and busaa; and to compare two methods of alcohol estimation: use by cost, and use by volume, the latter the current international standard. Laboratory results showed mean ethanol content was 34% (SD = 14%) for chang'aa and 4% (SD = 1%) for busaa. Standard drink unit equivalents for chang'aa and busaa, respectively, were 2 and 1.3 (US) and 3.5 and 2.3 (Great Britain). Using a computational approach, both methods demonstrated comparable results. We conclude that cost estimation of alcohol content is more culturally relevant and does not differ in accuracy from the international standard.

  8. Calculating alveolar capillary conductance and pulmonary capillary blood volume: comparing the multiple- and single-inspired oxygen tension methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceridon, Maile L; Beck, Kenneth C; Olson, Thomas P; Bilezikian, Jordan A; Johnson, Bruce D

    2010-09-01

    Key elements for determining alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) from the lung diffusing capacity (Dl) for carbon monoxide (DlCO) or for nitric oxide (DlNO) are the reaction rate of carbon monoxide with hemoglobin (thetaCO) and the DmCO/DlNO relationship (alpha-ratio). Although a range of values have been reported, currently there is no consensus regarding these parameters. The study purpose was to define optimal parameters (thetaCO, alpha-ratio) that would experimentally substantiate calculations of Dm and Vc from the single-inspired O2 tension [inspired fraction of O2 (FiO2)] method relative to the multiple-FiO2 method. Eight healthy men were studied at rest and during moderate exercise (80-W cycle). Dm and Vc were determined by the multiple-FiO2 and single-FiO2 methods (rebreathe technique) and were tabulated by applying previously reported thetaCO equations (both methods) and by varying the alpha-ratio (single-FiO2 method) from 1.90 to 2.50. Values were then compared between methods throughout the examined alpha-ratios. Dm and Vc were critically dependent on the applied thetaCO equation. For the multiple-FiO2 method, Dm was highly variable between thetaCO equations (rest and exercise); the range of Vc was less widespread. For the single-FiO2 method, the thetaCO equation by Reeves and Park (1992) combined with an alpha-ratio between 2.08 and 2.26 gave values for Dm and Vc that most closely matched those from the multiple-FiO2 method and were also physiologically plausible compared with predicted values. We conclude that the parameters used to calculate Dm and Vc values from the single-FiO2 method (using DlCO and DlNO) can significantly influence results and should be evaluated within individual laboratories to obtain optimal values.

  9. Performance analysis of the FDTD method applied to holographic volume gratings: Multi-core CPU versus GPU computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, J.; Bleda, S.; Neipp, C.; Márquez, A.; Pascual, I.; Beléndez, A.

    2013-03-01

    The finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) allows electromagnetic field distribution analysis as a function of time and space. The method is applied to analyze holographic volume gratings (HVGs) for the near-field distribution at optical wavelengths. Usually, this application requires the simulation of wide areas, which implies more memory and time processing. In this work, we propose a specific implementation of the FDTD method including several add-ons for a precise simulation of optical diffractive elements. Values in the near-field region are computed considering the illumination of the grating by means of a plane wave for different angles of incidence and including absorbing boundaries as well. We compare the results obtained by FDTD with those obtained using a matrix method (MM) applied to diffraction gratings. In addition, we have developed two optimized versions of the algorithm, for both CPU and GPU, in order to analyze the improvement of using the new NVIDIA Fermi GPU architecture versus highly tuned multi-core CPU as a function of the size simulation. In particular, the optimized CPU implementation takes advantage of the arithmetic and data transfer streaming SIMD (single instruction multiple data) extensions (SSE) included explicitly in the code and also of multi-threading by means of OpenMP directives. A good agreement between the results obtained using both FDTD and MM methods is obtained, thus validating our methodology. Moreover, the performance of the GPU is compared to the SSE+OpenMP CPU implementation, and it is quantitatively determined that a highly optimized CPU program can be competitive for a wider range of simulation sizes, whereas GPU computing becomes more powerful for large-scale simulations.

  10. The Effect of Bilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion on Swallowing – A Novel Method to Quantitate Aspirated Volume and Pharyngeal Threshold in Videofluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DING, Peng; FUNG, George Shiu-Kai; LIN, Ming De; HOLMAN, Shaina D.; GERMAN, Rebecca Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of bilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion on swallowing threshold volume and the occurrence of aspiration, using a novel measurement technique for videofluorscopic swallowing studies (VFSS). Methods and Materials We used a novel radiographic phantom to assess volume of the milk containing barium from fluoroscopy. The custom made phantom was firstly calibrated by comparing image intensity of the phantom with known cylinder depths. Secondly, known volume pouches of milk in a pig cadaver were compared to volumes calculated with the phantom. Using these standards, we calculated the volume of milk in the valleculae, esophagus and larynx, for 205 feeding sequences from four infant pigs feeding before and after had bilateral SLN lesions. Swallow safety was assessed using the IMPAS scale. Results The log-linear correlation between image intensity values from the phantom filled with barium milk and the known phantom cylinder depths was strong (R2>0.95), as was the calculated volumes of the barium milk pouches. The threshold volume of bolus in the valleculae during feeding was significantly larger after bilateral SLN lesion than in control swallows (p<0.001). The IMPAS score increased in the lesioned swallows relative to the controls (p<0.001). Conclusion Bilateral SLN lesion dramatically increased the aspiration incidence and the threshold volume of bolus in valleculae. The use of this phantom permits quantification of the aspirated volume of fluid. The custom made phantom and calibration allow for more accurate 3D volume estimation from 2D x-ray in VFSS. PMID:25270532

  11. Validation of semi-quantitative methods for DAT SPECT: influence of anatomical variability and partial volume effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, J.; Niñerola-Baizán, A.; Cot, A.; Aguiar, P.; Crespo, C.; Falcón, C.; Lomeña, F.; Sempau, J.; Pavía, J.; Ros, D.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of anatomical variability between subjects and of the partial volume effect (PVE) on the standardized Specific Uptake Ratio (SUR) in [123I]FP-bib SPECT studies. To this end, magnetic resonance (MR) images of 23 subjects with differences in the striatal volume of up to 44% were segmented and used to generate a database of 138 Monte Carlo simulated SPECT studies. Data included normal uptakes and pathological cases. Studies were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) and the ordered-subset expectation-maximization algorithm. Quantification was carried out by applying a reference method based on regions of interest (ROIs) derived from the MR images and ROIs derived from the Automated Anatomical Labelling map. Our results showed that, regardless of anatomical variability, the relationship between calculated and true SUR values for caudate and putamen could be described by a multiple linear model which took into account the spill-over phenomenon caused by PVE ({{R}2}≥slant 0.963 for caudate and ≥0.980 for putamen) and also by a simple linear model (R2 ≥ 0.952 for caudate and ≥0.973 for putamen). Calculated values were standardized by inverting both linear systems. Differences between standardized and true values showed that, although the multiple linear model was the best approach in terms of variability ({χ2}  ≥ 11.79 for caudate and  ≤7.36 for putamen), standardization based on a simple linear model was also suitable ({χ2}  ≥ 12.44 for caudate and  ≤12.57 for putamen).

