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Sample records for volume imaging pet

  1. Automatic extraction of myocardial mass and volumes using parametric images from dynamic non-gated PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen;

    2016-01-01

    -gated dynamic cardiac PET. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with aortic-valve stenosis and 10 healthy controls (HC) underwent a 27-min 11C-acetate PET/CT scan and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). HC were scanned twice to assess repeatability. Parametric images of uptake rate K1 and the blood pool were......LV and WT only and an overestimation for LVEF at lower values. Intra- and inter-observer correlations were >0.95 for all PET measurements. PET repeatability accuracy in HC was comparable to CMR. CONCLUSION: LV mass and volumes are accurately and automatically generated from dynamic 11C-acetate PET without...... ECG-gating. This method can be incorporated in a standard routine without any additional workload and can, in theory, be extended to other PET tracers....

  2. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jianhua; Chu-Shern Lim, Jason; Townsend, David W.

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and 18F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data.

  3. Combining MRI with PET for partial volume correction improves image-derived input functions in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Eleanor; Buonincontri, Guido [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Izquierdo, David [Athinoula A Martinos Centre, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Methner, Carmen [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, Rob C [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ansorge, Richard E [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kreig, Thomas [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Carpenter, T Adrian [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sawiak, Stephen J [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Behavioural and Clinical Neurosciences Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Kinetic modelling in PET requires the arterial input function (AIF), defined as the time-activity curve (TAC) in plasma. This measure is challenging to obtain in mice due to low blood volumes, resulting in a reliance on image-based methods for AIF derivation. We present a comparison of PET- and MR-based region-of-interest (ROI) analysis to obtain image-derived AIFs from the left ventricle (LV) of a mouse model. ROI-based partial volume correction (PVC) was performed to improve quantification.

  4. PET-guided delineation of radiation therapy treatment volumes: a survey of image segmentation techniques

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    Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); El Naqa, Issam [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Historically, anatomical CT and MR images were used to delineate the gross tumour volumes (GTVs) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The capabilities offered by modern radiation therapy units and the widespread availability of combined PET/CT scanners stimulated the development of biological PET imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning with the aim to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the tumour. One of the most difficult issues facing PET-based treatment planning is the accurate delineation of target regions from typical blurred and noisy functional images. The major problems encountered are image segmentation and imperfect system response function. Image segmentation is defined as the process of classifying the voxels of an image into a set of distinct classes. The difficulty in PET image segmentation is compounded by the low spatial resolution and high noise characteristics of PET images. Despite the difficulties and known limitations, several image segmentation approaches have been proposed and used in the clinical setting including thresholding, edge detection, region growing, clustering, stochastic models, deformable models, classifiers and several other approaches. A detailed description of the various approaches proposed in the literature is reviewed. Moreover, we also briefly discuss some important considerations and limitations of the widely used techniques to guide practitioners in the field of radiation oncology. The strategies followed for validation and comparative assessment of various PET segmentation approaches are described. Future opportunities and the current challenges facing the adoption of PET-guided delineation of target volumes and its role in basic and clinical research are also addressed. (orig.)

  5. Impact of motion and partial volume effects correction on PET myocardial perfusion imaging using simultaneous PET-MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Yoann; Guehl, Nicolas J.; Reese, Timothy G.; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Normandin, Marc D.; Shoup, Timothy M.; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    PET is an established modality for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) which enables quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using dynamic imaging and kinetic modeling. However, heart motion and partial volume effects (PVE) significantly limit the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of PET MPI. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a solution to the motion problem in PET by enabling MR-based motion correction of PET data. The aim of this study was to develop a motion and PVE correction methodology for PET MPI using simultaneous PET-MR, and to assess its impact on both static and dynamic PET MPI using 18F-Flurpiridaz, a novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracer. Two dynamic 18F-Flurpiridaz MPI scans were performed on healthy pigs using a PET-MR scanner. Cardiac motion was tracked using a dedicated tagged-MRI (tMR) sequence. Motion fields were estimated using non-rigid registration of tMR images and used to calculate motion-dependent attenuation maps. Motion correction of PET data was achieved by incorporating tMR-based motion fields and motion-dependent attenuation coefficients into image reconstruction. Dynamic and static PET datasets were created for each scan. Each dataset was reconstructed as (i) Ungated, (ii) Gated (end-diastolic phase), and (iii) Motion-Corrected (MoCo), each without and with point spread function (PSF) modeling for PVE correction. Myocardium-to-blood concentration ratios (MBR) and apparent wall thickness were calculated to assess image quality for static MPI. For dynamic MPI, segment- and voxel-wise MBF values were estimated by non-linear fitting of a 2-tissue compartment model to tissue time-activity-curves. MoCo and Gating respectively decreased mean apparent wall thickness by 15.1% and 14.4% and increased MBR by 20.3% and 13.6% compared to Ungated images (P  <  0.01). Combined motion and PSF correction (MoCo-PSF) yielded 30.9% (15.7%) lower wall thickness and 82.2% (20.5%) higher MBR compared to Ungated data reconstructed

  6. Intrasubject correlation between static scan and distribution volume images for [{sup 11}C]flumazenil PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, Masahiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Senda, Michio; Kimura, Yuichi [and others

    2000-06-01

    Accumulation of [{sup 11}C]flumazenil (FMZ) reflects central nervous system benzodiazepine receptor (BZR). We searched for the optimal time for a static PET scan with FMZ as semi-quantitative imaging of BZR distribution. In 10 normal subjects, a dynamic series of decay-corrected PET scans was performed for 60 minutes, and the arterial blood was sampled during the scan to measure radioactivity and labeled metabolites. We generated 13 kinds of ''static scan'' images from the dynamic scan in each subject, and analyzed the pixel correlation for these images versus distribution volume (DV) images. We also analyzed the time for the [{sup 11}C]FMZ in plasma and tissue to reach the equilibrium. The intra-subject pixel correlation demonstrated that the static scan'' images for the period centering around 30 minutes post-injection had the strongest linear correlation with the DV image. The ratio of radioactivity in the cortex to that in the plasma reached a peak at 40 minutes after injection. Considering the physical decay and patient burden, we conclude that the decay corrected static scan for [{sup 11}C]FMZ PET as semi-quantitative imaging of BZR distribution is to be optimally acquired from 20 to 40 minutes after injection. (author)

  7. MRI data driven partial volume effects correction in PET imaging using 3D local multi-resolution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pogam, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.lepogam@univ-brest.fr [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Lamare, Frederic [Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Hatt, Mathieu [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Fernandez, Philippe [Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2013-02-21

    PET partial volume effects (PVE) resulting from the limited resolution of PET scanners is still a quantitative issue that PET/MRI scanners do not solve by themselves. A recently proposed voxel-based locally adaptive 3D multi-resolution PVE correction based on the mutual analysis of wavelet decompositions was applied on 12 clinical {sup 18}F-FLT PET/T1 MRI images of glial tumors, and compared to a PET only voxel-wise iterative deconvolution approach. Quantitative and qualitative results demonstrated the interest of exploiting PET/MRI information with higher uptake increases (19±8% vs. 11±7%, p=0.02), as well as more convincing visual restoration of details within tumors with respect to deconvolution of the PET uptake only. Further studies are now required to demonstrate the accuracy of this restoration with histopathological validation of the uptake in tumors.

  8. Multimodality imaging with CT, MR and FDG-PET for radiotherapy target volume delineation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, David; Scarsbrook, Andrew F.; Sykes, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Satiavani; Subesinghe, Manil; Carey, Brendan; Wilson, Daniel J.; Roberts, Neil; McDermott, Gary; KARAKAYA, Ebru; BAYMAN, Evrim; Sen, Mehmet; Speight, Richard; Prestwich, Robin J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to quantify the variation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation between CT, MR and FDG PET-CT imaging. Methods A prospective, single centre, pilot study was undertaken where 11 patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers (2 tonsil, 9 base of tongue primaries) underwent pre-treatment, contrast enhanced, FDG PET-CT and MR imaging, all performed in a radiotherapy treatment mask. CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs were contoured by ...

  9. A new method for volume segmentation of PET images, based on possibility theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewalle-Vignion, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Lopes, Renaud; Huglo, Damien; Stute, Simon; Vermandel, Maximilien

    2011-02-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG PET) has become an essential technique in oncology. Accurate segmentation and uptake quantification are crucial in order to enable objective follow-up, the optimization of radiotherapy planning, and therapeutic evaluation. We have designed and evaluated a new, nearly automatic and operator-independent segmentation approach. This incorporated possibility theory, in order to take into account the uncertainty and inaccuracy inherent in the image. The approach remained independent of PET facilities since it did not require any preliminary calibration. Good results were obtained from phantom images [percent error =18.38% (mean) ± 9.72% (standard deviation)]. Results on simulated and anatomopathological data sets were quantified using different similarity measures and showed the method was efficient (simulated images: Dice index =82.18% ± 13.53% for SUV =2.5 ). The approach could, therefore, be an efficient and robust tool for uptake volume segmentation, and lead to new indicators for measuring volume of interest activity.

  10. Region-Based Partial Volume Correction Techniques for PET Imaging: Sinogram Implementation and Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Sattarivand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose. Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET requires partial volume correction (PVC. Region-based PVC methods are based on geometric transfer matrix implemented either in image-space (GTM or sinogram-space (GTMo, both with similar performance. Although GTMo is slower, it more closely simulates the 3D PET image acquisition, accounts for local variations of point spread function, and can be implemented for iterative reconstructions. A recent image-based symmetric GTM (sGTM has shown improvement in noise characteristics and robustness to misregistration over GTM. This study implements the sGTM method in sinogram space (sGTMo, validates it, and evaluates its performance. Methods. Two 3D sphere and brain digital phantoms and a physical sphere phantom were used. All four region-based PVC methods (GTM, GTMo, sGTM, and sGTMo were implemented and their performance was evaluated. Results. All four PVC methods had similar accuracies. Both noise propagation and robustness of the sGTMo method were similar to those of sGTM method while they were better than those of GTMo method especially for smaller objects. Conclusion. The sGTMo was implemented and validated. The performance of the sGTMo in terms of noise characteristics and robustness to misregistration is similar to that of the sGTM method and improved compared to the GTMo method.

  11. Symmetric geometric transfer matrix partial volume correction for PET imaging: principle, validation and robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarivand, Mike; Kusano, Maggie; Poon, Ian; Caldwell, Curtis

    2012-11-01

    Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) often requires partial volume correction (PVC) to improve the accuracy of quantitative PET studies. Conventional region-based PVC methods use co-registered high resolution anatomical images (e.g. computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images) to identify regions of interest. Spill-over between regions is accounted for by calculating regional spread functions (RSFs) in a geometric transfer matrix (GTM) framework. This paper describes a new analytically derived symmetric GTM (sGTM) method that relies on spill-over between RSFs rather than between regions. It is shown that the sGTM is mathematically equivalent to Labbe's method; however it is a region-based method rather than a voxel-based method and it avoids handling large matrices. The sGTM method was validated using two three-dimensional (3D) digital phantoms and one physical phantom. A 3D digital sphere phantom with sphere diameters ranging from 5 to 30 mm and a sphere-to-background uptake ratio of 3-to-1 was used. A 3D digital brain phantom was used with four different anatomical regions and a background region with different activities assigned to each region. A physical sphere phantom with the same geometry and uptake as the digital sphere phantom was manufactured and PET-CT images were acquired. Using these three phantoms, the performance of the sGTM method was assessed against that of the GTM method in terms of accuracy, precision, noise propagation and robustness. The robustness was assessed by applying mis-registration errors and errors in estimates of PET point spread function (PSF). In all three phantoms, the results showed that the sGTM method has accuracy similar to that of the GTM method and within 5%. However, the sGTM method showed better precision and noise propagation than the GTM method, especially for spheres smaller than 13 mm. Moreover, the sGTM method was more robust than the GTM method when mis-registration errors or

  12. Simulation-based partial volume correction for dopaminergic PET imaging. Impact of segmentation accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Ye; Winz, Oliver H. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Vernaleken, Ingo [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics; Goedicke, Andreas [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; High Tech Campus, Philips Research Lab., Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Rota Kops, Elena [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neuroscience and Medicine-4

    2015-07-01

    Partial volume correction (PVC) is an essential step for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, PVELab, a freely available software, is evaluated for PVC in {sup 18}F-FDOPA brain-PET, with a special focus on the accuracy degradation introduced by various MR-based segmentation approaches. Methods Four PVC algorithms (M-PVC; MG-PVC; mMG-PVC; and R-PVC) were analyzed on simulated {sup 18}F-FDOPA brain-PET images. MR image segmentation was carried out using FSL (FMRIB Software Library) and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) packages, including additional adaptation for subcortical regions (SPM{sub L}). Different PVC and segmentation combinations were compared with respect to deviations in regional activity values and time-activity curves (TACs) of the occipital cortex (OCC), caudate nucleus (CN), and putamen (PUT). Additionally, the PVC impact on the determination of the influx constant (K{sub i}) was assessed. Results Main differences between tissue-maps returned by three segmentation algorithms were found in the subcortical region, especially at PUT. Average misclassification errors in combination with volume reduction was found to be lowest for SPM{sub L} (PUT < 30%) and highest for FSL (PUT > 70%). Accurate recovery of activity data at OCC is achieved by M-PVC (apparent recovery coefficient varies between 0.99 and 1.10). The other three evaluated PVC algorithms have demonstrated to be more suitable for subcortical regions with MG-PVC and mMG-PVC being less prone to the largest tissue misclassification error simulated in this study. Except for M-PVC, quantification accuracy of K{sub i} for CN and PUT was clearly improved by PVC. Conclusions The regional activity value of PUT was appreciably overcorrected by most of the PVC approaches employing FSL or SPM segmentation, revealing the importance of accurate MR image segmentation for the presented PVC framework. The selection of a PVC approach should be adapted to the anatomical

  13. Trends in PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  14. Quantitative measurements of cerebral blood flow in volume imaging PET scanners

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    Smith, R.J.; Shao, L.; Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S.; Ragland, J.D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) are performed in a volume imaging PET Scanner by means of moderate activity infusions. In equilibrium infusions, activations are measured by scanning over 10 minutes with 16 minute activations. Typical measured whole brain CBF values are 37{+-}8 ml/min/100g, close to the value of 42 ml/min/100g reported by other groups using this method. For ramped infusions, scanning over 4 minutes with 5 minute activations results in whole brain CBFs of 49 {+-} 9 ml/min/100g, close to the Kety and Schmidt value of 50 ml/min/100g. Both equilibrium and ramped infusion methods have been used to study face and word memory in human subjects. Both methods were able to detect significant activations in regions implicated in human memory. The authors conclude that precise quantitation of regional CBF is achieved using both methods, and that ramped infusions also provide accurate measures of CBF. In addition a simplified protocol for ramped infusion studies has been developed. In this method the whole brain tissue time activity curve generated from dynamic scanning is replaced by an appropriately scaled camera coincidence countrate curve. The resulting whole brain CBF values are only 7% different from the dynamic scan and fit results. Regional CBFs (rCBF) may then be generated from the summed image (4.25 minutes) using a count density vs flow lookup table.

  15. A practical method for randoms subtraction in volume imaging PET from detector singles countrate measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.J.; Karp, J.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-06-01

    Randoms subtraction in a volume imaging PET scanner is a significant problem due to the high singles countrates experienced. The delayed coincidence method requires double counting of randoms events and results in a lowered countrate capability. Calculations based on detector singles countrates require complex corrections for countrate dependent livetime and event acceptance due to the camera coincidence processing between the detector and rebinned randoms countrates. The profile distribution method has been used to estimate and subtract both scatter and randoms background but this method is a compromise and couples these 2 sources of background together. In order to avoid these problems and provide accurate subtraction of both the distribution and magnitude of randoms contamination in the scan data the authors have developed an alternative singles based method. The singles distributions are measured across the detectors and are used to construct a randoms distribution sinogram. This distribution is scaled to the appropriate rebinned randoms countrate by means of a lookup table of randoms countrate vs detector singles countrate, generated from phantom calibrations. The advantages of performing randoms subtraction by this method are: (1) there is no increase in camera deadtime, (2) the method compensates for nonuniformities in randoms distributions due to both the activity distribution and nonuniform geometric response of the camera for on and off bankpairs, and (3) it deals with randoms subtraction independently of scatter so that different scatter correction routines may then be applied to the data.

  16. MR-based automatic delineation of volumes of interest in human brain PET images using probability maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karina; Hasselbalch, Steen G.;

    2005-01-01

    delineation of the VOI set. The approach was also shown to work equally well in individuals with pronounced cerebral atrophy. Probability-map-based automatic delineation of VOIs is a fast, objective, reproducible, and safe way to assess regional brain values from PET or SPECT scans. In addition, the method......The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an observer-independent approach for automatic generation of volume-of-interest (VOI) brain templates to be used in emission tomography studies of the brain. The method utilizes a VOI probability map created on the basis of a database of several...... subjects' MR-images, where VOI sets have been defined manually. High-resolution structural MR-images and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding PET-images (in terms of (18)F-altanserin binding) from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment were included for the analysis. A template including...

  17. A three-dimensional model-based partial volume correction strategy for gated cardiac mouse PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Tyler; Thorn, Stephanie; Kordos, Myra; DaSilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S. B.; deKemp, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    Quantification in cardiac mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by the imaging spatial resolution. Spillover of left ventricle (LV) myocardial activity into adjacent organs results in partial volume (PV) losses leading to underestimation of myocardial activity. A PV correction method was developed to restore accuracy of the activity distribution for FDG mouse imaging. The PV correction model was based on convolving an LV image estimate with a 3D point spread function. The LV model was described regionally by a five-parameter profile including myocardial, background and blood activities which were separated into three compartments by the endocardial radius and myocardium wall thickness. The PV correction was tested with digital simulations and a physical 3D mouse LV phantom. In vivo cardiac FDG mouse PET imaging was also performed. Following imaging, the mice were sacrificed and the tracer biodistribution in the LV and liver tissue was measured using a gamma-counter. The PV correction algorithm improved recovery from 50% to within 5% of the truth for the simulated and measured phantom data and image uniformity by 5-13%. The PV correction algorithm improved the mean myocardial LV recovery from 0.56 (0.54) to 1.13 (1.10) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections. The mean image uniformity was improved from 26% (26%) to 17% (16%) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections applied. Scatter and attenuation corrections were not observed to significantly impact PV-corrected myocardial recovery or image uniformity. Image-based PV correction algorithm can increase the accuracy of PET image activity and improve the uniformity of the activity distribution in normal mice. The algorithm may be applied using different tracers, in transgenic models that affect myocardial uptake, or in different species provided there is sufficient image quality and similar contrast between the myocardium and surrounding structures.

  18. Fundamentals of PET and PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Kwee, Thomas C; Surti, Suleman; Akin, Esma A; Yoo, Don; Alavi, Abass

    2011-06-01

    In this review, the fundamental principles of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging have been described. The basic physics of PET instrumentation, radiotracer chemistry, and the artifacts, as well as normal physiological or benign pathological variants, have been described and presented to the readers in a lucid manner to enable them an easy grasp of the fundamentals of the subject. Finally, we have outlined the current developments in quantitative PET imaging, including dual time point and delayed PET imaging, time-of-flight technology in PET imaging and partial volume correction, and global disease assessment with their potential of being incorporated into the assessment of benign and malignant disorders.

  19. A region growing method for tumor volume segmentation on PET images for rectal and anal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ellen; Betler, James; Parda, David; Reitz, Bodo; Kirichenko, Alexander; Mohammadi, Seyed; Miften, Moyed

    2009-10-01

    The application of automated segmentation methods for tumor delineation on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images presents an opportunity to reduce the interobserver variability in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. In this work, three segmentation methods were evaluated and compared for rectal and anal cancer patients: (i) Percentage of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV% max), (ii) fixed SUV cutoff of 2.5 (SUV2.5), and (iii) mathematical technique based on a confidence connected region growing (CCRG) method. A phantom study was performed to determine the SUV% max threshold value and found to be 43%, SUV43% max. The CCRG method is an iterative scheme that relies on the use of statistics from a specified region in the tumor. The scheme is initialized by a subregion of pixels surrounding the maximum intensity pixel. The mean and standard deviation of this region are measured and the pixels connected to the region are included or not based on the criterion that they are greater than a value derived from the mean and standard deviation. The mean and standard deviation of this new region are then measured and the process repeats. FDG-PET-CT imaging studies for 18 patients who received RT were used to evaluate the segmentation methods. A PET avid (PETavid) region was manually segmented for each patient and the volume was then used to compare the calculated volumes along with the absolute mean difference and range for all methods. For the SUV43% max method, the volumes were always smaller than the PETavid volume by a mean of 56% and a range of 21%-79%. The volumes from the SUV2.5 method were either smaller or larger than the PETavid volume by a mean of 37% and a range of 2%-130%. The CCRG approach provided the best results with a mean difference of 9% and a range of 1%-27%. Results show that the CCRG technique can be used in the segmentation of tumor volumes on FDG-PET images, thus providing treatment planners with a clinically

  20. A novel partial volume effects correction technique integrating deconvolution associated with denoising within an iterative PET image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlin, Thibaut, E-mail: thibaut.merlin@telecom-bretagne.eu [Université Bordeaux INCIA, CNRS UMR 5287, Hôpital de Bordeaux , Bordeaux 33 33076 (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest 29 29609 (France); Fernandez, Philippe; Lamare, Frederic [Université Bordeaux INCIA, CNRS UMR 5287, Hôpital de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33 33076 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Partial volume effect (PVE) plays an important role in both qualitative and quantitative PET image accuracy, especially for small structures. A previously proposed voxelwise PVE correction method applied on PET reconstructed images involves the use of Lucy–Richardson deconvolution incorporating wavelet-based denoising to limit the associated propagation of noise. The aim of this study is to incorporate the deconvolution, coupled with the denoising step, directly inside the iterative reconstruction process to further improve PVE correction. Methods: The list-mode ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm has been modified accordingly with the application of the Lucy–Richardson deconvolution algorithm to the current estimation of the image, at each reconstruction iteration. Acquisitions of the NEMA NU2-2001 IQ phantom were performed on a GE DRX PET/CT system to study the impact of incorporating the deconvolution inside the reconstruction [with and without the point spread function (PSF) model] in comparison to its application postreconstruction and to standard iterative reconstruction incorporating the PSF model. The impact of the denoising step was also evaluated. Images were semiquantitatively assessed by studying the trade-off between the intensity recovery and the noise level in the background estimated as relative standard deviation. Qualitative assessments of the developed methods were additionally performed on clinical cases. Results: Incorporating the deconvolution without denoising within the reconstruction achieved superior intensity recovery in comparison to both standard OSEM reconstruction integrating a PSF model and application of the deconvolution algorithm in a postreconstruction process. The addition of the denoising step permitted to limit the SNR degradation while preserving the intensity recovery. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating the Lucy–Richardson deconvolution associated with a

  1. Assessing and accounting for the impact of respiratory motion on FDG uptake and viable volume for liver lesions in free-breathing PET using respiration-suspended PET images as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Burger, Irene A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ridge, Carole A.; Solomon, Stephen B. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess and account for the impact of respiratory motion on the variability of activity and volume determination of liver tumor in positron emission tomography (PET) through a comparison between free-breathing (FB) and respiration-suspended (RS) PET images. Methods: As part of a PET/computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous liver ablation procedure performed on a PET/CT scanner, a patient's breathing is suspended on a ventilator, allowing the acquisition of a near-motionless PET and CT reference images of the liver. In this study, baseline RS and FB PET/CT images of 20 patients undergoing thermal ablation were acquired. The RS PET provides near-motionless reference in a human study, and thereby allows a quantitative evaluation of the effect of respiratory motion on PET images obtained under FB conditions. Two methods were applied to calculate tumor activity and volume: (1) threshold-based segmentation (TBS), estimating the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the segmented volume and (2) histogram-based estimation (HBE), yielding the background-subtracted lesion (BSL) activity and associated volume. The TBS method employs 50% of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the threshold for tumors with SUV{sub max} ≥ 2× SUV{sub liver-bkg}, and tumor activity above this threshold yields TLG{sub 50%}. The HBE method determines local PET background based on a Gaussian fit of the low SUV peak in a SUV-volume histogram, which is generated within a user-defined and optimized volume of interest containing both local background and lesion uptakes. Voxels with PET intensity above the fitted background were considered to have originated from the tumor and used to calculate the BSL activity and its associated lesion volume. Results: Respiratory motion caused SUV{sub max} to decrease from RS to FB by −15% ± 11% (p = 0.01). Using TBS method, there was also a decrease in SUV{sub mean} (−18% ± 9%, p = 0.01), but an increase in TLG{sub 50%} (18

  2. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation; Obtencao de volumes tumorais em pilhas de imagens PET usando tecnicas de segmentacao de imagens coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE) Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F., E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Cordeiro, Landerson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments.

  3. Evaluation of the partial volume effect in the activity quantification in PET/CT images; Avaliacao do efeito de volume parcial na quantificacao de atividade em imagens de PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krempser, Alexandre R., E-mail: krempser@peb.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra. Programa de Engenharia Biomedica; Oliveira, Silvia M. Velasques de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Sergio A. de [Hospital Samaritano, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Imagens PET/CT

    2012-08-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of partial volume effect (PVE) in the quantification of activity in images of a PET-CT scanner and its ability to identify lesions. Recovery coefficients were calculated using a phantom containing 12 cylinders with diameters between 4 and 30 mm and a National Electrical Manufactures Association scattering phantom, both fillable with known concentrations of {sup 18}F. The images were acquired for acquisition time of 3 and 5 minutes, and cylinder to background ratio of n=8:1 and n=4:1. The recovery coefficients were calculated between 0.01 and 0.91 depending on the diameter. Significant variations were not found in function of image acquisition parameters. Errors in the activity quantification above 70% were found for cylinders with diameters smaller than 10 mm. The cylinders with diameters smaller than 8 mm were not identified in the images. The phantoms were adequate for PVE evaluation in the PET/CT images. The PVE had the greatest impact on the cylinders with diameters of 6 and 4 mm. It's necessary to use partial volume correction techniques in the images in order to increase the quantitative accuracy of the studied equipment. (author)

  4. Singles transmission in volume-imaging PET with a 137Cs source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J S; Muehllehner, G; Qu, H; Yan, X H

    1995-05-01

    The feasibility of a new method of attenuation correction in PET has been investigated, using a single-photon emitter for the transmission scan. The transmission scan is predicted to be more than a factor of ten faster with the singles method than the standard coincidence method, for comparable statistics. Thus, a transmission scan be completed in 1-2 min, rather than 10-20 min, as is common practice with the coincidence method. In addition, a potential advantage of using the single-photon source 137Cs, which has an energy of 662 keV, is that postinjection transmission studies can be performed using energy discrimination to separate the transmission from the emission data at 511 keV. In order to compensate for the energy difference of the attenuation coefficients at 662 keV compared to 511 keV, the transmission images are segmented into two compartments, tissue and lung, and known values (for 511 keV) of attenuation are inserted into these compartments. This technique also compensates for the higher amount of scatter present with the singles method, since it is not possible to use a position gate (based on collinearity of the source and two detector positions) as is commonly done with a positron-emitting source. We have demonstrated, with experimental phantom studies, that the singles transmission method combined with segmentation gives results equivalent both qualitatively and quantitatively to the coincidence method, but requires significantly less time.

  5. Automated localization and segmentation of lung tumor from PET-CT thorax volumes based on image feature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT) plays an essential role in early tumor detection, diagnosis, staging and treatment. Automated and more accurate lung tumor detection and delineation from PET-CT is challenging. In this paper, on the basis of quantitative analysis of contrast feature of PET volume in SUV (standardized uptake value), our method firstly automatically localized the lung tumor. Then based on analysing the surrounding CT features of the initial tumor definition, our decision strategy determines the tumor segmentation from CT or from PET. The algorithm has been validated on 20 PET-CT studies involving non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Experimental results demonstrated that our method was able to segment the tumor when adjacent to mediastinum or chest wall, and the algorithm outperformed the other five lung segmentation methods in terms of overlapping measure.

  6. PET imaging of thin objects: measuring the effects of positron range and partial-volume averaging in the leaf of Nicotiana tabacum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, David L., E-mail: alexoff@bnl.gov; Dewey, Stephen L.; Vaska, Paul; Krishnamoorthy, Srilalan; Ferrieri, Richard; Schueller, Michael; Schlyer, David J.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: PET imaging in plants is receiving increased interest as a new strategy to measure plant responses to environmental stimuli and as a tool for phenotyping genetically engineered plants. PET imaging in plants, however, poses new challenges. In particular, the leaves of most plants are so thin that a large fraction of positrons emitted from PET isotopes ({sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N) escape while even state-of-the-art PET cameras have significant partial-volume errors for such thin objects. Although these limitations are acknowledged by researchers, little data have been published on them. Methods: Here we measured the magnitude and distribution of escaping positrons from the leaf of Nicotiana tabacum for the radionuclides {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N using a commercial small-animal PET scanner. Imaging results were compared to radionuclide concentrations measured from dissection and counting and to a Monte Carlo simulation using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Results: Simulated and experimentally determined escape fractions were consistent. The fractions of positrons (mean{+-}S.D.) escaping the leaf parenchyma were measured to be 59{+-}1.1%, 64{+-}4.4% and 67{+-}1.9% for {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N, respectively. Escape fractions were lower in thicker leaf areas like the midrib. Partial-volume averaging underestimated activity concentrations in the leaf blade by a factor of 10 to 15. Conclusions: The foregoing effects combine to yield PET images whose contrast does not reflect the actual activity concentrations. These errors can be largely corrected by integrating activity along the PET axis perpendicular to the leaf surface, including detection of escaped positrons, and calculating concentration using a measured leaf thickness.

  7. PET imaging of thin objects: measuring the effects of positron range and partial-volume averaging in the leag of Nicotiana Tabacum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, D.L.; Alexoff, D.L.; Dewey, S.L.; Vaska, P.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ferrieri, R.; Schueller, M.; Schlyer, D.; Fowler, J.S.

    2011-03-01

    PET imaging in plants is receiving increased interest as a new strategy to measure plant responses to environmental stimuli and as a tool for phenotyping genetically engineered plants. PET imaging in plants, however, poses new challenges. In particular, the leaves of most plants are so thin that a large fraction of positrons emitted from PET isotopes ({sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N) escape while even state-of-the-art PET cameras have significant partial-volume errors for such thin objects. Although these limitations are acknowledged by researchers, little data have been published on them. Here we measured the magnitude and distribution of escaping positrons from the leaf of Nicotiana tabacum for the radionuclides {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N using a commercial small-animal PET scanner. Imaging results were compared to radionuclide concentrations measured from dissection and counting and to a Monte Carlo simulation using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Simulated and experimentally determined escape fractions were consistent. The fractions of positrons (mean {+-} S.D.) escaping the leaf parenchyma were measured to be 59 {+-} 1.1%, 64 {+-} 4.4% and 67 {+-} 1.9% for {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N, respectively. Escape fractions were lower in thicker leaf areas like the midrib. Partial-volume averaging underestimated activity concentrations in the leaf blade by a factor of 10 to 15. The foregoing effects combine to yield PET images whose contrast does not reflect the actual activity concentrations. These errors can be largely corrected by integrating activity along the PET axis perpendicular to the leaf surface, including detection of escaped positrons, and calculating concentration using a measured leaf thickness.

  8. Incorporation of wavelet-based denoising in iterative deconvolution for partial volume correction in whole-body PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussion, N.; Cheze Le Rest, C.; Hatt, M.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, U650, Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM) CHU MORVAN, Brest (France)

    2009-07-15

    Partial volume effects (PVEs) are consequences of the limited resolution of emission tomography. The aim of the present study was to compare two new voxel-wise PVE correction algorithms based on deconvolution and wavelet-based denoising. Deconvolution was performed using the Lucy-Richardson and the Van-Cittert algorithms. Both of these methods were tested using simulated and real FDG PET images. Wavelet-based denoising was incorporated into the process in order to eliminate the noise observed in classical deconvolution methods. Both deconvolution approaches led to significant intensity recovery, but the Van-Cittert algorithm provided images of inferior qualitative appearance. Furthermore, this method added massive levels of noise, even with the associated use of wavelet-denoising. On the other hand, the Lucy-Richardson algorithm combined with the same denoising process gave the best compromise between intensity recovery, noise attenuation and qualitative aspect of the images. The appropriate combination of deconvolution and wavelet-based denoising is an efficient method for reducing PVEs in emission tomography. (orig.)

  9. Segmentation of biological target volumes on multi-tracer PET images based on information fusion for achieving dose painting in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelandais, Benoît; Gardin, Isabelle; Mouchard, Laurent; Vera, Pierre; Ruan, Su

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging plays an important role in radiotherapy. Dose painting consists in the application of a nonuniform dose prescription on a tumoral region, and is based on an efficient segmentation of biological target volumes (BTV). It is derived from PET images, that highlight tumoral regions of enhanced glucose metabolism (FDG), cell proliferation (FLT) and hypoxia (FMiso). In this paper, a framework based on Belief Function Theory is proposed for BTV segmentation and for creating 3D parametric images for dose painting. We propose to take advantage of neighboring voxels for BTV segmentation, and also multi-tracer PET images using information fusion to create parametric images. The performances of BTV segmentation was evaluated on an anthropomorphic phantom and compared with two other methods. Quantitative results show the good performances of our method. It has been applied to data of five patients suffering from lung cancer. Parametric images show promising results by highlighting areas where a high frequency or dose escalation could be planned.

  10. PET imaging in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; Copray, Sjef; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; de Vries, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive technique for quantitative imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in animals and humans. PET uses probes labeled with a radioactive isotope, called PET tracers, which can bind to or be converted by a specific biological target and thus

  11. PET radiopharmaceuticals for neuroreceptor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Routine clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals for the noninvasive imaging of brain receptors, transporters,and enzymes are commonly labeled with positron emitting nuclides such as carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Certain minimal conditions need to be fulfilled for these PET ligands to be used as imaging agents in vivo. Some of these prerequisites are discussed and examples of the most useful clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals that have found application in the central nervous system are reviewed.

  12. MR-based automatic delineation of volumes of interest in human brain PET images using probability maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karina; Hasselbalch, Steen G.;

    2005-01-01

    delineation of the VOI set. The approach was also shown to work equally well in individuals with pronounced cerebral atrophy. Probability-map-based automatic delineation of VOIs is a fast, objective, reproducible, and safe way to assess regional brain values from PET or SPECT scans. In addition, the method...... applies well in elderly subjects, even in the presence of pronounced cerebral atrophy...... subjects' MR-images, where VOI sets have been defined manually. High-resolution structural MR-images and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding PET-images (in terms of (18)F-altanserin binding) from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment were included for the analysis. A template including...

  13. Can body volume be determined by PET?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Michael; Paul, Dominik; Korsten-Reck, Ulrike; Mix, Michael; Müller, Frank; Merk, Stefan; Moser, Ernst; Brink, Ingo

    2005-05-01

    To avoid dependence on body weight, the standardised uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) can instead be normalised to the lean body mass (LBM), which can be determined from body volume and mass. This study was designed to answer the following questions: Firstly, can the total body volume in principle be determined using PET? Secondly, is the precision of this measurement comparable to that achieved using an established standard method. Ten patients were examined during oncological whole-body PET examinations. The whole-body volume of the patients was determined from the transmission scan in PET. Air displacement plethysmography with BOD POD was used for comparison as the standard method of volume determination. In all patients, the whole-body volumes could be determined using PET and the standard method. Bland and Altman [23] analysis for agreement between the volumes determined by the two methods (presentation of differences vs means) revealed a very small difference of -0.14 l. With a mean patient volume of 71.81+/-15.93 l, the relative systematic error is only <0.1%. On this basis, equality of the volume values determined by the two methods can be assumed. PET can be used as a supplementary method for experimental determination of whole-body volume and total body fat in tumour patients. The fat content can be used to calculate the LBM and to determine body weight-independent SUVs (SUV(LBM)).

  14. Can body volume be determined by PET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschel, Michael; Paul, Dominik; Mix, Michael; Moser, Ernst; Brink, Ingo [University Hospital Freiburg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Section of Positron Emission Tomography, Freiburg (Germany); Korsten-Reck, Ulrike [University Hospital Freiburg, Division of Sports Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Mueller, Frank [PET-Institute Rhein-Neckar, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Merk, Stefan [Kantonsspital Basel, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland)

    2005-04-01

    To avoid dependence on body weight, the standardised uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) can instead be normalised to the lean body mass (LBM), which can be determined from body volume and mass. This study was designed to answer the following questions: Firstly, can the total body volume in principle be determined using PET? Secondly, is the precision of this measurement comparable to that achieved using an established standard method. Ten patients were examined during oncological whole-body PET examinations. The whole-body volume of the patients was determined from the transmission scan in PET. Air displacement plethysmography with BOD POD was used for comparison as the standard method of volume determination. In all patients, the whole-body volumes could be determined using PET and the standard method. Bland and Altman [23] analysis for agreement between the volumes determined by the two methods (presentation of differences vs means) revealed a very small difference of -0.14 l. With a mean patient volume of 71.81{+-}15.93 l, the relative systematic error is only <0.1%. On this basis, equality of the volume values determined by the two methods can be assumed. PET can be used as a supplementary method for experimental determination of whole-body volume and total body fat in tumour patients. The fat content can be used to calculate the LBM and to determine body weight-independent SUVs (SUV{sub LBM}). (orig.)

  15. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  16. Semiautomatic methods for segmentation of the proliferative tumour volume on sequential FLT PET/CT images in head and neck carcinomas and their relation to clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arens, Anne I.J.; Grootjans, Willem; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Visser, Eric P. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G.C. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, MAASTRO clinic, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hoeben, Bianca A.W.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lee, John A.; Gregoire, Vincent [St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), INSERM UMR1101, Brest (France)

    2014-05-15

    Radiotherapy of head and neck cancer induces changes in tumour cell proliferation during treatment, which can be depicted by the PET tracer {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT). In this study, three advanced semiautomatic PET segmentation methods for delineation of the proliferative tumour volume (PV) before and during (chemo)radiotherapy were compared and related to clinical outcome. The study group comprised 46 patients with 48 squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, treated with accelerated (chemo)radiotherapy, who underwent FLT PET/CT prior to treatment and in the 2nd and 4th week of therapy. Primary gross tumour volumes were visually delineated on CT images (GTV{sub CT}). PVs were visually determined on all PET scans (PV{sub VIS}). The following semiautomatic segmentation methods were applied to sequential PET scans: background-subtracted relative-threshold level (PV{sub RTL}), a gradient-based method using the watershed transform algorithm and hierarchical clustering analysis (PV{sub W} and {sub C}), and a fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian algorithm (PV{sub FLAB}). Pretreatment PV{sub VIS} correlated best with PV{sub FLAB} and GTV{sub CT}. Correlations with PV{sub RTL} and PV{sub W} and {sub C} were weaker although statistically significant. During treatment, the PV{sub VIS}, PV{sub W} and {sub C} and PV{sub FLAB} significant decreased over time with the steepest decline over time for PV{sub FLAB}. Among these advanced segmentation methods, PV{sub FLAB} was the most robust in segmenting volumes in the third scan (67 % of tumours as compared to 40 % for PV{sub W} and {sub C} and 27 % for PV{sub RTL}). A decrease in PV{sub FLAB} above the median between the pretreatment scan and the scan obtained in the 4th week was associated with better disease-free survival (4 years 90 % versus 53 %). In patients with head and neck cancer, FLAB proved to be the best performing method for segmentation of the PV on repeat FLT PET/CT scans during (chemo)radiotherapy. This may

  17. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  18. Influence of the effect pf partial volume and the image filters in the removal of double-phase PET images; Influencia del efecto de volumen parcial y de los filtros de imagen en la sustraccion de imagenes PET de doble fase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado Chamorro, P.; Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Montes Fuentes, C.; Martinez Mirallas, O.; Tejada San Juan, S.; Ramirez Lazanta, R.

    2013-07-01

    A procedure of evaluation for PET studies of double-phase has been developed, and has been achieved to validate this procedure about images of mannequins for which the quantitative outcome was known to get. He has been also evaluated the effect of filtering on these images. You can reach the conclusion that the best results are obtained making the image ratio, making asymmetrical filtering of images. Since this filtering manages to reduce the partial volume effect, it is useful in assessing increases in recruitment in regions of reduced size, on double-phase PET studies. (Author)

  19. A new virtual ring-based system matrix generator for iterative image reconstruction in high resolution small volume PET systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K; Safavi-Naeini, M; Franklin, D R; Han, Z; Rosenfeld, A B; Hutton, B; Lerch, M L F

    2015-09-07

    A common approach to improving the spatial resolution of small animal PET scanners is to reduce the size of scintillation crystals and/or employ high resolution pixellated semiconductor detectors. The large number of detector elements results in the system matrix--an essential part of statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms--becoming impractically large. In this paper, we propose a methodology for system matrix modelling which utilises a virtual single-layer detector ring to greatly reduce the size of the system matrix without sacrificing precision. Two methods for populating the system matrix are compared; the first utilises a geometrically-derived system matrix based on Siddon's ray tracer method with the addition of an accurate detector response function, while the second uses Monte Carlo simulation to populate the system matrix. The effectiveness of both variations of the proposed technique is demonstrated via simulations of PETiPIX, an ultra high spatial resolution small animal PET scanner featuring high-resolution DoI capabilities, which has previously been simulated and characterised using classical image reconstruction methods. Compression factors of 5 x 10(7) and 2.5 x 10(7)are achieved using this methodology for the system matrices produced using the geometric and Monte Carlo-based approaches, respectively, requiring a total of 0.5-1.2 GB of memory-resident storage. Images reconstructed from Monte Carlo simulations of various point source and phantom models, produced using system matrices generated via both geometric and simulation methods, are used to evaluate the quality of the resulting system matrix in terms of achievable spatial resolution and the CRC, CoV and CW-SSIM index image quality metrics. The Monte Carlo-based system matrix is shown to provide the best image quality at the cost of substantial one-off computational effort and a lower (but still practical) compression factor. Finally, a straightforward extension of the virtual ring

  20. Contourlet-based active contour model for PET image segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, M.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Zaidi, H.

    Purpose: PET-guided radiation therapy treatment planning, clinical diagnosis, assessment of tumor growth, and therapy response rely on the accurate delineation of the tumor volume and quantification of tracer uptake. Most PET image segmentation techniques proposed thus far are suboptimal in the

  1. Contourlet-based active contour model for PET image segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, M.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided radiation therapy treatment planning, clinical diagnosis, assessment of tumor growth, and therapy response rely on the accurate delineation of the tumor volume and quantification of tracer uptake. Most PET image segmentation techniques proposed thus far are suboptimal in the pres

  2. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D{sub 1} receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. [{sup 11}C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D{sub 2} receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D{sub 2} occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D{sub 2} receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D{sub 2}, dopamine D{sub 1} receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors have been studied with [{sup 11}C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [{sup 11}C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly

  3. Validation of a method of automatic segmentation for delineation of volumes in PET imaging for radiotherapy; Validacion de un metodo de segmentacion automatica para delineacion de volumenes en imagenes PET para radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latorre Musoll, A.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Ruiz Martinez, A.; Fernandez Leon, A.; Carrasco de Fez, P.; Jornet Sala, N.; Ribas Morales, M.

    2011-07-01

    Prior to clinical use of PET imaging for the delineation of BTV, has made a preliminary study on model, to validate the automatic segmentation tools based on thresholds of activity concentration, which implement both PET-CT equipment as the Eclipse planning system.

  4. PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohliger, Michael A; Hope, Thomas A; Chapman, Jocelyn S; Chen, Lee-May; Behr, Spencer C; Poder, Liina

    2017-08-01

    MR imaging and PET using 2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoroglucose (FDG) are both useful in the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies. MR imaging is superior for local staging of disease whereas fludeoxyglucose FDG PET is superior for detecting distant metastases. Integrated PET/MR imaging scanners have great promise for gynecologic malignancies by combining the advantages of each modality into a single scan. This article reviews the technology behind PET/MR imaging acquisitions and technical challenges relevant to imaging the pelvis. A dedicated PET/MR imaging protocol; the roles of PET and MR imaging in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; and future directions for PET/MR imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  6. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the prognostic value of different volume-based calculations of tumor metabolic activity in the initial assessment of patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT.A single-site, retrospective study from 2002...... to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized.......05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02-11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%.Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of pretreatment estimation of TLG provide supplemental prognostic information to histologic grading, with significant independent properties for prediction...

