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Sample records for volume i orbital

  1. The validity and reliability of computed tomography orbital volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, Silviu C; Dreizin, David; Uluer, Mehmet; Mossop, Corey; Grant, Michael P; Nam, Arthur J

    2017-09-01

    Orbital volume calculations allow surgeons to design patient-specific implants to correct volume deficits. It is estimated that changes as small as 1 ml in orbital volume can lead to enophthalmos. Awareness of the limitations of orbital volume computed tomography (CT) measurements is critical to differentiate between true volume differences and measurement error. The aim of this study is to analyze the validity and reliability of CT orbital volume measurements. A total of 12 cadaver orbits were scanned using a standard CT maxillofacial protocol. Each orbit was dissected to isolate the extraocular muscles, fatty tissue, and globe. The empty bony orbital cavity was then filled with sculpting clay. The volumes of the muscle, fat, globe, and clay (i.e., bony orbital cavity) were then individually measured via water displacement. The CT-derived volumes, measured by manual segmentation, were compared to the direct measurements to determine validity. The difference between CT orbital volume measurements and physically measured volumes is not negligible. Globe volumes have the highest agreement with 95% of differences between -0.5 and 0.5 ml, bony volumes are more likely to be overestimated with 95% of differences between -1.8 and 2.6 ml, whereas extraocular muscle volumes have poor validity and should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 'Orbital volume restoration rate after orbital fracture'; a CT-based orbital volume measurement for evaluation of orbital wall reconstructive effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, J M; Sung, K H; Chi, M

    2017-01-13

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of orbital reconstruction and factors related to the effect of orbital reconstruction by assessing of orbital volume using orbital computed tomography (CT) in cases of orbital wall fracture.MethodsIn this retrospective study, 68 patients with isolated blowout fractures were evaluated. The volumes of orbits and herniated orbital tissues were determined by CT scans using a three-dimensional reconstruction technique (the Eclipse Treatment Planning System). Orbital CT was performed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and at final follow ups (minimum of 6 months). We evaluated the reconstructive effect of surgery making a new formula, 'orbital volume reconstruction rate' from orbital volume differences between fractured and contralateral orbits before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at final follow up.ResultsMean volume of fractured orbits before surgery was 23.01±2.60 cm(3) and that of contralateral orbits was 21.31±2.50 cm(3) (P=0.005). Mean volume of the fractured orbits immediately after surgery was 21.29±2.42 cm(3), and that of the contralateral orbits was 21.33±2.52 cm(3) (P=0.921). Mean volume of fractured orbits at final follow up was 21.50±2.44 cm(3), and that of contralateral orbits was 21.32±2.50 cm(3) (P=0.668). The mean orbital volume reconstruction rate was 100.47% immediately after surgery and 99.17% at final follow up. No significant difference in orbital volume reconstruction rate was observed with respect to fracture site or orbital implant type. Patients that underwent operation within 14 days of trauma had a better reconstruction rate at final follow up than patients who underwent operation over 14 days after trauma (P=0.039).ConclusionComputer-based measurements of orbital fracture volume can be used to evaluate the reconstructive effect of orbital implants and provide useful quantitative information. Significant reduction of orbital volume is observed immediately after orbital wall

  3. Correlation between the 2-Dimensional Extent of Orbital Defects and the 3-Dimensional Volume of Herniated Orbital Content in Patients with Isolated Orbital Wall Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jong Hyun; Moon, Myeong Ho; Lee, Yong Hae; Koh, In Chang; Kim, Kyu Nam; Kim, Chang Gyun