  12. Development of a higher-order finite volume method for simulation of thermal oil recovery process using moving mesh strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, M. [Heriot Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    This paper described a project in which a higher order up-winding scheme was used to solve mass/energy conservation equations for simulating steam flood processes in an oil reservoir. Thermal recovery processes are among the most complex because they require a detailed accounting of thermal energy and chemical reaction kinetics. The numerical simulation of thermal recovery processes involves localized phenomena such as saturation and temperatures fronts due to hyperbolic features of governing conservation laws. A second order accurate FV method that was improved by a moving mesh strategy was used to adjust for moving coordinates on a finely gridded domain. The Finite volume method was used and the problem of steam injection was then tested using derived solution frameworks on both mixed and moving coordinates. The benefits of using a higher-order Godunov solver instead of lower-order ones were qualified. This second order correction resulted in better resolution on moving features. Preferences of higher-order solvers over lower-order ones in terms of shock capturing is under further investigation. It was concluded that although this simulation study was limited to steam flooding processes, the newly presented approach may be suitable to other enhanced oil recovery processes such as VAPEX, SAGD and in situ combustion processes. 23 refs., 28 figs.

  13. Finite-volume method with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme for incompressible porous media flow at the representative-elementary-volume scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Based on the Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, a finite-volume computational model with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme is proposed for incompressible porous media flow in this paper. The fluxes across the cell interface are calculated by reconstructing the local solution of the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation for porous media flow. The time-scaled midpoint integration rule is adopted to discretize the governing equation, which makes the time step become limited by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewy condition. The force term which evaluates the effect of the porous medium is added to the discretized governing equation directly. The numerical simulations of the steady Poiseuille flow, the unsteady Womersley flow, the circular Couette flow, and the lid-driven flow are carried out to verify the present computational model. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical, finite-difference, and/or previously published solutions.

  14. Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    We examine the accuracy of a modified finite volume method compared to analytical and Monte Carlo solutions for solving the radiative transfer equation. The model is used for predicting light propagation within a two-dimensional absorbing and highly forward-scattering medium such as biological tissue subjected to a collimated light beam. Numerical simulations for the spatially resolved reflectance and transmittance are presented considering refractive index mismatch with Fresnel reflection at the interface, homogeneous and two-layered media. Time-dependent as well as steady-state cases are considered. In the steady state, it is found that the modified finite volume method is in good agreement with the other two methods. The relative differences between the solutions are found to decrease with spatial mesh refinement applied for the modified finite volume method obtaining method is used for the time semi-discretization of the radiative transfer equation. An agreement among the modified finite volume method, Runge-Kutta method, and Monte Carlo solutions are shown, but with relative differences higher than in the steady state.

  15. Lagrange-type modeling of continuous dielectric permittivity variation in double-higher-order volume integral equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobanyan, E.; Ilić, M. M.; Notaroš, B. M.

    2015-05-01

    A novel double-higher-order entire-domain volume integral equation (VIE) technique for efficient analysis of electromagnetic structures with continuously inhomogeneous dielectric materials is presented. The technique takes advantage of large curved hexahedral discretization elements—enabled by double-higher-order modeling (higher-order modeling of both the geometry and the current)—in applications involving highly inhomogeneous dielectric bodies. Lagrange-type modeling of an arbitrary continuous variation of the equivalent complex permittivity of the dielectric throughout each VIE geometrical element is implemented, in place of piecewise homogeneous approximate models of the inhomogeneous structures. The technique combines the features of the previous double-higher-order piecewise homogeneous VIE method and continuously inhomogeneous finite element method (FEM). This appears to be the first implementation and demonstration of a VIE method with double-higher-order discretization elements and conformal modeling of inhomogeneous dielectric materials embedded within elements that are also higher (arbitrary) order (with arbitrary material-representation orders within each curved and large VIE element). The new technique is validated and evaluated by comparisons with a continuously inhomogeneous double-higher-order FEM technique, a piecewise homogeneous version of the double-higher-order VIE technique, and a commercial piecewise homogeneous FEM code. The examples include two real-world applications involving continuously inhomogeneous permittivity profiles: scattering from an egg-shaped melting hailstone and near-field analysis of a Luneburg lens, illuminated by a corrugated horn antenna. The results show that the new technique is more efficient and ensures considerable reductions in the number of unknowns and computational time when compared to the three alternative approaches.

  16. Volume rendering acceleration method based on optimal bricking for large volume data%基于最优化分块的大规模数据体绘制加速方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭伟; 李建新; 闫镔; 童莉; 陈健; 管士勇

    2011-01-01

    GPU-based volume rendering has become an active research area in the domain of volume visualization.Large volume data cannot be uploaded directly due to the limitation of GPU memory, which has been a bottleneck of the application of GPU.Bricking method could not only solve this problem, but also maintain the quality of original volume-rendered image.However, the data exchange via the graphics bus is really time consuming and will definitely degrade the render performance.As for these difficulties, the optimal bricking for large volume data was calculated by establishing the model for optimal bricking, and also a 3D texture named node code texture was constructed and distance template was improved to accelerate the octree-based bricking volume rendering.The experimental results illustrate that the proposed method can significantly accelerate the bricking-based volume rendering for large volume data.%GPU加速体绘制已成为体可视化领域的研究热点,然而超出显存的大规模数据无法直接载入,成为GPU应用的瓶颈.分块技术能够在保证图像质量的条件下解决该问题,但分块数据的频繁加载和访问明显降低了绘制速度.针对上述问题,通过建立最优化分块模型得到了大规模数据的最优分块,并通过构造节点编号纹理和改进距离模板设计的方法进一步提高了基于八叉树的分块体绘制算法的绘制速度.实验结果表明,该方法加速效果明显.

  17. Evaluation of left atrial function by multidetector computed tomography before left atrial radiofrequency-catheter ablation: Comparison of a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Florian, E-mail: florian.wolf@meduniwien.ac.a [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ourednicek, Petr [Philips Medical Systems, Prague (Czech Republic); Loewe, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Bernhard; Goessinger, Heinz David; Gwechenberger, Marianne [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Plank, Christina; Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Toepker, Michael; Lammer, Johannes [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation tool for evaluation of left atrial (LA) function by 64-slice multidetector-CT (MDCT). Methods and materials: In 33 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation a MDCT scan was performed before radiofrequency-catheter ablation. Atrial function (minimal volume (LAmin), maximal volume (LAmax), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF)) was evaluated by two readers using a manual and an automatic tool and measurement time was evaluated. Results: Automated LA volume segmentation failed in one patient due to low LA enhancement (103HU). Mean LAmax, LAmin, SV and EF were 127.7 ml, 93 ml, 34.7 ml, 27.1% by the automated, and 122.7 ml, 89.9 ml, 32.8 ml, 26.3% by the manual method with no significant difference (p > 0.05) and high Pearsons correlation coefficients (r = 0.94, r = 0.94, r = 0.82 and r = 0.85, p < 0.0001), respectively. The automated method was significantly faster (p < 0.001). Interobserver variability was low for both methods with Pearson's correlation coefficients between 0.98 and 0.99 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Evaluation of LA volume and function with 64-slice MDCT is feasible with a very low interobserver variability. The automatic method is as accurate as the manual method but significantly less time consuming permitting a routine use in clinical practice before RF-catheter ablation.

