WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume manufacturing requirements

  1. Space station automation study. Automation requirements derived from space manufacturing concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The two manufacturing concepts developed represent innovative, technologically advanced manufacturing schemes. The concepts were selected to facilitate an in depth analysis of manufacturing automation requirements in the form of process mechanization, teleoperation and robotics, and artificial intelligence. While the cost effectiveness of these facilities has not been analyzed as part of this study, both appear entirely feasible for the year 2000 timeframe. The growing demand for high quality gallium arsenide microelectronics may warrant the ventures.

  2. Space station automation study: Automation requirements derived from space manufacturing concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The electroepitaxial process and the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits (chips) facilities were chosen because each requires a very high degree of automation, and therefore involved extensive use of teleoperators, robotics, process mechanization, and artificial intelligence. Both cover a raw materials process and a sophisticated multi-step process and are therfore highly representative of the kinds of difficult operation, maintenance, and repair challenges which can be expected for any type of space manufacturing facility. Generic areas were identified which will require significant further study. The initial design will be based on terrestrial state-of-the-art hard automation. One hundred candidate missions were evaluated on the basis of automation portential and availability of meaning ful knowldege. The design requirements and unconstrained design concepts developed for the two missions are presented.

  3. 16 CFR 1505.4 - Manufacturing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturing requirements. 1505.4 Section... USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.4 Manufacturing requirements. (a) General. (1) Only materials safe...-equipped manufacturing establishment. Each component of a toy shall comply with the requirements set...

  4. Device overlay method for high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Youngsik; Kim, Myoungsoo; Heo, Hoyoung; Jeon, Sanghuck; Choi, DongSub; Nabeth, Jeremy; Brinster, Irina; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    Advancing technology nodes with smaller process margins require improved photolithography overlay control. Overlay control at develop inspection (DI) based on optical metrology targets is well established in semiconductor manufacturing. Advances in target design and metrology technology have enabled significant improvements in overlay precision and accuracy. One approach to represent in-die on-device as-etched overlay is to measure at final inspection (FI) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Disadvantages to this approach include inability to rework, limited layer coverage due to lack of transparency, and higher cost of ownership (CoO). A hybrid approach is investigated in this report whereby infrequent DI/FI bias is characterized and the results are used to compensate the frequent DI overlay results. The bias characterization is done on an infrequent basis, either based on time or triggered from change points. On a per-device and per-layer basis, the optical target overlay at DI is compared with SEM on-device overlay at FI. The bias characterization results are validated and tracked for use in compensating the DI APC controller. Results of the DI/FI bias characterization and sources of variation are presented, as well as the impact on the DI correctables feeding the APC system. Implementation details in a high volume manufacturing (HVM) wafer fab will be reviewed. Finally future directions of the investigation will be discussed.

  5. The Value Added by Manufacturing Quality Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Lissa

    1996-01-01

    A methodology for assessing the value of manufacturing quality requirements to the final product, QVAL, is presented. The prime objective of this project was to reduce the Manufacturing Quality Requirements (MQR) that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) imposes on internal and contracted electronics assembly organizations to the minimum number of requirements of significant value to the product.

  6. High Volume Manufacturing and Field Stability of MEMS Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack

    Low volume MEMS/NEMS production is practical when an attractive concept is implemented with business, manufacturing, packaging, and test support. Moving beyond this to high volume production adds requirements on design, process control, quality, product stability, market size, market maturity, capital investment, and business systems. In a broad sense, this chapter uses a case study approach: It describes and compares the silicon-based MEMS accelerometers, pressure sensors, image projection systems, and gyroscopes that are in high volume production. Although they serve several markets, these businesses have common characteristics. For example, the manufacturing lines use automated semiconductor equipment and standard material sets to make consistent products in large quantities. Standard, well controlled processes are sometimes modified for a MEMS product. However, novel processes that cannot run with standard equipment and material sets are avoided when possible. This reliance on semiconductor tools, as well as the organizational practices required to manufacture clean, particle-free products partially explains why the MEMS market leaders are integrated circuit manufacturers. There are other factors. MEMS and NEMS are enabling technologies, so it can take several years for high volume applications to develop. Indeed, market size is usually a strong function of price. This becomes a vicious circle, because low price requires low cost - a result that is normally achieved only after a product is in high volume production. During the early years, IC companies reduced cost and financial risk by using existing facilities for low volume MEMS production. As a result, product architectures are partially determined by capabilities developed for previous products. This chapter includes a discussion of MEMS product architecture with particular attention to the impact of electronic integration, packaging, and surfaces. Packaging and testing are critical, because they are

  7. Optical manufacturing requirements for an AVLIS plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primdahl, K.; Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.

    1997-07-14

    A uranium enrichment plant utilizing Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology is currently being planned. Deployment of the Plant will require tens of thousands of commercial and custom optical components and subsystems. The Plant optical system will be expected to perform at a high level of optical efficiency and reliability in a high-average-power-laser production environment. During construction, demand for this large number of optics must be coordinated with the manufacturing capacity of the optical industry. The general requirements and approach to ensure supply of optical components is described. Dynamic planning and a closely coupled relationship with the optics industry will be required to control cost, schedule, and quality.

  8. 24 CFR 3282.406 - Required manufacturer correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required manufacturer correction... Handling and Remedial Actions § 3282.406 Required manufacturer correction. A manufacturer required to... by the manufacturer, including an error in design or assembly of any component or system...

  9. 24 CFR 3282.207 - Manufactured home consumer manual requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufactured home consumer manual... Inspection and Certification Requirements § 3282.207 Manufactured home consumer manual requirements. (a) The manufacturer shall provide a consumer manual with each manufactured home that enters the first stage...

  10. 27 CFR 40.526 - Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements. 40.526 Section 40.526 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... Manufacturers of Processed Tobacco § 40.526 Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements. A permit...

  11. 27 CFR 40.256 - Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum manufacturing and... Provisions Relating to Operations § 40.256 Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements. The minimum manufacturing and activity requirement prescribed in § 40.61(b) of this part is a continuing condition of...

  12. Cost-Efficient Low-Volume Production Through Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D Printing, is a production method of rising popularity. The method works by adding layers of material, in contrast to subtracting, which is the dominating method today. The objective of this thesis has been to evaluate the cost-efficiency of producing relatively complex parts through additive manufacturing, compared to subtractive methods with production volumes less than 20 units. Initial findings narrow the additive methods down ...

  13. Cost-Efficient Low-Volume Production Through Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D Printing, is a production method of rising popularity. The method works by adding layers of material, in contrast to subtracting, which is the dominating method today. The objective of this thesis has been to evaluate the cost-efficiency of producing relatively complex parts through additive manufacturing, compared to subtractive methods with production volumes less than 20 units. Initial findings narrow the additive methods down ...

  14. 49 CFR 529.4 - Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for incomplete automobile... AUTOMOBILES § 529.4 Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, §§ 529.5 and 529.6, each incomplete automobile manufacturer is considered,...

  15. Design Requirements for Designing Responsive Modular Manufacturing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen; Madsen, Ole; Nielsen, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    and industrial work are conducted in this area and has resulted in a wide span of theories, models, and methods. Manufacturing companies are, regardless hereon, still facing these challenges, especially regarding their manufacturing systems. Several theories state that modular manufacturing concepts possess...... requirement in order to achieve responsiveness and other benefits of modular manufacturing systems (MMS). Due to the complex and interrelated nature of a production system and its surroundings these production needs are complex to identify. This paper presents an analysis framework for identification...

  16. Precision requirements and innovative manufacturing for ultrahigh precision laser interferometry of gravitational-wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Wei-Tou; Jin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    With the LIGO announcement of the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs), the GW Astronomy was formally ushered into our age. After one-hundred years of theoretical investigation and fifty years of experimental endeavor, this is a historical landmark not just for physics and astronomy, but also for industry and manufacturing. The challenge and opportunity for industry is precision and innovative manufacturing in large size - production of large and homogeneous optical components, optical diagnosis of large components, high reflectance dielectric coating on large mirrors, manufacturing of components for ultrahigh vacuum of large volume, manufacturing of high attenuating vibration isolation system, production of high-power high-stability single-frequency lasers, production of high-resolution positioning systems etc. In this talk, we address the requirements and methods to satisfy these requirements. Optical diagnosis of large optical components requires large phase-shifting interferometer; the 1.06...

  17. Community biomass handbook volume 4: enterprise development for integrated wood manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini Lowell; D.R. Becker; D. Smith; M. Kauffman; D. Bihn

    2017-01-01

    The Community Biomass Handbook Volume 4: Enterprise Development for Integrated Wood Manufacturing is a guide for creating sustainable business enterprises using small diameter logs and biomass. This fourth volume is a companion to three Community Biomass Handbook volumes: Volume 1: Thermal Wood Energy; Volume 2: Alaska, Where Woody Biomass Can Work; and Volume 3: How...

  18. Additive Manufacturing in Production: A Study Case Applying Technical Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ituarte, Iñigo Flores; Coatanea, Eric; Salmi, Mika; Tuomi, Jukka; Partanen, Jouni

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is expanding the manufacturing capabilities. However, quality of AM produced parts is dependent on a number of machine, geometry and process parameters. The variability of these parameters affects the manufacturing drastically and therefore standardized processes and harmonized methodologies need to be developed to characterize the technology for end use applications and enable the technology for manufacturing. This research proposes a composite methodology integrating Taguchi Design of Experiments, multi-objective optimization and statistical process control, to optimize the manufacturing process and fulfil multiple requirements imposed to an arbitrary geometry. The proposed methodology aims to characterize AM technology depending upon manufacturing process variables as well as to perform a comparative assessment of three AM technologies (Selective Laser Sintering, Laser Stereolithography and Polyjet). Results indicate that only one machine, laser-based Stereolithography, was feasible to fulfil simultaneously macro and micro level geometrical requirements but mechanical properties were not at required level. Future research will study a single AM system at the time to characterize AM machine technical capabilities and stimulate pre-normative initiatives of the technology for end use applications.

  19. Manufacturing lot affects polyethylene tibial insert volume, thickness, and surface geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Matthew G; Milner, Jaques S; MacDonald, Steven J; Naudie, Douglas D R

    2013-08-01

    To perform wear measurements on retrieved joint replacement implants, a reference geometry of the implant's original state is required. Since implants are rarely individually scanned before implantation, a different, new implant of the same kind and size is frequently used. However, due to manufacturing variability, errors may be introduced into these measurements, as the dimensions between the retrieved and reference components may not be exactly the same. The hypothesis of this study was that new polyethylene tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots would demonstrate greater variability than those from the same lot. In total, 12 new tibial inserts of the same model and size were obtained, 5 from the same lot and the remainder from different lots. The geometry of each tibial insert was obtained using microcomputed tomography. Measurements of tibial insert volume, thickness, and three-dimensional surface deviations were obtained and compared between tibial inserts from the same and different manufacturing lots. Greater variability was found for the tibial inserts from different manufacturing lots for all types of measurements, including a fourfold difference in volume variability (p manufacturing lots for use as the reference geometry.

  20. Development of an advanced uncooled 10-Gb DFB laser for volume manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gordon; Charles, Paul M.

    2003-03-01

    Optical communication systems operating at 10Gbit/s such as 10Gigabit Ethernet are becoming more and more important in Local Area Networks (LAN) and Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN). This market requires optical transceivers of low cost, size and power consumption. This drives a need for uncooled DFB lasers directly modulated at 10Gbit/s. This paper describes the development of a state of the art uncooled high speed DFB laser which is capable of being manufactured in high volume at the low cost demanded by the GbE market. A DFB laser was designed by developing technological building blocks within the 'conventional" InGaAsP materials system, using existing well proven manufacturing processes modules wherever possible, limiting the design risk to a few key areas where innovation was required. The temperature and speed performance of the InGaAsP SMQW active layer system was carefully optimized and then coupled with a low parasitic lateral confinement system. Using concurrent engineering, new processes were demonstrated to have acceptable process capability within a manufacturing fabrication environment, proving their ability to support high volume manufacturing requirements. The DFB laser fabricated was shown to operate at 100C chip temperature with an open eye at 10Gbit/s operation (with an extinction ratio >5dB). Up to 90C operation this DFB shows threshold current as low as 29mA, optical power as high as 13mW and it meets the 10Gb scaled Ethernet mask with extinction ratio >6dB. It was found that the high temperature dynamic behavior of these lasers could not be fully predicted from static test data. A production test strategy was therefore followed where equipment was designed to fully test devices/subassemblies at 100C and up to 20Gbit/s at key points in the product build. This facilitated the rapid optimisation of product yields upon manufacturing ramp up and minimization of product costs. This state of the art laser is now transferred into volume manufacture.

  1. Hot-gas filter manufacturing assessments: Volume 5. Final report, April 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of advanced filtration media for advanced fossil-fueled power generating systems is a critical step in meeting the performance and emissions requirements for these systems. While porous metal and ceramic candle-filters have been available for some time, the next generation of filters will include ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), intermetallic alloys, and alternate filter geometries. The goal of this effort was to perform a cursory review of the manufacturing processes used by 5 companies developing advanced filters from the perspective of process repeatability and the ability for their processes to be scale-up to production volumes. It was found that all of the filter manufacturers had a solid understanding of the product development path. Given that these filters are largely developmental, significant additional work is necessary to understand the process-performance relationships and projecting manufacturing costs. While each organization had specific needs, some common among all of the filter manufacturers were access to performance testing of the filters to aide process/product development, a better understanding of the stresses the filters will see in service for use in structural design of the components, and a strong process sensitivity study to allow optimization of processing.

  2. Mask data volume: historical perspective and future requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Chris; Goad, Scott; Buck, Peter; Gladhill, Richard; Cinque, Russell; Preuninger, Jürgen; Griesinger, Üwe; Blöcker, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Mask data file sizes are increasing as we move from technology generation to generation. The historical 30% linear shrink every 2-3 years that has been called Moore's Law, has driven a doubling of the transistor budget and hence feature count. The transition from steppers to step-and-scan tools has increased the area of the mask that needs to be patterned. At the 130nm node and below, Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) has become prevalent, and the edge fragmentation required to implement OPC leads to an increase in the number of polygons required to define the layout. Furthermore, Resolution Enhancement Techniques (RETs) such as Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) or tri-tone Phase Shift Masks (PSM) require additional features to be defined on the mask which do not resolve on the wafer, further increasing masks volumes. In this paper we review historical data on mask file sizes for microprocessor, DRAM and Flash memory designs. We consider the consequences of this increase in file size on Mask Data Prep (MDP) activities, both within the Integrated Device Manufacturer (IDM) and Mask Shop, namely: computer resources, storage and networks (for file transfer). The impact of larger file sizes on mask writing times is also reviewed. Finally we consider, based on the trends that have been observed over the last 5 technology nodes, what will be required to maintain reasonable MDP and mask manufacturing cycle times.

  3. Update of Energy Efficiency Requirements for Manufactured Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, Craig C.; Dillon, Heather E.; Lucas, Robert G.; Early, Chris; Lubliner, Michael

    2004-03-22

    Energy efficiency requirements were developed for manufactured (mobile) homes, which are regulated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). A life-cycle cost analysis from the homeowner's perspective was used to establish parameters for a least-cost home in a large number of cities. Economic, financial, and energy-efficiency measures for the life-cycle cost analysis were selected. The resulting energy-efficiency levels were aggregated to the existing HUD zones and expressed as a maximum overall home U-value (thermal transmittance) requirement for the building envelope. The proposed revised standard's costs, benefits, and net value to the consumer were quantified. This analysis updates a similar effort completed in 1992, which was the basis for the existing HUD code Uo requirements.

  4. Nanoimprint system development and status for high volume semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiura, Hiromi; Takabayashi, Yukio; Takashima, Tsuneo; Emoto, Keiji; Choi, Jin; Schumaker, Phil

    2016-10-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography* (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. There are many criteria that determine whether a particular technology is ready for wafer manufacturing. For imprint lithography, recent attention has been given to the areas of overlay, throughput, defectivity, and mask replication. This paper reviews progress in these critical areas. Recent demonstrations have proven that mix and match overlay of less than 5nm can achieved. Further reductions require a higher order correction system. Modeling and experimental data are presented which provide a path towards reducing the overlay errors to less than 3nm. Throughput is mainly impacted by the fill time of the relief images on the mask. Improvement in resist materials provides a solution that allows 15 wafers per hour per station, or a tool throughput of 60 wafers per hour. Defectivity and mask life play a significant role relative to meeting the cost of ownership (CoO) requirements in the production of semiconductor devices. Hard particles on a wafer or mask create the possibility of inducing a permanent defect on the mask that can impact device yield and mask life. By using material methods to reduce particle shedding and by introducing an air curtain system, the lifetime of both the master mask and the replica mask can be extended. In this work, we report results that demonstrate a path towards achieving mask lifetimes of better than 1000 wafers. Finally, on the mask side, a new replication tool, the FPA-1100NR2 is

  5. Precision requirements and innovative manufacturing for ultrahigh precision laser interferometry of gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wei-Tou; Han, Sen; Jin, Tao

    2016-11-01

    With the LIGO announcement of the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs), the GW Astronomy was formally ushered into our age. After one-hundred years of theoretical investigation and fifty years of experimental endeavor, this is a historical landmark not just for physics and astronomy, but also for industry and manufacturing. The challenge and opportunity for industry is precision and innovative manufacturing in large size - production of large and homogeneous optical components, optical diagnosis of large components, high reflectance dielectric coating on large mirrors, manufacturing of components for ultrahigh vacuum of large volume, manufacturing of high attenuating vibration isolation system, production of high-power high-stability single-frequency lasers, production of high-resolution positioning systems etc. In this talk, we address the requirements and methods to satisfy these requirements. Optical diagnosis of large optical components requires large phase-shifting interferometer; the 1.06 μm Phase Shifting Interferometer for testing LIGO optics and the recently built 24" phase-shifting Interferometer in Chengdu, China are examples. High quality mirrors are crucial for laser interferometric GW detection, so as for ring laser gyroscope, high precision laser stabilization via optical cavities, quantum optomechanics, cavity quantum electrodynamics and vacuum birefringence measurement. There are stringent requirements on the substrate materials and coating methods. For cryogenic GW interferometer, appropriate coating on sapphire or silicon are required for good thermal and homogeneity properties. Large ultrahigh vacuum components and high attenuating vibration system together with an efficient metrology system are required and will be addressed. For space interferometry, drag-free technology and weak-light manipulation technology are must. Drag-free technology is well-developed. Weak-light phase locking is demonstrated in the laboratories while

  6. 46 CFR 50.25-5 - Products requiring manufacturer or mill certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Products requiring manufacturer or mill certification... manufacturer or mill certification. (a) Products required to be certified by a manufacturer or by mill... will not normally be subject to mill inspection by the Coast Guard except as required by § 50.25-7....

  7. Imaging requirements for medical applications of additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotilainen, Eero; Paloheimo, Markku; Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Björkstrand, Roy; Tuomi, Jukka; Markkola, Antti; Mäkitie, Antti

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), formerly known as rapid prototyping, is steadily shifting its focus from industrial prototyping to medical applications as AM processes, bioadaptive materials, and medical imaging technologies develop, and the benefits of the techniques gain wider knowledge among clinicians. This article gives an overview of the main requirements for medical imaging affected by needs of AM, as well as provides a brief literature review from existing clinical cases concentrating especially on the kind of radiology they required. As an example application, a pair of CT images of the facial skull base was turned into 3D models in order to illustrate the significance of suitable imaging parameters. Additionally, the model was printed into a preoperative medical model with a popular AM device. Successful clinical cases of AM are recognized to rely heavily on efficient collaboration between various disciplines - notably operating surgeons, radiologists, and engineers. The single main requirement separating tangible model creation from traditional imaging objectives such as diagnostics and preoperative planning is the increased need for anatomical accuracy in all three spatial dimensions, but depending on the application, other specific requirements may be present as well. This article essentially intends to narrow the potential communication gap between radiologists and engineers who work with projects involving AM by showcasing the overlap between the two disciplines.

  8. Settlement Requires Milford, Mass. Glass Manufacturer to Improve Stormwater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastewater discharged by a glass manufacturing company in Milford, Mass. into wetlands adjacent to the Charles River will be cleaner as a result of a recent settlement between the manufacturer and the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  9. 49 CFR 567.4 - Requirements for manufacturers of motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for manufacturers of motor vehicles... manufacturers of motor vehicles. (a) Each manufacturer of motor vehicles (except vehicles manufactured in two or... applicable Federal motor vehicle safety, bumper, and theft prevention standards in effect on the date...

  10. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries - Volume 1: Concepts and Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner to allow evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key nonmanufacturing sectors. This volume lays out the general concepts and methods used to develop the emergency operating estimates. The historical analysis of capacity extends from 1974 through 1986. Some nonmanufacturing industries are included. In addition to mining and utilities, key industries in transportation, communication, and services were analyzed. Physical capacity and efficiency of production were measured. 3 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs. (JF)

  11. 40 CFR 86.1845-01 - Manufacturer in-use verification testing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacturer in-use verification...-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1845-01 Manufacturer in-use verification testing requirements. (a) General requirements. A manufacturer...

  12. 49 CFR 579.26 - Reporting requirements for manufacturers of tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting requirements for manufacturers of tires... requirements for manufacturers of tires. For each reporting period, a manufacturer (including a brand name... in interstate commerce, or imported tires in the United States shall submit the information...

  13. ICAM (Integrated Computer-Aided Manufacturing) Manufacturing Cost/Design Guide. Volume 7. Technology Transfer Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    advanced composite structures for production. Conduct material and manufacturing trade-off studies on ATF advanced design, NASA composite wing, and...255-7371. D-17 .* . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . - . , o , . . - .’. TTD4502 60000 12 Sept 1984 CC tE % > LL 00 o0h K; Cr A .’ TTD450260000 12... coatings on the internal "Top-of-the-Line" Manu- observing the effect of the surfaces of hollowf~acturing Technology Success proposed change. Potential

  14. 40 CFR 86.1845-04 - Manufacturer in-use verification testing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacturer in-use verification...-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1845-04 Manufacturer.... (a) General requirements. (1) A manufacturer of LDVs, LDTs, MDPVs and/or complete HDVs must test,...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1846-01 - Manufacturer in-use confirmatory testing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacturer in-use confirmatory...-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1846-01 Manufacturer.... (a) General requirements. (1) A manufacturer of LDVs, LDTs and/or MDPVs must test, or cause...

  16. 14 CFR 21.143 - Quality control data requirements; prime manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... manufacturer. 21.143 Section 21.143 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... control data requirements; prime manufacturer. (a) Each applicant must submit, for approval, data..., purchased items, and parts and assemblies produced by manufacturers' suppliers including methods used...

  17. 21 CFR 111.355 - What are the design requirements for manufacturing operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the design requirements for manufacturing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process...

  18. Performance of volume phase gratings manufactured using ultrafast laser inscription

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, David; Cunningham, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast laser inscription (ULI) is a rapidly maturing technique which uses focused ultrashort laser pulses to locally modify the refractive index of dielectric materials in three-dimensions (3D). Recently, ULI has been applied to the fabrication of astrophotonic devices such as integrated beam combiners, 3D integrated waveguide fan-outs and multimode-to-single mode convertors (photonic lanterns). Here, we outline our work on applying ULI to the fabrication of volume phase gratings (VPGs) in fused silica and gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses. The VPGs we fabricated had a spatial frequency of 333 lines/mm. The optimum fused silica grating was found to exhibit a first order diffraction efficiency of 40 % at 633 nm, but exhibited approximately 40 % integrated scattered light. The optimum GLS grating was found to exhibit a first order diffraction efficiency of 71 % at 633 nm and less than 5 % integrated scattered light. Importantly for future astronomy applications, both gratings survived cooling to 20 K....

  19. Development of volume deposition on cast iron by additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyanth S, Niyanth [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Jordan, Brian H [ORNL; Babu, Suresh S. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2016-11-10

    ORNL partnered with Cummins to demonstrate the feasibility of using additive manufacturing techniques to help develop repair techniques for refurbished cast iron engine blocks. Cummins is interested in the refurbished engine business due to the increased cost savings and reduced emissions. It is expected that by refurbishing engines could help reduce the green house gas emissions by as much as 85%. Though such repair techniques are possible in principle there has been no major industry in the automotive sector that has deployed this technology. Therefore phase-1 would seek to evaluate the feasibility of using the laser directed energy deposition technique to repair cast iron engine blocks. The objective of the phase-1 would be to explore various strategies and understand the challenges involved. During phase-1 deposits were made using Inconel-718, Nickel, Nr-Cr-B braze filler. Inconel 718 builds showed significant cracking in the heat-affected zone in the cast iron. Nickel was used to reduce the cracking in the cast iron substrate, however the Ni builds did not wet the substrate sufficiently resulting in poor dimensional tolerance. In order to increase wetting the Ni was alloyed with the Ni-Cr-B braze to decrease the surface tension of Ni. This however resulted in significant cracks in the build due to shrinkage stresses associated with multiple thermal cycling. Hence to reduce the residual stresses in the builds the DMD-103D equipment was modified and the cast iron block was pre heated using cartridge heaters. Inconel-718 alloyed with Ni was deposited on the engine block. The pre-heated deposits showed a reduced susceptibility to cracking. If awarded the phase-2 of the project would aim to develop process parameters to achieve a crack free deposit engine block.

  20. Space station automation study: Automation requriements derived from space manufacturing concepts,volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Automation reuirements were developed for two manufacturing concepts: (1) Gallium Arsenide Electroepitaxial Crystal Production and Wafer Manufacturing Facility, and (2) Gallium Arsenide VLSI Microelectronics Chip Processing Facility. A functional overview of the ultimate design concept incoporating the two manufacturing facilities on the space station are provided. The concepts were selected to facilitate an in-depth analysis of manufacturing automation requirements in the form of process mechanization, teleoperation and robotics, sensors, and artificial intelligence. While the cost-effectiveness of these facilities was not analyzed, both appear entirely feasible for the year 2000 timeframe.

  1. Lean Production Control at a High-Variety, Low-Volume Parts Manufacturer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, Jos A. C.; Slomp, Jannes

    2010-01-01

    Eaton Electric General Supplies, a parts manufacturing unit that supplies parts for Eaton's electrical business unit, implemented several lean control elements in its high-variety, low-volume production units. These control elements include a constant work-in-process mechanism to limit and control

  2. Lean Production Control at a High-Variety, Low-Volume Parts Manufacturer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, Jos A. C.; Slomp, Jannes

    2010-01-01

    Eaton Electric General Supplies, a parts manufacturing unit that supplies parts for Eaton's electrical business unit, implemented several lean control elements in its high-variety, low-volume production units. These control elements include a constant work-in-process mechanism to limit and control t

  3. 49 CFR 568.4 - Requirements for incomplete vehicle manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... document applies. The identification shall be by vehicle identification number (VIN) or groups of VINs to... same tire size designation may, at the option of the incomplete vehicle manufacturer, be stated as a... statement that conformity with the standard cannot be determined based upon the components supplied on the...

  4. 46 CFR 160.066-5 - Design, construction, and manufacturing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design, construction, and manufacturing requirements...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Distress Signal for Boats, Red Aerial Pyrotechnic Flare § 160.066-5 Design, construction, and manufacturing requirements....

  5. Flight program language requirements. Volume 2: Requirements and evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The efforts and results are summarized for a study to establish requirements for a flight programming language for future onboard computer applications. Several different languages were available as potential candidates for future NASA flight programming efforts. The study centered around an evaluation of the four most pertinent existing aerospace languages. Evaluation criteria were established, and selected kernels from the current Saturn 5 and Skylab flight programs were used as benchmark problems for sample coding. An independent review of the language specifications incorporated anticipated future programming requirements into the evaluation. A set of detailed language requirements was synthesized from these activities. The details of program language requirements and of the language evaluations are described.

  6. 49 CFR 579.22 - Reporting requirements for manufacturers of 100 or more buses, manufacturers of 500 or more...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... system, air, 05 parking brake, 06 engine and engine cooling system, 07 fuel system, gasoline, 08 fuel... model that is manufactured and available with more than one type of service brake system (i.e., hydraulic or air), the information required by this subsection shall be reported by each of the two...

  7. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

  8. Generalized requirements and decompositions for the design of test parts for micro additive manufacturing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2015-01-01

    level decompositions for the design of test parts and the design of experiments to characterize micro additive manufacturing processes. While the test parts and the experiments described are still work in progress, the generic requirements derived from them can serve as a starting point for the design......The design of experimental test parts to characterize micro additive manufacturing (AM) processes is challenging due to the influence of the manufacturing and metrology processes. This work builds on the lessons learned from a case study in the literature to derive generalized requirements and high...... of other micro additive manufacturing related studies and their decompositions can help structure future work....

  9. CIM's bridge from CADD to CAM: Data management requirements for manufacturing engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Manufacturing engineering represents the crossroads of technical data management in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) environment. Process planning, numerical control programming and tool design are the key functions which translate information from as engineered to as assembled. In order to transition data from engineering to manufacturing, it is necessary to introduce a series of product interpretations which contain an interim introduction of technical parameters. The current automation of the product definition and the production process places manufacturing engineering in the center of CAD/CAM with the responsibility of communicating design data to the factory floor via a manufacturing model of the data. A close look at data management requirements for manufacturing engineering is necessary in order to establish the overall specifications for CADD output, CAM input, and CIM integration. The functions and issues associated with the orderly evolution of computer aided engineering and manufacturing are examined.

  10. CIM's bridge from CADD to CAM: Data management requirements for manufacturing engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Manufacturing engineering represents the crossroads of technical data management in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) environment. Process planning, numerical control programming and tool design are the key functions which translate information from as engineered to as assembled. In order to transition data from engineering to manufacturing, it is necessary to introduce a series of product interpretations which contain an interim introduction of technical parameters. The current automation of the product definition and the production process places manufacturing engineering in the center of CAD/CAM with the responsibility of communicating design data to the factory floor via a manufacturing model of the data. A close look at data management requirements for manufacturing engineering is necessary in order to establish the overall specifications for CADD output, CAM input, and CIM integration. The functions and issues associated with the orderly evolution of computer aided engineering and manufacturing are examined.

  11. Requirements for qualification of manufacture of the ITER Central Solenoid and Correction Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libeyre, Paul, E-mail: paul.libeyre@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Li, Hongwei [ITER China, 15B Fuxing Road, Beijing 100862 (China); Reiersen, Wayne [US ITER Project Office, 1055 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dolgetta, Nello; Jong, Cornelis; Lyraud, Charles; Mitchell, Neil; Laurenti, Adamo [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Sgobba, Stefano [CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Turck, Bernard [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Martovetsky, Nicolai; Everitt, David; Freudenberg, K.; Litherland, Steve; Rosenblad, Peter [US ITER Project Office, 1055 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Smith, John; Spitzer, Jeff [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Wei, Jing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Fang, Chao [ASIPP, Shushan Hu Road 350, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A manufacturing line is installed for the ITER Correction Coils. • A manufacturing line is under installation for the ITER Central Solenoid. • Qualification of the manufacturing procedures has started for both manufacturing lines and acceptance criteria set. • Winding procedure of Correction Coils is qualified. - Abstract: The manufacturing line of the ITER Correction Coils (CC) at ASIPP in Hefei (China) was completed in 2013 and the manufacturing line of the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) modules is under installation at General Atomic premises in Poway (USA). In both cases, before starting production of the first coils, qualification of the manufacturing procedures is achieved by the construction of a set of mock-ups and prototypes to demonstrate that design requirements defined by the ITER Organization are effectively met. For each qualification item, the corresponding mock-ups are presented with the tests to be performed and the related acceptance criteria. The first qualification results are discussed.

  12. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 1, chapters 1-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Space program scenarios for production of large space structures from lunar materials are defined. The concept of the space manufacturing facility (SMF) is presented. The manufacturing processes and equipment for the SMF are defined and the conceptual layouts are described for the production of solar cells and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, and converters. A 'reference' SMF was designed and its operation requirements are described.

  13. Multivariate process modeling of high-volume manufacturing of consumer electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, Stefan; Wide, Peter

    1998-12-01

    As production volumes continue to increase and the global market for consumer electronics is getting fiercer, the need for a reliable and essentially fault-free production process is becoming a necessity to survive. The manufacturing processes of today are highly complex and the increasing amount of process data produced in making it hard to unravel the useful information extracted from a huge data set. We have used multivariate and nonlinear process modeling to examine the surface mount production process in a high volume manufacturing of mobile telephones and made an artificial neural network model of the process. As input parameters to the model we have used process data logged by an automatic test equipment and the result variables come from an Automatic Inspection system placed after the board manufacturing process. Using multivariate process modeling has enabled us to identify parameters, which contributes heavily to the quality of the product and can further be implemented to optimize the manufacturing process for system production faults.

  14. Importance and globalization status of good manufacturing practice (GMP) requirements for pharmaceutical excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Abubaker; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Wan Ismail, Wan Azman

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical excipients are no longer inert materials but it is effective and able to improve the characteristics of the products' quality, stability, functionality, safety, solubility and acceptance of patients. It can interact with the active ingredients and alter the medicament characteristics. The globalization of medicines' supply enhances the importance of globalized good manufacturing practice (GMP) requirements for pharmaceutical excipients. This review was intended to assess the globalization status of good manufacturing practice (GMP) requirements for pharmaceutical excipients. The review outcomes demonstrate that there is a lack of accurately defined methods to evaluate and measure excipients' safety. Furthermore good manufacturing practice requirements for excipients are not effectively globalized.

  15. 49 CFR 178.69 - Responsibilities and requirements for manufacturers of UN pressure receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in English and must include detailed descriptions of the following: (i) The organizational structure... type, and ensure that all production of UN pressure receptacles meets the applicable requirements. (1... manufacturer of the findings. (b) Design type approvals. The manufacturer must have each pressure receptacle...

  16. 75 FR 56471 - Revisions to the Requirements for Authority To Manufacture and Distribute Postage Evidencing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... regulations to require that companies that manufacture and distribute postage evidencing systems (``Company or..., produce, and distribute Postage Evidencing Systems. The Postal Service published a proposed rule in the... manufacture and distribute postage evidencing systems. This revision clarifies the internal controls...

  17. 75 FR 61418 - Milk for Manufacturing Purposes and Its Production and Processing; Requirements Recommended for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... market milk or of processing plants to produce dairy products in their State. AMS is publishing this... Agricultural Marketing Service Milk for Manufacturing Purposes and Its Production and Processing; Requirements...: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: This document proposes to amend the recommended manufacturing...

  18. 49 CFR 574.7 - Information requirements-new tire manufacturers, new tire brand name owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information requirements-new tire manufacturers, new tire brand name owners. 574.7 Section 574.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to..., new tire brand name owners. (a)(1) Each new tire manufacturer and each new tire brand name...

  19. Requirements engineering:linking design and manufacturing in ICT companies

    OpenAIRE

    Möttönen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The information and communication technology (ICT) industry has expanded rapidly during the past decades and has changed in terms of frequent technology development, increase in product complexity, constant time-to-market pressures, heavy price erosion and the decrease in physical dimensions. Successful product development thus requires effective requirements engineering and acknowledging the different needs of internal and external stakeholders. A vital challenge for ICT com...

  20. Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark K.

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF

  1. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 3: Product data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is analyzed and the study results are presented. The chronology of the study process is discussed. The separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process is investigated. The production requirements of twelve candidate products including antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and interferon are evaluated.

  2. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME III: LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: NASHUA CORPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume discusses Nashua Corporation's Omaha facility, a label and label stock manufacturing facility that no longer uses solvent-based adhesives. Information obtained includes issues related to the technical, economic, and environmental barriers and opportunities associated ...

  3. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  4. An Improved Multivariate T2 Control Chart for Individual Observations in Low Volume Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Rui(苗瑞); Wang Dongpeng; Yao Yingxue

    2004-01-01

    For multivariate statistical process quality control with individual observations, the usually recommended procedure is Hotelling's T2 control chart. Using the T2 statistic based on β distribution is an exact method for constructing multivariate control limits in low volume manufacturing, but it is not convenient in that the variation of sample size leads to a change in control limit. This paper presents an improved multivariate T2 control chart whose control limit does not change with sample size, which is especially useful when the sample size is small.