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between the 2-dimensional (2D) extent of orbital defects and the 3-dimensional (3D) volume of herniated orbital content in patients with an orbital wall fracture. Methods This retrospective study was based on the medical records and radiologic data of 60 patients from January 2014 to June 2016 for a unilateral isolated orbital wall fracture. They were classified into 2 groups depending on whether the fracture involved the inferior wall (group I, n=30) or the medial wall (group M, n=30). The 2D area of the orbital defect was calculated using the conventional formula. The 2D extent of the orbital defect and the 3D volume of herniated orbital content were measured with 3D image processing software. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlations between the 2D and 3D parameters. Results Varying degrees of positive correlation were found between the 2D extent of the orbital defects and the 3D herniated orbital volume in both groups (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.568−0.788; R2=32.2%−62.1%). Conclusions Both the calculated and measured 2D extent of the orbital defects showed a positive correlation with the 3D herniated orbital volume in orbital wall fractures. However, a relatively large volume of herniation (>0.9 cm3) occurred not infrequently despite the presence of a small orbital defect (<1.9 cm2). Therefore, estimating the 3D volume of the herniated content in addition to the 2D orbital defect would be helpful for determining whether surgery is indicated and ensuring adequate surgical outcomes. PMID:28194344

  4. Comparison of orbital volume obtained by tomography and rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roça, Guilherme Berto; Foggiatto, José Aguiomar; Ono, Maria Cecilia Closs; Ono, Sergio Eiji; da Silva Freitas, Renato

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to compare orbital volume obtained by helical tomography and rapid prototyping. The study sample was composed of 6 helical tomography scans. Eleven healthy orbits were identified to have their volumes measured. The volumetric analysis with the helical tomography utilized the same protocol developed by the Plastic Surgery Unit of the Federal University of Paraná. From the CT images, 11 prototypes were created, and their respective volumes were analyzed in 2 ways: using software by SolidWorks and by direct analysis, when the prototype was filled with saline solution. For statistical analysis, the results of the volumes of the 11 orbits were considered independent. The average orbital volume measurements obtained by the method of Ono et al was 20.51 cm, the average obtained by the SolidWorks program was 20.64 cm, and the average measured using the prototype method was 21.81 cm. The 3 methods demonstrated a strong correlation between the measurements. The right and left orbits of each patient had similar volumes. The tomographic method for the analysis of orbital volume using the Ono protocol yielded consistent values, and by combining this method with rapid prototyping, both reliability validations of results were enhanced.

  5. The orbital volume measurement in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Chang, Moo-Hwan; Kyung, Sungeun E

    2015-01-01

    Enophthalmos occurs from the increased bony volume or decreased soft tissue volume in the orbit and can be caused in patients with long-term ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. This study tried to find out the change of orbital volume by measuring the orbital volume before and after operation in adult patients who underwent VP shunt for hydrocephalus. The 2 evaluators measured orbital volume by using ITK-SNAP 2.4 program with double-blind test for computed tomography images before and after operation targeting 36 patients over the age of 18 who underwent VP shunt with pressure-controlled valve from 2003 to 2011. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test of GraphPad software was used to statistically analyze the difference in orbital volume change before and after operation. In case of mean pre-op orbital volume of total 36 patients, the right was measured as 23.72 ± 4.65 cm(3), the left as 23.47 ± 4.61 cm(3), the post-op right as 24.67 ± 4.70 cm(3), and the left as 24.18 ± 4.63 cm(3), showing no statistically significant difference (P = 0.106). The mean pre-op orbital volume of 14 people (28 eyes) followed for more than 11 months was 25.06 ± 4.58 cm(3) in the right and 24.4 ± 5.02 cm(3) in the left and the mean post-op orbital volume was 27.0 ± 4.28 cm(3) in the right and 25.76 ± 3.92 cm(3) in the left, showing statistically significant differences in the change of the volume before and after shunt operation (P = 0.0057). In patients who maintain long-term shunt devices after VP shunt, remodeling of matured orbital bone may be caused due to the change in pressure gradient between cranial cavity and orbit and the possible occurrence of resulting secondary enophthalmos by increased orbital volume should be considered.

  6. Automatic measurement of orbital volume in unilateral coronal synostosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Einarsson, Gudmundur; Darvann, Tron Andre;

    2016-01-01

    Premature fusion of the coronal suture on one side of the calvaria (unilateral coronal synostosis, UCS) results in asymmetric craniofacial development and the deformation of the orbits. Often this necessitates surgery, where CT scanning is employed to obtain measures of the bony orbit...... segmentations. We obtain similar measures, as well as high Dice scores, compared to the experts. The run time for the proposed approach with a prototype implementation is around 3 minutes on a standard laptop, making the method suitable for rapid evaluation of orbital volume in UCS....