  18. The influence of management and construction methods in the repair costs of Spain’s low-volume road network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eutiquio Gallego

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the entire process of the implementation of the Spanish low volume road network, including the design criteria, the construction techniques and the management policies during all the periods. The current situation of low volume roads in Spain was analyzed with respect to the legal framework and their actual condition. In addition, the budget required for the repair of 41 low volume roads throughout Spain was calculated in order to statistically analyze the influence of the pavement materials and the period of construction. The main conclusions were that low volume roads constructed during the 1970´s are currently those in the best state of repair and those requiring the lower repair costs, even lower than those constructed after 1980´s. In addition, low volume roads constructed with higher quality materials and using standardized techniques required five times lower repair costs than those made of lower quality materials.

  19. Using Ray Tracing to Evaluate the Performance of Several Methods for Determining the Ground Range and Refractive Index of Ionospheric Scattering Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, R. A.; Frissell, N. A.; de Larquier, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of three methods used by HF radars in the SuperDARN network for determining the ground ranges to ionospheric scattering volumes. Each method uses somewhat different approaches, but the same equivalent-path analysis. We also show that Snell's Law can be added to this analysis to determine the refractive index of each scattering volume and thereby correct Doppler velocity measurements for ionospheric refraction. Two of these methods make their predictions using the group range to the scattering volume and a virtual height model, while the third method uses the group range and the elevation angle each backscattered return. The effectiveness of each of these methods is evaluated using ray tracing analyses through the International Reference Ionosphere. Ray tracings analysis provides determinations of the initial elevation angle, group range, group range, and refractive index of each ionospheric volume that backscatters signals to the radar. The initial or final elevation angle and the group range are used as inputs to the geolocation methods and the ground range and refractive index serve as reference data against which the predictions of the geolocation methods can be evaluated. We find that the methods using virtual height models actually change the initial elevation angle determined from ray tracing to a different elevation angle that is consistent with the virtual height model. Due to this change, predictions of the ground range and refractive index of scattering volumes located with virtual-height models are rarely consistent with the predictions obtained from ray tracing. In contrast, the geolocation method that uses the group range and initial or final elevation angle yields predictions that are in good agreement with ray tracing. Modifications to the equivalent-path analysis are required to obtain consistent predictions of the ground range and refractive index of backscatter from the topside F-layer.

  20. 3D modeling of forces between magnet and HTS in a levitation system using new approach of the control volume method based on an unstructured grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloui, L., E-mail: lotfi.alloui@lgep.supelec.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Laboratoire de modelisation des systemes energetiques (LMSE), Universite de Biskra, 07000 Biskra (Algeria); Bouillault, F., E-mail: bouillault@lgep.supelec.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bernard, L., E-mail: laurent.bernardl@lgep.supelc.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Leveque, J., E-mail: jean.leveque@green.uhp-nancy.fr [Groupe de recherche en electronique et electrotechnique de Nancy, Universite Henry Poincare, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper we present new 3D numerical model to calculate the vertical and the guidance forces in high temperature superconductors taking into account the influence of the flux creep phenomena. In the suggested numerical model, we adopt a new approach of the control volume method. This approach is based on the use of an unstructured grid which can be used to model more complex geometries. A comparison of the control volume method results with experiments verifies the validity of this approach and the proposed numerical model. Based on this model, the levitation force's relaxation at different temperatures was also studied.

  1. WLS-ENO: Weighted-least-squares based essentially non-oscillatory schemes for finite volume methods on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxu; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes are widely used high-order schemes for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), especially hyperbolic conservation laws with piecewise smooth solutions. For structured meshes, these techniques can achieve high order accuracy for smooth functions while being non-oscillatory near discontinuities. For unstructured meshes, which are needed for complex geometries, similar schemes are required but they are much more challenging. We propose a new family of non-oscillatory schemes, called WLS-ENO, in the context of solving hyperbolic conservation laws using finite-volume methods over unstructured meshes. WLS-ENO is derived based on Taylor series expansion and solved using a weighted least squares formulation. Unlike other non-oscillatory schemes, the WLS-ENO does not require constructing sub-stencils, and hence it provides a more flexible framework and is less sensitive to mesh quality. We present rigorous analysis of the accuracy and stability of WLS-ENO, and present numerical results in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D for a number of benchmark problems, and also report some comparisons against WENO.

  2. Unified method for the total pore volume and pore size distribution of hierarchical zeolites from argon adsorption and mercury intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenvin, Jeffrey; Jagiello, Jacek; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-02-03

    A generalized approach to determine the complete distribution of macropores, mesopores, and micropores from argon adsorption and mercury porosimetry is developed and validated for advanced zeolite catalysts with hierarchically structured pore systems in powder and shaped forms. Rather than using a fragmented approach of simple overlays from individual techniques, a unified approach that utilizes a kernel constructed from model isotherms and model intrusion curves is used to calculate the complete pore size distribution and the total pore volume of the material. An added benefit of a single full-range pore size distribution is that the cumulative pore area and the area distribution are also obtained without the need for additional modeling. The resulting complete pore size distribution and the kernel accurately model both the adsorption isotherm and the mercury porosimetry. By bridging the data analysis of two primary characterization tools, this methodology fills an existing gap in the library of familiar methods for porosity assessment in the design of materials with multilevel porosity for novel technological applications.

  3. More on analyzing the reflection of a laser beam by a deformed highly reflective volume Bragg grating using iteration of the beam propagation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hong; Mokhov, Sergiy; Zeldovich, Boris Ya; Bass, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A further extension of the iteration method for beam propagation calculation is presented that can be applied for volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) with extremely large grating strength. A reformulation of the beam propagation formulation is presented for analyzing the reflection of a laser beam by a deformed VBG. These methods will be shown to be very accurate and efficient. A VBG with generic z-dependent distortion has been analyzed using these methods.

  4. CT false-profile view of the hip: a reproducible method of measuring anterior acetabular coverage using volume CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needell, Steven D.; Borzykowski, Ross M. [Boca Radiology Group, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Carreira, Dominic S.; Kozy, John [Broward Health Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To devise a simple, reproducible method of using CT data to measure anterior acetabular coverage that results in values analogous to metrics derived from false-profile radiographs. Volume CT images were used to generate simulated false-profile radiographs and cross-sectional false-profile views by angling a multiplanar reformat 115 through the affected acetabulum relative to a line tangential to the posterior margin of the ischial tuberosities. The anterolateral margin of the acetabulum was localized on the CT false-profile view corresponding with the cranial opening of the acetabular roof. Anterior center edge angle (CEA) was measured between a vertical line passing through the center of the femoral head and a line connecting the center of the femoral head with the anterior edge of the condensed line of the acetabulum (sourcil). Anterior CEA values measured on CT false-profile views of 38 symptomatic hips were compared with values obtained on simulated and projection false-profile radiographs. The CT false-profile view produces a cross-sectional image in the same obliquity as false-profile radiographs. Anterior CEA measured on CT false-profile views were statistically similar to values obtained with false-profile radiographs. CT technologists quickly mastered the technique of generating this view. Inter-rater reliability indicated this method to be highly reproducible. The CT false-profile view is simple to generate and anterior CEA measurements derived from it are similar to those obtained using well-positioned false-profile radiographs. Utilization of CT to assess hip geometry enables precise control of pelvic inclination, eliminates projectional errors, and minimizes limitations of image quality inherent to radiography. (orig.)