  7. Artificial Neural Network-Based System for PET Volume Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhd Saeed Sharif

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour detection, classification, and quantification in positron emission tomography (PET imaging at early stage of disease are important issues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and radiotherapy planning. Many techniques have been proposed for segmenting medical imaging data; however, some of the approaches have poor performance, large inaccuracy, and require substantial computation time for analysing large medical volumes. Artificial intelligence (AI approaches can provide improved accuracy and save decent amount of time. Artificial neural networks (ANNs, as one of the best AI techniques, have the capability to classify and quantify precisely lesions and model the clinical evaluation for a specific problem. This paper presents a novel application of ANNs in the wavelet domain for PET volume segmentation. ANN performance evaluation using different training algorithms in both spatial and wavelet domains with a different number of neurons in the hidden layer is also presented. The best number of neurons in the hidden layer is determined according to the experimental results, which is also stated Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation training algorithm as the best training approach for the proposed application. The proposed intelligent system results are compared with those obtained using conventional techniques including thresholding and clustering based approaches. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulated PET phantom data sets and clinical PET volumes of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients were utilised to validate the proposed algorithm which has demonstrated promising results.

  8. Artificial Neural Network-Based System for PET Volume Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Mhd Saeed; Abbod, Maysam; Amira, Abbes; Zaidi, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Tumour detection, classification, and quantification in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging at early stage of disease are important issues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and radiotherapy planning. Many techniques have been proposed for segmenting medical imaging data; however, some of the approaches have poor performance, large inaccuracy, and require substantial computation time for analysing large medical volumes. Artificial intelligence (AI) approaches can provide improved accuracy and save decent amount of time. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), as one of the best AI techniques, have the capability to classify and quantify precisely lesions and model the clinical evaluation for a specific problem. This paper presents a novel application of ANNs in the wavelet domain for PET volume segmentation. ANN performance evaluation using different training algorithms in both spatial and wavelet domains with a different number of neurons in the hidden layer is also presented. The best number of neurons in the hidden layer is determined according to the experimental results, which is also stated Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation training algorithm as the best training approach for the proposed application. The proposed intelligent system results are compared with those obtained using conventional techniques including thresholding and clustering based approaches. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulated PET phantom data sets and clinical PET volumes of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients were utilised to validate the proposed algorithm which has demonstrated promising results.

  9. SPECT and PET Imaging of Meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara Valotassiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical and grade III (anaplastic meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT and Positron Emission Tomography (PET could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue.

  10. Imaging with {sup 124}I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, L. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using {sup 124}I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT{sub 2}) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after {sup 124}I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT{sub 2} acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI{sub 2}) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI{sub 30}). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI{sub 2} detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT{sub 2} (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI{sub 30} tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI{sub 2} (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine

  11. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  12. PET imaging in endocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Lloyd, C; Szyszko, T; Win, Z; Rubello, D; Al-Nahhas, A

    2008-06-01

    The role of PET in the assessment of endocrine tumours has been, until recently, restricted to the use of (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). Being a marker of metabolically active lesions that show high grading and low differentiation, FDG is not ideal for this purpose since the majority of endocrine tumours are slow growing and highly differentiated. It is however useful when dedifferentiation takes place and provides excellent prognostic information. A number of hormone precursors and amino acids are labelled with (11)C and used successfully in the management of parathyroid, adrenal and pituitary tumours. However, the short half-life of (11)C radiopharmaceuticals restricts their use to centres with access to an on-site cyclotron, while the high cost of production may limit their use to research purposes. A promising new positron-emission tomography (PET) tracer is Gallium-68 obtained by elution from a long shelf-life generator that makes it economic and cyclotron-independent. Its short half-life and flexible labelling ability to a wide range of peptides and antibodies makes it ideal for PET imaging. In addition to imaging GEP-NETs and phaeochromocytoma, it has the potential to be used in a wider range of endocrine tumours.

  13. Reproducibility of Quantitative Brain Imaging Using a PET-Only and a Combined PET/MR System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Martin L.; Muzik, Otto; Beyer, Thomas; Hacker, Marcus; Ladefoged, Claes Nøhr; Cal-González, Jacobo; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Rausch, Ivo; Langer, Oliver; Bauer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of migrating a quantitative brain imaging protocol from a positron emission tomography (PET)-only system to an integrated PET/MR system. Potential differences in both absolute radiotracer concentration as well as in the derived kinetic parameters as a function of PET system choice have been investigated. Five healthy volunteers underwent dynamic (R)-[11C]verapamil imaging on the same day using a GE-Advance (PET-only) and a Siemens Biograph mMR system (PET/MR). PET-emission data were reconstructed using a transmission-based attenuation correction (AC) map (PET-only), whereas a standard MR-DIXON as well as a low-dose CT AC map was applied to PET/MR emission data. Kinetic modeling based on arterial blood sampling was performed using a 1-tissue-2-rate constant compartment model, yielding kinetic parameters (K1 and k2) and distribution volume (VT). Differences for parametric values obtained in the PET-only and the PET/MR systems were analyzed using a 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Comparison of DIXON-based AC (PET/MR) with emission data derived from the PET-only system revealed average inter-system differences of −33 ± 14% (p PET/MR resulted in slightly lower systematic differences of −16 ± 18% for K1 and −9 ± 10% for k2. The average differences in VT were −18 ± 10% (p PET/MR and PET-only imaging due to different standard AC methods employed. Therefore, a transfer of imaging protocols from PET-only to PET/MR systems is not straightforward without application of proper correction methods. Clinical Trial Registration: www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, identifier 2013-001724-19 PMID:28769742

  14. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-06-01

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  16. PET-based delineation of tumour volumes in lung cancer: comparison with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Andrea; Mai, Sebastian; Bohnenberger, Hendrik; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Grgic, Aleksandar [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany); Kim, Yoo Jin; Bohle, Rainer M. [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Homburg (Germany); Kremp, Stephanie; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Radiooncology, Homburg (Germany); Schaefers, Hans-Joachim [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Homburg (Germany); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin [MeVis Research Center for Medical Diagnostic Systems and Visualization, Bremen (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    The objective of the study was to validate an adaptive, contrast-oriented thresholding algorithm (COA) for tumour delineation in {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in comparison with pathological findings. The impact of tumour localization, tumour size and uptake heterogeneity on PET delineation results was also investigated. PET tumour delineation by COA was compared with both CT delineation and pathological findings in 15 patients to investigate its validity. Correlations between anatomical volume, metabolic volume and the pathology reference as well as between the corresponding maximal diameters were determined. Differences between PET delineations and pathological results were investigated with respect to tumour localization and uptake heterogeneity. The delineated volumes and maximal diameters measured on PET and CT images significantly correlated with the pathology reference (both r > 0.95, p < 0.0001). Both PET and CT contours resulted in overestimation of the pathological volume (PET 32.5 {+-} 26.5 %, CT 46.6 {+-} 27.4 %). CT volumes were larger than those delineated on PET images (CT 60.6 {+-} 86.3 ml, PET 48.3 {+-} 61.7 ml). Maximal tumour diameters were similar for PET and CT (51.4 {+-} 19.8 mm for CT versus 53.4 {+-} 19.1 mm for PET), slightly overestimating the pathological reference (mean difference CT 4.3 {+-} 3.2 mm, PET 6.2 {+-} 5.1 mm). PET volumes of lung tumours located in the lower lobe were significantly different from those determined from pathology (p = 0.037), whereas no significant differences were observed for tumours located in the upper lobe (p = 0.066). Only minor correlation was found between pathological tumour size and PET heterogeneity (r = -0.24). PET tumour delineation by COA showed a good correlation with pathological findings. Tumour localization had an influence on PET delineation results. The impact of tracer uptake heterogeneity on PET delineation

  17. FDG PET/CT imaging as a biomarker in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Paris-Est Creteil University, LYSA Imaging, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Gallamini, Andrea [Nice University, Research, Innovation and Statistic Department, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Scientific Research Committee, S. Croce Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Younes, Anas [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Lymphoma Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FDG PET/CT has changed the management of FDG-avid lymphoma and is now recommended as the imaging technique of choice for staging and restaging. The need for tailoring therapy to reduce toxicity in patients with a favourable outcome and for improving treatment in those with high-risk factors requires accurate diagnostic methods and a new prognostic algorithm to identify different risk categories. New drugs are used in relapsed/refractory patients. The role of FDG PET/CT as a biomarker in this context is summarized in this review. New trends in FDG metabolic imaging in lymphoma are addressed including metabolic tumour volume measurement at staging and integrative PET which combines PET data with clinical and molecular markers or other imaging techniques. The quantitative approach for response assessment which is under investigation and is used in large ongoing trials is compared with visual criteria. The place of FDG in the era of targeted therapy is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-01-01

    . The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest...

  19. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/pathology image coregistration in primary localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Prokic, Vesna [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Wendl, Christina; Geinitz, Hans; Molls, Michael [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Kirste, Simon [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Souvatzoglou, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Gschwend, Juergen E.; Treiber, Uwe [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States); Krause, Bernd Joachim [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); University of Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for the comparison of pathology specimens after prostatectomy (post-S) with PET images obtained before surgery (pre-S). This method was used to evaluate the merit of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in prostate cancer (PC). In 28 PC patients, {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT was performed before surgery. PET/CT data were coregistered with the pathology specimens. GTV on PET images (GTV-PET) was outlined automatically and corrected manually. Tumour volume in the prostate (TVP) was delineated manually on the pathology specimens. Based on the coregistered PET/pathology images, the following parameters were assessed: SUVmax and SUVmean in the tumoral and nontumoral prostate (NP), GTV-PET (millilitres) and TVP (millilitres). PET/pathology image coregistration was satisfactory. Mean SUVmax in the TVP was lower than in the NP: 5.0 and 5.5, respectively (p = 0.093). Considering the entire prostate, SUVmax was located in the TVP in two patients, in the TVP and NP in 12 patients and exclusively in NP in 14 patients. Partial overlap the TVP and GTV-PET was seen in 71 % of patients, and complete overlap in 4 %. PET/pathology image coregistration can be used for evaluation of different imaging modalities. {sup 11}C-Choline PET failed to distinguish tumour from nontumour tissue. (orig.)

  1. PET/MR Imaging in Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Jensen, Karl Erik; Loft, Annika

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence suggesting that PET/MR imaging will have a role in many aspects of musculoskeletal imaging. The synergistic potential of hybrid PET/MR imaging in terms of acquiring anatomic, molecular, and functional data simultaneously seems advantageous in the diagnostic workup......, treatment planning and monitoring, and follow-up of patients with musculoskeletal malignancies, and may also prove helpful in assessment of musculoskeletal infectious and inflammatory disorders. The application of more sophisticated MR imaging sequences and PET radiotracers other than FDG in the diagnostic...... workup and follow-up of patients with musculoskeletal disorders should be explored....

  2. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G.; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties—well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning—for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in ‘inter-corporal’ transport properties—blood volume and clearance rate—as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  3. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W; Jaffray, David A

    2016-11-21

    Compared to FDG, the signal of (18)F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties-well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning-for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in 'inter-corporal' transport properties-blood volume and clearance rate-as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  4. Atlas of PET/MR imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratib, Osman [University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland). Nuclear Medicine Division; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Beyer, Thomas (eds.) [General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering

    2013-08-01

    Numerous illustrated clinical cases in different oncology domains. Includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. Interactive version based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring the widest compatibility. Edited by three international opinion leaders/imaging experts in the field. This new project on PET/MR imaging in oncology includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. The interactive version of the atlas is based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring compatibility with any computer operating system as well as a dedicated version for Apple iPad and iPhone. The book opens with an introduction to the principles of hybrid imaging that pays particular attention to PET/MR imaging and standard PET/MR acquisition protocols. A wide range of illustrated clinical case reports are then presented. Each case study includes a short clinical history, findings, and teaching points, followed by illustrations, legends, and comments. The multimedia version of the book includes dynamic movies that allow the reader to browse through series of rotating 3D images (MIP or volume rendered), display blending between PET and MR, and dynamic visualization of 3D image volumes. The movies can be played either continuously or sequentially for better exploration of sets of images. The editors of this state-of-the-art publication are key opinion leaders in the field of multimodality imaging. Professor Osman Ratib (Geneva) and Professor Markus Schwaiger (Munich) were the first in Europe to initiate the clinical adoption of PET/MR imaging. Professor Thomas Beyer (Zurich) is an internationally renowned pioneering physicist in the field of hybrid imaging. Individual clinical cases presented in this book are co-authored by leading international radiologists and nuclear physicians experts in the use of PET and MRI.

  5. Anatomical and functional volume concordance between FDG PET, and T2 and diffusion-weighted MRI for cervical cancer: a hybrid PET/MR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hongzan; Xin, Jun; Zhang, Shaomin; Guo, Qiyong; Lu, Yueyue; Zhai, Wei; Zhao, Long [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Peng, Weiai [NM Marketing, Great China, Philips Healthcare, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Baijun [Philips China Investment Co. Ltd. Shenyang Office, Shenyang, Liaoning (China)

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the concordance among {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging, MR T2-weighted (T2-W) imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging in cervical cancer using hybrid whole-body PET/MR. This study prospectively included 35 patients with cervical cancer who underwent pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MR images were fused using standard software. The percent of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) was used to contour tumours on PET images, and volumes were calculated automatically. Tumour volumes measured on T2-W and DW images were calculated with standard techniques of tumour area multiplied by the slice profile. Parametric statistics were used for data analysis. FDG PET tumour volumes calculated using SUV{sub max} (14.30 ± 4.70) and T2-W imaging volume (33.81 ± 27.32 cm{sup 3}) were similar (P > 0.05) at 35 % and 40 % of SUV{sub max} (32.91 ± 18.90 cm{sup 3} and 27.56 ± 17.19 cm{sup 3} respectively) and significantly correlated (P < 0.001; r = 0.735 and 0.766). The mean DW volume was 30.48 ± 22.41 cm{sup 3}. DW volumes were not significantly different from FDG PET volumes at either 35 % SUV{sub max} or 40 % SUV{sub max} or from T2-W imaging volumes (P > 0.05). PET subvolumes with increasing SUV{sub max} cut-off percentage showed an inverse change in mean ADC values on DW imaging (P < 0.001, ANOVA). Hybrid PET/MR showed strong volume concordance between FDG PET, and T2-W and DW imaging in cervical cancer. Cut-off at 35 % or 40 % of SUV{sub max} is recommended for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR SUV-based tumour volume estimation. The linear tumour subvolume concordance between FDG PET and DW imaging demonstrates individual regional concordance of metabolic activity and cell density. (orig.)

  6. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villemagne, Patricia S.R.; Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Frost, James J. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image {mu} and {delta} opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65{+-}8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [{sup 11}C]carfentanil ([{sup 11}C]CFN) and [{sup 11}C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([{sup 11}C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [{sup 11}C]CFN or [{sup 11}C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [{sup 11}C]CFN and [{sup 11}C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37{+-}0.91 with [{sup 11}C]CFN and 3.86{+-}0.60 with [{sup 11}C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [{sup 11}C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [{sup 11}C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  7. PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, Mathieu [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France); CHU MORVAN, LaTIM, INSERM U650, Brest (France); Cheze-le Rest, Catherine [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France); CHU, Academic Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brest (France); Albarghach, Nidal; Pradier, Olivier [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France); CHU, Institute of Oncology, Brest (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2011-04-15

    Current state-of-the-art algorithms for functional uptake volume segmentation in PET imaging consist of threshold-based approaches, whose parameters often require specific optimization for a given scanner and associated reconstruction algorithms. Different advanced image segmentation approaches previously proposed and extensively validated, such as among others fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering, or fuzzy locally adaptive bayesian (FLAB) algorithm have the potential to improve the robustness of functional uptake volume measurements. The objective of this study was to investigate robustness and repeatability with respect to various scanner models, reconstruction algorithms and acquisition conditions. Robustness was evaluated using a series of IEC phantom acquisitions carried out on different PET/CT scanners (Philips Gemini and Gemini Time-of-Flight, Siemens Biograph and GE Discovery LS) with their associated reconstruction algorithms (RAMLA, TF MLEM, OSEM). A range of acquisition parameters (contrast, duration) and reconstruction parameters (voxel size) were considered for each scanner model, and the repeatability of each method was evaluated on simulated and clinical tumours and compared to manual delineation. For all the scanner models, acquisition parameters and reconstruction algorithms considered, the FLAB algorithm demonstrated higher robustness in delineation of the spheres with low mean errors (10%) and variability (5%), with respect to threshold-based methodologies and FCM. The repeatability provided by all segmentation algorithms considered was very high with a negligible variability of <5% in comparison to that associated with manual delineation (5-35%). The use of advanced image segmentation algorithms may not only allow high accuracy as previously demonstrated, but also provide a robust and repeatable tool to aid physicians as an initial guess in determining functional volumes in PET. (orig.)

  8. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, C., E-mail: c.weirich@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany); Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany); Byars, L.; Michel, C. [Siemens Healthcare, Molecular Imaging, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany)

    2013-02-21

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  9. PET tracer for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a radiolabelled peptide-based compound for diagnostic imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). The compound may thus be used for diagnosis of malignant diseases. The compound is particularly useful for imaging of somatostatin overexpression in tumors, wherein the compound...... is capable of being imaged by PET when administered with a target dose in the range of 150-350 MBq, such as 150-250 MBq, preferable in the range of 191-210 MBq....

  10. Quantitative Techniques in PET-CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Sandip; Zaidi, Habib; Holm, Soren; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of hybrid PET/CT scanners has made quantitative whole body scanning of radioactive tracers feasible. This paper deals with the novel concepts for assessing global organ function and disease activity based on combined functional (PET) and structural (CT or MR) imaging techniques, their

  11. Imaging neuronal pathways with 52Mn PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napieczynska, Hanna; Severin, Gregory; Fonslet, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    tomography (PET) neuronal tract tracer. We used 52Mn for imaging dopaminergic pathways after a unilateral injection into the ventral tegmental area (VTA), as well as the striatonigral pathway after an injection into the dorsal striatum (STR) in rats. Furthermore, we tested potentially noxious effects...... of the radioactivity dose with a behavioral test and histological staining. 24 h after 52Mn administration, the neuronal tracts were clearly visible in PET images and statistical analysis confirmed the observed distribution of the tracer. We noticed a behavioral impairment in some animals treated with 170 kBq of 52Mn...... for PET imaging....

  12. PET/MR Imaging in Vascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    For imaging of atherosclerotic disease, lumenography using computed tomography, ultrasonography, or invasive angiography is still the backbone of evaluation. However, these methods are less effective to predict the likelihood of future thromboembolic events caused by vulnerability of plaques. PET...

  13. Designing Image Operators for MRI-PET Image Fusion of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Jorge; Gastélum, Alfonso; Padilla, Miguel A.

    2006-09-01

    Our goal is to obtain images combining in a useful and precise way the information from 3D volumes of medical imaging sets. We address two modalities combining anatomy (Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRI) and functional information (Positron Emission Tomography or PET). Commercial imaging software offers image fusion tools based on fixed blending or color-channel combination of two modalities, and color Look-Up Tables (LUTs), without considering the anatomical and functional character of the image features. We used a sensible approach for image fusion taking advantage mainly from the HSL (Hue, Saturation and Luminosity) color space, in order to enhance the fusion results. We further tested operators for gradient and contour extraction to enhance anatomical details, plus other spatial-domain filters for functional features corresponding to wide point-spread-function responses in PET images. A set of image-fusion operators was formulated and tested on PET and MRI acquisitions.

  14. Software-based PET-MR image coregistration: combined PET-MRI for the rest of us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Matthew S.; Liu, Xinyang; Vyas, Pranav K.; Safdar, Nabile M. [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); Plishker, William; Zaki, George F. [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, Raj [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-10-15

    With the introduction of hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), a new imaging option to acquire multimodality images with complementary anatomical and functional information has become available. Compared with hybrid PET/computed tomography (CT), hybrid PET/MRI is capable of providing superior anatomical detail while removing the radiation exposure associated with CT. The early adoption of hybrid PET/MRI, however, has been limited. To provide a viable alternative to the hybrid PET/MRI hardware by validating a software-based solution for PET-MR image coregistration. A fully automated, graphics processing unit-accelerated 3-D deformable image registration technique was used to align PET (acquired as PET/CT) and MR image pairs of 17 patients (age range: 10 months-21 years, mean: 10 years) who underwent PET/CT and body MRI (chest, abdomen or pelvis), which were performed within a 28-day (mean: 10.5 days) interval. MRI data for most of these cases included single-station post-contrast axial T1-weighted images. Following registration, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) values observed in coregistered PET (cPET) and the original PET were compared for 82 volumes of interest. In addition, we calculated the target registration error as a measure of the quality of image coregistration, and evaluated the algorithm's performance in the context of interexpert variability. The coregistration execution time averaged 97±45 s. The overall relative SUV{sub max} difference was 7% between cPET-MRI and PET/CT. The average target registration error was 10.7±6.6 mm, which compared favorably with the typical voxel size (diagonal distance) of 8.0 mm (typical resolution: 0.66 mm x 0.66 mm x 8 mm) for MRI and 6.1 mm (typical resolution: 3.65 mm x 3.65 mm x 3.27 mm) for PET. The variability in landmark identification did not show statistically significant differences between the algorithm and a typical expert. We have presented a software

  15. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  16. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  17. Novel Developments in Instrumentation for PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Advances in medical imaging, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), have been based on technical developments in physics and instrumentation that have common foundations with detection systems used in other fields of physics. New detector materials are used in PET systems that maximize efficiency, timing characteristics and robustness, and which lead to improved image quality and quantitative accuracy for clinical imaging. Time of flight (TOF) techniques are now routinely used in commercial PET scanners that combine physiological imaging with anatomical imaging provided by x-ray computed tomography. Using new solid-state photo-sensors instead of traditional photo-multiplier tubes makes it possible to combine PET with magnetic resonance imaging which is a significant technical challenge, but one that is creating new opportunities for both research and clinical applications. An overview of recent advances in instrumentation, such as TOF and PET/MR will be presented, along with examples of imaging studies to demonstrate the impact on patient care and basic research of diseases.

  18. PET Imaging of Skull Base Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, Erik S; Iagaru, Andrei; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy

    2007-10-01

    The utility of 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for the evaluation of skull base tumors is incompletely investigated, as a limited number of studies specifically focus on this region with regard to PET imaging. Several patterns can be ascertained, however, by synthesizing the data from various published reports and cases of primary skull base malignancies, as well as head and neck malignancies that extend secondarily to the skull base, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors, parotid cancers, and orbital tumors.

  19. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Leiner, Tim [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-18

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  20. Disease quantification on PET/CT images without object delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Fitzpatrick, Danielle; Winchell, Nicole; Schuster, Stephen J.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    The derivation of quantitative information from images to make quantitative radiology (QR) clinically practical continues to face a major image analysis hurdle because of image segmentation challenges. This paper presents a novel approach to disease quantification (DQ) via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images that explores how to decouple DQ methods from explicit dependence on object segmentation through the use of only object recognition results to quantify disease burden. The concept of an object-dependent disease map is introduced to express disease severity without performing explicit delineation and partial volume correction of either objects or lesions. The parameters of the disease map are estimated from a set of training image data sets. The idea is illustrated on 20 lung lesions and 20 liver lesions derived from 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans of patients with various types of cancers and also on 20 NEMA PET/CT phantom data sets. Our preliminary results show that, on phantom data sets, "disease burden" can be estimated to within 2% of known absolute true activity. Notwithstanding the difficulty in establishing true quantification on patient PET images, our results achieve 8% deviation from "true" estimates, with slightly larger deviations for small and diffuse lesions where establishing ground truth becomes really questionable, and smaller deviations for larger lesions where ground truth set up becomes more reliable. We are currently exploring extensions of the approach to include fully automated body-wide DQ, extensions to just CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone, to PET/CT performed with radiotracers other than FDG, and other functional forms of disease maps.

  1. Imaging Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology with PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Porcello Schilling

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD has been reconceptualised as a dynamic pathophysiological process characterized by preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia stages. Positron emission tomography (PET associated with various molecular imaging agents reveals numerous aspects of dementia pathophysiology, such as brain amyloidosis, tau accumulation, neuroreceptor changes, metabolism abnormalities and neuroinflammation in dementia patients. In the context of a growing shift toward presymptomatic early diagnosis and disease-modifying interventions, PET molecular imaging agents provide an unprecedented means of quantifying the AD pathophysiological process, monitoring disease progression, ascertaining whether therapies engage their respective brain molecular targets, as well as quantifying pharmacological responses. In the present study, we highlight the most important contributions of PET in describing brain molecular abnormalities in AD.

  2. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; von Schulthess, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET{sub Ge68}) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET{sub CT}) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT}. Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET{sub CT} in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET{sub Ge68} images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT} images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional {sup 68}Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the

  3. Definition of optimal percentage threshold of SUVmax by comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT metabolism volume with pathological volume of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-jun WANG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To define an optimal maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmaxthreshold of 18F-fluorodeoxygluose(18F-FDG in delineating metabolic tumor volume of cervical cancer by comparing positron emission tomography and computed tomography(PET/CT with pathological volume of the tumor. Methods Twelve patients with cervical cancer prospectively underwent a PET/CT scan. Different SUVmax thresholds, including10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%, 35%, 40%, 45% and 50%, were screened from PET images to obtain the corresponding PET metabolism gross tumor volume(GTV. Pathological slices were prepared after the operation for determination of the edge and area of the tumor. Pathological tumor volumes were measured from each slice, and they were then combined to derive the pathological GTV. An optimal PET GTV wasdefined when PET GTV was closest to the pathological tumor volume, and SUVmax threshold corresponding to the optimal PET GTV was named as the optimal SUVmax threshold. Results The optimal SUVmax threshold was between 30% and 50% with an mean value of40.83%±6.07%in all the 12patients. There was no significant statistical difference between the pathological GTV and PET GTV with aSUVmax threshold of 41%(P=0.352, and they were well correlated with each other with a coefficient of 0.99(P=0.000. Conclusions PET optimal SUVmax thresholdderivedby comparison with pathological GTV is of great significance in improving the curative effect of intensified modulated radiation herapy(IMRT.

  4. PET imaging in patients with Modic changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, H.B.; Manniche, C. [Univ. of Southern Denmark, Funen (Denmark). Back Research Centre; Petersen, H.; Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F. [Odense University Hospital, Univ. of Southern Denmark (Denmark). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was via PET imaging to reveal if any highly metabolic processes were occurring in Modic changes type 1 and/or in the adjacent discs. Modic changes (MC) are signal changes in the vertebral endplate and body visualised by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MC are strongly associated with low back pain (LBP). MC type 1 appear to be inflammation on MRI, and histological and biochemical findings make it highly likely that an inflammation is present. Though MC is painful no known treatment is available, and it is unknown which entities affect the progress or regress of MC. The changes observed on MRI are slow and take months to develop, but faster changes in the metabolism might provide a platform for monitoring patients. Patients from The Back Centre Funen, with low back pain in the area of L1 to S1, MC type 1 in L1 to L5, and a previous herniated lumbar disc. All patients had a PET scan using FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) as tracer. Included in the study were 11 patients, 4 women and 7 men, mean age 48.1 year (range 20-65). All MC were situated in the vertebrae both above and below the previously herniated disc/discs. Ten patients had MC at 1 level, and 1 had MC at 2 levels. The affected levels were 1 at L2/L3, 6 at L4 /L5, and 5 at L5/S1. All had a previous disc herniation and MC larger than 4 mm in diameter. Technically satisfactory PET scans were obtained. However, PET imaging showed no increases in metabolism in any vertebra or disc of any patient. Modic type 1 changes do not reveal themselves by showing increased metabolism with ordinary FDG PET imaging. PET tracers illuminating inflammation are being developed and hopefully may become more successful. (orig.)

  5. Gallium-68 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Iravani, Amir

    2017-04-01

    The role of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET imaging is evolving and finding its place in the imaging armamentarium for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite the progress of conventional imaging strategies, significant limitations remain, including identification of small-volume disease and assessment of bone. Clinical studies have demonstrated that (68)Ga-PSMA is a promising tracer for detection of PCa metastases, even in patients with low prostate-specific antigen. To provide an accurate interpretation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/computed tomography, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists should be familiar with physiologic (68)Ga-PSMA uptake, common variants, patterns of locoregional and distant spread of PCa, and inherent pitfalls.

  6. PET Image Reconstruction Using Information Theoretic Anatomical Priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayajula, Sangeetha; Panagiotou, Christos; Rangarajan, Anand; Li, Quanzheng; Arridge, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a nonparametric framework for incorporating information from co-registered anatomical images into positron emission tomographic (PET) image reconstruction through priors based on information theoretic similarity measures. We compare and evaluate the use of mutual information (MI) and joint entropy (JE) between feature vectors extracted from the anatomical and PET images as priors in PET reconstruction. Scale-space theory provides a framework for the analysis of images at different levels of detail, and we use this approach to define feature vectors that emphasize prominent boundaries in the anatomical and functional images, and attach less importance to detail and noise that is less likely to be correlated in the two images. Through simulations that model the best case scenario of perfect agreement between the anatomical and functional images, and a more realistic situation with a real magnetic resonance image and a PET phantom that has partial volumes and a smooth variation of intensities, we evaluate the performance of MI and JE based priors in comparison to a Gaussian quadratic prior, which does not use any anatomical information. We also apply this method to clinical brain scan data using F18 Fallypride, a tracer that binds to dopamine receptors and therefore localizes mainly in the striatum. We present an efficient method of computing these priors and their derivatives based on fast Fourier transforms that reduce the complexity of their convolution-like expressions. Our results indicate that while sensitive to initialization and choice of hyperparameters, information theoretic priors can reconstruct images with higher contrast and superior quantitation than quadratic priors. PMID:20851790

  7. Combined PET/MR imaging in neurology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Ladefoged, Claes Nøhr; Beyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Combined PET/MR systems have now become available for clinical use. Given the lack of integrated standard transmission (TX) sources in these systems, attenuation and scatter correction (AC) must be performed using the available MR-images. Since bone tissue cannot easily be accounted for duri...

  8. Exploratory matrix factorization for PET image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodewitz, A; Keck, I R; Tomé, A M; Lang, E W

    2010-01-01

    Features are extracted from PET images employing exploratory matrix factorization techniques such as nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). Appropriate features are fed into classifiers such as a support vector machine or a random forest tree classifier. An automatic feature extraction and classification is achieved with high classification rate which is robust and reliable and can help in an early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Estimation of an image derived input function with MR-defined carotid arteries in FDG-PET human studies using a novel partial volume correction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sari, Hasan; Erlandsson, Kjell; Law, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data requires an accurate knowledge the arterial input function. The gold standard method to measure the arterial input function requires collection of arterial blood samples and is an invasive method. Measuring an image...... segmentation of the carotid arteries from MR images. The simulation study results showed that at least 92% of the true intensity could be recovered after the partial volume correction. Results from 19 subjects showed that the mean cerebral metabolic rate of glucose calculated using arterial samples and partial...... volume corrected image derived input function were 26.9 and 25.4 mg/min/100 g, respectively, for the grey matter and 7.2 and 6.7 mg/min/100 g for the white matter. No significant difference in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate of glucose values was observed between arterial samples and corrected...

  10. Lung tumor segmentation in PET images using graph cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Fulham, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of segmentation of tumor regions in positron emission tomography (PET) is to provide more accurate measurements of tumor size and extension into adjacent structures, than is possible with visual assessment alone and hence improve patient management decisions. We propose a segmentation energy function for the graph cuts technique to improve lung tumor segmentation with PET. Our segmentation energy is based on an analysis of the tumor voxels in PET images combined with a standardized uptake value (SUV) cost function and a monotonic downhill SUV feature. The monotonic downhill feature avoids segmentation leakage into surrounding tissues with similar or higher PET tracer uptake than the tumor and the SUV cost function improves the boundary definition and also addresses situations where the lung tumor is heterogeneous. We evaluated the method in 42 clinical PET volumes from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our method improves segmentation and performs better than region growing approaches, the watershed technique, fuzzy-c-means, region-based active contour and tumor customized downhill.

  11. PET imaging in patients with Modic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Hanne; Pedersen, Henrik; Manniche, Claus

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was via PET imaging to reveal if any highly metabolic processes were occurring in Modic changes type 1 and/or in the adjacent discs. Modic changes (MC) are signal changes in the vertebral endplate and body visualised by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MC are strongly...... disc. All patients had a PET scan using FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) as tracer. RESULTS: Included in the study were 11 patients, 4 women and 7 men, mean age 48.1 year (range 20-65). All MC were situated in the vertebrae both above and below the previously herniated disc/discs. Ten patients had MC at 1...... level, and 1 had MC at 2 levels. The affected levels were 1 at L2/L3, 6 at L4 /L5, and 5 at L5/S1. All had a previous disc herniation and MC larger than 4 mm in diameter. Technically satisfactory PET scans were obtained. However, PET imaging showed no increases in metabolism in any vertebra or disc...

  12. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of PET/CT and PET/MR imaging in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nabhani, Khalsa Z; Syed, Rizwan; Michopoulou, Sofia; Alkalbani, Jokha; Afaq, Asim; Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; O'Meara, Celia; Groves, Ashley; Ell, Peter; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare whole-body PET/MR imaging and PET/CT, qualitatively and quantitatively, in oncologic patients and assess the confidence and degree of inter- and intraobserver agreement in anatomic lesion localization. Fifty patients referred for staging with known cancers underwent PET/CT with low-dose CT for attenuation correction immediately followed by PET/MR imaging with 2-point Dixon attenuation correction. PET/CT scans were obtained according to standard protocols (56 ± 20 min after injection of an average 367 MBq of (18)F-FDG, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATATE, or 333.8 MBq of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-choline; 2.5 min/bed position). PET/MR was performed with 5 min/bed position. Three dual-accredited nuclear medicine physicians/radiologists identified the lesions and assigned each to an exact anatomic location. The image quality, alignment, and confidence in anatomic localization of lesions were scored on a scale of 1-3 for PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the standardized uptake values. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement in image quality, alignment, and confidence in lesion localization for the 2 modalities. Two hundred twenty-seven tracer-avid lesions were identified in 50 patients. Of these, 225 were correctly identified on PET/CT and 227 on PET/MR imaging by all 3 observers. The confidence in anatomic localization improved by 5.1% when using PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. The mean percentage interobserver agreement was 96% for PET/CT and 99% for PET/MR imaging, and intraobserver agreement in lesion localization across the 2 modalities was 93%. There was 10% (5/50 patients) improvement in local staging with PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. In this first study, we show the effectiveness of whole-body PET/MR imaging in oncology. There is no statistically significant difference between PET

  13. The importance of appropriate partial volume correction for PET quantification in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Benjamin A.; Erlandsson, Kjell; Hutton, Brian F. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Modat, Marc [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Thurfjell, Lennart [GE Healthcare, Amersham (United Kingdom); Vandenberghe, Rik [Catholic University Leuven, Laboratory for Cognitive Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Neurology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Ourselin, Sebastien [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Clinically, it is characterized by progressive cognitive and functional impairment with structural hallmarks of cortical atrophy and ventricular expansion. Amyloid plaque aggregation is also known to occur in AD subjects. In-vivo imaging of amyloid plaques is now possible with positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands. PET imaging suffers from a degrading phenomenon known as the partial volume effect (PVE). The quantitative accuracy of PET images is reduced by PVEs primarily due to the limited spatial resolution of the scanner. The degree of PVE is influenced by structure size, with smaller structures tending to suffer from more severe PVEs such as atrophied grey matter regions. The aims of this paper were to investigate the effect of partial volume correction (PVC) on the quantification of amyloid PET and to highlight the importance of selecting an appropriate PVC technique. An improved PVC technique, region-based voxel-wise (RBV) correction, was compared against existing Van-Cittert (VC) and Mueller-Gaertner (MG) methods using amyloid PET imaging data. Digital phantom data were produced using segmented MRI scans from a control subject and an AD subject. Typical tracer distributions were generated for each of the phantom anatomies. Also examined were 70 clinical PET scans acquired using [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol. Volume of interest (VOI) analysis was performed for corrected and uncorrected images. PVC was shown to improve the quantitative accuracy of regional analysis performed on amyloid PET images. Of the corrections applied, VC deconvolution demonstrated the worst recovery of grey matter values. MG PVC was shown to induce biases in some grey matter regions due to grey matter variability. In addition, white matter variability was shown to influence the accuracy of MG PVC in cortical grey matter and also cerebellar grey matter, a typical reference region for amyloid PET normalization in

  14. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  15. Deformation field correction for spatial normalization of PET images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgel, Murat; Carass, Aaron; Resnick, Susan M.; Wong, Dean F.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images is essential for population studies, yet the current state of the art in PET-to-PET registration is limited to the application of conventional deformable registration methods that were developed for structural images. A method is presented for the spatial normalization of PET images that improves their anatomical alignment over the state of the art. The approach works by correcting the deformable registration result using a model that is learned from training data having both PET and structural images. In particular, viewing the structural registration of training data as ground truth, correction factors are learned by using a generalized ridge regression at each voxel given the PET intensities and voxel locations in a population-based PET template. The trained model can then be used to obtain more accurate registration of PET images to the PET template without the use of a structural image. A cross validation evaluation on 79 subjects shows that the proposed method yields more accurate alignment of the PET images compared to deformable PET-to-PET registration as revealed by 1) a visual examination of the deformed images, 2) a smaller error in the deformation fields, and 3) a greater overlap of the deformed anatomical labels with ground truth segmentations. PMID:26142272

  16. Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lois, Cristina [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Particle Physics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, Ilja [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems, Department of Empirical Inference, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Werner, Matthias K. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kupferschlaeger, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); cmi-experts GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Clinical PET/MR acquisition protocols entail the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) that could potentially affect PET quantification following MR-based attenuation correction (AC). We assessed the effect of oral and intravenous (IV) MRCA on PET quantification in PET/MR imaging. We employed two MRCA: Lumirem {sup registered} (oral) and Gadovist {sup registered} (IV). First, we determined their reference PET attenuation values using a PET transmission scan (ECAT-EXACT HR+, Siemens) and a CT scan (PET/CT Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens). Second, we evaluated the attenuation of PET signals in the presence of MRCA. Phantoms were filled with clinically relevant concentrations of MRCA in a background of water and {sup 18}F-fluoride, and imaged using a PET/CT scanner (Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens) and a PET/MR scanner (Biograph mMR, Siemens). Third, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant volumes of MRCA on MR-based AC using human pilot data: a patient study employing Gadovist {sup registered} (IV) and a volunteer study employing two different oral MRCA (Lumirem {sup registered} and pineapple juice). MR-based attenuation maps were calculated following Dixon-based fat-water segmentation and an external atlas-based and pattern recognition (AT and PR) algorithm. IV and oral MRCA in clinically relevant concentrations were found to have PET attenuation values similar to those of water. The phantom experiments showed that under clinical conditions IV and oral MRCA did not yield additional attenuation of PET emission signals. Patient scans showed that PET attenuation maps are not biased after the administration of IV MRCA but may be biased, however, after ingestion of iron oxide-based oral MRCA when segmentation-based AC algorithms are used. Alternative AC algorithms, such as AT and PR, or alternative oral contrast agents, such as pineapple juice, can yield unbiased attenuation maps. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to markedly increased attenuation

  17. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  18. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging with a radio frequency-penetrable PET insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Alexander M; Lee, Brian J; Chang, Chen-Ming; Levin, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    A brain sized radio frequency (RF)-penetrable PET insert has been designed for simultaneous operation with MRI systems. This system takes advantage of electro-optical coupling and battery power to electrically float the PET insert relative to the MRI ground, permitting RF signals to be transmitted through small gaps between the modules that form the PET ring. This design facilitates the use of the built-in body coil for RF transmission and thus could be inserted into any existing MR site wishing to achieve simultaneous PET/MR imaging. The PET detectors employ nonmagnetic silicon photomultipliers in conjunction with a compressed sensing signal multiplexing scheme, and optical fibers to transmit analog PET detector signals out of the MRI room for decoding, processing, and image reconstruction. The PET insert was first constructed and tested in a laboratory benchtop setting, where tomographic images of a custom resolution phantom were successfully acquired. The PET insert was then placed within a 3T body MRI system, and tomographic resolution/contrast phantom images were acquired both with only the B0 field present, and under continuous pulsing from different MR imaging sequences. The resulting PET images have comparable contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) under all MR pulsing conditions: The maximum percent CNR relative difference for each rod type among all four PET images acquired in the MRI system has a mean of 14.0 ± 7.7%. MR images were successfully acquired through the RF-penetrable PET shielding using only the built-in MR body coil, suggesting that simultaneous imaging is possible without significant mutual interference. These results show promise for this technology as an alternative to costly integrated PET/MR scanners; a PET insert that is compatible with any existing clinical MRI system could greatly increase the availability, accessibility, and dissemination of PET/MR. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  20. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was maintained. The change of gain of

  1. Tumor volume delineation using segmentation by thresholding on PET images: influence of source-to-background ratio, size and lesion motion; Contorneo de volumenes tumorales mediante segmentacion por umbrales en imagenes PET: influencia de la relacion senal-fondo, tamano y movimiento de la lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Castro Tejero, P.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Perez Moreno, J.M.; Serrada Hierro, A.; Fernandez Leton, P.

    2010-07-01

    PET imaging is increasingly used in radiotherapy department to assist in volume tumour contouring. In this work several factors affecting the volume of the lesion determined on PET images are investigated: lesion size, background concentration and lesion motion. The measurements are carried out on a phantom with different sizes spheres filled with FDG. Threshold values were determined as a percentage of the maximal activity in the inserts. It is found that the optimal threshold value is around 40% for most of the objects, with a slight influence of background radiation. For the smaller objects, less than 17 mm in diameter, the threshold increases up to 20% for objects of 10 mm in diameter. When applying the movement, there is not a optimal threshold value. Difference between large and small objects becomes more significant when applying motion. Thus, objects less than 13 mm are on the detection limit for some background values. The recovery coefficient curves obtained in each case are shown for discussion.(Author).

  2. Quantitative Evaluation of Atlas-based Attenuation Correction for Brain PET in an Integrated Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Jian, Yiqiang; Jenkins, Nathaniel; Behr, Spencer C; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel; Seo, Youngho

    2017-02-23

    Purpose To assess the patient-dependent accuracy of atlas-based attenuation correction (ATAC) for brain positron emission tomography (PET) in an integrated time-of-flight (TOF) PET/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system. Materials and Methods Thirty recruited patients provided informed consent in this institutional review board-approved study. All patients underwent whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) followed by TOF PET/MR imaging. With use of TOF PET data, PET images were reconstructed with four different attenuation correction (AC) methods: PET with patient CT-based AC (CTAC), PET with ATAC (air and bone from an atlas), PET with ATACpatientBone (air and tissue from the atlas with patient bone), and PET with ATACboneless (air and tissue from the atlas without bone). For quantitative evaluation, PET mean activity concentration values were measured in 14 1-mL volumes of interest (VOIs) distributed throughout the brain and statistical significance was tested with a paired t test. Results The mean overall difference (±standard deviation) of PET with ATAC compared with PET with CTAC was -0.69 kBq/mL ± 0.60 (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P atlas bone, the overall difference of PET with ATACpatientBone (-1.5% ± 1.5) improved over that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P atlas-based bone compensation. However, patient-specific anatomic differences from the atlas causes bone attenuation differences and misclassified sinuses, which result in patient-dependent performance variation of ATAC. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  3. Estimation of Tumor Volumes by 11C-MeAIB and 18F-FDG PET in an Orthotopic Glioblastoma Rat Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, Bo; Thisgaard, Helge; Hvidsten, Svend

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Brain tumor volume assessment is a major challenge. Molecular imaging using PET may be a promising option because it reflects the biologically active cells. We compared the agreement between PET- and histology-derived tumor volumes in an orthotopic glioblastoma rat model with a noninf...