  5. The confusion in complying with good manufacturing practice requirements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jali, Mohd Bakri; Ghani, Maaruf Abdul; Nor, Norazmir Md

    2016-11-01

    Food manufacturing operations need to fulfil regulatory requirements related to hygiene and good manufacturing practices (GMP) to successfully market their products as safe and quality products. GMP based on its ten elements used as guidelines to ensure control over biological, chemical and physical hazards. This study aims to investigate the confusion for design and facilities elements among food industries. Both qualitative and quantitative techniques are used as systematic tools. Design and facilities elements lay a firm foundation for good manufacturing practice to ensure food hygiene and should be used in conjunction with each specific code of hygiene practice and guidelines.

  6. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of the commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is examined. The method of obtaining pharmaceutical company involvement, laboratory results of the separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process, the selection and study of candidate products, and their production requirements is presented. Antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon were studied. Production mass balances for antihemophilic factor, beta cells, and erythropoietin were compared for space verus ground operation.

  7. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 2: Technical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A technical analysis on the feasibility of commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is presented. The method of obtaining pharmaceutical company involvement, laboratory results of the separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process, the selection and study of candidate products, and their production requirements is described. The candidate products are antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon. Production mass balances for antihemophelic factor, beta cells, and erythropoietin were compared for space versus ground operation. A conceptual description of a multiproduct processing system for space operation is discussed. Production requirements for epidermal growth factor of alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon are presented.

  8. Bistability: requirements on cell-volume, protein diffusion, and thermodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Endres

    Full Text Available Bistability is considered wide-spread among bacteria and eukaryotic cells, useful, e.g., for enzyme induction, bet hedging, and epigenetic switching. However, this phenomenon has mostly been described with deterministic dynamic or well-mixed stochastic models. Here, we map known biological bistable systems onto the well-characterized biochemical Schlögl model, using analytical calculations and stochastic spatiotemporal simulations. In addition to network architecture and strong thermodynamic driving away from equilibrium, we show that bistability requires fine-tuning towards small cell volumes (or compartments and fast protein diffusion (well mixing. Bistability is thus fragile and hence may be restricted to small bacteria and eukaryotic nuclei, with switching triggered by volume changes during the cell cycle. For large volumes, single cells generally loose their ability for bistable switching and instead undergo a first-order phase transition.

  9. Manufacturing cost analysis of a parabolic dish concentrator (General Electric design) for solar thermal electric power systems in selected production volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The manufacturing cost of a General Electric 12 meter diameter concentrator was estimated. This parabolic dish concentrator for solar thermal system was costed in annual production volumes of 100 - 1,000 - 5,000 - 10,000 - 50,000 100,000 - 400,000 and 1,000,000 units. Presented for each volume are the costs of direct labor, material, burden, tooling, capital equipment and buildings. Also presented is the direct labor personnel and factory space requirements. All costs are based on early 1981 economics.

  10. Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark K.

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF

  11. 40 CFR 53.51 - Demonstration of compliance with design specifications and manufacturing and test requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in an ISO 9001-registered facility under a quality system that meets ISO-9001 requirements for... quality system. (3) For the purposes of this section, the definitions of ISO 9001-registered facility and... as part of a designated PM2.5 or PM10−2.5 FRM or FEM will be manufactured in an ISO...

  12. Human Computer Interface Design Criteria. Volume 1. User Interface Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    2 entitled Human Computer Interface ( HCI )Design Criteria Volume 1: User Interlace Requirements which contains the following major changes from...MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER Air Force Space Command 483 N. Aviation Blvd. El Segundo, CA 90245 4. This standard has been approved for use on all Space and...and efficient model of how the system works and can generalize this knowledge to other systems. According to Mayhew in Principles and Guidelines in

  13. Nanoimprint system development and status for high-volume semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Tsuneo; Takabayashi, Yukio; Nishimura, Naosuke; Emoto, Keiji; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Atsushi; Choi, Jin; Schumaker, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. Criteria specific to any lithographic process for the semiconductor industry include overlay, throughput and defectivity. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technology advancements made overlay, throughput and defectivity and to introduce the FPA-1200NZ2C cluster system designed for high volume manufacturing of semiconductor devices. in the reduction of particle adders in an imprint tool and introduce the new mask replication tool that will enable the fabrication of replica masks with added residual image placement errors suitable for memory devices with half pitches smaller than 15nm. Overlay results better than 5nm 3sigma have been demonstrated. To further enhance overlay, wafer chucks with improved flatness have been implemented to reduce distortion at the wafer edge. To address higher order corrections, a two part solution is discussed. An array of piezo actuators can be applied to enable linear corrections. Additional reductions in distortion can then be addressed by the local heating of a wafer field. The NZ2C cluster platform for high volume manufacturing is also discussed. System development continues this year with a target for introduction later in 2016. The first application is likely to be NAND Flash memory, and eventual use for DRAM and logic devices as both overlay and defectivity improve.

  14. 2 CFR 176.170 - Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods (covered under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods (covered under International..., maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work, and involve iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods... paragraphs in the solicitation: (a) Definitions. Designated country iron, steel, and/or manufactured...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4238 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines â¤19 KW (25 HP) or a manufacturer... Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Compliance Requirements... SI internal combustion engines ≤19 KW (25 HP) or a manufacturer of equipment containing such engines...

  16. An economic model of the manufacturers' aircraft production and airline earnings potential, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, J. T.; Hill, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    A behavioral explanation of the process of technological change in the U. S. aircraft manufacturing and airline industries is presented. The model indicates the principal factors which influence the aircraft (airframe) manufacturers in researching, developing, constructing and promoting new aircraft technology; and the financial requirements which determine the delivery of new aircraft to the domestic trunk airlines. Following specification and calibration of the model, the types and numbers of new aircraft were estimated historically for each airline's fleet. Examples of possible applications of the model to forecasting an individual airline's future fleet also are provided. The functional form of the model is a composite which was derived from several preceding econometric models developed on the foundations of the economics of innovation, acquisition, and technological change and represents an important contribution to the improved understanding of the economic and financial requirements for aircraft selection and production. The model's primary application will be to forecast the future types and numbers of new aircraft required for each domestic airline's fleet.

  17. Integrated Computer-Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) Architecture. Part 3. Volume 8. Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Drvtd. . ; THE INFRl*,t.Ti j T’i’ MAI~ "WE BEL :1E’,E - .HA i * ARCHITECTURE P’,K’ l .... ’ J L.E % ANALYTICA ML ’-.q TEGTC 3USNS ZA<. * ~-- DAY OPERA...OF MANUFACTURING ENGINEER’S COMPUTF. AND AUTOMATED SYSTEMS ASSOCIATION (SME CASA ) REtrNTLY PUBLISHED THIS LOGO DEVELOPED BY ITS TECHNICAL COUNCIL AND...THAT, LIKE ICAM, SME CASA ALSO SEES INTEGRATED SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE AND COMMON DATABASES AS THE CENTRAL FOCUS REQUIRED FOR FUTURE FACTORY INTEGRATION

  18. Revision of the energy conservation requirements in the manufactured home construction and safety standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, C C; Lee, A D; Lucas, R G; Taylor, Z T

    1992-02-01

    Thermal requirements were developed for manufactured (mobile) homes in response to legislation requiring the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to revise its thermal standards for manufactured homes. A life-cycle cost minimization from the home owner's perspecetive was used to establish an optimum in a large number of cities for several prototype homes. The development of the economic, financial, and energy conservation measure parameters input into the life-cycle cost analysis was documented. The optimization results were aggregated to zones which were expressed as a maximum overall home U-value (thermal transmittance) requirement. The revised standard's costs, benefits, and net value to the consumer were quantified. 50 refs.

  19. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  20. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking... procedure for the collection, maintenance, and auditing of the data specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of... recording system, and the file maintenance procedures system; and (3) A quality assurance program...

  1. ICAM (Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing) Conceptual Design for Computer-Integrated Manufacturing. Volume 1. Project Overview and Technical Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-29

    8217MJANUFACTURING e MANUFACTURING, WHICH BEGINS WITH PRODUCT DESIGN AND ENDS WITH SUPPORT AND MAINTENANCE IN THE FIELD, IS A MONOLITHIC , INDIV~SIBLE...UPON. KNOWLEDGE OF THEIR SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENT £\\NQ CONTRIBUTION OF THEIH JLJ\\IA. • ITJ EAM (M1 ANAGEMENT liJ ECHtJIQUES OFFER AN EXPLOSIVE IMPACT...DBMS SURVEYED: 1) RELAT tONAL 2) NETWORKING I I INFORMATION FORMAT: DBMS NAME: VENDOR: PRICE: HARDWARE: TYPE oF DBr ~s: HosT lANGUAGE: DATA

  2. Proposal for a Guide for Quality Management Systems for PV Manufacturing: Supplemental Requirements to ISO 9001-2008 (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norum, P.; Sinicco, I.; Eguchi, Y.; Lokanath, S.; Zhou, W.; Brueggemann, G.; Mikonowicz, A.; Yamamichi, M.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-09-01

    This technical specification provides a guideline for photovoltaic module manufacturers to produce modules that, once the design has proven to meet the quality and reliability requirements, replicate such design in an industrial scale without compromising its consistency with the requirements.

  3. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  4. Factors Impacting Habitable Volume Requirements: Results from the 2011 Habitable Volume Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Whitmire, A.; Otto, C.; Neubek, D. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Habitable Volume Workshop held April 18-21, 2011 in Houston, TX at the Center for Advanced Space Studies-Universities Space Research Association. The workshop was convened by NASA to examine the factors that feed into understanding minimum habitable volume requirements for long duration space missions. While there have been confinement studies and analogs that have provided the basis for the guidance found in current habitability standards, determining the adequacy of the volume for future long duration exploration missions is a more complicated endeavor. It was determined that an improved understanding of the relationship between behavioral and psychosocial stressors, available habitable and net habitable volume, and interior layouts was needed to judge the adequacy of long duration habitat designs. The workshop brought together a multi-disciplinary group of experts from the medical and behavioral sciences, spaceflight, human habitability disciplines and design professionals. These subject matter experts identified the most salient design-related stressors anticipated for a long duration exploration mission. The selected stressors were based on scientific evidence, as well as personal experiences from spaceflight and analogs. They were organized into eight major categories: allocation of space; workspace; general and individual control of environment; sensory deprivation; social monotony; crew composition; physical and medical issues; and contingency readiness. Mitigation strategies for the identified stressors and their subsequent impact to habitat design were identified. Recommendations for future research to address the stressors and mitigating design impacts are presented.

  5. Design of Manufacturing Cells for Uncertain Production Requirements with Presence of Routing Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eski, Ozgur; Ozkarahan, Irem

    Cellular manufacturing has been seen as an effective strategy to the changing worldwide competition. Most of the existing cell design methods ignore the existence of stochastic production requirements and routing flexibility. In this study, a simulation based Fuzzy Goal Programming model is proposed for solving cell formation problems considering stochastic production requirements and routing flexibility. The model covers the objectives of minimizing inter-cell movements, maximizing system utilization, minimizing mean tardiness and minimizing the percentage of tardy jobs. The simple additive method and max-min method are used to handle fuzzy goals. A tabu search based solution methodology is used for solution of the proposed models and the results are presented.

  6. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 15, System design description. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-22

    This System Design Description, prepared in accordance with the TPX Project Management Plan provides a summary or TF Magnet System design features at the conclusion of Phase I, Preliminary Design and Manufacturing Research. The document includes the analytical and experimental bases for the design, and plans for implementation in final design, manufacturing, test, and magnet integration into the tokamak. Requirements for operation and maintenance are outlined, and references to sources of additional information are provided.

  7. Applications of on-product diffraction-based focus metrology in logic high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Ben F.; Mokaberi, Babak; Bolton, David; Li, Chen; Palande, Ashwin; Park, Kevin; Noot, Marc; Kea, Marc

    2016-03-01

    The integration of on-product diffraction-based focus (DBF) capability into the majority of immersion lithography layers in leading edge logic manufacturing has enabled new applications targeted towards improving cycle time and yield. A CD-based detection method is the process of record (POR) for excursion detection. The drawback of this method is increased cycle time and limited sampling due to CD-SEM metrology capacity constraints. The DBFbased method allows the addition of focus metrology samples to the existing overlay measurements on the integrated metrology (IM) system. The result enables the addition of measured focus to the SPC system, allowing a faster excursion detection method. For focus targeting, the current method involves using a dedicated focus-exposure matrix (FEM) on all scanners, resulting in lengthy analysis times and uncertainty in the best focus. The DBF method allows the measurement to occur on the IM system, on a regular production wafer, and at the same time as the exposure. This results in a cycle time gain as well as a less subjective determination of best focus. A third application aims to use the novel onproduct focus metrology data in order to apply per-exposure focus corrections to the scanner. These corrections are particularly effective at the edge of the wafer, where systematic layer-dependent effects can be removed using DBFbased scanner feedback. This paper will discuss the development of a methodology to accomplish each of these applications in a high-volume production environment. The new focus metrology method, sampling schemes, feedback mechanisms and analysis methods lead to improved focus control, as well as earlier detection of failures.

  8. Automated High-Volume Manufacturing of Modular Photovoltaic Panel Assemblies for Space Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS) will focus the proposed SBIR program on the creation and development of an automated robotic manufacturing infrastructure...

  9. Revision of the Energy-Efficiency Requirements in the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, Craig C.; Dillon, Heather E.; Lucas, Robert G.; Lubliner, Michael

    2004-06-01

    Energy-efficiency requirements were developed for manufactured (mobile) homes, which are regulated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. A life-cycle cost analysis from the homeowner's perspective was used to establish parameters for a least-cost home in a large number of cities. Economic, financial, and energy-efficiency measures for the life-cycle cost analysis were selected and documented. The resulting energy-efficiency levels were aggregated to zones that were expressed as a maximum overall home U-factor (thermal transmittance) requirement for the building envelope. The proposed revised standard's costs, benefits, and net value to the consumer were quantified. This analysis updates a similar effort completed in 1992, which was the basis for the existing HUD code overall U-factor requirement.

  10. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  11. 40 CFR 86.1826-01 - Assigned deterioration factors for small volume manufacturers and small volume test groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty... aggregated sales of less than 301 motor vehicles and motor vehicle engines per year (determined under the... deterioration factor. (2) Manufacturers with aggregated sales from and including 301 through 14,999...

  12. Optimization-based manufacturing scheduling with multiple resources and setup requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Luh, Peter B.; Thakur, Lakshman S.; Moreno, Jack, Jr.

    1998-10-01

    The increasing demand for on-time delivery and low price forces manufacturer to seek effective schedules to improve coordination of multiple resources and to reduce product internal costs associated with labor, setup and inventory. This study describes the design and implementation of a scheduling system for J. M. Product Inc. whose manufacturing is characterized by the need to simultaneously consider machines and operators while an operator may attend several operations at the same time, and the presence of machines requiring significant setup times. The scheduling problem with these characteristics are typical for many manufacturers, very difficult to be handled, and have not been adequately addressed in the literature. In this study, both machine and operators are modeled as resources with finite capacities to obtain efficient coordination between them, and an operator's time can be shared by several operations at the same time to make full use of the operator. Setups are explicitly modeled following our previous work, with additional penalties on excessive setups to reduce setup costs and avoid possible scraps. An integer formulation with a separable structure is developed to maximize on-time delivery of products, low inventory and small number of setups. Within the Lagrangian relaxation framework, the problem is decomposed into individual subproblems that are effectively solved by using dynamic programming with additional penalties embedded in state transitions. Heuristics is then developed to obtain a feasible schedule following on our previous work with new mechanism to satisfy operator capacity constraints. The method has been implemented using the object-oriented programming language C++ with a user-friendly interface, and numerical testing shows that the method generates high quality schedules in a timely fashion. Through simultaneous consideration of machines and operators, machines and operators are well coordinated to facilitate the smooth flow of

  13. Nanoimprint wafer and mask tool progress and status for high volume semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoichi; Seki, Junichi; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuki; Azuma, Hisanobu; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Sato, Chiaki; Sakai, Fumio; Takabayashi, Yukio; Aghili, Ali; Mizuno, Makoto; Choi, Jin; Jones, Chris E.

    2016-10-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. There are many criteria that determine whether a particular technology is ready for wafer manufacturing. Defectivity and mask life play a significant role relative to meeting the cost of ownership (CoO) requirements in the production of semiconductor devices. Hard particles on a wafer or mask create the possibility of inducing a permanent defect on the mask that can impact device yield and mask life. By using material methods to reduce particle shedding and by introducing an air curtain system, the lifetime of both the master mask and the replica mask can be extended. In this work, we report results that demonstrate a path towards achieving mask lifetimes of better than 1000 wafers. On the mask side, a new replication tool, the FPA-1100 NR2 is introduced. Mask replication is required for nanoimprint lithography (NIL), and criteria that are crucial to the success of a replication platform include both particle control, resolution and image placement accuracy. In this paper we discuss the progress made in both feature resolution and in meeting the image placement specification for replica masks.

  14. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume III. Energy data on 15 selected states' manufacturing subsector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-11-01

    An examination is made of the current and future energy demands, and uses, and cost to characterize typical applications and resulting services in the US and industrial sectors of 15 selected states. Volume III presents tables containing data on selected states' manufacturing subsector energy consumption, functional uses, and cost in 1974 and 1976. Alabama, California, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin were chosen as having the greatest potential for replacing conventional fuel with solar energy. Basic data on the quantities, cost, and types of fuel and electric energy purchased by industr for heat and power were obtained from the 1974 and 1976 Annual Survey of Manufacturers. The specific indutrial energy servic cracteristics developed for each selected state include. 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electricity consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuel consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector average cost of purchsed fuels and electricity per million Btu by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electric energy intensity by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); manufacturing subsector average annual growth rates of (1) fuels and electricity consumption, (2) fuels and electric energy intensity, and (3) average cost of purchased fuels and electricity (1974 to 1976). Data are compiled on purchased fuels, distillate fuel oil, residual ful oil, coal, coal, and breeze, and natural gas. (MCW)

  15. Consequences for designer and manufacturer of mechanical components due to future requirements in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans-Joachim, Frank [Siemens/ SNP-NDM1, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of European harmonization, a lot of changes on requirements for designer and manufacturer of mechanical components have been performed. Differed organizations are involved in preparing future requirements for nuclear application. On one side the French German cooperation on the development of EPR. At the origin of this project was the common decision in 1989 of Framatome and Siemens to cooperate through NPI, to design the Nuclear Island, which meets the future needs of utilities. EDF and a group of the main German Utilities joined this cooperation in 1991 and since then they have been totally involved to the progress of the work. In addition, all the process was backed up to the end by the strong cooperation between the French and the German. Safety Authorities, which have a long lasting cooperation to define common requirements, which have to be applied to future Nuclear Power Plants. Furthermore an organization has been set up to elaborate common codes related to the EPR design, at the level of the French design and construction rules (RCC) or the German KTA safety standards, the so-called EPR technical codes (ETC). On the other side, the European utilities co-operate on a much broader basis for the establishment of European Utilities Requirements (EUR). These requirements are prepared by a group of European utilities that represent the major European electricity generating companies that are determined to keep the nuclear option open. The technical requirements specified in the EUR document define the boundaries in which future plants need to be designed in order to be acceptable for the needs of the utilities and in order to fulfill the basic requirements of competitive power generation costs and licensability in all countries represented in the EUR group. All the new requirements have to be applied by designer and manufacturer. Siemens /SNP act as a designer of a lot of various vessels and tanks, heat exchangers and other items of process

  16. Consequences for designer and manufacturer of mechanical components due to future requirements in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans-Joachim, Frank [Siemens/ SNP-NDM1, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of European harmonization, a lot of changes on requirements for designer and manufacturer of mechanical components have been performed. Differed organizations are involved in preparing future requirements for nuclear application. On one side the French German cooperation on the development of EPR. At the origin of this project was the common decision in 1989 of Framatome and Siemens to cooperate through NPI, to design the Nuclear Island, which meets the future needs of utilities. EDF and a group of the main German Utilities joined this cooperation in 1991 and since then they have been totally involved to the progress of the work. In addition, all the process was backed up to the end by the strong cooperation between the French and the German. Safety Authorities, which have a long lasting cooperation to define common requirements, which have to be applied to future Nuclear Power Plants. Furthermore an organization has been set up to elaborate common codes related to the EPR design, at the level of the French design and construction rules (RCC) or the German KTA safety standards, the so-called EPR technical codes (ETC). On the other side, the European utilities co-operate on a much broader basis for the establishment of European Utilities Requirements (EUR). These requirements are prepared by a group of European utilities that represent the major European electricity generating companies that are determined to keep the nuclear option open. The technical requirements specified in the EUR document define the boundaries in which future plants need to be designed in order to be acceptable for the needs of the utilities and in order to fulfill the basic requirements of competitive power generation costs and licensability in all countries represented in the EUR group. All the new requirements have to be applied by designer and manufacturer. Siemens /SNP act as a designer of a lot of various vessels and tanks, heat exchangers and other items of process

  17. Automated High-Volume Manufacturing of Modular Photovoltaic Panel Assemblies for Space Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS) will focus the proposed SBIR Phase 2 program on the development and demonstration of an automated robotic manufacturing...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4240 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... certify their stationary SI ICE using the certification procedures required in 40 CFR part 1048, subpart C... other requirements for new nonroad SI engines in 40 CFR part 90 or 40 CFR part 1054, and manufacturers... stationary SI ICE using the certification procedures required in 40 CFR part 90, subpart B, or 40 CFR...

  19. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems. Volume 3: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Facilities and equipment are defined for refining processes to commercial grade of lunar material that is delivered to a 'space manufacturing facility' in beneficiated, primary processed quality. The manufacturing facilities and the equipment for producing elements of large space systems from these materials and providing programmatic assessments of the concepts are also defined. In-space production processes of solar cells (by vapor deposition) and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, converters, and others are described.

  20. SLAM: a fast high volume additive manufacturing concept by impact welding; application to Ti6Al4V alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentzel, C.M.; Carton, E.P.; Kloosterman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Against the manufacturing requirement for both lower lead time and reduced machining time for titanium components, a new concept was conceived assembling sheet material and other stock into semi finished parts by (explosive) impact welding. It is believed that this concept (which we named SLAM) coul

  1. SLAM: a fast high volume additive manufacturing concept by impact welding; application to Ti6Al4V alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentzel, C.M.; Carton, E.P.; Kloosterman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Against the manufacturing requirement for both lower lead time and reduced machining time for titanium components, a new concept was conceived assembling sheet material and other stock into semi finished parts by (explosive) impact welding. It is believed that this concept (which we named SLAM) coul

  2. Requirements for blood and blood components intended for transfusion or for further manufacturing use. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the regulations applicable to blood and blood components, including Source Plasma, to make the donor eligibility and testing requirements more consistent with current practices in the blood industry, to more closely align the regulations with current FDA recommendations, and to provide flexibility to accommodate advancing technology. In order to better assure the safety of the nation's blood supply and to help protect donor health, FDA is revising the requirements for blood establishments to test donors for infectious disease, and to determine that donors are eligible to donate and that donations are suitable for transfusion or further manufacture. FDA is also requiring establishments to evaluate donors for factors that may adversely affect the safety, purity, and potency of blood and blood components or the health of a donor during the donation process. Accordingly, these regulations establish requirements for donor education, donor history, and donor testing. These regulations also implement a flexible framework to help both FDA and industry to more effectively respond to new or emerging infectious agents that may affect blood product safety.

  3. Regulatory requirements in the good manufacturing practice production of an epithelial cell graft for ocular surface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth-Shah, Radhika; Vernon, Amanda J; Seetharaman, Shankar; Neale, Michael H; Daniels, Julie T

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, stem cell therapy has been increasingly employed for the treatment of various diseases. Subsequently, there has been a great interest in the manufacture of stem cells under good manufacturing practice, which is required by law for their use in humans. The cells for sight Stem Cell Therapy Research Unit, based at UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, delivers somatic cell-based and tissue-engineered therapies to patients suffering from blinding eye diseases at Moorfields Eye Hospital (London, UK). The following article is based on our experience in the conception, design, construction, validation and manufacturing within a good manufacturing practice manufacturing facility based in the UK. As such the regulations can be extrapolated to the 28 members stated within the EU. However, the principles may have a broad relevance outside the EU.

  4. 77 FR 56554 - Revisions to the Requirements for Authority to Manufacture and Distribute Postage Evidencing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... for Authority to Manufacture and Distribute Postage Evidencing Systems AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM... 501--AUTHORIZATION TO MANUFACTURE AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS 0 1. The authority... Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) to reflect recommended changes in Sarbanes-Oxley...

  5. 40 CFR 1054.625 - What requirements apply under the Transition Program for Equipment Manufacturers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... described in this paragraph (c)(2) and make them available to the engine manufacturer for any auditing under... assurance from equipment manufacturers or your authorized distributors that they need a certain number of...

  6. Habitat and logistic support requirements for the initiation of a space manufacturing enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajk, J. P.; Engel, J. H.; Shettler, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed scenario for the initiation of a space manufacturing enterprise using lunar materials to construct solar power satellites (SPS) was developed, with particular attention to habitat design and logistic support requirements. If SPS's can be constructed exclusively from lunar materials, the entire enterprise can be initiated in a 7 year period of launch activity (beginning as early as 1985) using the Space Shuttle and a low-cost, Shuttle-derived heavy lift vehicle. If additional chemical feedstocks must be imported from earth in significant quantities, it may be necessary to bring the next-generation launch vehicle (single-stage-to-orbit) into operation by 1991. The scenario presented features use of the mass-driver reaction engine for orbit-to-orbit transfer of cargos and makes extensive use of the expendable Shuttle external propellant tanks.

  7. 21 CFR 111.205 - What is the requirement to establish a master manufacturing record?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturing record? 111.205 Section 111.205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process...

  8. Modular Exhaust Design and Manufacturing Techniques for Low Cost Mid Volume Rapid Buidl to Order Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-06

    acoustic model into the give space claim. The current plan is to use parametric solid models generated from SolidWorks as the basis of the...manufacturing models. Parametric elements will be generated which are easily modifiable and easy to mate together. The SolidWorks API will then be used

  9. Updated Proposal for a Guide for Quality Management Systems for PV Manufacturing. Supplemental Requirements to ISO 9001-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramu, Govind [Sun Power, San Jose, CA (United States); Yamamichi, Masaaki [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST); Zhou, Wei [Trina Solar, San Jose, CA (United States); Mikonowicz, Alex [Powermark, Dallas, TX (United States); Lokanath, Sumanth [First Solar, Tempe, AZ (United States); Eguchi, Yoshihito [Mitsui Chemical, Rye Brook, NY (United States); Norum, Paul [Amonix, Seal Beach, CA (United States); Kurtz, Sarah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this Technical Specification is to provide a guideline for manufacturers of photovoltaic (PV) modules to produce modules that, once the design is proven to meet the quality and reliability requirements, replicate the design on an industrial scale without compromising its consistency with the requirements.

  10. 48 CFR 52.225-24 - Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act-Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements....225-24 Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods—Buy American Act...: Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods—Buy American...

  11. MODIS. Volume 1: MODIS level 1A software baseline requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, Edward; Fleig, Albert; Ardanuy, Philip; Goff, Thomas; Carpenter, Lloyd; Solomon, Carl; Storey, James

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the level 1A software requirements for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. This includes internal and external requirements. Internal requirements include functional, operational, and data processing as well as performance, quality, safety, and security engineering requirements. External requirements include those imposed by data archive and distribution systems (DADS); scheduling, control, monitoring, and accounting (SCMA); product management (PM) system; MODIS log; and product generation system (PGS). Implementation constraints and requirements for adapting the software to the physical environment are also included.

  12. 22 CFR 124.7 - Information required in all manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... should be described by military nomenclature, contract number, National Stock Number, nameplate data, or... specifically identify the countries or areas in which manufacturing, production, processing, sale or other...

  13. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 2, chapters 7-14 and appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Production and support equipment specifications are described for the space manufacturing facility (SMF). Defined production equipment includes electromagnetic pumps for liquid metal, metal alloying furnaces, die casters, electron beam welders and cutters, glass forming for structural elements, and rolling. A cost analysis is presented which includes the development, the aquisition of all SMF elements, initial operating cost, maintenance and logistics cost, cost of terrestrial materials, and transportation cost for each major element. Computer program listings and outputs are appended.

  14. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 46, CPDR review package. Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.M. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This preliminary design reviews the overall design package for the magnet system. It is mostly presented in viewgraphs. The lengthy presentation took up two full days. Sections are given on TF SDD, TF magnet specifications, TF interface definition, drawing tree and design control, winding pack design, manufacturing, coil setup for VPI, TPX TF magnet assembly, TF materials and processes, quality assurance and test requirements, coil verification testing, TPX acceptance tools, and planning tools.

  15. Operation and control of flow manufacturing based on constraints management for high-mix/low-volume production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zailin GUAN; Yunfang PENG; Li MA; Chaoyong ZHANG; Peigen LI

    2008-01-01

    The existing technology of flow manufacturing, which is mainly appropriate for high volume and repetitive production, is proven difficult to be applied in high-mix/ low-volume environments. To adapt lean production into the latter, a new type of flow manufacturing is proposed based on flow path management technology. This paper first describes the general operation framework of the pro-posed new mode. The main idea is the dynamic formation of adaptable virtual production lines (called flow paths) corresponding to different product families. The applica-tion of different theories of constraints/drum-buffer-rope (TOC/DBR) control policies depends on the differences in scope of variety and scale of demand for these product families. The overall architecture of the proposed mech-anism of constraint management-based operation and con-trol is introduced. For the implementation, a mathematical programming method is suggested for the dynamic plan-ning of flow paths, and a TOC/DBR 'path-specific' mech-anism with group scheduling is used for the control over each flow path. We also study other critical issues including the identification and management of resource bottlenecks, and the setting of the buffer size in the deployment of the TOC/DBR mechanism.

  16. CONWIP versus POLCA: A comparative analysis in a high-mix, low-volume (HMLV manufacturing environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Frazee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Few studies comparing manufacturing control systems as they relate to high-mix, low-volume applications have been reported. This paper compares two strategies, constant work in process (CONWIP and Paired-cell Overlapping Loops of Cards with Authorization (POLCA, for controlling work in process (WIP in such a manufacturing environment. Characteristics of each control method are explained in regards to lead time impact and thus, why one may be advantageous over the other. Design/methodology/approach: An industrial system in the Photonics industry is studied. Discrete event simulation is used as the primary tool to compare performance of CONWIP and POLCA controls for the same WIP level with respect to lead time. Model verification and validation are accomplished by comparing historic data to simulation generated data including utilizations. Both deterministic and Poisson distributed order arrivals are considered.  Findings: For the system considered in this case study, including order arrival patterns, a POLCA control can outperform a CONWIP parameter in terms of average lead time for a given level of WIP. At higher levels of WIP, the performance of POLCA and CONWIP is equivalent.  Practical Implications: The POLCA control helps limit WIP in specific áreas of the system where the CONWIP control only limits the overall WIP in the system. Thus, POLCA can generate acceptably low lead times at lower levels of WIP for conditions equivalent to the HMLV manufacturing systems studied. Originality/value: The study compliments and extends previous studies of  CONWIP and POLCA performance to a HMLV manufacturing environment. It demonstrates the utility of discrete event simulation in that regard. It shows that proper inventory controls in bottleneck áreas of a system can reduce average lead time.

  17. Rapid die manufacturing - high pressure casting of low volume non ferrous metals components

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pereira, MFV

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Pressure Casting of Low Volume Non Ferrous Metals Components Date: 2 November 2006 Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Introduction to RPT • Rapid Prototyping Techniques (RPT) generally used for non functional prototypes • RPT...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4241 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gas applications. The label must be added according to the labeling requirements specified in 40 CFR... a gas chromatograph as allowed under 40 CFR 1065.267 and may measure ethane, as well as methane, for... stationary SI engines as certified or non-certified engines. (d) Manufacturers of natural gas...

  19. Back-end interconnection. A generic concept for high volume manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosman, J.; Budel, T.; De Kok, C.J.G.M.

    2013-10-15

    The general method to realize series connection in thin film PV modules is monolithical interconnection through a sequence of laser scribes (P1, P2 and P3) and layer depositions. This method however implies that the deposition processes are interrupted several times, an undesirable situation in high volume processing. In order to eliminate this drawback we focus our developments on the so called 'back-end interconnection concept' in which series interconnection takes place AFTER the deposition of the functional layers of the thin film PV device. The process of making a back-end interconnection combines laser scribing, curing, sintering and inkjet processes. These different processes interacts with each other and are investigated in order to create processing strategies that are robust to ensure high volume production. The generic approach created a technology base that can be applied to any thin film PV technology.

  20. 48 CFR 52.225-23 - Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act-Construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act-Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements. 52....225-23 Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods—Buy American Act—Construction... American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods—Buy American Act—Construction Materials Under Trade...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4242 - What other requirements must I meet if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or equipment containing stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer of equipment containing such engines? 60.4242... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Compliance Requirements for Manufacturers § 60.4242 What other...

  2. Normative price for a manufactured product: the SAMICS methodology. Volume II. Analysis. JPL publication 78-98. [Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, R.G.

    1979-01-15

    The Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS) provide standard formats, data, assumptions, and procedures for determining the price a hypothetical solar array manufacturer would have to be able to obtain in the market to realize a specified after-tax rate of return on equity for a specified level of production. This document presents the methodology and its theoretical background. It is contended that the model is sufficiently general to be used in any production-line manufacturing environment. Implementation of this methodology by the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation computer program (SAMIS III, Release 1) is discussed.

  3. Recent experience with design and manufacture of cine lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Michael D.; Dalzell, Kristen E.

    2015-09-01

    Modern cine lenses require a high degree of aberration correction over a large and ever expanding image size. At low to medium volume production levels, these highly corrected designs also require a workable tolerance set and compensation scheme for successful manufacture. In this paper we discuss the design and manufacture of cine lenses with reference to current designs both internal and in the patent literature and some experience in design, tolerancing and manufacturing these lenses in medium volume production.

  4. Highspeed manufacturing of periodical surface and in-volume nanostructures by fs-laser direct writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottmann, J.; Wortmann, D.; Brandt, N.

    2008-02-01

    Sub wavelength ripples (spacing glass fiber laser (τ=400fs, λ=1045nm, f=0.1-5MHz) over the surface of various materials like amorphous Nd:Gd 3Ga 5O 12 films 1 μm in thickness on YAG substrates, diamond, polytetrafluoroethylene, LiF, MgF II, ZBLAN, Al IIO 3, LiNbO 3, SiO II, Si, Cu and Au. The ripple patterns extend coherently over many overlapping laser pulses and scanning tracks. Investigated are the dependence of the ripple spacing Λ on the material, the lateral distance of the laser pulses, the N.A. of the focussing optics, the repetition rate and the applied wavelength. The ripples are characterised using electron microscopy. Some possible models for the origin of the ripple growth are discussed. New results concerning the scaling of the production process using a high repetition rate laser and a fast translation stage are demonstrated. The cross-sections of the ripples are investigated using electron microscopy. A very large aspect ration of ~10 is observed for the periodical nanostructures in fused silica. Using in-volume selective laser etching (ISLE) of sapphire results in deep hollow nanoplanes ~200 nm in width and up to 1 mm in length. Microchannels have been produced using in-volume selective laser etching with a scanning speed of 1 mm/s.

  5. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements, volume 2, book 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    The objective of the systems engineering task was to develop and implement an approach that would generate the required study products as defined by program directives. This product list included a set of system and subsystem requirements, a complete set of optimized trade studies and analyses resulting in a recommended system configuration, and the definition of an integrated system/technology and advanced development growth path. A primary ingredient in the approach was the TQM philosophy stressing job quality from the inception. Included throughout the Systems Engineering, Programmatics, Concepts, Flight Design, and Technology sections are data supporting the original objectives as well as supplemental information resulting from program activities. The primary result of the analyses and studies was the recommendation of a single propulsion stage Lunar Transportation System (LTS) configuration that supports several different operations scenarios with minor element changes. This concept has the potential to support two additional scenarios with complex element changes. The space based LTS concept consists of three primary configurations--Piloted, Reusable Cargo, and Expendable Cargo.