  5. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  6. A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    increasing the fiber-volume fraction by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) in order to produce composite structures with aerospace-grade...processed composites. Using a combination of viscosity control, ARL- based VARTM techniques, and a pressure control system, we increased the fiber-volume...content from 50% (ARL’s normal processing range for a particular material system and VARTM process) to over 60%. Future work will focus on

  7. Application of machine learning methods to describe the effects of conjugated equine estrogens therapy on region-specific brain volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Ramon; Espeland, Mark A; Goveas, Joseph S; Davatzikos, Christos; Gaussoin, Sarah A; Maldjian, Joseph A; Brunner, Robert L; Kuller, Lewis H; Johnson, Karen C; Mysiw, W Jerry; Wagner, Benjamin; Resnick, Susan M

    2011-05-01

    Use of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) has been linked to smaller regional brain volumes in women aged ≥65 years; however, it is unknown whether this results in a broad-based characteristic pattern of effects. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess regional volumes of normal tissue and ischemic lesions among 513 women who had been enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of CEE therapy for an average of 6.6 years, beginning at ages 65-80 years. A multivariate pattern analysis, based on a machine learning technique that combined Random Forest and logistic regression with L(1) penalty, was applied to identify patterns among regional volumes associated with therapy and whether patterns discriminate between treatment groups. The multivariate pattern analysis detected smaller regional volumes of normal tissue within the limbic and temporal lobes among women that had been assigned to CEE therapy. Mean decrements ranged as high as 7% in the left entorhinal cortex and 5% in the left perirhinal cortex, which exceeded the effect sizes reported previously in frontal lobe and hippocampus. Overall accuracy of classification based on these patterns, however, was projected to be only 54.5%. Prescription of CEE therapy for an average of 6.6 years is associated with lower regional brain volumes, but it does not induce a characteristic spatial pattern of changes in brain volumes of sufficient magnitude to discriminate users and nonusers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Validation of a novel method for measuring intra-abdominal pressure and gastric residual volume in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stappen, Johan; Pigozzi, Chiara; Tepaske, Robert; Van Regenmortel, Niels; De Laet, Inneke; Schoonheydt, Karen; Dits, Hilde; Severgnini, Paolo; Roberts, Derek J; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2014-01-01

    Gastric residual volume (GRV) can be measured in a variety of ways in critically ill patients, most often, the nasogastric tube is disconnected and the GRV is aspirated via a 60 mL syringe. Bladder pressure (IBP) measurement is the gold standard for intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) estimation. This study will look at the validation of a novel method combining measurement of GRV and estimation of IAP via intra-gastric pressure (IGP). In total 135 paired IAP and 146 paired GRV measurements were performed in 37 mechanically ventilated ICU patients. The IAP was estimated via the bladder (i.e. IBP) using the FoleyManometer and via the stomach (i.e. IGP) with the new device. The GRV was measured with the new device (GRVprototype) and via the classic method (GRVclassic). The devices were provided by Holtech Medical (Charlottenlund, Denmark) and data were retrospectively analysed. The number of paired measurements in each patient was 4 ± 1. The mean IBP was 10.7 ± 4.1 and mean IGP was 11.6 ± 4.1 mm Hg. Correlation between the IBP and IGP was significant, however moderate (R2 = 0.51). Analysis according to Bland and Altman showed a bias and precision of 0.8 and 2.7 mm Hg respectively, however the limits of agreement (LA) were large and ranged from -4.5 to 6.1 mm Hg. Changes in IGP correlated well with changes in IBP. The median GRVprototype was 80 mL (0-1050) and equal to the median GRVclassic of 80 mL (0-1250). Correlation between the 2 methods was excellent (R2 = 0.89). Analysis according to Bland and Altman showed a bias and precision of -0.8 and 52.3 mL respectively and the LA ranged from -103 to 102 mL. Changes in GRVclassic correlated well with changes in GRVprototype. The results of this multicentre pilot study show that GRV can be measured with the new device. Furthermore this allows simultaneous screening for intra-abdominal hypertension with IAP estimation via IGP.

  9. Assessment of Volume Measurement of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema by Three Methods: Circumference Measurement, Water Displacement, and Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Caroline; Zerahn, B.; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2010-01-01

    Background: Following treatment for breast cancer 12%-60% develop breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). There are several ways of assessing BCRL. Circumference measurement (CM) and water displacement (WD) for volume measurements (VM) are frequently used methods in practice and research...

  10. The influence of volume, type of irrigant and flushing method on removing artificially placed dentine debris from the apical root canal during passive ultrasonic irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Der Sluis, LWM; Gambarini, G; Wu, MK; Wesselink, PR

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the influence of volume, irrigant and method of flushing on the removal of artificially-placed dentine debris from the apical part of root canals during passive ultrasonic irrigation. Methodolgy Access cavities were prepared in 15 canine teeth and their root canals instrumented to s

  11. A new Method to Estimate the Representative Elementary Volume (REV) for Porosity in Heterogeneous Karst Aquifers Using Geographic Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M. R.; Manda, A. K.

    2004-12-01

    Karst limestones are characterized by solution-enhanced macropores and conduits that lead to exceptional heterogeneity at the aquifer scale. The interconnected network of solution cavities often results in a conduit flow regime that bypasses the less permeable rock matrix. Efforts to manage and protect karst aquifers, which are vital water resources in many parts of the world, will benefit from meaningful characterizations of the heterogeneity inherent in these formations. To this end, we propose a new method to estimate the representative elementary volume (REV) for macroporosity within karst aquifers using techniques borrowed from remote sensing and geospatial analysis. The REV represents a sampling window in which numerous measurements of a highly-variable property (e.g., porosity, hydraulic conductivity) can be averaged into a single representative value of statistical and physical significance. High-resolution borehole images are classified into binary images consisting of pixels designated as either rock matrix or pore space. A two-dimensional porosity is calculated by summing the total area occupied by pores within a rectangular sampling window placed over the binary image. Small sampling windows quantify the heterogeneous nature of porosity distribution in the aquifer, whereas large windows provide an estimate of overall porosity. Applying this procedure to imagery taken from the Biscayne aquifer of south Florida yields a macroporosity of ~40%, considerably higher than the ~28% porosity measured from recovered core samples. Geospatial analysis may provide the more reliable estimate because it incorporates large solution cavities and conduits captured by the borehole image. The REV is estimated by varying the size of sampling windows around prominent conduits and evaluating the change in porosity as a function of window size. Average porosities decrease systematically with increasing sampling size, eventually converging to a constant value and thus

  12. Comparison study of some finite volume and finite element methods for the shallow water equations with bottom topography and friction terms

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Teschke, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    We present a comparison of two discretization methods for the shallow water equations, namely the finite volume method and the finite element scheme. A reliable model for practical interests includes terms modelling the bottom topography as well as the friction effects. The resulting equations belong to the class of systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations of first order with zero order source terms, the so-called balance laws. In order to approximate correctly steady equilibrium ...