  4. Predictive value of PET response combined with baseline metabolic tumor volume in peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottereau, Anne-Segolene; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Becker, Stéphanie; Broussais, Florence; Peterson, Lars Jelstrup; Bonnet, Christophe; Prior, John O; Tilly, Herve; Hutchings, Martin; Casasnovas, Olivier; Meignan, Michel A

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas with poor outcomes with current therapy. We investigated if response assessed with Positron Emission Tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combined with baseline total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV) could detect early relapse/refractory patients. Methods: 140 patients with nodal PTCL who underwent baseline PET/CT were selected from 7 European centers. 43 had interim PET (iPET) performed after two cycles (iPET2), 95 after 3 or 4 cycles (iPET3/4) and 96 had end of treatment PET (eotPET). Baseline TMTV was computed with 41% SUVmax threshold, and PET response was reported with the Deauville 5-point scale (5-PS). Results: With 43 months median follow-up, the 2-year Progression free survival (PFS) and Overall survival (OS) were 51% and 67%. Positive iPET2 patients (5-PS ≥4) had a significantly worse outcome than those with negative iPET2 (p230cm(3) and iPET3/4 negative (59%/84%); TMTV≤230cm(3) and iPET3/4 positive (42%/50%); TMTV>230cm(3) and iPET3/4 positive (0%/18%). Conclusion: IPET response is predictive of outcome and allows early detection of high-risk PTCL patients. Combining iPET with TMTV improves risk stratification in individual patients. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Clinical evaluation of PET image reconstruction using a spatial resolution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Loft, Annika;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: PET image resolution is variable across the measured field-of-view and described by the point spread function (PSF). When accounting for the PSF during PET image reconstruction image resolution is improved and partial volume effects are reduced. Here, we evaluate the effect of PSF......-based reconstruction on lesion quantification in routine clinical whole-body (WB) PET/CT imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 41 oncology patients were referred for a WB-PET/CT examination (Biograph 40 TruePoint). Emission data were acquired at 2.5min/bed at 1hpi of 400 MBq [18F]-FDG. Attenuation-corrected PET images were...... of view (FOV). There was no significant difference in SUV(mean) in homogenous liver tissue between R1 and R2. CONCLUSION: In whole-body FDG-PET/CT using routine clinical protocols, PSF-based PET reconstruction increases lesion detection and affects SUV(max) measurements compared to standard AW-OSEM PET...

  6. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  7. [¹⁸F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk...... of atherosclerosis-related disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. With excellent reproducibility, (18)FDG PET can be a surrogate end point in clinical drug trials, improving trial efficiency. This article summarizes key findings in the literature, discusses limitations of (18)FDG PET imaging...

  8. The application of PET imaging in psychoneuroimmunology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannestad, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a research tool that allows in vivo measurements of brain metabolism and specific target molecules. PET imaging can be used to measure these brain variables in a variety of species, including human and non-human primates, and rodents. PET imaging can therefore be combined with various experimental and clinical model systems that are commonly used in psychoneuroimmunology research.

  9. Cerebral blood volume in humans by NIRS and PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Frank; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Rostrup, Egill; Ide, Kojiro; Secher, Niels H.; Paulson, Olaf B.

    1998-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) determined changes in the cerebral blood volume (CBV) were compared to those obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) in five healthy volunteers (2 females). Two NIRS optodes were placed on the left forehead and NIRS-CBV was derived from the sum of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. CBV changes were induced by hyperventilation and inhalation of 6% CO2. After 2 min inhalation of labeled carbon monoxide, data were sampled during 8 min for both PET- and NIRS-CBV as well as for the arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). The region of interest for PET-CBV was `banana-shaped' with boundaries corresponding to the position of the NIRS optodes on the transmission scan and to a depth of approximately 2 cm. During hyperventilation, PaCO2 decreased from 5.2 (4.6 - 5.8) to 4.6 (4.2 - 4.9) kPa and equally PET-CBV (from 3.9 (2.5 - 5.2) to 3.6 (3.0 - 4.8) ml (DOT) 100 g-1) and NIRS-CBV were reduced (by -0.14 [-0.38 - 0.50] ml (DOT) 100 g-1). During hypercapnia PaCO2 increased to 6.0 (5.9 - 7.0) kPa accompanied by parallel changes in PET- (to 4.5 (3.9 - 4.9) ml (DOT) 100 g-1) and NIRS-CBV (by 0.04 [-0.02 - 0.30] ml (DOT) 100 g-1) and the two variables were correlated (r equals 0.78, p arterial carbon dioxide tension, the cerebral blood volumes determined by near infrared spectroscopy and by positron emission tomography change in parallel but the change in NIRS-CBV is small compared to that obtained by PET.

  10. Image reconstruction techniques for high resolution human brain PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comtat, C.; Bataille, F.; Sureau, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    High resolution PET imaging is now a well established technique not only for small animal, but also for human brain studies. The ECAT HRRT brain PET scanner(Siemens Molecular Imaging) is characterized by an effective isotropic spatial resolution of 2.5 mm, about a factor of 2 better than for state-of-the-art whole-body clinical PET scanners. Although the absolute sensitivity of the HRRT (6.5 %) for point source in the center of the field-of-view is increased relative to whole-body scanner (typically 4.5 %) thanks to a larger co-polar aperture, the sensitivity in terms of volumetric resolution (75 (m{sup 3} at best for whole-body scanners and 16 (m{sup 3} for t he HRRT) is much lower. This constraint has an impact on the performance of image reconstruction techniques, in particular for dynamic studies. Standard reconstruction methods used with clinical whole-body PET scanners are not optimal for this application. Specific methods had to be developed, based on fully 3D iterative techniques. Different refinements can be added in the reconstruction process to improve image quality: more accurate modeling of the acquisition system, more accurate modeling of the statistical properties of the acquired data, anatomical side information to guide the reconstruction . We will present the performances these added developments for neuronal imaging in humans. (author)

  11. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, 110 Donner, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla. (author)

  12. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  13. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  14. The suitable uptake value threshold of 18F-FDG PET/CT image on gross tumor volume delineation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma%18F-FDG PET/CT勾画鼻咽癌原发肿瘤体积最适阈值的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓翀; 林勤; 石丽婉; 朱鹭超; 田野

    2014-01-01

    目的寻找18F-FDG PET/CT勾画鼻咽癌大体肿瘤体积(GTV)的最适阈值.方法 16例初诊鼻咽癌患者在治疗前接受18F-FDG PET/CT及MRI检查,将MRI/CT融合图像上勾画的肿瘤GTV定义为GTVf,18F-FDG PET/CT勾画肿瘤范围为BTV.不同阈值条件下的BTV通过调整最大标准摄取值(SUVmax)的比例得到.将不同阈值条件下的BTV和GTVf进行比较,当二者在体积及形态学上达到最佳匹配时对应的阈值水平为最适阈值(sTL).sTL×SUVmax得到相应的最适标准摄取值(sSUV).结果 16例患者最适阈值sTL(%)为20.93 ±6.51,相应的最适标准摄取值sSUV为2.27±0.48.sTL与SUVmax呈负相关(R2=0.85,F=78.57,P<0.05);sSUV与SUVmax呈正相关(R2 =0.75,F=41.88,P<0.05);sTL与GTVf无相关性.结论利用SUVmax阈值法勾画鼻咽癌GTV是可行的,最适阈值不是一个固定数值,与SUVmax相关,与肿瘤体积没有明显相关性.%Objective To define a suitable threshold setting for gross tumor volume (GTV)when using 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomogram (PET/CT) for radiotherapy planning in Nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC).Methods Sixteen NPC patients respectively received PET/CT and MRI scan before their radiation treatment.All of the images were transferred to the radiotherapy planning system (TPS).MRI/CT-based primary GTV was defined as GTVf.Biological target volumes (BTVs) were derived from PET/CT-based GTVs of primary tumors.The BTVs were defined as the volumes when adjusting different percentage of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax).GTVfs were compared with BTVs.The suitable threshold level (sTL) could be determined when BTV value and its morphology using a certain threshold level were observed to be the fittest GTVf.The suitable standardized uptake value (sSUV) was calculated as the sTL multiplied by the SUVmax.Results Our result demonstrated no single sTL or sSUV method could achieve an optimized volumetric match with the GTVf.The sTL was

  15. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Catherine; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Nuyts, Johan; Ratib, Osman; Dupont, Patrick; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of 18F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  16. Small Molecule PET Tracers for Transporter Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourn, Michael R

    2017-09-01

    As the field of PET has expanded and an ever-increasing number and variety of compounds have been radiolabeled as potential in vivo tracers of biochemistry, transporters have become important primary targets or facilitators of radiotracer uptake and distribution. A transporter can be the primary target through the development of a specific high-affinity radioligand: examples are the multiple high-affinity radioligands for the neuronal membrane neurotransmitter or vesicular transporters, used to image nerve terminals in the brain. The goal of a radiotracer might be to study the function of a transporter through the use of a radiolabeled substrate, such as the application of 3-O-[(11)C]methyl]glucose to measure rates of glucose transport through the blood-brain barrier. In many cases, transporters are required for radiotracer distributions, but the targeted biochemistries might be unrelated: an example is the use of 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]FDG for imaging glucose metabolism, where initial passage of the radiotracer through cell membranes requires the action of specific glucose transporters. Finally, there are transporters such as p-glycoprotein that function to extrude small molecules from tissues, and can effectively work against successful uptake of radiotracers. The diversity of structures and functions of transporters, their importance in human health and disease, and their role in therapeutic drug disposition suggest that in vivo imaging of transporter location and function will continue to be a point of emphasis in PET radiopharmaceutical development. In this review, the variety of transporters and their importance for in vivo PET radiotracer development and application are discussed. Transporters have thus joined the other major protein targets such as G-protein coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, enzymes, and aggregated proteins as of high interest for understanding human health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Congruency of tumour volume delineated by FET PET and MRSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauler, Jörg; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany); Maudsley, Andrew A [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami (United States); Nikoubashman, Omid [Department of Neuroradiology, Faculty of Medicine, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Filss, Christian; Stoffels, Gabriele; Shah, N Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    In addition to MR imaging, PET imaging of O-(2-[18F]Fluorethyl)-L-Tyrosine (FET) uptake provides information on brain tumour extent and metabolic activity. Similarly, MRS has been shown to be of value for distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas. Based on 2D spatially resolved MRSI, an overlap between 18FET uptake and the choline/N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio of more than 75 % has been reported.

  18. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  19. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  20. Standardised uptake values from PET/CT images: comparison with conventional attenuation-corrected PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souvatzoglou, M.; Ziegler, S.I.; Martinez, M.J.; Dzewas, G.; Schwaiger, M.; Bengel, F. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Busch, R. [Institut fuer Epidemiologie und Statistik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    In PET/CT, CT-derived attenuation factors may influence standardised uptake values (SUVs) in tumour lesions and organs when compared with stand-alone PET. Therefore, we compared PET/CT-derived SUVs intra-individually in various organs and tumour lesions with stand-alone PET-derived SUVs. Thirty-five patients with known or suspected cancer were prospectively included. Sixteen patients underwent FDG PET using an ECAT HR+scanner, and subsequently a second scan using a Biograph Sensation 16PET/CT scanner. Nineteen patients were scanned in the reverse order. All images were reconstructed with an iterative algorithm (OSEM). Suspected lesions were grouped as paradiaphragmatic versus distant from the diaphragm. Mean and maximum SUVs were also calculated for brain, lung, liver, spleen and vertebral bone. The attenuation coefficients ({mu} values) used for correction of emission data (bone, soft tissue, lung) in the two data sets were determined. A body phantom containing six hot spheres and one cold cylinder was measured using the same protocol as in patients. Forty-six lesions were identified. There was a significant correlation of maximum and mean SUVs derived from PET and PET/CT for 14 paradiaphragmatic lesions (r=0.97 respectively; p<0.001 respectively) and for 32 lesions located distant from the diaphragm (r=0.87 and r=0.89 respectively; p<0.001 respectively). No significant differences were observed in the SUVs calculated with PET and PET/CT in the lesions or in the organs. In the phantom, radioactivity concentration in spheres calculated from PET and from PET/CT correlated significantly (r=0.99; p<0.001). SUVs of cancer lesions and normal organs were comparable between PET and PET/CT, supporting the usefulness of PET/CT-derived SUVs for quantification of tumour metabolism. (orig.)

  1. Twelve automated thresholding methods for segmentation of PET images: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; Lecumberri, Pablo; Pagola, Miguel; Gómez, Marisol; Bilbao, Izaskun; Ecay, Margarita; Peñuelas, Iván; Martí-Climent, Josep M

    2012-06-21

    Tumor volume delineation over positron emission tomography (PET) images is of great interest for proper diagnosis and therapy planning. However, standard segmentation techniques (manual or semi-automated) are operator dependent and time consuming while fully automated procedures are cumbersome or require complex mathematical development. The aim of this study was to segment PET images in a fully automated way by implementing a set of 12 automated thresholding algorithms, classical in the fields of optical character recognition, tissue engineering or non-destructive testing images in high-tech structures. Automated thresholding algorithms select a specific threshold for each image without any a priori spatial information of the segmented object or any special calibration of the tomograph, as opposed to usual thresholding methods for PET. Spherical (18)F-filled objects of different volumes were acquired on clinical PET/CT and on a small animal PET scanner, with three different signal-to-background ratios. Images were segmented with 12 automatic thresholding algorithms and results were compared with the standard segmentation reference, a threshold at 42% of the maximum uptake. Ridler and Ramesh thresholding algorithms based on clustering and histogram-shape information, respectively, provided better results that the classical 42%-based threshold (p < 0.05). We have herein demonstrated that fully automated thresholding algorithms can provide better results than classical PET segmentation tools.

  2. SiPM-PET with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong Jong; Kang, Han Gyoo; Ko, Guen Bae; Song, In Chan; Rhee, June-Tak; Lee, Jae Sung

    2012-06-21

    For positron emission tomography (PET) inserts to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications, optical fibers have been used for some time to transfer scintillation photons to photomultiplier tubes positioned outside the fringe magnetic field. We previously proposed a novel utilization of an optical fiber for good radio frequency (RF) transmission from body coils to an imaging object. Optical fiber bundles between silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and scintillation crystals provide an increased spacing between RF-shielded electronics boxes, facilitating RF passage from the body RF coils to imaging objects. In this paper, we present test results of a SiPM-PET system with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. We built the SiPM-PET system which consisted of 12 SiPM-PET modules; each module was assembled with a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicatecrystal block, a 31 mm optical fiber bundle, a Hamamatsu multi-pixel photon counter S11064-050P and a signal processing box shielded with copper. The SiPM-PET system, with a face-to-face distance of 71 mm, was placed inside a 3 T MRI. A small surface coil placed inside the SiPM-PET system was used to receive the signal from phantoms while the body RF coil transmitted the RF pulses. The SiPM-PET system showed little performance degradation during the simultaneous PET-MR imaging and it caused no significant degradation of MR images with turbo spin echo (TSE), gradient echo or 3D spoiled gradient recalled sequences. Echo planar imaging MR images with and without the SiPM-PET inside the MR scanner were significantly worse than the images obtained with the TSE sequence.

  3. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  4. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  5. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  6. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  7. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Thompson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positron emission tomography (PET is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations in small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Susana [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: susana.silva@fc.ul.pt; Jan, Sebastien [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV/DRM, Orsay (France); Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-10-01

    This work is based on the use of an implemented Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simulation system dedicated for small animal PET imaging. Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE), a Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 libraries, is well suited for modeling the microPET FOCUS system and to implement realistic phantoms, such as the MOBY phantom, and data maps from real examinations. The use of a microPET FOCUS simulation model with GATE has been validated for spatial resolution, counting rates performances, imaging contrast recovery and quantitative analysis. Results from realistic studies of the mouse body using {sup -}F and [{sup 18}F]FDG imaging protocols are presented. These simulations include the injection of realistic doses into the animal and realistic time framing. The results have shown that it is possible to simulate small animal PET acquisitions under realistic conditions, and are expected to be useful to improve the quantitative analysis in PET mouse body studies.

  9. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  11. A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON COMPARISON AND FUSION OF METABOLIC IMAGES OF PET WITH ANATOMIC IMAGES OF CT AND MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To compare and match metabolic images of PET with anatomic images of CT and MRI. Methods. The CT or MRI images of the patients were obtained through a photo scanner, and then transferred to the remote workstation of PET scanner with a floppy disk. A fusion method was developed to match the 2-dimensional CT or MRI slices with the correlative slices of 3-dimensional volume PET images. Results. Twenty- nine metabolically changed foci were accurately localized in 21 epilepsy patients' MRI images, while MRI alone had only 6 true positive findings. In 53 cancer or suspicious cancer patients, 53 positive lesions detected by PET were compared and matched with the corresponding lesions in CT or MRI images, in which 10 lesions were missed. On the other hand, 23 lesions detected from the patients' CT or MRI images were negative or with low uptake in the PET images, and they were finally proved as benign. Conclusions. Comparing and matching metabolic images with anatomic images helped obtain a full understanding about the lesion and its peripheral structures. The fusion method was simple, practical and useful for localizing metabolically changed lesions.

  12. Application of PET/SPECT imaging in vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, M. G.; Meerwaidt, R.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; van Dam, G. M.; Tio, R. A.; Zeebregts, C. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Nuclear medicine imaging differs from other imaging modalities by showing physiological processes instead of anatomical details. Objective. To describe the current applications of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as a diagnostic to

  13. Erythrocytes labeled with [(18) F]SFB as an alternative to radioactive CO for quantification of blood volume with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herance, José Raúl; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Abad, Sergio; Victor, Victor M; Pareto, Deborah; Torrent, Èlia; Rojas, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Inhaled radioactive CO is currently the tracer of choice for blood volume quantification by positron emission tomography (PET). This measurement is of great interest for several clinical and research applications. However, owing to the short half-life of the radiolabeled CO, it can only be used in centers equipped with a cyclotron. In the present work, we propose an alternative method to label the red blood cells with [(18) F] in order to obtain blood volume measurements by PET. The use of the radioactive synthon [(18) F] N-succinimidyl 4-[(18) F]fluorobenzoate ([(18) F]SFB) was evaluated for erythrocyte labeling and PET blood volume imaging. The images provided by [(18) F]SFB labeled erythrocytes were compared with those obtained with inhaled [(11) C]CO. Blood volumes obtained with [(18) F]SFB labeled erythrocytes were similar to those obtained with [(11) C]CO in all of the evaluated organs with the exception of spleen, which presented lower uptake with this method. Since the [(18) F]-SFB binds irreversibly to red blood cells, in vivo stability of the radiolabel was higher compared with the [(11) C]CO method. Additionally, owing to the longer half-life and the shorter positron range of [(18) F], the image quality was also higher with the [(18) F]SFB radiolabeled erythrocytes. The labeling of red blood with [(18) F]SFB represents an advantageous alternative to radioactive CO for blood volume measurement by PET and cardiovascular isotopic imaging.

  14. Validation of automatic target volume definition as demonstrated for 11C-choline PET/CT of human prostate cancer using multi-modality fusion techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R; Wood, David; Khan, Asra; Shah, Rajal; Hussain, Hero; Siddiqui, Javed; Seo, Jongbum; Chenevert, Thomas; Piert, Morand

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is actively investigated to aid in target volume definition for radiation therapy. The objectives of this study were to apply an automatic computer algorithm to compute target volumes and to validate the algorithm using histologic data from real human prostate cancer. Various modalities for prostate imaging were performed. In vivo imaging included T2 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and (11)C-choline PET. Ex vivo imaging included 3-T magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and block face photos of the prostate specimen. A novel registration method based on mutual information and thin-plate splines was applied to all modalities. Once PET is registered with histology, a voxel-by-voxel comparison between PET and histology is possible. A thresholding technique based on various fractions of the maximum standardized uptake value in the tumor was applied, and the respective computed threshold volume on PET was compared with histologic truth. Sixteen patients whose primary tumor volumes ranged from 1.2 to 12.6 cm(3) were tested. PET has low spatial resolution, so only tumors > 4 cm(3) were considered. Four cases met this criterion. A threshold value of 60% of the (11)C-choline maximum standardized uptake value resulted in the highest volume overlap between threshold volume on PET and histology. Medial axis distances between threshold volume on PET and histology showed a mean error of 7.7 +/- 5.2 mm. This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating for the first time that histology-guided thresholding on PET can delineate tumor volumes in real human prostate cancer. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular cardiac PET besides FDG viability imaging; Molekulare Kardiale PET jenseits der FDG-Vitalitaetsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, O.; Burchert, W. [Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Molekulare Bildgebung, Herz- und Diabetszentrum NRW

    2009-06-15

    Molecular cardiac non F-18-FDG PET is currently based on perfusion imaging. It is of excellent diagnostic accuracy to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and superior to perfusion SPECT. There is also evidence for its incremental prognostic value. The unique feature of PET to measure myocardial perfusion in absolute terms and in short time periods define its impact on cardiac imaging enabling both the evaluation of early changes in CAD and the accurate characterization of multivessel disease. Currently, all available PET perfusion tracers in Europe are cyclotron products. Rb-82, a generator product, is the most frequently employed perfusion tracer in the United States and cyclotron independent. This tracer has the potential to become an alternative in Europe soon. Nowadays, PET systems are manufactured as hybrid PET-CT scanners. In oncology, hybrid imaging revealed, that the combination of functional and morphological imaging is superior to the single components. In cardiology, the integration of perfusion PET imaging with CT calcium scoring and CT anatomy of the coronary arteries represents a similar constellation. Atherosclerotic plaque evaluation by combined PET-CT technique will be one of the most promising future applications with a potential immense impact on prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy of CAD in the future. (orig.)

  16. PET guidance in prostate cancer radiotherapy: Quantitative imaging to predict response and guide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, G M; Bettinardi, V; Mapelli, P; Picchio, M

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows a monitoring and recording of the spatial and temporal distribution of molecular/cellular processes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The aim of this review is to describe the current applications and to explore the role of PET in prostate cancer management, mainly in the radiation therapy (RT) scenario. The state-of-the art of PET for prostate cancer will be presented together with the impact of new specific PET tracers and technological developments aiming at obtaining better imaging quality, increased tumor detectability and more accurate volume delineation. An increased number of studies have been focusing on PET quantification methods as predictive biomarkers capable of guiding individualized treatment and improving patient outcome; the sophisticated advanced intensity modulated and imaged guided radiation therapy techniques (IMRT/IGRT) are capable of boosting more radioresistant tumor (sub)volumes. The use of advanced feature analyses of PET images is an approach that holds great promise with regard to several oncological diseases, but needs further validation in managing prostate diseases.

  17. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  18. Automated Identification of Dementia Using FDG-PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parametric FDG-PET images offer the potential for automated identification of the different dementia syndromes. However, various existing image features and classifiers have their limitations in characterizing and differentiating the patterns of this disease. We reported a hybrid feature extraction, selection, and classification approach, namely, the GA-MKL algorithm, for separating patients with suspected Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia from normal controls. In this approach, we extracted three groups of features to describe the average level, spatial variation, and asymmetry of glucose metabolic rates in 116 cortical volumes. An optimal combination of features, that is, capable of classifying dementia cases was identified by a genetic algorithm- (GA- based method. The condition of each FDG-PET study was predicted by applying the selected features to a multikernel learning (MKL machine, in which the weighting parameter of each kernel function can be automatically estimated. We compared our approach to two state-of-the-art dementia identification algorithms on a set of 129 clinical cases and improved the performance in separating the dementia types, achieving accuracy of 94.62%. There is a very good agreement between the proposed automated technique and the diagnosis made by clinicians.

  19. Automated identification of dementia using FDG-PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Lu, Shen; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2014-01-01

    Parametric FDG-PET images offer the potential for automated identification of the different dementia syndromes. However, various existing image features and classifiers have their limitations in characterizing and differentiating the patterns of this disease. We reported a hybrid feature extraction, selection, and classification approach, namely, the GA-MKL algorithm, for separating patients with suspected Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia from normal controls. In this approach, we extracted three groups of features to describe the average level, spatial variation, and asymmetry of glucose metabolic rates in 116 cortical volumes. An optimal combination of features, that is, capable of classifying dementia cases was identified by a genetic algorithm- (GA-) based method. The condition of each FDG-PET study was predicted by applying the selected features to a multikernel learning (MKL) machine, in which the weighting parameter of each kernel function can be automatically estimated. We compared our approach to two state-of-the-art dementia identification algorithms on a set of 129 clinical cases and improved the performance in separating the dementia types, achieving accuracy of 94.62%. There is a very good agreement between the proposed automated technique and the diagnosis made by clinicians.

  20. Variability of Image Features Computed from Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine A. Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiomics is being explored for potential applications in radiation therapy. How various imaging protocols affect quantitative image features is currently a highly active area of research. To assess the variability of image features derived from conventional [three-dimensional (3D] and respiratory-gated (RG positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT images of lung cancer patients, image features were computed from 23 lung cancer patients. Both protocols for each patient were acquired during the same imaging session. PET tumor volumes were segmented using an adaptive technique which accounted for background. CT tumor volumes were delineated with a commercial segmentation tool. Using RG PET images, the tumor center of mass motion, length, and rotation were calculated. Fifty-six image features were extracted from all images consisting of shape descriptors, first-order features, and second-order texture features. Overall, 26.6% and 26.2% of total features demonstrated less than 5% difference between 3D and RG protocols for CT and PET, respectively. Between 10 RG phases in PET, 53.4% of features demonstrated percent differences less than 5%. The features with least variability for PET were sphericity, spherical disproportion, entropy (first and second order, sum entropy, information measure of correlation 2, Short Run Emphasis (SRE, Long Run Emphasis (LRE, and Run Percentage (RPC; and those for CT were minimum intensity, mean intensity, Root Mean Square (RMS, Short Run Emphasis (SRE, and RPC. Quantitative analysis using a 3D acquisition versus RG acquisition (to reduce the effects of motion provided notably different image feature values. This study suggests that the variability between 3D and RG features is mainly due to the impact of respiratory motion.

  1. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging.

  2. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Bashir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging.

  3. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  4. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  5. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S; Visvikis, D; Roux, C; Hatt, M, E-mail: simon.david@etudiant.univ-brest.fr [INSERM U650, LaTIM, Brest, F-29200 (France)

    2011-09-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumor volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumor metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using a stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on clinical datasets it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracer datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumor volume definition for radiotherapy applications.

  6. PET imaging of the myocardial innervation system : CME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slart, Riemer

    2014-01-01

    PET imaging of the cardiac autonomic nervous system has advanced in recent years, and multiple pre- and postsynaptic tracers have been introduced. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PET enables noninvasive quantification of neurophysiologic processes at the tissue level. Ligands for

  7. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  8. Comparison of tumor volumes derived from glucose metabolic rate maps and SUV maps in dynamic 18F-FDG PET.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Philippens, M.E.P.; Kienhorst, L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor delineation using noninvasive medical imaging modalities is important to determine the target volume in radiation treatment planning and to evaluate treatment response. It is expected that combined use of CT and functional information from 18F-FDG PET will improve tumor delineation. However, u

  9. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  10. PET image reconstruction using multi-parametric anato-functional priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Belzunce, Martin A.; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios; Prieto, Claudia; Turkheimer, Federico; Hammers, Alexander; Reader, Andrew J.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of multi-parametric anato-functional (MR-PET) priors for the maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction of brain PET data in order to address the limitations of the conventional anatomical priors in the presence of PET-MR mismatches. In addition to partial volume correction benefits, the suitability of these priors for reconstruction of low-count PET data is also introduced and demonstrated, comparing to standard maximum-likelihood (ML) reconstruction of high-count data. The conventional local Tikhonov and total variation (TV) priors and current state-of-the-art anatomical priors including the Kaipio, non-local Tikhonov prior with Bowsher and Gaussian similarity kernels are investigated and presented in a unified framework. The Gaussian kernels are calculated using both voxel- and patch-based feature vectors. To cope with PET and MR mismatches, the Bowsher and Gaussian priors are extended to multi-parametric priors. In addition, we propose a modified joint Burg entropy prior that by definition exploits all parametric information in the MAP reconstruction of PET data. The performance of the priors was extensively evaluated using 3D simulations and two clinical brain datasets of [18F]florbetaben and [18F]FDG radiotracers. For simulations, several anato-functional mismatches were intentionally introduced between the PET and MR images, and furthermore, for the FDG clinical dataset, two PET-unique active tumours were embedded in the PET data. Our simulation results showed that the joint Burg entropy prior far outperformed the conventional anatomical priors in terms of preserving PET unique lesions, while still reconstructing functional boundaries with corresponding MR boundaries. In addition, the multi-parametric extension of the Gaussian and Bowsher priors led to enhanced preservation of edge and PET unique features and also an improved bias-variance performance. In agreement with the simulation results, the clinical results

  11. 3D-segmentation of the 18F-choline PET signal for target volume definition in radiation therapy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciernik, I Frank; Brown, Derek W; Schmid, Daniel; Hany, Thomas; Egli, Peter; Davis, J Bernard

    2007-02-01

    Volumetric assessment of PET signals becomes increasingly relevant for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Here, we investigate the utility of 18F-choline PET signals to serve as a structure for semi-automatic segmentation for forward treatment planning of prostate cancer. 18F-choline PET and CT scans of ten patients with histologically proven prostate cancer without extracapsular growth were acquired using a combined PET/CT scanner. Target volumes were manually delineated on CT images using standard software. Volumes were also obtained from 18F-choline PET images using an asymmetrical segmentation algorithm. PTVs were derived from CT 18F-choline PET based clinical target volumes (CTVs) by automatic expansion and comparative planning was performed. As a read-out for dose given to non-target structures, dose to the rectal wall was assessed. Planning target volumes (PTVs) derived from CT and 18F-choline PET yielded comparable results. Optimal matching of CT and 18F-choline PET derived volumes in the lateral and cranial-caudal directions was obtained using a background-subtracted signal thresholds of 23.0+/-2.6%. In antero-posterior direction, where adaptation compensating for rectal signal overflow was required, optimal matching was achieved with a threshold of 49.5+/-4.6%. 3D-conformal planning with CT or 18F-choline PET resulted in comparable doses to the rectal wall. Choline PET signals of the prostate provide adequate spatial information amendable to standardized asymmetrical region growing algorithms for PET-based target volume definition for external beam RT.

  12. Coronary Artery PET/MR Imaging: Feasibility, Limitations, and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Philip M; Dweck, Marc R; Trivieri, Maria Giovanna; Abgral, Ronan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Contreras, Johanna; Gidwani, Umesh; Narula, Jagat P; Fuster, Valentin; Kovacic, Jason C; Fayad, Zahi A

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the authors' initial experience with combined coronary artery positron emission tomographic (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and (18)F-sodium fluoride ((18)F-NaF) radiotracers, describe common problems and their solutions, and demonstrate the feasibility of coronary PET/MR imaging in appropriate patients. Recently, PET imaging has been applied to the aortic valve and regions of atherosclerosis. (18)F-FDG PET imaging has become established for imaging inflammation in atherosclerosis in the aorta and carotid arteries. Moreover, (18)F-NaF has emerged as a novel tracer of active microcalcification in the aortic valve and coronary arteries. Coronary PET imaging remains challenging because of the small caliber of the vessels and their complex motion. Currently, most coronary imaging uses combined PET and computed tomographic imaging, but there is increasing enthusiasm for PET/MR imaging because of its reduced radiation, potential to correct for motion, and the complementary information available from cardiac MR in a single scan. Twenty-three patients with diagnosed or documented risk factors for coronary artery disease underwent either (18)F-FDG or (18)F-NaF PET/MR imaging. Standard breath-held MR-based attenuation correction was compared with a novel free-breathing approach. The impact on PET image artifacts and the interpretation of vascular uptake were evaluated semiquantitatively by expert readers. Moreover, PET reconstructions with more algorithm iterations were compared visually and by target-to-background ratio. Image quality was significantly improved by novel free-breathing attenuation correction. Moreover, conspicuity of coronary uptake was improved by increasing the number of algorithm iterations from 3 to 6. Elevated radiotracer uptake could be localized to individual coronary lesions using both (18)F-FDG (n = 1, maximal target-to-background ratio = 1.61) and (18

  13. Statistical image reconstruction methods in PET with compensation for missing data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinahan, P.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Fessler, J.A.; Karp, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    We present the results of combining volume imaging with the PENN-PET scanner with statistical image reconstruction methods such as the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method. The goal of this particular combination is to improve both classification and estimation tasks in PET imaging protocols where image quality is dominated by spatially-variant system responses and/or measurement statistics. The PENN-PET scanner has strongly spatially-varying system behavior due to its volume imaging design and the presence of detector gaps. Statistical methods are easily adapted to this scanner geometry, including the detector gaps, and have also been shown to have improved bias/variance trade-offs compared to the standard filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The PWLS method requires fewer iterations and may be more tolerant of errors in the system model than other statistical methods. We present results demonstrating the improvement in image quality for PWLS image reconstructions of data from the PENN-PET scanner.

  14. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kaffanke, Joachim B. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); MR-Transfer e.K., Wuppertal (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or {sup 11}C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  15. Clinical evaluation of PET image reconstruction using a spatial resolution model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Loft, Annika [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Beyer, Thomas [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); cmi-experts GmbH, Zurich (Switzerland); Holm, Søren, E-mail: sholm@pet.rh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: PET image resolution is variable across the measured field-of-view and described by the point spread function (PSF). When accounting for the PSF during PET image reconstruction image resolution is improved and partial volume effects are reduced. Here, we evaluate the effect of PSF-based reconstruction on lesion quantification in routine clinical whole-body (WB) PET/CT imaging. Materials and methods: 41 oncology patients were referred for a WB-PET/CT examination (Biograph 40 TruePoint). Emission data were acquired at 2.5 min/bed at 1 h pi of 400 MBq [18F]-FDG. Attenuation-corrected PET images were reconstructed on 336 × 336-matrices using: (R1) standard AW-OSEM (4 iter, 8 subsets, 4 mm Gaussian) and (R2) AW-OSEM with PSF (3 iter, 21 subsets, 2 mm). Blinded and randomised reading of R1- and R2-PET images was performed. Individual lesions were located and counted independently on both sets of images. The relative change in PET quantification (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, volume) of lesions seen on R1 and R2 is reported as (R2 − R1)/R1. Furthermore, SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} was measured for a 3 cm spherical norm region in the right lobe of the healthy liver for R1 and R2. Results: Clinical reading revealed 91 and 103 positive lesions for R1 and R2, respectively. For all lesions SUV{sub max} (R2) was higher than SUV{sub max} (R1). Regression analysis indicated that the relative increase in SUV{sub max} (and SUV{sub mean}) decreased with lesion size, whilst it increased with increasing radial distance from the centre of the field of view (FOV). There was no significant difference in SUV{sub mean} in homogenous liver tissue between R1 and R2. Conclusion: In whole-body FDG-PET/CT using routine clinical protocols, PSF-based PET reconstruction increases lesion detection and affects SUV{sub max} measurements compared to standard AW-OSEM PET reconstruction.

  16. Automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images using fuzzy Markov random field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  17. Automatic Lung Tumor Segmentation on PET/CT Images Using Fuzzy Markov Random Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of positron emission tomography (PET and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  18. PET IMAGING STUDIES IN DRUG ABUSE RESEARCH.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Ding, Y.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J.

    2001-01-29

    There is overwhelming evidence that addiction is a disease of the brain (Leshner, 1997). Yet public perception that addiction is a reflection of moral weakness or a lack of willpower persists. The insidious consequence of this perception is that we lose sight of the fact that there are enormous medical consequences of addiction including the fact that a large fraction of the total deaths from cancer and heart disease are caused by smoking addiction. Ironically the medical school that educates physicians in addiction medicine and the cancer hospital that has a smoking cessation clinic are vanishingly rare and efforts at harm reduction are frequently met with a public indignation. Meanwhile the number of people addicted to substances is enormous and increasing particularly the addictions to cigarettes and alcohol. It is particularly tragic that addiction usually begins in adolescence and becomes a chronic relapsing problem and there are basically no completely effective treatments. Clearly we need to understand how drugs of abuse affect the brain and we need to be creative in using this information to develop effective treatments. Imaging technologies have played a major role in the conceptualization of addiction as a disease of the brain (Fowler et al., 1998a; Fowler et al., 1999a). New knowledge has been driven by advances in radiotracer design and chemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation and the integration of these scientific tools with the tools of biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine. This topic cuts across the medical specialties of neurology, psychiatry, cancer and heart disease because of the high medical, social and economic toll that drugs of abuse, including and especially the legal drugs, cigarettes and alcohol, take on society. In this chapter we will begin by highlighting the important role that chemistry has played in making it possible to quantitatively image the movement of drugs as well as their effects on the human brain

  19. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi [CYRIC, Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3} GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a {sup 22}Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that {sup 18}F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET

  20. Cardiovascular hybrid imaging using PET/MRI; Kardiovaskulaere Hybridbildgebung mit PET/MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nensa, Felix; Schlosser, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2014-12-15

    The following overview provides a summary of the state of the art and research as well as potential clinical applications of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging. PET/MRI systems have been clinically available for a few years, and their use in cardiac imaging has been successfully demonstrated. At this period in time, some of the technical difficulties that arose at the beginning have been solved; in particular with respect to MRI-based attenuation correction, caution should be exercised with PET quantification. In addition, many promising technical options are still in the developmental stage, such as MRI-based motion correction of PET data resulting from simultaneous MR acquisition, and are not yet available for cardiovascular imaging. On the other hand, PET/MRI has been used to demonstrate significant pathologies such as acute and chronic myocardial infarction, myocarditis or cardiac sarcoidosis; future applications in clinical routine or within studies appear to be possible. In coming years additional studies will have to be performed to prove diagnostic gain at a reasonable cost-benefit ratio before valid conclusions are possible regarding the clinical utility and future of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging.

  1. A study of artefacts in simultaneous PET and MR imaging using a prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slates, R B; Farahani, K; Shao, Y; Marsden, P K; Taylor, J; Summers, P E; Williams, S; Beech, J; Cherry, S R

    1999-08-01

    We have assessed the possibility of artefacts that can arise in attempting to perform simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a small prototype MR compatible PET scanner (McPET). In these experiments, we examine MR images for any major artefacts or loss in image quality due to inhomogeneities in the magnetic field, radiofrequency interference or susceptibility effects caused by operation of the PET system inside the MR scanner. In addition, possible artefacts in the PET images caused by the static and time-varying magnetic fields or radiofrequency interference from the MR system were investigated. Biological tissue and a T2-weighted spin echo sequence were used to examine susceptibility artefacts due to components of the McPET scanner (scintillator, optical fibres) situated in the MR field of view. A range of commonly used MR pulse sequences was studied while acquiring PET data to look for possible artefacts in either the PET or MR images. Other than a small loss in signal-to-noise using gradient echo sequences, there was no significant interaction between the two imaging systems. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging of simple phantoms was also carried out in different MR systems with field strengths ranging from 0.2 to 4.7 T. The results of these studies demonstrate that it is possible to acquire PET and MR images simultaneously, without any significant artefacts or loss in image quality, using our prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

  2. Synergistic role of simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS in soft tissue sarcoma metabolism imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yen-Lin E; Lim, Ruth; Huang, Chuan; Chebib, Ivan A; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop and validate simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS as a novel biological image-guided approach to neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemoradiation (chemoRT) in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). A patient with sarcoma of the right thigh underwent PET/MRI scan before and after neoadjuvant (preoperative) radiotherapy. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-D-glucose-Positron Emission Tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) scans were performed simultaneously. In the post-radiation scan, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was subsequently acquired with volume of interest positioned in a residual hyper-metabolic region detected by PET. Post-radiation PET/MRI showed a residual T2-hyperintense mass with significantly reduced (18)F-FDG-uptake, compatible with near complete response to radiotherapy. However, a small region of residual high (18)F-FDG uptake was detected at the tumor margin. MRS of this region had similar metabolite profile as normal tissue, and was thus considered false positive on PET scan. Pathology results were obtained after surgery for confirmation of imaging findings.

  3. PET/MR imaging of head/neck in the presence of dental implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes; Beyer, Thomas; Keller, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Aim: In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC (MR-AC). We evaluate the accuracy of MR-AC in PET/MR in patients with metallic dental...... void. Conclusion: Metallic dental work causes severe MR signal voids and PET/MR artifacts that exceed the actual implant volume. The resulting bias in AC-PET is severe in regions in and near the signal voids. Notably, the bias is present also in areas further away from the implants. In selected cases...... this bias may markedly affect regions used commonly as reference for kinetic modeling. Artifacts and bias can be corrected to a first degree by inpainting with soft tissue prior to MR-AC....

  4. Ultrasonography Fused with PET-CT Hybrid Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Ewertsen, Caroline; Gran, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a method with fusion of images of three modalities 18F-FDG PET, CT, and 3-D ultrasound (US) applied to imaging of the anal canal and the rectum. To obtain comparable geometries in the three imaging modalities, a plexiglas rod, with the same dimensions as the US transducer, is placed...... in the anal canal prior to the PET-CT examination. The method is based on manual co-registration of PET-CT images and 3-D US images. The three-modality imaging of the rectum-anal canal may become useful as a supplement to conventional imaging in the external radiation therapy in the treatment of anal cancer......, where the precise delineation of a tumor is crucial to avoid damage from radiation therapy to the healthy tissue surrounding it. The technique is still in a phase of development, and the demands for integration different company software systems are significant before commercial application. Three...

  5. A fully automatic approach for multimodal PET and MR image segmentation in gamma knife treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundo, Leonardo; Stefano, Alessandro; Militello, Carmelo; Russo, Giorgio; Sabini, Maria Gabriella; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Marletta, Francesco; Ippolito, Massimo; Mauri, Giancarlo; Vitabile, Salvatore; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, clinical practice in Gamma Knife treatments is generally based on MRI anatomical information alone. However, the joint use of MRI and PET images can be useful for considering both anatomical and metabolic information about the lesion to be treated. In this paper we present a co-segmentation method to integrate the segmented Biological Target Volume (BTV), using [(11)C]-Methionine-PET (MET-PET) images, and the segmented Gross Target Volume (GTV), on the respective co-registered MR images. The resulting volume gives enhanced brain tumor information to be used in stereotactic neuro-radiosurgery treatment planning. GTV often does not match entirely with BTV, which provides metabolic information about brain lesions. For this reason, PET imaging is valuable and it could be used to provide complementary information useful for treatment planning. In this way, BTV can be used to modify GTV, enhancing Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation. A novel fully automatic multimodal PET/MRI segmentation method for Leksell Gamma Knife(®) treatments is proposed. This approach improves and combines two computer-assisted and operator-independent single modality methods, previously developed and validated, to segment BTV and GTV from PET and MR images, respectively. In addition, the GTV is utilized to combine the superior contrast of PET images with the higher spatial resolution of MRI, obtaining a new BTV, called BTVMRI. A total of 19 brain metastatic tumors, undergone stereotactic neuro-radiosurgery, were retrospectively analyzed. A framework for the evaluation of multimodal PET/MRI segmentation is also presented. Overlap-based and spatial distance-based metrics were considered to quantify similarity concerning PET and MRI segmentation approaches. Statistics was also included to measure correlation among the different segmentation processes. Since it is not possible to define a gold-standard CTV according to both MRI and PET images without treatment response assessment

  6. Development of a PET-Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu.; Moses, William W.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. Chow

    2011-06-01

    Multimodality imaging has an increasing role in the management of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and structural information are acquired and accurately registered. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is currently an integral part of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment procedures, providing high-resolution anatomical detail of the prostate region. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with 11C-choline is a sensitive functional imaging technique that can identify biochemical states associated with prostate cancer. We believe that merging these prostate imaging technologies will help identify the location and aggressiveness of prostate cancer. We envision using dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging to guide biopsy, guide treatment procedures, and detect local recurrence earlier than is currently possible. Hence, we have developed a dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging system and protocol designed to allow accurate 3-D image registration. We have evaluated this PET-TRUS system by performing dual PET-TRUS imaging of custom phantoms. We describe here our dual-modality imaging system, custom phantoms and phantom study results. We also discuss our investigation of the PET-TRUS registration accuracy. We measure an average PET-TRUS registration error for our phantom studies of 2.1 ±1.7 mm in the x direction, 1.9 ±1.6 mm in the y direction, and 0.6 ±0.2 mm in the z direction. This registration accuracy is sufficient for some clinical applications such as biopsy guidance and early detection of recurrence.

  7. Evaluation of the response to preoperative chemotherapy with PET image in osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Dae Geun

    2001-01-01

    F18 FDG PET scan has an advantage in evaluating the biologic status of the tumors. The purpose of this study is evaluate the role of PET scan in pre- and postchemotherapeutic osteosarcomas and correlate the findings with pathologic examination. 18 cases of osteosarcomas had biopsy and preoperative chemotherapy at our department. All case had initial MRI and PET scan and those were repeated after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Under PET image parameters such as VOI(volume of interest), total activity(SUV), ratio of pre- and postchemotherapy SUV, T/N(tumor/normal tissue) ratio were analyzed. There was a significant correlation between the calculated necrosis in PET and observed one on pathologic specimen(r2=0.78, P<0.05). Cross correlation among identified variables revealed meaningful result between SUV2/SUV1 ratio and tumor necrosis(r2=0.57, P=0.025). As the SUV2/SUV1 decrease, so much more the tumor necrosis was. F18 FDG PET scan could get objective data such as volume, degree of necrosis and total activity and was also useful in estimating the contribution of chemotherapy in tumor necrosis over the innate necrosis before treatment.