  7. Age and gender-specific reference values of orbital fat and muscle volumes in Caucasians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regensburg, N.I.; Wiersinga, W.M.; van Velthoven, M.E.J.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; Zonneveld, F.W.; Baldeschi, L.; Saeed, P.; Mourits, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    To provide age and gender-specific reference values for orbital fat and muscle volumes (MV) in Caucasian adults. Computed tomographic scans of 160 orbits from 52 men and 55 women, aged 20-80 years, not affected by orbital disease were evaluated. Orbital bony cavity volume (OV), fat volume (FV) and M

  8. Age and gender-specific reference values of orbital fat and muscle volumes in Caucasians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regensburg, N.I.; Wiersinga, W.M.; van Velthoven, M.E.J.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; Zonneveld, F.W.; Baldeschi, L.; Saeed, P.; Mourits, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    To provide age and gender-specific reference values for orbital fat and muscle volumes (MV) in Caucasian adults. Computed tomographic scans of 160 orbits from 52 men and 55 women, aged 20-80 years, not affected by orbital disease were evaluated. Orbital bony cavity volume (OV), fat volume (FV) and

  9. Semiautomatic regional segmentation to measure orbital fat volumes in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. A validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerci, M; Elefante, A; Strianese, D; Senese, R; Bonavolontà, P; Alfano, B; Bonavolontà, B; Brunetti, A

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to validate a novel semi-automated segmentation method to measure regional intra-orbital fat tissue volume in Graves' ophthalmopathy. Twenty-four orbits from 12 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, 24 orbits from 12 controls, ten orbits from five MRI study simulations and two orbits from a digital model were used. Following manual region of interest definition of the orbital volumes performed by two operators with different levels of expertise, an automated procedure calculated intra-orbital fat tissue volumes (global and regional, with automated definition of four quadrants). In patients with Graves' disease, clinical activity score and degree of exophthalmos were measured and correlated with intra-orbital fat volumes. Operator performance was evaluated and statistical analysis of the measurements was performed. Accurate intra-orbital fat volume measurements were obtained with coefficients of variation below 5%. The mean operator difference in total fat volume measurements was 0.56%. Patients had significantly higher intra-orbital fat volumes than controls (p<0.001 using Student's t test). Fat volumes and clinical score were significantly correlated (p<0.001). The semi-automated method described here can provide accurate, reproducible intra-orbital fat measurements with low inter-operator variation and good correlation with clinical data.

  10. Orbital change following Le Fort III advancement in syndromic craniosynostosis: quantitative evaluation of orbital volume, infra-orbital rim and globe position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nout, Erik; van Bezooijen, Jine S; Koudstaal, Maarten J; Veenland, Jifke F; Hop, Wim C J; Wolvius, Eppo B; van der Wal, Karel G H