  13. 非结构动网格方法在内燃机数值模拟中的应用%Application of Unstructured Dynamic Mesh Method in ICE Numerical Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永丰; 张文平; 明平剑; 倪大明

    2012-01-01

    The unstructured dynamic method of dynamic layer and elastic moving was introduced, which allowed to merge and split in the direction of mesh movement. The dynamic layer method was regarded as the particular case of mesh reconstruction,and the interpolation method of second-order precision for ICE in-cylinder process was proposed. When the mesh deforming met a certain condition, a group mesh layer were merged or split at the same time. The times of mesh splitting and decomposition were reduced and hence the computation efficiency was increased. Concerning the flow simulation, the control equations were discretized by the finite volume method (FVM), the NS equations were evaluated by SIMPLEC algorithm and the 3D CFD sim-ulation program was developed. The results show that the calculation results are consistent with the test value.%提出了一种动态层和弹性平滑结合的非结构动网格方法,在网格运动方向进行网格合并和分裂.由于动态层方法可视为网格重构方法的特例,提出了一种内燃机缸内过程处理的二阶精度的插值计算方法.当网格运动达到一定条件时,将多组网格层同时合并或分裂,减少了网格合并和分裂次数,提高了计算效率.对于流场计算部分,采用有限体积法离散流场控制方程,运用SIMPLEC算法求解NS方程,开发了内燃机三维CFD数值模拟程序,计算实例表明计算结果与试验值吻合较好.

  14. Assessment of Intracranial Structure Volumes in Fetuses With Growth Restriction by 3-Dimensional Sonography Using the Extended Imaging Virtual Organ Computer-Aided Analysis Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Ana Carolina Rabachini; Zamarian, Ana Cristina Perez; Araujo Júnior, E; Cavalcante, Rafael Oliveira; Simioni, Christiane; Silva, Carolina Pacheco; Rolo, Liliam Cristine; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado

    2015-08-01

    To assess intracranial structure volumes by 3-dimensional (3D) sonography in fetuses with growth restriction. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional case-control study involving 59 fetuses with growth restriction (38 fetuses with estimated weight <3rd percentile and 21 fetuses with estimated weight between 3rd and 10th percentiles, according to Hadlock et al [Radiology 1984; 150:535-540]) and 54 controls between 24 and 34 weeks' gestation. The following fetal intracranial structure volumes were assessed: cerebellum, brain, and frontal region. The volume was assessed by 3D sonography using the extended imaging virtual organ computer-aided analysis method with 10 sequential planes. Analysis of variance was used to compare fetal groups. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility. Statistical significance between the brain, frontal region, and cerebellar volumes and a relationship between the frontal region and the brain in fetuses with estimated weights below the 3rd percentile and controls were observed (P < .001; P < .001; and P = .002; and P = .008, respectively). Good intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility was observed for the fetal brain, frontal region, and cerebellar volumes, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.998, 0.997, 0.997, 0.999, 0.997, and 0.998, respectively. The intracranial structure volumes assessed by 3D sonography using the extended imaging virtual organ computer-aided analysis method were reduced in fetuses with growth restriction (estimated weight <3rd percentile). © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Method of tumor volume evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging for outcome prediction in cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To evaluate the patterns of tumor shape and to compare tumor volume derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid measurement with that derived from tracing the entire tumor contour using region of interest (ROI)-based 3D volumetry with respect to the prediction outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 98 patients with cervical cancer (stage IB-IIIB). The tumor shape was classified into two categories: ellipsoid and non-ellipsoid shape. ROI-based volumetry was derived from each magnetic resonance slice on the work station. For the diameter-based surrogate 'ellipsoid volume,' the three orthogonal diameters were measured to calculate volume as an ellipsoid. The more than half of tumor (55.1%) had a non-ellipsoid configuration. The predictions for outcome were consistent between two volume groups, with overall survival of 93.6% and 87.7% for small tumor (<20 mL), 62.9% and 69.1% for intermediate-size tumor (20-39 mL), and 14.5% and 16.7% for large tumors ({>=}40 mL) using ROI and diameter based measurement, respectively. Disease-free survival was 93.8% and 90.6% for small tumor, 54.3% and 62.7% for intermediate-size tumor, and 13.7% and 10.3% for large tumor using ROI and diameter based method, respectively. Differences in outcome between size groups were statistically significant, and the differences in outcome predicted by the tumor volume by two different methods. Our data suggested that large numbers of cervical cancers are not ellipsoid. However, simple diameter-based tumor volume measurement appears to be useful in comparison with ROI-based volumetry for predicting outcome in cervical cancer patients.

  16. Improved method for collection of sputum for tuberculosis testing to ensure adequate sample volumes for molecular diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark; Dolby, Tania; Surtie, Shireen; Omar, Gaironesa; Hapeela, Nchimunya; Basu, Debby; DeWalt, Abby; Kelso, David; Nicol, Mark; McFall, Sally

    2017-04-01

    The quality and quantity of sputum collected has an important impact on the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary TB. We conducted a pilot study to assess a new collection cups for the collection of sputum for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. The pilot study utilized the standard collection cup in South Africa demonstrating a mean collection volume of 2.86±2.36SDml for 198 samples; 19% of the specimens contained 5ml. We designed and tested two novel sputum cups with a narrow bottom section and clear minimum and maximum markings to allow patients and clinicians to know whether sufficient sputum volume has been produced. The cups differed in their shape and manufacturing approach. The two options also support different mixing approaches being considered for a highly sensitive companion TB-screening assay being developed at Northwestern University (XtracTB assay). Sputum was collected from 102 patients at Nolungile Youth Centre, Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa for a total of 204 samples. The mean volumes collected from the two cups were 2.70±0.88SDml and 2.88±0.89SDml. While the mean volumes of current and novel cups are similar, the volume ranges collected with the novel cups were narrower, and 98% of the specimen volumes were within the target range. Only 4 samples contained >5ml, but none were >6ml, and none of the specimens contained <1ml. The number of coughs that produced the samples, patient HIV and TB status plus qualitative descriptions of the sputum specimens were also evaluated.