  8. Towards optimal imaging with PET: an in silico feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, A. L.; Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; Wu, K.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging relies fundamentally on the ability of the system to accurately identify true coincidence events. With existing systems, this is currently accomplished with an energy acceptance criterion followed by correction techniques to remove suspected false coincidence events. These corrections generally result in signal and contrast loss and thus limit the PET system’s ability to achieve optimum image quality. A key property of annihilation radiation is that the photons are polarised with respect to each other. This polarisation correlation offers a potentially powerful discriminator, independent of energy, to accurately identify true events. In this proof of concept study, we investigate how photon polarisation information can be exploited in PET imaging by developing a method to discriminate true coincidences using the polarisation correlation of annihilation pairs. We implement this method using a Geant4 PET simulation of a GE Advance/Discovery LS system and demonstrate the potential advantages of the polarisation coincidence selection method over a standard energy criterion method. Current PET ring detectors are not capable of exploiting the polarisation correlation of the photon pairs. Compton PET systems, however are promising candidates for this application. We demonstrate the feasibility of a two-component Compton camera system in identifying true coincidences with Monte Carlo simulations. Our study demonstrates the potential of improving signal gain using polarisation, particularly for high photon emission rates. We also demonstrate the ability of the Compton camera at exploiting this polarisation correlation in PET.

  9. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  10. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan K [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Zorn, Carl [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Marano, Gary D [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  11. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soultan, D [University of California-San Diego, San Diego State University, La Jolla, CA (United States); Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Gill, B [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Windsor, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing.

  12. Partial volume correction of brain PET studies using iterative deconvolution in combination with HYPR denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golla, Sandeep S V; Lubberink, Mark; van Berckel, Bart N M; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2017-12-01

    Accurate quantification of PET studies depends on the spatial resolution of the PET data. The commonly limited PET resolution results in partial volume effects (PVE). Iterative deconvolution methods (IDM) have been proposed as a means to correct for PVE. IDM improves spatial resolution of PET studies without the need for structural information (e.g. MR scans). On the other hand, deconvolution also increases noise, which results in lower signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). The aim of this study was to implement IDM in combination with HighlY constrained back-PRojection (HYPR) denoising to mitigate poor SNR properties of conventional IDM. An anthropomorphic Hoffman brain phantom was filled with an [(18)F]FDG solution of ~25 kBq mL(-1) and scanned for 30 min on a Philips Ingenuity TF PET/CT scanner (Philips, Cleveland, USA) using a dynamic brain protocol with various frame durations ranging from 10 to 300 s. Van Cittert IDM was used for PVC of the scans. In addition, HYPR was used to improve SNR of the dynamic PET images, applying it both before and/or after IDM. The Hoffman phantom dataset was used to optimise IDM parameters (number of iterations, type of algorithm, with/without HYPR) and the order of HYPR implementation based on the best average agreement of measured and actual activity concentrations in the regions. Next, dynamic [(11)C]flumazenil (five healthy subjects) and [(11)C]PIB (four healthy subjects and four patients with Alzheimer's disease) scans were used to assess the impact of IDM with and without HYPR on plasma input-derived distribution volumes (V T) across various regions of the brain. In the case of [(11)C]flumazenil scans, Hypr-IDM-Hypr showed an increase of 5 to 20% in the regional V T whereas a 0 to 10% increase or decrease was seen in the case of [(11)C]PIB depending on the volume of interest or type of subject (healthy or patient). References for these comparisons were the V Ts from the PVE-uncorrected scans. IDM improved quantitative accuracy

  13. Quantitative Comparison of Y-90 and Ge-68 PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sangkeun; Kwak, Shin Hye; Lee, Jeong A; Song, Han Kyeol; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lim, Sang Moo; KIm, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute of Raiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Su Young [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess statistical characteristics and to improve count rate of image for enhancing Y-90 image quality by using non-parametric bootstrap method. The results showed that Y-90 PET image can be improved using non-parametric bootstrap method. PET data was able to be improved using non-parametric bootstrap method and it was verified with showing improved prompts rate. Y-90 PET image quality was improved and bias indicated that the bootstrapped image was more similar to the gold standard than other images. The non-parametric bootstrap method will be useful tool for enhancing Y-90 PET image and it will be expected to reduce time for acquisition and to elevate performance for diagnosis and treatment. Yttrium-90 (Y-90) radioembolization is one of the treatment methods unrespectable stage of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic colon cancer to the liver. However, Y-90 radioembolization is a catheter-based therapy that delivers internal radiation to tumors, it results in greater radiation exposure to the tumors than using external radiation. Also, unlike other current therapies for the treatment of unresectable liver tumors, Y-90 radioembolization is much less often associated with toxicities such as abdominal pain, fever, nausea, and vomiting. Therefore Y-90 has been received much interest and studied by many researchers. Imaging of Y-90 has been conducted using most commonly gamma camera but quantitative PET imaging is required due to low sensitivity and resolution. Y-90 imaging is generally performed with SPECT by Bremsstrahlung photons. Unfortunately, the low image quality due to the nature of the Bremsstrahlung photon limits the quantitative accuracy of Y-90 SPECT. To overcome this limitation in SPECT imaging, Y-90 PET has been suggested as an alternative.

  14. Partial volume effect-corrected FDG PET and grey matter volume loss in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuraki, Miharu; Yanase, Daisuke; Yamada, Masahito [Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa (Japan); Matsunari, Ichiro; Chen, Wei-Ping; Yajima, Kazuyoshi; Fujikawa, Akihiko; Takeda, Nozomi; Nishimura, Shintaro [The Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Hakui-City, Ishikawa (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Saitama Medical School Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saitama (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    Although{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is an established imaging technique to assess brain glucose utilisation, accurate measurement of tracer concentration is confounded by the presence of partial volume effect (PVE) due to the limited spatial resolution of PET, which is particularly true in atrophic brains such as those encountered in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our aim was to investigate the effects of PVE correction on FDG PET in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in patients with mild AD. Thirty-nine AD patients and 73 controls underwent FDG PET and MRI. The PVE-corrected grey matter PET images were obtained using an MRI-based three-compartment method. Additionally, the results of PET were compared with grey matter loss detected by VBM. Before PVE correction, reduced FDG uptake was observed in posterior cingulate gyri (PCG) and parieto-temporal lobes (PTL) in AD patients, which persisted after PVE correction. Notably, PVE correction revealed relatively preserved FDG uptake in hippocampal areas, despite the grey matter loss in medial temporal lobe (MTL) revealed by VBM. FDG uptake in PCG and PTL is reduced in AD regardless of whether or not PVE correction is applied, supporting the notion that the reduced FDG uptake in these areas is not the result of atrophy. Furthermore, FDG uptake by grey matter tissue in the MTL, including hippocampal areas, is relatively preserved, suggesting that compensatory mechanisms may play a role in patients with mild AD. (orig.)

  15. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Kadir, T [Mirada Medical Ltd., Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires

  16. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik;

    Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study was to vali......Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study...... was to validate automated methods for extracting FSV directly from dynamic PET studies for two different tracers and to examine potential scanner hardware bias. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner (scanner I). In addition, 8...... subjects underwent a dynamic 6 min 15O-water PET scan followed by a 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a GE Discovery ST PET/CT scanner (scanner II). The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic...

  17. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend Aage;

    2011-01-01

    and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.......0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number...

  18. Quantitation of regional cerebral blood flow corrected for partial volume effect using O-15 water and PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iida, H; Law, I; Pakkenberg, B

    2000-01-01

    formulated four mathematical models that describe the dynamic behavior of a freely diffusible tracer (H215O) in a region of interest (ROI) incorporating estimates of regional tissue flow that are independent of PVE. The current study was intended to evaluate the feasibility of these models and to establish...... a methodology to accurately quantify regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) corrected for PVE in cortical gray matter regions. Five monkeys were studied with PET after IV H2(15)O two times (n = 3) or three times (n = 2) in a row. Two ROIs were drawn on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and projected...... onto the PET images in which regional CBF values and the water perfusable tissue fraction for the cortical gray matter tissue (hence the volume of gray matter) were estimated. After the PET study, the animals were killed and stereologic analysis was performed to assess the gray matter mass...

  19. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  20. Towards coronary plaque imaging using simultaneous PET-MR: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Y.; El Fakhri, G.; Nezafat, R.; Johnson, N.; Brady, T.; Ouyang, J.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the main cause of myocardial infarction and the leading killer in the US. Inflammation is a known bio-marker of plaque vulnerability and can be assessed non-invasively using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography imaging (FDG-PET). However, cardiac and respiratory motion of the heart makes PET detection of coronary plaque very challenging. Fat surrounding coronary arteries allows the use of MRI to track plaque motion during simultaneous PET-MR examination. In this study, we proposed and assessed the performance of a fat-MR based coronary motion correction technique for improved FDG-PET coronary plaque imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. The proposed methods were evaluated in a realistic four-dimensional PET-MR simulation study obtained by combining patient water-fat separated MRI and XCAT anthropomorphic phantom. Five small lesions were digitally inserted inside the patients coronary vessels to mimic coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The heart of the XCAT phantom was digitally replaced with the patient's heart. Motion-dependent activity distributions, attenuation maps, and fat-MR volumes of the heart, were generated using the XCAT cardiac and respiratory motion fields. A full Monte Carlo simulation using Siemens mMR's geometry was performed for each motion phase. Cardiac/respiratory motion fields were estimated using non-rigid registration of the transformed fat-MR volumes and incorporated directly into the system matrix of PET reconstruction along with motion-dependent attenuation maps. The proposed motion correction method was compared to conventional PET reconstruction techniques such as no motion correction, cardiac gating, and dual cardiac-respiratory gating. Compared to uncorrected reconstructions, fat-MR based motion compensation yielded an average improvement of plaque-to-background contrast of 29.6%, 43.7%, 57.2%, and 70.6% for true plaque-to-blood ratios of 10, 15, 20 and 25:1, respectively. Channelized

  1. Improved correction for the tissue fraction effect in lung PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Millner, Lynn; Hutton, Brian F.; Maher, Toby M.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in imaging different pulmonary disorders using PET techniques. Previous work has shown, for static PET/CT, that air content in the lung influences reconstructed image values and that it is vital to correct for this ‘tissue fraction effect’ (TFE). In this paper, we extend this work to include the blood component and also investigate the TFE in dynamic imaging. CT imaging and PET kinetic modelling are used to determine fractional air and blood voxel volumes in six patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. These values are used to illustrate best and worst case scenarios when interpreting images without correcting for the TFE. In addition, the fractional volumes were used to determine correction factors for the SUV and the kinetic parameters. These were then applied to the patient images. The kinetic parameters K1 and Ki along with the static parameter SUV were all found to be affected by the TFE with both air and blood providing a significant contribution to the errors. Without corrections, errors range from 34-80% in the best case and 29-96% in the worst case. In the patient data, without correcting for the TFE, regions of high density (fibrosis) appeared to have a higher uptake than lower density (normal appearing tissue), however this was reversed after air and blood correction. The proposed correction methods are vital for quantitative and relative accuracy. Without these corrections, images may be misinterpreted.

  2. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  3. PET/MR imaging of atherosclerosis: initial experience and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G; Beer, Ambros J

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid scanners such as PET/CT have in the past emerged as a valuable modality in clinical routine as well as an important research tool. Recently, the newly developed fully integrated PET/MR scanners were introduced to the market, raising high expectations especially due to the excellent soft tissue contrast and functional imaging capabilities of MRI. In this issue of the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, initial experiences using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for carotid artery imaging in a group of patients with increased risk for atherosclerosis are described. This represents a proof-of-principle study, which could stimulate future applications of this powerful modality in atherosclerotic plaque imaging.

  4. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuping; España, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Ouyang, Jinsong; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-07-07

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  5. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer.

  6. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PE...

  7. Pigmented villonodular synovitis: dedicated PET imaging findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber, Ian Blake; Clark, Brian J; Greene, Gary Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is an uncommon entity, which has the potential to cause severe pain. The gold standard for evaluation is MRI, and previous PET findings associated with PVNS have only been documented in the setting of concurrent malignancy. In the setting of recurrent disease, PET is being used to evaluate prebiological and postbiological treatment responses. Recurrent PVNS demonstrates greater hypermetabolic activity than previously documented, supporting the case as a potential mimic of malignant/metastatic disease. Post-treatment evaluations demonstrate decreased metabolic activity, which suggests response to treatment. This behaviour further supports the contention that there is a neoplastic origin to PVNS. PMID:23598941

  8. Small-molecule PET Tracers for Imaging Proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Chester A; Lopresti, Brian J; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Klunk, William E

    2017-09-01

    In this chapter, we provide a review of the challenges and advances in developing successful PET imaging agents for 3 major types of aggregated amyloid proteins: amyloid-beta (Aβ), tau, and alpha-synuclein (α-syn). These 3 amyloids are involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, referred to as proteinopathies or proteopathies, that include Alzheimer disease, Lewy body dementias, multiple system atrophy, and frontotemporal dementias, among others. In the Introduction section, we briefly discuss the history of amyloid in neurodegenerative diseases and describe why progress in developing effective imaging agents has been hampered by the failure of crystallography to provide definitive ligand-protein interactions for rational radioligand design efforts. Instead, the field has relied on largely serendipitous, trial-and-error methods to achieve useful and specific PET amyloid imaging tracers for Aβ, tau, and α-syn deposits. Because many of the proteopathies involve more than 1 amyloid protein, it is important to develop selective PET tracers for the different amyloids to help assess the relative contribution of each to total amyloid burden. We use Pittsburgh compound B to illustrate some of the critical steps in developing a potent and selective Aβ PET imaging agent. Other selective Aβ and tau PET imaging compounds have followed similar pathways in their developmental processes. Success for selective α-syn PET imaging agents has not been realized yet, but work is ongoing in multiple laboratories throughout the world. In the tau sections, we provide background regarding 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat (4R) tau proteins and how they can affect the binding of tau radioligands in different tauopathies. We review the ongoing efforts to assess the properties of tau ligands, which are useful in 3R, 4R, or combined 3R-4R tauopathies. Finally, we describe in the α-syn sections recent attempts to develop selective tracers to image

  9. PET/SPECT imaging: From carotid vulnerability to brain viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert [Department of Surgery, Isala Clinics, Zwolle (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Dam, Gooitzen M. van [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijckx, Gert-Jan [Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tio, Rene A. [Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Zeebregts, Clark J. [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: czeebregts@hotmail.com

    2010-04-15

    Background: Current key issues in ischemic stroke are related to carotid plaque vulnerability, brain viability, and timing of intervention. The treatment of ischemic stroke has evolved into urgent active interventions, as 'time is brain'. Functional imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could improve selection of patients with a vulnerable plaque and evaluation of brain viability in ischemic stroke. Objective: To describe the current applications of PET and SPECT as a diagnostic tool in relation to ischemic stroke. Methods: A literature search using PubMed identified articles. Manual cross-referencing was also performed. Results: Several papers, all observational studies, identified PET/SPECT to be used as a tool to monitor systemic atheroma modifying treatment and to select high-risk patients for surgery regardless of the degree of luminal stenosis in carotid lesions. Furthermore, PET/SPECT is able to quantify the penumbra region during ischemic stroke and in this way may identify those patients who may benefit from timely intervention. Discussion: Functional imaging modalities such as PET/SPECT may become important tools for risk-assessment and evaluation of treatment strategies in carotid plaque vulnerability and brain viability. Prospective clinical studies are needed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of PET/SPECT.

  10. The development of PET/CT in determining gross tumor target volume of esophageal carcinoma in precise radiotherapy%PET/CT确定食管癌大体靶区的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 宋轶鹏; 姜翠芳

    2014-01-01

    随着功能影像及分子影像的发展,PET/CT逐渐成为辅助制定肿瘤最佳精确放疗计划的成像方式.许多研究支持18 F-FDG PET/CT用于精确放疗中食管癌的靶区勾画,然而18F-FDGPET/CT在食管癌靶区勾画中的有效性尚需进一步研究.该文主要对18F-FDG PET/CT用于食管癌原发病灶、区域转移淋巴结GTV勾画的应用价值及有效性等方面的研究进行综述.%As the development of functional and molecular imaging,PET/CT gradually becomes one of methods in optimizing cancer radiotherapy treatment planning.Currently,numerous hospitals routinely use 18F-FDG PET/CT for the delineation of target volume in esophageal carcinoma (EC).However,the validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the delineation of target volume for EC is limited and needs further clinical validation.This review focuses on the value and validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumor target volume of EC primary lesions and regional lymph nodes.

  11. Application of MR/PET in oncologic imaging; Einsatz von MR/PET in der onkologischen Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, N.F.; Pfannenberg, C.; Werner, M.K. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reischl, G. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Praeklinische Bildgebung und Radiopharmazie; Schmidt, H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Praeklinische Bildgebung und Radiopharmazie

    2012-09-15

    The present review aims to depict the possibilities offered by hybrid imaging with magnetic resonance positron emission tomography (MR/PET). Recently, new whole-body MR/PET scanners were introduced allowing for the combination of both modalities outside the brain. This is a challenge for both modalities: For MRI, it is essential to provide anatomical images with high resolution. Additionally, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton spectroscopy, but also dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging plays an important role. With regard to PET, the technical challenge mainly consists of obtaining an appropriate MR-based attenuation correction for the PET data. Using MR/PET, it is possible to acquire morphological and functional data in one examination. In particular, children and young adults will benefit from this new hybrid technique, especially in oncologic imaging with multiple follow-up examinations. However, it is expected that PET/CT will not be replaced completely by MR/PET because PET/CT is less cost-intensive and more widely available. Moreover, in lung imaging, MRI limitations still have to be accepted. Concerning research, simultaneous MR/PET offers a variety of new possibilities, for example cardiac imaging, functional brain studies or the evaluation of new tracers in correlation with specific MR techniques. (orig.)

  12. Guidelines for 18F-FDG PET and PET-CT imaging in paediatric oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauss, J.; Franzius, C.; Pfluger, T.

    2008-01-01

    by the EANM Paediatric Committee, do not intend to compete with the existing guidelines, but rather aim at providing additional information on issues particularly relevant to PET imaging of children with cancer. CONCLUSION: The guidelines summarize the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European...

  13. PET imaging in ectopic Cushing syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Prasanna; Taieb, David; Giovanella, Luca; Treglia, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    Cushing syndrome due to endogenous hypercortisolism may cause significant morbidity and mortality. The source of excess cortisol may be adrenal, pituitary, or ectopic. Ectopic Cushing syndrome is sometimes difficult to localize on conventional imaging like CT and MRI. After performing a multilevel thoracoabdominal imaging with CT, the evidence regarding the use of radiotracers for PET imaging is unclear due to significant molecular and etiological heterogeneity of potential causes of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. In our systematic review of literature, it appears that GalLium-based (Ga68) somatostatin receptor analogs have better sensitivity in diagnosis of bronchial carcinoids causing Cushing syndrome and FDG PET appears superior for small-cell lung cancers and other aggressive tumors. Further large-scale studies are needed to identify the best PET tracer for this condition.

  14. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  15. Infection imaging using whole-body FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, K.D.M.; Schulthess, G.K. von [Department of Medical Radiology: Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Dazzi, H.; Schaffner, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the detection of soft tissue and bone infections. Forty-five PET examinations in 39 patients (26 male, 13 female, age range 27-86 years) with suspected infectious foci were examined with whole- or partial-body PET scans using FDG. Twenty-seven scans were done in patients with soft tissue and 18 in patients with bone infections. Corrected and uncorrected transaxial PET images were acquired. Seven hundred and twelve body regions in these 45 PET scans were evaluated. Pathological findings were graded using a confidence scale from A to E (A, definitive infection; E, no infection). Disease status was defined in all patients by culture, biopsy or surgery and clinical follow-up. In 45 PET scans there were 40 true-positive, four false-positive and one false-negative findings. Twelve foci suspected to be infectious in nature on the basis of other imaging examinations were identified as negative by PET, thus representing true-negative findings. Sensitivities for the patients with soft tissue (STI) and bone infections (BI) and for the pooled data were 96%, 100% and 98%, respectively. As the calculation of specificity is not straightforward, it was calculated on a per lesion as well as on a per body region basis to permit estimation of an upper and a lower limit. On a per lesion basis, specificities were 70% (STI), 83% (BI) and 75% for the pooled data and on a per body region basis (dividing the body into 22 regions) they were 99% (STI), 99% (BI) and 99% for the pooled data. One false-negative result was found in a patient with cholangitis. It is concluded that PET appears to be a highly sensitive method to detect infectious foci. Specificity is more difficult to estimate, but is probably in the range from 70% to above 90%. (orig.)

  16. Transmission imaging for integrated PET-MR systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Spencer L; Fuin, Niccolò; Levine, Michael A; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-08-07

    Attenuation correction for PET-MR systems continues to be a challenging problem, particularly for body regions outside the head. The simultaneous acquisition of transmission scan based μ-maps and MR images on integrated PET-MR systems may significantly increase the performance of and offer validation for new MR-based μ-map algorithms. For the Biograph mMR (Siemens Healthcare), however, use of conventional transmission schemes is not practical as the patient table and relatively small diameter scanner bore significantly restrict radioactive source motion and limit source placement. We propose a method for emission-free coincidence transmission imaging on the Biograph mMR. The intended application is not for routine subject imaging, but rather to improve and validate MR-based μ-map algorithms; particularly for patient implant and scanner hardware attenuation correction. In this study we optimized source geometry and assessed the method's performance with Monte Carlo simulations and phantom scans. We utilized a Bayesian reconstruction algorithm, which directly generates μ-map estimates from multiple bed positions, combined with a robust scatter correction method. For simulations with a pelvis phantom a single torus produced peak noise equivalent count rates (34.8 kcps) dramatically larger than a full axial length ring (11.32 kcps) and conventional rotating source configurations. Bias in reconstructed μ-maps for head and pelvis simulations was  ⩽4% for soft tissue and  ⩽11% for bone ROIs. An implementation of the single torus source was filled with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and the proposed method quantified for several test cases alone or in comparison with CT-derived μ-maps. A volume average of 0.095 cm(-1) was recorded for an experimental uniform cylinder phantom scan, while a bias of  <2% was measured for the cortical bone equivalent insert of the multi-compartment phantom. Single torus μ-maps of a hip implant phantom showed significantly

  17. Transmission imaging for integrated PET-MR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Spencer L.; Fuin, Niccolò; Levine, Michael A.; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-08-01

    Attenuation correction for PET-MR systems continues to be a challenging problem, particularly for body regions outside the head. The simultaneous acquisition of transmission scan based μ-maps and MR images on integrated PET-MR systems may significantly increase the performance of and offer validation for new MR-based μ-map algorithms. For the Biograph mMR (Siemens Healthcare), however, use of conventional transmission schemes is not practical as the patient table and relatively small diameter scanner bore significantly restrict radioactive source motion and limit source placement. We propose a method for emission-free coincidence transmission imaging on the Biograph mMR. The intended application is not for routine subject imaging, but rather to improve and validate MR-based μ-map algorithms; particularly for patient implant and scanner hardware attenuation correction. In this study we optimized source geometry and assessed the method’s performance with Monte Carlo simulations and phantom scans. We utilized a Bayesian reconstruction algorithm, which directly generates μ-map estimates from multiple bed positions, combined with a robust scatter correction method. For simulations with a pelvis phantom a single torus produced peak noise equivalent count rates (34.8 kcps) dramatically larger than a full axial length ring (11.32 kcps) and conventional rotating source configurations. Bias in reconstructed μ-maps for head and pelvis simulations was  ⩽4% for soft tissue and  ⩽11% for bone ROIs. An implementation of the single torus source was filled with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and the proposed method quantified for several test cases alone or in comparison with CT-derived μ-maps. A volume average of 0.095 cm-1 was recorded for an experimental uniform cylinder phantom scan, while a bias of  translation of the patient table to perform complete tomographic sampling, generated highly quantitative measured μ-maps and is expected to produce images with

  18. Importance of PET/CT for imaging of colorectal cancer; Stellenwert der PET/CT zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, F.G.; Schramm, N.; Graser, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Rist, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Haug, A.R. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) has emerged as a very useful imaging modality in the management of colorectal carcinoma. Data from the literature regarding the role of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis, staging, radiotherapy planning, response monitoring and surveillance of colorectal carcinoma is presented. Future directions and economic aspects are discussed. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET for colorectal cancer and endorectal ultrasound for rectal cancer. Combined FDG-PET/CT. While other imaging modalities allow superior visualization of the extent and invasion depth of the primary tumor, PET/CT is most sensitive for the detection of distant metastases of colorectal cancer. We recommend a targeted use of PET/CT in cases of unclear M staging, prior to metastasectomy and in suspected cases of residual or recurrent colorectal carcinoma with equivocal conventional imaging. The role of PET/CT in radiotherapy planning and response monitoring needs to be determined. Currently there is no evidence to support the routine use of PET/CT for colorectal screening, staging or surveillance. To optimally exploit the synergy between morphologic and functional information, FDG-PET should generally be performed as an integrated FDG-PET/CT with a contrast-enhanced CT component in colorectal carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Die Fluordesoxyglukose-Positronenemissionstomographie/Computertomographie (FDG-PET/CT) hat in den letzten Jahren zunehmende Bedeutung zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms erlangt. In diesem Beitrag stellen wir den Stand der Literatur zur Rolle der PET/CT bei Screening, Staging, Bestrahlungsplanung, Beurteilung eines Therapieansprechens und Nachsorge des kolorektalen Karzinoms dar. Zudem wird auf gesundheitsoekonomische Aspekte und zukuenftige Entwicklungen eingegangen. CT, MRT, FDG-PET, beim Rektumkarzinom zusaetzlich endorektaler Ultraschall. Kombinierte FDG-PET/CT. Waehrend

  19. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors; PET-CT-Bildgebung bei Kopf-Hals-Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Straehler-Pohl, H.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde (Germany); Jaeger, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Radiologische Klinik (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [German] Die Bestimmung der Wertigkeit der kombinierten PET-CT-Untersuchung zum Nachweis maligner Kopf-Hals-Tumoren und ihrer Metastasen. Bei 51 Patienten wurden Ganzkoerperuntersuchungen mit dem kombiniertem PET-CT-System durchgefuehrt. Die CT erfolgte ohne i.v. Kontrastmittelgabe. Die Ergebnisse wurden in ihrer diagnostischen Aussage einerseits getrennt fuer native CT- und FDG-PET-Bildgebung und andererseits fuer das fusionierte Bild verglichen. Von 153 Laesionen wurden 97 im CT und 136 im FDG-PET als maligne, 33 im CT und 7 im FDG-PET als malignitaetsverdaechtig, 23 im CT und 10 in der FDG-PET als benigne beurteilt. Die Anzahl der konkordanten Ergebnisse betrug 94 (61%), die der diskordanten 59 (39 %). Mit der PET-CT konnten alle Primaertumoren und Rezidive entdeckt werden, die Nachweisrate eines unbekannten Primaertumors betrug 45%. Im Vergleich zur alleinigen PET- oder CT-Untersuchung erhoehen sich bei der kombinierten PET-CT Sensitivitaet, Spezifitaet sowie die

  20. A statistical method for lung tumor segmentation uncertainty in PET images based on user inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaojie; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    PET has been widely accepted as an effective imaging modality for lung tumor diagnosis and treatment. However, standard criteria for delineating tumor boundary from PET are yet to develop largely due to relatively low quality of PET images, uncertain tumor boundary definition, and variety of tumor characteristics. In this paper, we propose a statistical solution to segmentation uncertainty on the basis of user inference. We firstly define the uncertainty segmentation band on the basis of segmentation probability map constructed from Random Walks (RW) algorithm; and then based on the extracted features of the user inference, we use Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to formulate the statistical model for labeling the uncertainty band. We validated our method on 10 lung PET-CT phantom studies from the public RIDER collections [1] and 16 clinical PET studies where tumors were manually delineated by two experienced radiologists. The methods were validated using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.878 ± 0.078 on phantom studies and 0.835 ± 0.039 on clinical studies.

  1. MRI and PET images fusion based on human retina model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic potential of brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by low spatial resolution.For solving this problem we propose a technique for the fusion of PET and MRI images. This fusion is a trade-off between the spectral information extracted from PET images and the spatial information extracted from high spatial resolution MRI. The proposed method can control this trade-off. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to build a multiscale fusion model, based on the retinal cell photoreceptors model. This paper introduces general prospects of this model, and its application in multispectral medical image fusion. Results showed that the proposed method preserves more spectral features with less spatial distortion.transform methods, the best spectral and spatial quality is only achieved simultaneously with the proposed feature-based data fusion method. This method does not require resampling images, which is an advantage over the other methods, and can perform in any aspect ratio between the pixels of MRI and PET images.

  2. TSPO PET for glioma imaging using the novel ligand (18)F-GE-180: first results in patients with glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nathalie L; Unterrainer, M; Fleischmann, D F; Lindner, S; Vettermann, F; Brunegraf, A; Vomacka, L; Brendel, M; Wenter, V; Wetzel, C; Rupprecht, R; Tonn, J-C; Belka, C; Bartenstein, P; Niyazi, M

    2017-08-19

    The 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) was reported to be upregulated in gliomas. (18)F-GE-180 is a novel 3rd generation TSPO receptor ligand with improved target-to-background contrast compared to previous tracers. In this pilot study, we compared PET imaging with (18)F-GE-180 and MRI of patients with untreated and recurrent pretreated glioblastoma. Eleven patients with histologically confirmed IDH wildtype gliomas (10 glioblastomas, 1 anaplastic astrocytoma) underwent (18)F-GE-180 PET at initial diagnosis or recurrence. The PET parameters mean background uptake (SUVBG), maximal tumour-to-background ratio (TBRmax) and PET volume using different thresholds (SUVBG × 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0) were evaluated in the 60-80 min p.i. summation images. The different PET volumes were compared to the contrast-enhancing tumour volume on MRI. All gliomas were positive on (18)F-GE-180 PET and were depicted with extraordinarily high tumour-to-background contrast (median SUVBG 0.47 (0.37-0.93), TBRmax 6.61 (3.88-9.07)). (18)F-GE-180 uptake could be found even in areas without contrast enhancement on MRI, leading to significantly larger PET volumes than MRI-based volumes (median 90.5, 74.5, and 63.8 mL vs. 31.0 mL; p = 0.003, 0.004, 0.013). In percentage difference, the PET volumes were on average 179%, 135%, and 90% larger than the respective MRI volumes. The median spatial volumetric correlation (Sørensen-Dice coefficient) of PET volumes and MRI volumes prior to radiotherapy was 0.48, 0.54, and 0.58. (18)F-GE-180 PET provides a remarkably high tumour-to-background contrast in untreated and pretreated glioblastoma and shows tracer uptake even beyond contrast enhancement on MRI. To what extent (18)F-GE-180 uptake reflects the tumour extent of human gliomas and inflammatory cells remains to be evaluated in future prospective studies with guided stereotactic biopsies and correlation of histopathological results.

  3. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  4. MRI and PET image fusion using fuzzy logic and image local features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Umer; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin; Ghafoor, Abdul; Ali, Syed Sohaib; Cheema, Tanveer Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    An image fusion technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using local features and fuzzy logic is presented. The aim of proposed technique is to maximally combine useful information present in MRI and PET images. Image local features are extracted and combined with fuzzy logic to compute weights for each pixel. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme produces significantly better results compared to state-of-art schemes.

  5. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  6. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semah, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DSV-CEA, 91 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    The research projects on epilepsy addressed two main issues: the pathophysiology of the inter-ictal hypo-metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy and the role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizure. Our research projects focused primarily on temporal lobe epilepsy: The pathophysiology of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism and its correlation with the epileptogenic network was investigated in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Inter-ictal hypo-metabolism is commonly found in mesio-temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that metabolic changes reflect the preferential networks involved in ictal discharges. We analyzed the topography of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism according to electro-clinical patterns in 50 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and consistent features of MTLE. Based on electro-clinical correlations we identified 4 groups:1) mesial group characterized by mesial seizure onset without evidence of early spread beyond the temporal lobe; 2) anterior mesio-lateral group (AML) with early anterior spread, involving the anterior lateral temporal cortex and insulo-fronto-opercular areas; 3) widespread mesio-lateral group (WML) with widespread spread, involving both anterior and posterior lateral temporal and peri-sylvian areas; 4) bi-temporal group (BT) with early contralateral temporal spread. Results of FDG-PET imaging in each group were compared to control subjects using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). MRI data and surgical outcome in each group were compared to metabolic findings. Hypo-metabolism was limited to the hippocampal gyrus, the temporal pole and the insula in the mesial group. Gradual involvement of the lateral temporal cortex, the insula and the peri-sylvian areas was observed in the AML and WML groups. The BT group differed from the others by mild bi-temporal involvement, bilateral insular hypo-metabolism and longer epilepsy duration. MRI

  7. Spatio-temporal diffusion of dynamic PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauber, C; Chalon, S; Guilloteau, D [Inserm U930, CNRS ERL3106, Universite Francois Rabelais, Tours (France); Stute, S; Buvat, I [IMNC, IN2P3, UMR 8165 CNRS-Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay (France); Chau, M [ASA-Advanced Solutions Accelerator, Montpellier (France); Spiteri, P, E-mail: clovis.tauber@univ-tours.fr [IRIT-ENSEEIHT, UMR CNRS 5505, Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are corrupted by noise. This is especially true in dynamic PET imaging where short frames are required to capture the peak of activity concentration after the radiotracer injection. High noise results in a possible bias in quantification, as the compartmental models used to estimate the kinetic parameters are sensitive to noise. This paper describes a new post-reconstruction filter to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging. It consists in a spatio-temporal robust diffusion of the 4D image based on the time activity curve (TAC) in each voxel. It reduces the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics in regions of interest corresponding to different underlying physiological processes. Neither anatomical priors nor the kinetic model are required. We propose an automatic selection of the scale parameter involved in the diffusion process based on a robust statistical analysis of the distances between TACs. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of brain activity distributions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over two other post-reconstruction spatial and temporal filters. Our simulations suggest that the proposed method can be used to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging.

  8. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E;

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  9. MRI versus {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for gross tumour volume delineation in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Kirste, Simon; Fechter, Tobias; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Wieser, Gesche [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Hennies, Steffen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Rempel, Irene; Soschynski, Martin; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, Hans Christian [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Jilg, Cordula A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Bock, Michael [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is widely used in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer (PCA). Focal dose escalation to the dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIPL) may lead to improved PCA control. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most PCAs. {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA inhibitors have demonstrated promising results in detection of PCA with PET/CT. The aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT with MRI for gross tumour volume (GTV) definition in primary PCA. This retrospective study included 22 patients with primary PCA analysed after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI. GTVs were delineated on MR images by two radiologists (GTV-MRIrad) and two radiation oncologists separately. Both volumes were merged leading to GTV-MRIint. GTVs based on PET/CT were delineated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus (GTV-PET). Laterality (left, right, and left and right prostate lobes) on mpMRI, PET/CT and pathological analysis after biopsy were assessed. Mean GTV-MRIrad, GTV-MRIint and GTV-PET were 5.92, 3.83 and 11.41 cm{sup 3}, respectively. GTV-PET was significant larger then GTV-MRIint (p = 0.003). The MRI GTVs GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint showed, respectively, 40 % and 57 % overlap with GTV-PET. GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint included the SUVmax of GTV-PET in 12 and 11 patients (54.6 % and 50 %), respectively. In nine patients (47 %), laterality on mpMRI, PET/CT and histopathology after biopsy was similar. Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI provided concordant results for delineation of the DIPL in 47 % of patients (40 % - 54 % of lesions). GTV-PET was significantly larger than GTV-MRIint. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT may have a role in radiation treatment planning for focal radiation to the DIPL. Exact correlation of PET and MRI images with histopathology is needed. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  11. PET/CT Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T; Goldsmith, Stanley J;

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis...... disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Antiprostate-specific membrane antigen RIT demonstrates...... of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in the imaging of prostate cancer...

  12. Improving PET spatial resolution and detectability for prostate cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, H.; Guerin, L.; Casey, M. E.; Conti, M.; Eriksson, L.; Michel, C.; Fanti, S.; Pettinato, C.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.

    2014-08-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common forms of cancer among men, can benefit from recent improvements in positron emission tomography (PET) technology. In particular, better spatial resolution, lower noise and higher detectability of small lesions could be greatly beneficial for early diagnosis and could provide a strong support for guiding biopsy and surgery. In this article, the impact of improved PET instrumentation with superior spatial resolution and high sensitivity are discussed, together with the latest development in PET technology: resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction. Using simulated cancer lesions, inserted in clinical PET images obtained with conventional protocols, we show that visual identification of the lesions and detectability via numerical observers can already be improved using state of the art PET reconstruction methods. This was achieved using both resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction, and a high resolution image with 2 mm pixel size. Channelized Hotelling numerical observers showed an increase in the area under the LROC curve from 0.52 to 0.58. In addition, a relationship between the simulated input activity and the area under the LROC curve showed that the minimum detectable activity was reduced by more than 23%.

  13. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  14. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R. [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States)]. E-mail: rraylman@wvu.edu; Majewski, Stan [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S. Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brain [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F. [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wojcik, Randy [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2006-12-20

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5x5x4 cm{sup 3}. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5x2.5x15 mm{sup 3}) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of {approx}60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to {approx}85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy.

  15. 89Zr-bevacizumab PET imaging in primary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaykema, Sietske B M; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Pleijhuis, Rick G; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Pot, Linda; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Meulen, Sibylle B; de Jong, Johan R; Bart, Joost; de Vries, Jakob; Jansen, Liesbeth; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schröder, Carolien P; de Vries, J

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A is overexpressed in most malignant and premalignant breast lesions. VEGF-A can be visualized noninvasively with PET imaging and using the tracer (89)Zr-labeled bevacizumab. In this clinical feasibility study, we assessed whether VEGF-A in prima

  16. PET/SPECT imaging : From carotid vulnerability to brain viability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Current key issues in ischemic stroke are related to carotid plaque vulnerability, brain viability, and timing of intervention. The treatment of ischemic stroke has evolved into urgent active interventions, as 'time is brain'. Functional imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET)

  17. ClearPEM: prototype PET device dedicated to breast imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Joao Varela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new breast imaging system (ClearPEM) using positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  18. Impact of consensus contours from multiple PET segmentation methods on the accuracy of functional volume delineation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Saarland University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany); Vermandel, M. [U1189 - ONCO-THAI - Image Assisted Laser Therapy for Oncology, University of Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, Lille (France); CHU Lille, Nuclear Medicine Department, Lille (France); Baillet, C. [CHU Lille, Nuclear Medicine Department, Lille (France); Dewalle-Vignion, A.S. [U1189 - ONCO-THAI - Image Assisted Laser Therapy for Oncology, University of Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, Lille (France); Modzelewski, R.; Vera, P.; Gardin, I. [Centre Henri-Becquerel and LITIS EA4108, Rouen (France); Massoptier, L.; Parcq, C.; Gibon, D. [AQUILAB, Research and Innovation Department, Loos Les Lille (France); Fechter, T.; Nestle, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department for Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) Freiburg and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Nemer, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of consensus algorithms on segmentation results when applied to clinical PET images. In particular, whether the use of the majority vote or STAPLE algorithm could improve the accuracy and reproducibility of the segmentation provided by the combination of three semiautomatic segmentation algorithms was investigated. Three published segmentation methods (contrast-oriented, possibility theory and adaptive thresholding) and two consensus algorithms (majority vote and STAPLE) were implemented in a single software platform (Artiview registered). Four clinical datasets including different locations (thorax, breast, abdomen) or pathologies (primary NSCLC tumours, metastasis, lymphoma) were used to evaluate accuracy and reproducibility of the consensus approach in comparison with pathology as the ground truth or CT as a ground truth surrogate. Variability in the performance of the individual segmentation algorithms for lesions of different tumour entities reflected the variability in PET images in terms of resolution, contrast and noise. Independent of location and pathology of the lesion, however, the consensus method resulted in improved accuracy in volume segmentation compared with the worst-performing individual method in the majority of cases and was close to the best-performing method in many cases. In addition, the implementation revealed high reproducibility in the segmentation results with small changes in the respective starting conditions. There were no significant differences in the results with the STAPLE algorithm and the majority vote algorithm. This study showed that combining different PET segmentation methods by the use of a consensus algorithm offers robustness against the variable performance of individual segmentation methods and this approach would therefore be useful in radiation oncology. It might also be relevant for other scenarios such as the merging of expert recommendations in clinical routine and

  19. PET/MR imaging of head/neck in the presence of dental implants: reducing image artifacts and increasing accuracy through inpainting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes; Beyer, Thomas; Keller, Sune;

    Aim: In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC (MR-AC). We evaluate the accuracy of MR-AC in PET/MR in patients with metallic dental...... void. Conclusion: Metallic dental work causes severe MR signal voids and PET/MR artifacts that exceed the actual implant volume. The resulting bias in AC-PET is severe in regions in and near the signal voids. Notably, the bias is present also in areas further away from the implants. In selected cases...... implants or braces, and propose a clinically feasible correction method. Materials and Methods: This study includes subjects selected retrospectively from our routine PET/MR referral base of patients with neurological disorders. Seven patients with metallic implants and implant-induced signal voids > 100 m...

  20. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements.

  1. Innovative LuYAP:Ce array for PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinti, M. N.; Scafe, R.; Bennati, P.; Lo Meo, S.; Frantellizzi, V.; Pellegrini, R.; De Vincentis, G.; Sacco, D.; Fabbri, A.; Pani, R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an imaging characterization of a 10 × 10 LuYAP array (2 × 2 × 10 mm3 pixels) with an innovative dielectric coating insulation (0.015 mm thick), in view of its possible use in a gamma camera for imaging positron emission tomography (PET) or in similar applications, e.g. as γ -prompt detector in hadron therapy. The particular assembly of this array was realized in order to obtain a packing fraction of 98%, improving detection efficiency and light collection. For imaging purpose, the array has been coupled with a selected Hamamatsu H10966-100 Multi Anode Photomultiplier read out by a customized 64 independent channels electronics. This tube presents a superbialkali photocathode with 38% of quantum efficiency, permitting to enhance energy resolution and consequently image quality. A pixel identification of about 0.5 mm at 662 keV was obtained, highlighting the potentiality of this detector in PET applications.

  2. Whole-body hybrid imaging concept for the integration of PET/MR into radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Daniel H.; Oehmigen, Mark; Grueneisen, Johannes; Umutlu, Lale; Quick, Harald H.

    2016-05-01

    Modern radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is based on multimodality imaging. With the recent availability of whole-body PET/MR hybrid imaging new opportunities arise to improve target volume delineation in RT treatment planning. This, however, requires dedicated RT equipment for reproducible patient positioning on the PET/MR system, which has to be compatible with MR and PET imaging. A prototype flat RT table overlay, radiofrequency (RF) coil holders for head imaging, and RF body bridges for body imaging were developed and tested towards PET/MR system integration. Attenuation correction (AC) of all individual RT components was performed by generating 3D CT-based template models. A custom-built program for μ-map generation assembles all AC templates depending on the presence and position of each RT component. All RT devices were evaluated in phantom experiments with regards to MR and PET imaging compatibility, attenuation correction, PET quantification, and position accuracy. The entire RT setup was then evaluated in a first PET/MR patient study on five patients at different body regions. All tested devices are PET/MR compatible and do not produce visible artifacts or disturb image quality. The RT components showed a repositioning accuracy of better than 2 mm. Photon attenuation of  -11.8% in the top part of the phantom was observable, which was reduced to  -1.7% with AC using the μ-map generator. Active lesions of 3 subjects were evaluated in terms of SUVmean and an underestimation of  -10.0% and  -2.4% was calculated without and with AC of the RF body bridges, respectively. The new dedicated RT equipment for hybrid PET/MR imaging enables acquisitions in all body regions. It is compatible with PET/MR imaging and all hardware components can be corrected in hardware AC by using the suggested μ-map generator. These developments provide the technical and methodological basis for integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT planning.