    2012-04-01

    Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis suffering from shallow orbits due to midface hypoplasia can be treated with a Le Fort III advancement osteotomy. This study evaluates the influence of Le Fort III advancement on orbital volume, position of the infra-orbital rim and globe. In pre- and post-operative CT-scans of 18 syndromic craniosynostosis patients, segmentation of the left and right orbit was performed and the infra-orbital rim and globe were marked. By superimposing the pre- and post-operative scans and by creating a reference coordinate system, movements of the infra-orbital rim and globe were assessed. Orbital volume increased significantly, by 27.2% for the left and 28.4% for the right orbit. Significant anterior movements of the left infra-orbital rim of 12.0mm (SD 4.2) and right infra-orbital rim of 12.8mm (SD 4.9) were demonstrated. Significant medial movements of 1.7mm (SD 2.2) of the left globe and 1.5mm (SD 1.9) of the right globe were demonstrated. There was a significant correlation between anterior infra-orbital rim movement and the increase in orbital volume. Significant orbital volume increase has been demonstrated following Le Fort III advancement. The position of the infra-orbital rim was moved forward significantly, whereas the globe position remained relatively unaffected. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of palpebral fissure and orbital volume after bimatoprost 0.03% orbital injections. Experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Lopes da Fonseca Junior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate in experimental animals the changes of the palpebral fissure and the orbital volume after orbital injection of bimatoprost 0.03%. Methods: Two main groups of Wistar rats were analyzed, one after orbital injection of bimatoprost 0.03% and another, a control group, after orbital injection of saline solution. The calculation of the palpebral fissure was done on images by means of computer processing, using the program Image J. After taking photographs, the animals were submitted to bilateral orbital exenteration and the volume was calculated in all the animals by the water displacement method (Archimedes’ Principle. Results: While comparing the measurements of the palpebral fissure and the orbital volume among animals given an injection with bimatoprost 0.03% and the control group it was found that there were no statistically significant differences. Conclusions: In this study there were no statistically significant differences in the measurement of the vertical palpebral fissure and the orbital volume among animals given the orbital injection of bimatoprost 0.03% and the animals of the control group.

  12. Lunar ring dikes from orbiter I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Cameron, W S

    1967-01-01

    Orbiter photographs of the wall of a large circular formation on the moon show that the wall is a convex body resembling a flow of viscous lava. The slopes are less than the angle of repose of dry rock; hence an explanation in terms of mass wastage is hard to support. The viscosity is approximately 10(13) centimeter-gram- second units, indicating an acid lava.

  13. Collected Reprints-1975. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    David Drake (;t’~)rge Ereeland , W i l l i a m Lavelle , Thomas Mc Ki nney (Vassar College) terry Nelsen , Richard Permenter , William Stubblefield...vort ici ty, shearing deformation rate , l imitat ions of two techni ques for computing 1)KP fr omand stretching deformation rate are important e l em

  14. Stereological estimation of the orbital volume: a criterion standard study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Niyazi; Sahin, Bünyamin; Ergür, Hayati; Basaloglu, Hulki; Ceri, Nazli Gülriz

    2009-05-01

    Several methodologies have been proposed to assess the orbital volume (OV). However, we have not seen a criterion standard study evaluating the results of the methodologies for the assessment of OV. In the current study, the actual OV of 9 dry skulls was measured using the water filling method as the criterion standard. Consecutive computed tomographic sections at a thickness of 1.5 mm were used to estimate the OV by means of the point counting method. The mean (SD) of the OV measured by the water filling method was 17.84 (1.56) cm3. By using the point counting method, it was 17.05 (1.69) cm3. There was no statistically significant difference between sides (P > 0.001). The results of the OV values obtained by the two methods were compared statistically. The agreements between the two methods were also evaluated using the Bland-Altman plots. There was no statistically significant difference between the OV measurements obtained by the stereological technique and water filling method. The described method could be used for the assessment of OV in vivo.

  15. Patent Abstract Digest. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-30

    Abraham . Ketterig. both of Ohio Kuhn (𔃽[ Assignee The United States of America as [57] ABSTRACT represented by the Secretary of the Thermooxidatively and... Pelee . Nalibth het United States Gees..wa, an sy Pe... acting en behalf ef the United States Goernent~e satetes any liebility resulting Its. he se ef the...r Abraham Ci.. Dayton, Ohi,, 45414 Dun,,vyAn tw i -oehE uzRoc Kr 121 pp N U,78(57] ABSTRACT 1211AppiNo ~A graphic curve ditizer is disclosed

  16. Orbital Debris Quarterly News. Volume 13; No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C. (Editor); Shoots, Debi (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    Topics discussed include: new debris from a decommissioned satellite with a nuclear power source; debris from the destruction of the Fengyun-1C meteorological satellite; quantitative analysis of the European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle 'Jules Verne' reentry event; microsatellite impact tests; solar cycle 24 predictions and other long-term projections and geosynchronus (GEO) environment for the Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2008). Abstracts from the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office, examining satellite reentry risk assessments and statistical issues for uncontrolled reentry hazards, are also included.