  17. Development of ultrasonic velocity profile method for flow rate measurements of power plant (effect of measurement volume on turbulent flow measurement)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroshige, Kikura; Gentaro, Yamanaka; Tsuyoshi, Taishi; Masanori, Aritomi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Yasushi, Takeda [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Michitsugu, Mori [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Ultrasonic Velocity Profile method has many advantages for flow rate measurement of power plant over the conventional flow measurement methods, such as measurement of the instantaneous velocity profile along the measuring line and its applicability to opaque liquids. Furthermore, the method has an advantage of being non-intrusive. Hence, it is applicable to various flow conditions, although it requires a relatively large measurement volume. In this paper, the effects of the measurement volume on the mean velocity profile for flow rate measurements of power plant and the Reynolds stress measurement have been investigated for fully developed turbulent pipe flows in a vertical pipe. The results are then compared with data obtained by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). (authors)

  18. Error propagation in the computation of volumes in 3D city models with the Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biljecki, F.; Ledoux, H.; Stoter, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of the propagation of positional uncertainty in 3D city models to the uncertainty in the computation of their volumes. Current work related to error propagation in GIS is limited to 2D data and 2D GIS operations, especially of rasters. In this research we have (1) d

  19. A simple and rational numerical method of two-phase flow with volume-junction model. 1. Verification calculation in saturated condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Motoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    A new numerical method to achieve a rigorous numerical calculation of each phase using a simple explicit method with volume-junction model is proposed. For this purpose, difference equations for numerical use are carefully derived so as to preserve the physical meaning of the basic equations. Specifically, momentum equations for the flow in the volume are newly derived to keep strict conservation of energy within the volume. To prove the validity of the numerical method and of previously proposed basic equations, including the original phase change equations, which were rigorously derived, some numerical calculations were made for each phase independently to examine the correctness of calculated results. The numerical calculation is advanced by simple integration of an explicitly obtained solution of difference equations without any special treatment. Calculated results of density and specific internal energy of each phase for saturated two-phase blowdown behavior are consistent for two different solution scheme as described below. Further, no accumulation of error in mass or energy was found. These results prove the consistency among basic equations, including phase change equations, and the correctness of numerical calculation method. The two different solution schemes used were: (1) solutions of pressure and void fraction in saturated condition were obtained by using mass conservation equation of each phase simultaneously, and (2) fluid properties were calculated directly from mass and energy conservation equation of each phase. (author)

  20. Numerical Simulation of Planar 4:1 Contraction Flow of a Viscoelastic Fluid Using a Higher-order Upwind Finite Volume Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    New form of the constitutive equations for the Oldroyd-B model, which have physical meaning, is developed to facilitate theoretical analysis. The new equations are used to simulate planar 4∶1 contraction flow of a Maxwell fluid using a third-order upwind finite volume method. The numerical results compare well with the theoretical solutions and the results of other references to show the effectiveness of the numerical method. Numerical experiments suggest that the present method not only converges fairly rapidly, but can also generate a highly resolved approximation to an Oldroyd-B fluid flow at a high Weissenberg number.

  1. Test Methods for Telemetry Systems and Subsystems: Volume 5: Test Method for Digital Recorder/Reproducer Systems and Recorder Memory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 118-11 Volume V 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11...involved. Several IRIG 106 Chapter 10 packet dumper utilities are available to help in this manual task. Current freely available versions can be

  2. Estimation of an image derived input function with MR-defined carotid arteries in FDG-PET human studies using a novel partial volume correction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sari, Hasan; Erlandsson, Kjell; Law, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data requires an accurate knowledge the arterial input function. The gold standard method to measure the arterial input function requires collection of arterial blood samples and is an invasive method. Measuring an image...... segmentation of the carotid arteries from MR images. The simulation study results showed that at least 92% of the true intensity could be recovered after the partial volume correction. Results from 19 subjects showed that the mean cerebral metabolic rate of glucose calculated using arterial samples and partial...... volume corrected image derived input function were 26.9 and 25.4 mg/min/100 g, respectively, for the grey matter and 7.2 and 6.7 mg/min/100 g for the white matter. No significant difference in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate of glucose values was observed between arterial samples and corrected...

  3. Successful Production of Piglets Derived from Expanded Blastocysts Vitrified Using a Micro Volume Air Cooling Method without Direct Exposure to Liquid Nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    MISUMI, Koji; Hirayama, Yuri; EGAWA, Sachiko; Yamashita, Shoko; HOSHI, Hiroyoshi; Imai, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to clarify the feasibility of newly developed vitrification techniques for porcine embryos using the micro volume air cooling (MVAC) method without direct contact with liquid nitrogen (LN2). Expanded blastocysts were vitrified in a solution containing 6 M ethylene glycol, 0.6 M trehalose and 2% (wt/vol) polyethylene glycol in 10% HEPES-buffered PZM-5. The blastocysts were collected from gilts and vitrified using the new device (MVAC) or a Cryotop (CT). Blasto...

  4. Least Squares Best Fit Method for the Three Parameter Weibull Distribution: Analysis of Tensile and Bend Specimens with Volume or Surface Flaw Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    Material characterization parameters obtained from naturally flawed specimens are necessary for reliability evaluation of non-deterministic advanced ceramic structural components. The least squares best fit method is applied to the three parameter uniaxial Weibull model to obtain the material parameters from experimental tests on volume or surface flawed specimens subjected to pure tension, pure bending, four point or three point loading. Several illustrative example problems are provided.

  5. Ambulatory instrument for monitoring indirect beat-to-beat blood pressure in superficial temporal artery using volume-compensation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S; Yamakoshi, K

    1996-11-01

    A portable instrument, based on a volume-compensation technique, is designed for ambulatory monitoring of indirect beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) in the superficial temporal artery. The instrument consists of a small disc-type cuff and a portable unit carried by the subject. Several components are integrated in the cuff for applying counter-pressure to the artery, i.e. a reflectance-type photo-plethysmographic sensor for arterial volume detection, a pressure sensor for cuff pressure Pc measurement and a nozzle flapper-type- electro-pneumatic convertor for controlling Pc. The portable unit includes volume servo control circuitry and a microprocessor-based signal-processing and recording unit. This automatically performs all the necessary measurement procedures and stores into a memory IC element the processed systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure data, together with pulse intervals on a beat-to-beat basis from the servo-controlled Pc (indirectly measured BP waveform). With this instrument, momentary changes in BP during ambulatory situations such as bicycle ergometer exercise and daily activities including motorway driving are successfully recorded. From the results of simultaneous measurement of the subject's posture changes, the effect of posture change on blood pressure, e.g. baroreceptor-cardiac reflex, is also clearly demonstrated.