  6. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    The objectives of the Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) Concepts and Requirements studies were to provide sensitivity data on usage, economics, and technology associated with new space transportation systems. The study was structured to utilize data on the emerging launch vehicles, the latest mission scenarios, and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) payload manifesting and schedules, to define a flexible, high performance, cost effective, evolutionary space transportation system for NASA. Initial activities were to support the MSFC effort in the preparation of inputs to the 90 Day Report to the National Space Council (NSC). With the results of this study establishing a point-of-departure for continuing the STV studies in 1990, additional options and mission architectures were defined. The continuing studies will update and expand the parametrics, assess new cargo and manned ETO vehicles, determine impacts on the redefined Phase 0 Space Station Freedom, and to develop a design that encompasses adequate configuration flexibility to ensure compliance with on-going NASA study recommendations with major system disconnects. In terms of general requirements, the objectives of the STV system and its mission profiles will address crew safety and mission success through a failure-tolerant and forgiving design approach. These objectives were addressed through the following: engine-out capability for all mission phases; built-in-test for vehicle health monitoring to allow testing of all critical functions such as, verification of lunar landing and ascent engines before initiating the landing sequence; critical subsystems will have multiple strings for redundancy plus adequate supplies of onboard spares for removal and replacement of failed items; crew radiation protection; and trajectories that optimize lunar and Mars performance and flyby abort capabilities.

  7. Changes in production control required for untended operation of a flexible manufacturing cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, Jannes; Stecke, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines and improves the production control system of a firm that wants to operate its flexible manufacturing cell (FMC) in an untended third shift. The FMC consists of a machining centre, a pallet storage, a rail-guided transport vehicle for pallets and a clamping/unclamping station.

  8. Changes in production control required for untended operation of a flexible manufacturing cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, Jannes; Stecke, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines and improves the production control system of a firm that wants to operate its flexible manufacturing cell (FMC) in an untended third shift. The FMC consists of a machining centre, a pallet storage, a rail-guided transport vehicle for pallets and a clamping/unclamping station.

  9. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 3: Package evaluation, modification and hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The software package evaluation was designed to analyze commercially available, field-proven, production control or manufacturing resource planning management technology and software package. The analysis was conducted by comparing SRB production control software requirements and conceptual system design to software package capabilities. The methodology of evaluation and the findings at each stage of evaluation are described. Topics covered include: vendor listing; request for information (RFI) document; RFI response rate and quality; RFI evaluation process; and capabilities versus requirements.

  10. Long-Term Support for High-Volume Manufacturing Industry: The Centre for Achievement in Manufacturing and Management, University of Sunderland, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Dennis; Terry, Brian

    1996-01-01

    A unique partnership of industry, government, and the University of Sunderland involves a holistic approach to manufacturing, integrating efficiency with quality of life for a profitable and sustainable competitive advantage. (SK)

  11. Long-Term Support for High-Volume Manufacturing Industry: The Centre for Achievement in Manufacturing and Management, University of Sunderland, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Dennis; Terry, Brian

    1996-01-01

    A unique partnership of industry, government, and the University of Sunderland involves a holistic approach to manufacturing, integrating efficiency with quality of life for a profitable and sustainable competitive advantage. (SK)

  12. Current good manufacturing practices, quality control procedures, quality factors, notification requirements, and records and reports, for infant formula. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that adopts, with some modifications, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled "Current Good Manufacturing Practices, Quality Control Procedures, Quality Factors, Notification Requirements, and Records and Reports, for Infant Formula'' (February 10, 2014). This final rule affirms the IFR's changes to FDA's regulations and provides additional modifications and clarifications. The final rule also responds to certain comments submitted in response to the request for comments in the IFR.

  13. Vascular refilling is independent of volume overload in hemodialysis with moderate ultrafiltration requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Susanne; Schneditz, Daniel; Leimbach, Til; Aign, Sabine; Kron, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Blood volume changes and vascular refilling during hemodialysis (HD) and ultrafiltration (UF) have been assumed to depend on volume overload (Vo ). It was the aim to study the magnitude of vascular refilling in stable HD patients with moderate volume expansion in everyday dialysis using novel technical approaches. Methods Patients were studied during routine dialysis and UF based on clinical dry weight assessment. Pre-dialysis Vo was independently measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy. Vascular refilling volume (Vref ) was calculated as: Vref  = Vuf  - ΔV, where ΔV is the absolute blood volume change determined by on-line dialysate dilution using a commercial on-line hemodiafiltration machine incorporating a relative blood volume monitor, and where Vuf is the prescribed UF volume. Findings Thirty patients (dry weight: 81.0 ± 17.8 kg) were studied. Pre-dialysis Vo was 2.46 ± 1.45 L. Vuf was 2.27 ± 0.71 L, specific UF rate was 6.45 ± 2.43 mL/kg/h, and since ΔV was 0.66 ± 0.31 L, Vref was determined as 1.61 ± 0.58 L, corresponding to a constant refilling fraction (Fref ) of 70.6 ± 10.6%. Vref strongly correlated with Vuf (r(2)  = 0.82) but was independent of Vo and other volumes. Fref was also independent of Vo and other volumes normalized for various measures of body size. Discussion While vascular refilling and Fref is independent of Vo in treatments with moderate UF requirements, intravascular volume depletion increases with increasing UF requirements. The relationship between blood volume and Vo needs to be more closely examined in further studies to optimize volume control in everyday dialysis.

  14. 48 CFR 52.225-22 - Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act-Construction Materials. 52.225-22 Section 52... Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods—Buy American Act—Construction Materials. As prescribed in 25.1102(e), insert the following provision: Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel,...

  15. Light sources for high-volume manufacturing EUV lithography: technology, performance, and power scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkov, Igor; Brandt, David; Ershov, Alex; Schafgans, Alexander; Tao, Yezheng; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Rokitski, Slava; Kats, Michael; Vargas, Michael; Purvis, Michael; Rafac, Rob; La Fontaine, Bruno; De Dea, Silvia; LaForge, Andrew; Stewart, Jayson; Chang, Steven; Graham, Matthew; Riggs, Daniel; Taylor, Ted; Abraham, Mathew; Brown, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is expected to succeed in 193-nm immersion multi-patterning technology for sub-10-nm critical layer patterning. In order to be successful, EUV lithography has to demonstrate that it can satisfy the industry requirements in the following critical areas: power, dose stability, etendue, spectral content, and lifetime. Currently, development of second-generation laser-produced plasma (LPP) light sources for the ASML's NXE:3300B EUV scanner is complete, and first units are installed and operational at chipmaker customers. We describe different aspects and performance characteristics of the sources, dose stability results, power scaling, and availability data for EUV sources and also report new development results.

  16. Precision manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Today there is a high demand for high-precision products. The manufacturing processes are now highly sophisticated and derive from a specialized genre called precision engineering. Precision Manufacturing provides an introduction to precision engineering and manufacturing with an emphasis on the design and performance of precision machines and machine tools, metrology, tooling elements, machine structures, sources of error, precision machining processes and precision process planning. As well as discussing the critical role precision machine design for manufacturing has had in technological developments over the last few hundred years. In addition, the influence of sustainable manufacturing requirements in precision processes is introduced. Drawing upon years of practical experience and using numerous examples and illustrative applications, David Dornfeld and Dae-Eun Lee cover precision manufacturing as it applies to: The importance of measurement and metrology in the context of Precision Manufacturing. Th...

  17. Detailed requirements document for the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The detailed requirements for phase 1 (online fund control, subauthorization accounting, and accounts receivable functional capabilities) of the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS) are described. This includes information on the following: systems requirements, performance requirements, test requirements, and production implementation. Most of the work is centered on systems requirements, and includes discussions on the following processes: resources authority, allotment, primary work authorization, reimbursable order acceptance, purchase request, obligation, cost accrual, cost distribution, disbursement, subauthorization performance, travel, accounts receivable, payroll, property, edit table maintenance, end-of-year, backup input. Other subjects covered include: external systems interfaces, general inquiries, general report requirements, communication requirements, and miscellaneous. Subjects covered under performance requirements include: response time, processing volumes, system reliability, and accuracy. Under test requirements come test data sources, general test approach, and acceptance criteria. Under production implementation come data base establishment, operational stages, and operational requirements.

  18. Manufacturing and test of 2G-HTS coils for rotating machines: Challenges, conductor requirements, realization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oomen, Marijn, E-mail: marijn.oomen@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT T DE HW4, PO Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Herkert, Werner; Bayer, Dietmar; Kummeth, Peter; Nick, Wolfgang; Arndt, Tabea [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT T DE HW4, PO Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the use of 2nd-generation High-Temperature Superconductors (2G-HTSs) in the rotors of electrical motors and generators. For these devices the conductor must be wound into robust impregnated coils, which are operated in vacuum at temperatures around 30 K, in strong magnetic fields of about 2T. Differences in thermal contraction between the coil former, conductor constituents, impregnation resin, bandage and heat-sink materials (assembled at room temperature) cause mechanical stresses at operating temperature. Rotating-machine operation adds Lorentz forces and challenging centripetal accelerations up to thousands of g. Second generation-HTS conductors withstand large tensile stresses in axial direction and compression in normal direction. However, shear stresses, axial compression, and tension normal to the conductor can cause degradation in superconducting properties. Such stresses can be mitigated by correct choice of materials, coil lay-out and manufacturing process. A certain stress level will remain, which the conductor must withstand. We have manufactured many impregnated round and race-track coils, using different 2G-HTS conductors, and tested them at temperatures from 25 K to 77 K. Degradation of the superconductor in early coils was traced to the mentioned differences in thermal contraction, and was completely avoided in coils produced later. We will discuss appropriate coil-winding techniques to assure robust and reliable superconductor performance.

  19. Manufacturing and test of 2G-HTS coils for rotating machines: Challenges, conductor requirements, realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, Marijn; Herkert, Werner; Bayer, Dietmar; Kummeth, Peter; Nick, Wolfgang; Arndt, Tabea

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the use of 2nd-generation High-Temperature Superconductors (2G-HTSs) in the rotors of electrical motors and generators. For these devices the conductor must be wound into robust impregnated coils, which are operated in vacuum at temperatures around 30 K, in strong magnetic fields of about 2T. Differences in thermal contraction between the coil former, conductor constituents, impregnation resin, bandage and heat-sink materials (assembled at room temperature) cause mechanical stresses at operating temperature. Rotating-machine operation adds Lorentz forces and challenging centripetal accelerations up to thousands of g. Second generation-HTS conductors withstand large tensile stresses in axial direction and compression in normal direction. However, shear stresses, axial compression, and tension normal to the conductor can cause degradation in superconducting properties. Such stresses can be mitigated by correct choice of materials, coil lay-out and manufacturing process. A certain stress level will remain, which the conductor must withstand. We have manufactured many impregnated round and race-track coils, using different 2G-HTS conductors, and tested them at temperatures from 25 K to 77 K. Degradation of the superconductor in early coils was traced to the mentioned differences in thermal contraction, and was completely avoided in coils produced later. We will discuss appropriate coil-winding techniques to assure robust and reliable superconductor performance.

  20. Computers in engineering 1983; Proceedings of the International Conference and Exhibit, Chicago, IL, August 7-11, 1983. Volume 1 - Computer-aided design, manufacturing, and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokonis, T. J.

    The papers presented in this volume provide examples of the impact of computers on present engineering practice and indicate some future trends in computer-aided design, manufacturing, and simulation. Topics discussed include computer-aided design of turbine cycle configuration, managing and development of engineering computer systems, computer-aided manufacturing with robots in the automotive industry, and computer-aided design/analysis techniques of composite materials in the cure phase. Papers are also presented on computer simulation of vehicular propulsion systems, the performance of a hydraulic system simulator in a CAD environment, and computer simulation of hovercraft heave dynamics and control.

  1. Quality control of cultured tissues requires tools for quantitative analyses of heterogeneous features developed in manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino-Oka, Masahiro; Takezawa, Yasunori; Taya, Masahito

    2009-02-01

    Tissue engineering and related technology have attracted a great deal of medical attention as promising fields for curing defective tissues in vivo. Nowadays, many companies have been established for supplying the reconstructed grafts of cultured tissues for transplantation. The manufacturing processes generally deals with the handlings of starter cells offered by patients (or donors) as raw materials to cultured tissues as products, requiring the construction of novel ex vivo methodologies based on principles different from conventional processes for chemical and pharmaceutical productions. In addition, the raw materials have heterogeneity depending on the state of patients and location of cell harvests, and the products possess spatial cell distribution in the three dimensional structure. These features request a unique strategy in manufacturing process accompanied with the quality control for raw materials and products. This review article describes the contribution of tissue bankers and biochemical engineers to the quality control of cultured tissues during manufacturing, introducing the advances in methodologies to evaluate spatial heterogeneity of cells (or aggregates) and matrices in cultured tissues.

  2. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 2: System requirements and conceptual description

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    In the development of the business system for the SRB automated production control system, special attention had to be paid to the unique environment posed by the space shuttle. The issues posed by this environment, and the means by which they were addressed, are reviewed. The change in management philosphy which will be required as NASA switches from one-of-a-kind launches to multiple launches is discussed. The implications of the assembly process on the business system are described. These issues include multiple missions, multiple locations and facilities, maintenance and refurbishment, multiple sources, and multiple contractors. The implications of these aspects on the automated production control system are reviewed including an assessment of the six major subsystems, as well as four other subsystem. Some general system requirements which flow through the entire business system are described.

  3. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van F.J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering. Desi

  4. Design and high-volume manufacture of low-cost molded IR aspheres for personal thermal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazny, A. L.; Walsh, K. F.; Deegan, J. P.; Bundschuh, B.; Patton, E. K.

    2015-05-01

    The demand for infrared optical elements, particularly those made of chalcogenide materials, is rapidly increasing as thermal imaging becomes affordable to the consumer. The use of these materials in conjunction with established lens manufacturing techniques presents unique challenges relative to the cost sensitive nature of this new market. We explore the process from design to manufacture, and discuss the technical challenges involved. Additionally, facets of the development process including manufacturing logistics, packaging, supply chain management, and qualification are discussed.

  5. 40 CFR 60.4239 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... engines in 40 CFR part 90 or 40 CFR part 1054, and manufacturers of stationary SI emergency engines that... I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines >19 KW (25 HP) that use gasoline or... manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines >19 KW (25 HP) that use gasoline or a manufacturer...

  6. 78 FR 4307 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice Requirements for Combination Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... streamlined regulatory framework for firms to use when demonstrating compliance with CGMP requirements for... framework that takes account of the fact that combination products are made up of drug, device, and biological product constituent parts. At the same time, commenters wanted to ensure that the framework...

  7. Synthesis from Design Requirements of a Hybrid System for Transport Aircraft Longitudinal Control. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Charles S.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Sherry, Lance

    2007-01-01

    Volume I of this report presents a new method for synthesizing hybrid systems directly from desi gn requirements, and applies the method to design of a hybrid system for longitudinal control of transport aircraft. The resulting system satisfies general requirement for safety and effectiveness specified a priori, enabling formal validation to be achieved. Volume II contains seven appendices intended to make the report accessible to readers with backgrounds in human factors, flight dynamics and control, and formal logic. Major design goals are (1) system design integrity based on proof of correctness at the design level, (2) significant simplification and cost reduction in system development and certification, and (3) improved operational efficiency, with significant alleviation of human-factors problems encountered by pilots in current transport aircraft. This report provides for the first time a firm technical basis for criteria governing design and certification of avionic systems for transport aircraft. It should be of primary interest to designers of next-generation avionic systems.

  8. 2 CFR 176.160 - Award term-Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods (covered under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... manufactured goods; (B) Unit of measure; (C) Quantity; (D) Cost; (E) Time of delivery or availability; (F.... (iii) The cost of iron, steel, or manufactured goods shall include all delivery costs to the..., Steel, and Manufactured Goods (covered under International Agreements)-Section 1605 of the American...

  9. MARA (Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter) system documentation. Volume 1: MARA system requirements document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C. L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA), a flexible airborne radar remote sensing facility developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is discussed. This volume describes the scientific justification for the development of the instrument and the translation of these scientific requirements into instrument design goals. Values for key instrument parameters are derived to accommodate these goals, and simulations and analytical models are used to estimate the developed system's performance.

  10. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 2) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Quality Assurance, Training and Qualification, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, and Construction.

  11. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 5) outlines the standards and requirements for the Fire Protection and Packaging and Transportation sections.

  12. High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 6) outlines the standards and requirements for the sections on: Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Research and Development and Experimental Activities, and Nuclear Safety.

  13. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 4) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Radiation Protection and Operations.

  14. High Volume Manufacturing of Silicon-Film Solar Cells and Modules; Final Subcontract Report, 26 February 2003 - 30 September 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, J. A.; Culik, J. S.

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the PV Manufacturing R&D subcontract was to continue to improve AstroPower's technology for manufacturing Silicon-Film* wafers, solar cells, and modules to reduce costs, and increase production yield, throughput, and capacity. As part of the effort, new technology such as the continuous back metallization screen-printing system and the laser scribing system were developed and implemented. Existing processes, such as the silicon nitride antireflection coating system and the fire-through process were optimized. Improvements were made to the statistical process control (SPC) systems of the major manufacturing processes: feedstock preparation, wafer growth, surface etch, diffusion, and the antireflection coating process. These process improvements and improved process control have led to an increase of 5% relative power, and nearly 15% relative improvement in mechanical and visual yield.

  15. Treatment of Wastewater from Electroplating, Metal Finishing and Printed Circuit Board Manufacturing. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants Volume 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    One of four manuals dealing with the operation of wastewater plants, this document was designed to address the treatment of wastewater from electroplating, metal finishing, and printed circuit board manufacturing. It emphasizes how to operate and maintain facilities which neutralize acidic and basic waters; treat waters containing metals; destroy…

  16. Micro Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing deals with systems that include products, processes, materials and production systems. These systems have functional requirements, constraints, design parameters and process variables. They must be decomposed in a systematic manner to achieve the best possible system performance....... If a micro manufacturing system isn’t designed rationally and correctly, it will be high-cost, unreliable, and not robust. For micro products and systems it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial production. As the products through product development...... processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing production technologies that make it possible to produce the products at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing. The micro/nano manufacturing programme at the Department of Manufacturing...

  17. Decision Making in Manufacturing Environment Using Graph Theory and Fuzzy Multiple Attribute Decision Making Methods Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, R Venkata

    2013-01-01

    Decision Making in Manufacturing Environment Using Graph Theory and Fuzzy Multiple Attribute Decision Making Methods presents the concepts and details of applications of MADM methods. A range of methods are covered including Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS), VIšekriterijumsko KOmpromisno Rangiranje (VIKOR), Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), Preference Ranking METHod for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE), ELimination Et Choix Traduisant la Realité (ELECTRE), COmplex PRoportional ASsessment (COPRAS), Grey Relational Analysis (GRA), UTility Additive (UTA), and Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA). The existing MADM methods are improved upon and three novel multiple attribute decision making methods for solving the decision making problems of the manufacturing environment are proposed. The concept of integrated weights is introduced in the proposed subjective and objective integrated weights (SOIW) method and the weighted Euclidean distance ba...

  18. Synthesis from Design Requirements of a Hybrid System for Transport Aircraft Longitudinal Control. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Charles S.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Sherry, Lance

    2007-01-01

    Volume I of this report presents a new method for synthesizing hybrid systems directly from design requirements, and applies the method to design of a hybrid system for longitudinal control of transport aircraft. The resulting system satisfies general requirement for safety and effectiveness specified a priori, enabling formal validation to be achieved. Volume II contains seven appendices intended to make the report accessible to readers with backgrounds in human factors, fli ght dynamics and control. and formal logic. Major design goals are (1) system desi g n integrity based on proof of correctness at the design level, (2), significant simplification and cost reduction in system development and certification, and (3) improved operational efficiency, with significant alleviation of human-factors problems encountered by pilots in current transport aircraft. This report provides for the first time a firm technical basis for criteria governing design and certification of avionic systems for transport aircraft. It should be of primary interest to designers of next-generation avionic systems.

  19. 13 CFR 127.505 - May a non-manufacturer submit an offer on an EDWOSB or WOSB requirement for supplies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May a non-manufacturer submit an offer on an EDWOSB or WOSB requirement for supplies? 127.505 Section 127.505 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WOMEN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS FEDERAL CONTRACT ASSISTANCE...

  20. Registration requirements for importers and manufacturers of prescription drug products containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or phenylpropanolamine. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is amending its registration regulations to ensure that a registration is obtained for every location where ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or phenylpropanolamine, or drug products containing one of these chemicals, are imported or manufactured. These amendments will make it possible to establish the system of quotas and assessment of annual needs for the importation and manufacture of these chemicals that Congress mandated in the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005.

  1. Southwest Project: resource/institutional requirements analysis. Volume III. Systems integration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormsby, L. S.; Sawyer, T. G.; Brown, Dr., M. L.; Daviet, II, L. L; Weber, E. R.; Brown, J. E.; Arlidge, J. W.; Novak, H. R.; Sanesi, Norman; Klaiman, H. C.; Spangenberg, Jr., D. T.; Groves, D. J.; Maddox, J. D.; Hayslip, R. M.; Ijams, G.; Lacy, R. G.; Montgomery, J.; Carito, J. A.; Ballance, J. W.; Bluemle, C. F.; Smith, D. N.; Wehrey, M. C.; Ladd, K. L.; Evans, Dr., S. K.; Guild, D. H.; Brodfeld, B.; Cleveland, J. A.; Hicks, K. L.; Noga, M. W.; Ross, A. M.

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide information to DOE which can be used to establish its plans for accelerated commercialization and market penetration of solar electric generating plants in the southwestern region of the United States. The area of interest includes Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The system integration study establishes the investment that utilities could afford to make in solar thermal, photovoltaic, and wind energy systems, and to assess the sensitivity of the break-even cost to critical variables including fuel escalation rates, fixed charge rates, load growth rates, cloud cover, number of sites, load shape, and energy storage. This information will be used as input to Volume IV, Institutional Studies, one objective of which will be to determine the incentives required to close the gap between the break-even investment for the utilities of the Southwest and the estimated cost of solar generation.

  2. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 32, Coil assembly documentation. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.M. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This document is intended to address the contract requirement for providing coil assembly documentation, as required in the applicable Statement of Work: `Provide preliminary procedures and preliminary design and supporting analysis of the equipment, fixtures, and hardware required to integrate and align the impregnated coil assemblies with the coil cases and intercoil structure. Each of the three major processes associated with the coil case and intercoil structure (ICS), TF Case Fabrication, Coil Preparation for Case Assembly are examined in detail. The specific requirements, processes, equipment, and technical concerns for each of these assembly processes is presented.

  3. Optimising a two-echelon capacity-constrained material requirement manufacturing system using a linear programming model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Delgado Hidalgo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A mixed integer linear programming model representing a two-echelon manufacturing system was implemented. Optimal deci- sions could be made about raw material/component provisioning by using the model. The model was programmed by using an algebraic modeller which was then integrated into a computational tool from which defining parameters could be managed as well as consulting the results once the model had been executed. The model was validated on a real manufacturing system; be- sides providing good representation of the system, optimal provisioning decisions were also reached. The article emphasises that such decisions cannot be made by using usual MRP reasoning.

  4. Process Planning and Scheduling Integration in an Open Manufacturing Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Ping; LIU Quan; ZHOU Zu-de; QUAN Shu-hai; FANG Ban-hang

    2009-01-01

    New open manufacturing environments have been proposed aiming at realizing more flexible distributed manufacturing paradigms, which can deal with not only dynamic changes in volume and variety of products, but also changes of machining equipments, dispersals of processing locations, and also with unscheduled disruptions. This research is to develop an integrated process planning and scheduling system, which is suited to this open, dynamic,distributed manufacturing environment. Multi-agent system (MAS) approaches are used for integration of manufacturing processing planning and scheduling in an open distributed manufacturing environment, in which process planning can be adjusted dynamically and manufacturing resources can increase/decrease according to the requirements. One kind of multi-level dynamic negotiated approaches to process planning and scheduling is presented for the integration of manufacturing process planning and scheduling.

  5. Manufacturing ontology through templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diciuc Vlad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry contains a high volume of knowhow and of high value, much of it being held by key persons in the company. The passing of this know-how is the basis of manufacturing ontology. Among other methods like advanced filtering and algorithm based decision making, one way of handling the manufacturing ontology is via templates. The current paper tackles this approach and highlights the advantages concluding with some recommendations.

  6. Manned remote work station development article. Volume 1, book 1: Flight article requirements. Appendix A: Mission requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The requirements for several configurations of flight articles are presented. These requirements provide the basis to design manned remote work station development test articles and establish tests and simulation objectives for the resolution of development issues. Mission system and subsystem requirements for four MRWS configurations included: open cherry picker; closed cherry picker; crane turret; and free flyer.

  7. Influence of Hospital Volume Effects and Minimum Caseload Requirements on Quality of Care in Pancreatic Surgery in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautz, Christian; Denz, Axel; Weber, Georg F; Grützmann, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Numerous international studies have identified hospital volume as significant independent variable of death following pancreatic surgery. Most of these studies were limited to regions of countries or portions of a national population and did not include data on volume-outcome effects in Germany. The Medline database was systematically searched to identify studies that analyzed volume-outcome relationships and effects of minimum caseload requirements on outcomes of pancreatic surgery in Germany. Recent observational studies utilizing German hospital discharge data confirmed that patients undergoing pancreatic surgery in Germany also have better outcomes when treated in facilities with high annual caseloads. Besides a decreased risk of in-hospital mortality, there is also a reduced risk of 1-year mortality in high-volume hospitals. In addition, there is evidence that adherence to already existing minimum caseload requirements reduces morbidity and mortality of pancreatic surgery in Germany. As a result of an insufficient centralization in the recent past, however, a large proportion of hospitals that perform pancreatic surgery still do not meet minimum caseload requirements. Specific measures (i.e. sanctions for failure to achieve minimum volumes) that initiate a sufficient centralization process without threatening patient access to surgical care are needed.

  8. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Manufacturing/producibility final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, A.J.; White, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    This Final MFTF-B Manufacturing/Producibility Report covers facilities, tooling plan, manufacturing sequence, schedule and performance, producibility, and lessons learned for the solenoid, axicell, and transition coils, as well as a deactivation plan, conclusions, references, and appendices.

  9. Measurement and Development of Humanware and Technoware Competencies in Order to Meet Pintle Chain Product Requirements in Bandung Manufacture Polytechnic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Jodi; Akbar, Muhammad; Irianto, Dradjad

    2016-02-01

    Politeknik Manufaktur Bandung (Bandung Manufacture Polytechnic) is a polytechnic education that is not only to educate their students, but also manufactures order from customers at its teaching factory. This polytechnic is usually not responsive with the number of reject due to amateur operators from newcomer students. However, customers will be displeased if the reject rate is too high which can cause delay of delivery. At the foundry section, pintle chain is a product that has the highest amount of quantity but the lowest product standard fulfilment. Realizing this problem, it is a strong need to give more focus on quality improvement. The polytechnic considers that bad quality is not only related to low level of humanware (operator) but also related to low level of technoware (machine and equipment). In this research, QFD model was used as a tool for identifying target of improvement of non conforming factors of humanware and technoware using UNESCAP's technometric model. An improvement was done by implementing new scheduling strategy at foundry unit in order to minimize waiting time from molding to pouring process because of deterioration problem. This strategy provides an opportunity to reduce completion times about 50% and waiting time about 95% compared to the existing scheduling strategy.

  10. Standard requirement of a microbiological quality control program for the manufacture of human mesenchymal stem cells for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Patricia; Clares, Beatriz; Bermejo, Maria; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2014-05-15

    The manufacturing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as cell-based products for clinical use should be performed with appropriate controls that ensure its safety and quality. The use of hMSCs in cell therapy has increased considerably in the past few years. In line with this, the assessment and management of contamination risks by microbial agents that could affect the quality of cells and the safety of patients have to be considered. It is necessary to implant a quality control program (QCP) covering the entire procedure of the ex vivo expansion, from the source of cells, starting materials, and reagents, such as intermediate products, to the final cellular medicine. We defined a QCP to detect microbiological contamination during manufacturing of autologous hMSCs for clinical application. The methods used include sterility test, Gram stain, detection of mycoplasma, endotoxin assay, and microbiological monitoring in process according to the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) and each analytical technique was validated in accordance with three different cell cultures. Results showed no microbiological contamination in any phases of the cultures, meeting all the acceptance criteria for sterility test, detection of mycoplasma and endotoxin, and environmental and staff monitoring. Each analytical technique was validated demonstrating the sensitivity, limit of detection, and robustness of the method. The quality and safety of MSCs must be controlled to ensure their final use in patients. The evaluation of the proposed QCP revealed satisfactory results in order to standardize this procedure for clinical use of cells.

  11. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS. VOLUME II. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LYNN, FRANK

    THE APPENDIXES FOR "AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, FINAL REPORT, VOLUME I" (VT 004 006) INCLUDE (1) TWO LETTERS FROM PLANT ENGINEERS STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, (2) A DESCRIPTION OF THE MAINTENANCE TRAINING SURVEY, A SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE,…

  12. MCM-C Multichip Module Manufacturing Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazek, R.J.; Kautz, D.R.; Galichia, J.V.

    2000-11-20

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) provides complete microcircuit capabilities from design layout through manufacturing and final electrical testing. Manufacturing and testing capabilities include design layout, electrical and mechanical computer simulation and modeling, circuit analysis, component analysis, network fabrication, microelectronic assembly, electrical tester design, electrical testing, materials analysis, and environmental evaluation. This document provides manufacturing guidelines for multichip module-ceramic (MCM-C) microcircuits. Figure 1 illustrates an example MCM-C configuration with the parts and processes that are available. The MCM-C technology is used to manufacture microcircuits for electronic systems that require increased performance, reduced volume, and higher density that cannot be achieved by the standard hybrid microcircuit or printed wiring board technologies. The guidelines focus on the manufacturability issues that must be considered for low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) network fabrication and MCM assembly and the impact that process capabilities have on the overall MCM design layout and product yield. Prerequisites that are necessary to initiate the MCM design layout include electrical, mechanical, and environmental requirements. Customer design data can be accepted in many standard electronic file formats. Other requirements include schedule, quantity, cost, classification, and quality level. Design considerations include electrical, network, packaging, and producibility; and deliverables include finished product, drawings, documentation, and electronic files.

  13. MCM-C Multichip Module Manufacturing Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazek, R.J.; Kautz, D.R.; Galichia, J.V.

    2000-11-20

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) provides complete microcircuit capabilities from design layout through manufacturing and final electrical testing. Manufacturing and testing capabilities include design layout, electrical and mechanical computer simulation and modeling, circuit analysis, component analysis, network fabrication, microelectronic assembly, electrical tester design, electrical testing, materials analysis, and environmental evaluation. This document provides manufacturing guidelines for multichip module-ceramic (MCM-C) microcircuits. Figure 1 illustrates an example MCM-C configuration with the parts and processes that are available. The MCM-C technology is used to manufacture microcircuits for electronic systems that require increased performance, reduced volume, and higher density that cannot be achieved by the standard hybrid microcircuit or printed wiring board technologies. The guidelines focus on the manufacturability issues that must be considered for low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) network fabrication and MCM assembly and the impact that process capabilities have on the overall MCM design layout and product yield. Prerequisites that are necessary to initiate the MCM design layout include electrical, mechanical, and environmental requirements. Customer design data can be accepted in many standard electronic file formats. Other requirements include schedule, quantity, cost, classification, and quality level. Design considerations include electrical, network, packaging, and producibility; and deliverables include finished product, drawings, documentation, and electronic files.

  14. A model for the design of computer integrated manufacturing systems: Identification of information requirements of decision makers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1990-01-01

    are developed to support production planning and control processes as they are found in the present organizations. In this case, the result has been the evolution of "islands of automation" and in the CIM literature, integration is widely discussed in terms of standardization of communication protocols...... processes and production planning in these cases involve decisions within several different work domains which are normally known in detail by different people. The cases are used to illustrate how an explicit representation of the means-ends relations of the work domain can be used to identify......A predominant interest in recent design research has been the development of a general model of the design process to formulate a framework within which support systems based on modern information technology can be developed. Similarly, for manufacturing systems, advanced information systems...

  15. Capability Framework for Sustainable Manufacturing of Sports Apparel and Footwear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enda Crossin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The sporting goods sector is characterized by large volumes of production, high levels of consumption and short product life cycles resulting in high disposal rates and waste. Manufacturing of sports products is distributed globally through tier-based supply chains and complex logistics systems. Companies within such supply chains have different levels of capability in sustainable manufacturing, which impacts on the sustainability of the overall business. Reducing environmental impacts is of particular concern for companies at present, due to heightened requirements for the reduction of energy and water consumption, waste and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. This article describes outcomes of a research project conducted in collaboration with a global sporting goods manufacturer that focused on the development of relevant capabilities across their supply chain for sustainable manufacturing of sports apparel and footwear. The article presents the developed sustainable manufacturing framework and capability assessment results obtained for selected companies within the supply chain of this global manufacturer in Asia.

  16. Manufacturing Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waid, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the manufacturing facilities. The Manufacturing Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in manufacturing planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the manufacturing process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  17. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

  18. 40 CFR 80.1429 - Requirements for separating RINs from volumes of renewable fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or biogas for which RINs have been generated in accordance with § 80.1426(f) must separate any RINs that have been assigned to that volume of renewable electricity or biogas if: (i) The party designates the electricity or biogas as transportation fuel; and (ii) The electricity or biogas is used...

  19. New Approach to Purging Monitoring Wells: Lower Flow Rates Reduce Required Purging Volumes and Sample Turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is generally accepted that monitoring wells must be purged to access formation water to obtain “representative” ground water quality samples. Historically anywhere from 3 to 5 well casing volumes have been removed prior to sample collection to evacuate the standing well water...

  20. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  1. Applicability of SREM to the Verification of Management Information System Software Requirements. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-30

    approach during R ,ET development is required during the verification effort. The approach used for verifying the MOM 3FER to prepare for TD . X was to...the value resident in TRACK NR is equal to the value resident in TRACK NR ’N. The portion of the VMH requirement described above requires tnat the

  2. 49 CFR 579.24 - Reporting requirements for manufacturers of 5,000 or more trailers annually.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... system, hydraulic, 04 service brake system, air, 05 parking brake, 11 electrical, 12 exterior lighting... with more than one type of service brake system (i.e., hydraulic and air), the information required by this subsection shall be reported by each of the two brake types (i.e., “H” for hydraulic, “A” for...

  3. Hypertonic/Hyperoncotic Resuscitation from Shock: Reduced Volume Requirement and Lower Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Volume 15, No. 4 ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS 433 INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE FOLLOWING RESUSCITATION FROM HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK John H. Whitley, Donald S. Prough, Michael ...SHOCK: COMPARISON OF FLUIDS John M. Whitley, PhD, Michael A. Olympio, MD, Donald S. Prough, MD Department of Anesthesia, Bowman Gray School of Medicine...fluid infused within the range of sodium and colloid concentrations examined in this study. In contrast, Gunnar et al.7’ 2 and Ducey et al.,8

  4. The normal increase in insulin after a meal may be required to prevent postprandial renal sodium and volume losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsik, Debra L; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie L; Staruschenko, Alexander; Brands, Michael W

    2017-06-01

    Despite the effects of insulinopenia in type 1 diabetes and evidence that insulin stimulates multiple renal sodium transporters, it is not known whether normal variation in plasma insulin regulates sodium homeostasis physiologically. This study tested whether the normal postprandial increase in plasma insulin significantly attenuates renal sodium and volume losses. Rats were instrumented with chronic artery and vein catheters, housed in metabolic cages, and connected to hydraulic swivels. Measurements of urine volume and sodium excretion (UNaV) over 24 h and the 4-h postprandial period were made in control (C) rats and insulin-clamped (IC) rats in which the postprandial increase in insulin was prevented. Twenty-four-hour urine volume (36 ± 3 vs. 15 ± 2 ml/day) and UNaV (3.0 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 mmol/day) were greater in the IC compared with C rats, respectively. Four hours after rats were given a gel meal, blood glucose and urine volume were greater in IC rats, but UNaV decreased. To simulate a meal while controlling blood glucose, C and IC rats received a glucose bolus that yielded peak increases in blood glucose that were not different between groups. Urine volume (9.7 ± 0.7 vs. 6.0 ± 0.8 ml/4 h) and UNaV (0.50 ± 0.08 vs. 0.20 ± 0.06 mmol/4 h) were greater in the IC vs. C rats, respectively, over the 4-h test. These data demonstrate that the normal increase in circulating insulin in response to hyperglycemia may be required to prevent excessive renal sodium and volume losses and suggest that insulin may be a physiological regulator of sodium balance. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 1: Study background and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The solid rocket boosters assembly environment is described in terms of the contraints it places upon an automated production control system. The business system generated for the SRB assembly and the computer system which meets the business system requirements are described. The selection software process and modifications required to the recommended software are addressed as well as the hardware and configuration requirements necessary to support the system.