  3. A new assessment model for tumor heterogeneity analysis with [18]F-FDG PET images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Xu, Wengui; Sun, Jian; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Gang; Sa, Yu; Hu, Xin-Hua; Feng, Yuanming

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that the intratumor heterogeneity can be characterized with quantitative analysis of the [18]F-FDG PET image data. The existing models employ multiple parameters for feature extraction which makes it difficult to implement in clinical settings for the quantitative characterization. This article reports an easy-to-use and differential SUV based model for quantitative assessment of the intratumor heterogeneity from 3D [18]F-FDG PET image data. An H index is defined to assess tumor heterogeneity by summing voxel-wise distribution of differential SUV from the [18]F-FDG PET image data. The summation is weighted by the distance of SUV difference among neighboring voxels from the center of the tumor and can thus yield increased values for tumors with peripheral sub-regions of high SUV that often serves as an indicator of augmented malignancy. Furthermore, the sign of H index is used to differentiate the rate of change for volume averaged SUV from its center to periphery. The new model with the H index has been compared with a widely-used model of gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) for image texture characterization with phantoms of different configurations and the [18]F-FDG PET image data of 6 lung cancer patients to evaluate its effectiveness and feasibility for clinical uses. The comparison of the H index and GLCM parameters with the phantoms demonstrate that the H index can characterize the SUV heterogeneity in all of 6 2D phantoms while only 1 GLCM parameter can do for 1 and fail to differentiate for other 2D phantoms. For the 8 3D phantoms, the H index can clearly differentiate all of them while the 4 GLCM parameters provide complicated patterns in the characterization. Feasibility study with the PET image data from 6 lung cancer patients show that the H index provides an effective single-parameter metric to characterize tumor heterogeneity in terms of the local SUV variation, and it has higher correlation with tumor volume change after

  4. 3.5D dynamic PET image reconstruction incorporating kinetics-based clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lijun; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Tang, Jing; Chen, Wufan; Rahmim, Arman

    2012-08-07

    Standard 3D dynamic positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging consists of independent image reconstructions of individual frames followed by application of appropriate kinetic model to the time activity curves at the voxel or region-of-interest (ROI). The emerging field of 4D PET reconstruction, by contrast, seeks to move beyond this scheme and incorporate information from multiple frames within the image reconstruction task. Here we propose a novel reconstruction framework aiming to enhance quantitative accuracy of parametric images via introduction of priors based on voxel kinetics, as generated via clustering of preliminary reconstructed dynamic images to define clustered neighborhoods of voxels with similar kinetics. This is then followed by straightforward maximum a posteriori (MAP) 3D PET reconstruction as applied to individual frames; and as such the method is labeled '3.5D' image reconstruction. The use of cluster-based priors has the advantage of further enhancing quantitative performance in dynamic PET imaging, because: (a) there are typically more voxels in clusters than in conventional local neighborhoods, and (b) neighboring voxels with distinct kinetics are less likely to be clustered together. Using realistic simulated (11)C-raclopride dynamic PET data, the quantitative performance of the proposed method was investigated. Parametric distribution-volume (DV) and DV ratio (DVR) images were estimated from dynamic image reconstructions using (a) maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), and MAP reconstructions using (b) the quadratic prior (QP-MAP), (c) the Green prior (GP-MAP) and (d, e) two proposed cluster-based priors (CP-U-MAP and CP-W-MAP), followed by graphical modeling, and were qualitatively and quantitatively compared for 11 ROIs. Overall, the proposed dynamic PET reconstruction methodology resulted in substantial visual as well as quantitative accuracy improvements (in terms of noise versus bias performance) for parametric DV and

  5. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the variability of gross tumor volume (GTV using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT images for nasopharyngeal carcinomas boundary definition. Assessment consisted of inter-observer and inter-modality variation analysis. Four radiation oncologists were invited to manually contour GTV by using PET/CT fusion obtained from a cohort of 12 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC and who underwent both 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG scans. Student's paired-sample t-test was performed for analyzing inter-observer and inter-modality variability. Semi-automatic segmentation methods, including thresholding and region growing, were also validated against the manual contouring of the two types of PET images. We observed no significant variation in the results obtained by different oncologists in terms of the same type of PET/CT volumes. Choline fusion volumes were significantly larger than the FDG volumes (p < 0.0001, mean ± SD = 18.21 ± 8.19. While significantly consistent results were obtained between the oncologists and the standard references in Choline volumes compared with those in FDG volumes (p = 0.0025. Simple semi-automatic delineation methods indicated that 11C-Choline PET images could provide better results than FDG volumes (p = 0.076, CI = [-0.29, 0.025]. 11C-Choline PET/CT may be more advantageous in GTV delineation for the radiotherapy of NPC than 18F-FDG. Phantom simulations and clinical trials should be conducted to prove the possible improvement of the treatment outcome.

  6. A dedicated high resolution PET imager for plant sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PET provides in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that is crucial to studying the interaction of plant with changing environment at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager that features high spatial resolution, housed in a fully controlled environment provided by a plant growth chamber (PGC). The system currently contains two types of detector modules: 84 microPET R4 block detectors with 2.2 mm crystals to provide a large detecting area; and 32 Inveon block detectors with 1.5 mm crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. Outputs of the four microPET block detectors in a modular housing are concatenated by a custom printed circuit board to match the output characteristics of an Inveon detector. All the detectors are read out by QuickSilver electronics. The detector modules are configured to full rings with a 15 cm diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Potentially, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to qua...

  7. Potential of hybrid {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/MRI for prostate cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, Thomas de; Scheffler, Max; Vallee, Jean-Paul [Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Division of Radiology, Geneve 14 (Switzerland); Rager, Olivier; Ratib, Osman [Geneva University Hospitals, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Lord, Martin [University of Montreal Hospital Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Montreal (Canada); Pusztaszeri, Marc [Geneva University Hospitals, Division of Clinical Pathology, Geneva (Switzerland); Iselin, Christophe [Geneva University Hospitals, Division of Urologic Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    To report the first results of hybrid {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/MRI imaging for the detection of prostate cancer. This analysis included 26 consecutive patients scheduled for prostate PET/MRI before radical prostatectomy. The examinations were performed on a hybrid whole-body PET/MRI scanner. The MR acquisitions which included T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences were followed during the same session by whole-body PET scans. Parametric maps were constructed to measure normalized T2-weighted intensity (nT2), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume transfer constant (K {sup trans}), extravascular extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}) and standardized uptake values (SUV). With pathology as the gold standard, ROC curves were calculated using logistic regression for each parameter and for the best combination with and without PET to obtain a MR model versus a PETMR model. Of the 26 patients initially selected, 3 were excluded due to absence of an endorectal coil (2 patients) or prosthesis artefacts (1 patient). In the whole prostate, the area under the curve (AUC) for SUV{sub max}, ADC, nT2, K {sup trans} and v{sub e} were 0.762, 0.756, 0.685, 0.611 and 0.529 with a best threshold at 3.044 for SUV{sub max} and 1.075 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for ADC. The anatomical distinction between the transition zone and the peripheral zone showed the potential of the adjunctive use of PET. In the peripheral zone, the AUC of 0.893 for the PETMR model was significantly greater (p = 0.0402) than the AUC of 0.84 for the MR model only. In the whole prostate, no relevant correlation was observed between ADC and SUV{sub max}. The SUV{sub max} was not affected by the Gleason score. The performance of a hybrid whole-body {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/MRI scan in the same session combined with a prostatic MR examination did not interfere with the diagnostic accuracy of the MR sequences. The registration of the PET data and the T2 anatomical MR

  8. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Jiliu; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  9. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyebola O. Sogbein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed.

  10. Characterizing Tumors Using Metabolic Imaging: PET Imaging of Cellular Proliferation and Steroid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Mankoff

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment decisions in oncology are increasingly guided by information on the biologic characteristics of tumors. Currently, patient-specific information on tumor biology is obtained from the analysis of biopsy material. Positron emission tomography (PET provides quantitative estimates of regional biochemistry and receptor status and can overcome the sampling error and difficulty in performing serial studies inherent with biopsy. Imaging using the glucose metabolism tracer, 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG, has demonstrated PET's ability to guide therapy in clinical oncology. In this review, we highlight PET approaches to imaging two other aspects of tumor biology: cellular proliferation and tumor steroid receptors. We review the biochemical and biologic processes underlying the imaging, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals that have been developed, quantitative image-analysis considerations, and clinical studies to date. This provides a basis for evaluating future developments in these promising applications of PET metabolic imaging.

  11. Current status of PET imaging in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2016-06-01

    To review the developments of recent decades and the current status of PET molecular imaging in Huntington's disease (HD). A systematic review of PET studies in HD was performed. The MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane and Scopus databases were searched for articles in all languages published up to 19 August 2015 using the major medical subject heading "Huntington Disease" combined with text and key words "Huntington Disease", "Neuroimaging" and "PET". Only peer-reviewed, primary research studies in HD patients and premanifest HD carriers, and studies in which clinical features were described in association with PET neuroimaging results, were included in this review. Reviews, case reports and nonhuman studies were excluded. A total of 54 PET studies were identified and analysed in this review. Brain metabolism ([(18)F]FDG and [(15)O]H2O), presynaptic ([(18)F]fluorodopa, [(11)C]β-CIT and [(11)C]DTBZ) and postsynaptic ([(11)C]SCH22390, [(11)C]FLB457 and [(11)C]raclopride) dopaminergic function, phosphodiesterases ([(18)F]JNJ42259152, [(18)F]MNI-659 and [(11)C]IMA107), and adenosine ([(18)F]CPFPX), cannabinoid ([(18)F]MK-9470), opioid ([(11)C]diprenorphine) and GABA ([(11)C]flumazenil) receptors were evaluated as potential biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and for assessing the development and efficacy of novel disease-modifying drugs in premanifest HD carriers and HD patients. PET studies evaluating brain restoration and neuroprotection were also identified and described in detail. Brain metabolism, postsynaptic dopaminergic function and phosphodiesterase 10A levels were proven to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique may be currently considered an optimal biomarker and an integrative multimodal imaging approach combining different techniques should be developed for monitoring potential neuroprotective and preventive treatment in HD.

  12. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek, S [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, R [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jonsson, C [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Brahme, A [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-11-21

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O but also {sup 13}N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery

  13. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, S.; Svensson, R.; Jonsson, C.; Brahme, A.

    2006-11-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  14. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging in a human brain PET/MR system in 50 patients-Current state of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, N.F., E-mail: nina.schwenzer@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Stegger, L., E-mail: stegger@gmx.net [Department of Nuclear Medicine and European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Bisdas, S., E-mail: sbisdas@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Schraml, C., E-mail: christina.schraml@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kolb, A., E-mail: armin.kolb@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, A., E-mail: Andreas.Boss@usz.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mueller, M., E-mail: mark.mueller@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: The present work illustrates the current state of image quality and diagnostic accuracy in a new hybrid BrainPET/MR. Materials and methods: 50 patients with intracranial masses, head and upper neck tumors or neurodegenerative diseases were examined with a hybrid BrainPET/MR consisting of a conventional 3T MR system and an MR-compatible PET insert. Directly before PET/MR, all patients underwent a PET/CT examination with either [{sup 18}F]-FDG, [{sup 11}C]-methionine or [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. In addition to anatomical MR scans, functional sequences were performed including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and proton-spectroscopy. Image quality score of MR imaging was evaluated using a 4-point-scale. PET data quality was assessed by evaluating FDG-uptake and tumor delineation with [{sup 11}C]-methionine and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. FDG uptake quantification accuracy was evaluated by means of ROI analysis (right and left frontal and temporo-occipital lobes). The asymmetry indices and ratios between frontal and occipital ROIs were compared. Results: In 45/50 patients, PET/MR examination was successful. Visual analysis revealed a diagnostic image quality of anatomical MR imaging (mean quality score T2 FSE: 1.27 {+-} 0.54; FLAIR: 1.38 {+-} 0.61). ASL and proton-spectroscopy was possible in all cases. In DTI, dental artifacts lead to one non-diagnostic dataset (mean quality score DTI: 1.32 {+-} 0.69; ASL: 1.10 {+-} 0.31). PET datasets of PET/MR and PET/CT offered comparable tumor delineation with [{sup 11}C]-methionine; additional lesions were found in 2/8 [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET in the PET/MR. Mean asymmetry index revealed a high accordance between PET/MR and PET/CT (1.5 {+-} 2.2% vs. 0.9 {+-} 3.6%; mean ratio (frontal/parieto-occipital) 0.93 {+-} 0.08 vs. 0.96 {+-} 0.05), respectively. Conclusions: The hybrid BrainPET/MR allows for molecular, anatomical and functional imaging with uncompromised MR image quality and a high accordance

  15. Pitfalls and Limitations of PET/CT in Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Eric; Bernard Ir, Claire; Hustinx, Roland

    2015-11-01

    Neurologic applications were at the forefront of PET imaging when the technique was developed in the mid-1970s. Although oncologic indications have become prominent in terms of number of studies performed worldwide, neurology remains a major field in which functional imaging provides unique information, both for clinical and research purposes. The evaluation of glucose metabolism using FDG remains the most frequent exploration, but in recent years, alternative radiotracers have been developed, including fluorinated amino acid analogues for primary brain tumor imaging and fluorinated compounds for assessing the amyloid deposits in patients with suspected Alzheimer disease. As the brain is enclosed in the skull, which presents fixed landmarks, it is relatively easy to coregister images obtained with various cross-sectional imaging methods, either functional or anatomical, with a relatively high accuracy and robustness. Nevertheless, PET in neurology has fully benefited from the advent of hybrid imaging. Attenuation and scatter correction is now much faster and equally accurate, using CT as compared with the traditional transmission scan using an external radioactive source. The perfect coregistration with the CT data, which is now systematically performed, also provides its own set of valuable information, for instance regarding cerebral atrophy. However, hybrid imaging in neurology comes with pitfalls and limitations, in addition to those that are well known, for example, blood glucose levels or psychotropic drugs that greatly affect the physiological FDG uptake. Movements of the patient's head, either during the PET acquisition or between the PET and the CT acquisitions will generate artifacts that may be very subtle yet lead to erroneous interpretation of the study. Similarly, quantitative analysis, such as voxel-based analyses, may prove very helpful in improving the diagnostic accuracy and the reproducibility of the reading, but a wide variety of artifacts may

  16. Dynamic PET Image reconstruction for parametric imaging using the HYPR kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Benjamin; Qi, Jinyi; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Wang, Guobao

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging problem because of the ill-conditioned nature of PET and the lowcounting statistics resulted from short time-frames in dynamic imaging. The kernel method for image reconstruction has been developed to improve image reconstruction of low-count PET data by incorporating prior information derived from high-count composite data. In contrast to most of the existing regularization-based methods, the kernel method embeds image prior information in the forward projection model and does not require an explicit regularization term in the reconstruction formula. Inspired by the existing highly constrained back-projection (HYPR) algorithm for dynamic PET image denoising, we propose in this work a new type of kernel that is simpler to implement and further improves the kernel-based dynamic PET image reconstruction. Our evaluation study using a physical phantom scan with synthetic FDG tracer kinetics has demonstrated that the new HYPR kernel-based reconstruction can achieve a better region-of-interest (ROI) bias versus standard deviation trade-off for dynamic PET parametric imaging than the post-reconstruction HYPR denoising method and the previously used nonlocal-means kernel.

  17. Imaging for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 in rat and monkey brains using PET with [{sup 18}F]FITM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Imaging Centre, Chiba (Japan); Tohoku University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sendai (Japan); Fujinaga, Masayuki; Maeda, Jun; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yui, Joji; Hatori, Akiko; Nagai, Yuji; Tokunaga, Masaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Fukumura, Toshimitsu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Imaging Centre, Chiba (Japan); Yoshida, Yuichiro [SHI Accelerator Service Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Zhang, Ming-Rong [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Imaging Centre, Chiba (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Centre, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    In this study, we evaluate the utility of 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methylbenzamide ([{sup 18}F]FITM) as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for imaging of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) in rat and monkey brains. In vivo distribution of [{sup 18}F]FITM in brains was evaluated by PET scans with or without the mGluR1-selective antagonist (JNJ16259685). Kinetic parameters of monkey PET data were obtained using the two-tissue compartment model with arterial blood sampling. In PET studies in rat and monkey brains, the highest uptake of radioactivity was in the cerebellum, followed by moderate uptake in the thalamus, hippocampus and striatum. The lowest uptake of radioactivity was detected in the pons. These uptakes in all brain regions were dramatically decreased by pre-administration of JNJ16259685. In kinetic analysis of monkey PET, the highest volume of distribution (V{sub T}) was detected in the cerebellum (V{sub T} = 11.5). [{sup 18}F ]FITM has an excellent profile as a PET ligand for mGluR1 imaging. PET with [{sup 18}F ]FITM may prove useful for determining the regional distribution and density of mGluR1 and the mGluR1 occupancy of drugs in human brains. (orig.)

  18. Data Acquisition and Image Reconstruction Systems from the miniPET Scanners to the CARDIOTOM Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valastván, I.; Imrek, J.; Hegyesi, G.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.; Bone, D.; Kerek, A.

    2007-11-01

    Nuclear imaging devices play an important role in medical diagnosis as well as drug research. The first and second generation data acquisition systems and the image reconstruction library developed provide a unified hardware and software platform for the miniPET-I, miniPET-II small animal PET scanners and for the CARDIOTOM™.

  19. Value of C-11-methionine PET in imaging brain tumours and metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Enting, Roeline; Heesters, Martinus; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; van Rheenen, Ronald W J; Walenkamp, Annemiek M E; Slart, Riemer H J A

    2013-01-01

    C-11-methionine (MET) is the most popular amino acid tracer used in PET imaging of brain tumours. Because of its characteristics, MET PET provides a high detection rate of brain tumours and good lesion delineation. This review focuses on the role of MET PET in imaging cerebral gliomas. The Introduct

  20. Simultaneous Tumor Segmentation, Image Restoration, and Blur Kernel Estimation in PET Using Multiple Regularizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Laquan; Wang, Jian; Lu, Wei; Tan, Shan

    2017-02-01

    Accurate tumor segmentation from PET images is crucial in many radiation oncology applications. Among others, partial volume effect (PVE) is recognized as one of the most important factors degrading imaging quality and segmentation accuracy in PET. Taking into account that image restoration and tumor segmentation are tightly coupled and can promote each other, we proposed a variational method to solve both problems simultaneously in this study. The proposed method integrated total variation (TV) semi-blind de-convolution and Mumford-Shah segmentation with multiple regularizations. Unlike many existing energy minimization methods using either TV or L2 regularization, the proposed method employed TV regularization over tumor edges to preserve edge information, and L2 regularization inside tumor regions to preserve the smooth change of the metabolic uptake in a PET image. The blur kernel was modeled as anisotropic Gaussian to address the resolution difference in transverse and axial directions commonly seen in a clinic PET scanner. The energy functional was rephrased using the Γ-convergence approximation and was iteratively optimized using the alternating minimization (AM) algorithm. The performance of the proposed method was validated on a physical phantom and two clinic datasets with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and esophageal cancer, respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method had high performance for simultaneous image restoration, tumor segmentation and scanner blur kernel estimation. Particularly, the recovery coefficients (RC) of the restored images of the proposed method in the phantom study were close to 1, indicating an efficient recovery of the original blurred images; for segmentation the proposed method achieved average dice similarity indexes (DSIs) of 0.79 and 0.80 for two clinic datasets, respectively; and the relative errors of the estimated blur kernel widths were less than 19% in the transversal direction and 7% in the axial

  1. A novel 3D-printed phantom insert for 4D PET/CT imaging and simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerviño, Laura; Soultan, Dima; Cornell, Mariel; Yock, Adam; Pettersson, Niclas; Song, William Y; Aguilera, Joseph; Advani, Sunil; Murphy, James; Hoh, Carl; James, Claude; Paravati, Anthony; Coope, Robin; Gill, Bradford; Moiseenko, Vitali

    2017-08-02

    To construct a 3D-printed phantom insert designed to mimic the variable PET tracer uptake seen in lung tumor volumes and a matching dosimetric insert to be used in simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) phantom studies, and to evaluate the design through end-to-end tests. A set of phantom inserts was designed and manufactured for a realistic representation of gated radiotherapy steps from 4D PET/CT scanning to dose delivery. A cylindrical phantom (φ80 × 120 mm) holds inserts for PET/CT scanning. The novel 3D printed insert dedicated to 4D PET/CT mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and low uptake in the periphery. This insert is a variable density porous cylinder (φ44.5 × 70.0 mm), ABS-P430 thermoplastic, 3D printed by fused deposition modeling an inner (φ11 × 42 mm) cylindrical void. The square pores (1.8 × 1.8 mm(2) each) fill 50% of outer volume, resulting in a 2:1 PET tracer concentration ratio in the void volume with respect to porous volume. A matching cylindrical phantom insert is dedicated to validate gated radiotherapy. It contains eight peripheral holes and one central hole, matching the location of the porous part and the void part of the 3D printed insert, respectively. These holes accommodate adaptors for Farmer-type ion chamber and cells vials. End-to-end tests were designed for imaging, planning, and dose measurements. End-to-end test were performed from 4D PET/CT scanning to transferring data to the planning system, target volume delineation, and dose measurements. 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of the phantom at different respiratory motion patterns and gating windows. A measured 2:1 18F-FDG concentration ratio between inner void and outer porous volume matched the 3D printed design. Measured dose in the dosimetric insert agreed well with planned dose on the imaging insert, within 3% for the static phantom and within 5% for most breathing patterns. The novel 3D printed phantom insert mimics variable PET tracer uptake typical of tumors

  2. A small animal PET based on GAPDs and charge signal transmission approach for hybrid PET-MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jihoon; Choi, Yong; Hong, Key Jo; Hu, Wei; Jung, Jin Ho; Huh, Yoonsuk [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Tae, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) employing Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) and charge signal transmission approach was developed for small animal imaging. Animal PET contained 16 LYSO and GAPD detector modules that were arranged in a 70 mm diameter ring with an axial field of view of 13 mm. The GAPDs charge output signals were transmitted to a preamplifier located remotely using 300 cm flexible flat cables. The position decoder circuits (PDCs) were used to multiplex the PET signals from 256 to 4 channels. The outputs of the PDCs were digitized and further-processed in the data acquisition unit. The cross-compatibilities of the PET detectors and MRI were assessed outside and inside the MRI. Experimental studies of the developed full ring PET were performed to examine the spatial resolution and sensitivity. Phantom and mouse images were acquired to examine the imaging performance. The mean energy and time resolution of the PET detector were 17.6% and 1.5 ns, respectively. No obvious degradation on PET and MRI was observed during simultaneous PET-MRI data acquisition. The measured spatial resolution and sensitivity at the CFOV were 2.8 mm and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, a 3 mm diameter line source was clearly resolved in the hot-sphere phantom images. The reconstructed transaxial PET images of the mouse brain and tumor displaying the glucose metabolism patterns were imaged well. These results demonstrate GAPD and the charge signal transmission approach can allow the development of high performance small animal PET with improved MR compatibility.

  3. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  4. Contribution of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT to Target Volume Delineation of Skull Base Meningiomas Treated With Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Reinhold, E-mail: reinhold.graf@charite.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Steffen, Ingo G.; Michel, Roger; Fahdt, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Wust, Peter; Brenner, Winfried; Budach, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Wurm, Reinhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Plotkin, Michail [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET) in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for retrospectively assessing the gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation of meningiomas of the skull base in patients treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 48 patients with 54 skull base meningiomas, previously treated with FSRT. After scans were coregistered, the GTVs were first delineated with MRI and CT data (GTV{sub MRI/CT}) and then by PET (GTV{sub PET}) data. The overlapping regions of both datasets resulted in the GTV{sub common}, which was enlarged to the GTV{sub final} by adding volumes defined by only one of the complementary modalities (GTV{sub MRI/CT-added} or GTV{sub PET-added}). We then evaluated the contribution of conventional imaging modalities (MRI, CT) and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET to the GTV{sub final}, which was used for planning purposes. Results: Forty-eight of the 54 skull base lesions in 45 patients showed increased {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC uptake and were further analyzed. The mean GTV{sub MRI/CT} and GTV{sub PET} were approximately 21 cm{sup 3} and 25 cm{sup 3}, with a common volume of approximately 15 cm{sup 3}. PET contributed a mean additional GTV of approximately 1.5 cm{sup 3} to the common volume (16% {+-} 34% of the GTV{sub common}). Approximately 4.5 cm{sup 3} of the GTV{sub MRI/CT} was excluded from the contribution to the common volume. The resulting mean GTV{sub final} was significantly smaller than both the GTV{sub MRI/CT} and the GTV{sub PET}. Compared with the initial GTV{sub MRI/CT}, the addition of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET resulted in more than 10% modification of the size of the GTV{sub final} in 32 (67%) meningiomas Conclusions: {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT seems to improve the target volume delineation in skull base meningiomas, often leading to a reduction of

  5. Automated lung tumor segmentation for whole body PET volume based on novel downhill region growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2010-03-01

    We propose an automated lung tumor segmentation method for whole body PET images based on a novel downhill region growing (DRG) technique, which regards homogeneous tumor hotspots as 3D monotonically decreasing functions. The method has three major steps: thoracic slice extraction with K-means clustering of the slice features; hotspot segmentation with DRG; and decision tree analysis based hotspot classification. To overcome the common problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots in automated lung tumor segmentation, DRG employs the tumors' SUV monotonicity features. DRG also uses gradient magnitude of tumors' SUV to improve tumor boundary definition. We used 14 PET volumes from patients with primary NSCLC for validation. The thoracic region extraction step achieved good and consistent results for all patients despite marked differences in size and shape of the lungs and the presence of large tumors. The DRG technique was able to avoid the problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots and produced a volumetric overlap fraction of 0.61 +/- 0.13 which outperformed four other methods where the overlap fraction varied from 0.40 +/- 0.24 to 0.59 +/- 0.14. Of the 18 tumors in 14 NSCLC studies, 15 lesions were classified correctly, 2 were false negative and 15 were false positive.

  6. FDG PET/CT for rectal carcinoma radiotherapy treatment planning: comparison of functional volume delineation algorithms and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withofs, Nadia; Bernard, Claire; Van der Rest, Catherine; Martinive, Philippe; Hatt, Mathieu; Jodogne, Sebastien; Visvikis, Dimitris; Lee, John A; Coucke, Philippe A; Hustinx, Roland

    2014-09-08

    PET/CT imaging could improve delineation of rectal carcinoma gross tumor volume (GTV) and reduce interobserver variability. The objective of this work was to compare various functional volume delineation algorithms. We enrolled 31 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma. The FDG PET/CT and the high dose CT (CTRT) were performed in the radiation treatment position. For each patient, the anatomical GTVRT was delineated based on the CTRT and compared to six different functional/metabolic GTVPET derived from two automatic segmentation approaches (FLAB and a gradient-based method); a relative threshold (45% of the SUVmax) and an absolute threshold (SUV > 2.5), using two different commercially available software (Philips EBW4 and Segami OASIS). The spatial sizes and shapes of all volumes were compared using the conformity index (CI). All the delineated metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) were significantly different. The MTVs were as follows (mean ± SD): GTVRT (40.6 ± 31.28ml); FLAB (21.36± 16.34 ml); the gradient-based method (18.97± 16.83ml); OASIS 45% (15.89 ± 12.68 ml); Philips 45% (14.52 ± 10.91 ml); OASIS 2.5 (41.6 2 ± 33.26 ml); Philips 2.5 (40 ± 31.27 ml). CI between these various volumes ranged from 0.40 to 0.90. The mean CI between the different MTVs and the GTVCT was algorithms and the software products. The manipulation of PET/CT images and MTVs, such as the DICOM transfer to the Radiation Oncology Department, induced additional volume variations.

  7. The Combination of In vivo (124)I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ali, Henrik H; Eckerwall, Martin; Skovgaard, Dorthe;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that (124)I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid...... physiology and dose calculation. METHODS: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid (124)I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. RESULTS...... indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information...

  8. Simultaneous PET/MRI with (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L; Henriksen, Sarah T; Vignaud, Alexandre; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas; Klausen, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((13)C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous (1)H-MRI and PET but never for (13)C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Combined PET and (13)C-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [(18)F]-FDG phantom, (13)C-acetate and (13)C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or (13)C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET trues; and (13)C-MRSI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for urea and acetate phantoms. Differences between measurement conditions were evaluated using t tests. PET and (13)C-MRSI data acquisition could be performed simultaneously without any discernible artifacts. The average difference in PET activity between acquisitions with and without simultaneous (13)C-MRSI was 0.83 (largest sphere) and -0.76 % (background). The average difference in net trues was -0.01 %. The average difference in (13)C-MRSI SNR between acquisitions with and without simultaneous PET ranged from -2.28 to 1.21 % for all phantoms and measurement conditions. No differences were significant. The system was capable of (13)C-MRSI of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is feasible. Phantom experiments showed that possible interference effects introduced by acquiring data from the two modalities simultaneously are small and non-significant. Further experiments can now investigate the benefits of simultaneous PET and

  9. A dedicated high-resolution PET imager for plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Mathews, Aswin J; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-10-07

    PET provides an in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that could be valuable for studying the interaction of plants in changing environments at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager housed in a plant growth chamber (PGC), which provides a fully controlled environment. The system currently contains two types of scintillation detector modules from commercial small animal PET scanners: 84 microPET® detectors, which are made with scintillation crystal arrays of 2.2 mm(3) × 2.2 mm(3) × 10 mm(3) crystals to provide a large detection area; and 32 Inveon™ detectors, which are made with scintillation crystal arrays of 1.5 mm(3) × 1.5 mm(3) × 10 mm(3) crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. The detector modules are configured to form two half-rings, which provide a 15 cm-diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Alternatively, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to form quarter-rings, which provide a 25 cm FOV using step-and-shoot motion. The imager contains two linear stages that move detectors vertically at different heights for multisection scanning, and two rotation stages to collect coincidence events from all angles when using the step-and-shoot acquisition. The detector modules and mechanical components of the imager are housed inside a PGC that regulates the environmental parameters. The system has a typical energy resolution of 15% for the Inveon detectors and 24% for the microPET detectors, timing resolution of 1.8 ns, and sensitivity of 1.3%, 1.4% and 3.0% measured at the center of the FOV, 5 cm off to the larger half-ring and 5 cm off to the smaller half-ring, respectively (with a 350-650 keV energy window and 3.1 ns timing window). The system's spatial resolution is capable of resolving rod sources of 1.25 mm diameter spaced 2.5 mm apart (center to center) using the ML-EM reconstruction algorithm. Preliminary imaging experiments

  10. 3D skeletal uptake of (18)F sodium fluoride in PET/CT images is associated with overall survival in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren Belal, Sarah; Sadik, May; Kaboteh, Reza; Hasani, Nezar; Enqvist, Olof; Svärm, Linus; Kahl, Fredrik; Simonsen, Jane; Poulsen, Mads H; Ohlsson, Mattias; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Edenbrandt, Lars; Trägårdh, Elin

    2017-12-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) positron emission tomography combined with computer tomography (PET/CT) has shown to be more sensitive than the whole-body bone scan in the detection of skeletal uptake due to metastases in prostate cancer. We aimed to calculate a 3D index for NaF PET/CT and investigate its correlation to the bone scan index (BSI) and overall survival (OS) in a group of patients with prostate cancer. NaF PET/CT and bone scans were studied in 48 patients with prostate cancer. Automated segmentation of the thoracic and lumbar spines, sacrum, pelvis, ribs, scapulae, clavicles, and sternum were made in the CT images. Hotspots in the PET images were selected using both a manual and an automated method. The volume of each hotspot localized in the skeleton in the corresponding CT image was calculated. Two PET/CT indices, based on manual (manual PET index) and automatic segmenting using a threshold of SUV 15 (automated PET15 index), were calculated by dividing the sum of all hotspot volumes with the volume of all segmented bones. BSI values were obtained using a software for automated calculations. BSI, manual PET index, and automated PET15 index were all significantly associated with OS and concordance indices were 0.68, 0.69, and 0.70, respectively. The median BSI was 0.39 and patients with a BSI >0.39 had a significantly shorter median survival time than patients with a BSI PET index was 0.53 and patients with a manual PET index >0.53 had a significantly shorter median survival time than patients with a manual PET index PET15 index was 0.11 and patients with an automated PET15 index >0.11 had a significantly shorter median survival time than patients with an automated PET15 index PET/CT indices based on NaF PET/CT are correlated to BSI and significantly associated with overall survival in patients with prostate cancer.

  11. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent (15)O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values

  12. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  13. Reproducibility of functional volume and activity concentration in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT of liver metastases in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijmen, Linda [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology 452, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de; Visser, Eric P.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wilt, Johannes H.W. de [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Visvikis, Dimitris; Hatt, Mathieu [LaTIM, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Bussink, Johan [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Punt, Cornelis J.A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology 452, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Several studies showed potential for monitoring response to systemic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Before {sup 18}F-FDG PET can be implemented for response evaluation the repeatability should be known. This study was performed to assess the magnitude of the changes in standardized uptake value (SUV), volume and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) in colorectal liver metastases and validate the biological basis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in colorectal liver metastases. Twenty patients scheduled for liver metastasectomy underwent two {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans within 1 week. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to assess repeatability of SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, volume and TLG. Tumours were delineated using an adaptive threshold method (PET{sub SBR}) and a semiautomatic fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (FLAB) delineation method. Coefficient of repeatability of SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} were {proportional_to}39 and {proportional_to}31 %, respectively, independent of the delineation method used and image reconstruction parameters. However, repeatability was worse in recently treated patients. The FLAB delineation method improved the repeatability of the volume and TLG measurements compared to PET{sub SBR}, from coefficients of repeatability of over 85 % to 45 % and 57 % for volume and TLG, respectively. Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression correlated to the SUV{sub mean}. Vascularity (CD34 expression) and tumour hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase IX expression) did not correlate with {sup 18}F-FDG PET parameters. In conclusion, repeatability of SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} was mainly affected by preceding systemic therapy. The repeatability of tumour volume and TLG could be improved using more advanced and robust delineation approaches such as FLAB, which is recommended when {sup 18}F-FDG PET is utilized for volume or TLG measurements. Improvement of repeatability of PET measurements

  14. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik;

    , potentially introducing bias if measured with a separate modality. The aim of this study was to develop and validate methods for automatically extracting FSV directly from the dynamic PET used for measuring oxidative metabolism. Methods: 16 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min PET scan on a Siemens Biograph...... TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner after bolus injection of 399±27 MBq of 11C-acetate. The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was derived by automatic extrapolation of the down-slope of the TAC. FSV...... was then calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured in the left ventricular outflow tract by cardiovascular magnetic resonance using phase-contrast velocity mapping within two weeks of PET imaging. Results...

  15. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ∼14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  16. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ˜14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  17. PET/MR brain imaging: evaluation of clinical UTE-based attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasheim, Lars Birger [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway); St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Karlberg, Anna [St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Goa, Paal Erik [St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Department of Physics, Trondheim (Norway); Haaberg, Asta [NTNU, Department of Neuroscience, Trondheim (Norway); St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway); Soerhaug, Sveinung [St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Fagerli, Unn-Merete [St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Eikenes, Live [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-08-15

    One of the greatest challenges in PET/MR imaging is that of accurate MR-based attenuation correction (AC) of the acquired PET data, which must be solved if the PET/MR modality is to reach its full potential. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of Siemens' most recent version (VB20P) of MR-based AC of head PET data, by comparing it to CT-based AC. Methods:{sup 18}F-FDG PET data from seven lymphoma and twelve lung cancer patients examined with a Biograph mMR PET/MR system were reconstructed with both CT-based and MR-based AC, avoiding sources of error arising when comparing PET data from different systems. The resulting images were compared quantitatively by measuring changes in mean SUV in ten different brain regions in both hemispheres, as well as the brainstem. In addition, the attenuation maps (μ maps) were compared regarding volume and localization of cranial bone. The UTE μ maps clearly overestimate the amount of bone in the neck, while slightly underestimating the amount of bone in the cranium, and the localization of bone in the cranial region also differ from the CT μ maps. In air/tissue interfaces in the sinuses and ears, the MRAC method struggles to correctly classify the different tissues. The misclassification of tissue is most likely caused by a combination of artefacts and the insufficiency of the UTE method to accurately separate bone. Quantitatively, this results in a combination of overestimation (0.5-3.6 %) and underestimation (2.7-5.2 %) of PET activity throughout the brain, depending on the proximity to the inaccurate regions. Our results indicate that the performance of the UTE method as implemented in VB20P is close to the theoretical maximum of such an MRAC method in the brain, while it does not perform satisfactorily in the neck or face/nasal area. Further improvement of the UTE MRAC or other available methods for more accurate segmentation of bone should be incorporated. (orig.)

  18. Fuzzy hidden Markov chains segmentation for volume determination and quantitation in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, M [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Bat 2bis (I3S), 5 avenue Foch, Brest, 29609 (France); Lamare, F [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Bat 2bis (I3S), 5 avenue Foch, Brest, 29609, (France); Boussion, N [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Bat 2bis (I3S), 5 avenue Foch, Brest, 29609 (France); Turzo, A [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Bat 2bis (I3S), 5 avenue Foch, Brest, 29609 (France); Collet, C [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Physique de Strasbourg (ENSPS), ULP, Strasbourg, F-67000 (France); Salzenstein, F [Institut d' Electronique du Solide et des Systemes (InESS), ULP, Strasbourg, F-67000 (France); Roux, C [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Bat 2bis (I3S), 5 avenue Foch, Brest, 29609 (France); Jarritt, P [Medical Physics Agency, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom); Carson, K [Medical Physics Agency, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom); Rest, C Cheze-Le [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Bat 2bis (I3S), 5 avenue Foch, Brest, 29609 (France); Visvikis, D [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Bat 2bis (I3S), 5 avenue Foch, Brest, 29609 (France)

    2007-07-21

    Accurate volume of interest (VOI) estimation in PET is crucial in different oncology applications such as response to therapy evaluation and radiotherapy treatment planning. The objective of our study was to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm for automatic lesion volume delineation; namely the fuzzy hidden Markov chains (FHMC), with that of current state of the art in clinical practice threshold based techniques. As the classical hidden Markov chain (HMC) algorithm, FHMC takes into account noise, voxel intensity and spatial correlation, in order to classify a voxel as background or functional VOI. However the novelty of the fuzzy model consists of the inclusion of an estimation of imprecision, which should subsequently lead to a better modelling of the 'fuzzy' nature of the object of interest boundaries in emission tomography data. The performance of the algorithms has been assessed on both simulated and acquired datasets of the IEC phantom, covering a large range of spherical lesion sizes (from 10 to 37 mm), contrast ratios (4:1 and 8:1) and image noise levels. Both lesion activity recovery and VOI determination tasks were assessed in reconstructed images using two different voxel sizes (8 mm{sup 3} and 64 mm{sup 3}). In order to account for both the functional volume location and its size, the concept of % classification errors was introduced in the evaluation of volume segmentation using the simulated datasets. Results reveal that FHMC performs substantially better than the threshold based methodology for functional volume determination or activity concentration recovery considering a contrast ratio of 4:1 and lesion sizes of <28 mm. Furthermore differences between classification and volume estimation errors evaluated were smaller for the segmented volumes provided by the FHMC algorithm. Finally, the performance of the automatic algorithms was less susceptible to image noise levels in comparison to the threshold based techniques. The

  19. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær

    2012-01-01

    was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II). CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity...... concentration in the same organ with and without AC revealed an overall attenuation recovery of 9–21% for MAP reconstructed images, i.e., SUV without AC could underestimate the true activity at this level. For subcutaneous tumors, the attenuation was 13 ± 4% (9–17%), for kidneys 20 ± 1% (19......–21%), and for bladder 18 ± 3% (15–21%). The FBP reconstructed images showed almost the same attenuation levels as the MAP reconstructed images for all organs. Conclusions: The annihilation photons are suffering attenuation even in small subjects. Both PET-based and CT-based are adequate as AC methods. The amplitude...

  20. Molecular imaging for prostate cancer: Performance analysis of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT versus choline PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, L; Touijer, K A

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for a precise and reliable imaging to improve the management of prostate cancer. In recent years the PET/CT with choline has changed the handling of prostate cancer in Europe, and it is commonly used for initial stratification or for the diagnosis of a biochemical recurrence, although it does not lack limitations. Other markers are being tested, including the ligand of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), that seems to offer encouraging prospects. The goal of this piece of work was to critically review the role of choline and PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. A systematic literature review of databases PUBMED/MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted searching for articles fully published in English on the PET marker in prostate cancer and its clinical application. It seems as 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT is better than PET/CT in prostate cancer to detect primary prostate lesions, initial metastases in the lymph nodes and recurrence. However, further research is required to obtain high-level tests. Also, other PET markers are studied. Moreover, the emergence of a new PET/MR camera could change the performance of PET imaging. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Jha, Abhinav K.; Casey, Michael E.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUVmean and SUVmax, including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUVmean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  2. The Combination of In vivo 124I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El-Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that 124I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid physiology and dose calculation. Methods: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid 124I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. Results: Small animal image-based measurements of the activity amount and the volumes of the spheres with a priori known volumes showed a good agreement with their corresponding actual volumes. The CT scans of the rats showed thyroid volumes from 34–70 mL. Conclusions: The wide span in volumes of thyroid glands indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information is essential for quantitative thyroid imaging and accurate thyroid absorbed dose calculation.

  3. Is STAPLE algorithm confident to assess segmentation methods in PET imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewalle-Vignion, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Baillet, Clio; Vermandel, Maximilien

    2015-12-01

    Accurate tumor segmentation in [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is crucial for tumor response assessment and target volume definition in radiation therapy. Evaluation of segmentation methods from clinical data without ground truth is usually based on physicians’ manual delineations. In this context, the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm could be useful to manage the multi-observers variability. In this paper, we evaluated how this algorithm could accurately estimate the ground truth in PET imaging. Complete evaluation study using different criteria was performed on simulated data. The STAPLE algorithm was applied to manual and automatic segmentation results. A specific configuration of the implementation provided by the Computational Radiology Laboratory was used. Consensus obtained by the STAPLE algorithm from manual delineations appeared to be more accurate than manual delineations themselves (80% of overlap). An improvement of the accuracy was also observed when applying the STAPLE algorithm to automatic segmentations results. The STAPLE algorithm, with the configuration used in this paper, is more appropriate than manual delineations alone or automatic segmentations results alone to estimate the ground truth in PET imaging. Therefore, it might be preferred to assess the accuracy of tumor segmentation methods in PET imaging.

  4. Performance evaluation of the microPET P4: a PET system dedicated to animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Y.C.; Chatziioannou, A.; Cherry, S.R. [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Siegel, S.; Goble, R.N.; Nutt, R.E. [Concorde Microsystems, Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Young, J. [CTI, Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Newport, D. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The microPET Primate 4-ring system (P4) is an animal PET tomograph with a 7.8 cm axial extent, a 19 cm diameter transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 22 cm animal port. The system is composed of 168 detector modules, each with an 8x8 array of 2.2x2.2x10 mm{sup 3} lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals, arranged as 32 crystal rings 26 cm in diameter. The detector crystals are coupled to a Hamamatsu R5900-C8 PS-PMT via a 10 cm long optical fibre bundle. The detectors have a timing resolution of 3.2 ns, an average energy resolution of 26%, and an average intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.75 mm. The system operates in 3D mode without inter-plane septa, acquiring data in list mode. The reconstructed image spatial resolution ranges from 1.8 mm at the centre to 3 mm at 4 cm radial offset. The tomograph has a peak system sensitivity of 2.25% at the centre of the FOV with a 250-750 keV energy window. The noise equivalent count rate peaks at 100-290 kcps for representative object sizes. Images from two phantoms and three different types of laboratory animal demonstrate the advantage of the P4 system over the original prototype microPET, including its threefold improvement in sensitivity and a large axial FOV sufficient to image an entire mouse in a single bed position. (author)

  5. Performance evaluation of the microPET P4: a PET system dedicated to animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Y. C.; Chatziioannou, A.; Siegel, S.; Young, J.; Newport, D.; Goble, R. N.; Nutt, R. E.; Cherry, S. R.

    2001-07-01

    The microPET Primate 4-ring system (P4) is an animal PET tomograph with a 7.8 cm axial extent, a 19 cm diameter transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 22 cm animal port. The system is composed of 168 detector modules, each with an 8×8 array of 2.2×2.2×10 mm3 lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals, arranged as 32 crystal rings 26 cm in diameter. The detector crystals are coupled to a Hamamatsu R5900-C8 PS-PMT via a 10 cm long optical fibre bundle. The detectors have a timing resolution of 3.2 ns, an average energy resolution of 26%, and an average intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.75 mm. The system operates in 3D mode without inter-plane septa, acquiring data in list mode. The reconstructed image spatial resolution ranges from 1.8 mm at the centre to 3 mm at 4 cm radial offset. The tomograph has a peak system sensitivity of 2.25% at the centre of the FOV with a 250-750 keV energy window. The noise equivalent count rate peaks at 100-290 kcps for representative object sizes. Images from two phantoms and three different types of laboratory animal demonstrate the advantage of the P4 system over the original prototype microPET, including its threefold improvement in sensitivity and a large axial FOV sufficient to image an entire mouse in a single bed position.

  6. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  7. Short-lived positron emitters in beam-on PET imaging during proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, P.; Buitenhuis, H. J. T.; Diblen, F.; Heeres, P. N.; Biegun, A. K.; Fiedler, F.; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2015-01-01

    The only method for in vivo dose delivery verification in proton beam radiotherapy in clinical use today is positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron emitters produced in the patient during irradiation. PET imaging while the beam is on (so called beam-on PET) is an attractive option, provid

  8. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    for molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm......Molecular imaging allows for the study of molecular and cellular events in the living intact organism. The nuclear medicine methodologies of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) posses several advantages, which make them particularly suited...