  6. Repeatability of Brain Volume Measurements Made with the Atlas-based Method from T1-weighted Images Acquired Using a 0.4 Tesla Low Field MR Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Suzuki, Makoto; Mizukami, Shinya; Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Fukuda, Michinari; Gomi, Tsutomu; Takeda, Tohoru

    2016-10-11

    An understanding of the repeatability of measured results is important for both the atlas-based and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) methods of magnetic resonance (MR) brain volumetry. However, many recent studies that have investigated the repeatability of brain volume measurements have been performed using static magnetic fields of 1-4 tesla, and no study has used a low-strength static magnetic field. The aim of this study was to investigate the repeatability of measured volumes using the atlas-based method and a low-strength static magnetic field (0.4 tesla). Ten healthy volunteers participated in this study. Using a 0.4 tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner and a quadrature head coil, three-dimensional T1-weighted images (3D-T1WIs) were obtained from each subject, twice on the same day. VBM8 software was used to construct segmented normalized images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) images]. The regions-of-interest (ROIs) of GM, WM, CSF, hippocampus (HC), orbital gyrus (OG), and cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL) were generated using WFU PickAtlas. The percentage change was defined as[100 × (measured volume with first segmented image - mean volume in each subject)/(mean volume in each subject)]The average percentage change was calculated as the percentage change in the 6 ROIs of the 10 subjects. The mean of the average percentage changes for each ROI was as follows: GM, 0.556%; WM, 0.324%; CSF, 0.573%; HC, 0.645%; OG, 1.74%; and CPL, 0.471%. The average percentage change was higher for the orbital gyrus than for the other ROIs. We consider that repeatability of the atlas-based method is similar between 0.4 and 1.5 tesla MR scanners. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that the level of repeatability with a 0.4 tesla MR scanner is adequate for the estimation of brain volume change by the atlas-based method.

  7. Volume rendering accelerating method based on image recognition%建立在图像识别基础上的体绘制加速方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何元烈; 陈萍; 战荫伟; 陈仰纯

    2009-01-01

    提出了一种新算法--IRVR(Image Recognition Volume Rendering),该算法能大幅降低冗余数据,从而提升体绘制速度.IRVR算法首先利用交叉熵阈值分割法从三维数据集中将物体像素和背景像素识别出来,然后将迭代光线追踪方法和物体检测采样策略结合起来对原始三维数据集进行采样.接着运用快速迭代法对分类数据集进行采样,从而定位视线与原始数据集的交点.IRVR算法还应用了准确正规采样方法(例如,三线性插值、样条插值等)在体绘制过程中对原始数据集进行插值.经过实验得出的结论证明IRVR算法既能提高体绘制的速度,又可以保证体绘制图像的质量.%A new algorithm (Image Recognition Volume Rendering,IRVR) is developed in this paper,which can remarkably decrease the redundant data during volume rendering.The IRVR algorithm uses the minimun cross-entropy threshold selection method to detecte the object and background voxels from a three dimensional dataset.An iterating ray tracing method combined with the objects detection sampling strategy is developed to sample the original dataset.The fast iterative method is implemented to sampling the classification dataset for locating the intersection position of the viewing ray and the original dataset.And the precise normal sampling method (for example,trilinear interpelation,spline interpolation,etc.) is applied to extract the gray value from the original dataset for volume rendering.The experiment result is given in this paper.It proves that the IRVR algorithm can improve the volume rendering speed and guarantee the quality of the volume rendering results.

  8. Neural Correlates of Biased Responses: The Negative Method Effect in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale Is Associated with Right Amygdala Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Kong, Feng; Huang, Lijie; Liu, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Self-esteem is a widely studied construct in psychology that is typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). However, a series of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that a simple and widely used unidimensional factor model does not provide an adequate explanation of RSES responses due to method effects. To identify the neural correlates of the method effect, we sought to determine whether and how method effects were associated with the RSES and investigate the neural basis of these effects. Two hundred and eighty Chinese college students (130 males; mean age = 22.64 years) completed the RSES and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Behaviorally, method effects were linked to both positively and negatively worded items in the RSES. Neurally, the right amygdala volume negatively correlated with the negative method factor, while the hippocampal volume positively correlated with the general self-esteem factor in the RSES. The neural dissociation between the general self-esteem factor and negative method factor suggests that there are different neural mechanisms underlying them. The amygdala is involved in modulating negative affectivity; therefore, the current study sheds light on the nature of method effects that are related to self-report with a mix of positively and negatively worded items. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-02-25

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick’s law of diffusion for multi-component fluids and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The mobility is obtained from diffusion coefficients by relating the gradient of chemical potential to the gradient of molar density. The evolution equation for moles of each component is derived using the discretization of diffusion equations, while the volume evolution equation is constructed based on the mechanical mechanism and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. It is proven that the proposed evolution system can well model the VT-flash problem, and moreover, it possesses the property of total energy decay. By using the Euler time scheme to discretize this evolution system, we develop an energy stable algorithm with an adaptive choice strategy of time steps, which allows us to calculate the suitable time step size to guarantee the physical properties of moles and volumes, including positivity, maximum limits, and correct definition of the Helmhotz free energy function. The proposed evolution method is also proven to be energy-stable under the proposed time step choice. Numerical examples are tested to demonstrate efficiency and robustness of the proposed method.

  10. The Effects of Design Strength, Fly Ash Content and Curing Method on Compressive Strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete: A Design of Experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solikin Mochamad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High volume fly ash concrete becomes one of alternatives to produce green concrete as it uses waste material and significantly reduces the utilization of Portland cement in concrete production. Although using less cement, its compressive strength is comparable to ordinary Portland cement (hereafter OPC and the its durability increases significantly. This paper reports investigation on the effect of design strength, fly ash content and curing method on compressive strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete. The experiment and data analysis were prepared using minitab, a statistic software for design of experimental. The specimens were concrete cylinder with diameter of 15 cm and height of 30 cm, tested for its compressive strength at 56 days. The result of the research demonstrates that high volume fly ash concrete can produce comparable compressive strength which meets the strength of OPC design strength especially for high strength concrete. In addition, the best mix proportion to achieve the design strength is the combination of high strength concrete and 50% content of fly ash. Moreover, the use of spraying method for curing method of concrete on site is still recommended as it would not significantly reduce the compressive strength result.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Electromagnetic Field in a Tornado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Fiala

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the numerical model of both the physical and the chemical processes in the tornado. Within the paper, a basic theoretical model and a numerical solution are presented. We prepared numerical models based on the combined finite element method (FEM and the finite volume method (FVM. The model joins the magnetic, electric and current fields, the flow field and a chemical nonlinear ion model. The results were obtained by means of the FEM/FVM as a main application in ANSYS software.

  12. Finite Volume Element Predictor-corrector Method for a Class of Nonlinear Parabolic Systems%一类非线性抛物型方程组的有限体积元预估-校正方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高夫征

    2005-01-01

    A finite volume element predictor-correetor method for a class of nonlinear parabolic system of equations is presented and analyzed. Suboptimal L2 error estimate for the finite volume element predictor-corrector method is derived. A numerical experiment shows that the numerical results are consistent with theoretical analysis.

  13. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  14. Solution strategies for finite elements and finite volumes methods applied to flow and heat transfer problem in U-shaped geothermal exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Nadaniela; Giacomini, Josephin; Maponi, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Matter of this paper is the study of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer in a U-shaped heat exchanger. We propose a mathematical model that is formulated as a forced convection problem for incompressible and Newtonian fluids and results in the unsteady Navier-Stokes problem. In order to get a solution, we discretise the equations with both the Finite Elements Method and the Finite Volumes Method. These procedures give rise to a non-symmetric indefinite quadratic system of equations. Thus, three regularisation techniques are proposed to make approximations effective and ideas to compare their results are provided.