  6. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 7. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 7) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Occupational Safety and Health, and Environmental Protection.

  7. Competitive Manufacturing Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rymaszewska, Anna; Christensen, Irene; Karlsson, Christer

    The increasing complexity of business environments and the pressure for organizations on delivering new products faster while maintaining the superior quality of their products, has forced manufacturing organizations to rethink their operations. Managers responsible for manufacturing ramp-up need...... to constantly improve this process in terms of time to volume, according to predefined cost and quality measures. The importance of the success of this process can lead to a significant creation of competitive advantage. This paper addresses the challenges of the manufacturing ramp-up process in the context...

  8. Competitive Manufacturing Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rymaszewska, Anna; Christensen, Irene; Karlsson, Christer

    The increasing complexity of business environments and the pressure for organizations on delivering new products faster while maintaining the superior quality of their products, has forced manufacturing organizations to rethink their operations. Managers responsible for manufacturing ramp-up need...... to constantly improve this process in terms of time to volume, according to predefined cost and quality measures. The importance of the success of this process can lead to a significant creation of competitive advantage. This paper addresses the challenges of the manufacturing ramp-up process in the context...... of lean improvements as well as organizational learning....

  9. Transaction-based building controls framework, Volume 2: Platform descriptive model and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyol, Bora A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haack, Jereme N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carpenter, Brandon J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lutes, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hernandez, George [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Transaction-based Building Controls (TBC) offer a control systems platform that provides an agent execution environment that meets the growing requirements for security, resource utilization, and reliability. This report outlines the requirements for a platform to meet these needs and describes an illustrative/exemplary implementation.

  10. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: User`s guide and input requirements. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. Volume II contains detailed instructions for code application and input data preparation.

  11. Southwest Project: resource/institutional requirements analysis. Volume IV. Institutional studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormsby, L. S.; Sawyer, T. G.; Brown, Dr., M. L.; Daviett, II, L. L.; Weber, E. R.; Brown, J. E.; Arlidge, J. W.; Novak, H. R.; Sanesi, Norman; Klaiman, H. C.; Spangenberg, Jr., D. T.; Groves, D. J.; Maddox, J. D.; Hayslip, R. M.; Ijams, G.; Lacy, R. G.; Montgomery, J.; Carito, J. A.; Ballance, J. W.; Bluemle, C. F.; Smith, D. N.; Wehrey, M. C.; Ladd, K. L.; Evans, Dr., S. K.; Guild, D. H.; Brodfield, B.; Cleveland, J. A.; Hicks, K. L.; Noga, M. W.; Ross, A. M.

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate ways to accelerate the commercialization of solar electric-generating plants and their expected market penetration into the electric utility network of the southwestern US through year 2000. The study was conducted primarily from a utility perspective and included the utility view of the technical, legal, economic, and institutional considerations necessary to make central-station generation of electricity from solar power commercially successful. No dispersed uses of solar electric generation were addressed. The report provides a basis from which periodic updates can be made to analyze the effect of economic trends and technology developments on utilization of solar and/or conventional electric generation as technology continues to progress in future years. The basis established in this report utilized current state-of-the-art technology for solar and conventional electric generating plants. Also, 1977 costs of conventional electric generating plants were utilized. The cost of first generation commercial solar electric generating plants was based on assumptions reflecting large-scale manufacturing of components by a mature industry.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF MATERIAL FLOW IN FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.V.S. BHASKAR,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Flexible manufacturing systems have evolved as a solution to efficient mid-volume production of a variety of part types with low setup time, low work-in-process, low inventory, short manufacturing lead time, high machine utilization and high quality. Flexible manufacturing system (FMS is a computer controlled manufacturing system composed of separate workstations that are inter-connected by automatic material handling system. FMS can produce a number of different parts concurrently. Each part requires different operations in a certain sequence and workstations can typically perform a variety of operations. In this work, a material and information flow analysis as well as an analysis of the department and machines layout is made using genetic algorithm and Tabu search. This method reduces the manufacturing lead-time to produce the components and in-turn gives monetary benefits to the industry.

  13. Southwest Project: resource/institutional requirements analysis. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This project provides information which could be used by DOE in formulating their plans for commercialization and market penetration of central station solar electric generating plants in the southwestern region of the United States. The area of interest includes Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The project evaluated the potential integration of central station solar electric generating facilities into the existing electric grids of the region through the year 2000 by making use of system planning methodology which is commonly used throughout the electric utility industry. The technologies included: wind energy conversion, solar thermal electric, solar photovoltaic conversion, and hybrid (solar thermal repowering) solar electric systems. The participants in this project included 12 electric utility companies and a state power authority in the southwestern United States as well as a major consulting engineering firm. A broad synopsis of information found in Volumes II, III, and IV is presented. (MCW)

  14. Environmentally benign silicon solar cell manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Menna, P. [National Agency for New Technologies Energy and Environment, Portici (Italy); Strebkov, D.S.; Pinov, A.; Zadde, V. [Intersolarcenter, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-09-01

    The manufacturing of silicon devices--from polysilicon production, crystal growth, ingot slicing, wafer cleaning, device processing, to encapsulation--requires many steps that are energy intensive and use large amounts of water and toxic chemicals. In the past two years, the silicon integrated-circuit (IC) industry has initiated several programs to promote environmentally benign manufacturing, i.e., manufacturing practices that recover, recycle, and reuse materials resources with a minimal consumption of energy. Crystalline-silicon solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which accounted for 87% of the worldwide module shipments in 1997, are large-area devices with many manufacturing steps similar to those used in the IC industry. Obviously, there are significant opportunities for the PV industry to implement more environmentally benign manufacturing approaches. Such approaches often have the potential for significant cost reduction by reducing energy use and/or the purchase volume of new chemicals and by cutting the amount of used chemicals that must be discarded. This paper will review recent accomplishments of the IC industry initiatives and discuss new processes for environmentally benign silicon solar-cell manufacturing.

  15. 多批次小批量生产过程能力指数的贝叶斯估计%The Bayesian estimation of process capability indices for multi-batch and low volume manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗瑞; 章欣已; 江志斌; 赵言正

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at the estimation deviation of traditional approaches for calculating process capability indices(PCIs)during multi-batch and low volume manufacturing, the process mean and the process variance of multi-batch and low volume manufacturing are assumed to follow the conjugate normal distribution and the conjugate gamma distribution, respectively, and by utilizing the theory of conjugate Bayesian estimation, the method for estimation of distributed parameters and the general expression for calculation of PCIs for multi-batch and low volume manufacturing, are proposed. This Bayesian estimation method not only eliminates the deviation in estimation of process parameters when only using the current sample with the low sample volume, but also enables the weight of current sample increasing automatically in estimation of process parameters while the sample volume of the current batch is increasing. The effectiveness and practicability of the PCI calculation based on Bayesian estimation for multi-batch and low volume manufacturing were verified by an example.%针对过程能力指数(PCIs)的传统计算方法应用于多批次小批量生产过程出现的失真问题,以多批次小批量生产过程的总体均值和总体方差分别服从共轭正态分布和共轭逆伽马分布,利用共轭贝叶斯估计理论提出了多批次小批量生产过程分布参数估计方法、过程能力指数计算方法及其通用表达式,这种贝叶斯估计方法减小仅用当前批小样本容量估计过程参数的失真,且能够随着当前批样本容量的增大,会自动增加其在过程参数贝叶斯估计中的权重.实例验证了基于贝叶斯估计的过程能力指数计算方法的有效性和实用性.

  16. Study of power management technology for orbital multi-100KWe applications. Volume 3: Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildice, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Mid to late 1980's power management technology needs to support development of a general purpose space platform, capable of suplying 100 to 250 KWe to a variety of users in low Earth orbit are examined. A typical, shuttle assembled and supplied space platform is illustred, along with a group of payloads which might reasonably be expected to use such a facility. Examination of platform and user power needs yields a set of power requirements used to evaluate power management options for life cycle cost effectivness. The most cost effective ac/dc and dc systems are evaluated, specifically to develop system details which lead to technology goals, including: array and transmission voltages, best frequency for ac power transmission, and advantages and disadvantages of ac and dc systems for this application. System and component requirements are compared with the state-of-the-art to identify areas where technological development is required.

  17. Improved technology for manufacture of carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platon, A.; Dumbrava, A.; Petrescu, N.I.; Simionescu, L.

    2000-07-01

    The paper presents investigations to improve some physico-chemical characteristics of carbon electrodes (such as coefficient of thermal expansion, mechanical strengths, density, pore volume, porosity etc.) obtained in different manufacture steps by addition of varieties of coal tar pitch. These include attempts to improve the chemical compatibility of the coke-pitch system in the mixture and establish the method and the point of introduction of additive, the concentration required and appropriate analytical control during the entire manufacture. Methods of analysis used include thermogravimetry and porosimetry. The microstructure of the electrodes is investigated through a wide range and the data obtained include pore size and pore volume distribution, surface area, porosity, particle size distribution and type of pores. The overall results clearly indicate better characteristics and performance for electrodes with additives as against electrodes without them, such as lower porosity, lower thermal expansion coefficients and greater mechanical strength. These data are analyzed with respect to the process step and electrode type.

  18. 40 CFR 799.5085 - Chemical testing requirements for certain high production volume chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (preferred species), rat, or Chinese hamster): 40 CFR 799.9538 OR Mammalian Erythrocyte Micronucleus Test (in... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Multichemical Test Rules § 799.5085 Chemical testing... paragraph (j) of this section at any time from April 17, 2006 to the end of the test data...

  19. DDC 10 Year Requirements and Planning Study. Volume II. Technical Discussion, Bibliography, and Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-12

    Technology of Information Procesoing (1978-1988) ........ .................. ... 39 2.2.3 Organizational Interface Between DDC and Other Information...Requirements and Planning Study: Expert Penal Review Report. December 31, 1975. (AUER-2325/2326-T-N5 AD-A022 303) TABLE 14 Evaluation of Technological

  20. Computational manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general framework for computational manufacturing. The methodology of computational manufacturing aims at integrating computational geometry, machining principle, sensor information fusion, optimization, computational intelligence and virtual prototyping to solve problems of the modeling, reasoning, control, planning and scheduling of manufacturing processes and systems. There are three typical problems in computational manufacturing, i.e., scheduling (time-domain), geometric reasoning (space-domain) and decision- making (interaction between time-domain and space-domain). Some theoretical fundamentals of computational manufacturing are also discussed.

  1. Marksmanship Requirements From the Perspective of Combat Veterans - Volume I: Main Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    by Armor, Military Police, Quartermaster, Engineer and Field Artillery leaders. Three other skill areas, each accounting for 6% of less of the...Clusters of marksmanship skills were identified and linked to three groups of branches. Skills common to all branches were identified as well as... Skills identified reflected the leaders’ combat experience. Training of some high priority, common skills will require additional training time

  2. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  3. Green manufacturing processes and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Davim J, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    This volume fulfills a pressing need in both academia and industry to follow the latest innovations in sustainable manufacturing. The contents cover a host of topics, from environmentally friendly machining techniques to developments in zero-waste production.

  4. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 5. Science Applications, Incorporated system requirements definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report sets forth the system requirements for a Solar Controlled-Environment Agriculture System (SCEAS) Project. In the report a conceptual baseline system description for an engineering test facility is given. This baseline system employs a fluid roof/roof filter in combination with a large storage tank and a ground water heat exchanger in order to provide cooling and heating as needed. Desalination is accomplished by pretreatment followed by reverse osmosis. Energy is provided by means of photovoltaics and wind machines in conjunction with storage batteries. Site and climatic data needed in the design process are given. System performance specifications and integrated system design criteria are set forth. Detailed subsystem design criteria are presented and appropriate references documented.

  5. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Final report. Volume I. Systems requirements and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Studies leading to the development of two 400 MW Offshore Thermal Energy Conversion Commercial Plants are presented. This volume includes a summary of three tasks: task IIA--systems evaluation and requirements; task IIB--evaluation plan; task III--technology review; and task IV--systems integration evaluation. Task IIA includes the definition of top level requirements and an assessment of factors critical to the selection of hull configuration and size, quantification of payload requirements and characteristics, and sensitivity of system characteristics to site selection. Task IIB includes development of a methodology for systematically evaluating the candidate hullforms, based on interrelationships and priorities developed during task IIA. Task III includes the assessment of current technology and identification of deficiencies in relation to OTEC requirements and the development of plans to correct such deficiencies. Task IV involves the formal evaluation of the six candidate hullforms in relation to sit and plant capacity to quantify cost/size/capability relationships, leading to selection of an optimum commercial plant. (WHK)

  6. Optimized manufacturable porous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    Topology optimization has been used to design two-dimensional material structures with specific elastic properties, but optimized designs of three-dimensional material structures are more scarsely seen. Partly because it requires more computational power, and partly because it is a major challenge...... to include manufacturing constraints in the optimization. This work focuses on incorporating the manufacturability into the optimization procedure, allowing the resulting material structure to be manufactured directly using rapid manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting/sintering (SLM....../S). The available manufacturing methods are best suited for porous materials (one constituent and void), but the optimization procedure can easily include more constituents. The elasticity tensor is found from one unit cell using the homogenization method together with a standard finite element (FE) discretization...

  7. 2 CFR 176.150 - Notice of Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Section 1605 of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods—Section 1605 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009... unreasonable cost of domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods applies, the Federal Government will... to the estimated total cost of the project 25 percent of the project cost, if foreign iron, steel,...

  8. 2 CFR 176.140 - Award term-Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Section 1605 of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... measure; (C) Quantity; (D) Cost; (E) Time of delivery or availability; (F) Location of the project; (G..., steel, and/or manufactured goods material shall include all delivery costs to the construction site and..., Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Section 1605 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. 176...

  9. 48 CFR 52.225-21 - Required Use of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act-Construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Quantity; (D) Cost; (E) Time of delivery or availability; (F) Location of the construction project; (G... Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods-Buy American Act-Construction Materials. 52.225-21 Section 52.225... of American Iron, Steel, and Manufactured Goods—Buy American Act—Construction Materials. As...

  10. Manufacturing technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  11. Improving Project Manufacturing Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpivaara Ville

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop firms’ project manufacturing coordination. The development will be made by centralizing the manufacturing information flows in one system. To be able to centralize information, a deep user need assessment is required. After user needs have been identified, the existing system will be developed to match these needs. The theoretical background is achieved through exploring the literature of project manufacturing, development project success factors and different frameworks and tools for development project execution. The focus of this research is rather in customer need assessment than in system’s technical expertise. To ensure the deep understanding of customer needs this study is executed by action research method. As a result of this research the information system for project manufacturing coordination was developed to respond revealed needs of the stakeholders. The new system improves the quality of the manufacturing information, eliminates waste in manufacturing coordination processes and offers a better visibility to the project manufacturing. Hence it provides a solid base for the further development of project manufacturing.

  12. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Roger [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors less than 1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants.

  13. Automated inspection in printed circuit board assembly (PCBA) manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Francy K.

    1997-08-01

    Visual inspection has long been a necessary method of quality control in Printed Circuit Board Assemblies (PCBA) manufacturing. The characteristics of electronic assemblies have changed substantially over the last decade. Todays high lead count, fine pitch SMT components are becoming even more difficult for humans to inspect at the same time automated inspection systems have become reliable than manual inspection and are now accepted as valuable tools for producing high quality PCBA products. The basic requirements of an automated inspection system remain same in all PCBA manufacturing but the type of the automated system (off- line/on-line), where applied in the production flow, entire boards or only on a sample basis, inspection coverage (100% or partial) vary between different PCBA manufacturers. In PCBA manufacturing the emphasis is more in the electrical functionality of the PCBA than in it's appearance. It is nearly impossible to impose stringent specifications in the appearance of the components and other materials used in PCBA manufacturing. Due to the large number of component/PCB supplier and wide variations in materials and processes the challenge in successfully automating the inspection process is the variability in the appearance of components on PCBA. But in a high volume PCBA manufacturing where fewer board types are running in large volumes for long periods of time, the variability in component appearance can be controlled much better than a low volume PCBA manufacturing where more types are running in low volumes for short period of time. This paper discusses the development and implementation of a low cost flexible automated inspection system for PCBAs. The system can detect over ninety percent of visual defects on PCBAs. The key features of the system are quick and easy set-up, capability to inspect different types of board and quick change over between different boards and low cost.

  14. Micro Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    . If a micro manufacturing system isn’t designed rationally and correctly, it will be high-cost, unreliable, and not robust. For micro products and systems it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial production. As the products through product development...... processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing production technologies that make it possible to produce the products at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing. The micro/nano manufacturing programme at the Department of Manufacturing...

  15. Energy Use in Nanoscale Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Teresa; Boyd, Sarah; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of key nanoscale manufacturing technologies, and qualitatively examines their fundamental process requirements with respect to energy demand. The processes requirements are related to semiconductor manufacturing, where applicable, and gaps in our understanding of these processes on the production scale are identified as goals for the research community. Finally, the paper proposes a framework for the systematic analysis of energy use in nanoscale manufacturing ...

  16. A framework for distributed manufacturing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Leitão, Paulo; Restivo, Francisco

    2000-01-01

    The new organisational structures used in world wide manufacturing systems require the development of distributed applications, which present solutions to their requirements. The work research in the distributed manufacturing control leads to emergent paradigms, such as Holonic Manufacturing Systems (HMS) and Bionic Manufacturing Systems (BMS), which translates the concepts from social organisations and biological systems to the manufacturing world. This paper present a Framework for the deve...

  17. Robust Manufacturing Control

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This contributed volume collects research papers, presented at the CIRP Sponsored Conference Robust Manufacturing Control: Innovative and Interdisciplinary Approaches for Global Networks (RoMaC 2012, Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany, June 18th-20th 2012). These research papers present the latest developments and new ideas focusing on robust manufacturing control for global networks. Today, Global Production Networks (i.e. the nexus of interconnected material and information flows through which products and services are manufactured, assembled and distributed) are confronted with and expected to adapt to: sudden and unpredictable large-scale changes of important parameters which are occurring more and more frequently, event propagation in networks with high degree of interconnectivity which leads to unforeseen fluctuations, and non-equilibrium states which increasingly characterize daily business. These multi-scale changes deeply influence logistic target achievement and call for robust planning and control ...

  18. The development of a scanning strategy for the manufacture of porous biomaterials by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, R; Fox, P; O'Neill, W; Jones, E; Sutcliffe, C

    2009-09-01

    Porous structures are used in orthopaedics to promote biological fixation between metal implant and host bone. In order to achieve rapid and high volumes of bone ingrowth the structures must be manufactured from a biocompatible material and possess high interconnected porosities, pore sizes between 100 and 700 microm and mechanical strengths that withstand the anticipated biomechanical loads. The challenge is to develop a manufacturing process that can cost effectively produce structures that meet these requirements. The research presented in this paper describes the development of a 'beam overlap' technique for manufacturing porous structures in commercially pure titanium using the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) rapid manufacturing technique. A candidate bone ingrowth structure (71% porosity, 440 microm mean pore diameter and 70 MPa compression strength) was produced and used to manufacture a final shape orthopaedic component. These results suggest that SLM beam overlap is a promising technique for manufacturing final shape functional bone ingrowth materials.

  19. Smart Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing.

  20. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  1. Exploring manufacturing solutions for SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Blichfeldt, Henrik; Bilberg, Arne

    This exploratory study provides an overview over current state of manufacturing solutions in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in region of Southern Denmark. Building on manufacturing paradigms, this paper reveals relevant aspects for the development and implementation of improving SMEs’ ...... of manufacturing solutions, which are required to increase their competitiveness and assure sustainable growth.......This exploratory study provides an overview over current state of manufacturing solutions in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in region of Southern Denmark. Building on manufacturing paradigms, this paper reveals relevant aspects for the development and implementation of improving SMEs...

  2. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME IV: FILM AND LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: FLEXCON COMPANY, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume discusses a visit to a site operated by FLEXcon Company, Inc., a pressure-sensitive adhesive coater, to collect information on the pollution prevention opportunities and barriers associated with waterbased adhesives. The purpose of the visit to FLEXcon was to gather i...

  3. MEDICAL MANUFACTURING INNOVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Sorin Cosmin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of these studies was to improve the design and manufacturing process by selective laser melting, of new medical implants. After manufacturing process, the implants were measured, microscopically and mechanical analyzed. Implants manufactured by AM can be an attractive option for surface coatings to improve the osseointegration process. The main advantages of customized implants made by AM process are: the precise adaptation to the region of implantation, better cosmesis, reduced surgical times and better performance over their generic counterparts. These medical manufacturing changes the way that the surgeons are planning surgeries and engineers are designing custom implant. AM process has eliminated the constraints of shape, size, internal structure and mechanical properties making it possible for fabrication of implants that conform to the physical and mechanical requirements of implantation according to CT images. This article will review some custom implants fabricated in DME using biocompatible titanium.

  4. Manufacturing of lasers for DWDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kevin T.; Robertson, Alexander J., Jr.; Wetzel, Steven J.

    1999-11-01

    The evolution of dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) has allowed service provides a convenient and cost effective method to dramatically increase transmission capacity over existing and new fiber network systems. As the demand for bandwidth continues to increase, systems designers are responding by increasing both the number of channels and the data rates. This trend has placed considerable pressure on many of the underlying system components. One component that has been particularly challenged by this trend is the manufacture of semiconductor lasers. This paper reviews the technical and logistical challenges faced in the high volume manufacture of lasers to support DWDM systems. As the product portfolio continues to expand, precise execution and team work among multiple organizations is required to assure reliable shipping performance. Production scheduling and manufacturing operations must work closely to continuously re-prioritize the work in process in response to constantly changing channel demand and yield fluctuations. Wavelength prediction models must be developed that correlate in-process parameters to final device wavelength. These models are then applied to both in-process specification targeting and inventory management. Once the in-process specifications are properly targeted, the challenge moves to the fabrication processes, where processes are pushed to the limits of their control. Underpinning the entire effort must be an information management system in which parametric data is collected, wavelength prediction models are executed, and work in process inventory is controlled with respect to the final output volume and wavelength distribution.

  5. Integrating post-manufacturing issues into design and manufacturing decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, Charles F.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation is conducted on research into some of the fundamental issues underlying the design for manufacturing, service and recycling that affect engineering decisions early in the conceptual design phase of mechanical systems. The investigation focuses on a system-based approach to material selection, manufacturing methods and assembly processes related to overall product requirements, performance and life-cycle costs. Particular emphasis is placed on concurrent engineering decision support for post-manufacturing issues such as serviceability, recyclability, and product retirement.

  6. Continued Evolution of Automated Manufacturing – Cloud-Enabled Digital Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hung Huang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to conventional manufacturing, digital manufacturing is not affected by marginal costs; that is, the cost for producing a single prototype is not different from producing several thousand ones. Digital manufacturing consequently eliminates the requirement for large sums of capital necessary for conventional manufacturing. Digital manufacturing combined with cloud platforms and cloud-enabled databases will allow large-quantity virtual product development while minimizing costs, which will consequently reflect on the efficient manufacturing of physical products.

  7. 77 FR 28281 - Withdrawal of Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... issue of March 16, 2012 (77 FR 15609) (FRL-9335-6). If you have questions regarding the applicability of... One High Production Volume Chemical Substance AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... production volume chemicals (HPV1). * * * * * (j) * * * Table 2--Chemical Substances and Testing...

  8. Micro manufacturing techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ruxu; Li, Zifu

    2013-01-01

    Micro/meso-scale manufacturing has been developed in research fields of machining, forming, materials and others, but its potential to industries are yet to be fully realized. The theme of the current volume was to build a bridge joining academic research and industrial needs in micro manufacturing. Among the 12 papers selected for publication are three keynote addresses onmicro and desktop factories for micro/meso-scale manufacturing applicationsand future visions, tissue cutting mechanics and applications for needlecore biopsy and guidance, and micro-texturing onto amorphous carbonmaterials

  9. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  10. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of

  11. Analysis and forecast of electrical distribution system materials. Final report. Volume III. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, C G

    1976-08-23

    These appendixes are referenced in Volume II of this report. They contain the detailed electrical distribution equipment requirements and input material requirements forecasts. Forecasts are given for three electric energy usage scenarios. Also included are data on worldwide reserves and demand for 30 raw materials required for the manufacture of electrical distribution equipment.

  12. Knowledge Management for Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OveRustungHjelmervik; 王克胜; 袁庆丰; 方明伦

    2004-01-01

    Technology development and implementation on the manufacturing arena has, throughout the years, frustrated employees over the requirement of constantly adjusting to new technologies. The employee's ability to learn is bounded, and thus limited. Looking at a modern production system, it is often a complicated array of technologies that have to be coordinated; or the technologies are coordinating themselves through artificial intelligence. This paper discusses the need for a holistic knowledge management approach to manufacturing,combining in-place technology with process management philosophy, in order for the firm's human resources to create, share, store and apply new knowledge.

  13. Manufacturers Shall Meet DSM Requirement Through New Products By Technical Renovation%制造企业要以科技创新产品满足DSM需求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学信; 郑小平; 曾辛

    2002-01-01

    DSM is a movement integrated with and accomplished by government, utilities, manufacturers and customers.As the main body, the nanufacture will function to take all responsibilities of providing timely, reliable and feasible technicalsupporting for the movement. A new product based on high technology is of a great significance in generalizing DSM. Oneimportant and effective measure to implement DSM is the flexible and practicable electrovalence policy, which heavily relieson advanced technology for its execution.

  14. Cloud manufacturing distributed computing technologies for global and sustainable manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Mehnen, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Global networks, which are the primary pillars of the modern manufacturing industry and supply chains, can only cope with the new challenges, requirements and demands when supported by new computing and Internet-based technologies. Cloud Manufacturing: Distributed Computing Technologies for Global and Sustainable Manufacturing introduces a new paradigm for scalable service-oriented sustainable and globally distributed manufacturing systems.   The eleven chapters in this book provide an updated overview of the latest technological development and applications in relevant research areas.  Following an introduction to the essential features of Cloud Computing, chapters cover a range of methods and applications such as the factors that actually affect adoption of the Cloud Computing technology in manufacturing companies and new geometrical simplification method to stream 3-Dimensional design and manufacturing data via the Internet. This is further supported case studies and real life data for Waste Electrical ...

  15. Manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

  16. Green Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  17. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  18. Robot skills for manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Rath; Nalpantidis, Lazaros; Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Due to a general shift in manufacturing paradigm from mass production towards mass customization, reconfigurable automation technologies, such as robots, are required. However, current industrial robot solutions are notoriously difficult to program, leading to high changeover times when new...... products are introduced by manufacturers. In order to compete on global markets, the factories of tomorrow need complete production lines, including automation technologies that can effortlessly be reconfigured or repurposed, when the need arises. In this paper we present the concept of general, self......-asserting robot skills for manufacturing. We show how a relatively small set of skills are derived from current factory worker instructions, and how these can be transferred to industrial mobile manipulators. General robot skills can not only be implemented on these robots, but also be intuitively concatenated...

  19. Enabling Manufacturing Competitiveness and Economic Sustainability : Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual production

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The changing manufacturing environment requires more responsive and adaptable manufacturing systems. The theme of the 4th International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual production (CARV2011) is “Enabling Manufacturing Competitiveness and Economic Sustainability”. Leading edge research and best implementation practices and experiences, which address these important issues and challenges, are presented. The proceedings include advances in manufacturing systems design, planning, evaluation, control and evolving paradigms such as mass customization, personalization, changeability, re-configurability and flexibility. New and important concepts such as the dynamic product families and platforms, co-evolution of products and systems, and methods for enhancing manufacturing systems’ economic sustainability and prolonging their life to produce more than one product generation are treated. Enablers of change in manufacturing systems, production volume and capability scalability and man...

  20. Study for identification of Beneficial Uses of Space (BUS). Volume 2: Technical report. Book 1: Sections 1 through 4. [with emphasis on space manufacturing and product development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Consolidated information is presented for the study whose purpose was to identify products, processes, and services to be produced in future spacecraft environments for direct utilization on earth. Discussion of methodology for selecting from among potential space processing approaches, definition of requirements for experiments and tests needed to acquire sufficient knowledge for proof testing of selected processes, formulation of research and development schedules to achieve proof testing, and documentation of the decision processes involved in the programs are presented. Technology and programmatics are reported for the following select studies: (1) surface acoustic wave components; (2) transparent oxides; (3) high purity tungsten X-ray targets; and (4) high specificity isoenzymes.

  1. Textile Manufacturing Sector (NAICS 313)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the textile and leather manufacturing sector, including NESHAPs for leather tanning and fabric printing, and small business guidance for RCRA hazardous waste requirements.

  2. Process for manufacturing slit collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, V. P.; Yemelyanov, A. A.; Churbakov, K. I.

    1974-01-01

    Peculiarities are described of the manufacturing process and the control of elements of slit collimators, the structural design of the required equipment and the process or assembling the collimators.

  3. LEAN Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne

      As part of an employment as Technology Architect at the company Linak in combination with research at the University of Southern Denmark, this paper will present results from a strategy process where Lean has been pointed out as being a very strategic element in the Linak Production System....... The mission with the strategy is to obtain competitive production in Denmark and in Western Europe based on the right combination of manufacturing principles, motivated and trained employees, level of automation, and cooperation with suppliers and customers worldwide. The strategy has resulted in technical......, organizational and management improvements in the company to what is named the Linak Production System.  ...

  4. LEAN Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne

      As part of an employment as Technology Architect at the company Linak in combination with research at the University of Southern Denmark, this paper will present results from a strategy process where Lean has been pointed out as being a very strategic element in the Linak Production System....... The mission with the strategy is to obtain competitive production in Denmark and in Western Europe based on the right combination of manufacturing principles, motivated and trained employees, level of automation, and cooperation with suppliers and customers worldwide. The strategy has resulted in technical...

  5. 24 CFR 3286.9 - Manufacturer shipment responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacturer shipment... Requirements § 3286.9 Manufacturer shipment responsibilities. (a) Providing information to HUD. At or before the time that each manufactured home is shipped by a manufacturer, the manufacturer must provide...

  6. Low-cost manufacturing of the point focus concentrating module and its key component, the Fresnel lens. Final subcontract report, 31 January 1991--6 May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifee, T.; Konnerth, A. III [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) has been developing point-focus concentrating PV modules since 1986. SKI is currently in position to manufacture between 200 to 600 kilowatts annually of the current design by a combination of manual and semi-automated methods. This report reviews the current status of module manufacture and specifies the required approach to achieve a high-volume manufacturing capability and low cost. The approach taken will include process development concurrent with module design for automated manufacturing. The current effort reviews the major manufacturing costs and identifies components and processes whose improvements would produce the greatest effect on manufacturability and cost reduction. The Fresnel lens is one such key component. Investigating specific alternative manufacturing methods and sources has substantially reduced the lens costs and has exceeded the DOE cost-reduction goals. 15 refs.

  7. An Architecture for Hybrid Manufacturing Combining 3D Printing and CNC Machining

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel Müller; Elmar Wings

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is one of the key technologies of the 21st century. Additive manufacturing processes are often combined with subtractive manufacturing processes to create hybrid manufacturing because it is useful for manufacturing complex parts, for example, 3D printed sensor systems. Currently, several CNC machines are required for hybrid manufacturing: one machine is required for additive manufacturing and one is required for subtractive manufacturing. Disadvantages of conventional h...

  8. An Architecture for Hybrid Manufacturing Combining 3D Printing and CNC Machining

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel Müller; Elmar Wings

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is one of the key technologies of the 21st century. Additive manufacturing processes are often combined with subtractive manufacturing processes to create hybrid manufacturing because it is useful for manufacturing complex parts, for example, 3D printed sensor systems. Currently, several CNC machines are required for hybrid manufacturing: one machine is required for additive manufacturing and one is required for subtractive manufacturing. Disadvantages of conventional h...

  9. Regulatory volume increase in astrocytes exposed to hypertonic medium requires β1 -adrenergic Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase stimulation and glycogenolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Xu, Junnan; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The cotransporter of Na(+) , K(+) , 2Cl(-) , and water, NKKC1, is activated under two conditions in the brain, exposure to highly elevated extracellular K(+) concentrations, causing astrocytic swelling, and regulatory volume increase in cells shrunk in response to exposure to hypertonic medium. NKCC1-mediated transport occurs as secondary active transport driven by Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity, which establishes a favorable ratio for NKCC1 operation between extracellular and intracellular products of the concentrations of Na(+) , K(+) , and Cl(-) × Cl(-) . In the adult brain, astrocytes are the main target for NKCC1 stimulation, and their Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity is stimulated by elevated K(+) or the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Extracellular K(+) concentration is normal during regulatory volume increase, so this study investigated whether the volume increase occurred faster in the presence of isoproterenol. Measurement of cell volume via live cell microscopic imaging fluorescence to record fluorescence intensity of calcein showed that this was the case at isoproterenol concentrations of ≥1 µM in well-differentiated mouse astrocyte cultures incubated in isotonic medium with 100 mM sucrose added. This stimulation was abolished by the β1 -adrenergic antagonist betaxolol, but not by ICI118551, a β2 -adrenergic antagonist. A large part of the β1 -adrenergic signaling pathway in astrocytes is known. Inhibitors of this pathway as well as the glycogenolysis inhibitor 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol hydrochloride and the NKCC1 inhibitors bumetanide and furosemide abolished stimulation by isoproterenol, and it was weakened by the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase inhibitor ouabain. These observations are of physiological relevance because extracellular hypertonicity occurs during intense neuronal activity. This might trigger a regulatory volume increase, associated with the post-excitatory undershoot.

  10. Project Columbiad: Mission to the Moon. Book 1: Executive Summary. Volume 1: Mission trade studies and requirements. Volume 2: Subsystem trade studies and selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael; Denecke, Johan; Garber, Suzanne; Kader, Beth; Liu, Celia; Weintraub, Ben; Cazeau, Patrick; Goetz, John; Haughwout, James; Larson, Erik

    1992-01-01

    In response to the Report of the Advisory Committee on the future of the U.S. Space Program and a request from NASA's Exploration Office, the MIT Hunsaker Aerospace Corporation (HAC) conducted a feasibility study, known as Project Columbiad, on reestablishing human presence on the Moon before the year 2000. The mission criteria established were to transport a four person crew to the lunar surface at any latitude and back to Earth with a 14-28 day stay on the lunar surface. Safety followed by cost of the Columbiad Mission were the top level priorities of HAC. The resulting design has a precursor mission that emplaces the required surface payloads before the piloted mission arrives. Both the precursor and piloted missions require two National Launch System (NLS) launches. Both the precursor and piloted mission have an Earth orbit rendezvous (EOR) with a direct transit to the Moon post-EOR. The piloted mission returns to Earth via a direct transit. Included among the surface payloads preemplaced are a habitat, solar power plant (including fuel cells for the lunar night), lunar rover, and mechanisms used to cover the habitat with regolith (lunar soil) in order to protect the crew members from severe solar flare radiation.

  11. Virtual CIM and Digital Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sev V.Nagalingam; Grier C.I.Lin

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturing enterprises play an important role in improving the economic environment of a country.Today, the capability to produce high quality products with shorter delivery time and the ability to produce according to the diverse customer requirements has become the characteristics of successful manufacturing industries. Application of intelligent manufacturing systems and Computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) are the most effective methods for overcoming the issues faced by present day manufactures while retaining the employment level and revenue of a country in today's highly competitive global market. With the developments taking place in CIM and its related technologies, the application of CIM in manufacturing enterprises has become a reality from the dream. This paper highlights the historical developments towards automation and the need for CIM systems. Furthermore, it analyses some new terms such as agile manufacturing, digital manufacturing, agent-based manufacturing and others, which have been emerging recently, and argues all these new technologies are the subsystems of CIM. In addition, this paper provides a new direction in CIM to fulfil the emerging challenges in today's global market and to satisfy the emerging need of virtual enterprises in the form of Virtual CIM.