  9. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  10. Pretargeted PET Imaging Using a Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brendon E; Adumeau, Pierre; Membreno, Rosemery; Carnazza, Kathryn E; Brand, Christian; Reiner, Thomas; Agnew, Brian J; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-08-17

    In recent years, both site-specific bioconjugation techniques and bioorthogonal pretargeting strategies have emerged as exciting technologies with the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of antibody-based nuclear imaging. In the work at hand, we have combined these two approaches to create a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the rapid and bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between a (64)Cu-labeled tetrazine radioligand ((64)Cu-Tz-SarAr) and a site-specifically modified huA33-trans-cyclooctene immunoconjugate ((ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO). A bioconjugation strategy that harnesses enzymatic transformations and strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry was used to site-specifically append PEGylated TCO moieties to the heavy chain glycans of the colorectal cancer-targeting huA33 antibody. Preclinical in vivo validation studies were performed in athymic nude mice bearing A33 antigen-expressing SW1222 human colorectal carcinoma xenografts. To this end, mice were administered (ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO via tail vein injection and-following accumulation intervals of 24 or 48 h-(64)Cu-Tz-SarAr. PET imaging and biodistribution studies reveal that this strategy clearly delineates tumor tissue as early as 1 h post-injection (6.7 ± 1.7%ID/g at 1 h p.i.), producing images with excellent contrast and high tumor-to-background activity concentration ratios (tumor:muscle = 21.5 ± 5.6 at 24 h p.i.). Furthermore, dosimetric calculations illustrate that this pretargeting approach produces only a fraction of the overall effective dose (0.0214 mSv/MBq; 0.079 rem/mCi) of directly labeled radioimmunoconjugates. Ultimately, this method effectively facilitates the high contrast pretargeted PET imaging of colorectal carcinoma using a site-specifically modified immunoconjugate.

  11. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dregely, Isabel [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lanz, Titus; Mueller, Matthias F. [Rapid Biomedical GmbH, Rimpar (Germany); Metz, Stephan [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Munich (Germany); Kuschan, Marika [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Bundschuh, Ralph A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Bonn (Germany); Haase, Axel [IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative {sup 18} F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of optimization-based reconstruction with an image-total-variation constraint in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-08-01

    Interest remains in reconstruction-algorithm research and development for possible improvement of image quality in current PET imaging and for enabling innovative PET systems to enhance existing, and facilitate new, preclinical and clinical applications. Optimization-based image reconstruction has been demonstrated in recent years of potential utility for CT imaging applications. In this work, we investigate tailoring the optimization-based techniques to image reconstruction for PET systems with standard and non-standard scan configurations. Specifically, given an image-total-variation (TV) constraint, we investigated how the selection of different data divergences and associated parameters impacts the optimization-based reconstruction of PET images. The reconstruction robustness was explored also with respect to different data conditions and activity up-takes of practical relevance. A study was conducted particularly for image reconstruction from data collected by use of a PET configuration with sparsely populated detectors. Overall, the study demonstrates the robustness of the TV-constrained, optimization-based reconstruction for considerably different data conditions in PET imaging, as well as its potential to enable PET configurations with reduced numbers of detectors. Insights gained in the study may be exploited for developing algorithms for PET-image reconstruction and for enabling PET-configuration design of practical usefulness in preclinical and clinical applications.

  13. NEMA NU 4-2008 Comparison of Preclinical PET Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Bao, Qinan; Bergeron, Mélanie; Blankemeyer, Eric; Blinder, Stephan; Cañadas, Mario; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Dinelle, Katherine; Elhami, Esmat; Jans, Hans-Sonke; Lage, Eduardo; Lecomte, Roger; Sossi, Vesna; Surti, Suleman; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Vaquero, Juan José; Vicente, Esther; Williams, Darin A.; Laforest, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standard NU 4-2008 for performance measurements of small-animal tomographs was recently published. Before this standard, there were no standard testing procedures for preclinical PET systems, and manufacturers could not provide clear specifications similar to those available for clinical systems under NEMA NU 2-1994 and 2-2001. Consequently, performance evaluation papers used methods that were modified ad hoc from the clinical PET NEMA standard, thus making comparisons between systems difficult. Methods We acquired NEMA NU 4-2008 performance data for a collection of commercial animal PET systems manufactured since 2000: micro- PET P4, microPET R4, microPET Focus 120, microPET Focus 220, Inveon, ClearPET, Mosaic HP, Argus (formerly eXplore Vista), VrPET, LabPET 8, and LabPET 12. The data included spatial resolution, counting-rate performance, scatter fraction, sensitivity, and image quality and were acquired using settings for routine PET. Results The data showed a steady improvement in system performance for newer systems as compared with first-generation systems, with notable improvements in spatial resolution and sensitivity. Conclusion Variation in system design makes direct comparisons between systems from different vendors difficult. When considering the results from NEMA testing, one must also consider the suitability of the PET system for the specific imaging task at hand. PMID:22699999

  14. Establishment of an open database of realistic simulated data for evaluation of partial volume correction techniques in brain PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Ana [Instituto de Biofísica e Engenharia Biomédica, FC-UL, Lisboa (Portugal); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Cuplov, Vesna [Instituto de Biofísica e Engenharia Biomédica, FC-UL, Lisboa (Portugal); Schott, Jonathan; Hutton, Brian; Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Drobnjak, Ivana [Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Dickson, John [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Bert, Julien [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, CHRU de Brest, Brest (France); Burgos, Ninon; Cardoso, Jorge; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien [Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Erlandsson, Kjell [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-18

    The Partial Volume (PV) effect in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging leads to loss in quantification accuracy, which manifests in PV effects (small objects occupy partially the sensitive volume of the imaging instrument, resulting in blurred images). Simultaneous acquisition of PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) produces concurrent metabolic and anatomical information. The latter has proved to be very helpful for the correction of PV effects. Currently, there are several techniques used for PV correction. They can be applied directly during the reconstruction process or as a post-processing step after image reconstruction. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the different PV correction techniques in brain- PET, we are constructing a database of simulated data. Here we present the framework and steps involved in constructing this database. Static 18F-FDG epilepsy and 18F-Florbetapir amyloid dementia PET/MR were selected because of their very different characteristics. The methodology followed was based on four main steps: Image pre-processing, Ground Truth (GT) generation, MRI and PET data simulation and reconstruction. All steps used Open Source software and can therefore be repeated at any centre. The framework as well as the database will be freely accessible. Tools used included GIF, FSL, POSSUM, GATE and STIR. The final data obtained after simulation, involving raw or reconstructed PET data together with corresponding MRI datasets, were close to the original patient data. Besides, there is the advantage that data can be compared with the GT. We indicate several parameters that can be improved and optimized.

  15. Reproducibility of 18F-FDG and 3'-deoxy-3'-18F-fluorothymidine PET tumor volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Mathieu; Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine; Aboagye, Eric O; Kenny, Laura M; Rosso, Lula; Turkheimer, Federico E; Albarghach, Nidal M; Metges, Jean-Philippe; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the repeatability and reproducibility limits of several volume-related PET image-derived indices-namely tumor volume (TV), mean standardized uptake value, total glycolytic volume (TGV), and total proliferative volume (TPV)-relative to those of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)), commonly used in clinical practice. Fixed and adaptive thresholding, fuzzy C-means, and fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian methodology were considered for TV delineation. Double-baseline (18)F-FDG (17 lesions, 14 esophageal cancer patients) and 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) (12 lesions, 9 breast cancer patients) PET scans, acquired at a mean interval of 4 d and before any treatment, were used for reproducibility evaluation. The repeatability of each method was evaluated for the same datasets and compared with manual delineation. A negligible variability of less than 5% was measured for all segmentation approaches in comparison to manual delineation (5%-35%). SUV(max) reproducibility levels were similar to others previously reported, with a mean percentage difference of 1.8% +/- 16.7% and -0.9% +/- 14.9% for the (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT lesions, respectively. The best TV, TGV, and TPV reproducibility limits ranged from -21% to 31% and -30% to 37% for (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT images, respectively, whereas the worst reproducibility limits ranged from -90% to 73% and -68% to 52%, respectively. The reproducibility of estimating TV, mean standardized uptake value, and derived TGV and TPV was found to vary among segmentation algorithms. Some differences between (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT scans were observed, mainly because of differences in overall image quality. The smaller reproducibility limits for volume-derived image indices were similar to those for SUV(max), suggesting that the use of appropriate delineation tools should allow the determination of tumor functional volumes in PET images in a repeatable and reproducible fashion.

  16. A PET imaging system dedicated to mammography

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The imaging system Clear-PEM for positron emission mammography, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, is presented. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APD) and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger and data acquisition system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and negligible dead-time. The detector module performance was characterized in detail.

  17. Comparison between two super-resolution implementations in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoping; Pan, Tinsu; Qiao, Feng; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2009-04-01

    Super-resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POV). In this article, the authors propose a novel implementation of the SR technique whereby the required multiple low-resolution images are generated by shifting the reconstruction pixel grid during the image reconstruction process rather than being acquired from different POVs. The objective of this article is to compare the performances of the two SR implementations using theoretical and experimental studies. A mathematical framework is first provided to support the hypothesis that the two SR implementations have similar performance in current PET/CT scanners that use block detectors. Based on this framework, a simulation study, a point source study, and a NEMA/IEC phantom study were conducted to compare the performance of these two SR implementations with respect to contrast, resolution, noise, and SNR. For reference purposes, a comparison with a native reconstruction (NR) image using a high-resolution pixel grid was also performed. The mathematical framework showed that the two SR implementations are expected to achieve similar contrast and resolution but different noise contents. These results were confirmed by the simulation and experimental studies. The simulation study showed that the two SR implementations have an average contrast difference of 2.3%, while the point source study showed that their average differences in contrast and resolution were 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Comparisons between the SR and NR images for the point source study showed that the NR image exhibited averages of 30% and 8% lower contrast and resolution, respectively. The NEMA/IEC phantom study showed that the three images (two SR and NR) exhibited different noise structures. The SNR of the new SR implementation was, on average, 21.5% lower than the original implementation largely due to an

  18. Respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy planning of lower oesophageal carcinoma: feasibility and impact on planning target volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsbrook, Andrew; Ward, Gillian; Murray, Patrick; Goody, Rebecca; Marshall, Karen; McDermott, Garry; Prestwich, Robin; Radhakrishna, Ganesh

    2017-10-04

    To assess the feasibility and potential impact on target delineation of respiratory-gated (4D) contrast-enhanced (18)Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT), in the treatment planning position, for a prospective cohort of patients with lower third oesophageal cancer. Fifteen patients were recruited into the study. Imaging included 4D PET-CT, 3D PET-CT, endoscopic ultrasound and planning 4D CT. Target volume delineation was performed on 4D CT, 4D CT with co-registered 3D PET and 4D PET-CT. Planning target volumes (PTV) generated with 4D CT (PTV4DCT), 4D CT co-registered with 3D PET-CT (PTV3DPET4DCT) and 4D PET-CT (PTV4DPETCT) were compared with multiple positional metrics. Mean PTV4DCT, PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT were 582.4 ± 275.1 cm(3), 472.5 ± 193.1 cm(3) and 480.6 ± 236.9 cm(3) respectively (no significant difference). Median DICE similarity coefficients comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.85 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.85 (range 0.69-0.9) and 0.88 (range 0.79-0.9) respectively. The median sensitivity index for overlap comparing PTV4DCT with PTV3DPET4DCT, PTV4DCT with PTV4DPETCT and PTV3DPET4DCT with PTV4DPETCT were 0.78 (range 0.65-0.9), 0.79 (range 0.65-0.9) and 0.89 (range 0.68-0.94) respectively. Planning 4D PET-CT is feasible with careful patient selection. PTV generated using 4D CT, 3D PET-CT and 4D PET-CT were of similar volume, however, overlap analysis demonstrated that approximately 20% of PTV3DPETCT and PTV4DPETCT are not included in PTV4DCT, leading to under-coverage of target volume and a potential geometric miss. Additionally, differences between PTV3DPET4DCT and PTV4DPETCT suggest a potential benefit for 4D PET-CT. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier - NCT02285660 (Registered 21/10/2014).

  19. RGD-based PET tracers for imaging receptor integrin αv β3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hancheng; Conti, Peter S

    2013-05-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of receptor integrin αv β3 expression may play a key role in the early detection of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, monitoring disease progression, evaluating therapeutic response, and aiding anti-angiogenic drugs discovery and development. The last decade has seen the development of new PET tracers for in vivo imaging of integrin αv β3 expression along with advances in PET chemistry. In this review, we will focus on the radiochemistry development of PET tracers based on arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, present an overview of general strategies for preparing RGD-based PET tracers, and review the recent advances in preparations of (18) F-labeled, (64) Cu-labeled, and (68) Ga-labeled RGD tracers, RGD-based PET multivalent probes, and RGD-based PET multimodality probes for imaging receptor integrin αv β3 expression.

  20. Deep Learning MR Imaging-based Attenuation Correction for PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Jang, Hyungseok; Kijowski, Richard; Bradshaw, Tyler; McMillan, Alan B

    2017-09-19

    Purpose To develop and evaluate the feasibility of deep learning approaches for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based attenuation correction (AC) (termed deep MRAC) in brain positron emission tomography (PET)/MR imaging. Materials and Methods A PET/MR imaging AC pipeline was built by using a deep learning approach to generate pseudo computed tomographic (CT) scans from MR images. A deep convolutional auto-encoder network was trained to identify air, bone, and soft tissue in volumetric head MR images coregistered to CT data for training. A set of 30 retrospective three-dimensional T1-weighted head images was used to train the model, which was then evaluated in 10 patients by comparing the generated pseudo CT scan to an acquired CT scan. A prospective study was carried out for utilizing simultaneous PET/MR imaging for five subjects by using the proposed approach. Analysis of covariance and paired-sample t tests were used for statistical analysis to compare PET reconstruction error with deep MRAC and two existing MR imaging-based AC approaches with CT-based AC. Results Deep MRAC provides an accurate pseudo CT scan with a mean Dice coefficient of 0.971 ± 0.005 for air, 0.936 ± 0.011 for soft tissue, and 0.803 ± 0.021 for bone. Furthermore, deep MRAC provides good PET results, with average errors of less than 1% in most brain regions. Significantly lower PET reconstruction errors were realized with deep MRAC (-0.7% ± 1.1) compared with Dixon-based soft-tissue and air segmentation (-5.8% ± 3.1) and anatomic CT-based template registration (-4.8% ± 2.2). Conclusion The authors developed an automated approach that allows generation of discrete-valued pseudo CT scans (soft tissue, bone, and air) from a single high-spatial-resolution diagnostic-quality three-dimensional MR image and evaluated it in brain PET/MR imaging. This deep learning approach for MR imaging-based AC provided reduced PET reconstruction error relative to a CT-based standard within the brain compared

  1. Simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG imaging for the investigation of resting state networks in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Mauler, Joerg; Arrubla, Jorge; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Scheins, Jurgen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and its relationship to neuronal activity are poorly understood. The human brain uses 80% of its energy for ongoing neural activity that occurs in isolation from any particular stimulus. A promising tool for the investigation of glucose metabolism and its relationship to neuronal activity is simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG data imaging. We here demonstrate the first in vivo human trimodal data at 3T. In one session MR, FDG-PET and EEG data were recorded simultaneously at a 3T hybrid MR-BrainPET scanner (Siemens, Germany) equipped with a 32 channel MR-compatible EEG system (Brain Products, Germany) in 11 healthy volunteers (11 males, mean age: 25.2 years SD: 1.2). MR and EEG data acquisition MP-RAGE (TR = 2250 ms, TE= 3.03 ms, 176 sagittal slices. 1 mm, GRAPPA factor 2. MR-based attenuation correction of PET data via UTE: flip angle=15. Two different echo times TE1=0.07 and TE2=2.46 ms, TR=200 ms. EPI sequence (TR: 2.2 s, TE: 30 ms, FOV: 200 mm, 165 volumes, The subjects were requested to close their eyes and relax EEG data were recorded using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. App. 200 MBq/μmol FDG were injected, data were acquired in list mode and iteratively reconstructed with all necessary corrections into 153 slices with 256 x 256 voxels sized 1.25 mm{sup 3}. The trimodal approach, recording PET data, MR data and EEG data simultaneously was successful. The high neuronal activity of the structures within the default mode network occurs on the basis of a high glucose consumption rate within the default node network. The activity of the default mode is not tied to a special EEG frequency band.

  2. MRI and PET Image Fusion Using Fuzzy Logic and Image Local Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Javed

    2014-01-01

    to maximally combine useful information present in MRI and PET images. Image local features are extracted and combined with fuzzy logic to compute weights for each pixel. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme produces significantly better results compared to state-of-art schemes.

  3. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    was then calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured in the left ventricular outflow tract by cardiovascular magnetic resonance using phase-contrast velocity mapping within two weeks of PET imaging. Results...... TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner after bolus injection of 399±27 MBq of 11C-acetate. The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was derived by automatic extrapolation of the down-slope of the TAC. FSV...... = 0.001). Conclusions: FSV can be obtained automatically and reliably using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT and cluster analysis, although a small overestimation is observed when compared to FSV determined from MRI. This method could potentially be generalized to other tracers, although this requires...

  4. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagust, W.J. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Imaging results and TOF studies with axial PET detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator setup which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the held of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The Fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations ( <2 mm FWHM in all three coordinates over the complete held of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-cr...

  6. [18F]fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT imaging for radiation treatment planning of recurrent and primary prostate cancer with dose escalation to PET/CT-positive lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahl Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present there is no consensus on irradiation treatment volumes for intermediate to high-risk primary cancers or recurrent disease. Conventional imaging modalities, such as CT, MRI and transrectal ultrasound, are considered suboptimal for treatment decisions. Choline-PET/CT might be considered as the imaging modality in radiooncology to select and delineate clinical target volumes extending the prostate gland or prostate fossa. In conjunction with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and imaged guided radiotherapy (IGRT, it might offer the opportunity of dose escalation to selected sites while avoiding unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissues. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary (n = 7 or recurrent (n = 19 prostate cancer received Choline-PET/CT planned 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy. The median age of the patients was 65 yrs (range 45 to 78 yrs. PET/CT-scans with F18-fluoroethylcholine (FEC were performed on a combined PET/CT-scanner equipped for radiation therapy planning. The majority of patients had intermediate to high risk prostate cancer. All patients received 3D conformal or intensity modulated and imaged guided radiotherapy with megavoltage cone beam CT. The median dose to primary tumours was 75.6 Gy and to FEC-positive recurrent lymph nodal sites 66,6 Gy. The median follow-up time was 28.8 months. Results The mean SUVmax in primary cancer was 5,97 in the prostate gland and 3,2 in pelvic lymph nodes. Patients with recurrent cancer had a mean SUVmax of 4,38. Two patients had negative PET/CT scans. At 28 months the overall survival rate is 94%. Biochemical relapse free survival is 83% for primary cancer and 49% for recurrent tumours. Distant disease free survival is 100% and 75% for primary and recurrent cancer, respectively. Acute normal tissue toxicity was mild in 85% and moderate (grade 2 in 15%. No or mild late side effects were observed in the majority of patients (84%. One patient had

  7. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumhagen, Jan O., E-mail: janole.blumhagen@siemens.com; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias [Magnetic Resonance, Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Faul, David [Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, New York 10015 (United States); Scheffler, Klaus [MRC Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen 72076, Germany and Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  8. Image-derived input function obtained in a 3TMR-brainPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, N.A. da [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Lisbon (Portugal); Institute of Neurosciences and Medicine - 4, Juelich (Germany); Herzog, H., E-mail: h.herzog@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Neurosciences and Medicine - 4, Juelich (Germany); Weirich, C.; Tellmann, L.; Rota Kops, E. [Institute of Neurosciences and Medicine - 4, Juelich (Germany); Hautzel, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine (KME), University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty at Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Almeida, P. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Lisbon (Portugal)

    2013-02-21

    Aim: The combination of a high-resolution MR-compatible BrainPET insert operated within a 3 T MAGNETOM Trio MR scanner is an excellent tool for obtaining an image derived input function (IDIF), due to simultaneous imaging. In this work, we explore the possibility of obtaining an IDIF from volumes of interest (VOI) defined over the carotid arteries (CAs) using the MR data. Material and methods: FDG data from three patients without brain disorders were included. VOIs were drawn bilaterally over the CAs on a MPRAGE image using a 50% isocontour (MR50VOI). CA PET/MR co-registration was examined based on an individual and combined CA co-registration. After that, to estimate the IDIF, the MR50VOI average (IDIF-A), four hottest pixels per plane (IDIF-4H) and four hottest pixels in VOI (IDIF-4V) were considered. A model-based correction for residual partial volume effects involving venous blood samples was applied, from which partial volume (PV) and spillover (SP) coefficients were estimated. Additionally, a theoretical PV coefficient (PVt) was calculated based on MR50VOI. Results: The results show an excellent co-registration between the MR and PET, with an area under the curve ratio between both co-registration methods of 1.00±0.04. A good agreement between PV and PVt was found for IDIF-A, with PV of 0.39±0.06 and PVt 0.40±0.03, and for IDIF-4H, with PV of 0.47±0.05 and PVt 0.47±0.03. The SPs were 0.20±0.03 and 0.21±0.03 for IDIF-A and IDIF-4H, respectively. Conclusion: The integration of a high resolution BrainPET in an MR scanner allows to obtain an IDIF from an MR-based VOI. This must be corrected for a residual partial volume effect.

  9. Clinical investigations on the use of positron emission tomography (PET) for target volume definition in radiation therapy planning; Klinische Untersuchungen zum Einsatz der Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (PET) in der Zielvolumendefinition bei der Bestrahlungsplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Ingo G.

    2014-12-05

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) for target volume definition in different tumor entities using different tracers and taking pretreatment of patients into account. The study collective comprised 109 patients with 112 target volumes. In 48 patients with skull base meningiomas (SBM) and 42 patients with meningiomas of other localizations (SOM) undergoing fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy the gross tumor volumes (SBM, n=48; SOM, n=39) based on magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography (MRI/CT) and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET were compared retrospectively. Additionally, in 19 patients with liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (LM-CRC) treated in 25 CT guided brachytherapy sessions the clinical target volumes (CTV) either based on MRI/CT or {sup 18}F-FDG-PET were compared retrospectively. The spatial agreement of the target volumes was analyzed using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The association of DSC, tumor entity and pretreatment was analyzed using the general linear model (GLM). Metric parameters are given as median (25th/75th-quartile). In the complete patient sample the PET based target volume was 24.1 (10.8/51.2) ml and, thus, significantly (p<0.001) increased by 18.9% (-3.6%/62.7%) compared to the MRI/CT based target volume of 20.8 (8.6/45.0) ml. In the subgroup of LM-CRC, the PET based target volume was significantly increased by 24.4% (0%/ 71.4%; p=0.021), and in patients with SBM it was increased by 23.9%(-1.7%/65.7%; p=0.003) whereas in SOM the difference of 8.0% (-3.6%/51.7%; p=0.199) was not significant. The DSC for PET and MRI/CT based target volumes was 0.66 (0.46/0.76) in the whole study group and varied between 0.65 (0.46/0.71) in patients with SBM and 0.70 (0.40/0.79) in patients with SOM. In pre-treated patients with LM-CRC a significant lower DSC of 0.62 (0.41/0.66) was observed in comparison to 0.84 (0.70/0.96) in untreated patients (significant interaction

  10. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  11. Comparison of Imaging Characteristics of 124I PET for Determination of Optimal Energy Window on the Siemens Inveon PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ram Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.124I has a half-life of 4.2 days, which makes it suitable for imaging over several days over its uptake and washout phases. However, it has a low positron branching ratio (23%, because of prompt gamma coincidence due to high-energy γ-photons (602 to 1,691 keV, which are emitted in cascade with positrons. Methods. In this study, we investigated the optimal PET energy window for 124I PET based on image characteristics of reconstructed PET. Image characteristics such as nonuniformities, recovery coefficients (RCs, and the spillover ratios (SORs of 124I were measured as described in NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results. The maximum and minimum prompt gamma coincidence fraction (PGF were 33% and 2% in 350~800 and 400~590 keV, respectively. The difference between best and worst uniformity in the various energy windows was less than 1%. The lowest SORs of 124I were obtained at 350~750 keV in nonradioactive water compartment. Conclusion. Optimal energy window should be determined based on image characteristics. Our developed correction method would be useful for the correction of high-energy prompt gamma photon in 124I PET. In terms of the image quality of 124I PET, our findings indicate that an energy window of 350~750 keV would be optimal.

  12. Quantitation of regional cerebral blood flow corrected for partial volume effect using O-15 water and PET: I. Theory, error analysis, and stereologic comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lida, H; Law, I; Pakkenberg, B

    2000-01-01

    formulated four mathematical models that describe the dynamic behavior of a freely diffusible tracer (H215O) in a region of interest (ROI) incorporating estimates of regional tissue flow that are independent of PVE. The current study was intended to evaluate the feasibility of these models and to establish...... a methodology to accurately quantify regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) corrected for PVE in cortical gray matter regions. Five monkeys were studied with PET after IV H2(15)O two times (n = 3) or three times (n = 2) in a row. Two ROIs were drawn on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and projected...... onto the PET images in which regional CBF values and the water perfusable tissue fraction for the cortical gray matter tissue (hence the volume of gray matter) were estimated. After the PET study, the animals were killed and stereologic analysis was performed to assess the gray matter mass...

  13. Noise and physical limits to maximum resolution of PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vicente, E.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital GU ' Gregorio Maranon' , E-28007 Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2007-10-01

    In this work we show that there is a limit for the maximum resolution achievable with a high resolution PET scanner, as well as for the best signal-to-noise ratio, which are ultimately related to the physical effects involved in the emission and detection of the radiation and thus they cannot be overcome with any particular reconstruction method. These effects prevent the spatial high frequency components of the imaged structures to be recorded by the scanner. Therefore, the information encoded in these high frequencies cannot be recovered by any reconstruction technique. Within this framework, we have determined the maximum resolution achievable for a given acquisition as a function of data statistics and scanner parameters, like the size of the crystals or the inter-crystal scatter. In particular, the noise level in the data as a limitation factor to yield high-resolution images in tomographs with small crystal sizes is outlined. These results have implications regarding how to decide the optimal number of voxels of the reconstructed image or how to design better PET scanners.

  14. Segmentation of dynamic PET images with kinetic spectral clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouysset, S.; Zbib, H.; Stute, S.; Girault, J. M.; Charara, J.; Noailles, J.; Chalon, S.; Buvat, I.; Tauber, C.

    2013-10-01

    Segmentation is often required for the analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. However, noise and low spatial resolution make it a difficult task and several supervised and unsupervised methods have been proposed in the literature to perform the segmentation based on semi-automatic clustering of the time activity curves of voxels. In this paper we propose a new method based on spectral clustering that does not require any prior information on the shape of clusters in the space in which they are identified. In our approach, the p-dimensional data, where p is the number of time frames, is first mapped into a high dimensional space and then clustering is performed in a low-dimensional space of the Laplacian matrix. An estimation of the bounds for the scale parameter involved in the spectral clustering is derived. The method is assessed using dynamic brain PET images simulated with GATE and results on real images are presented. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over three other clustering methods from the literature. The proposed approach appears as a promising pre-processing tool before parametric map calculation or ROI-based quantification tasks.

  15. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [{sup 18}F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI: feasibility, agreement and initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Hansen, Adam E.; Law, Ian [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Vibeke A. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans S. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, Henrik B.W. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Functional Imaging Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2016-01-15

    Both [{sup 18}F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET and blood volume (BV) MRI supplement routine T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI in gliomas, but whether the two modalities provide identical or complementary information is unresolved. The aims of the study were to investigate the feasibility of simultaneous structural MRI, BV MRI and FET PET of gliomas using an integrated PET/MRI scanner and to assess the spatial and quantitative agreement in tumour imaging between BV MRI and FET PET. A total of 32 glioma patients underwent a 20-min static simultaneous PET/MRI acquisition on a Siemens mMR system 20 min after injection of 200 MBq FET. The MRI protocol included standard structural MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging for BV measurements. Maximal relative tumour FET uptake (TBR{sub max}) and BV (rBV{sub max}), and Dice coefficients were calculated to assess the quantitative and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes determined by FET PET, BV MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI. FET volume and TBR{sub max} were higher in BV-positive than in BV-negative scans, and both VOL{sub BV} and rBV{sub max} were higher in FET-positive than in FET-negative scans. TBR{sub max} and rBV{sub max} were positively correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). FET and BV positivity were in agreement in only 26 of the 32 patients and in 42 of 63 lesions, and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes as assessed by the Dice coefficients was generally poor with median Dice coefficients exceeding 0.1 in less than half the patients positive on at least one modality for any pair of modalities. In 56 % of the patients susceptibility artefacts in DSC BV maps overlapped the tumour on MRI. The study demonstrated that although tumour volumes determined by BV MRI and FET PET were quantitatively correlated, their spatial congruence in a mixed population of treated glioma patients was generally poor, and the modalities did not provide the same information in this population of patients. Combined

  16. Pediatric oncologic imaging. A key application of combined PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatidis, Sergios; La Fougere, C.; Schaefer, J.F. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2016-04-15

    Pediatric imaging has been identified as a key application of combined whole-body PET/MRI. First studies have revealed the clinical feasibility and possible advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT and MRI. Besides a significant reduction in radiation exposure of about 50 - 75 %, combined whole-body PET/MRI offers the diagnostic advantage of the multiparametric characterization of pathophysiologic processes and helps reduce the number of necessary imaging studies. However, very few studies focusing on pediatric PET/MRI have been published to date. Additional studies are necessary in order to fully appreciate the clinical impact of this novel method. This review article shall summarize the existing literature concerning pediatric PET/MRI and give insight into the practical experience derived from over 160 pediatric PET/MRI examinations that were performed in Tuebingen.

  17. PET imaging of neurogenic activity in the adult brain: Toward in vivo imaging of human neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yasuhisa; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    Neural stem cells are present in 2 neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), and continue to generate new neurons throughout life. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to a variety of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, and to the therapeutic effects of antidepressants, as well as learning and memory. In vivo imaging for hippocampal neurogenic activity may be used to diagnose psychiatric disorders and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants. However, these imaging techniques remain to be established until now. Recently, we established a quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique for neurogenic activity in the adult brain with 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluoro-L-thymidine ([(18)F]FLT) and probenecid, a drug transporter inhibitor in blood-brain barrier. Moreover, we showed that this PET imaging technique can monitor alterations in neurogenic activity in the hippocampus of adult rats with depression and following treatment with an antidepressant. This PET imaging method may assist in diagnosing depression and in monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants. In this commentary, we discuss the possibility of in vivo PET imaging for neurogenic activity in adult non-human primates and humans.

  18. Is metal artefact reduction mandatory in cardiac PET/CT imaging in the presence of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, Pardis [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamiri, S.M.R. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad R. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schindler, Thomas H. [Geneva University, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Ratib, Osman [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac PET/CT imaging is often performed in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads. However, metallic implants usually produce artefacts on CT images which might propagate to CT-based attenuation-corrected (CTAC) PET images. The impact of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for CTAC of cardiac PET/CT images in the presence of pacemaker, ICD and ECG leads was investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in phantom and clinical studies. The study included 14 patients with various leads undergoing perfusion and viability examinations using dedicated cardiac PET/CT protocols. The PET data were corrected for attenuation using both artefactual CT images and CT images corrected using the MAR algorithm. The severity and magnitude of metallic artefacts arising from these leads were assessed on both linear attenuation coefficient maps ({mu}-maps) and attenuation-corrected PET images. CT and PET emission data were obtained using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and a dedicated heart phantom made in-house incorporating pacemaker and ICD leads attached at the right ventricle of the heart. Volume of interest-based analysis and regression plots were performed for regions related to the lead locations. Bull's eye view analysis was also performed on PET images corrected for attenuation with and without the MAR algorithm. In clinical studies, the visual assessment of PET images by experienced physicians and quantitative analysis did not reveal erroneous interpretation of the tracer distribution or significant differences when PET images were corrected for attenuation with and without MAR. In phantom studies, the mean differences between tracer uptake obtained without and with MAR were 10.16{+-}2.1% and 6.86{+-}2.1% in the segments of the heart in the vicinity of metallic ICD or pacemaker leads, and were 4.43{+-}0.5% and 2.98{+-}0.5% in segments far from the leads. Although the MAR algorithm was able to effectively improve

  19. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boellaard, Ronald; O'Doherty, Mike J; Weber, Wolfgang A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography......-computed tomography (PET/CT) and is provided to help the physician and physicist to assist to carrying out,interpret, and document quantitative FDG PET/CT examinations,but will concentrate on the optimisation of diagnostic quality and quantitative information....

  20. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-09-09

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  1. PET imaging reveals brain functional changes in internet gaming disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Mei; Zhang, Ying; Du, Fenglei; Hou, Haifeng; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong [The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Chen, Qiaozhen [The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-07-15

    Internet gaming disorder is an increasing problem worldwide, resulting in critical academic, social, and occupational impairment. However, the neurobiological mechanism of internet gaming disorder remains unknown. The aim of this study is to assess brain dopamine D{sub 2} (D{sub 2})/Serotonin 2A (5-HT{sub 2A}) receptor function and glucose metabolism in the same subjects by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging approach, and investigate whether the correlation exists between D{sub 2} receptor and glucose metabolism. Twelve drug-naive adult males who met criteria for internet gaming disorder and 14 matched controls were studied with PET and {sup 11}C-N-methylspiperone ({sup 11}C-NMSP) to assess the availability of D{sub 2}/5-HT{sub 2A} receptors and with {sup 18}F-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) to assess regional brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain function. {sup 11}C-NMSP and {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging data were acquired in the same individuals under both resting and internet gaming task states. In internet gaming disorder subjects, a significant decrease in glucose metabolism was observed in the prefrontal, temporal, and limbic systems. Dysregulation of D{sub 2} receptors was observed in the striatum, and was correlated to years of overuse. A low level of D{sub 2} receptors in the striatum was significantly associated with decreased glucose metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex. For the first time, we report the evidence that D{sub 2} receptor level is significantly associated with glucose metabolism in the same individuals with internet gaming disorder, which indicates that D{sub 2}/5-HT{sub 2A} receptor-mediated dysregulation of the orbitofrontal cortex could underlie a mechanism for loss of control and compulsive behavior in internet gaming disorder subjects. (orig.)

  2. A comparison of PET imaging characteristics of various copper radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Heather Ann [North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Instrumentation and Analytical Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Robinson, Simon; Julyan, Peter; Hastings, David [North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Zweit, Jamal [University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Instrumentation and Analytical Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    PET radiotracers which incorporate longer-lived radionuclides enable biological processes to be studied over many hours, at centres remote from a cyclotron. This paper examines the radioisotope characteristics, imaging performance, radiation dosimetry and production modes of the four copper radioisotopes, {sup 60}Cu,{sup 61}Cu,{sup 62}Cu and{sup 64}Cu, to assess their merits for different PET imaging applications. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and noise-equivalent count rate (NEC) are predicted for{sup 60}Cu,{sup 61}Cu,{sup 62}Cu and{sup 64}Cu using a model incorporating radionuclide decay properties and scanner parameters for the GE Advance scanner. Dosimetry for{sup 60}Cu,{sup 61}Cu and{sup 64}Cu is performed using the MIRD model and published biodistribution data for copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N{sup 4}-methyl)thiosemicarbazone (Cu-PTSM). {sup 60}Cu and{sup 62}Cu are characterised by shorter half-lives and higher sensitivity and NEC, making them more suitable for studying the faster kinetics of small molecules, such as Cu-PTSM.{sup 61}Cu and{sup 64}Cu have longer half-lives, enabling studies of the slower kinetics of cells and peptides and prolonged imaging to compensate for lower sensitivity, together with better spatial resolution, which partially compensates for loss of image contrast.{sup 61}Cu-PTSM and{sup 64}Cu-PTSM are associated with radiation doses similar to [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose, whilst the doses for{sup 60}Cu-PTSM and{sup 62}Cu-PTSM are lower and more comparable with H{sub 2}{sup 15}O. The physical and radiochemical characteristics of the four copper isotopes make each more suited to some imaging tasks than others. The results presented here assist in selecting the preferred radioisotope for a given imaging application, and illustrate a strategy which can be extended to the majority of novel PET tracers. (orig.)

  3. PET imaging predicts future body weight and cocaine preference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides M.; Wang G.; Michaelides M.; Thanos P.K. Kim R.; Cho J.; Ananth M.; Wang G.-J.; Volkow N.D.

    2011-08-28

    Deficits in dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) binding availability using PET imaging have been reported in obese humans and rodents. Similar deficits have been reported in cocaine-addicts and cocaine-exposed primates. We found that D2R/D3R binding availability negatively correlated with measures of body weight at the time of scan (ventral striatum), at 1 (ventral striatum) and 2 months (dorsal and ventral striatum) post scan in rats. Cocaine preference was negatively correlated with D2R/D3R binding availability 2 months (ventral striatum) post scan. Our findings suggest that inherent deficits in striatal D2R/D3R signaling are related to obesity and drug addiction susceptibility and that ventral and dorsal striatum serve dissociable roles in maintaining weight gain and cocaine preference. Measuring D2R/D3R binding availability provides a way for assessing susceptibility to weight gain and cocaine abuse in rodents and given the translational nature of PET imaging, potentially primates and humans.

  4. PET imaging with the non-pure positron emitters: 55Co, 86Y and 124I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braad, Poul-Erik; Hansen, S B; Thisgaard, H;

    2015-01-01

    PET/CT with non-pure positron emitters is a highly valuable tool in immuno-PET and for pretherapeutic dosimetry. However, imaging is complicated by prompt gamma coincidences (PGCs) that add an undesired background activity to the images. Time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction improves lesion detecta...

  5. FDG PET/CT : EANM procedure guidelines for tumour imaging: version 2.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Giammarile, Francesco; Tatsch, Klaus; Eschner, Wolfgang; Verzijlbergen, Fred J.; Barrington, Sally F.; Pike, Lucy C.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Stroobants, Sigrid; Delbeke, Dominique; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Holbrook, Scott; Graham, Michael M.; Testanera, Giorgio; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Zijlstra, Josee; Visser, Eric; Hoekstra, Corneline J.; Pruim, Jan; Willemsen, Antoon; Arends, Bertjan; Kotzerke, Joerg; Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Chiti, Arturo; Krause, Bernd J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist physicians in recommending, performing, interpreting and reporting the results of FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging of adult patients. PET is a quantitative imaging technique and therefore requires a common quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA) pro

  6. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aide, N.; Visser, E.P.; Lheureux, S.; Heutte, N.; Szanda, I.; Hicks, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has

  7. Effects of image noise, respiratory motion, and motion compensation on 3D activity quantification in count-limited PET images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman, W.; Mawlawi, O. R.; Mikell, J. K.; Mourtada, F.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of noise, motion blur, and motion compensation using quiescent-period gating (QPG) on the activity concentration (AC) distribution—quantified using the cumulative AC volume histogram (ACVH)—in count-limited studies such as 90Y-PET/CT. An International Electrotechnical Commission phantom filled with low 18F activity was used to simulate clinical 90Y-PET images. PET data were acquired using a GE-D690 when the phantom was static and subject to 1-4 cm periodic 1D motion. The static data were down-sampled into shorter durations to determine the effect of noise on ACVH. Motion-degraded PET data were sorted into multiple gates to assess the effect of motion and QPG on ACVH. Errors in ACVH at AC90 (minimum AC that covers 90% of the volume of interest (VOI)), AC80, and ACmean (average AC in the VOI) were characterized as a function of noise and amplitude before and after QPG. Scan-time reduction increased the apparent non-uniformity of sphere doses and the dispersion of ACVH. These effects were more pronounced in smaller spheres. Noise-related errors in ACVH at AC20 to AC70 were smaller (15%). The accuracy of ACmean was largely independent of the total count. Motion decreased the observed AC and skewed the ACVH toward lower values; the severity of this effect depended on motion amplitude and tumor diameter. The errors in AC20 to AC80 for the 17 mm sphere were  -25% and  -55% for motion amplitudes of 2 cm and 4 cm, respectively. With QPG, the errors in AC20 to AC80 of the 17 mm sphere were reduced to  -15% for motion amplitudes  0.5, QPG was effective at reducing errors in ACVH despite increases in image non-uniformity due to increased noise. ACVH is believed to be more relevant than mean or maximum AC to calculate tumor control and normal tissue complication probability. However, caution needs to be exercised when using ACVH in post-therapy 90Y imaging because of its susceptibility to image

  8. PET and PET/CT imaging for the earliest detection and treatment of colorectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Kevin [Michigan State Univ., Pontiac, MI (United States). POH Medical Center; Kotlyarov, Eduard [Michigan State Univ., Pontiac, MI (United States). POH Medical Center; Georgetown Univ. (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Approximately 150,000 new cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed each year with the life time risk of developing colon caner in developed nations being 4.6% in men and 3.2% in women. Screening patients is essential early detection of colon carcinoma to aid in complete resection. Unfortunately current screening methods carry with them poor patient compliance. PET and PET/CT may be a significant part of this screening solution. The authors reviewed and analyzed the English language articles and case reports identified on Medline during the last 10 years. PET and PET/CT results for colorectal carcinoma were tabulated and presented for the fifth Scientific Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Though most studies have been retrospective analysis in using PET for staging for other malignant processes the cases that have identified additional uptake in the colon are important. The accuracy when utilizing PET and PET/CT in this screening method has a sensitivity between 65 and 90% with a specificity of 84 to 90% and a positive predictive value 71 to 78%. Early stages of malignancies and pre-cancerous polyps avidly accumulates F-18 Deoxyfluoro glucose allowing us to conclude that whole body PET and PET/CT is an essential component in the work up, staging or treatment monitoring in colon carcinoma. We have to continue to accumulate data for possible introduction for whole body PET and PET/CT scanning for colon carcinoma and precancerous polyps.(author)

  9. Correlation of {sup 18}F-FDG Avid Volumes on Pre–Radiation Therapy and Post–Radiation Therapy FDG PET Scans in Recurrent Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusharina, Nadya, E-mail: nshusharina@partners.org; Cho, Joseph; Sharp, Gregory C.; Choi, Noah C.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the spatial correlation between high uptake regions of 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) before and after therapy in recurrent lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 106 patients with inoperable lung cancer into a prospective study whose primary objectives were to determine first, the earliest time point when the maximum decrease in FDG uptake representing the maximum metabolic response (MMR) is attainable and second, the optimum cutoff value of MMR based on its predicted tumor control probability, sensitivity, and specificity. Of those patients, 61 completed the required 4 serial {sup 18}F-FDG PET examinations after therapy. Nineteen of 61 patients experienced local recurrence at the primary tumor and underwent analysis. The volumes of interest (VOI) on pretherapy FDG-PET were defined by use of an isocontour at ≥50% of maximum standard uptake value (SUV{sub max}) (≥50% of SUV{sub max}) with correction for heterogeneity. The VOI on posttherapy images were defined at ≥80% of SUV{sub max}. The VOI of pretherapy and posttherapy {sup 18}F-FDG PET images were correlated for the extent of overlap. Results: The size of VOI at pretherapy images was on average 25.7% (range, 8.8%-56.3%) of the pretherapy primary gross tumor volume (GTV), and their overlap fractions were 0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.7-0.9), 0.63 (95% CI: 0.49-0.77), and 0.38 (95% CI: 0.19-0.57) of VOI of posttherapy FDG PET images at 10 days, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The residual uptake originated from the pretherapy VOI in 15 of 17 cases. Conclusions: VOI defined by the SUV{sub max}-≥50% isocontour may be a biological target volume for escalated radiation dose.

  10. Fully-3D PET image reconstruction using scanner-independent, adaptive projection data and highly rotation-symmetric voxel assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheins, J J; Herzog, H; Shah, N J

    2011-03-01

    For iterative, fully 3D positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction intrinsic symmetries can be used to significantly reduce the size of the system matrix. The precalculation and beneficial memory-resident storage of all nonzero system matrix elements is possible where sufficient compression exists. Thus, reconstruction times can be minimized independently of the used projector and more elaborate weighting schemes, e.g., volume-of-intersection (VOI), are applicable. A novel organization of scanner-independent, adaptive 3D projection data is presented which can be advantageously combined with highly rotation-symmetric voxel assemblies. In this way, significant system matrix compression is achieved. Applications taking into account all physical lines-of-response (LORs) with individual VOI projectors are presented for the Siemens ECAT HR+ whole-body scanner and the Siemens BrainPET, the PET component of a novel hybrid-MR/PET imaging system. Measured and simulated data were reconstructed using the new method with ordered-subset-expectation-maximization (OSEM). Results are compared to those obtained by the sinogram-based OSEM reconstruction provided by the manufacturer. The higher computational effort due to the more accurate image space sampling provides significantly improved images in terms of resolution and noise.