  17. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current

  18. MSFC Skylab Orbital Workshop, volume 1. [systems analysis and equipment specifications for orbital laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The technical aspects of the Skylab-Orbital Workshop are discussed. Original concepts, goals, design philosophy, hardware, and testing are reported. The final flight configuration, overall test program, and mission performance are analyzed. The systems which are examined are: (1) the structural system, (2) the meteoroid shield systems, and (3) the environmental/thermal control subsystem.

  19. Minerals Yearbook, volume I, Metals and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  20. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Regina E.; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-09-15

    The Site Environmental Report is an integrated report on Berkeley Lab's environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. It summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2007. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory's environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  1. Changes of orbital tissue volumes and proptosis in patients with thyroid extraocular muscle swelling after methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Tomoaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Ohji, Masahito

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the changes of orbital tissue volumes and proptosis after methylprednisolone pulse therapy in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). The cross-sectional areas of orbital tissues and proptosis were measured with magnetic resonance imaging in 40 orbits of 20 patients with TAO before and after methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The volumes of the whole orbit, orbital fatty tissue, and extraocular muscles were calculated. The volumes and proptosis were compared before and after treatment using a paired t test. Before treatment, the mean volumes were 33.0 ± 4.8 cm(3) in the whole orbit, 19.9 ± 4.1 cm(3) in the orbital fatty tissue, and 4.6 ± 1.2 cm(3) in the total extraocular muscles. After treatment, the mean volumes were 32.5 ± 4.4 cm(3) in the whole orbit, 19.9 ± 3.7 cm(3) in the orbital fatty tissue, and 4.0 ± 1.0 cm(3) in the total extraocular muscles. The mean volumes of the whole orbit (P = 0.17) and orbital fatty tissue (P = 0.82) were not significantly decreased after treatment, while the mean volume of total extraocular muscles was significantly decreased (P tissue seemed to be unchanged after methylprednisolone pulse therapy while that of total extraocular muscles was decreased. The proptosis value seemed to be unchanged after treatment.

  2. Analysis of Orbital Volume Measurements Following Reduction and Internal Fixation Using Absorbable Mesh Plates and Screws for Patients With Orbital Floor Blowout Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Won Joo; Lee, Do Heon; Choi, Won; Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Kwang Seog; Lee, Sam Yong

    2017-08-22

    Hinge-shaped fractures are common type of orbital floor blowout fractures, for which reduction and internal fixation is ideal. Nonetheless, orbital floor reconstruction using alloplastic materials without reducing the number of bone fragments is the most frequently used procedure. Therefore, this study analyzed and compared the outcomes between open reduction and internal fixation using absorbable mesh plates and screws, and orbital floor reconstruction, by measuring the orbital volume before and after surgery. Among patients with orbital floor blowout fractures, this study was conducted on 28 patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation, and 27 patients who underwent orbital floor reconstruction from December 2008 to September 2015. The mechanism of injury, ophthalmic symptoms before and after surgery, and the degree of enophthalmos were examined; subsequently, the volumes of the affected and unaffected sides were measured before and after surgery based on computed tomography images. This study compared the degree of recovery in the correction rate of the orbital volume, ophthalmic symptoms, and enophthalmos between the 2 groups. The patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation, and the patients who underwent orbital floor reconstruction showed average correction rates of 100.36% and 105.24%, respectively. Open reduction and internal fixation showed statistically, significantly superior treatment outcomes compared with orbital floor reconstruction. The ophthalmic symptoms and incidence of enophthalmos completely resolved in both groups. For orbital floor blowout fractures, open reduction and internal fixation using absorbable mesh plates and screws was a feasible alternative to orbital floor reconstruction.