  12. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Chi Lee; Chung-Ming Chen; Shih-Tseng Lee; Kuo-Chen Wei; Ping-Ching Pai; Cheng-Hong Toh; Chi-Cheng Chuang

    2015-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective...

  13. Continued Evolution of Automated Manufacturing – Cloud-Enabled Digital Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Hung Huang

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to conventional manufacturing, digital manufacturing is not affected by marginal costs; that is, the cost for producing a single prototype is not different from producing several thousand ones. Digital manufacturing consequently eliminates the requirement for large sums of capital necessary for conventional manufacturing. Digital manufacturing combined with cloud platforms and cloud-enabled databases will allow large-quantity virtual product development while minimizing costs, whi...

  14. Manufacturing processes 2 grinding, honing, lapping

    CERN Document Server

    Klocke, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Presents a view of the most common machining and non-machining manufacturing processes. This volume describes the characteristics of abrasive tools, their design and manufacturing, followed by the fundamentals of grinding fluids. It also discusses grinding of different materials (steel, cast iron, hard and brittle materials, nickel and titanium).

  15. Dairy Product Manufacturing Costs at Cooperative Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, K. Charles

    1983-01-01

    Cost data are summarized for 14 plants manufacturing cheese, butter, and powder and average costs are presented for each product. Average cost curves are estimated for each plant. The scale of plant for least-cost operations is identified for plants of each product type. Plant capacity utilization and seasonal volume variation and their impacts on manufacturing cost are delineated.

  16. 16 CFR 1204.5 - Manufacturer's instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturer's instructions. 1204.5 Section... Manufacturer's instructions. (a) For all antennas covered under this part 1204, the following statement shall be included in the manufacturer's instructions, in addition to the material required by 16 CFR...

  17. AN ANALYSIS OF THE MANUFACTURING POSSIBILITY OF SPECIAL ANKLE FOOT ORTHOSIS COMPONENTS BY OMPARISON BETWEEN THE REQUIRED PRECISION AND THE VAILABLE PRECISION ON A VERTICAL MACHINING CENTER PROGRAMED WITH TOPSOLID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru STANIMIR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Validation of different solutions adopted to achieve new ankle foot orthosis involves among others their prototyping. In these paper we developed a representative part for two axis machining that requires the use of the main features of TopSolid Cad and Cam modules, and that assumes the use of the main manufacturing processes that usually may be met on a vertical machining center. Also, in order to determine the dimensional and geometrical deviations of the part this was done on the YMC 1050 machining center. After comparing the measured deviations with the requirements of various components of orthesis, we concluded that the available precision meets the requirements and that the machining center with TopSolid software that we have will enable us to realize special ankle foot orthosis of quality, for experimental research .

  18. Lean manufacturing in Indian context: A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to examine the implementation of Lean Manufacturing system in the Indian industries. Predominant elements of Lean Manufacturing, benefits gained after its implementation and obstacles observed by Indian Industry have been recognized. The results of this survey support the opinion that Lean Manufacturing had potential to improve the organizational performance of Indian industries. Nevertheless, Indian industries are required to be passionate to transform their manufacturing by adopting Lean manufacturing to gain the full benefits. A large numbers of literature papers are available on the better side of Lean manufacturing approach and its benefits gained by manufacturing organizations after implementation. But the adverse impacts of Lean manufacturing are not discussed to a great extent. Some drawbacks of Lean manufacturing are also highlighted in this paper.

  19. Topology Optimization for Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders

    This PhD thesis deals with the combination of topology optimization and additive man-ufacturing (AM, also known as 3D-printing). In addition to my own works, the thesis contains a broader review and assessment of the literature within the field. The thesis first presents a classification...... of the various AM technologies, a review of relevant manufacturing materials, the properties of these materials in the additively manufactured part, as well as manufacturing constraints with a potential for design optimization. Subsequently, specific topology optimization formulations relevant for the most im......-portant AM-related manufacturing constraints are presented. These constraints are di-vided into directional and non-directional constraints. Non-directional constraints include minimum/uniform length scale and a cavity constraint. It is shown that modified filter boundary conditions are required in order...

  20. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-11-05

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement.

  1. Challenges in Additive Manufacturing of Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Hugo

    Additive manufacturing is seen by many as the holy grail of manufacturing, the ability to produce parts nearly autonomously. Adding material rather than removing it would eliminate the need for expensive resources and machining. The recent expiration of key 3D printing patents has led to many advances in the field and has dramatically lowered the prices of 3D printers, making them accessible to the average individual. The one area where additive manufacturing is still in its infancy is in ceramics. Ceramic materials have advantages over polymers and metals such as corrosion resistance, insulating behavior, high stiffness and high temperature stability that make them attractive in industries such as aerospace, medical, and electronics. Processing and machining ceramics however is difficult and expensive as it requires high temperature furnaces and diamond tooling. There are currently two companies that produce printers capable of printing technical ceramics, Lithoz in Germany and 3D Ceram in France. The issue is that both of these printers retail for over $100,000. The work in this thesis intends to show the challenges associated with setting up a ceramic 3D printer at a fraction of that cost for 3D printing of alumina. The first such challenge was creating a photopolymer resin that could be loaded with a large volume percent of aluminum oxide powder while maintain its curability and low viscosity. Several combinations of monomers and dispersants were evaluated before coming to the conclusion that the use of a hexanediol diacrylate monomer and quarternary ammonia acetate were the most effective in suspending volume sold loadings of over 40% while maintaining a low viscosity. The next challenge was adapting an inexpensive polymer printer to use the powder loaded resin. Various printer parameters were modified and different window coatings were implemented to create a print. The issue of the layers curing on the build area window however, proved to be difficult to

  2. Improved technology for manufacture of carbon electrodes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Platon; A Dumbrava; N Iutes-Petrescu; Luzia Simionescu

    2000-02-01

    Current industrial carbon electrodes are typically manufactured by blending petroleum coke particles (the filler) with molten coal tar pitch (the binder) and extruding the resultant mix to form the `green electrode’. This is then baked under controlled conditions. In case of usage as anodes in steel electric furnaces (or as other carbon and graphite products), the electrodes could undergo further processing like pitch impregnation or graphitization. During heat treatment, some of the organics are destructively distilled, vaporized or decomposed, resulting in carbon deposition in the electrode. As the vaporized materials exit the body of the electrode they cause porosity in the walls, which results in reduction in density, current carrying capacity and flexural strength. The paper presents investigations to improve some physico-chemical characteristics of these electrodes (such as coefficient of thermal expansion, mechanical strengths, density, pore volume, porosity etc.), obtained in different manufacture steps, by addition of varieties of coal tar pitch. These include attempts to improve the chemical compatibility of the coke-pitch system in the mixture and establish the method and the point of introduction of additive, the concentration required and appropriate analytical control during the entire manufacture. Methods of analysis used include thermogravimetry and porosimetry. The microstructure of the electrodes is investigated through a wide range and the data obtained include pore size and pore volume distribution, surface area, porosity, particle size distribution and type of pores. The overall results clearly indicate better characteristics and performance for electrodes with additives as against electrodes without them, such as lower porosity, lower thermal expansion coefficients and greater mechanical strength. These data are analyzed with respect to the process step and electrode type.

  3. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 1: Concepts of Use, Initial System Requirements, Architecture, and AeroMACS Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Henriksen, Steve; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this document) is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  4. Manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, Jay; Brower, David; Levine, Stan; Walker, Ray; Wooten, John

    1991-01-01

    The following issues are covered: process development frequently lags behind material development, high fabrication costs, flex joints (bellows) - a continuing program, SRM fabrication-induced defects, and in-space assembly will require simplified design.

  5. Geosynchronous platform definition study. Volume 4, Part 2: Traffic analysis and system requirements for the new traffic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    A condensed summary of the traffic analyses and systems requirements for the new traffic model is presented. The results of each study activity are explained, key analyses are described, and important results are highlighted.

  6. ASME 规范对核设备制造和运行期间的无损检验要求对比%Differences of NDT Technology Requirement between Manufacture and Operation Period of Nuclear Equipment in ASME Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛亮; 蔡家藩; 聂勇; 梁平

    2016-01-01

    对比分析了美国机械工程师协会(ASME)规范对核设备在制造和运行阶段中,在检验范围、检验技术和验收准则等方面的无损检验要求,对存在的差异进行了归纳总结。%This paper takes the ASME code as an example to describe the requirement of NDT for nuclear equipment in Manufacture and Operation Periods,and to analyze and compare the corresponding requirements of inspection scope,technique and acceptance standard in this two period,as well as,the sum-up the difference.

  7. Additive manufacturing – a sustainable manufacturing route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frăţilă Domniţa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive Manufacturing (AM technologies allow developing and manufacturing very complex shaped parts and functional products with a high level of customization, being a great alternative to Traditional Manufacturing (TM methods like injection molding, die-casting or machining. Due to the importance of cleaner production in the field of manufacturing processes, sustainability of AM processes needs to be assessed in order to make easier its acceptance and implementation in the industry. Furthermore, the manufacturers can improve their competitiveness and profitability by considering the ecological aspects during the manufacturing step of a product. This paper gives a survey on sustainability issues related to AM.

  8. INFRASTRUCTURAL BACKBONE OF ENABLING AND CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MASS CUSTOMIZATION MANUFACTURING SYSTEM IN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandkumar Gilke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of Mass Customization can result in a challenging manufacturing environment with both high volume production and high product mix, where the customers expect individualized products at the same price they are paying for mass-produced items. Meeting this challenge requires changes in the manufacturing strategies, increase in the flexibility of the production equipments and the most importantly are the adaptable computer systems which make this possible in the manufacturing enterprise. The major requirement is to develop a system which can adapt quickly in order to start new production or to react quickly in failure scenario. Thus the system should have the ability of self improving, self-adaptable and self healing. Thus there is a need for technical migration from a well established flexible manufacturing system (FMS to intelligent and reconfigurable manufacturing system. This paper describes the major enabling and converging technologies facilitating mass customization manufacturing systems in automobile industries in Indian setting and also discusses the proposed architecture for Mass Customization Manufacturing System.

  9. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume II. Final report, Appendix A: selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this survey and identification of DSG technologies is to present an understanding of the special characteristics of each of these technologies in sufficient detail so that the physical principles of their operation and the internal control of each technology are evident. In this way, a better appreciation can be obtained of the monitoring and control requirements for these DSGs from a remote distribution dispatch center. A consistent approach is being sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. From this study it appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

  10. 77 FR 28340 - Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume Chemical Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... acute toxicity, bacterial reverse mutation, and chromosomal damage for C.I. Pigment Blue 61 by removing...]phenyl]amino]- (CAS No. 1324-76-1), also known as C.I. Pigment Blue 61. EPA is basing its decision to... amendment revokes some of the testing requirements for C.I. Pigment Blue 61. EPA is basing its decision...

  11. 78 FR 27860 - Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume Chemical Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... toxicity, mammalian acute toxicity, bacterial reverse mutation, and chromosomal damage for C.I. Pigment...), also known as C.I. Pigment Blue 61. After publication in the Federal Register of a final rule requiring testing for C.I. Pigment Blue 61, EPA received adequate, existing studies which eliminated the need...

  12. Development of flight experiment task requirements. Volume 2: Technical Report. Part 2: Appendix H: Tasks-skills data series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatterick, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The data sheets presented contain the results of the task analysis portion of the study to identify skill requirements of space shuttle crew personnel. A comprehensive data base is provided of crew functions, operating environments, task dependencies, and task-skills applicable to a representative cross section of earth orbital research experiments.

  13. Additive Manufacturing: Ensuring Quality for Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore; Stephenson, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Reliable manufacturing requires that material properties and fabrication processes be well defined in order to insure that the manufactured parts meet specified requirements. While this issue is now relatively straightforward for traditional processes such as subtractive manufacturing and injection molding, this capability is still evolving for AM products. Hence, one of the principal challenges within AM is in qualifying and verifying source material properties and process control. This issue is particularly critical for applications in harsh environments and demanding applications, such as spacecraft.

  14. Safe food manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A; Mercier, C

    1994-03-31

    Food safety is a growing preoccupation of the health authorities and the major food companies in any European country. All the aspects of food manufacturing, from the raw materials until the product is consumed have to insure they are innoxious to human health, eliminate any harmful effects related either to food handling or consumption in domestic or common eating places, as well as protect, as much as possible, our environment. Thus, the food manufacturer has to examine step-by-step the security of the agro-cultures, their composition, but also the possible residues of pollutants and contaminants, or chemicals used to protect them against various pests and determine the possible loss or retention of these substances during technological processes. Animal raw materials should not contain veterinary drug residues or an abnormal amount of some components that result from inadequate feeding. Care should be taken to ensure the security of foods manufactured by biotechnology processes. The organisms and the whole processes used in food biotechnologies should eliminate any impurities. Any minor food ingredients, such as food additives, are under a permanent revision from the point of view of their safety. The industry reacts immediately if any justification requires that a particular food additive should not be used. In other words all the raw materials must conform to their specifications. Technological processes must create a food with an adequate microbiological quality, e.g. free of pathogens and their toxic metabolites. Any danger of microbiological contamination or accidental pollution, such as mechanical particles, chemical substances, etc. should be eliminated. The particular role of food packaging is crucial, since this is a barrier to protect the food against further parasites or microbial contamination and preserve the food from alterations due to enzymatic reactions that require particular oxygen and water activity conditions. The packaging should also

  15. Additive manufacturing – a sustainable manufacturing route

    OpenAIRE

    Frăţilă Domniţa; Rotaru Horaţiu

    2017-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies allow developing and manufacturing very complex shaped parts and functional products with a high level of customization, being a great alternative to Traditional Manufacturing (TM) methods like injection molding, die-casting or machining. Due to the importance of cleaner production in the field of manufacturing processes, sustainability of AM processes needs to be assessed in order to make easier its acceptance and implementation in the industry. Furth...

  16. Additive manufacturing – a sustainable manufacturing route

    OpenAIRE

    Frăţilă Domniţa; Rotaru Horaţiu

    2017-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies allow developing and manufacturing very complex shaped parts and functional products with a high level of customization, being a great alternative to Traditional Manufacturing (TM) methods like injection molding, die-casting or machining. Due to the importance of cleaner production in the field of manufacturing processes, sustainability of AM processes needs to be assessed in order to make easier its acceptance and implementation in the industry. Furth...

  17. ISO 15189:2012《医学实验室质量和能力的要求》解读-对制造商的要求%Interpretation of ISO 15189:2012“Medical laboratories-Requirements for quality and competence” -Requirements for IVD manufacturers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡冬梅; 周亚莉; 翟培军

    2015-01-01

    In vitro diagnostic ( IVD) manufacturers were important suppliers of external servicesto medical laboratories .There equipment , reagents , calibration and maintenauce services played an important role in ensuring the quality of medical laboratory tests .It is also helpful for IVD manufacturers to establish and maintain a good reputation and credibility .ISO 15189:2012“Medical laboratories -Requirements for quality and competence” was issued onNovember 1, 2012, which replaced the second edition (ISO 15189:2007).Requirements related to IVD manufacturers are involved in the new edition standard .The article aimed to help medical laboratories and IVD manufacturers understand the requirements ; therefore , laboratories would know how to select suppliers based on their ability to supply external services , IVD manufacturers would know how to meet the needs of laboratories , and the cooperation between IVD manufacturers and laboratories would be facilitated .%体外诊断医疗器械的制造商是医学实验室外部服务的重要供方,制造商提供的设备、试剂及耗材的质量和良好售后维护服务是保证医学实验室检验结果的质量起着至关重要作用。也是建立并维护制造商声誉和信誉的重要保障。 ISO 15189:2012《医学实验室质量和能力的要求》(第三版)于2012年11月1日发布,替代ISO 15189:2007。新版标准中有很多涉及体外诊断医疗器械制造商的要求。通过对标准中对体外诊断医疗器械制造商要求的分析,帮助制造商更好理解标准从而满足医学实验室的需求,以及医学实验室准确理解标准要求,更科学合理选择外部服务,促进制造商与医学实验室的有机合作。(中华检验医学杂志,2015,38:502-504)

  18. Desktop Manufacturing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Desktop manufacturing is the use of data from a computer-assisted design system to construct actual models of an object. Emerging processes are stereolithography, laser sintering, ballistic particle manufacturing, laminated object manufacturing, and photochemical machining. (SK)

  19. Geosynchronous platform definition study. Volume 4, Part 1: Traffic analysis and system requirements for the baseline traffic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The traffic analyses and system requirements data generated in the study resulted in the development of two traffic models; the baseline traffic model and the new traffic model. The baseline traffic model provides traceability between the numbers and types of geosynchronous missions considered in the study and the entire spectrum of missions foreseen in the total national space program. The information presented pertaining to the baseline traffic model includes: (1) definition of the baseline traffic model, including identification of specific geosynchronous missions and their payload delivery schedules through 1990; (2) Satellite location criteria, including the resulting distribution of the satellite population; (3) Geosynchronous orbit saturation analyses, including the effects of satellite physical proximity and potential electromagnetic interference; and (4) Platform system requirements analyses, including satellite and mission equipment descriptions, the options and limitations in grouping satellites, and on-orbit servicing criteria (both remotely controlled and man-attended).

  20. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortovich, C. [PCC Airfoils, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The efficiency and effectiveness of the gas turbine engine is directly related to the turbine inlet temperatures. The ability to increase these temperatures has occurred as a result of improvements in materials, design, and processing techniques. A generic sequence indicating the relationship of these factors to temperature capability is schematically shown in Figure 1 for aircraft engine and land based engine materials. A basic contribution that is not captured by the Figure is the significant improvement in process and manufacturing capability that has accompanied each of these innovations. It is this capability that has allowed the designs and innovations to be applied on a high volume, cost effective scale in the aircraft gas turbine market.

  1. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Derivations and Verification of Plans. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K, Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques. This recommended procedure would be used as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. This document contains the outcome of the assessment.

  2. Predictors and outcomes of lead extraction requiring a bailout femoral approach: Data from 2 high-volume centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chami, Mikhael F; Merchant, Faisal M; Waheed, Anam; Khattak, Furqan; El-Khalil, Jad; Patel, Adarsh; Sayegh, Michael N; Desai, Yaanik; Leon, Angel R; Saba, Samir

    2017-04-01

    Lead extraction (LE) infrequently requires the use of the "bailout" femoral approach. Predictors and outcomes of femoral extraction are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine the predictors of need for femoral LE and its outcomes. Consecutive patients who underwent LE at our centers were identified. Baseline demographic characteristics, procedural outcomes, and clinical outcomes were ascertained by medical record review. Patients were stratified into 2 groups on the basis of the need for femoral extraction. A total of 1080 patients underwent LE, of whom 50 (4.63%) required femoral extraction. Patients requiring femoral extraction were more likely to have leads with longer dwell time (9.5 ± 6.0 years vs 5.7 ± 4.3 years; P extracted per procedure (2.0 ± 1.0 vs 1.7 ± 0.9; P = .003), and to have infection as an indication for extraction (72% vs 37.2%; P extraction group than in the nonfemoral group (58% and 76% vs 94.7% and 97.9 %, respectively; P extraction was needed in ~5% of LEs. Longer lead dwell time, higher number of leads extracted per procedure, and the presence of infection predicted the need for femoral extraction. Procedural success of femoral extraction was low, highlighting the fact that this approach is mostly used as a bailout strategy and thus selects for more challenging cases. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Detecting Attacks in CyberManufacturing Systems: Additive Manufacturing Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Mingtao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available CyberManufacturing System is a vision for future manufacturing where physical components are fully integrated with computational processes in a connected environment. However, realizing the vision requires that its security be adequately ensured. This paper presents a vision-based system to detect intentional attacks on additive manufacturing processes, utilizing machine learning techniques. Particularly, additive manufacturing systems have unique vulnerabilities to malicious attacks, which can result in defective infills but without affecting the exterior. In order to detect such infill defects, the research uses simulated 3D printing process images as well as actual 3D printing process images to compare accuracies of machine learning algorithms in classifying, clustering and detecting anomalies on different types of infills. Three algorithms - (i random forest, (ii k nearest neighbor, and (iii anomaly detection - have been adopted in the research and shown to be effective in detecting such defects.

  4. Tribology in Manufacturing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The present book aims to provide research advances on tribology in manufacturing technology for modern industry. This book can be used as a research book for final undergraduate engineering course (for example, mechanical, manufacturing, materials, etc) or as a subject on manufacturing at the postgraduate level. Also, this book can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and tribology researchers, mechanical, mechanical, manufacturing and materials engineers, professionals in related industries with manufacturing and tribology.

  5. Contemporary design and manufacturing technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Taiyong; Zuo, Dunwen

    2013-01-01

    The special topic volume communicates the latest progress and research results of new theory, new technology, method, equipment and so on in Engineering Technology, and to grasp the updated technological and research trends in internationally. The major topics covered by the special volumes include Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technologies, Control, Automation and Detection Systems, Advanced Design Technology, Optimization and Modeling. In 80 invited and peer-reviewed papers, mechanical and other engineers describe their recent and current research and results in advanced materials and

  6. The effects of ultrasound guidance and neurostimulation on the minimum effective anesthetic volume of mepivacaine 1.5% required to block the sciatic nerve using the subgluteal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelli, Giorgio; Ghisi, Daniela; Fanelli, Andrea; Ortu, Andrea; Moschini, Elisa; Berti, Marco; Ziegler, Stefanie; Fanelli, Guido

    2009-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ultrasound (US) guidance may reduce the minimum effective anesthetic volume (MEAV(50)) of 1.5% mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve with a subgluteal approach compared with neurostimulation (NS). After premedication and single-injection femoral nerve block, 60 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block with either NS (n = 30) or US (n = 30). In the US group, the sciatic nerve was localized between the ischial tuberosity and the greater trochanter. In the NS group, the appropriate muscular response (foot plantar flexion or inversion) was elicited (1.5 mA, 2 Hz, 0.1 ms) and maintained to mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve compared with NS.

  7. Goal-Directed Fluid Therapy Using Stroke Volume Variation Does Not Result in Pulmonary Fluid Overload in Thoracic Surgery Requiring One-Lung Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Haas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT guided by functional parameters of preload, such as stroke volume variation (SVV, seems to optimize hemodynamics and possibly improves clinical outcome. However, this strategy is believed to be rather fluid aggressive, and, furthermore, during surgery requiring thoracotomy, the ability of SVV to predict volume responsiveness has raised some controversy. So far it is not known whether GDT is associated with pulmonary fluid overload and a deleterious reduction in pulmonary function in thoracic surgery requiring one-lung-ventilation (OLV. Therefore, we assessed the perioperative course of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI and paO2/FiO2-ratio during and after thoracic surgery requiring lateral thoracotomy and OLV to evaluate the hypothesis that fluid therapy guided by SVV results in pulmonary fluid overload. Methods. A total of 27 patients (group T were enrolled in this prospective study with 11 patients undergoing lung surgery (group L and 16 patients undergoing esophagectomy (group E. Goal-directed fluid management was guided by SVV (SVV 0.05 in EVLWI during the observation period (BL: 7.8 ± 2.5, 24postop: 8.1 ± 2.4 mL/kg. A subgroup analysis for group L and group E also did not reveal significant changes of EVLWI. The paO2/FiO2-ratio decreased significantly during the observation period (group L: BL: 462 ± 140, OLVterm15: 338 ± 112 mmHg; group E: BL: 389 ± 101, 24postop: 303 ± 74 mmHg but remained >300 mmHg except during OLV. Conclusions. SVV-guided fluid management in thoracic surgery requiring lateral thoracotomy and one-lung ventilation does not result in pulmonary fluid overload. Although oxygenation was reduced, pulmonary function remained within a clinically acceptable range.

  8. Wartime Requirements for Ammunition, Materiel and Personnel (WARRAMP). Volume III. Ammunition Post Processor User’s Manual (APP-UM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    preparation of the Distribution Requirement Report and the 3 - Day Report; these are produced and copied into the output file REPORTI by the program, and is...day in the study the number of samples or postures that are being played, and the AMMO (or DATA) expenditure file. The main output file ** REPORTI is...34 is to be used instead of the Program File name for the remainder of the processing; o The old output file REPORTI (56REPORT)is deleted o The input

  9. Advanced manufacturing: Technology and international competitiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesar, A.

    1995-02-01

    Dramatic changes in the competitiveness of German and Japanese manufacturing have been most evident since 1988. All three countries are now facing similar challenges, and these challenges are clearly observed in human capital issues. Our comparison of human capital issues in German, Japanese, and US manufacturing leads us to the following key judgments: Manufacturing workforces are undergoing significant changes due to advanced manufacturing technologies. As companies are forced to develop and apply these technologies, the constituency of the manufacturing workforce (especially educational requirements, contingent labor, job content, and continuing knowledge development) is being dramatically and irreversibly altered. The new workforce requirements which result due to advanced manufacturing require a higher level of worker sophistication and responsibility.

  10. DECOMPOSITION OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M.Z.N. Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing is a global activity that started during the industrial revolution in the late 19th century to cater for the large-scale production of products. Since then, manufacturing has changed tremendously through the innovations of technology, processes, materials, communication and transportation. The major challenge facing manufacturing is to produce more products using less material, less energy and less involvement of labour. To face these challenges, manufacturing companies must have a strategy and competitive priority in order for them to compete in a dynamic market. A review of the literature on the decomposition of manufacturing processes outlines three main processes, namely: high volume, medium volume and low volume. The decomposition shows that each sub process has its own characteristics and depends on the nature of the firm’s business. Two extreme processes are continuous line production (fast extreme and project shop (slow extreme. Other processes are in between these two extremes of the manufacturing spectrum. Process flow patterns become less complex with cellular, line and continuous flow compared with jobbing and project. The review also indicates that when the product is high variety and low volume, project or functional production is applied.

  11. From shifting silt to solid stone: the manufacture of synthetic basalt in ancient mesopotamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone; Lindsley; Pigott; Harbottle; Ford

    1998-06-26

    Slabs and fragments of gray-black vesicular "rock," superficially resembling natural basalt but distinctive in chemistry and mineralogy, were excavated at the second-millennium B.C. Mesopotamian city of Mashkan-shapir, about 80 kilometers south of Baghdad, Iraq. Most of this material appears to have been deliberately manufactured by the melting and slow cooling of local alluvial silts. The high temperatures (about 1200 degreesC) required and the large volume of material processed indicate an industry in which lithic materials were manufactured ("synthetic basalt") for grinding grain and construction.

  12. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner that allows evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key non-manufacturing sectors. This volume presents tabular and graphical results of the historical analysis and projections for each SIC industry. (JF)

  13. 19 CFR 191.26 - Recordkeeping for manufacturing drawback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping for manufacturing drawback. 191.26...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Manufacturing Drawback § 191.26 Recordkeeping for manufacturing drawback. (a) Direct identification manufacturing—(1) Records required. Each manufacturer...

  14. 46 CFR 160.077-25 - Manufacturer records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manufacturer records. 160.077-25 Section 160.077-25... Manufacturer records. (a) Each manufacturer of hybrid PFD's must keep the records required by § 159.007-13 of... prescribed in § 159.077-13 of this chapter as long as the manufacturer's procedures and apparatus meet...

  15. 27 CFR 40.355 - Return of manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Return of manufacturer. 40..., AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Manufacture of Cigarette Papers and Tubes Taxes § 40.355 Return of manufacturer. (a) Requirement for filing. A manufacturer of cigarette papers and tubes shall file, for each...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.2 - Manufacturer installation instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacturer installation... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS General § 3285.2 Manufacturer installation instructions. (a) Instructions required. A manufacturer must provide with each new...

  17. 46 CFR 160.076-33 - Manufacturer records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manufacturer records. 160.076-33 Section 160.076-33... Manufacturer records. (a) Each manufacturer of inflatable PFDs shall keep the records of production inspections... information required by § 159.007-13 of this chapter, the manufacturer's records must also include...

  18. 46 CFR 164.019-15 - Component manufacturer records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Component manufacturer records. 164.019-15 Section 164... manufacturer records. (a) Each component manufacturer shall retain records as required by § 159.007-13 of this... corrective action taken, and the final disposition of each lot rejected. (c) Manufacturers...

  19. 10 CFR 52.167 - Issuance of manufacturing license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Issuance of manufacturing license. 52.167 Section 52.167... POWER PLANTS Manufacturing Licenses § 52.167 Issuance of manufacturing license. (a) After completing any... manufacturing license if the Commission finds that: (1) Applicable standards and requirements of the Act and the...

  20. Thin Wafer Processing——Handling and Processing Technologies Utilized in High Volume Manufacturing Environment%用于大批量制造环境的薄晶圆处理——传送和加工技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pargfrieder; P.; Lindner; S.; Dwyer; T.; Matthias

    2007-01-01

    在半导体生产商不断推进器件和圆片厚度薄型化的形势下,为满足与新产品和加工工艺有关的生产工艺挑战,必须采用更新的分裂方法.新面世的产品射频识别标签,更完善的IC卡以及集成度更高的存储器件,随着更新的从逻辑到存储器及图像传感器各种产品先进封装技术的来临,需要越来越薄基片.对此提出了一种基于临时键合以及新颖的粘接剂技术的适合于薄圆片传送和处理加工的完全解决方案(设备,材料以及工艺过程).这种方法与25 μm以下厚度圆片以及在原有设备没有变更的现有生产线进行薄圆片产品发展路线图加工工艺相适应.%As semiconductor manufacturer continue to push the thickness of devices and wafers down,new and disruptive methods to meet the manufacturing challenges associated with new products and processes have to be utilized. Emerging products, such as radio-frequency identification tags,more-sophisticated chip cards, or ever denser memory devices, along with the advent of new advanced packaging technologies for a variety of products ranging from logic to memory to image sensors require increasingly thinner substrates.In this paper a complete solution (equipment, material and process) for thin wafer handling and processing is presented based on temporary bonding and novel adhesives by Brewer Science. This approach is compatible with product roadmaps to less than 25 micron wafer thickness and enables processing of the thin wafers in existing fabs without modification of the existing equipment.

  1. Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Volume 4: Future requirements of dedicated freighter aircraft to year 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The 1978 fleet operations are extended to the year 1992, thus providing an evaluation of current aircraft types in meeting the ensuing increased market demand. Possible changes in the fleet mix and the resulting economic situation are defined in terms of the number of units of each type aircraft and the resulting growth in operational frequency. Among the economic parameters considered are the associated investment required by the airline, the return on investment to the airline, and the accompanying levels of cash flow and operating income. Against this background the potential for a derivative aircraft to enter fleet operations in 1985 is defined as a function of payload size and as affected by 1980 technology. In a similar manner, the size and potential for a new dedicated 1990 technology, freighter aircraft to become operational in 1995 is established. The resulting aircraft and fleet operational and economic characteristics are evaluated over the period 1994 to 2008. The impacts of restricted growth in operational frequency, reduced market demand, variations in aircraft configurations, and military participation, are assessed.

  2. An Assessment of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies Implementation in Manufacturing Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Yasin Shaikh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of AMTs (Advanced Manufacturing Technologies has always been the high interest and core issue for the manufacturing enterprises to get rapid production for global market place. The developed countries have achieved its competitive advantage by implementing this unique model of technologies with full range of systems. In developing countries, the implementation of such technologies is not much common due to so many reasons, (political, social, economical and technical but entrepreneurs of growing economies are contemplating to reshape long term strategy to adopt Computer systems oriented technologies in their manufacturing companies to meet the growing needs of their indigenous market on one hand and to make a place in the international market on the other. Although, very few manufacturing organization do meet the global market requirements. But there is still lot of efforts to be taken for world class competition. An attempt has been made in this paper to develop a conceptual model taking in to account the three parameters such as, Direct, Indirect and Administrative AMTs. This research work further attempts to present an empirical data analysis conducted in the manufacturing enterprises in province of Sindh, Pakistan. The overall indigenous progress of manufacturing enterprises as according to the data collected from 60 companies reveals that the AMTs systems are partially understood and practiced that is also one of the cause towards slow progress of national exchequer.

  3. Decentralized manufacturing of cell and gene therapies: Overcoming challenges and identifying opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard P; Ruck, Steven; Medcalf, Nicholas; Rafiq, Qasim A

    2017-10-01

    Decentralized or "redistributed" manufacturing has the potential to revolutionize the manufacturing approach for cell and gene therapies (CGTs), moving away from the "Fordist" paradigm, delivering health care locally, customized to the end user and, by its very nature, overcoming many of the challenges associated with manufacturing and distribution of high volume goods. In departing from the traditional centralized model of manufacturing, decentralized manufacturing divides production across sites or geographic regions. This paradigm shift imposes significant structural and organisational changes on a business presenting both hidden challenges that must be addressed and opportunities to be embraced. By profoundly adapting business practices, significant advantages can be realized through a democratized value chain, creation of professional-level jobs without geographic restriction to the central hub and a flexibility in response to external pressures and demands. To realize these potential opportunities, however, advances in manufacturing technology and support systems are required, as well as significant changes in the way CGTs are regulated to facilitate multi-site manufacturing. Decentralized manufacturing is likely to be the manufacturing platform of choice for advanced health care therapies-in particular, those with a high degree of personalization. The future success of these promising products will be enhanced by adopting sound business strategies early in development. To realize the benefits that decentralized manufacturing of CGTs has to offer, it is important to examine both the risks and the substantial opportunities present. In this research, we examine both the challenges and the opportunities this shift in business strategy represents in an effort to maximize the success of adoption. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Manufacturing network evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Farooq, Sami; Johansen, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the effect of changes at the manufacturing plant level on other plants in the manufacturing network and also investigates the role of manufacturing plants on the evolution of a manufacturing network. Design/methodology/approach –The research questions are developed......, the complex phenomenon of a manufacturing network evolution is observed by combining the analysis of a manufacturing plant and network level. The historical trajectories of manufacturing networks that are presented in the case studies are examined in order to understand and determine the future shape...

  5. Manufacturing network evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Farooq, Sami; Johansen, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the effect of changes at the manufacturing plant level on other plants in the manufacturing network and also investigates the role of manufacturing plants on the evolution of a manufacturing network. Design/methodology/approach –The research questions are developed...... by identifying the gaps in the reviewed literature. The paper is based on three case studies undertaken in Danish manufacturing companies to explore in detail their manufacturing plants and networks. The cases provide a sound basis for developing the research questions and explaining the interaction between...... different manufacturing plants in the network and their impact on network transformation. Findings – The paper highlights the dominant role of manufacturing plants in the continuously changing shape of a manufacturing network. The paper demonstrates that a product or process change at one manufacturing...

  6. Future manufacturing techniques for stacked MCM interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, R. F.; Seigal, P. K.; Craft, D. C.; Lovejoy, M. L.

    1994-06-01

    As multichip modules (MCMs) grow in chip count and complexity, increasingly large numbers of input/output (I/O) channels will be required for connection to other MCMs or printed wiring boards. In applications such as digital signal processing, large increases in processing density (number of operations in a given volume) can be obtained in stacked MCM arrangements. The potential pin counts and required I/O densities in these stacked architectures will push beyond the limits of present interlevel coupling techniques. This problem is particularly acute if easy separation of layers is needed to meet MCM testing and yield requirements. Solutions to this problem include the use of laser-drilled, metal-filled electrical vias in the MCM substrate and also optoelectronic data channels that operate in large arrays. These arrays will emit and detect signals traveling perpendicular to the surface of the MCM. All of these approaches will require packaging and alignment that makes use of advanced MCM manufacturing techniques.

  7. Challenges in manufacturing adenoviral vectors for global vaccine product deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellinga, Jort; Smith, J Patrick; Lipiec, Agnieszka; Majhen, Dragomira; Lemckert, Angelique; van Ooij, Mark; Ives, Paul; Yallop, Christopher; Custers, Jerome; Havenga, Menzo

    2014-04-01

    Abstract Once adenovirus vector-based vaccines are licensed for the prevention of important infectious diseases, manufacturing processes capable of reliably delivering large numbers of vaccine doses will be required. The highest burden of disease for many infectious pathogens under investigation occurs in resource-poor settings. Therefore, the price per dose will be an important determinant of success. This review describes common practices for manufacturing replication-incompetent adenovirus vectors at clinical scale. Recent innovations and strategies aimed at improving the cost-effectiveness of manufacturing and ensuring high-volume vaccine production and purification are described. Hereto, technologies to increase bioreactor yields are reviewed. In addition, the use of single-use perfusion bioreactors, modification of some purification steps to avoid the use of expensive endonucleases, and use of charged filters during anion exchange all have the potential to bring down the cost of goods and are thus described. Finally, processes for ensuring quality throughout the manufacturing process, methods for testing viral identity, and safety of master seeds through to the end vaccine product are described.