  15. A coupled soil-pore fluid formulation for modeling soil liquefaction and cyclic mobility in seabed using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian; Roenby, Johan; Hededal, Ole

    by formulating the strong interactions between soil skeleton and the pore fluid via a coupled set of partial differential equations. A single bounding surface soil model capable of simulating the accumulations of pore pressures, strains, dilatancy, and strain „softening‟, is then adopted for quantifying...... the cyclic soil constitutive relations. To deal with the high non-linearity in the equations, the finite volume (FV) method is proposed for the numerical simulation. The corresponding discretization strategies and solution algorithms, including the conventional segregated method and the more recent block...

  16. Numerical simulation of friction stir spot welding process for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongun; Badarinarayan, Harsha; Ryu, Ill; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Chongmin; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Wagoner, R. H.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2010-04-01

    Thermo-mechanical simulations of the Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) processes were performed for AA5083-H18 and AA6022-T4, utilizing commercial Finite Element Method (FEM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM) codes, which are based on Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, respectively. The Lagrangian explicit dynamic FEM code, PAM-CRASH, and the Eulerian Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) FVM code, STAR-CD, were utilized to understand the effect of pin geometry on weld strength and material flow under the unsteady state condition. Using FVM code, material flow patterns near the tool boundary were analyzed to explain weld strength difference between welds by a cylindrical pin and welds by a triangular pin, whereas the frictional energy concept using the FEM code had a limited capacity to explain the weld strength difference.

  17. Simulation of tandem hydrofoils by finite volume method with moving grid system; Henkei koshi wo tsukatta yugen taisekiho ni yoru tandem suichuyoku no simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Miyata, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-12-31

    With an objective to clarify possibility of application of time-advancing calculated fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation by using a finite volume method with moving grid system, a simulation was performed on motion of a ship with hydrofoils including the control system therein. The simulation consists of a method that couples a moving grid system technology, an equation of motion, and the control system. Complex interactions between wings and with free surface may be considered automatically by directly deriving fluid force from a flow field by using the CFD. In addition, two-dimensional flows around tandem hydrofoils were calculated to solve the motion problem within a vertical plane. As a result, the following results were obtained: a finite volume method using a dynamic moving grid system method was applied to problems in non-steady tandem hydrofoils to show its usefulness; a method that couples the CFD with the equation of motion was applied to the control problems in the tandem hydrofoils to show possibility of a new technology for simulating motions; and a simulation that considers such wing interference as wave creation, discharged vortices, and associated flows was shown useful to understand characteristics of the tandem hydrofoils. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Improved Simulation of Subsurface Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs Using a Fully Discontinuous Control-Volume-Finite-Element Method, Implicit Timestepping and Dynamic Unstructured Mesh Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, P.; Jackson, M.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Adam, A.; Xie, Z.; Percival, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Within these volumes, termed geologic domains, the material properties are constant. A given model typically contains numerous such geologic domains. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization, in which an unstructured mesh adapts in space and time to key solution fields, such as pressure, velocity or saturation, whilst preserving the geometry of the geologic domains. Up-, cross- or down-scaling of material properties during mesh optimization is not required, as the properties are uniform within each geologic domain. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains such as fractures and mudstones, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at significantly lower computational cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods to model flow in highly heterogeneous porous media, in which CVs span boundaries between domains of contrasting material properties. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number.

  19. Correlation of In Vivo and In Vitro Methods in Measuring Choroidal Vascularization Volumes Using a Subretinal Injection Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Nie; Mao-Nian Zhang; Hong-Wei Zhao; Thomas D Olsen; Kyle Jackman; Lian-Na Hu; Wen-Ping Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:In vivo quantification of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) based on noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination and in vitro choroidal flatmount immunohistochemistry stained of CNV currently were used to evaluate the process and severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) both in human and animal studies.This study aimed to investigate the correlation between these two methods in murine CNV models induced by subretinal injection.Methods:CNV was developed in 20 C57BL6/j mice by subretinal injection of adeno-associated viral delivery of a short hairpin RNA targeting sFLT-1 (AAV.shRNA.sFLT-1),as reported previously.After 4 weeks,CNV was imaged by OCT and fluorescence angiography.The scaling factors for each dimension,x,y,and z (μm/pixel) were recorded,and the corneal curvature standard was adjusted from human (7.7) to mice (1.4).The volume of each OCT image stack was calculated and then normalized by multiplying the number of voxels by the scaling factors for each dimension in Seg3D software (University of Utah Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute,available at http://www.sci.utah.edu/cibc-software/seg3d.html).Eighteen mice were prepared for choroidal flatmounts and stained by CD31.The CNV volumes were calculated using scanning laser confocal microscopy after immunohistochemistry staining.Two mice were stained by Hematoxylin and Eosin for observing the CNV morphology.Results:The CNV volume calculated using OCT was,on average,2.6 times larger than the volume calculated using the laser confocal microscopy.The correlation statistical analysis showed OCT measuring of CNV correlated significantly with the in vitro method (R2 =0.448,P=0.001,n =18).The correlation coefficient for CNV quantification using OCT and confocal microscopy was 0.693 (n =18,P =0.001).Conclusions:There is a fair linear correlation on CNV volumes between in vivo and in vitro methods in CNV models induced by subretinal injection.The result might provide a useful

  20. Correlation of In Vivo and In Vitro Methods in Measuring Choroidal Vascularization Volumes Using a Subretinal Injection Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Nie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vivo quantification of choroidal neovascularization (CNV based on noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT examination and in vitro choroidal flatmount immunohistochemistry stained of CNV currently were used to evaluate the process and severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD both in human and animal studies. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between these two methods in murine CNV models induced by subretinal injection. Methods: CNV was developed in 20 C57BL6/j mice by subretinal injection of adeno-associated viral delivery of a short hairpin RNA targeting sFLT-1 (AAV.shRNA.sFLT-1, as reported previously. After 4 weeks, CNV was imaged by OCT and fluorescence angiography. The scaling factors for each dimension, x, y, and z (μm/pixel were recorded, and the corneal curvature standard was adjusted from human (7.7 to mice (1.4. The volume of each OCT image stack was calculated and then normalized by multiplying the number of voxels by the scaling factors for each dimension in Seg3D software (University of Utah Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, available at http://www.sci.utah.edu/cibc-software/seg3d.html. Eighteen mice were prepared for choroidal flatmounts and stained by CD31. The CNV volumes were calculated using scanning laser confocal microscopy after immunohistochemistry staining. Two mice were stained by Hematoxylin and Eosin for observing the CNV morphology. Results: The CNV volume calculated using OCT was, on average, 2.6 times larger than the volume calculated using the laser confocal microscopy. The correlation statistical analysis showed OCT measuring of CNV correlated significantly with the in vitro method (R 2 =0.448, P = 0.001, n = 18. The correlation coefficient for CNV quantification using OCT and confocal microscopy was 0.693 (n = 18, P = 0.001. Conclusions: There is a fair linear correlation on CNV volumes between in vivo and in vitro methods in CNV models induced by subretinal