  11. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, R.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Weber, W.A.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Stroobants, S.G.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kotzerke, J.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Pruim, J.; Marsden, P.K.; Tatsch, K.; Hoekstra, C.J.; Visser, E.P.; Arends, B.; Verzijlbergen, F.J.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Comans, E.F.I.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Paans, A.M.; Willemsen, A.T.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Delbeke, D.; Baum, R.P.; Chiti, A.; Krause, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed

  12. Technical Considerations on Scanning and Image Analysis for Amyloid PET in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Go; Ohnishi, Akihito; Aita, Kazuki; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Yasuji; Senda, Michio

    Brain imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), can provide essential and objective information for the early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Amyloid PET is especially useful to evaluate the amyloid-β pathological process as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews critical points about technical considerations on the scanning and image analysis methods for amyloid PET. Each amyloid PET agent has its own proper administration instructions and recommended uptake time, scan duration, and the method of image display and interpretation. In addition, we have introduced general scanning information, including subject positioning, reconstruction parameters, and quantitative and statistical image analysis. We believe that this article could make amyloid PET a more reliable tool in clinical study and practice.

  13. Polyglucose nanoparticles with renal elimination and macrophage avidity facilitate PET imaging in ischaemic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tricot, Benoit; Senders, Max L.; Groenen, Hannah; Fay, Francois; Perez-Medina, Carlos; Calcagno, Claudia; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Reiner, Thomas; Sun, Yuan; Courties, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Wang, Cuihua; Chen, John W.; Swirski, Filip K.; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Hooker, Jacob; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Tissue macrophage numbers vary during health versus disease. Abundant inflammatory macrophages destruct tissues, leading to atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Emerging therapeutic options create interest in monitoring macrophages in patients. Here we describe positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-Macroflor, a modified polyglucose nanoparticle with high avidity for macrophages. Due to its small size, Macroflor is excreted renally, a prerequisite for imaging with the isotope flourine-18. The particle's short blood half-life, measured in three species, including a primate, enables macrophage imaging in inflamed cardiovascular tissues. Macroflor enriches in cardiac and plaque macrophages, thereby increasing PET signal in murine infarcts and both mouse and rabbit atherosclerotic plaques. In PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments, Macroflor PET imaging detects changes in macrophage population size while molecular MRI reports on increasing or resolving inflammation. These data suggest that Macroflor PET/MRI could be a clinical tool to non-invasively monitor macrophage biology. PMID:28091604

  14. Non rigid respiratory motion correction in whole body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Schmidt, Holger [Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Wuerslin, Christian [University Hospital of Tübingen (Germany); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2014-07-29

    Respiratory motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies include the use of respiratory synchronized gated frames which lead to low signal to noise ratio (SNR) given that each frame contains only part of the count available throughout an average PET acquisition. In this work, 4D MRI extracted elastic transformations were applied to list-mode data either inside the image reconstruction or to the reconstructed respiratory synchronized images to obtain respiration corrected PET images.

  15. 小动物PET及PET-CT及其在分子影像学中的应用%Small animal PET and PET-CT its application in molecular imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天然; 田嘉禾

    2008-01-01

    The review article introduce molecular imaging equipment small animal PET and PET-CT's philosophy and technique feature.small animal PET and PET-CT apply many new techniques and images resolution has obviously raising.as same time,small animal PET and small animal CT may come true image fusion.small animal PET and PET-CT permit us to engage molecular level imaging in vivo without invading.so small animal PET and PET-CT are good tool in medical molecular imaging.%阐述小动物PET及PET-CT技术特点及在分子影像学中的应用.小动物PET及PET-CT采用多项新技术,分辨率明显提高,结合小动物CT实现了图像融合.小动物PET及PET-CT实现了在活体上非侵人性分子水平显像,是研究分子影像的尖端设备.

  16. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight head-and-

  17. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight

  18. 3D Surface Realignment Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Phantom Study with PET Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2013-01-01

    We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The system is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET brain scanner. The struct......We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The system is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET brain scanner...

  19. Evaluation of the combined effects of target size, respiratory motion and background activity on 3D and 4D PET/CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-June; Ionascu, Dan; Killoran, Joseph; Chin, Lee; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mamede, Marcelo; Gerbaudo, Victor H [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: spark@lroc.harvard.edu

    2008-07-07

    Gated (4D) PET/CT has the potential to greatly improve the accuracy of radiotherapy at treatment sites where internal organ motion is significant. However, the best methodology for applying 4D-PET/CT to target definition is not currently well established. With the goal of better understanding how to best apply 4D information to radiotherapy, initial studies were performed to investigate the effect of target size, respiratory motion and target-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) on 3D (ungated) and 4D PET images. Using a PET/CT scanner with 4D or gating capability, a full 3D-PET scan corrected with a 3D attenuation map from 3D-CT scan and a respiratory gated (4D) PET scan corrected with corresponding attenuation maps from 4D-CT were performed by imaging spherical targets (0.5-26.5 mL) filled with {sup 18}F-FDG in a dynamic thorax phantom and NEMA IEC body phantom at different TBRs (infinite, 8 and 4). To simulate respiratory motion, the phantoms were driven sinusoidally in the superior-inferior direction with amplitudes of 0, 1 and 2 cm and a period of 4.5 s. Recovery coefficients were determined on PET images. In addition, gating methods using different numbers of gating bins (1-20 bins) were evaluated with image noise and temporal resolution. For evaluation, volume recovery coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated as a function of the number of gating bins. Moreover, the optimum thresholds which give accurate moving target volumes were obtained for 3D and 4D images. The partial volume effect and signal loss in the 3D-PET images due to the limited PET resolution and the respiratory motion, respectively were measured. The results show that signal loss depends on both the amplitude and pattern of respiratory motion. However, the 4D-PET successfully recovers most of the loss induced by the respiratory motion. The 5-bin gating method gives the best temporal resolution with acceptable image noise. The results based on

  20. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-21

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq (18)F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  1. Characterization of PET/CT images using texture analysis: the past, the present... any future?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [University of Brest IBSAM, INSERM, UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Poitiers (France); University of Poitiers, Medical school, EE DACTIM, Poitiers (France); Pierce, Larry; Kinahan, Paul E. [University of Washington, Imaging Research Laboratory, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    After seminal papers over the period 2009 - 2011, the use of texture analysis of PET/CT images for quantification of intratumour uptake heterogeneity has received increasing attention in the last 4 years. Results are difficult to compare due to the heterogeneity of studies and lack of standardization. There are also numerous challenges to address. In this review we provide critical insights into the recent development of texture analysis for quantifying the heterogeneity in PET/CT images, identify issues and challenges, and offer recommendations for the use of texture analysis in clinical research. Numerous potentially confounding issues have been identified, related to the complex workflow for the calculation of textural features, and the dependency of features on various factors such as acquisition, image reconstruction, preprocessing, functional volume segmentation, and methods of establishing and quantifying correspondences with genomic and clinical metrics of interest. A lack of understanding of what the features may represent in terms of the underlying pathophysiological processes and the variability of technical implementation practices makes comparing results in the literature challenging, if not impossible. Since progress as a field requires pooling results, there is an urgent need for standardization and recommendations/guidelines to enable the field to move forward. We provide a list of correct formulae for usual features and recommendations regarding implementation. Studies on larger cohorts with robust statistical analysis and machine learning approaches are promising directions to evaluate the potential of this approach. (orig.)

  2. Molecular imaging of head and neck cancers. Perspectives of PET/MRI; Molekulare Bildgebung bei Kopf-ï]¿Hals-Tumoren. Perspektive der PET-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpp, P.; Kahn, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany); Purz, S.; Sabri, O. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    The {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) procedure is a cornerstone in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers. Several years ago PET-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) also became available as an alternative hybrid multimodal imaging method. Does PET/MRI have advantages over PET/CT in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers ?The diagnostic accuracy of the standard imaging methods CT, MRI and PET/CT is depicted according to currently available meta-analyses and studies concerning the use of PET/MRI for these indications are summarized. In all studies published up to now PET/MRI did not show superiority regarding the diagnostic accuracy in head and neck cancers; however, there is some evidence that in the future PET/MRI can contribute to tumor characterization and possibly be used to predict tumor response to therapy with the use of multiparametric imaging. Currently, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT is not outperformed by PET/MRI in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers. The additive value of PET/MRI due to the use of multiparametric imaging needs to be investigated in future research. (orig.) [German] Die {sup 18}F-Fluordesoxyglukose-Positronenemissionstomographie-Computertomographie ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET-CT) hat ihren festen Stellenwert in der Diagnostik von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Seit einigen Jahren ist die PET-MRT als weitere hybride Bildgebungsmodalitaet verfuegbar. Bringt die PET-MRT Fortschritte bei der Diagnostik von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren ?Darstellung der diagnostischen Genauigkeit der bisherigen Bildgebungsmethoden CT, MRT und PET-CT anhand von Metaanalysen und Zusammenfassung der bisherigen Publikationen zur PET-MRT auf diesem Gebiet. Die PET-MRT zeigt in allen bisherigen Studien keine Ueberlegenheit bzgl. der diagnostischen Genauigkeit von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Sie kann jedoch durch die multiparametrische Diagnostik perspektivisch Beitraege zur Tumorcharakterisierung und damit moeglicherweise Voraussagen zum

  3. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to

  4. The impact of audio-visual biofeedback on 4D PET images: Results of a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Cho, Byungchul; Seo, Youngho; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Irregular breathing causes motion blurring artifacts in 4D PET images. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been demonstrated to improve breathing regularity. To investigate the hypothesis that, compared with free breathing, motion blurring artifacts are reduced with AV biofeedback, the authors performed the first experimental phantom-based quantification of the impact of AV biofeedback on 4D PET image quality. Methods: The authors acquired 4D PET dynamic phantom images with AV biofeedback and free breathing by moving a phantom programmed with AV biofeedback trained and free breathing respiratory traces of ten healthy subjects. The authors also acquired stationary phantom images for reference. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The authors quantified motion blurring using the target diameter, Dice coefficient and recovery coefficient (RC) metrics to estimate the effect of motion. Results: The average increase in target diameter for AV biofeedback was 0.6±1.6mm(4.7±13%), which was significantly (pbiofeedback was 0.90±0.07, which was significantly (pbiofeedback were consistently higher than those for free breathing and comparable to those for stationary targets. However, for RCs the impact of target sizes was more dominant than that of motion. In addition, the authors observed large variations in the results with respect to target sizes, subject traces and respiratory bins due to partial volume effects and respiratory motion irregularity. Conclusions: The results indicate that AV biofeedback can significantly reduce motion blurring artifacts and may facilitate improved identification and localization of lung tumors in 4D PET images. The results justify proceeding with clinical studies to quantify the impact of AV biofeedback on 4D PET image quality and tumor detectability. PMID:22320815

  5. Impact of (18)F-Fluciclovine PET on Target Volume Definition for Postprostatectomy Salvage Radiotherapy: Initial Findings from a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Ashesh B; Schreibmann, Eduard; Rossi, Peter J; Shelton, Joseph; Godette, Karen; Nieh, Peter; Master, Viraj A; Kucuk, Omer; Goodman, Mark; Halkar, Raghuveer; Cooper, Sherrie; Chen, Zhengjia; Schuster, David M

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the synthetic amino acid PET radiotracer (18)F-fluciclovine in modifying the defined clinical and treatment-planning target volumes in postprostatectomy patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy and to evaluate the resulting dosimetric consequences to surrounding organs at risk. Methods: Ninety-six patients were enrolled in a randomized, prospective intention-to-treat clinical trial for potential salvage radiotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy. The initial treatment plan was based on the results from conventional abdominopelvic CT and MRI. The 45 patients in the experimental arm also underwent abdominopelvic (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT, and the images were registered with the conventional images to determine whether the results would modify the initial treatment plan. The 51 patients in the control arm did not undergo (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT. For each patient, the clinical and treatment-planning target volumes that would have been treated before (18)F-fluciclovine registration were compared with those after registration. For organs at risk (rectum, bladder, and penile bulb), the volumes receiving 40 Gy and 65 Gy before registration were compared with those after registration. Statistical comparisons were made using the paired t test. Acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was compared between the control and experimental arms using the χ(2) test. Results: In 24 cases, radiotherapy was planned to a clinical target volume consisting of the prostate bed alone (CTV) (64.8-66.6 Gy). In 21 cases, radiotherapy was planned to a clinical target volume consisting of the pelvis (CTV1) (45.0 Gy) followed by a boost to the prostate bed (CTV2) (19.8-25.2 Gy). In each case, the respective treatment-planning target volume expansion (PTV, PTV1, or PTV2) was 0.8 cm (0.6 cm posterior). With the exception of PTV2, all postregistration volumes were

  6. Liver SULmean at FDG PET/CT: interreader agreement and impact of placement of volume of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viner, Maya; Mercier, Gustavo; Hao, Frank; Malladi, Ashish; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate how interreader agreement and the site of the volume of interest (VOI) affect the agreement and variability of liver mean standardized uptake value normalized to lean body mass (SUL(mean)) at fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective review of PET/CT images and patient records. PET/CT images were reviewed in 116 randomly selected patients who had undergone a baseline PET/CT examination and who had normal livers according to imaging and biochemical test results. A 30-mm-diameter spherical VOI was placed within the right lobe of the liver above, below, and at the level of the main portal vein. Two readers performed all measurements independently. Analysis of variance, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis were performed. The mean SUL(mean) was between 2.11 and 2.17 at the upper, portal, and lower levels of the right lobe of the liver. The coefficient of variance was between 21.0% and 23.1%, without significant differences for location, with the least variance in the upper level. The ICC of the two readers varied between 0.98 and 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.97, 0.99; P = .0001) at each level. The greatest precision (narrowest CI) was also in the upper level. Bias was 0.025 ± 0.10 (standard deviation) at the upper level, was 0.004 ± 0.14 at the lower level, and was 0.047 ± 0.10 at the portal vein (P = .02). For each reader, there was almost perfect reliability between the SUL(mean) measurements made at the three levels, with an ICC of 0.98 (95% CI: 0.98, 0.99; P = .0001). Liver SUL(mean) at FDG PET/CT has excellent interreader agreement, with similar values and variance whether measured at the upper, lower, or portal vein levels within the right lobe of the liver. © RSNA, 2013.

  7. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanye [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Kun, E-mail: yangkun9999@hotmail.com [Department of Control Technology and Instrumentation, College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding, 071000 (China); Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, Qiushi, E-mail: renqsh@coe.pku.edu.cn [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-11

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development.

  8. Intra-tumour 18F-FDG uptake heterogeneity decreases the reliability on target volume definition with positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinzhe; Wu, Peipei; Sun, Xiaorong; Li, Wenwu; Wan, Honglin; Yu, Jinming; Xing, Ligang

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore whether the intra-tumour (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake heterogeneity affects the reliability of target volume definition with FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and squamous cell oesophageal cancer (SCEC). Patients with NSCLC (n = 50) or SCEC (n = 50) who received (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning before treatments were included in this retrospective study. Intra-tumour FDG uptake heterogeneity was assessed by visual scoring, the coefficient of variation (COV) of the standardised uptake value (SUV) and the image texture feature (entropy). Tumour volumes (gross tumour volume (GTV)) were delineated on the CT images (GTV(CT)), the fused PET/CT images (GTV(PET-CT)) and the PET images, using a threshold at 40% SUV(max) (GTV(PET40%)) or the SUV cut-off value of 2.5 (GTV(PET2.5)). The correlation between the FDG uptake heterogeneity parameters and the differences in tumour volumes among GTV(CT), GTV(PET-CT), GTV(PET40%) and GTV(PET2.5) was analysed. For both NSCLC and SCEC, obvious correlations were found between uptake heterogeneity, SUV or tumour volumes. Three types of heterogeneity parameters were consistent and closely related to each other. Substantial differences between the four methods of GTV definition were found. The differences between the GTV correlated significantly with PET heterogeneity defined with the visual score, the COV or the textural feature-entropy for NSCLC and SCEC. In tumours with a high FDG uptake heterogeneity, a larger GTV delineation difference was found. Advance image segmentation algorithms dealing with tracer uptake heterogeneity should be incorporated into the treatment planning system. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume on {sup 11}C-methionine PET in predicting progression-free survival in high-grade glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Min Young; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Kang, Keon Wook [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E. Edmund [Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    C-11 methionine (MET) PET is commonly used for diagnosing high-grade glioma (HGG). Recently, volumetric analysis has been widely applied to oncologic PET imaging. In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on MET PET in HGG. A total of 30 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 12) and glioblastoma multiforme (n = 18) who underwent MET PET before treatment (surgery followed by chemo-radiotherapy) were retrospectively enrolled. Maximal tumor-to-normal brain ratio (TNR{sub max}, maximum tumor activity divided by mean of normal tissue) and MTV (volume of tumor tissue that shows uptake >1.3-fold of mean uptake in normal tissue) were measured on MET PET. Adult patients were classified into two subgroups according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RTOG RPA) classification. Prognostic values of TNR{sub max}, MTV and clinicopathologic factors were evaluated with regard to progression-free survival (PFS). Median PFS of all patients was 7.9 months (range 1.0–53.8 months). In univariate analysis, MTV (cutoff 35 cm{sup 3}) was a significant prognostic factor for PFS (P = 0.01), whereas TNR{sub max} (cutoff 3.3) and RTOG RPA class were not (P = 0.80 and 0.61, respectively). Treatment of surgical resection exhibited a borderline significance (P = 0.06). In multivariate analysis, MTV was the only independent prognostic factor for PFS (P = 0.03). MTV on MET PET is a significant and independent prognostic factor for PFS in HGG patients, whereas TNR{sub max} is not. Thus, performing volumetric analysis of MET PET is recommended in HGG for better prognostication.

  10. Clinical evaluation of 2D versus 3D whole-body PET image quality using a dedicated BGO PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [CHU Morvan, U650 INSERM, Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), Brest (France); Griffiths, D. [Lister Healthcare, London PET Centre, London (United Kingdom); Costa, D.C. [Middlesex Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom); HPP Medicina Molecular, SA Porto (Portugal); Bomanji, J.; Ell, P.J. [Middlesex Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    Three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D PET) results in higher system sensitivity, with an associated increase in the detection of scatter and random coincidences. The objective of this work was to compare, from a clinical perspective, 3D and two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions in terms of whole-body (WB) PET image quality with a dedicated BGO PET system. 2D and 3D WB emission acquisitions were carried out in 70 patients. Variable acquisition parameters in terms of time of emission acquisition per axial field of view (aFOV) and slice overlap between sequential aFOVs were used during the 3D acquisitions. 3D and 2D images were reconstructed using FORE+WLS and OSEM respectively. Scatter correction was performed by convolution subtraction and a model-based scatter correction in 2D and 3D respectively. All WB images were attenuation corrected using segmented transmission scans. Images were blindly assessed by three observers for the presence of artefacts, confidence in lesion detection and overall image quality using a scoring system. Statistically significant differences between 2D and 3D image quality were only obtained for 3D emission acquisitions of 3 min. No statistically significant differences were observed for image artefacts or lesion detectability scores. Image quality correlated significantly with patient weight for both modes of operation. Finally, no differences were seen in image artefact scores for the different axial slice overlaps considered, suggesting the use of five slice overlaps in 3D WB acquisitions. 3D WB imaging using a dedicated BGO-based PET scanner offers similar image quality to that obtained in 2D considering similar overall times of acquisitions. (orig.)

  11. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Kohlmyer, Steve; Clark, John W; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-08-21

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m(-2)) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD® fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better count rate

  12. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Kohlmyer, Steve; Clark, John W., Jr.; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2011-08-01

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m-2) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD® fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better count rate

  13. Optimising rigid motion compensation for small animal brain PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler-Bickell, Matthew G.; Zhou, Lin; Kyme, Andre Z.; De Laat, Bart; Fulton, Roger R.; Nuyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Motion compensation (MC) in PET brain imaging of awake small animals is attracting increased attention in preclinical studies since it avoids the confounding effects of anaesthesia and enables behavioural tests during the scan. A popular MC technique is to use multiple external cameras to track the motion of the animal’s head, which is assumed to be represented by the motion of a marker attached to its forehead. In this study we have explored several methods to improve the experimental setup and the reconstruction procedures of this method: optimising the camera-marker separation; improving the temporal synchronisation between the motion tracker measurements and the list-mode stream; post-acquisition smoothing and interpolation of the motion data; and list-mode reconstruction with appropriately selected subsets. These techniques have been tested and verified on measurements of a moving resolution phantom and brain scans of an awake rat. The proposed techniques improved the reconstructed spatial resolution of the phantom by 27% and of the rat brain by 14%. We suggest a set of optimal parameter values to use for awake animal PET studies and discuss the relative significance of each parameter choice.

  14. Brain tissue segmentation in PET-CT images using probabilistic atlas and variational Bayes inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Wang, Jiabin; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    PET-CT provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scan, and has the potential to improve brain PET image segmentation, which can in turn improve quantitative clinical analyses. We propose a statistical segmentation algorithm that incorporates the prior anatomical knowledge represented by probabilistic brain atlas into the variational Bayes inference to delineate gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in brain PET-CT images. Our approach adds an additional novel aspect by allowing voxels to have variable and adaptive prior probabilities of belonging to each class. We compared our algorithm to the segmentation approaches implemented in the expectation maximization segmentation (EMS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) packages in 26 clinical cases. The results show that our algorithm improves the accuracy of brain PET-CT image segmentation.

  15. A CT-, PET- and MR-imaging-compatible hyperbaric pressure chamber for baromedical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Tolbod, Lars P;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We describe the development of a novel preclinical rodent-sized pressure chamber system compatible with computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows continuous uncompromised and minimally invasive data acquisition...... different tissues in the MRI phantoms. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates a pressure chamber system compatible with CT, PET and MRI. We found that no correction in image intensity was required with pressurisation up to 1.013 mPa for any imaging modality. CT, PET or MRI can be used to obtain anatomical...... throughout hyperbaric exposures. The effect of various pressures on the acquired image intensity obtained with different CT, PET and MRI phantoms are characterised. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tissue-representative phantom models were examined with CT, PET or MRI at normobaric pressure and hyperbaric pressures up...

  16. In Vivo PET Imaging of HDL in Multiple Atherosclerosis Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Binderup, Tina; Lobatto, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to develop and validate a noninvasive imaging tool to visualize the in vivo behavior of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by using positron emission tomography (PET), with an emphasis on its plaque-targeting abilities. BACKGROUND: HDL is a natural nanoparticle......,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-deferoxamine B). Biodistribution and plaque targeting of radiolabeled HDL were studied in established murine, rabbit, and porcine atherosclerosis models by using PET combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging or PET combined with magnetic resonance imaging......-injection for both (89)Zr-HDL nanoparticles. In the porcine model, increased accumulation of radioactivity was observed in lesions by using in vivo PET imaging. Irrespective of the radiolabel's location, HDL nanoparticles were able to preferentially target plaque macrophages and monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: (89)Zr...

  17. Heterogeneity in stabilization phenomena in FLT PET images of canines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncic, Urban; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-12-01

    3ʹ-(18F)fluoro-3ʹ-deoxy-L-thymidine (FLT) is a PET marker of cellular proliferation. Its tissue uptake rate is often quantified with a Standardized Uptake Value (SUV), although kinetic analysis provides a more accurate quantification. The purpose of this study is to investigate the heterogeneity in FLT stabilization phenomena. The study was done on 15 canines with spontaneously occurring sinonasal tumours. They were imaged dynamically for 90 min with FLT PET/CT twice; before and during the radiotherapy. Images were analyzed for kinetics on a voxel basis through compartmental analysis. Stabilization curves were calculated as a time-dependant correlation between the time-dependant SUV and the kinetic parameters (voxel values within the tumour were correlated). Stabilization curves were analyzed for stabilization speed, maximal correlation and correlation decrease following the maximal correlation. These stabilization parameters were correlated with the region-averaged kinetic parameters. The FLT SUV was highly correlated with vasculature fraction immediately post-injection, followed by maximum in correlation with the perfusion/permeability. At later times post-injection the FLT SUV was highly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient above 0.95) with the FLT influx parameter for cases with tumour-averaged SUV30-50 min above 2, while others were indeterminate (correlation coefficients from 0.1 to 0.97). All cases with highly correlated SUV and FLT influx parameter had correlation coefficient within 0.5% of its maximum in the period of 30-50 min post-injection. Stabilization time was inversely proportional to the FLT influx rate. Correlation between the FLT SUV and FLT influx parameter dropped at later times post-injection with drop being proportional to the dephosphorylation rate. The FLT was found to be metabolically stable in canines. FLT PET imaging protocol should define minimal and maximal FLT uptake period, which would be 30-50 min for our patients

  18. In vivo PET imaging of brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottlaender, M.; Valette, H.; Saba, W.; Schollhorn-Peyronneau, M.A.; Dolle, F.; Syrota, A. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system where they modulate a number of CNS functions including neurotransmitter release, cognitive function, anxiety, analgesia and control of cerebral blood flow. In the brain, a major subtype is composed of the {alpha}4{beta}2 subunit combination. Density of this subtype has been shown to be decreased in patients with neuro-degenerative disease such as Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease (AD and PD), and mutated receptors has been described in some familial epilepsy. Thus, in vivo mapping of the nicotinic nAChRs by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are of great interest to monitor the evolution of these pathologies and changes in the neuronal biochemistry induced by therapeutic agents. Recently, a new compound, 3-[2(S)-2-azetidinyl-methoxy]pyridine (A-85380) has been synthesised and labelled with fluorine-18, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 (Dolle et al., 1999). The [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 has been shown to bind with high affinity t o nAChRs in vitro (Saba et al., 2004), and its toxicity was low and compatible with it s use at tracer dose in human PET studies (Valette, 2002). PET studies in baboons showed that, after in vivo administration of [ {sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 at a tracer dose, the distribution of the radioactivity in the brain reflect the distribution of the < 4R2 nAChRs. Competition and pre-blocking studies, using nicotinic agonists, confirm that the radiotracer binds specifically to the heteromeric nAChRs in the brain (Valette et al., 1999). The in vivo, characteristics of the [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-8538 0 combined with its low toxicity make possible the imaging of the nicotinic receptor s in human by PET (Bottlaender 2003). Studies were performed in healthy non-smoker volunteers to evaluate the brain kinetics of [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 and to assess the quantification of its nAChRs binding in the human brain with PET (Gallezot et a., 2005). The [{sup 18}F

  19. MR-based truncation and attenuation correction in integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging using HUGE with continuous table motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Maike E; Oehmigen, Mark; Blumhagen, Jan O; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce and evaluate a method for MR-based attenuation and truncation correction in phantom and patient measurements to improve PET quantification in PET/MR hybrid imaging. The fully MR-based method HUGE (B0 Homogenization using gradient enhancement) provides field-of-view extension in MR imaging, which can be used for truncation correction and improved PET quantification in PET/MR hybrid imaging. The HUGE method in this recent implementation is combined with continuously moving table data acquisition to provide a seamless nontruncated whole-body data set of the outer patient contours to complete the established standard MR-based Dixon-VIBE data for attenuation correction. The method was systematically evaluated in NEMA standard phantom experiments to investigate the impact of HUGE truncation correction on PET quantification. The method was then applied to 24 oncologic patients in whole-body PET/MR hybrid imaging. The impact of MR-based truncation correction with HUGE on PET data was compared to the impact of the established PET-based MLAA algorithm for contour detection. In phantom and in all patient measurements, the standard Dixon-VIBE attenuation correction data show geometric distortions and signal truncations at the edges of the MR imaging field-of-view. In contrast, the Dixon-VIBE-based attenuation correction data additionally extended by applying HUGE shows significantly less distortion and truncations and due to the continuously moving table acquisition robustly provides smooth outer contours of the patient arms. In the investigated patient cases, MLAA frequently showed an overestimation of arm volume and associated artifacts limiting contour detection. When applying HUGE, an average relative increase in SUVmean in patients' lesion of 4.2% and for MLAA of 4.6% were measured, when compared to standard Dixon-VIBE only. In specific lesions maximal differences in SUVmean up to 13% for HUGE and 14% for MLAA were measured

  20. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Pawel [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgos, Ninon [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Manber, Richard [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Jiao, Jieqing [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Barnes, Anna [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Dementia Research Centre, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  1. New targets for the development of PET tracers for imaging neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    The field of molecular imaging has experienced significant advances in the area of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most significant being the development of PET radiotracers for imaging β-amyloid burden in the brain of individuals at risk for or in the early stages of AD. More recent advances include the development of PET radiotracers for imaging aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in neurofibrillary tangles, a process that occurs late in the disease process. This article highlights advances in the neurobiology of AD and describes how PET can be used to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in AD. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  2. EXPLORER: Changing the molecular imaging paradigm with total-body PET/CT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Jones, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the highest sensitivity technique for human whole-body imaging studies. However, current clinical PET scanners do not make full use of the available signal, as they only permit imaging of a 15-25 cm segment of the body at one time. Given the limited sensitive region, whole-body imaging with clinical PET scanners requires relatively long scan times and subjects the patient to higher than necessary radiation doses. The EXPLORER initiative aims to build a 2-meter axial length PET scanner to allow imaging the entire subject at once, capturing nearly the entire available PET signal. EXPLORER will acquire data with ~40-fold greater sensitivity leading to a six-fold increase in reconstructed signal-to-noise ratio for imaging the total body. Alternatively, total-body images with the EXPLORER scanner will be able to be acquired in ~30 seconds or with ~0.15 mSv injected dose, while maintaining current PET image quality. The superior sensitivity will open many new avenues for biomedical research. Specifically for cancer applications, high sensitivity PET will enable detection of smaller lesions. Additionally, greater sensitivity will allow imaging out to 10 half-lives of positron emitting radiotracers. This will enable 1) metabolic ultra-staging with FDG by extending the uptake and clearance time to 3-5 hours to significantly improve contrast and 2) improved kinetic imaging with short-lived radioisotopes such as C-11, crucial for drug development studies. Frequent imaging studies of the same subject to study disease progression or to track response to therapy will be possible with the low dose capabilities of the EXPLORER scanner. The low dose capabilities will also open up new imaging possibilities in pediatrics and adolescents to better study developmental disorders. This talk will review the basis for developing total-body PET, potential applications, and review progress to date in developing EXPLORER, the first total-body PET scanner.

  3. Design, synthesis and validation of integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1}-targeted probe for microPET imaging of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chiun-Wei; Li, Zibo; Cai, Hancheng; Chen, Kai; Shahinian, Tony; Conti, Peter S. [University of Southern California, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The ability of PET to aid in the diagnosis and management of recurrent and/or disseminated metastatic prostate cancer may be enhanced by the development of novel prognostic imaging probes. Accumulating experimental evidence indicates that overexpression of integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} may correlate with progression in human prostate cancer. In this study, {sup 64}Cu-labeled integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1}-targeted PET probes were designed and evaluated for the imaging of prostate cancer. DGEA peptides conjugated with a bifunctional chelator (BFC) were developed to image integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} expression with PET in a subcutaneous PC-3 xenograft model. The microPET images were reconstructed by a two-dimensional ordered subsets expectation maximum algorithm. The average radioactivity accumulation within a tumor or an organ was quantified from the multiple region of interest volumes. The PET tracer demonstrated prominent tumor uptake in the PC-3 xenograft (integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1}-positive). The receptor specificity was confirmed in a blocking experiment. Moreover, the low tracer uptake in a CWR-22 tumor model (negative control) further confirmed the receptor specificity. The sarcophagine-conjugated DGEA peptide allows noninvasive imaging of tumor-associated {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} expression, which may be a useful PET probe for evaluating the metastatic potential of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  4. SU-E-J-124: 18F-FDG PET Imaging to Improve RT Treatment Outcome for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Sharp, G; Choi, N [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate spatial correlation between high uptake regions of pre- and 10-days-post therapy{sup 1} {sup 8}F-FDG PET in recurrent lung cancer and to evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation boosting only regions with high FDG uptake identified on baseline PET. Methods: Nineteen patients with stages II– IV inoperable lung cancer were selected. Volumes of interest (VOI) on pre-therapy FDG-PET were defined using an isocontour at ≥50% of SUVmax. VOI of pre- and post-therapy PET images were correlated for the extent of overlap. A highly optimized IMRT plan to 60 Gy prescribed to PTV defined on the planning CT was designed using clinical dose constraints for the organs at risk. A boost of 18 Gy was prescribed to the VOI defined on baseline PET. A composite plan of the total 78 Gy was compared with the base 60 Gy plan. Increases in dose to the lungs, spinal cord and heart were evaluated. IMRT boost plan was compared with proton RT and SBRT boost plans. Results: Overlap fraction of baseline PET VOI with the VOI on 10 days-post therapy PET was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7 – 0.9). Using baseline VOI as a boosting volume, dose could be escalated to 78 Gy for 15 patients without compromising the dose constraints. For 4 patients, the dose limiting factors were V20Gy and Dmean for the total lung, and Dmax for the spinal cord. An increase of the dose to OARs correlated significantly with the relative size of the boost volume. Conclusion: VOI defined on baseline 18F-FDG PET by the SUVmax-≥50% isocontour may be a biological target volume for escalated radiation dose. Dose escalation to this volume may provide improved tumor control without breaching predefined dose constraints for OARs. The best treatment outcome may be achieved with proton RT for large targets and with SBRT for small targets.

  5. Assessment of histological response of paediatric bone sarcomas using FDG PET in comparison to morphological volume measurement and standardized MRI parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denecke, Timm; Misch, Daniel; Steffen, Ingo G.; Plotkin, Michail; Stoever, Brigitte [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Henze, Guenter [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Paediatrie m.S. Onkologie und Haematologie, Otto-Heubner-Zentrum, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Schoenberger, Stefan [Universitaetsklinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Kinder-Onkologie, -Haematologie und -Immunologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Furth, Christian; Ruf, Juri [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany); Hautzel, Hubertus [Universitaetsklinikum der Heinrich Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kluge, Regine [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig A.oe.R., Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Leipzig (Germany); Bierbach, Uta [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig A.oe.R., Abteilung fuer Kinder-Haematologie, -Onkologie und -Haemostaseologie, Leipzig (Germany); Otto, Sylke [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Greifswald (Germany); Beck, James F. [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald, Abteilung fuer Paediatrische Haematologie und Onkologie, Greifswald (Germany); Franzius, Christiane [MR- und PET/CT-Zentrum, Bremen-Mitte (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Muenster (Germany); Amthauer, Holger [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in comparison to volumetry and standardized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters for the assessment of histological response in paediatric bone sarcoma patients. FDG PET and local MRI were performed in 27 paediatric sarcoma patients [Ewing sarcoma family of tumours (EWS), n = 16; osteosarcoma (OS), n = 11] prior to and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy before local tumour resection. Several parameters for assessment of response of the primary tumour to therapy by FDG PET and MRI were evaluated and compared with histopathological regression of the resected tumour as defined by Salzer-Kuntschik. FDG PET significantly discriminated responders from non-responders using the standardized uptake value (SUV) reduction and the absolute post-therapeutic SUV (SUV2) in the entire patient population ({nabla}SUV, p = 0.005; SUV2, p = 0.011) as well as in the subgroup of OS patients ({nabla}SUV, p = 0.009; SUV2, p = 0.028), but not in the EWS subgroup. The volume reduction measured by MRI/CT did not significantly discriminate responders from non-responders either in the entire population (p = 0.170) or in both subgroups (EWS, p = 0.950; OS, p = 1.000). The other MRI parameters alone or in combination were unreliable and did not improve the results. Comparing diagnostic parameters of FDG PET and local MRI, metabolic imaging showed high superiority in the subgroup of OS patients, while similar results were observed in the population of EWS. FDG PET appears to be a useful tool for non-invasive response assessment in the group of OS patients and is superior to MRI. In EWS patients, however, neither FDG PET nor volumetry or standardized MRI criteria enabled a reliable response assessment to be made after neoadjuvant treatment. (orig.)

  6. PET and PET/CT imaging for the earliest detection and treatment of colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Carter

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 150,000 new cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed each year with the life time risk of developing colon caner in developed nations being 4.6% in men and 3.2% in women. Screening patients is essential early detection of colon carcinoma to aid in complete resection. Unfortunately current screening methods carry with them poor patient compliance. PET and PET/CT may be a significant part of this screening solution. The authors reviewed and analyzed the English language articles and case reports identified on Medline during the last 10 years. PET and PET/CT results for colorectal carcinoma were tabulated and presented for the fifth Scientific Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Though most studies have been retrospective analysis in using PET for staging for other malignant processes the cases that have identified additional uptake in the colon are important. The accuracy when utilizing PET and PET/CT in this screening method has a sensitivity between 65 and 90% with a specificity of 84 to 90% and a positive predictive value 71 to 78%. Early stages of malignancies and pre-cancerous polyps avidly accumulates F-18 Deoxyflouro glucose allowing us to conclude that whole body PET and PET/CT is an essential component in the work up, staging or treatment monitoring in colon carcinoma. We have to continue to accumulate data for possible introduction for whole body PET and PET/CT scanning for colon carcinoma and precancerous polyps.Aproximadamente, 150 000 novos casos de câncer coloretal são diagnosticados, anualmente, em países em desenvolvimento. Destes, 4,6% em homens e 3,2% em mulheres. A triagem de pacientes é essencial na detecção precoce do carcinoma de colon para ajudar na completa ressecção. Infelizmente, os métodos de exame atualmente disponíveis contam com uma baixa adesão dos pacientes. Parte significativa da solução desse problema pode estar no uso de PET e PET/CT. Os autores revisaram e

  7. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  8. A custom-built PET phantom design for quantitative imaging of printed distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, P J; Angelis, G I; Kotasidis, F; Green, M; Matthews, J C [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: p.markiewicz@manchester.ac.uk [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2011-11-07

    This note presents a practical approach to a custom-made design of PET phantoms enabling the use of digital radioactive distributions with high quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution. The phantom design allows planar sources of any radioactivity distribution to be imaged in transaxial and axial (sagittal or coronal) planes. Although the design presented here is specially adapted to the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the presented methods can be adapted to almost any PET scanner. Although the presented phantom design has many advantages, a number of practical issues had to be overcome such as positioning of the printed source, calibration, uniformity and reproducibility of printing. A well counter (WC) was used in the calibration procedure to find the nonlinear relationship between digital voxel intensities and the actual measured radioactive concentrations. Repeated printing together with WC measurements and computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plates (IP) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and uniformity of such printing. Results show satisfactory printing uniformity and reproducibility; however, calibration is dependent on the printing mode and the physical state of the cartridge. As a demonstration of the utility of using printed phantoms, the image resolution and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed HRRT images are assessed. There is very good quantitative agreement in the calibration procedure between HRRT, CR and WC measurements. However, the high resolution of CR and its quantitative accuracy supported by WC measurements made it possible to show the degraded resolution of HRRT brain images caused by the partial-volume effect and the limits of iterative image reconstruction. (note)

  9. Absolute cerebral blood flow and blood volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging bolus tracking: comparison with positron emission tomography values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Leif; Smith, D F; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter;

    1998-01-01

    The authors determined cerebral blood flow (CBF) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of contrast agent bolus passage and compared the results with those obtained by O-15 labeled water (H215O) and positron emission tomography (PET). Six pigs were examined by MRI and PET under normo......- and hypercapnic conditions. After dose normalization and introduction of an empirical constant phi Gd, absolute regional CBF was calculated from MRI. The spatial resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of CBF measurements by MRI were better than by the H215O-PET protocol. Magnetic resonance imaging cerebral...... blood volume (CBV) estimates obtained using this normalization constant correlated well with values obtained by O-15 labeled carbonmonooxide (C15O) PET. However, PET CBV values were approximately 2.5 times larger than absolute MRI CBV values, supporting the hypothesized sensitivity of MRI to small...

  10. Simultaneous functional imaging using fPET and fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villien, Marjorie [CERMEP (France)

    2015-05-18

    Brain mapping of task-associated changes in metabolism with PET has been accomplished by subtracting scans acquired during two distinct static states. We have demonstrated that PET can provide truly dynamic information on cerebral energy metabolism using constant infusion of FDG and multiple stimuli in a single experiment. We demonstrate here that the functional PET (fPET-FDG) method accomplished simultaneously with fMRI, can enable the first direct comparisons in time, space and magnitude of hemodynamics and oxygen and glucose consumption. The imaging studies were performed on a 3T Tim-Trio MR scanner modified to support an MR-compatible BrainPET insert. Ten healthy subjects were included. The total PET acquisition and infusion time was 90 minutes. We did 3 blocks of right hand fingers tapping for 10 minutes at 30, 50 and 70 minutes after the beginning of the PET acquisition. ASL and BOLD imaging were acquired simultaneously during the motor paradigm. Changes in glucose utilization are easily observed as changes in the TAC slope of the PET data (FDG utilization rate) and in the derivative signal during motor stimuli in the activated voxels. PET and MRI (ASL, and BOLD) activations are largely colocalized but with very different statistical significance and temporal dynamic, especially in the ipsilateral side of the stimuli. This study demonstrated that motor activation can be measured dynamically during a single FDG PET scan. The complementary nature of fPET-FDG to fMRI capitalizes on the emerging technology of hybrid MR-PET scanners. fPET-FDG, combined with quantitative fMRI methods, allow us to simultaneously measure dynamic changes in glucose utilization and hemodynamic, addressing vital questions about neurovascular coupling.

  11. Assessment of oxidative metabolism in Brown Fat using PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto eMuzik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although it has been believed that brown adipose tissue (BAT depots disappear shortly after the perinatal period in humans, PET imaging using the glucose analog FDG has shown unequivocally the existence of functional BAT in humans. The objective of this study was to determine, using dynamic oxygen-15 (15O PET imaging, to what extent BAT thermogenesis is activated in adults during cold stress and to establish the relationship between BAT oxidative metabolism and FDG tracer uptake.Methods: Fourteen adult normal subjects (9F/5M, 30+7 years underwent triple oxygen scans (H215O, C15O, 15O2 as well as indirect calorimetric measurements at rest and following exposure to mild cold (60F. Subjects were divided into two groups (BAT+ and BAT- based on the presence or absence of FDG tracer uptake (SUV > 2 in supraclavicular BAT. Blood flow (BF and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF was calculated from dynamic PET scans at the location of BAT, muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT. The metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2 in BAT was determined and used to calculate the contribution of activated BAT to daily energy expenditure (DEE.Results: The median mass of activated BAT in the BAT+ group (5F, 31+8yrs was 52.4 g (14-68g and was 1.7 g (0-6.3g in the BAT- group (5M/4F, 29+6yrs. SUV values were significantly higher in the BAT+ as compared to the BAT- group (7.4+3.7 vs 1.9+0.9; p=0.03. BF values in BAT were significantly higher in the BAT+ as compared to the BAT- group (13.1+4.4 vs 5.7+1.1 ml/100g/min, p=0.03, but were similar in WAT (4.1+1.6 vs 4.2+1.8 ml/100g/min and muscle (3.7+0.8 vs 3.3+1.2 ml/100g/min. Calculated MRO2 values in BAT increased from 0.95+0.74 to 1.62+0.82 ml/100g/min in the BAT+ group and were significantly higher than those determined in the BAT- group (0.43+0.27 vs 0.56+0.24; p=0.67. The DEE associated with BAT oxidative metabolism was highly variable in the BAT+ group, with an average of 5.5+6.4 kcal/day (range 0.57–15.3 kcal/day.