  8. Application of layout optimization to the design of additively manufactured metallic components

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, C. J.; Gilbert, M.; Todd, I; Derguti, F.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (‘3D printing’) techniques provide engineers with unprecedented design freedoms, opening up the possibility for stronger and lighter component designs. In this paper ‘layout optimization’ is used to provide a reference volume and to identify potential design topologies for a given component, providing a useful alternative to continuum based topology optimization approaches (which normally require labour intensive post-processing in order to realise a practical component...

  9. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  10. The technology base for agile manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brost, R. C.; Strip, D. R.; Eicker, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    The effective use of information is a critical problem faced by manufacturing organizations that must respond quickly to market changes. As product runs become shorter, rapid and efficient development of product manufacturing facilities becomes crucial to commercial success. Effective information utilization is a key element to successfully meeting these requirements. This paper reviews opportunities for developing technical solutions to information utilization problems within a manufacturing enterprise and outlines a research agenda for solving these problems.

  11. Implementation of Lean Manufacturing System for Successful Production System in Manufacturing Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shoeb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In manufacturing industries lean manufacturing is a broadly accepted philosophy. There are more requirements of research and studies. To investigate the needs, techniques, benefits of lean manufacturing and approaches for implementation Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm has applied in many economy sectors, where we have to reduce manufacturing cost, improving product quality, reducing cost of poor quality, and quick to respond and “first to market to customer needs are critical to competitiveness and success. Lean methods and principle focus on the continuous improvement and engages employees reducing the intensity of materials, time, and capital necessary for meeting a customer’s needs. Successful implementation of lean manufacturing is very important to increase quality and waste reduction. By implementation of lean manufacturing there are various benefits such as waste elimination, reduction in reworking, financial benefits, lead time reduction and lower inventory levels.

  12. Cloud manufacturing: from concept to practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Tao, Fei; Zhao, Chun; Chai, Xudong; Zhao, Xinpei

    2015-02-01

    The concept of cloud manufacturing is emerging as a new promising manufacturing paradigm, as well as a business model, which is reshaping the service-oriented, highly collaborative, knowledge-intensive and eco-efficient manufacturing industry. However, the basic concepts about cloud manufacturing are still in discussion. Both academia and industry will need to have a commonly accepted definition of cloud manufacturing, as well as further guidance and recommendations on how to develop and implement cloud manufacturing. In this paper, we review some of the research work and clarify some fundamental terminologies in this field. Further, we developed a cloud manufacturing systems which may serve as an application example. From a systematic and practical perspective, the key requirements of cloud manufacturing platforms are investigated, and then we propose a cloud manufacturing platform prototype, MfgCloud. Finally, a public cloud manufacturing system for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) is presented. This paper presents a new perspective for cloud manufacturing, as well as a cloud-to-ground solution. The integrated solution proposed in this paper, including the terminology, MfgCloud, and applications, can push forward this new paradigm from concept to practice.

  13. Sustainable manufacturing challenges, solutions and implementation perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Seliger, Günther; Bonvoisin, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability imposes an unprecedented challenge on society and has become the driving force of an urgent search for innovative solutions in all branches of economy. Manufacturing plays a key role in many areas of human living, and it is both part of the problem and of the solution. This book offers an overview of the broad field of research on sustainability in manufacturing with a particular focus on manufacturing technology and management. It summarizes the current challenges, describes best in class methods for development of sustainable manufacturing solutions and offers implementation perspectives. This volume covers areas of research such as production processes, product development, business model and corporate development, macro economy and education. The target audience primarily comprises research experts and practitioners in the field of manufacturing, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students. .

  14. Predictive Manufacturing: Classification of categorical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Abdul Rauf; Schiøler, Henrik; Kulahci, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Today, advances in computing along with smart sensor technologies are redesigning the whole manufacturing paradigm. Advanced sensors have boosted the transition in manufacturing systems from semi-automated to fully automated manufacturing processes. The distinguishing feature of these automated...... processes is high volume of information about the process dynamics. In this paper we present a methodology to deal with the categorical data streams from manufacturing processes, with an objective of predicting failures on the last stage of the process. A thorough examination of the behaviour...... and classification capabilities of our methodology (on different experimental settings) is done through a specially designed simulation experiment. Secondly, in order to demonstrate the applicability in a real life problem a data set from electronics component manufacturing is being analysed through our proposed...

  15. Strategic Roles of Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng

    Addressing three development trends of manufacturing, this thesis aims to explore: (1) facing challenges on manufacturing (globalisation, knowledge-based manufacturing and servitisation of manufacturing), what kinds of roles does manufacturing play within industrial companies; (2) along...... with the trend of globalisation, how do industrial companies develop their global manufacturing networks? These two questions are actually interlinked. On the one hand, facing increasing offshoring and outsourcing of production activities, industrial companies have to understand how to develop their global...... manufacturing networks. On the other hand, ongoing globalisation also brings tremendous impacts to post-industrial economies (e.g. Denmark). A dilemma therefore arises, i.e. whether it is still necessary to keep manufacturing in these post-industrial economies; if yes, what kinds of roles manufacturing should...

  16. Framework for Grid Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈笠; 邓宏; 邓倩妮; 吴振宇

    2004-01-01

    With the development of networked manufacturing, it is more and more imminent to solve problems caused by inherent limitations of network technology, such as heterogeneity, collaboration collision, and decentralized control.This paper presents a framework for grid manufacturing, which neatly combines grid technology with the infrastructure of advanced manufacturing technology.The paper studies grid-oriented knowledge description and acquisition, and constructs a distributed knowledge grid model.The paper also deals with the protocol of node description in collaborative design, and describes a distributed collaborative design model.The protocol and node technology leads to a collaborative production model for grid manufacturing.The framework for grid manufacturing offers an effective and feasible solution for the problems of networked manufacturing.The grid manufacturing will become an advanced distributed manufacturing model and promote the development of advanced manufacturing technologies.

  17. Additive Manufacturing Applications for Wind Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlström, Niklas; Gabrielsson, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D-printing is an automated manufacturing process in which the component is built layer upon layer from a predefined 3D computer model. In contrast to conventional manufacturing processes where a vast volume of material is wasted due to machining, AM only uses the material that the component consists of. In addition to material savings, the method has a number of potential benefits. Two of these are (1) a large design freedom which enables the produc...

  18. 48 CFR 11.105 - Items peculiar to one manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... manufacturer. 11.105 Section 11.105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... peculiar to one manufacturer. Agency requirements shall not be written so as to require a particular brand name, product, or a feature of a product, peculiar to one manufacturer, thereby...

  19. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME I: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume represents the analysis of case study facilities' experience with waterbased adhesive use and retrofit requirements. (NOTE: The coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry was selected as part of NRMRL'S support of the 33/50 Program because of its significan...

  20. Research on TQCS Strategy of Digital Manufacturing Resource Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zude; ZHANG Huifu

    2006-01-01

    Heterogeneous in nature, digitized manufacturing resources are geographically distributed, and owned by different organizations each having their own resource management policies and different access-and-cost models. In this paper, by means of stateful serviceData, we make manufacturing resources as grid nodes. Considering TQCS requirements of resources in the manufacturing industry, we capture the essentials of grid resource management models and propose the TQCS market model to inquire, browse and use manufacturing resources. The manufacturing resource integration will integrate and organize the manufacture technology resource to form the core manufacture powers.

  1. Strategi Bersaing dengan Agile Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidah Tussifah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Competitive advantage now increasingly rests upon a dynamic capability to compete successfully in an environment of frequent, challenging and unpredictable change. The agile manufacturing a recently popularized concept has been advocated as the 21st century manufacturing paradigm. In adopting and developing the key elements of agile manufactruring, there is requirement for enterprises to overcome the philosophical challenges of a shift from mass/lean production to the customization of agility. Beside that, enterprises should explore the key success factors to support succesfull agile implementation.

  2. Semiconductors integrated circuit design for manufacturability

    CERN Document Server

    Balasinki, Artur

    2011-01-01

    Because of the continuous evolution of integrated circuit manufacturing (ICM) and design for manufacturability (DfM), most books on the subject are obsolete before they even go to press. That's why the field requires a reference that takes the focus off of numbers and concentrates more on larger economic concepts than on technical details. Semiconductors: Integrated Circuit Design for Manufacturability covers the gradual evolution of integrated circuit design (ICD) as a basis to propose strategies for improving return-on-investment (ROI) for ICD in manufacturing. Where most books put the spotl

  3. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  4. Programmatic implications of implementing the relational algebraic capacitated location (RACL) algorithm outcomes on the allocation of laboratory sites, test volumes, platform distribution and space requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Naseem; Smith, Honora; Coetzee, Lindi M; Glencross, Deborah K

    2017-01-01

    CD4 testing in South Africa is based on an integrated tiered service delivery model that matches testing demand with capacity. The National Health Laboratory Service has predominantly implemented laboratory-based CD4 testing. Coverage gaps, over-/under-capacitation and optimal placement of point-of-care (POC) testing sites need investigation. We assessed the impact of relational algebraic capacitated location (RACL) algorithm outcomes on the allocation of laboratory and POC testing sites. The RACL algorithm was developed to allocate laboratories and POC sites to ensure coverage using a set coverage approach for a defined travel time (T). The algorithm was repeated for three scenarios (A: T = 4; B: T = 3; C: T = 2 hours). Drive times for a representative sample of health facility clusters were used to approximate T. Outcomes included allocation of testing sites, Euclidian distances and test volumes. Additional analysis included platform distribution and space requirement assessment. Scenarios were reported as fusion table maps. Scenario A would offer a fully-centralised approach with 15 CD4 laboratories without any POC testing. A significant increase in volumes would result in a four-fold increase at busier laboratories. CD4 laboratories would increase to 41 in scenario B and 61 in scenario C. POC testing would be offered at two sites in scenario B and 20 sites in scenario C. The RACL algorithm provides an objective methodology to address coverage gaps through the allocation of CD4 laboratories and POC sites for a given T. The algorithm outcomes need to be assessed in the context of local conditions.

  5. Programmatic implications of implementing the relational algebraic capacitated location (RACL algorithm outcomes on the allocation of laboratory sites, test volumes, platform distribution and space requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Cassim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: CD4 testing in South Africa is based on an integrated tiered service delivery model that matches testing demand with capacity. The National Health Laboratory Service has predominantly implemented laboratory-based CD4 testing. Coverage gaps, over-/under-capacitation and optimal placement of point-of-care (POC testing sites need investigation.Objectives: We assessed the impact of relational algebraic capacitated location (RACL algorithm outcomes on the allocation of laboratory and POC testing sites.Methods: The RACL algorithm was developed to allocate laboratories and POC sites to ensure coverage using a set coverage approach for a defined travel time (T. The algorithm was repeated for three scenarios (A: T = 4; B: T = 3; C: T = 2 hours. Drive times for a representative sample of health facility clusters were used to approximate T. Outcomes included allocation of testing sites, Euclidian distances and test volumes. Additional analysis included platform distribution and space requirement assessment. Scenarios were reported as fusion table maps.Results: Scenario A would offer a fully-centralised approach with 15 CD4 laboratories without any POC testing. A significant increase in volumes would result in a four-fold increase at busier laboratories. CD4 laboratories would increase to 41 in scenario B and 61 in scenario C. POC testing would be offered at two sites in scenario B and 20 sites in scenario C.Conclusion: The RACL algorithm provides an objective methodology to address coverage gaps through the allocation of CD4 laboratories and POC sites for a given T. The algorithm outcomes need to be assessed in the context of local conditions.

  6. Energy Efficiency in Manufacturing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thiede, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption is of great interest to manufacturing companies. Beyond considering individual processes and machines, the perspective on process chains and factories as a whole holds major potentials for energy efficiency improvements. To exploit these potentials, dynamic interactions of different processes as well as auxiliary equipment (e.g. compressed air generation) need to be taken into account. In addition, planning and controlling manufacturing systems require  balancing technical, economic and environmental objectives. Therefore, an innovative and comprehensive methodology – with a generic energy flow-oriented manufacturing simulation environment as a core element – is developed and embedded into a step-by-step application cycle. The concept is applied in its entirety to a wide range of case studies such as aluminium die casting, weaving mills, and printed circuit board assembly in order to demonstrate the broad applicability and the benefits that can be achieved.

  7. Energy efficiency in manufacturing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiede, Sebastian [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkzeugmaschinen und Fertigungstechnik

    2012-07-01

    Energy consumption is of great interest to manufacturing companies. Beyond considering individual processes and machines, the perspective on process chains and factories as a whole holds major potentials for energy efficiency improvements. To exploit these potentials, dynamic interactions of different processes as well as auxiliary equipment (e.g. compressed air generation) need to be taken into account. In addition, planning and controlling manufacturing systems require balancing technical, economic and environmental objectives. Therefore, an innovative and comprehensive methodology - with a generic energy flow-oriented manufacturing simulation environment as a core element - is developed and embedded into a step-by-step application cycle. The concept is applied in its entirety to a wide range of case studies such as aluminium die casting, weaving mills, and printed circuit board assembly in order to demonstrate the broad applicability and the benefits that can be achieved.

  8. Northwest Manufacturing Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    warehouse. If the batch of lenses is faulty, the manufacturer wants to know ASAP in order to send Visionary Lenses a new batch of lenses. The manufacturer ...increased. • A few years ago, Nike started using pre-consumer Nike Grind – (scrap material from their manufacturing facilities) – in new ...Northwest ( in particular with firms in the manufacturing eco-system of defense supply chains). Special emphasis was placed to increase the

  9. Manufacturing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johannes; Boer, Henrike Engele Elisabeth; Boer, Harry

    This report compares the manufacturing strategies, practices, performances and improvement activities of 39 companies that are representative for the Danish assembly industry with those of 804 companies from 19 other countries. The data supporting this report were collected in 2013 and concern......: • Manufacturing strategies pursued and implemented between 2010 and 2012. • Performance improvements achieved during that period. • Actual manufacturing practices and performances as well as competitive priorities in 2012. • Manufacturing strategies pursued for the years 2010-2012....

  10. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  11. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) improvements for ENTECH's concentrator module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.; Perry, J.L.; Jackson, M.C.; Walters, R.R. (ENTECH, Inc., Dallas-Fort Worth Airport, TX (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This final technical report documents ENTECH's Phase 1 contract with Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Under this project we prepared a detailed description of our current manufacturing process for making our unique linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator modules. In addition, we prepared a detailed description of an improved manufacturing process, which will simultaneously increase module production rates, enhance module quality, and substantially reduce module costs. We also identified potential problems in implementing the new manufacturing process, and we proposed solutions to these anticipated problems. Before discussing the key results of our program, however, we present a brief description of our unique photovoltaic technology. The key conclusion of our PVMAT Phase 1 study is that our module technology, without further breakthroughs, can realistically meet the near-term DOE goal of 12 cents/kWh levelized electricity cost, provided that we successfully implement the new manufacturing process at a production volume of at least 10 megawatts per year. The key recommendation from our Phase 1 study is to continue our PVMaT project into Phase 2A, which is directed toward the actual manufacturing technology development required for our new module production process. 15 refs.

  12. Designing using manufacturing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecsi, T.; Hoque, A. S. M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design system that enables the composition of a part using manufacturing features. Features are selected from feature libraries. Upon insertion, the system ensures that the feature does not contradict the design-for-manufacture rules. This helps eliminating costly manufacturing problems. The system is developed as an extension to a commercial CAD/CAM system Pro/Engineer.

  13. Maintenance in sustainable manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Stuchly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sustainable development is about reaching a balance between economic, social, and environmental goals, as well as people's participation in the planning process in order to gain their input and support. For a company, sustainable development means adoption of such business strategy and actions that contribute to satisfying present needs of company and stakeholders, as well as simultaneous protection, maintenance and strengthening of human and environmental potential which will be needed in the future. This new approach forces manufacturing companies to change their previous management paradigms. New management paradigm should include new issues and develop innovative methods, practices and technologies striving for solving problem of shortages of resources, softening environment overload and enabling development of environment-friendly lifecycle of products. Hence, its realization requires updating existing production models as they are based on previously accepted paradigm of unlimited resources and unlimited regeneration capabilities. Maintenance plays a crucial role because of its impact on availability, reliability, quality and life cycle cost, thus it should be one of the main pillars of new business running model.  Material and methods: The following paper is a result of research on the literature and observation of practices undertaken by a company within maintenance area. Results and conclusions: The main message is that considering sustainable manufacturing requires considerable expanding range of analysis and focusing on supporting processes. Maintenance offers numerous opportunities of decreasing influence of business processes on natural environment and more efficient resources utilization. The goal of maintenance processes realizing sustainable development strategy is increased profitability of exploitation and optimization of total lifecycle cost without disturbing safety and environmental issues. 

  14. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in‐process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

  15. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by the Chronar Corporation, prepared by Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) for Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Development project. Amorphous silicon is chosen as the PV technology that Chronar Corporation and APS believe offers the greatest potential for manufacturing improvements, which, in turn, will result in significant cost reductions and performance improvements in photovoltaic products. The APS Eureka'' facility was chosen as the manufacturing system that can offer the possibility of achieving these production enhancements. The relationship of the Eureka'' facility to Chronar's batch'' plants is discussed. Five key areas are also identified that could meet the objectives of manufacturing potential that could lead to improved performance, reduced manufacturing costs, and significantly increased production. The projected long-term potential benefits of these areas are discussed, as well as problems that may impede the achievement of the hoped-for developments. A significant number of the problems discussed are of a generic nature and could be of general interest to the industry. The final section of this document addresses the cost and time estimates for achieving the solutions to the problems discussed earlier. Emphasis is placed on the number, type, and cost of the human resources required for the project.

  16. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  17. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT): Manufacturing Initiative Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA supports the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO). Hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) the AMNPO is...

  18. Mechatronic sensory system for computer integrated manufacturing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumile, CM

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available (CIM) systems plays an important role towards integrating such flexible systems. The requirement of fast and cheap design and redesign of manufacturing systems therefore is gaining in importance, considering not only the products and the physical...

  19. Discussion on advanced manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiankui

    2007-01-01

    Advanced manufacturing consists of continuity of manufacturing,its broad sense,and the core of the manufacturing process.The technology of continuous manufacturing is discussed according to both historical and modern perspectives.The relationship between human development and manufacturing technology is also discussed.Manufacturing is a continuously evolving topic.It is not only the foundation and means of imagination,conception,the science,and the technology of material change,but also the expression of national economy,national defense,and the support industries.The broad sense of manufacturing theory,which extends the concept of manufacturing,is an important development in the 20th century.The sense is analyzed in connection with design,material forming theory,synthesis of manufacturing technology,manufacturing modes,life cycle of product,hardware and sottware,and support environment,etc.At the same time,the core action and the development of the theory and technology of process is also discussed.At the end of this paper,the development directions of mechanical manufacturing science and technology are mentioned.

  20. Hydrogen manufacturing using plasma reformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A.; Hochgreb, S.; O`Brien, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Manufacturing of hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels is needed for a variety of applications. These applications include fuel cells used in stationary electric power production and in vehicular propulsion. Hydrogen can also be used for various combustion engine systems. There is a wide range of requirements on the capacity of the hydrogen manufacturing system, the purity of the hydrogen fuel, and capability for rapid response. The overall objectives of a hydrogen manufacturing facility are to operate with high availability at the lowest possible cost and to have minimal adverse environmental impact. Plasma technology has potential to significantly alleviate shortcomings of conventional means of manufacturing hydrogen. These shortcomings include cost and deterioration of catalysts; limitations on hydrogen production from heavy hydrocarbons; limitations on rapid response; and size and weight requirements. In addition, use of plasma technology could provide for a greater variety of operating modes; in particular the possibility of virtual elimination of CO{sub 2} production by pyrolytic operation. This mode of hydrogen production may be of increasing importance due to recent additional evidence of global warming.

  1. 21 CFR 111.210 - What must the master manufacturing record include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must the master manufacturing record include... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING...: Requirements for the Master Manufacturing Record § 111.210 What must the master manufacturing record...

  2. Connecting American Manufacturers (CAM) Virtual Manufacturing Marketplace (VMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    at a time. The GDIT Team tried several free web scraping utilities/programs that were just not up to the task for various reasons. The GDIT Team...which resulted in a more robust vendor profile. • A framework on the web site where vendors could update their profile. • A framework on the web site...team developed a web site where Government and commercial buyers could post their manufacturing requirements. o The buyers could post their

  3. Low Noise PAV Ducted Propeller using Automotive Manufacturing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A critical barrier for GA to serve as viable and volume personal transportation is the lack of a cost-effective, yet open-growth, Lean Design and manufacturing...

  4. Manufacturing of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will develop a technology that will enable nanoscale and microscale superhydrophobic (SHP) features to be imaged onto surfaces for the high-volume manufacturing of water-repellent components and coatings.

  5. Space Manufacturing: The Next Great Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Curreri, Peter; Sharpe, Jonathan B.; Colberg, Wendell R.; Vickers, John H.

    1998-01-01

    Space manufacturing encompasses the research, development and manufacture necessary for the production of any product to be used in near zero gravity, and the production of spacecraft required for transporting research or production devices to space. Manufacturing for space, and manufacturing in space will require significant breakthroughs in materials and manufacturing technology, as well as in equipment designs. This report reviews some of the current initiatives in achieving space manufacturing. The first initiative deals with materials processing in space, e.g., processing non-terrestrial and terrestrial materials, especially metals. Some of the ramifications of the United States Microgravity Payloads fourth (USMP-4) mission are discussed. Some problems in non-terrestrial materials processing are mentioned. The second initiative is structures processing in space. In order to accomplish this, the International Space Welding Experiment was designed to demonstrate welding technology in near-zero gravity. The third initiative is advancements in earth-based manufacturing technologies necessary to achieve low cost access to space. The advancements discussed include development of lightweight material having high specific strength, and automated fabrication and manufacturing methods for these materials.

  6. Leanergy(TM): how lean manufacturing can improve energy efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficiency has become a competitive issue for industrial companies. The evolution of energy prices and regulation will make this issue even more important in the future. For several years, the energy-intensive chemical industry has been implementing corrective actions. Helped by the absorption of base load energy consumption by larger production volumes, specific energy consumption (KWh per production unit) has been significantly reduced in recent years. However, most plants have reached the end of their first action plan based on improving the utilities performance. The Leanergy(TM) method developed by the consultancy company Okavango-energy, is a structured approach based on lean manufacturing which widens the scope of saving sources to process and operations. Starting from the analysis of actual production requirements, Okavango is able to adjust consumption to minimum requirements and so remove any energy consumption that does not contribute to the added value creation.

  7. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF MANUFACTURING STRATEGY OF PACKAGING PRODUCT-MANUFACTURING COMPANIES IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip P. Patil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents finding of a survey on manufacturing strategy implementation (MSI adopted by the Indian packaging product manufacturing companies (IPPMC. Though the companies differ in terms of prod uct types (shape, method, content and material of packaging, conversion system, sales volume and sophistication of machinery used, they share common purpose that are used for packaging the product s . With growth in demand for consumer products, packaging f orms basis of differentiating products from competitors. The survey shows emphasis on implementation of manufacturing strategy, key decision areas, identifies competitive priorities, order winners. To get insight, three companies are selected for detailed case studies.

  8. Silicon photonics manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Watts, Michael R

    2010-11-08

    Most demonstrations in silicon photonics are done with single devices that are targeted for use in future systems. One of the costs of operating multiple devices concurrently on a chip in a system application is the power needed to properly space resonant device frequencies on a system's frequency grid. We asses this power requirement by quantifying the source and impact of process induced resonant frequency variation for microdisk resonators across individual die, entire wafers and wafer lots for separate process runs. Additionally we introduce a new technique, utilizing the Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) modes in microdisks, to extract thickness and width variations across wafers and dice. Through our analysis we find that a standard six inch Silicon on Insulator (SOI) 0.35 μm process controls microdisk resonant frequencies for the TE fundamental resonances to within 1 THz across a wafer and 105 GHz within a single die. Based on demonstrated thermal tuner technology, a stable manufacturing process exhibiting this level of variation can limit the resonance trimming power per resonant device to 231 μW. Taken in conjunction with the power to compensate for thermal environmental variations, the expected power requirement to compensate for fabrication-induced non-uniformities is 17% of that total. This leads to the prediction that thermal tuning efficiency is likely to have the most dominant impact on the overall power budget of silicon photonics resonator technology.

  9. An Architecture for Hybrid Manufacturing Combining 3D Printing and CNC Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Müller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing is one of the key technologies of the 21st century. Additive manufacturing processes are often combined with subtractive manufacturing processes to create hybrid manufacturing because it is useful for manufacturing complex parts, for example, 3D printed sensor systems. Currently, several CNC machines are required for hybrid manufacturing: one machine is required for additive manufacturing and one is required for subtractive manufacturing. Disadvantages of conventional hybrid manufacturing methods are presented. Hybrid manufacturing with one CNC machine offers many advantages. It enables manufacturing of parts with higher accuracy, less production time, and lower costs. Using the example of fused layer modeling (FLM, we present a general approach for the integration of additive manufacturing processes into a numerical control for machine tools. The resulting CNC architecture is presented and its functionality is demonstrated. Its application is beyond the scope of this paper.

  10. 75 FR 82073 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 249 (Wednesday, December 29, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 82073] [FR Doc No: 2010-32855] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled... registered as a bulk manufacturer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedules I and...

  11. 75 FR 10313 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 43 (Friday, March 5, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 10313] [FR Doc No: 2010-4717] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances... as a bulk manufacturer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedules I and...

  12. Virtual Manufacturing : Tools for improving Design and Production

    CERN Document Server

    Dépincé, Philippe; Woelk, Peer-Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The research area "Virtual Manufacturing" can be defined as an integrated manufacturing environment which can enhance one or several levels of decision and control in manufacturing process. Several domains can be addressed: Product and Process Design, Process and Production Planning, Machine Tool, Robot and Manufacturing System. As automation technologies such as CAD/CAM have substantially shortened the time required to design products, Virtual Manufacturing will have a similar effect on the manufacturing phase thanks to the modelling, simulation and optimisation of the product and the processes involved in its fabrication.

  13. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 783 - Manufacturing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturing Activities No. Supplement No. 2 to Part 783 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... Part 783—Manufacturing Activities The following constitute manufacturing activities that require...

  14. 46 CFR 160.176-17 - Manufacturer records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manufacturer records. 160.176-17 Section 160.176-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Inflatable Lifejackets § 160.176-17 Manufacturer records. (a) Each manufacturer of inflatable lifejackets must keep the records required by § 159.007-13 of...

  15. 46 CFR 160.072-7 - Manufacturer certification and labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manufacturer certification and labeling. 160.072-7..., Orange Flag § 160.072-7 Manufacturer certification and labeling. (a) Each distress flag intended as a Day Visual Distress Signal required by 33 CFR Part 175 must be certified by the manufacturer as...

  16. 46 CFR 161.013-13 - Manufacturer certification and labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manufacturer certification and labeling. 161.013-13... § 161.013-13 Manufacturer certification and labeling. (a) Each electric light intended as a Night Visual Distress Signal required by 33 CFR part 175 must be certified by the manufacturer as complying with...

  17. 27 CFR 45.32 - Under manufacturer's bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Under manufacturer's bond..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Removals § 45.32 Under manufacturer's bond. Removals... filed by the manufacturer of such articles to cover the operations of his factory as required by...

  18. Designing modular manufacturing systems using mass customisation theories and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen Nordahl; Hvilshøj, Mads; Madsen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    . In response, modular manufacturing systems (MMS) are evolving, which are aimed to possess the required responsiveness and to be the manufacturing paradigm of mass customisation (MC). Hereby, MMS brings the development process of manufacturing systems against configured to order (CTO). Up to now, research...

  19. 21 CFR 146.153 - Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.153 Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing is the food that complies with the requirements of composition and label...

  20. MEASURING MANUFACTURING INNOVATIVENESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt, Henrik; Knudsen, Mette Præst

    2017-01-01

    Globalization and customization increases the pressure on manufacturing companies, and the ability to provide innovativeness is a potential source of competitive advantage. This paper positions the manufacturing entity in the innovation process, and investigates the relation between innovation vers...... technology and organizational concepts. Based on Danish survey data from the European Manufacturing Survey (EMS-2015) this paper finds that there is a relation between innovative companies, and their level of technology and use of organizational concepts. Technology and organizational concepts act...... as manufacturing levers to support the manufacturing and production system to provide innovativeness. The managerial implication lies in building manufacturing capabilities to support the innovative process, by standardization, optimization and creating stability in combination with automation and advanced...

  1. Cálculo do volume de sangue necessário para a correção da anemia fetal em gestantes isoimunizadas Blood volume calculation required for the correction of fetal anemia in pregnant women with alloimmunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Deolindo Santiago

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: obter uma equação capaz de estimar o volume de concentrado de hemácias a ser infundido para correção da anemia em fetos de gestantes portadoras de isoimunização pelo fator Rh, baseado em parâmetros alcançados durante a cordocentese prévia à transfusão intra-uterina. MÉTODOS: em estudo transversal, foram analisadas 89 transfusões intra-uterinas para correção de anemia em 48 fetos acompanhados no Centro de Medicina Fetal do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. A idade gestacional mediana, no momento da cordocentese, foi de 29 semanas e a média de procedimentos por feto foi de 2,1. A hemoglobina fetal foi dosada antes e após a cordocentese, sendo verificado o volume de concentrado de hemácias transfundido. Para determinação de uma fórmula para estimar o volume sanguíneo necessário para correção da anemia fetal, tomou-se como base o volume necessário para elevar em 1 g% a hemoglobina fetal (diferença entre a concentração de hemoglobina final e a inicial, dividida pelo volume transfundido e o volume de quanto seria necessário para se atingir 14 g%, em análise de regressão múltipla. RESULTADOS: a concentração da hemoglobina pré-transfusional variou entre 2,3 e 15,7 g%. A prevalência de anemia fetal (HbPURPOSE: to obtain an equation to estimate the volume of red blood cells concentrate to be infused to correct anemia in fetuses of pregnant women with Rh factor isoimmunization, based in parameters obtained along the cordocentesis previous to intrauterine transfusion. METHODS: a transversal study analyzing 89 intrauterine transfusions to correct anemia in 48 fetuses followed-up in the Centro de Medicina Fetal do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de Minas Gerais. The median gestational age at the cordocentesis was 29 weeks and the average number of procedures was 2.1. Fetal hemoglobin was assayed before and after cordocentesis, leading to the volume of transfused red blood

  2. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Maryland provides the state of the art facilities for realizing next generation products and educating the...

  3. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  4. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  5. Implementing Manufacturing as a Service : A Pull-Driven Agent-Based Manufacturing Grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moergestel, Leo van; Puik, Erik; Telgen, Daniël; Meyer, John-Jules Ch.

    2015-01-01

    User requirements and low-cost small quantity production are new challenges for the modern manufacturing industry. This means that small batch sizes or even the manufacturing of one single product should be affordable. To make such a system cost-effective it should be capable to use the available pr

  6. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  7. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts.

  8. Larger, Lighter Space Telescopes by Implementing In-Space Manufacturing Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, James t.; Gregory, Don; Herren, Ken; Howsman, Tom

    2007-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for larger, lighter, and higher quality telescopes from both the astronomical and global surveillance communities one looking up and the other down. Enabling technologies must be developed and implemented that will allow this goal to be financially and technically feasible. The optical systems needed far high spatial resolution surveillance and astronomical applications require large optical, apertures with mention of future systems up to 150 meter in diameter. With traditional optical manufacturing technologies, large optical aperture means high mass and long fabrication lead times with associated high costs. Completely new approaches to optical fabrication must be developed to enable the fabrication of such optical systems. The cost and lead time associated with the fabrication of lightweight, high quality optical systems limits the feasible size of the optics. A primary factor in the launch cost of space optical systems is volume and mass. To minimize the mass of the high quality optics, optical fabricators implement materials with high specific stiffness and use honeycomb, or other structural minimization patterns, to support the optical surface; however, the structure must still be designed to survive launch loads. This sigmficantly adds to the fabrication difficulty and dramatically increases launch costs. One approach to minimizing launch volume and negating the need for the design to survive launch loads is to send the manufacturing facility and raw materials into space and perform the fabrication in-situ. We, are currently performing feasibility studies of initial concepts for inspace manufacturing of optical systems. By utilizing the micro-gravity and vacuum environment of space while eliminating the constraints defined by high launch forces and limited volume of the launch vehicle, the development of large, high quality glass membrane mirrors may be feasible. Several concepts were investigated to address the manufacturing of

  9. Agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterling, R.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Initiatives Dept.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of agile manufacturing is to provide the ability to quickly realize high-quality, highly-customized, in-demand products at a cost commensurate with mass production. More broadly, agility in manufacturing, or any other endeavor, is defined as change-proficiency; the ability to thrive in an environment of unpredictable change. This report discusses the general direction of the agile manufacturing initiative, including research programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy, and other government agencies, but focuses on agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective. The role of statistics can be important because agile manufacturing requires the collection and communication of process characterization and capability information, much of which will be data-based. The statistical community should initiate collaborative work in this important area.

  10. Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whisnant, R.A. (Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project. PVMaT is a five-year project to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DOE/industry partnership, seeks to advanced PV manufacturing technologies, reduce PV module production costs, increase module performance, and expand US commercial production capacities. Under PVMaT, manufacturers will propose specific manufacturing process improvements that may contribute to the goals of the project, which is to lessen the cost, thus hastening entry into the larger scale, grid-connected applications. Phase 1 of the PVMaT project is to identify obstacles and problems associated with manufacturing processes. This report describes the cost analysis methodology required under Phase 1 that will allow subcontractors to be ranked and evaluated during Phase 2.

  11. The Economics of Big Area Addtiive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Lindahl, John [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Case studies on the economics of Additive Manufacturing (AM) suggest that processing time is the dominant cost in manufacturing. Most additive processes have similar performance metrics: small part sizes, low production rates and expensive feedstocks. Big Area Additive Manufacturing is based on transitioning polymer extrusion technology from a wire to a pellet feedstock. Utilizing pellets significantly increases deposition speed and lowers material cost by utilizing low cost injection molding feedstock. The use of carbon fiber reinforced polymers eliminates the need for a heated chamber, significantly reducing machine power requirements and size constraints. We hypothesize that the increase in productivity coupled with decrease in feedstock and energy costs will enable AM to become more competitive with conventional manufacturing processes for many applications. As a test case, we compare the cost of using traditional fused deposition modeling (FDM) with BAAM for additively manufacturing composite tooling.

  12. Contribution of additive manufacturing systems to supply chain

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Satya; Mattiuzza, Stefano; Naghi Ganji, Elmira; Coutroubis, Alec

    2017-01-01

    The current economic pressures have been challenging manufacturing SMEs that play a complicated role in the Supply Chain (SC); and innovation in the manufacturing supply chain which requires new approaches and technologies. Additive Manufacturing (AM) is considered by research studies as pioneering and disruptive technology that can drive such a transformation. This paper is aimed at investigating in what measures can additive manufacturing techniques adopted as an opportunity for the supply ...

  13. 我国制成品出口规模的理论分析:1985-2030%Theoretical Analysis of China's Manufactured Goods Export Volume: 1985--2030

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴长洪; 郑文

    2012-01-01

    The existing international trade theory focuses on the mechanism of the international trade, but does not give an effective method to explain a country's goods export proportion in the world. We think that research of merchandise exports must distinguish commodity structure ; whereas the trade of manufactured goods is the most important in international trade, we select the manufactured goods as the research object and establish a theory frame and empirical model for the measuring of a country's manufactured goods export proportion in the world. Through the large sample test, we get the following conclusion: A country's manufactured goods exports proportion in the world is decided mainly by the amount of its population, population density, population age structure, capital formation, economic development mode, trade cost comparison and profits convert. We apply the above theory and model, soundly explain China's manufactured goods export growth in the 1985--2010 years and simulate its developing in 2010--2030 period in six situations. Then,We make the following prediction: the 2010--2020 period will still be the golden era for China's manufactured goods export growth; during the 2020--2030 period,the global proportion of China's manufactured goods export will enter into a high level stage, and will reach the historic peak about 25% ; then, mainly by the large and swiftly increasing of the dependency ratio of population, the long-term growth trend of China's manufactured goods exports will be stop, thus China's manufactured goods exports would enter into a declining stage.%现有国际贸易理论主要探讨了国际贸易的发生机制,但没有给出一国商品出口总量决定的有效方法。本文认为,研究商品出口必须注意区分商品结构,鉴于制成品出口在全球商品出口中占据最主要的地位,本文以制成品出口为研究对象,构建了衡量一国制成品出口规模的理论框架与实证模型,经大样本

  14. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  15. Modern manufacturing engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers recent research and trends in Manufacturing Engineering. The chapters emphasize different aspects of the transformation from materials to products. It provides the reader with fundamental materials treatments and the integration of processes. Concepts such as green and lean manufacturing are also covered in this book.

  16. Strategic Roles of Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng

    are accordingly elaborated to address the identified theoretical gaps: • Regarding manufacturing role, the first initial research question is still taken as the starting point, but specific attention is paid on: (1) exploring empirical evidence on the proactive role of manufacturing and investigate how...

  17. Appraising manufacturing location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik J.

    2002-01-01

    International location of manufacturing activities is an issue for managers of manufacturing companies as well as public policy makers. For managers, the issue is relevant because international locations offer opportunities for lowering costs due to productivity improvements. For governments the iss

  18. Assessing manufacturing location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik J.

    2004-01-01

    International location of manufacturing activities is an issue for managers of manufacturing companies as well as public policy-makers. For managers, the issue is relevant because international locations offer opportunities for lowering costs due to productivity improvements. For governments the iss

  19. Key technologies for manufacturing and processing sheet materials: A global perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeri, Mahmoud Y.

    2001-02-01

    Modern industrial technologies continue to seek new materials and processes to produce products that meet design and functional requirements. Sheet materials made from ferrous and non-ferrous metals, laminates, composites, and reinforced plastics constitute a large percentage of today’s products, components, and systems. Major manufacturers of sheet products include automotive, aerospace, appliance, and food-packaging industries. The Second Global Symposium on Innovations in Materials Processing & Manufacturing: Sheet Materials is organized to provide a forum for presenting advances in sheet processing and manufacturing by worldwide researchers and engineers from industrial, research, and academic centers. The symposium, sponsored by the TMS Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD), was planned for the 2001 TMS Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 11 15, 2001. This article is a review of key papers submitted for publication in the concurrent volume. The selected papers present significant developments in the rapidly expanding areas of advanced sheet materials, innovative forming methods, industrial applications, primary and secondary processing, composite processing, and numerical modeling of manufacturing processes.

  20. Efficient manufacturing technology of metal optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jizhen; Wu, Yanxiong; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Liping; Wang, Lingjie; Qu, Hemeng

    2015-10-01

    The efficient manufacturing technologies greatly accelerate the development and production process. Optical components have higher precision requirements than mechanical parts. This provides great challenge for rapid manufacturing. Metallic optical system is featured high resolution, wide spectral range, light weight, compact design, low cost and short manufacturing period. Reflective mirrors and supporting structures can be made from the same material to improve athermal performance of the system. Common materials for metal mirrors in optical applications include aluminum, copper, beryllium, aluminum beryllium alloy and so on. Their physical characteristics and relative advantages are presented. Most kinds of metals have good machinability and can be manufactured by many kinds of producing methods. This makes metallic optical system saving 30%~60% cost and time than others. The manufacturing process of metal mirror is different due to its working spectral. The metal mirror can be directly manufactured by single point diamond turning. This is an outstanding technique in point of ultra-precision as well as economical manufacture of mirrors. The roughness values and form accuracy of optical surfaces after diamond turning can satisfy the quality level for applications in the near infrared and infrared range. And for visible light spectral the turning structures must be removed with a smoothing procedure in order to minimize the scatter losses. Some smoothing methods to obtain visible quality metal mirrors are given in this paper. Some new manufacturing technology, such as 3D printing, can be used for metallic optical system and several promising techniques are presented.

  1. In Situ Manufacturing is a Necessary Part of Any Planetary Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, Jennifer E.; McLemore, Carole A.

    2012-01-01

    The key to any sustainable presence in space is the ability to manufacture necessary tools, parts, structures, spares, etc. in situ and on demand. Cost, volume, and up-mass constraints prohibit launching everything needed for long-duration or long-distance missions from Earth, including spare parts and replacement systems. There are many benefits to building items as-needed in situ using computer aided drafting (CAD) models and additive manufacturing technology: (1) Cost, up-mass, and volume savings for launch due to the ability to manufacture specific parts when needed. (2) CAD models can be generated on Earth and transmitted to the station or spacecraft, or they can be designed in situ for any task. Thus, multiple people in many locations can work on a single problem. (3) Items can be produced that will enhance the safety of crew and vehicles (e.g., latches or guards). (4) Items can be produced on-demand in a small amount of time (i.e., hours or days) compared to traditional manufacturing methods and, therefore, would not require the lengthy amount of time needed to machine the part from a solid block of material nor the wait time required if the part had to be launched from Earth. (5) Used and obsolete parts can be recycled into powder or wire feedstock for use in later manufacturing. (6) Ultimately, the ability to produce items as-needed will reduce mission risk, as one will have everything they need to fix a broken system or fashion a new part making it available on a more timely basis.

  2. Lighting molded optics: Design and manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kočárková H.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Proper design and manufacturing of glass molded lenses need to be performed in several steps. The whole process from customer requirements to f nal functional product is shown on two examples - a lens for street light and a lens for spot light with narrow lighting angle. After discussing customer requirements, optical design is made. Thanks to various commercial softwares with optimization, manufacturer of the lens can work as well as a designer which enables simplif cation and acceleration of lens manufacturing, since limitations of the manufacturing process are considered during creation of the design. When the prototype is made, its functionality needs to be evaluated. This work shows measurement of light distribution for street light lens in a dark room using goniometer and measurement of light intensity for spot lens f xed on an optical bench. These measurements can reveal the root cause in case of lens malfunction, which enables to optimize manufacturing process or modify lens design accordingly. Designing, manufacturing and evaluation of molded optics under one roof enables creation of easily manufacturable design and fast solution of problems.

  3. 4th International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Howlett, Robert; Setchi, Rossi; Cimatti, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This volume includes papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing (SDM-17) held in Bologna, Italy, in April 2017. The conference covered a wide range of topics from cutting-edge sustainable product design and service innovation, sustainable processes and technology for the manufacturing of sustainable products, sustainable manufacturing systems and enterprises, decision support for sustainability, and the study of the societal impact of sustainability including research for circular economy. Application areas are wide and varied, and the book provides an excellent overview of the latest research and development in the area of Sustainable Design and Manufacturing.

  4. Solder technology in the manufacturing of electronic products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianco, P.T.

    1993-08-01

    The electronics industry has relied heavily upon the use of soldering for both package construction and circuit assembly. The solder attachment of devices onto printed circuit boards and ceramic microcircuits has supported the high volume manufacturing processes responsible for low cost, high quality consumer products and military hardware. Defects incurred during the manufacturing process are minimized by the proper selection of solder alloys, substrate materials and process parameters. Prototyping efforts are then used to evaluate the manufacturability of the chosen material systems. Once manufacturing feasibility has been established, service reliability of the final product is evaluated through accelerated testing procedures.

  5. Ceramic components manufacturing by selective laser sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Ph.; Bayle, F.; Combe, C.; Goeuriot, P.; Smurov, I.

    2007-12-01

    In the present paper, technology of selective laser sintering/melting is applied to manufacture net shaped objects from pure yttria-zirconia powders. Experiments are carried out on Phenix Systems PM100 machine with 50 W fibre laser. Powder is spread by a roller over the surface of 100 mm diameter alumina cylinder. Design of experiments is applied to identify influent process parameters (powder characteristics, powder layering and laser manufacturing strategy) to obtain high-quality ceramic components (density and micro-structure). The influence of the yttria-zirconia particle size and morphology onto powder layering process is analysed. The influence of the powder layer thickness on laser sintering/melting is studied for different laser beam velocity V ( V = 1250-2000 mm/s), defocalisation (-6 to 12 mm), distance between two neighbour melted lines (so-called "vectors") (20-40 μm), vector length and temperature in the furnace. The powder bed density before laser sintering/melting also has significant influence on the manufactured samples density. Different manufacturing strategies are applied and compared: (a) different laser beam scanning paths to fill the sliced surfaces of the manufactured object, (b) variation of vector length (c) different strategies of powder layering, (d) temperature in the furnace and (e) post heat treatment in conventional furnace. Performance and limitations of different strategies are analysed applying the following criteria: geometrical accuracy of the manufactured samples, porosity. The process stability is proved by fabrication of 1 cm 3 volume cube.

  6. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    1981-07-13

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

  7. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    1981-07-13

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

  8. Research on an Agile Manufacturing Information System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    With the more intense competition in the worldwide market, the agile virtual enterprise (AVE) will become a new organization form of manufacturing enterprise. To support the new rela tionship, an agile manufacturing information system (AMIS) is described in this paper which serves to assist the virtual enterprise to manage and control information flow among collaborating partners. Based on the requirement analysis of virtual information system, the architecture, functions, features and execution scheme of AMIS are discussed in detail.

  9. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  10. OPERATOR BURDEN IN METAL ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is an emerging manufacturing process that creates usable machine parts via layer-by-layer joining of a stock material. With this layer-wise approach, high-performance geometries can be created which are impossible with traditional manufacturing methods. Metal AM technology has the potential to significantly reduce the manufacturing burden of developing custom hardware; however, a major consideration in choosing a metal AM system is the required amount of operator involvement (i.e., operator burden) in the manufacturing process. The operator burden not only determines the amount of operator training and specialization required but also the usability of the system in a facility. As operators of several metal AM processes, the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Labs is uniquely poised to provide insight into requirements for operator involvement in each of the three major metal AM processes. The paper covers an overview of each of the three metal AM technologies, focusing on the burden on the operator to complete the build cycle, process the part for final use, and reset the AM equipment for future builds.

  11. Investigations of sewn preform characteristics and quality aspects for the manufacturing of fiber reinforced polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ogale, Amol

    2017-01-01

    Sewn net-shape preform based composite manufacturing technology is widely accepted in combination with liquid composite molding technologies for the manufacturing of fiber reinforced polymer composites. The development of threedimensional dry fibrous reinforcement structures containing desired fiber orientation and volume fraction before the resin infusion is based on the predefined preforming processes. Various preform manufacturing aspects influence the overall composite m...

  12. Digital Manufacture Techniques for Large Hydro Turbine's Blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Xide; ZHANG Qinghua; ZHOU Yunfei; YAN Sijie

    2006-01-01

    Blades are one of the vital components and most difficulty in manufacturing of large hydro turbines. In order to cost-effectively and productively manufacture these kinds of blades, a series of digital techniques in manufacturing have been developed, which includes digital design of hydro turbine blades based on manufacture' requirements, Computer-aided location and the machined error evaluation by using 3-dimensional digitized measuring, tool path generation strategy to meet requirements of enhancing machining efficiency and controlling deviation in NC machining, tool path generation and NC machining simulation by establishing a virtual NC machining environment for blades, and reasonable and feasible strategy and the systematic scheme for manufacturing of large blades by using 5-axis simultaneous CNC machining. The developed digital manufacture techniques have been successfully applied in manufacturing of both the large Kaplan and Francis hydraulic turbine blades; it shows that higher efficiency and the better surfaces finish accuracy can be achieved.

  13. Five-Axis Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing for Nuclear Component Manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Wenning, Justin; Terrani, Kurt; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Norfolk, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a three-dimensional metal printing technology which uses high-frequency vibrations to scrub and weld together both similar and dissimilar metal foils. There is no melting in the process and no special atmosphere requirements are needed. Consequently, dissimilar metals can be joined with little to no intermetallic compound formation, and large components can be manufactured. These attributes have the potential to transform manufacturing of nuclear reactor core components such as control elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These components are hybrid structures consisting of an outer cladding layer in contact with the coolant with neutron-absorbing materials inside, such as neutron poisons for reactor control purposes. UAM systems are built into a computer numerical control (CNC) framework to utilize intermittent subtractive processes. These subtractive processes are used to introduce internal features as the component is being built and for net shaping. The CNC framework is also used for controlling the motion of the welding operation. It is demonstrated here that curved components with embedded features can be produced using a five-axis code for the welder for the first time.

  14. Five-Axis Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing for Nuclear Component Manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Wenning, Justin; Terrani, Kurt; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Norfolk, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a three-dimensional metal printing technology which uses high-frequency vibrations to scrub and weld together both similar and dissimilar metal foils. There is no melting in the process and no special atmosphere requirements are needed. Consequently, dissimilar metals can be joined with little to no intermetallic compound formation, and large components can be manufactured. These attributes have the potential to transform manufacturing of nuclear reactor core components such as control elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These components are hybrid structures consisting of an outer cladding layer in contact with the coolant with neutron-absorbing materials inside, such as neutron poisons for reactor control purposes. UAM systems are built into a computer numerical control (CNC) framework to utilize intermittent subtractive processes. These subtractive processes are used to introduce internal features as the component is being built and for net shaping. The CNC framework is also used for controlling the motion of the welding operation. It is demonstrated here that curved components with embedded features can be produced using a five-axis code for the welder for the first time.

  15. Mask data volume: explosion or damp squib?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Chris; Goad, Scott; Buck, Peter; Gladhill, Richard; Cinque, Russell

    2005-11-01

    Mask data file sizes are increasing as we move from technology generation to generation. The historical 30% linear shrink every 2-3 years that has been called Moore's Law, has driven a doubling of the transistor budget and hence feature count. The transition from steppers to step-and-scan tools has increased the area of the mask that needs to be patterned. At the 130nm node and below, Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) has become prevalent, and the edge fragmentation required to implement OPC leads to an increase in the number of polygons required to define the layout. Furthermore, Resolution Enhancement Techniques (RETs) such as Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) or tri-tone Phase Shift Masks (PSM) require additional features to be defined on the mask which do not resolve on the wafer, further increasing masks volumes. In this paper we review historical data on mask file sizes for microprocessor designs. We consider the consequences of this increase in file size on Mask Data Prep (MDP) activities, both within the Integrated Device Manufacturer (IDM) and Mask Shop, namely: computer resources, storage and networks (for file transfer). The impact of larger file sizes on mask writing times is also reviewed. Finally we consider, based on the trends that have been observed over the last 5 technology nodes, what will be required to maintain reasonable MDP and mask manufacturing cycle times.

  16. Intel design for manufacturing and evolution of design rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Clair

    2008-03-01

    The difficult issues in continuing Moore's law with the lack of improvement in lithography resolution are well known. 1, 2, 3 Design rules have to change and DFM methodology has to continue to improve to enable Moore's law scaling. This paper will discuss our approach to DFM though co-optimization across design and process. The poly layer is used to show how rules have changed to meet patterning requirements and how co-optimization has been used to define the poly design rules. With the introduction and ramp of several products on our 45nm technology, we have shown our ability to meet the goals of Moore's law scaling at high yields in volume manufacturing on a two year cycle.

  17. Additive manufacturing in production: challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Bhrigu; Karg, Michael; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, characterized by its inherent layer by layer fabrication methodology has been coined by many as the latest revolution in the manufacturing industry. Due to its diversification of Materials, processes, system technology and applications, Additive Manufacturing has been synonymized with terminology such as Rapid prototyping, 3D printing, free-form fabrication, Additive Layer Manufacturing, etc. A huge media and public interest in the technology has led to an innovative attempt of exploring the technology for applications beyond the scope of the traditional engineering industry. Nevertheless, it is believed that a critical factor for the long-term success of Additive Manufacturing would be its ability to fulfill the requirements defined by the traditional manufacturing industry. A parallel development in market trends and product requirements has also lead to a wider scope of opportunities for Additive Manufacturing. The presented paper discusses some of the key challenges which are critical to ensure that Additive Manufacturing is truly accepted as a mainstream production technology in the industry. These challenges would highlight on various aspects of production such as product requirements, process management, data management, intellectual property, work flow management, quality assurance, resource planning, etc. In Addition, changing market trends such as product life cycle, mass customization, sustainability, environmental impact and localized production will form the foundation for the follow up discussion on the current limitations and the corresponding research opportunities. A discussion on ongoing research to address these challenges would include topics like process monitoring, design complexity, process standardization, multi-material and hybrid fabrication, new material development, etc.

  18. 75 FR 80040 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On November 23, 2010, the Department of Commerce's International Trade... vacant position on the Manufacturing Council (Council). The November 23, 2010 notice provided that all...

  19. 75 FR 30781 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On March 16, 2010, the Department of Commerce's International Trade... the Manufacturing Council (Council). The March 16, 2010 notice provided that all applications must be...

  20. Agile manufacturing concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Steven L.

    1994-03-01

    The initial conceptualization of agile manufacturing was the result of a 1991 study -- chaired by Lehigh Professor Roger N. Nagel and California-based entrepreneur Rick Dove, President of Paradigm Shifts, International -- of what it would take for U.S. industry to regain global manufacturing competitiveness by the early twenty-first century. This industry-led study, reviewed by senior management at over 100 companies before its release, concluded that incremental improvement of the current system of manufacturing would not be enough to be competitive in today's global marketplace. Computer-based information and production technologies that were becoming available to industry opened up the possibility of an altogether new system of manufacturing, one that would be characterized by a distinctive integration of people and technologies; of management and labor; of customers, producers, suppliers, and society.

  1. Manufacturing parabolic mirrors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The photo shows the construction of a vertical centrifuge mounted on an air cushion, with a precision of 1/10000 during rotation, used for the manufacture of very high=precision parabolic mirrors. (See Annual Report 1974.)

  2. Manufacturing tolerant topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an extension of the topology optimization method to include uncertainties during the fabrication of macro, micro and nano structures. More specifically, we consider devices that are manufactured using processes which may result in (uniformly) too thin (eroded) or too thick...... (dilated) structures compared to the intended topology. Examples are MEMS devices manufactured using etching processes, nano-devices manufactured using e-beam lithography or laser micro-machining and macro structures manufactured using milling processes. In the suggested robust topology optimization...... approach, under- and over-etching is modelled by image processing-based "erode" and "dilate" operators and the optimization problem is formulated as a worst case design problem. Applications of the method to the design of macro structures for minimum compliance and micro compliant mechanisms show...

  3. Many Manufactured Nanosats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To achieve the capability to affordably produce scores of nano-spacecraft for envisioned constellation missions, a new manufacturing process is needed to reduce the...

  4. Advances in 3D printing & additive manufacturing technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Pulak; Kumar, L

    2017-01-01

    This edited volume comprises select chapters on advanced technologies for 3D printing and additive manufacturing and how these technologies have changed the face of direct, digital technologies for rapid production of models, prototypes and patterns. Because of its wide applications, 3D printing and additive manufacturing technology has become a powerful new industrial revolution in the field of manufacturing. The evolution of 3D printing and additive manufacturing technologies has changed design, engineering and manufacturing processes across industries such as consumer products, aerospace, medical devices and automotives. The objective of this book is to help designers, R&D personnel, and practicing engineers understand the state-of-the-art developments in the field of 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing. .

  5. 3rd International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Howlett, Robert; Liu, Ying; Theobald, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This volumes consists of 59 peer-reviewed papers, presented at the International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing (SDM-16) held in Chania, Crete Greece in April 2016. Leading-edge research into sustainable design and manufacturing aims to enable the manufacturing industry to grow by adopting more advanced technologies, and at the same time improve its sustainability by reducing its environmental impact. SDM-16 covers a wide range of topics from sustainable product design and service innovation, sustainable process and technology for the manufacturing of sustainable products, sustainable manufacturing systems and enterprises, decision support for sustainability, and the study of societal impact of sustainability including research for circular economy. Application areas are wide and varied. The book will provide an excellent overview of the latest research and development in the area of Sustainable Design and Manufacturing.

  6. Study of Manpower Requirements by Occupation for Alternative Technologies in the Energy-Related Industries, 1970-1990. Volumes I, IIA, and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmanis, Ivars; And Others

    The report presents the methodology used by the National Planning Association (NPA), under contract to the Federal Energy Administration (FEA), to estimate direct labor usage coefficients in some sixty different occupational categories involved in construction, operation, and maintenance of energy facilities. Volume 1 presents direct labor usage…

  7. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  8. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Harper, Warren W.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Humble, Paul H.; Madison, Jill C.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  9. Plasma-aided manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohet, J. L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasma-aided manufacturing is used for producing new materials with unusual and superior properties, for developing new chemical compounds and processes, for machining, and for altering and refining materials and surfaces. Plasma-aided manufacturing has direct applications to semiconductor fabrication, materials synthesis, welding, lighting, polymers, anti-corrosion coatings, machine tools, metallurgy, electrical and electronics devices, hazardous waste removal, high performance ceramics, and many other items in both the high-technology and the more traditional industries in the United States.

  10. Additively Manufactured Propulsion System

    OpenAIRE

    Dushku, Matthew; Mueller, Paul

    2012-01-01

    New high-performance, carbon-fiber reinforced polymer material allows additive manufacturing to produce pressure vessels capable of high pressures (thousands of pounds per square inch). This advancement in turn allows integral hybrid propulsion which is revolutionary for both CubeSats and additively-manufactured spacecraft. Hybrid propulsion offers simplicity as compared to bipropellant liquid propulsion, significantly better safety compared to solid or monopropellant hydrazine propulsion, an...

  11. Connecting American Manufacturers (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    assessments and analyses focused on identifying the sources and criticality of manufacturing variability on high pressure turbine blade performance...to evaluate manufacturing variability as it relates to overall engine performance, whereas General Electric Aviation focused on airflow efficiency...VizSpace’s web crawlers extract opportunities nightly from various Federal, OEM and public and private sites and match and deliver them to suppliers. As a

  12. Beryllium Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A

    2006-06-30

    This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61

  13. 48 CFR 211.105 - Items peculiar to one manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Items peculiar to one manufacturer. 211.105 Section 211.105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.105 Items peculiar to one manufacturer. Follow the publication requirements at...

  14. Nonterrestrial utilization of materials: Automated space manufacturing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Four areas related to the nonterrestrial use of materials are included: (1) material resources needed for feedstock in an orbital manufacturing facility, (2) required initial components of a nonterrestrial manufacturing facility, (3) growth and productive capability of such a facility, and (4) automation and robotics requirements of the facility.

  15. 21 CFR 680.2 - Manufacture of Allergenic Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirement. Neither horse protein nor any allergenic derivative of horse protein shall be used in culture...) (f) Records. A record of the history of the manufacture or propagation of each lot of source material... manufacturer of the source material, as required by § 211.188 of this chapter. A summary of the history of the...

  16. Workshop Report on Additive Manufacturing for Large-Scale Metal Components - Development and Deployment of Metal Big-Area-Additive-Manufacturing (Large-Scale Metals AM) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Love, Lonnie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Dehoff, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

    2016-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is considered an emerging technology that is expected to transform the way industry can make low-volume, high value complex structures. This disruptive technology promises to replace legacy manufacturing methods for the fabrication of existing components in addition to bringing new innovation for new components with increased functional and mechanical properties. This report outlines the outcome of a workshop on large-scale metal additive manufacturing held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on March 11, 2016. The charter for the workshop was outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office program manager. The status and impact of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for polymer matrix composites was presented as the background motivation for the workshop. Following, the extension of underlying technology to low-cost metals was proposed with the following goals: (i) High deposition rates (approaching 100 lbs/h); (ii) Low cost (<$10/lbs) for steel, iron, aluminum, nickel, as well as, higher cost titanium, (iii) large components (major axis greater than 6 ft) and (iv) compliance of property requirements. The above concept was discussed in depth by representatives from different industrial sectors including welding, metal fabrication machinery, energy, construction, aerospace and heavy manufacturing. In addition, DOE’s newly launched High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4MFG) program was reviewed. This program will apply thermo-mechanical models to elucidate deeper understanding of the interactions between design, process, and materials during additive manufacturing. Following these presentations, all the attendees took part in a brainstorming session where everyone identified the top 10 challenges in large-scale metal AM from their own perspective. The feedback was analyzed and grouped in different categories including, (i) CAD to PART software, (ii) selection of energy source, (iii

  17. Conceptual Framework and Curriculum for Networked Agile Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周杰韩; 熊光楞; 张和明; 曾庆良

    2003-01-01

    Networked agile manufacturing (NAM) is a new manufacturing paradigm for the 21st century.Manufacturing businesses based on NAM are characterized by virtual organization, innovation, global sourcingof materials and production centered on the workforce. Therefore, NAM requires a knowledgeable, motivatedworkforce. This paper reviews the literature related to developing an NAM curriculum to: (1) review theprogress for organizing manufacturing information, (2) study the fundamental technologies impacting NAM,including product data management (PDM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), and component/suppliermanagement (CSM), (3) present a definition of NAM and its conceptual framework, and (4) generalize thebasic NAM curriculum. The NAM curriculum can be used for developing a manufacturing course.

  18. Mechanical Prototyping and Manufacturing Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The internship was located at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Innovation Design Center (IDC), which is a facility where the JSC workforce can meet and conduct hands-on innovative design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of ideas and concepts relevant to NASA's mission. The tasks of the internship included mechanical prototyping design and manufacturing projects in service of research and development as well as assisting the users of the IDC in completing their manufacturing projects. The first project was to manufacture hatch mechanisms for a team in the Systems Engineering and Project Advancement Program (SETMAP) hexacopter competition. These mechanisms were intended to improve the performance of the servomotors and offer an access point that would also seal to prevent cross-contamination. I also assisted other teams as they were constructing and modifying their hexacopters. The success of this competition demonstrated a proof of concept for aerial reconnaissance and sample return to be potentially used in future NASA missions. I also worked with Dr. Kumar Krishen to prototype an improved thermos and a novel, portable solar array. Computer-aided design (CAD) software was used to model the parts for both of these projects. Then, 3D printing as well as conventional techniques were used to produce the parts. These prototypes were then subjected to trials to determine the success of the designs. The solar array is intended to work in a cluster that is easy to set up and take down and doesn't require powered servomechanisms. It could be used terrestrially in areas not serviced by power grids. Both projects improve planetary exploration capabilities to future astronauts. Other projects included manufacturing custom rail brackets for EG-2, assisting engineers working on underwater instrument and tool cases for the NEEMO project, and helping to create mock-up parts for Space Center Houston. The use of the IDC enabled efficient completion of these projects at

  19. How development and manufacturing will need to be structured--heads of development/manufacturing. May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepveux, Kevin; Sherlock, Jon-Paul; Futran, Mauricio; Thien, Michael; Krumme, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Continuous manufacturing (CM) is a process technology that has been used in the chemical industry for large-scale mass production of chemicals in single-purpose plants with benefit for many years. Recent interest has been raised to expand CM into the low-volume, high-value pharmaceutical business with its unique requirements regarding readiness for human use and the required quality, supply chain, and liability constraints in this business context. Using a fairly abstract set of definitions, this paper derives technical consequences of CM in different scenarios along the development-launch-supply axis in different business models and how they compare to batch processes. Impact of CM on functions in development is discussed and several operational models suitable for originators and other business models are discussed and specific aspects of CM are deduced from CM's technical characteristics. Organizational structures of current operations typically can support CM implementations with just minor refinements if the CM technology is limited to single steps or small sequences (bin-to-bin approach) and if the appropriate technical skill set is available. In such cases, a small, dedicated group focused on CM is recommended. The manufacturing strategy, as centralized versus decentralized in light of CM processes, is discussed and the potential impact of significantly shortened supply lead times on the organization that runs these processes. The ultimate CM implementation may be seen by some as a totally integrated monolithic plant, one that unifies chemistry and pharmaceutical operations into one plant. The organization supporting this approach will have to reflect this change in scope and responsibility. The other extreme, admittedly futuristic at this point, would be a highly decentralized approach with multiple smaller hubs; this would require a new and different organizational structure. This processing approach would open up new opportunities for products that

  20. How Development and Manufacturing Will Need to Be Structured-Heads of Development/Manufacturing May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepveux, Kevin; Sherlock, Jon-Paul; Futran, Mauricio; Thien, Michael; Krumme, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Continuous manufacturing (CM) is a process technology that has been used in the chemical industry for large-scale mass production of chemicals in single-purpose plants with benefit for many years. Recent interest has been raised to expand CM into the low-volume, high-value pharmaceutical business with its unique requirements regarding readiness for human use and the required quality, supply chain, and liability constraints in this business context. Using a fairly abstract set of definitions, this paper derives technical consequences of CM in different scenarios along the development-launch-supply axis in different business models and how they compare to batch processes. Impact of CM on functions in development is discussed and several operational models suitable for originators and other business models are discussed and specific aspects of CM are deduced from CM's technical characteristics. Organizational structures of current operations typically can support CM implementations with just minor refinements if the CM technology is limited to single steps or small sequences (bin-to-bin approach) and if the appropriate technical skill set is available. In such cases, a small, dedicated group focused on CM is recommended. The manufacturing strategy, as centralized versus decentralized in light of CM processes, is discussed and the potential impact of significantly shortened supply lead times on the organization that runs these processes. The ultimate CM implementation may be seen by some as a totally integrated monolithic plant, one that unifies chemistry and pharmaceutical operations into one plant. The organization supporting this approach will have to reflect this change in scope and responsibility. The other extreme, admittedly futuristic at this point, would be a highly decentralized approach with multiple smaller hubs; this would require a new and different organizational structure. This processing approach would open up new opportunities for products that

  1. Additive manufacturing of tunable lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Katja; Novak, Tobias; Heinrich, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Individual additive manufacturing of optical systems based on 3D Printing offers varied possibilities in design and usage. In addition to the additive manufacturing procedure, the usage of tunable lenses allows further advantages for intelligent optical systems. Our goal is to bring the advantages of additive manufacturing together with the huge potential of tunable lenses. We produced tunable lenses as a bundle without any further processing steps, like polishing. The lenses were designed and directly printed with a 3D Printer as a package. The design contains the membrane as an optical part as well as the mechanical parts of the lens, like the attachments for the sleeves which contain the oil. The dynamic optical lenses were filled with an oil. The focal length of the lenses changes due to a change of the radius of curvature. This change is caused by changing the pressure in the inside of the lens. In addition to that, we designed lenses with special structures to obtain different areas with an individual optical power. We want to discuss the huge potential of this technology for several applications. Further, an appropriate controlling system is needed. Wéll show the possibilities to control and regulate the optical power of the lenses. The lenses could be used for illumination tasks, and in the future, for individual measurement tasks. The main advantage is the individuality and the possibility to create an individual design which completely fulfills the requirements for any specific application.

  2. Collaborative Manufacturing for Small-Medium Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianto, D.

    2016-02-01

    Manufacturing systems involve decisions concerning production processes, capacity, planning, and control. In a MTO manufacturing systems, strategic decisions concerning fulfilment of customer requirement, manufacturing cost, and due date of delivery are the most important. In order to accelerate the decision making process, research on decision making structure when receiving order and sequencing activities under limited capacity is required. An effective decision making process is typically required by small-medium components and tools maker as supporting industries to large industries. On one side, metal small-medium enterprises are expected to produce parts, components or tools (i.e. jigs, fixture, mold, and dies) with high precision, low cost, and exact delivery time. On the other side, a metal small- medium enterprise may have weak bargaining position due to aspects such as low production capacity, limited budget for material procurement, and limited high precision machine and equipment. Instead of receiving order exclusively, a small-medium enterprise can collaborate with other small-medium enterprise in order to fulfill requirements high quality, low manufacturing cost, and just in time delivery. Small-medium enterprises can share their best capabilities to form effective supporting industries. Independent body such as community service at university can take a role as a collaboration manager. The Laboratory of Production Systems at Bandung Institute of Technology has implemented shared manufacturing systems for small-medium enterprise collaboration.

  3. Study on Resource Configuration on Cloud Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of manufacturing is to realize the requirement of customer. In manufacturing process of cloud system, there exist a lot of resource services which have similar functional characteristics to realize the requirement. It makes the manufacturing process more diverse. To develop the quality and reduce cost, a resource configuration model on cloud-manufacturing platform is put forward in this paper. According to the generalized six-point location principle, a growth design from the requirement of customers to entities with geometric constraints is proposed. By the requirement growing up to product, a configuration process is used to match the entities with the instances which the resources in the database could supply. Different from most existing studies, this paper studies the tolerance design with multiple candidate resource suppliers on cloud manufacturing to make the market play a two-level game considering the benefit of customers and the profit of resources to give an optimal result. A numerical case study is used to illustrate the proposed model and configuration process. The performance and advantage of the proposed method are discussed at the end.

  4. Ceramic component development analysis -- Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1998-06-09

    The development of advanced filtration media for advanced fossil-fueled power generating systems is a critical step in meeting the performance and emissions requirements for these systems. While porous metal and ceramic candle-filters have been available for some time, the next generation of filters will include ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) (Techniweave/Westinghouse, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), DuPont Lanxide Composites), intermetallic alloys (Pall Corporation), and alternate filter geometries (CeraMem Separations). The goal of this effort was to perform a cursory review of the manufacturing processes used by 5 companies developing advanced filters from the perspective of process repeatability and the ability for their processes to be scale-up to produce volumes. Given the brief nature of the on-site reviews, only an overview of the processes and systems could be obtained. Each of the 5 companies had developed some level of manufacturing and quality assurance documentation, with most of the companies leveraging the procedures from other products they manufacture. It was found that all of the filter manufacturers had a solid understanding of the product development path. Given that these filters are largely developmental, significant additional work is necessary to understand the process-performance relationships and projecting manufacturing costs.

  5. New strategic roles of manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Johansen, John; Boer, Harry

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to view manufacturing from a new angle, and tries to look beyond fit, focus and trade-offs, approaches which may no longer be sufficient for long-term competitive success. Four cases from different industries are described and used to illustrate and discuss the possibility...... of manufacturing playing new strategic roles. Backward, forward and lateral interactive support are suggested to explicate how manufacturing can realize its new strategic roles. Finally, four new strategic roles of manufacturing are suggested. They are: innovation manufacturing, ramp-up manufacturing, primary...... manufacturing, and service manufacturing....

  6. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  7. Agile manufacturing: The factory of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Joseph M.; Bossieux, Terry A.

    1994-01-01

    The factory of the future will require an operating methodology which effectively utilizes all of the elements of product design, manufacturing and delivery. The process must respond rapidly to changes in product demand, product mix, design changes or changes in the raw materials. To achieve agility in a manufacturing operation, the design and development of the manufacturing processes must focus on customer satisfaction. Achieving greatest results requires that the manufacturing process be considered from product concept through sales. This provides the best opportunity to build a quality product for the customer at a reasonable rate. The primary elements of a manufacturing system include people, equipment, materials, methods and the environment. The most significant and most agile element in any process is the human resource. Only with a highly trained, knowledgeable work force can the proper methods be applied to efficiently process materials with machinery which is predictable, reliable and flexible. This paper discusses the affect of each element on the development of agile manufacturing systems.

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Porous Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoff, Ryan R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kirka, Michael M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Currently, helium is obtained through separation from natural gas. The current industrial process incurs significant costs and requires large energy resources to successfully achieve separation. Through utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies it is possible to reduce both of these burdens when refining helium gas. The ability to engineer porosity levels within Inconel 718 discs for controlled separation of helium from natural gas was investigated. Arrays of samples fabricated using the electron beam melting process were analyzed for their relative porosity density. Based upon the measurements, full scale discs were fabricated, and subsequently tested to determine their effectiveness in separating helium from liquefied natural gas.

  9. Quality cell therapy manufacturing by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Yonatan Y; Timmins, Nicholas E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Transplantation of live cells as therapeutic agents is poised to offer new treatment options for a wide range of acute and chronic diseases. However, the biological complexity of cells has hampered the translation of laboratory-scale experiments into industrial processes for reliable, cost-effective manufacturing of cell-based therapies. We argue here that a solution to this challenge is to design cell manufacturing processes according to quality-by-design (QbD) principles. QbD integrates scientific knowledge and risk analysis into manufacturing process development and is already being adopted by the biopharmaceutical industry. Many opportunities to incorporate QbD into cell therapy manufacturing exist, although further technology development is required for full implementation. Linking measurable molecular and cellular characteristics of a cell population to final product quality through QbD is a crucial step in realizing the potential for cell therapies to transform healthcare.