  12. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  13. Improved quantification for local regions of interest in preclinical PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal-González, J.; Moore, S. C.; Park, M.-A.; Herraiz, J. L.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.; Udias, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography, there are several causes of quantitative inaccuracy, such as partial volume or spillover effects. The impact of these effects is greater when using radionuclides that have a large positron range, e.g., 68Ga and 124I, which have been increasingly used in the clinic. We have implemented and evaluated a local projection algorithm (LPA), originally evaluated for SPECT, to compensate for both partial-volume and spillover effects in PET. This method is based on the use of a high-resolution CT or MR image, co-registered with a PET image, which permits a high-resolution segmentation of a few tissues within a volume of interest (VOI) centered on a region within which tissue-activity values need to be estimated. The additional boundary information is used to obtain improved activity estimates for each tissue within the VOI, by solving a simple inversion problem. We implemented this algorithm for the preclinical Argus PET/CT scanner and assessed its performance using the radionuclides 18F, 68Ga and 124I. We also evaluated and compared the results obtained when it was applied during the iterative reconstruction, as well as after the reconstruction as a postprocessing procedure. In addition, we studied how LPA can help to reduce the “spillover contamination”, which causes inaccurate quantification of lesions in the immediate neighborhood of large, “hot” sources. Quantification was significantly improved by using LPA, which provided more accurate ratios of lesion-to-background activity concentration for hot and cold regions. For 18F, the contrast was improved from 3.0 to 4.0 in hot lesions (when the true ratio was 4.0) and from 0.16 to 0.06 in cold lesions (true ratio = 0.0), when using the LPA postprocessing. Furthermore, activity values estimated within the VOI using LPA during reconstruction were slightly more accurate than those obtained by post-processing, while also visually improving the image contrast and uniformity within the VOI

  14. Imaging the ischaemic penumbra after acute ischaemic stroke using PET and {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, S.J.; Hirano, T.; Abbott, D.F.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Chan, J.G.; Egan, F.; Scott, A.M.; Bladin, C.F.; McKay, W.J.; Donna, G.A. [Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Departments of Neurology, Nuclear Medicine and Centre for Positron Emission Tomogrpahy]|[University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Department of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Using PET with {sup 15}O-labelled oxygen and water, the ischaemic penumbra is currently defined as peri-infarct areas demonstrating misery perfusion. We have used PET with the hypoxic tissue marker {sup l8}F-fluoromisonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) to detect hypoxic but viable peri-infarct tissue in patients after acute ischaemic stroke. Fifteen patients with acute ischaemic strokes were studied using PET and {sup 18}F-FMISO. Studies were performed within 48 hours of stroke in 7 patients, at 6-11 days after stroke in 2 patients, and serially during both time epochs in 6 patients. We objectively assessed tracer uptake using a statistically-based image thresholding method. The mean activity in the contralateral (normal) hemisphere was calculated, and the whole image thresholded so that pixels with activity > 3 SD above the mean were identified. Positive studies were those with high activity pixels ipsilateral to the infarct. Hypoxic tissue was detected in peri-infarct regions in 9 of the 13 patients studied within 48 hours of stroke. These areas were generally distributed in the peripheries of the final infarct volume. None of the 8 patients studied 6-11 days after stroke exhibited increased {sup I8}F- FMISO activity. The 6 patients studied both early and late all exhibited areas of increased activity on the early but not the late study, consistent with resolution of the penumbra by this time. The distribution of the hypoxic tissue identified with this method supports the hypothesis that these tissues are likely to comprise the ischaemic penumbra.

  15. Optimization, evaluation, and comparison of standard algorithms for image reconstruction with the VIP-PET

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhaylova, E.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel positron emission tomography (PET) scanner design based on a room-temperature pixelated CdTe solid-state detector is being developed within the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project [1]. The simulation results show a great potential of the VIP to produce high-resolution images even in extremely challenging conditions such as the screening of a human head [2]. With unprecedented high channel density (450 channels/cm3) image reconstruction is a challenge. Therefore...

  16. Comparative methods for PET image segmentation in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaidi, Habib; Abdoli, Mehrsima; Fuentes, Carolina Llina; El Naqa, Issam M.

    2012-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed for the segmentation of F-18-FDG uptake in PET. In this study, we assessed the performance of four categories of F-18-FDG PET image segmentation techniques in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using clinical studies where the surgical specimen served as the

  17. Scatter Characterization and Correction for Simultaneous Multiple Small-Animal PET Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasad, Rameshwar; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth and usage of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) in molecular imaging research has led to increased demand on PET scanner's time. One potential solution to increase throughput is to scan multiple rodents simultaneously. However, this is achieved at the expense of deterio

  18. An ordered-subsets proximal preconditioned gradient algorithm for edge-preserving PET image reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Rahmim, Arman; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Kotasidis, Fotis; Zaidi, Habib

    Purpose: In iterative positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction, the statistical variability of the PET data precorrected for random coincidences or acquired in sufficiently high count rates can be properly approximated by a Gaussian distribution, which can lead to a penalized weighted

  19. Motion correction in simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging using sparsely sampled MR navigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Hansen, Casper; Hansen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a study performing motion correction (MC) of PET using MR navigators sampled between other protocolled MR sequences during simultaneous PET/MR brain scanning with the purpose of evaluating its clinical feasibility and the potential improvement of image quality. FINDINGS: Tw...

  20. Influence of Arm Movement on Lesion Detection in PET/CT Imaging: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Parlak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Arm movement after the CT scan is a common artifact in PET/CT scanning. Motion artifacts may lead to difficulties in interpreting PET/CT images accurately. We report a 66 year old male patient with gastric cancer who underwent PET/CT for primary staging. He had a previous history of papillary thyroid cancer. In PET scan, there were striking cold artifacts at the level of arms. This is a classical sign of an accidental arm motion. A second scan was performed with the arms down due to the history of papillary thyroid cancer. The results were discussed.

  1. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine: PET/Computed Tomography and Therapy Response Assessment in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Mena, Esther; Pattanayak, Puskar; Taghipour, Mehdi; Solnes, Lilja B; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    A variety of methods have been developed to assess tumor response to therapy. Standardized qualitative criteria based on 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET/computed tomography have been proposed to evaluate the treatment effectiveness in specific cancers and these allow more accurate therapy response assessment and survival prognostication. Multiple studies have addressed the utility of the volumetric PET biomarkers as prognostic indicators but there is no consensus about the preferred segmentation methodology for these metrics. Heterogeneous intratumoral uptake was proposed as a novel PET metric for therapy response assessment. PET imaging techniques will be used to study the biological behavior of cancers during therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    in this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume measurements...... is also described. In addition, the non-invasive nature of molecular imaging and the targets of these promising new tracers are attractive for other research areas as well, although these fields are much less explored. We present an example of an interesting research field with the application of small...

  3. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, James C.; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart [University of Oxford, CR-UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins. (orig.)

  4. Rare Thyroid Cartilage and Diaphragm Metastases from Lung Cancer Visualized on F-18 FDG-PET/CT Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Özcan Kara

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG has evolved as a useful imaging modality in the assessment of a variety of cancers, especially for tumor staging and post treatment monitoring. It provides metabolic information. Although, when used alone, relative lack of anatomic landmarks, is a major limitation of PET imaging, this limitation of PET imaging is overcome by the availability of integrated PET/CT imaging. PET and CT images are acquired in one procedure, yielding fused anatomical and functional data sets. Studies with integrated PET/CT imaging have shown promising results. In this case, we present an interesting integrated PET/CT imaging in a lung cancer patient with rare, diaphragm and thyroid cartilage metastases. (MIRT 2011;20:70-72

  5. Respiratory-gated PET/CT versus delayed images for the quantitative evaluation of lower pulmonary and hepatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahari, Abdel K; Lodge, Martin A; Wahl, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion degrades fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) images of the lower chest and upper abdomen, as the blur introduced by breathing motion increases the apparent size of the moving tumour lesions and decreases their apparent uptake, reducing the sensitivity of PET in detection of small lesions. We assessed the role of delayed and respiratory-gated PET acquisition in the quantitative evaluation of lung and liver lesions. A retrospective analysis of 64 lesions was performed. After initial non-gated whole-body PET/CT, respiratory gating was performed with 15 min in list mode. Non-gated delayed images were obtained by summing all list mode data. SUV(max) adjusted for lean body mass (SUL(max)) was measured in the initial whole-body scan, the delayed non-gated scans and the individual gated bins for each lesion. The axial z-position of SUL(max) for each lesion in five respiratory-gated bins was determined. The mean SUL of the non-pathological liver parenchyma was also recorded for each patient. Tumour lesion SUL(max) increased by an average of 34% in the delayed non-gated scan as compared with the whole-body initial scan and further by an additional 17.2% in respiratory-gated images. The maximum lesion displacement was 6.2 ± 5.0 mm. Delayed imaging alone substantially increases the magnitude of the SUL of liver and lung lesions as compared with standard whole-body images and may allow for a more accurate definition of the lesion's volume and localisation and improve tracer quantitation in malignant lesions in the lungs or upper abdomen. While respiratory gating provides more optimal imaging with greatest increase in SUL(max), the benefit is small, and delayed imaging appears sufficient in most cases. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. Optimal whole-body PET scanner configurations for different volumes of LSO scintillator: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Jonathan K; Dahlbom, Magnus L; Moses, William W; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Wang, Wenli; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2012-07-07

    The axial field of view (AFOV) of the current generation of clinical whole-body PET scanners range from 15-22 cm, which limits sensitivity and renders applications such as whole-body dynamic imaging or imaging of very low activities in whole-body cellular tracking studies, almost impossible. Generally, extending the AFOV significantly increases the sensitivity and count-rate performance. However, extending the AFOV while maintaining detector thickness has significant cost implications. In addition, random coincidences, detector dead time, and object attenuation may reduce scanner performance as the AFOV increases. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to find the optimal scanner geometry (i.e. AFOV, detector thickness and acceptance angle) based on count-rate performance for a range of scintillator volumes ranging from 10 to 93 l with detector thickness varying from 5 to 20 mm. We compare the results to the performance of a scanner based on the current Siemens Biograph mCT geometry and electronics. Our simulation models were developed based on individual components of the Siemens Biograph mCT and were validated against experimental data using the NEMA NU-2 2007 count-rate protocol. In the study, noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed as a function of maximum ring difference (i.e. acceptance angle) and activity concentration using a 27 cm diameter, 200 cm uniformly filled cylindrical phantom for each scanner configuration. To reduce the effect of random coincidences, we implemented a variable coincidence time window based on the length of the lines of response, which increased NECR performance up to 10% compared to using a static coincidence time window for scanners with a large maximum ring difference values. For a given scintillator volume, the optimal configuration results in modest count-rate performance gains of up to 16% compared to the shortest AFOV scanner with the thickest detectors. However, the longest AFOV of approximately 2 m with

  7. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  8. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [INCIA, UMR 5287, University of Bordeaux, Talence F-33400, France and Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest 29609 (France)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  9. Nonlinear PET parametric image reconstruction with MRI information using kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kuang; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T.; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging modality widely used in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. It is highly sensitive, but suffers from relatively poor spatial resolution, as compared with anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With the recent development of combined PET/MR systems, we can improve the PET image quality by incorporating MR information. Previously we have used kernel learning to embed MR information in static PET reconstruction and direct Patlak reconstruction. Here we extend this method to direct reconstruction of nonlinear parameters in a compartment model by using the alternating direction of multiplier method (ADMM) algorithm. Simulation studies show that the proposed method can produce superior parametric images compared with existing methods.

  10. In vivo amyloid imaging with PET in frontotemporal dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engler, Henry [Uruguay University Hospital of Clinics and Faculty of Science, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Montevideo (Uruguay); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); GE Healthcare, Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala (Sweden); Santillo, Alexander F.; Lindau, Maria; Lannfelt, Lars; Kilander, Lena [Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala (Sweden); Wang, Shu Xia [Guangdong Provincial People' s Hospital, Weilun PET Centre, Guangzhou (China); Savitcheva, Irina [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institute, Division of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Laangstroem, Bengt [GE Healthcare, Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Departments of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    N-methyl[11C]2-(4'methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole (PIB) is a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer with amyloid binding properties which allows in vivo measurement of cerebral amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a syndrome that can be clinically difficult to distinguish from AD, but in FTD amyloid deposition is not a characteristic pathological finding. The aim of this study is to investigate PIB retention in FTD. Ten patients with the diagnosis of FTD participated. The diagnosis was based on clinical and neuropsychological examination, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan, and PET with 18Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG). The PIB retention, measured in regions of interest, was normalised to a reference region (cerebellum). The results were compared with PIB retention data previously obtained from 17 AD patients with positive PIB retention and eight healthy controls (HC) with negative PIB retention. Statistical analysis was performed with a students t-test with significance level set to 0.00625 after Bonferroni correction. Eight FTD patients showed significantly lower PIB retention compared to AD in frontal (p < 0.0001), parietal (p < 0.0001), temporal (p = 0.0001), and occipital (p = 0.0003) cortices as well as in putamina (p < 0.0001). The PIB uptake in these FTD patients did not differ significantly from the HC in any region. However, two of the 10 FTD patients showed PIB retention similar to AD patients. The majority of FTD patients displayed no PIB retention. Thus, PIB could potentially aid in differentiating between FTD and AD. (orig.)

  11. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsia; SPECT und PET in der Diagnostik von Epilepsien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landvogt, C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-09-15

    In preoperative localisation of epileptogenic foci, nuclear medicine diagnostics plays a crucial role. FDG-PET is used as first line diagnostics. In case of inconsistent MRI, EEG and FDG-PET findings, {sup 11}C-Flumazenil-PET or ictal and interictal perfusion-SPECT should be performed. Other than FDG, Flumazenil can help to identify the extend of the region, which should be resected. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, further data analysis using voxelbased statistical analyses or SISCOM (substraction ictal SPECT coregistered MRI) should be performed.

  12. Quantitative analysis of fluorodeoxyglucose-, fluoro-misonidazole- and fluoro-thymidine-PET images on five patients irradiated for a non-small-cell bronchial cancer; Analyse quantitative d'images de TEP au fluorodesoxyglucose, au fluoromisonidazole et a la fluorothymidine chez cinq patients irradies pour un cancer bronchique non a petites cellules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thureau, S.; Dubray, B. [Departement de radiotherapie et physique medicale, centre Henri-Becquerel, Rouen (France); Litis EA 4108, QuantiF, universite de Rouen, Rouen (France); Modzelewski, R.; Lelandais, B.; Edet Sanson, A.; Gardin, I.; Vera, P. [Litis EA 4108, QuantiF, universite de Rouen, Rouen (France); Departement de medecine nucleaire, centre Henri-Becquerel, Rouen (France)

    2011-10-15

    As fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (positron emission tomography) is used for the planning of non-small-cell bronchial carcinoma radiotherapy in order to help to define the gross tumour volume (GTV), and as new tracers have been developed to define a biological target volume, the authors report the comparison of several thresholding methods by using fluorodeoxyglucose-, fluoro-misonidazole- and fluoro-thymidine-PET images. They notice important differences between the delineated volumes. Short communication

  13. Impact of PET - CT motion correction in minimising the gross tumour volume in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Masoomi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: To investigate the impact of respiratory motion on localization, and quantification lung lesions for the Gross Tumour Volume utilizing an in-house developed Auto3Dreg programme and dynamic NURBS-based cardiac-torso digitised phantom (NCAT. Methods: Respiratory motion may result in more than 30% underestimation of the SUV values of lung, liver and kidney tumour lesions. The motion correction technique adopted in this study was an image-based motion correction approach using, an in-house developed voxel-intensity-based and a multi-resolution multi-optimisation (MRMO algorithm. All the generated frames were co-registered to a reference frame using a time efficient scheme. The NCAT phantom was used to generate CT attenuation maps and activity distribution volumes for the lung regions. Quantitative assessment including Region of Interest (ROI, image fidelity and image correlation techniques, as well as semi-quantitative line profile analysis and qualitatively overlaying non-motion and motion corrected image frames were performed. Results: the largest transformation was observed in the Z-direction. The greatest translation was for the frame 3, end inspiration, and the smallest for the frame 5 which was closet frame to the reference frame at 67% expiration. Visual assessment of the lesion sizes, 20-60mm at 3 different locations, apex, mid and base of lung showed noticeable improvement for all the foci and their locations. The maximum improvements for the image fidelity were from 0.395 to 0.930 within the lesion volume of interest. The greatest improvement in activity concentration underestimation, post motion correction, was 7% below the true activity for the 20 mm lesion. The discrepancies in activity underestimation were reduced with increasing the lesion sizes. Overlay activity distribution on the attenuation map showed improved localization of the PET metabolic information to the anatomical CT images. Conclusion: The respiratory

  14. TU-CD-BRB-10: 18F-FDG PET Image-Derived Tumor Features Highlight Altered Pathways Identified by Trancriptomic Analysis in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tixier, F [CHU Miletrie, Poitiers (France); INSERM UMR1101 LaTIM, Brest (France); Cheze-Le-Rest, C; Dufour, X [CHU Miletrie, Poitiers (France); Hatt, M; Visvikis, D [INSERM UMR1101 LaTIM, Brest (France); Valette, G; Potard, G [CHRU Brest, Brest (France); Corcos, L [INSERM, UMR 1078, Brest (France)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Several quantitative features can be extracted from 18F-FDG PET images, such as standardized uptake values (SUVs), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), shape characterization (SC) or intra-tumor radiotracer heterogeneity quantification (HQ). Some of these features calculated from baseline 18F-FDG PET images have shown a prognostic and predictive clinical value. It has been hypothesized that these features highlight underlying tumor patho-physiological processes at smaller scales. The objective of this study was to investigate the ability of recovering alterations of signaling pathways from FDG PET image-derived features. Methods: 52 patients were prospectively recruited from two medical centers (Brest and Poitiers). All patients underwent an FDG PET scan for staging and biopsies of both healthy and primary tumor tissues. Biopsies went through a transcriptomic analysis performed in four spates on 4×44k chips (Agilent™). Primary tumors were delineated in the PET images using the Fuzzy Locally Adaptive Bayesian algorithm and characterized using 10 features including SUVs, SC and HQ. A module network algorithm followed by functional annotation was exploited in order to link PET features with signaling pathways alterations. Results: Several PET-derived features were found to discriminate differentially expressed genes between tumor and healthy tissue (fold-change >2, p<0.01) into 30 co-regulated groups (p<0.05). Functional annotations applied to these groups of genes highlighted associations with well-known pathways involved in cancer processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as with more specific ones such as unsaturated fatty acids. Conclusion: Quantitative features extracted from baseline 18F-FDG PET images usually exploited only for diagnosis and staging, were identified in this work as being related to specific altered pathways and may show promise as tools for personalizing treatment decisions.

  15. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (874), P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogen, Frank J.A. van den [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A.W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Slootweg, Piet J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (Node{sub CT}) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PET{sub VIS}), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PET{sub SUV}), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both Node{sub CT} and PET{sub VIS} showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PET{sub VIS}. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PET{sub SUV} was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  16. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  17. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia [Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital (CHUS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  18. (18)F-FDG PET image biomarkers improve prediction of late radiation-induced xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Lisanne V; Noordzij, Walter; Brouwer, Charlotte L; Boellaard, Ronald; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Langendijk, Johannes A; Sijtsema, Nanna M; Steenbakkers, Roel J H M

    2017-09-23

    Current prediction of radiation-induced xerostomia 12months after radiotherapy (Xer12m) is based on mean parotid gland dose and baseline xerostomia (Xerbaseline) scores. The hypothesis of this study was that prediction of Xer12m is improved with patient-specific characteristics extracted from (18)F-FDG PET images, quantified in PET image biomarkers (PET-IBMs). Intensity and textural PET-IBMs of the parotid gland were collected from pre-treatment (18)F-FDG PET images of 161 head and neck cancer patients. Patient-rated toxicity was prospectively collected. Multivariable logistic regression models resulting from step-wise forward selection and Lasso regularisation were internally validated by bootstrapping. The reference model with parotid gland dose and Xerbaseline was compared with the resulting PET-IBM models. High values of the intensity PET-IBM (90th percentile (P90)) and textural PET-IBM (Long Run High Grey-level Emphasis 3 (LRHG3E)) were significantly associated with lower risk of Xer12m. Both PET-IBMs significantly added in the prediction of Xer12m to the reference model. The AUC increased from 0.73 (0.65-0.81) (reference model) to 0.77 (0.70-0.84) (P90) and 0.77 (0.69-0.84) (LRHG3E). Prediction of Xer12m was significantly improved with pre-treatment PET-IBMs, indicating that high metabolic parotid gland activity is associated with lower risk of developing late xerostomia. This study highlights the potential of incorporating patient-specific PET-derived functional characteristics into NTCP model development. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Survey of FDG- and Amyloid-PET Imaging in Dementia and GRADE Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perani Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PET based tools can improve the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and differential diagnosis of dementia. The importance of identifying individuals at risk of developing dementia among people with subjective cognitive complaints or mild cognitive impairment has clinical, social, and therapeutic implications. Within the two major classes of AD biomarkers currently identified, that is, markers of pathology and neurodegeneration, amyloid- and FDG-PET imaging represent decisive tools for their measurement. As a consequence, the PET tools have been recognized to be of crucial value in the recent guidelines for the early diagnosis of AD and other dementia conditions. The references based recommendations, however, include large PET imaging literature based on visual methods that greatly reduces sensitivity and specificity and lacks a clear cut-off between normal and pathological findings. PET imaging can be assessed using parametric or voxel-wise analyses by comparing the subject’s scan with a normative data set, significantly increasing the diagnostic accuracy. This paper is a survey of the relevant literature on FDG and amyloid-PET imaging aimed at providing the value of quantification for the early and differential diagnosis of AD. This allowed a meta-analysis and GRADE analysis revealing high values for PET imaging that might be useful in considering recommendations.

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  2. Anatomical standardization of small animal brain FDG-PET images using synthetic functional template: experimental comparison with anatomical template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Christopher; Hjornevik, Trine; Courivaud, Frédéric; Willoch, Frode

    2011-07-15

    Anatomical standardization (also called spatial normalization) of positron emission tomography (PET) small animal brain images is required to make statistical comparisons across individuals. Frequently, PET images are co-registered to an individual MR or CT image of the same subject in order to transform the functional images to an anatomical space. In the present work, we evaluate the normalization of synthetic PET (synPET) images to a synthetic PET template. To provide absolute error in terms of pixel misregistration, we created a synthetic PET image from the individual MR image through segmentation of the brain into gray and white matter which produced functional and anatomical images in the same space. When comparing spatial normalization of synPET images to a synPET template with the gold standard (MR images to an MR template), a mean translation error of 0.24mm (±0.20) and a maximal mean rotational error of 0.85° (±0.91) were found. Significant decrease in misregistration error was measured when achieving spatial normalization of functional images to a functional template instead of an anatomical template. This accuracy strengthens the use of standardization methods where individual PET images are registered to a customized PET template in order to statistically assess physiological changes in rat brains.

  3. Application of PET/CT Image Segmentation Technology in Formulating Radiotherapy Plan of Lung Cancer%PET/CT图像分割技术在肺癌放疗计划中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭莹莹; 张书旭; 余辉; 张国前; 周露; 周祥

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inlfuence on radiotherapy planning of lung cancer with the PET/CT segmentation technology.Methods 12 patients with non-metastatic lung cancer were scanned by PET/CT. The PET targets were segmented by automatic segmenting program written independently based on PCNN model.According to CT images and PET/CT images, the tumor targets were delineated manually by ocular estimating, radiotherapy planning was formulated with the same parameters, the targets volume and dose distribution were compared and analyzed.Results The differences between automatic segmentation target area and manual delineation target area of PET weren’t of statistical signiifcance (P>0.05), which proved the PET automatic segmentation method was more accurate and reliable. Statistically signiifcant differences (P0.05) in the quantity difference of spinal cords, hearts and esophaguses.Conclusion PET/CT image segmentation improves the accuracy of tumor target delineation. The radiotherapy planning based on target segmentation can reduce the illuminated scope of normal tissues and the incidence rate of complications.%目的:探讨PET/CT图像分割技术对肺癌放疗计划制定的影响。方法对12例无转移的肺癌患者行PET/CT扫描。采用自主编写的基于PCNN模型的自动分割程序对PET靶区进行分割处理,再分别以CT图像、PET/CT图像为依据采用目测法手动勾画肿瘤靶区,以相同参数制定调强放疗计划,对比分析靶区体积和剂量分布。结果 PET自动分割靶区与PET手动勾画靶区之间未见统计学差异(P>0.05),分割方法准确可靠;与CT手动勾画靶区之间差异有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论 PET/CT图像分割技术提高了肿瘤靶区勾画的准确性,依据分割靶区制订的放疗计划能降低正常组织受照范围,减少并发症的发生率。

  4. Evolving role of FDG PET imaging in assessing joint disorders: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, Kathleen; Saboury, Babak; Basu, Sandip; Brothers, Alex; Ogdie, Alexis; Werner, Tom; Torigian, Drew A. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Alavi, Abass [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Assessing joint disorders has been a relatively recent and evolving application of {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. FDG is taken up by inflammatory cells, particularly when they are active as part of an ongoing inflammatory process. Hence FDG PET has been employed to assess a wide array of arthritic disorders. FDG PET imaging has been investigated in various joint diseases for diagnostic purposes, treatment monitoring, and as a prognostic indicator as in other disorders. In some of the diseases the ancillary findings in FDG PET have provided important clues about the underlying pathophysiology and pathogenesis processes. While substantial promise has been demonstrated in a number of studies, it is clear that the potential utility of PET in this clinical realm far outweighs that which has been established to date. (orig.)

  5. A pretargeting system for tumor PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eKraeber-Bodéré

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Labeled antibodies, as well as their fragments and antibody-derived recombinant constructs, have long been proposed as general vectors to target radionuclides to tumor lesions for imaging and therapy. They have indeed shown promise in both imaging and therapeutic applications, but they have not fulfilled the original expectations of achieving sufficient image contrast for tumor detection or sufficient radiation dose delivered to tumors for therapy. Pretargeting was originally developed for tumor immunoscintigraphy. It was assumed that directly-radiolabled antibodies could be replaced by an unlabeled immunoconjugate capable of binding both a tumor-specific antigen and a small molecular weight molecule. The small molecular weight molecule would carry the radioactive payload and would be injected after the bispecific immunoconjugate. It has been demonstrated that this approach does allow for both antibody-specific recognition and fast clearance of the radioactive molecule, thus resulting in improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios. It was subsequently shown that pretargeting also held promise for tumor therapy, translating improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios into more specific delivery of absorbed radiation doses. Many technical approaches have been proposed to implement pretargeting, and two have been extensively documented. One is based on the avidin-biotin system, and the other on bispecific antibodies binding a tumor-specific antigen and a hapten. Both have been studied in preclinical models, as well as in several clinical studies, and have shown improved targeting efficiency. This article reviews the historical and recent preclinical and clinical advances in the use of bispecific-antibody-based pretargeting for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The results of recent evaluation of pretargeting in PET imaging also are discussed.

  6. Grading of Cerebral Glioma with Multiparametric MR Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG-PET: Concordance and Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Choi, Seung Hong; Yun, Tae Jin; Song, Yong Sub [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Jun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Yong [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Kee-Hyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate concordance rates and predictive values in concordant cases among multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET to grade cerebral gliomas. Multiparametric MR imaging and FDG-PET were performed in 60 consecutive patients with cerebral gliomas (12 low-grade and 48 high-grade gliomas). As the dichotomic variables, conventional MRI, minimum apparent diffusion coefficient in diffusion-weighted imaging, maximum relative cerebral blood volume ratio in perfusion-weighted imaging, choline/creatine ratio and (lipid and lactate)/creatine ratio in MR spectroscopy, and maximum standardised uptake value ratio in FDG-PET in low- and high-grade gliomas were compared. Their concordance rates and positive/negative predictive values (PPV/NPV) in concordant cases were obtained for the various combinations of multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET. There were significant differences between low- and high-grade gliomas in all techniques. Combinations of two, three, four, and five out of the five techniques showed concordance rates of 77.0 ± 4.8 %, 65.5 ± 4.0 %, 58.3 ± 2.6 % and 53.3 %, PPV in high-grade concordant cases of 97.3 ± 1.7 %, 99.1 ± 1.4 %, 100.0 ± 0 % and 100.0 % and NPV in low-grade concordant cases of 70.2 ± 7.5 %, 78.0 ± 6.0 %, 80.3 ± 3.4 % and 80.0 %, respectively. Multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET have a concordant tendency in a two-tiered classification for the grading of cerebral glioma. If at least two examinations concordantly indicated high-grade gliomas, the PPV was about 95 %. (orig.)

  7. In-beam PET imaging for on-line adaptive proton therapy: an initial phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Mirkovic, Dragon; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David

    2014-07-01

    We developed and investigated a positron emission tomography (PET) system for use with on-line (both in-beam and intra-fraction) image-guided adaptive proton therapy applications. The PET has dual rotating depth-of-interaction measurable detector panels by using solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays and LYSO scintillators. It has a 44 mm diameter trans-axial and 30 mm axial field-of-view (FOV). A 38 mm diameter polymethyl methacrylate phantom was placed inside the FOV. Both PET and phantom axes were aligned with a collimated 179.2 MeV beam. Each beam delivered ˜50 spills (0.5 s spill and 1.5 s inter-spill time, 3.8 Gy at Bragg peak). Data from each beam were acquired with detectors at a given angle. Nine datasets for nine beams with detectors at nine different angles over 180° were acquired for full-tomographic imaging. Each dataset included data both during and 5 min after irradiations. The positron activity-range was measured from the PET image reconstructed from all nine datasets and compared to the results from simulated images. A 22Na disc-source was also imaged after each beam to monitor the PET system's performance. PET performed well except for slight shifts of energy photo-peak positions (PET with high sensitivity and uniform resolution. Sub-mm activity-ranges were achieved with minimal 6 s acquisition time and three spill irradiations. These results indicate the feasibility of PET for intra-fraction beam-range verification. Further studies are needed to develop and apply a novel clinical PET system for on-line image-guided adaptive proton therapy.

  8. A Review on Motion Correction Methods in Pet/Ct Images for Detection of Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyeri F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography (PET is an important cancer imaging tool, both for diagnosing and staging, as well as offering predictive information based on response. PET is a nuclear medicine imaging technique which produces a three-dimensional image of functional processes in the body. While PET is commonly used to detect the tumors, especially in breast, colon, lung and for lymphoma, as well in the last decade it is verified as considerably more accurate than Computed Tomography (CT in the distinction between benign and malignant lesions. PET is not only more accurate than conventional imaging for the assessment of therapy response, but also it is useful to detect some viable tumor cells after treatment. However, motion is a source of artifacts in the medical imaging and results in reducing the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the image. In general during the procedure of PET scanning, a few types of motion can occur that should be corrected and compensated. Different body motions are classified as brain motion, cardiac motion and respiratory motion. In this study, some of the most important motion correction and compensation methods using PET imaging system are compared.

  9. Robust framework for PET image reconstruction incorporating system and measurement uncertainties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Liu

    Full Text Available In Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an optimal estimate of the radioactivity concentration is obtained from the measured emission data under certain criteria. So far, all the well-known statistical reconstruction algorithms require exactly known system probability matrix a priori, and the quality of such system model largely determines the quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for PET image reconstruction for the real world case where the PET system model is subject to uncertainties. The method counts PET reconstruction as a regularization problem and the image estimation is achieved by means of an uncertainty weighted least squares framework. The performance of our work is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan simulated and real phantom data, which demonstrates significant improvements in image quality over the least squares reconstruction efforts.

  10. Development of new peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands for SPECT and PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsifis, A.; Fookes, C.; Pham, T.; Holmes, T.; Mattner, F.; Berghoffer, P.; Gregoire, M.C.; Loc' h, C.; Greguric, I. [Radiopharmaceuticas Research Institute, ANSTO, Menai, N.S.W. Sydney (Australia); Thominiaux, C.; Boutin, H.; Chauveau, F.; Gregoire, M.C.; Hantraye, Ph.; Tavitain, B.; Dolle, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Arlicot, N.; Chalon, S.; Guilloteau, D. [Universite Francois Rabelais, Inserm U619, 37 - Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    This study aims to demonstrate that a number of radiolabelled ({sup 123}I,{sup 11}C, {sup 18}F) imidazo pyridines, imidazo pyridazines and indolglyoxylamides can be developed as potential tracers for SPECT and PET imaging. (N.C.)

  11. A generator-produced gallium-68 radiopharmaceutical for PET imaging of myocardial perfusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, Vijay; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Harpstrite, Scott E; Prior, Julie L; Gu, Hannah; Rath, Nigam P; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    ... incorporating alternative radionuclides. Recently, germanium/gallium (Ge/Ga) generators capable of producing high quality 68Ga, an isotope with excellent emission characteristics for clinical PET imaging, have emerged...

  12. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipritidis, John, E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3052 (Australia); Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne VIC 3002 (Australia)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with{sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV{sub HU} and ρV{sub Jac}) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ{sub m} = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d{sub 20} for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV{sub HU}) with σ{sub m} = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d{sub 20} ⩽ 0.68, with r{sup ¯}=0.42±0.16 and d{sup ¯}{sub 20}=0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant

  13. Imaging characteristics of a volume holographic lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Jiang, Zhu-qing; Xu, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Shao-jie; Sun, Ya-jun; Tao, Shi-quan

    2009-07-01

    A volume holographic grating lens can reconstruct the three-dimensional information by conducting multiple optical slicing of an object based on Bragg selectivity of the volume holographic grating. In this paper, we employ the point-spread function of volume holographic imaging system to theoretically analyze its imaging resolution. In the experiments, the volume holographic gratings are made with a spherical reference (SR) and a planar reference (PR), respectively, and used as volume holographic imaging lens in our imaging system. The longitudinal and lateral defocusing characteristics of volume holographic lens with SR and with PR are investigated experimentally by displacing the interested objects from original reference location, respectively. The effects of the parameters of the volume holographic lens on the longitudinal and lateral resolution are also discussed. The experimental results show that increasing the size of the volume holographic lens can improve the depth resolution, and in particular, it has greater influence on SR VHI. The lateral selectivity of SR VHI is more sensitive than that of PR VHI, and the Bragg degenerate diffraction of PR VHI on the y axis is obviously observed.

  14. Impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor volume segmentation on patient-specific targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry using CLR1404

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besemer, Abigail E.; Titz, Benjamin; Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Kuo, John S.; Robins, H. Ian; Hall, Lance T.; Bednarz, Bryan P.

    2017-08-01

    Variations in tumor volume segmentation methods in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) may lead to dosimetric uncertainties. This work investigates the impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor segmentation on TRT dosimetry in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. In this study, PET/CT images of five brain cancer patients were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h post-injection of 124I-CLR1404. The tumor volume was segmented using two standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold levels, two tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) threshold levels, and a T1 Gadolinium-enhanced MRI threshold. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC), and overlap volume (OV) metrics were calculated to compare differences in the MRI and PET contours. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 voxel-level dose distribution was calculated from the 124I-CLR1404 activity distribution using RAPID, a Geant4 Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform. The TBR, SUV, and MRI tumor volumes ranged from 2.3-63.9 cc, 0.1-34.7 cc, and 0.4-11.8 cc, respectively. The average  ±  standard deviation (range) was 0.19  ±  0.13 (0.01-0.51), 0.30  ±  0.17 (0.03-0.67), and 0.75  ±  0.29 (0.05-1.00) for the JSC, DSC, and OV, respectively. The DSC and JSC values were small and the OV values were large for both the MRI-SUV and MRI-TBR combinations because the regions of PET uptake were generally larger than the MRI enhancement. Notable differences in the tumor dose volume histograms were observed for each patient. The mean (standard deviation) 131I-CLR1404 tumor doses ranged from 0.28-1.75 Gy GBq-1 (0.07-0.37 Gy GBq-1). The ratio of maximum-to-minimum mean doses for each patient ranged from 1.4-2.0. The tumor volume and the interpretation of the tumor dose is highly sensitive to the imaging modality, PET enhancement metric, and threshold level used for tumor volume segmentation. The large variations in tumor doses clearly demonstrate the need for standard

  15. Modern CT and PET/CT imaging of the liver; Moderne CT- und PET/CT-Bildgebung der Leber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, J.; Heusner, T.A.; Riegger, C.; Reichelt, D.; Kuhlemann, J.; Antoch, G.; Blondin, D. [Medizinische Fakultaet, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is now widely available and represents an important and rapid method for the diagnostics of acute liver disease, characterization of focal liver lesions, planning of interventional therapy measures and postintervention control. In recent years CT has not become less important despite the increasing value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By the use of different contrast medium phases good characterization of space-occupying lesions can be achieved. For the diagnostics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) a triphasic examination protocol should always be implemented. The introduction of dual energy CT increased the sensitivity of imaging of hypervascularized and hypovascularized liver lesions and by the use of virtual native imaging it has become possible to avoid additional native imaging which reduces the x-ray exposition of patients. Positron emission tomography (PET) has an advantage for imaging in oncology because nearly the complete body of the patient can be screened and this is the main indication for PET/CT (whole-body staging). For purely hepatic problems 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT using diagnostic CT data has a higher precision than CT alone but is inferior to MRI. (orig.) [German] Die Computertomographie (CT) ist heute breit verfuegbar und stellt eine wichtige und schnelle Methode zur Diagnostik akuter Lebererkrankungen, der Artdiagnostik fokaler Leberlaesionen und der Planung interventioneller Therapiemassnahmen sowie der postinterventionellen Kontrolle dar. In den letzten Jahren hat die CT trotz des zunehmenden Stellenwerts der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) nicht an Bedeutung verloren. Durch den Einsatz unterschiedlicher Kontrastmittelphasen kann meist eine gute Charakterisierung von Raumforderungen erfolgen. Bei der Diagnostik des hepatozellulaeren Karzinoms (HCC) sollte beispielsweise immer ein triphasisches Untersuchungsprotokoll angewendet werden. Mit Einfuehrung der Dual-energy-CT hat die Sensitivitaet in der

  16. Performance of a PET Insert for High Resolution Small Animal PET/MR Imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortz, Greg; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Khan, Muhammad S; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Schellenberg, Graham; Shams, Ehsan; Zhang, Xuezhu; Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew; Sossi, Vesna

    2017-09-14

    We present the characterization of a compact magnetic resonance (MR) compatible positron emission tomography (PET) insert for simultaneous pre-clinical PET/MR imaging. While specifically designed with the strict size constraint to fit inside the 114 mm inner diameter of the BGA-12S gradient coil used in the Bruker 70/20 and 94/20 series of small animal MR imaging (MRI) systems, the insert can be easily installed in any appropriate MRI scanner or used as a stand-alone PET system. Methods: The insert is made from a ring of 16 detector-blocks each made from depth-of-interaction capable dual-layer-offset arrays of cerium-doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystals read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. Scintillator crystal arrays are made from 22×10 / 21×9 crystals in the bottom/top layers with 6/4 mm layer thicknesses, arranged with a 1.27 mm pitch, resulting in a useable field of view (FOV) 28 mm long and ~55 mm wide. Results: Spatial resolution ranges from 1.17 to 1.86 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) in the radial direction from a radial offset of 0 to 15 mm. With a 300-800 keV energy window, peak sensitivity is 2.2% and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) from a mouse-sized phantom at 3.7 MBq is 11.1 kcps and peaks at 20.8 kcps at 14.5 MBq. Phantom imaging shows that feature sizes as low as 0.7 mm can be resolved. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/MR images of mouse and rat brains show no signs of inter-modality interference, and can excellently resolve substructures within the brains. Conclusion: Due to excellent spatial resolvability and lack of intermodality interference, this PET insert will serve as a useful tool for pre-clinical PET/MR. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  17. 11C-acetate PET imaging in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushiro Takata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activation of glial cells is a cardinal feature in multiple sclerosis (MS pathology, and acetate has been reported to be selectively uptaken by astrocytes in the CNS. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of PET with (11C-acetate for MS diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 6 healthy volunteers (HV were enrolled. The (11C-acetate brain uptake on PET was measured in patients with MS and HV. Volume-of-interest analysis of cerebral gray and white matter based on the segmentation technique for co-registered MRI and voxel-based statistical parametric analysis were performed. Correlation between 11C-acetate uptake and the lesion number in T1- and T2- weighted MR images were also assessed. RESULTS: The standardized uptake value (SUV of 11C-acetate was increased in both white and gray matter in MS patients compared to HV. Voxel-based statistical analysis revealed a significantly increased SUV relative to that in the bilateral thalami (SUVt in a broad area of white matter, particularly in the subcortical white matter of MS patients. The numbers of T2 lesions and T1 black holes were significantly correlated with SUV of (11C-acetate in white and gray matter. CONCLUSIONS: The 11C-acetate uptake significantly increased in MS patients and correlated to the number of MRI lesions. These preliminary data suggest that (11C-acetate PET can be a useful clinical examination for MS patients.

  18. Thorax: normal and benign pathologic patterns in FDG-PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmann, Jason W; Gerbaudo, Victor H

    2014-04-01

    This article describes the normal patterns of thoracic (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) biodistribution, and expands on the role of FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of patients suffering from a spectrum of benign pathologic conditions that affect the chest. The discussion addresses the applications of FDG-PET/CT imaging in a wide variety of chest-related disorders. Familiarity with the normal thoracic biodistribution of FDG, coupled with knowledge of the potential nonmalignant causes of increased FDG uptake in the chest, is essential to minimize the incidence of incorrect interpretation of FDG-PET images in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. VrPET/CT: development of a rotating multimodality scanner for small-animal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Eduardo; Vaquero, Juan José; Sisniega, Alejandro; España, Manuel; Tapias, Gustavo; Udías, Ángel; García,Verónica; Rodríguez-Ruano, Alexia; Desco, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2008 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '08), Dresden, Germany, 19-25 Oct. 2008 This work reports on the development and evaluation of the PET component of a PETtCT system for small-animal in-vivo imaging. The PET and CT subsystems are assembled in a rotary gantry in such a way that the center of rotation for both imaging modalities is mechanically aligned. The PET scanner configuration is based on 2 detector modules, each of which consis...

  20. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær;

    2012-01-01

    was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II). CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity...

  1. The Effect of Defective PET Detectors in Clinical Simultaneous [(18)F]FDG Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Voert, Edwin E G W; Delso, Gaspar; de Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Huellner, Martin; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of defective positron emission tomography (PET) detectors on clinical PET image quality in simultaneous PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF reconstructed images. A total of six patients with various malignant tumors were included and underwent a 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose PET scan in a fully functional simultaneous TOF PET/MRI. TOF and non-TOF PET images were reconstructed before and after simulating defective detector units. All images were clinically assessed and scored. In addition, a quantitative assessment was performed. Differences were ascertained and compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed-rank test. Without TOF, the image artifacts introduced by one defective detector unit already started to degrade the overall image quality. It reduced the confidence and could lead to a change in diagnosis. Simulating three or five defective detector units resulted in more artifacts and further reduced overall image quality and confidence. By including TOF information, the effects were mitigated: Images reconstructed with one defective detector unit had similar scores as the ones without defective units. The average absolute percentage error for one, three, and five defective detector units were respectively 8, 20, and 37 % for the non-TOF cases and only 5, 11, and 19 % for the TOF cases. Our study indicates that PET image artifacts due to (simulated) defective detectors are significantly mitigated with the integration of TOF information in simultaneous PET/MR. One defective detector unit introduces, on average, a 5 % absolute percentage error. However, in TOF imaging, even in cases with one or three defective units for head and neck imaging and one defective unit for chest and abdominal imaging, overall image quality, artifact scoring, and reader confidence are not significantly degraded.

  2. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [18F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Larsen, Vibeke A; Muhic, Aida;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Both [(18)F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET and blood volume (BV) MRI supplement routine T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI in gliomas, but whether the two modalities provide identical or complementary information is unresolved. The aims of the study were to investigate the feasibility...... congruence in the tumour volumes determined by FET PET, BV MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI. RESULTS: FET volume and TBRmax were higher in BV-positive than in BV-negative scans, and both VOLBV and rBVmax were higher in FET-positive than in FET-negative scans. TBRmax and rBVmax were positively correlated (R (2...

  3. Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) Imaging: A Novel Method for Optical Imaging of PET Isotopes in Biological Systems: e13300

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robin S Dothager; Reece J Goiffon; Erin Jackson; Scott Harpstrite; David Piwnica-Worms

    2010-01-01

    .... Principal Findings To improve optical imaging of Cerenkov radiation in biological systems, we demonstrate that Cerenkov radiation from decay of the PET isotopes 64Cu and 18F can be spectrally coupled...

  4. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsy; La TEP et la TEMP pour l'etude des epilepsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semah, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic-Joliot, Institut d' Imagerie Biomedicale, Dir. des Sciences du Vivant, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2007-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging are very useful for the management of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy. Presurgical evaluation of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy often included PET imaging using FDG. The use of SPECT in these patients adds some more information and gives the clinicians the possibility of having ictal imaging. Furthermore, PET and SPECT imaging are performed to better understand the pathophysiology of epilepsy. (authors)

  5. Simultaneous PET/MR head–neck cancer imaging: Preliminary clinical experience and multiparametric evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covello, M., E-mail: echoplanare@gmail.com [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Cavaliere, C.; Aiello, M.; Cianelli, M.S. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Mesolella, M.; Iorio, B. [Department of Otorhinolaryngoiatry, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Rossi, A.; Nicolai, E. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI is a suitable tool for head/neck T-staging. • No significant differences have been found for PET measures get by both PET/CT and PET/MRI. • SUV 2D and 3D measures in HN lesion offer comparable estimations. • Multiparametric evaluation allows a complete characterization of HN lesions. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the role of simultaneous hybrid PET/MR imaging and to correlate metabolic PET dat