  10. High Production Volume Information System (HPVIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The High Production Volume Information System (HPVIS) provides access to select health and environmental effect information on chemicals that are manufactured in...

  11. Biosimilarity Versus Manufacturing Change: Two Distinct Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declerck, Paul; Farouk-Rezk, Mourad; Rudd, Pauline M

    2016-02-01

    As products of living cells, biologics are far more complicated than small molecular-weight drugs not only with respect to size and structural complexity but also their sensitivity to manufacturing processes and post-translational changes. Most of the information on the manufacturing process of biotherapeutics is proprietary and hence not fully accessible to the public. This information gap represents a key challenge for biosimilar developers and plays a key role in explaining the differences in regulatory pathways required to demonstrate biosimilarity versus those required to ensure that a change in manufacturing process did not have implications on safety and efficacy. Manufacturing process changes are frequently needed for a variety of reasons including response to regulatory requirements, up scaling production, change in facility, change in raw materials, improving control of quality (consistency) or optimising production efficiency. The scope of the change is usually a key indicator of the scale of analysis required to evaluate the quality. In most cases, where the scope of the process change is limited, only quality and analytical studies should be sufficient while comparative clinical studies can be required in case of major changes (e.g., cell line changes). Biosimilarity exercises have been addressed differently by regulators on the understanding that biosimilar developers start with fundamental differences being a new cell line and also a knowledge gap of the innovator's processes, including culture media, purification processes, and potentially different formulations, and are thus required to ensure that differences from innovators do not result in differences in efficacy and safety.

  12. Development of practical application technology for photovoltaic power generation systems in fiscal 1997. Development of technologies to manufacture thin film solar cells, development of technologies to manufacture materials and substrates, development of technologies to manufacture amorphous-based high-quality materials and substrates (Volume 1); 1997 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu. Usumaku taiyo denchi no seizo gijutsu kaihatsu, zairyo kiban seizo gijutsu kaihatsu, amorphous silicon kei kohinshitsu zairyo kiban no seizo gijutsu kaihatsu (daiichi bunsatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Research and development was made for the purpose of reducing cost and enhancing safety and reliability in amorphous solar cells. In the research of photo-deterioration phenomena in amorphous silicon, measurements were made on bending displacement alternately when light irradiation is turned on and off on an a-Si:H film manufactured at a substrate temperature of 250 degrees C and the SiH{sub 4}:H{sub 2} ratio at 1:4. As a result, a result was obtained that the film has swollen. It was made clear that this phenomenon is reversible from the fact that one-hour annealing at 200 degrees C has returned the film to the initial condition, and another light irradiation reproduces the light-induced swelling. In developing a stable and transparent electrically conductive substrate for a thin film solar cell, aqueous silica-sol solution dispersed with polymeric micro-fine particles was painted and printed uniformly on a glass substrate for the purpose of improving the permeation rate. As a result, a low-reflection film was obtained after sintering at about 500 degrees C. This has allowed visible light permeation rate to increase by 87%, thus having achieved the objective for fiscal 1997. In order to enhance mass production performance for this transparent conductive substrate, development was performed on a technology to form a texture with even thinner film. (NEDO)

  13. Manufacturing tolerant topology optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ole Sigmund

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an extension of the topology optimization method to include uncertainties during the fabrication of macro, micro and nano structures. More specifically, we consider devices that are manufactured using processes which may result in (uniformly) too thin (eroded)or too thick (dilated) structures compared to the intended topology. Examples are MEMS devices manufactured using etching processes, nano-devices manufactured using e-beam lithography or laser micro-machining and macro structures manufactured using milling processes. In the suggested robust topology optimization approach, under- and over-etching is modelled by image processing-based "erode" and "dilate" operators and the optimization problem is formulated as a worst case design problem. Applications of the method to the design of macro structures for minimum compliance and micro compliant mechanisms show that the method provides manufacturing tolerant designs with little decrease in performance. As a positive side effect the robust design formulation also eliminates the longstanding problem of one-node connected hinges in compliant mechanism design using topology optimization.

  14. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  15. 78 FR 67117 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an Opportunity to Apply for Membership on the Manufacturing Council.... manufacturing industry to fill five vacant positions on the Manufacturing Council (Council). The purpose of the...

  16. Value networks in manufacturing sustainability and performance excellence

    CERN Document Server

    Uusitalo, Teuvo

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights innovative solutions together with various techniques and methods that can help support the manufacturing sector to excel in economic, social, and environmental terms in networked business environments. The book also furthers understanding of sustainable manufacturing from the perspective of value creation in manufacturing networks, by capitalizing on the outcomes of the European ‘Sustainable Value Creation in Manufacturing Networks’ project. New dynamics and uncertainties in modern markets call for innovative solutions in the global manufacturing sector. While the manufacturing sector is traditionally driven by technology, it also requires other managerial and organizational solutions in terms of network governance, business models, sustainable solution development for products and services, performance management portals, etc., which can provide major competitive advantages for companies. At the same time, the manufacturing industry is subject to a change process, where business net...

  17. The relationships between Lean manufacturing, management accounting and firm performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Borup; Nielsen, Henrik; Grasso, Lawrency

    2016-01-01

    , likewise, Lean manufacturing affects employee’s mindsets. The extent of which such a transformation can occur is constrained in time as it requires employees and management to unlearn old principles and practices before new ones can be fine-tuned and put fruitfully into use. This study investigates......Lean manufacturing has been adopted by numerous western companies as an answer to an increasing competitive environment. Lean manufacturing is seen as an enterprise-wide strategy encompassing a transformation of manufacturing practices, affecting companies’ management accounting practices and...... the relationship between Lean manufacturing, management accounting practices, Lean thinking and firm performance. Using survey data from 368 different manufacturing facilities, we construct a structural equation model and we develop hypotheses predicting relationships between Lean manufacturing, management...

  18. Evaluation of Hand Lay-Up and Resin Transfer Molding in Composite Wind Turbine Blade Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAIRNS,DOUGLAS S.; SHRAMSTAD,JON D.

    2000-06-01

    The majority of the wind turbine blade industry currently uses low cost hand lay-up manufacturing techniques to process composite blades. While there are benefits to the hand lay-up process, drawbacks inherent to this process along with advantages of other techniques suggest that better manufacturing alternatives may be available. Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) was identified as a processing alternative and shows promise in addressing the shortcomings of hand lay-up. This report details a comparison of the RTM process to hand lay-up of composite wind turbine blade structures. Several lay-up schedules and critical turbine blade structures were chosen for comparison of their properties resulting from RTM and hand lay-up processing. The geometries investigated were flat plate, thin and thick flanged T-stiffener, I-beam, and root connection joint. It was found that the manufacturing process played an important role in laminate thickness, fiber volume, and weight for the geometries investigated. RTM was found to reduce thickness and weight and increase fiber volumes for all substructures. RTM resulted in tighter material transition radii and eliminated the need for most secondary bonding operations. These results would significantly reduce the weight of wind turbine blades. Hand lay-up was consistently slower in fabrication times for the structures investigated. A comparison of mechanical properties showed no significant differences after employing fiber volume normalization techniques to account for geometry differences resulting from varying fiber volumes. The current root specimen design does not show significant mechanical property differences according to process and exceeds all static and fatigue requirements.

  19. IMPROVED COMMUNICATION BETWEEN MANUFACTURING ROBOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Stopforth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Communication between manufacturing robots and autonomous vehicles in the industrial environment is important, sinceinstructions and information are crucial for communication between the control station and the robot station. Information is required between different manufacturing robots for optimal performance and dedication to industrial tasks within the environment. Failures in communication could cause robots to be a safety hazard or to perform tasks that are not required. This article shows how communication was improved with the use of the Robotics Communication Protocol (RCP and an extension of this protocol.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Kommunikasie tussen vervaardigingsrobotte en outonome voertuie in ‘n industriële omgewing is belangrik, aangesien opdragte en inligting krities is vir kommunikasie tussen die beheerstasie en die robotstasie. Inligting word benodig tussen verskillende vervaardigingsrobotte vir optimale werkverrigting en toewyding aan take in die omgewing. Mislukte kommunikasie mag veroorsaak dat robotte ‘n veiligheidsrisiko word of veroorsaak dat onnodige take verrig word. Hierdie artikel toon hoe kommunikasie verbeter is deur die gebruik van die “robotika-kommunikasie-protokol” en ‘n uitbreiding van die protokol.

  20. Laser in manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Generally a laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) is defined as "a device which uses a quantum mechanical effect, stimulated emission, to generate a coherent beam of light from a lasing medium of controlled purity, size, and shape". Laser material processing represents a great number of methods, which are rapidly growing in current and different industrial applications as new alternatives to traditional manufacturing processes. Nowadays, the use of lasers in manufacturing is an emerging area with a wide variety of applications, for example, in electronics, molds an

  1. Manufacturing and automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Córdoba Nieto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents concepts and definitions from different sources concerning automation. The work approaches automation by virtue of the author’s experience in manufacturing production; why and how automation prolects are embarked upon is considered. Technological reflection regarding the progressive advances or stages of automation in the production area is stressed. Coriat and Freyssenet’s thoughts about and approaches to the problem of automation and its current state are taken and examined, especially that referring to the problem’s relationship with reconciling the level of automation with the flexibility and productivity demanded by competitive, worldwide manufacturing.

  2. State policies and requirements for management of uranium mining and milling in New Mexico. Volume V. State policy needs for community impact assistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevender, S.G.

    1980-04-01

    The report contained in this volume describes a program for management of the community impacts resulting from the growth of uranium mining and milling in New Mexico. The report, submitted to Sandia Laboratories by the New Mexico Department of Energy and Minerals, is reproduced without modification. The state recommends that federal funding and assistance be provided to implement a growth management program comprised of these seven components: (1) an early warning system, (2) a community planning and technical assistance capability, (3) flexible financing, (4) a growth monitoring system, (5) manpower training, (6) economic diversification planning, and (7) new technology testing.

  3. Development of Integrated Programs for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD): Product manufacture interactions with the design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The product manufacturing interactions with the design process and the IPAD requirements to support the interactions are described. The data requirements supplied to manufacturing by design are identified and quantified. Trends in computer-aided manufacturing are discussed and the manufacturing process of the 1980's is anticipated.

  4. Manufacturing prototypes for LIPAC beam dump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arranz, F., E-mail: fernando.arranz@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Brañas, B.; Iglesias, D. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Nomen, O. [IREC, Barcelona (Spain); Rapisarda, D.; Lapeña, J.; Muñoz, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Szcepaniak, B. [GALVANO-T, Windeck (Germany); Manini, J. [CARMAN, Madrid (Spain); Gómez, J. [TRINOS VACUUM, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Electroforming of copper and electronbeam welding techniques are compared. •Mechanical properties of Cu–stainless steel joint by electroforming are presented. •Achieved manufacturing tolerances are shown. •The difficulties and solutions for the complicated manufacturing are explained. -- Abstract: The purpose of the research is to define the most adequate manufacturing process for the dump of a linear deuteron accelerator. The deuteron beam can be pulsed as well as continuous with energies up to 9 MeV. The maximum beam power is 1.12 MW corresponding to a beam current of 125 mA. The requirements on the surface on which the deuterons will be stopped are quite demanding and the length and slenderness of the cone poses a considerable difficulty in the manufacturing process. The design of the beam dump is based on a copper cone 2500 mm long, 300 mm aperture and 5 to 6.5 mm thickness. Basically only two technologies were found feasible for the manufacturing of the cone: Electroforming and Electron Beam Welding (EBW). The article shows the main results found when manufacturing different prototypes.

  5. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  6. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Springfield, Robert M. [Tru Design, LLC, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  7. Contributions on Computer Aided Manufacturing of Drill-Jig Bushings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Cojocaru

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the steps for computer aided manufacturing (CAMof the bushings technological class parts: design of the part in CADsoftware; generation of the parametrical link with MSExcel files; extract of the useful information for the technological design (mass, volume, surfaces; setting of the CNC lathe and necessary tools; programming of the CNC code for manufacturing. Given the large variety of the bushingsshapes and dimensions, the application focused on the jig bushings used in drilling processes.

  8. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  9. Overview and status of ITER Cryostat manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Anil K., E-mail: anil.bhardwaj@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Sector-25, Gandhinagar 382016 (India); Gupta, Girish; Prajapati, Rajnikant; Joshi, Vaibhav; Patel, Mitul; Bhavsar, Jagrut; More, Vipul; Jindal, Mukesh; Bhattacharya, Avik; Jogi, Gourav; Palaliya, Amit; Jha, Saroj; Pandey, Manish; Shukla, Dileep [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Sector-25, Gandhinagar 382016 (India); Iyer, Ganesh; Jadhav, Pandurang; Goyal, Dipesh; Desai, Anish [Larsen & Toubro Limited, Heavy Engineering, Hazira Manufacturing Complex, Gujarat (India); Sekachev, I.; Vitupier, Guillaume [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Manufacturing status of one of the largest and the heaviest fully welded stainless steel vacuum chambers in the world (ITER Cryostat). • Overview of manufacturing stages and its segmentation. • Overview of manufacturing procedures and assembly and installation. - Abstract: One of ITER-India's commitments to the ITER Organization is procurement of the ITER Cryostat. It is a large vacuum vessel (∼29 m dia. and ∼29 m height), which is made up of 304/304 L dual marked stainless steel and has a total mass over 3500 t. The thickness of the vessel wall varies from 50 mm to 190 mm. It is one of the largest and the heaviest fully welded stainless steel vacuum chambers in the world which provides vacuum thermal insulation for the superconducting magnets operating at 4.5 K and for the thermal shield operating at 80 K. It also mechanically supports the magnet system along with the vacuum vessel (VV). The cryostat is designed and constructed according to ASME Section-VIII Division-2 with additional ITER Vacuum Handbook requirements and it is classified as protection important component (PIC-2). Manufacturing of cryostat segments is ongoing in India; sub-assembly of four major sections of the cryostat from the segments will be done at the ITER site in a temporary workshop building and the final assembly will be done in the pit of the tokamak building, the final location. The cryostat manufacturing contract has been awarded to Larsen and Toubro Limited in August 2012 after completion of design [4] and signing of Procurement Arrangement [1] with ITER Organization. Manufacturing of the cryostat was started in January 2014 after approval of the manufacturing drawings and procedures. The temporary workshop of 44 m × 110 m × 26 m in height has been completed in November 2014 at the ITER site with a 200 t crane installed. This paper gives an overview and the status of the cryostat manufacturing.

  10. Additive Manufacturing: Preparing for the Reality of Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    applications.185 The separation between high- and low-end machines in the late 1990s was critical to the current additive manufacturing landscape. The...research into the development and output of high-end additive manufacturing machines continued along a relatively constant and predictable trajectory...technologies required for the low-end additive manufacturing machines led to surprising industry changes. After nearly two decades of a strict industrial

  11. Research of Enterprise Resource Management Supporting Networked Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The nature of networked manufacturing and agile manufacturing is to recognize enterprise resources timely and accurately. This paper mainly discusses an enterprise resource model method and the construction process. Furthermore, the system frameworks of software and application are put forward to realize various enterprise resources management based on a resource business process. Thus, we ensure the integration and sharing of enterprise resources for the requirement of networked manufacturing.

  12. Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains the following materials to support Volume 1: (1) Survey of Metal Fabrication Industry in Alabama; (2) Survey of Electronics Manufacturing/Assembly Industry in Alabama; (3) Apparel Modular Manufacturing Simulators; (4) Synopsis of a Stereolithography Project; (5) Transferring Modular Manufacturing Technology to an Apparel Firm; (6) Letters of Support; (7) Fact Sheets; (8) Publications; and (9) One Stop Access to NASA Technology Brochure.

  13. Manufacturing halal in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    production, trade and consumption. Based on fieldwork in Malaysia, this article explores how manufacturing companies understand and practise halal certification, standards and technoscience. I argue that while existing studies of halal overwhelmingly explore micro-social aspects such as the everyday...

  14. Virtual manufacturing in reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papstel, Jyri; Saks, Alo

    2000-10-01

    SMEs play an important role in manufacturing industry. But from time to time there is a shortage in resources to complete the particular order in time. Number of systems is introduced to produce digital information in order to support product and process development activities. Main problem is lack of opportunity for direct data transition within design system modules when needed temporary extension of design capacity (virtuality) or to implement integrated concurrent product development principles. The planning experience in the field is weakly used as well. The concept of virtual manufacturing is a supporting idea to solve this problem. At the same time a number of practical problems should be solved like information conformity, data transfer, unified technological concepts acceptation etc. In the present paper the proposed ways to solve the practical problems of virtual manufacturing are described. General objective is to introduce the knowledge-based CAPP system as missing module for Virtual Manufacturing in the selected product domain. Surface-centered planning concept based on STEP- based modeling principles, and knowledge-based process planning methodology will be used to gain the objectives. As a result the planning module supplied by design data with direct access, and supporting advising environment is expected. Mould producing SME would be as test basis.

  15. Tolerances in micro manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Zhang, Yang; Islam, Aminul

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a method for analysis of tolerances in micro manufacturing. It proposes a mapping oftolerances to dimensions and compares this with current available international standards. The analysisdocuments that tolerances are not scaled down as the absolute dimension. In practice...

  16. The Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    the organization.”92 Dr. Eliyahu Goldratt designed the most popular system, based on his “Theory of Constraints.” He emphasized the importance of...Exploring Advanced Manufacturing Technologies. New York, NY, Industrial Press Inc. Goldratt , Eliyahu M. and Robert E. Fox. The Race. Croton-on-Hudson

  17. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkranz, S.

    2003-01-01

    Based on arguments of the `reference- dependent' theory of consumer choice we assume that a retailer's discount of a manufacturer's suggested retail price changes consumers' demand. We can show that the producer benefits from suggesting a retail price. If consumers are additionally sufficiently `los

  18. Drug development and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  19. Manufacturing and Merchandising Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Anyone with a flair for business, product development, or promotion might consider a manufacturing or merchandising occupation. The music industry offers many career opportunities for administrators, salespersons, marketing specialists--the record industry offers positions from promotion manager to rack jobber. Describes instrument company…

  20. Reusing Old Manufacturing Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an interesting design challenge for students, one that will certainly let them integrate subject matter and get a sense of pride for doing something useful in their own community. The author would be willing to bet that the average town or city has some old red brick manufacturing building(s) that have seen much better days.…

  1. Transfer of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing and unfolding relocation of activities is one of the major trends, that calls for attention in the domain of operations management. In particular, prescriptive models outlining: stages of the process, where to locate, and how to establish the new facilities have been studied, while...... and dilemmas to be addressed when transferring manufacturing units....

  2. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  3. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  4. Thermal modelling of extrusion based additive manufacturing of composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mathias Laustsen; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2017-01-01

    One of the hottest topics regarding manufacturing these years is additive manufacturing (AM). AM is a young branch of manufacturing techniques, which by nature is disruptive due to its completely different manufacturing approach, wherein material is added instead of removed. By adding material...... process knowledge, and validating the generated toolpaths before the real manufacturing process takes place: Hence removing time consuming and expensive trial-and-error processes for new products. This study applies a 2D restricted finite volume model aimed to describe thermoplastic Acrylonitrille......-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and thermosetting polyurethane (PU) material extrusion processes. During the experimental evaluation of the produced models it is found that some critical material properties needs to be further investigated to increase the precision of the model. It is however also found that even with only...

  5. Fundamentals of Digital Manufacturing Science

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zude; Chen, Dejun

    2012-01-01

    The manufacturing industry will reap significant benefits from encouraging the development of digital manufacturing science and technology. Digital Manufacturing Science uses theorems, illustrations and tables to introduce the definition, theory architecture, main content, and key technologies of digital manufacturing science. Readers will be able to develop an in-depth understanding of the emergence and the development, the theoretical background, and the techniques and methods of digital manufacturing science. Furthermore, they will also be able to use the basic theories and key technologies described in Digital Manufacturing Science to solve practical engineering problems in modern manufacturing processes. Digital Manufacturing Science is aimed at advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students, academic researchers and researchers in the manufacturing industry. It allows readers to integrate the theories and technologies described with their own research works, and to propose new ideas and new methods to...

  6. Ceramic components manufacturing by selective laser sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Ph.; Bayle, F.; Combe, C. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Saint-Etienne (ENISE), DIPI Laboratory, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Goeuriot, P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne (ENSMSE), Centre SMS 158, Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Smurov, I. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Saint-Etienne (ENISE), DIPI Laboratory, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: smurov@enise.fr

    2007-12-15

    In the present paper, technology of selective laser sintering/melting is applied to manufacture net shaped objects from pure yttria-zirconia powders. Experiments are carried out on Phenix Systems PM100 machine with 50 W fibre laser. Powder is spread by a roller over the surface of 100 mm diameter alumina cylinder. Design of experiments is applied to identify influent process parameters (powder characteristics, powder layering and laser manufacturing strategy) to obtain high-quality ceramic components (density and micro-structure). The influence of the yttria-zirconia particle size and morphology onto powder layering process is analysed. The influence of the powder layer thickness on laser sintering/melting is studied for different laser beam velocity V (V = 1250-2000 mm/s), defocalisation (-6 to 12 mm), distance between two neighbour melted lines (so-called 'vectors') (20-40 {mu}m), vector length and temperature in the furnace. The powder bed density before laser sintering/melting also has significant influence on the manufactured samples density. Different manufacturing strategies are applied and compared: (a) different laser beam scanning paths to fill the sliced surfaces of the manufactured object, (b) variation of vector length (c) different strategies of powder layering, (d) temperature in the furnace and (e) post heat treatment in conventional furnace. Performance and limitations of different strategies are analysed applying the following criteria: geometrical accuracy of the manufactured samples, porosity. The process stability is proved by fabrication of 1 cm{sup 3} volume cube.

  7. A Discussion on Construction of Courses System for Mechanical Manufacturing Major Oriented to Requirements of Industry 4.0%面向工业4.0需求的机械制造类本科教育课程体系探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩奉林; 严宏志

    2016-01-01

    The technical connotation of industry 4.0 was discussed and the knowledge and ability requirements of the practitioners in mechanism manufacture industry in the industry 4.0 time were proposed. The current course system of the mechanical manu-facturing engineering of domestic universities were analyzed. A WJ4Z course system was put forward. It is expectant to provide reference for the revise of the training plans of mechanical manu-facturing engineering.%从工业4.0的技术内涵着手,提出工业4.0时代机械制造行业从业人员的知识和能力特殊要求。分析当前高校机械制造专业课程体系,并针对性地提出WJ4Z(W,网络;J,集成;4Z包括制造、自动、智能、治理或管理)课程体系结构,可为我国高校机械制造专业培养计划的修订提供参考。

  8. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-04-01

    This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

  9. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-04-01

    This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

  10. 40 CFR 63.807 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations § 63.807 Reporting requirements. (a) The... months of wood furniture manufacturing operations: (1) The first report shall be submitted 30...

  11. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  12. Flexible Manufacturing System--The procurement phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1992-02-01

    A method has been developed for procuring a Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS). The method includes preparation of a functional specification that defines equipment and system requirements; development of relationships between the potential suppliers and purchasers; proposal evaluation and selection in a competitive bid environment; and a technique to minimize misunderstandings between buyer requirements and supplier offerings. Methods established during this development effort have permitted successful procurement of a multimillion-dollar FMS. Techniques used will be helpful to procurement of other systems.

  13. 49 CFR 229.213 - Locomotive manufacturing information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive manufacturing information. 229.213 Section 229.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Design Requirements § 229.213 Locomotive manufacturing information. (a) Each railroad operating...

  14. 78 FR 8407 - Authorization To Manufacture and Distribute Postage Evidencing Systems; Discontinued Indicia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... 501 Authorization To Manufacture and Distribute Postage Evidencing Systems; Discontinued Indicia... concerning the manufacture and distribution of postage evidencing systems to clarify that effective January 1, 2016, all postage evidencing systems (postage meters and PC Postage products) will be required...

  15. 75 FR 104 - Manufacturing & Services' Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative; Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... No: E9-31188] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Manufacturing & Services' Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative; Update ACTION: Notice and request for input on proposed new areas of work for the Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative which could include a series of events...

  16. Manufacturing of Lightweight Mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrication of the lightweight mirror is one of the key techniques for many large optical systems. CAD,CAM and CNC technologies are adopted in designing and manufacturing such mirrors in CIOMP. Better working efficiency and higher lightweight grade have been achieved. The results show that mirrors up to 70% weight reduction and 0.02λ(rms.) surface accuracy or better can be obtained.

  17. Northwest Manufacturing Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    Training areas included Total Productive Maintenance, First Aide and Safety, Lean Training, Inventory Management, Purchasing Supply Chain, ISO 13485 ...improve their business through quality certifications and initiatives such as AS9100, ISO 9001-2000, and implementing Lean Manufacturing. All of these...not show up on a visible profile. 13 Certifications: Quality Certifications such as AS9100, ISO etc. a. List Certifying Agency and number

  18. Electrohydrodynamic Printing and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Poon, Hak Fei (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An stable electrohydrodynamic filament is obtained by causing a straight electrohydrodynamic filament formed from a liquid to emerge from a Taylor cone, the filament having a diameter of from 10 nm to 100.mu.m. Such filaments are useful in electrohydrodynamic printing and manufacturing techniques and their application in liquid drop/particle and fiber production, colloidal deployment and assembly, and composite materials processing.

  19. Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing: Summary of Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing will help policymakers and industry gain deeper understanding of global manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Increased knowledge of the product supply chains can inform decisions related to manufacturing facilities for extracting and processing raw materials, making the array of required subcomponents, and assembling and shipping the final product. This brochure summarized key findings from the analysis and includes important figures from the report. The report was prepared by the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) analysts at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  20. Stiffness tuning of FeGa structures manufactured by ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the use of Galfenol (FeGa) composite beams as solid-state, adaptive vibration absorbers that have an electrically-tunable sti ness. The study encompasses the manufacture of these structures by ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) and the formulation of a continuous model for the beams' bending vibrations. The beams' 1st and 3rd resonant frequencies are calculated as a function of base acceleration, Galfenol volume fraction, and DC magnetic eld. The e ects of an axial force, viscoelastic material damping, beam nonuniformity, and Galfenol's nonlinear behavior are incorporated. Autoresonant feedback control is used as a numerical technique to maintain the resonant state under changes in the inputs. The model is validated by comparing (1) calculated and analytical frequency responses and (2) calculated and measured resonant frequencies and modes shapes of a Galfenol/Al 6061 composite beam that was manufactured using UAM. The modeling results show that by varying the DC magnetic eld, the resonant frequency can be tuned between 3 % and 51 % for Galfenol/Al 6061 composites containing from 10 % to 100 % Galfenol by volume, respectively. The magnitude of this change will increase for composites that have a softer matrix. The axial force was found to have only a small e ect on the maximum resonant frequency tunability, but, for high Galfenol volume fractions, was also found to broaden the region over which tuning can occur.

  1. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  2. Manufacturing a Superconductor in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John

    1989-01-01

    Described is the manufacture of a superconductor from a commercially available kit using equipment usually available in schools or easily obtainable. The construction is described in detail including equipment, materials, safety procedures, tolerances, and manufacture. (Author/CW)

  3. Green Manufacturing Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Green Manufacturing: Fundamentals and Applications introduces the basic definitions and issues surrounding green manufacturing at the process, machine and system (including supply chain) levels. It also shows, by way of several examples from different industry sectors, the potential for substantial improvement and the paths to achieve the improvement. Additionally, this book discusses regulatory and government motivations for green manufacturing and outlines the path for making manufacturing more green as well as making production more sustainable. This book also: • Discusses new engineering approaches for manufacturing and provides a path from traditional manufacturing to green manufacturing • Addresses regulatory and economic issues surrounding green manufacturing • Details new supply chains that need to be in place before going green • Includes state-of-the-art case studies in the areas of automotive, semiconductor and medical areas as well as in the supply chain and packaging areas Green Manufactu...

  4. Digital factory concept implementation for flexible and reconfigurable manufacturing systems modelling and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Caggiano, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    In modern manufacturing industry, the ever-changing turbulent environment as well as the strong competition among companies require manufacturing systems that are easily upgradable and into which new technologies can be readily integrated. Indispensable requirements for modern flexible and reconfigurable manufacturing systems are related to system responsiveness, that enables rapid launch of new product models, fast adjustment of the manufacturing system capacity to market demands, easy integ...

  5. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  6. Implementing lean manufacturing system: ISM approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lean Manufacturing System has emerged as an important area of research in Indian context. The requirement of Lean Manufacturing has increased due to defects in products (semi finished and finished and subsequent increase in cost. In this context, this study is an attempt to develop a structural model of the variables, important to implement Lean Manufacturing System in Indian automobile industry. Design/Methodology/Approach: Various variables of lean manufacturing system implementation have been identified from literature review and experts’ opinions. Contextual relationship among these identified variables has been set after carrying out brainstorming session. Further, classification of the variables has been carried out based upon the driving power and dependence. In addition to this, a structural model of variables to implement lean concept in Indian automobile industry has also been developed using Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM technique. Questionnaire based survey has also been conducted to rank these variables. Findings: Eighteen variables have been identified from the literature and subsequent discussions with experts. Out of which, nine variables have been identified as dependent and nine variables have been identified as driver. No variable has been identified as linkage variable and autonomous variable. From the model developed, ‘Relative cost benefits’ has been identified as top level dependent variable and top management commitment as bottom level most independent variable. Research limitations/Implications: The model so developed is a hypothetical model based upon experts’ opinions. The conclusions so drawn may be further modified to apply in real situation. Practical implication: Clear understanding of interactions among these variables will help organizations to prioritize and manage these variables more effectively and efficiently to draw advantage from lean manufacturing system implementation

  7. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moon, Ji-Won [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Datskos, Panos G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gresback, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ivanov, Ilia N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jacobs, Christopher B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jellison, Gerald Earle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jang, Gyoung Gug [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joshi, Pooran C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jung, Hyunsung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meyer, III, Harry M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Phelps, Tommy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  8. Progress in organic integrated circuit manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D. Martin

    2016-02-01

    This review article focuses on the development of processes for the manufacture of organic electronic circuits. Beginning with the first report of an organic transistor it highlights the key developments leading to the successful manufacture of microprocessors and other complex circuits incorporating organic transistors. Both batch processing (based on silicon integrated circuit technology) as well as mass-printing, roll-to-roll (R2R) approaches are discussed. Currently, the best circuit performances are achieved using batch processing. It is suggested that an emerging, large mass-market for electronic tags may dictate that R2R manufacture will likely be required to meet the high throughput rates needed. However, significant improvements in resolution and registration are necessary to achieve increased circuit operating speeds.

  9. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  10. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenshan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Wind Turbine Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Richardson, Bradley [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lloyd, Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Love, Lonnie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nolet, Stephen [TPI Composites, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Hannan, James [TPI Composites, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this project was to explore the utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for low cost manufacturing of wind turbine molds. Engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and TPI Composites (TPI) collaborated to design and manufacture a printed mold that can be used for resin infusion of wind turbine components. Specific focus was on required material properties (operating temperatures and pressures, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), thermal conductivity), surface finish (accuracy and coatings) and system integration (integrated vacuum ports, and heating element). The project began with a simple proof of principle components, targeting surface coatings and material properties for printing a small section (approximately 4’ x 4’ x 2’) of a mold. Next, the second phase scaled up and integrated with the objective of capturing all of the necessary components (integrated heating to accelerate cure time, and vacuum, sealing) for resin infusion on a mold of significant size (8’ x 20’ x 6’).

  12. 2001 Industry Studies: Advanced Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    markets, production and innovation. After encountering growing international competition in the 1970’s and 1980’s, U.S. manufacturers sought new and better...competitive advantages and better performance in world markets. Importantly, advanced manufacturing involves the innovative integration of new technology...the traditional parameters of mass production, giving rise to a new era in manufacturing in which manufacturers are increasing the speed and

  13. Cyber Enabled Direct Digital Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    3 - A survey of sensing and control systems for machine and process monitoring of directed energy, metal-based additive manufacturing A3-1 Appendix...Street Journal, p. B2, 7 February 2013. [4] National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining , "National Additive Manufacturing Innovation...and control systems for machine and process monitoring of directed energy, metal-based additive manufacturing Reutzel, E.W., Nassar, A.R., 2015. A

  14. Manufacturing Innovation and Technological Superiority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Defense AT&L: September-October 2016 2 From the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisit ion, Technology, and Logist ics Manufacturing Innovation ...English advantages in mechanized textile manufacturing in the early 1800s drove the performance of the British economy, just as Carnegie’s steel...program to establish Manufacturing Innovation Institutes (MIIs) that would create incubators for advanced manufacturing technology in key

  15. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killpatrick, Don H.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core 10 of a first metal, a tubular sleeve 12 of a second metal, and an outer sheath 14, 16, 18 of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket 14. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MDH channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core 10 and the second metal of the sleeve 12 strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  16. [Manufactured baby food: safety expectations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, L; Van Egroo, L-D; Galesne, N

    2010-12-01

    Food safety is a concern for parents of infants, and healthcare professionals are often questioned by them about this topic. Baby food European regulation ensures high levels of safety and is more rigorous than common food regulation. Maximal limit for pesticides in baby food demonstrates the high level of requirements. This limit must be below the 10 ppb detection threshold, whatever the chemical used. Other contaminants such as nitrates are also the subject of greater expectations in baby food. Food safety risks control needs a specific know-how that baby food manufacturers have acquired and experienced, more particularly by working with producers of high quality raw material. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagula, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

  18. Distributed optically integrated manufacture system based on CORBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Ming; Jiang, Jian-chun; Liu, Xing-fa; Hu, Rui-fei

    2007-12-01

    Focused on the shortcoming and insufficiency of reconfigurable manufacture system (RMS) for optical manufacturing in control layer and interface of manufacturing execution systems (MES) and control layer, the difference of MES-plan layer interface and that of MES-control layer is discussed, and an architecture of distributed optically integrated manufacture executing system based on fieldbus/Ethernet network and common object request broker architecture (CORBA) is presented. In this solution, the optical manufacture equipments are connected by fieldbus network, a gateway is used for the communication of fieldbus manufacture equipment and MES in the workshop, and CORBA services which provide a general interface for communication of heterogeneous fieldbus manufacture equipment of workshop are realized on the gateway. Then all specifics of heterogeneous fieldbus manufacture equipments are concealed, which show as virtual equipment and can be accessed in a simple and unified way. So the control layer is composed of virtual equipment and easy to be reconfigured. Similarly workshop management function components are modeled and encapsulated by CORBA interface, and MES could be integrated to RMS expediently. The optical integrated manufacture system presented is proved with good ability of flexible, reconfigurable, opening and high feasibility, and met the reconfigurable requirement of distributed optical manufacturing workshop preferably.

  19. Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility (CoMET) at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) paves the way for innovative wind turbine components and accelerated manufacturing. Available for use by industry partners and university researchers, the 10,000-square-foot facility expands NREL's composite manufacturing research capabilities by enabling researchers to design, prototype, and test composite wind turbine blades and other components -- and then manufacture them onsite. Designed to work in conjunction with NREL's design, analysis, and structural testing capabilities, the CoMET facility expedites manufacturing innovation.

  20. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) improvements for ENTECH`s concentrator module. Final technical report, 9 January 1991--14 April 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.; Perry, J.L.; Jackson, M.C.; Walters, R.R. [ENTECH, Inc., Dallas-Fort Worth Airport, TX (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This final technical report documents ENTECH`s Phase 1 contract with Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Under this project we prepared a detailed description of our current manufacturing process for making our unique linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator modules. In addition, we prepared a detailed description of an improved manufacturing process, which will simultaneously increase module production rates, enhance module quality, and substantially reduce module costs. We also identified potential problems in implementing the new manufacturing process, and we proposed solutions to these anticipated problems. Before discussing the key results of our program, however, we present a brief description of our unique photovoltaic technology. The key conclusion of our PVMAT Phase 1 study is that our module technology, without further breakthroughs, can realistically meet the near-term DOE goal of 12 cents/kWh levelized electricity cost, provided that we successfully implement the new manufacturing process at a production volume of at least 10 megawatts per year. The key recommendation from our Phase 1 study is to continue our PVMaT project into Phase 2A, which is directed toward the actual manufacturing technology development required for our new module production process. 15 refs.