  3. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: a human cadaver study: part I: endoscopic-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Jansen, J.; Schreurs, R.; Saeed, P.; Beenen, L.; Maal, T.J.J.; Gooris, P.J.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital defects, surgeon errors may lead to incorrect positioning of orbital implants and, consequently, poor clinical outcomes. Endoscopy can provide additional visualization of the orbit through the transantral approach. We aimed to evaluate whether endoscopic guidance during o

  4. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: A human cadaver study. Part I: Endoscopic-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Jansen, J; Schreurs, R.; Saeed, P.; Beenen, L.; Maal, T.J.J.; Gooris, P.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital defects, surgeon errors may lead to incorrect positioning of orbital implants and, consequently, poor clinical outcomes. Endoscopy can provide additional visualization of the orbit through the transantral approach. We aimed to evaluate whether endoscopic guidance during o

  5. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Regina

    2010-08-17

    Each year, the University of California (UC), as the managing and operating contractor of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, prepares an integrated report regarding its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.1 The Site Environmental Report for 2009 summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year (CY) 2009. Throughout this report, 'Berkeley Lab' or 'LBNL' refers both to (1) the multiprogram scientific facility the UC manages and operates on the 202-acre university-owned site located in the hills above the UC Berkeley campus, and the site itself, and (2) the UC as managing and operating contractor for Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of LBNL, a discussion of its environmental management system (EMS), the status of environmental programs, summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities, and quality assurance (QA) measures. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The Site Environmental Report is distributed by releasing it on the World Wide Web (Web) from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. Links to documents available on the Web are given with the citations in the References section. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows Berkeley Lab's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible

  6. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  7. SLSF loop handling system. Volume I. Structural analysis. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H.; Cowie, A.; Ma, D.

    1978-10-01

    SLSF loop handling system was analyzed for deadweight and postulated dynamic loading conditions, identified in Chapters II and III in Volume I of this report, using a linear elastic static equivalent method of stress analysis. Stress analysis of the loop handling machine is presented in Volume I of this report. Chapter VII in Volume I of this report is a contribution by EG and G Co., who performed the work under ANL supervision.

  8. Developmental Physical Education Accountability; Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Barbara; Sandeen, Cecile

    Presented in the first of a two volume series is a developmental physical education checklist which provides teachers of trainable mentally retarded students with a permanent and accountable record of pupil progress and needs. The checklist is intended to be used with the accompanying volume of curricular activities in a nongraded enviroment for…

  9. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The first volume of this 4-volume report presents the basic rationale for an anthropological and cross-cultural approach to education, abstracts of 14 research projects sponsored by the American Anthropological Association, a proposal for the establishment of a Research Center for Anthropology and Education to be coordinated by the Association, a…

  10. Skylab Experiments, Volume I, Physical Science, Solar Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Up-to-date knowledge about Skylab experiments is presented for the purpose of informing high school teachers about scientific research performed in orbit and enabling them to broaden their scope of material selection. The first volume is concerned with the solar astronomy program. The related fields are physics, electronics, biology, chemistry,…

  11. Be discs in binary systems I. Coplanar orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Panoglou, Despina; Vieira, Rodrigo G; Cyr, Isabelle H; Jones, Carol E; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Rivinius, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Be stars are surrounded by outflowing circumstellar matter structured in the form of decretion discs. They are often members of binary systems, where it is expected that the decretion disc interacts both radiatively and gravitationally with the companion. In this work we study how various orbital (period, mass ratio, eccentricity) and disc (viscosity) parameters affect the disc structure in coplanar systems. We simulate such binaries with the use of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The main effects of the secondary on the disc are its truncation and the accumulation of material inwards of truncation. In circular or nearly circular prograde orbits, the disc maintains a rotating, constant in shape, configuration, which is locked to the orbital phase. The disc is smaller in size, more elongated and more massive for low viscosity parameter, small orbital separation and/or high mass ratio. Highly eccentric orbits are more complex, with the disc structure and total mass strongly dependent on the orbital phas...

  12. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the Electrical Power Distribution and Control Subsystem, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C) hardware. The EPD and C hardware performs the functions of distributing, sensing, and controlling 28 volt DC power and of inverting, distributing, sensing, and controlling 117 volt 400 Hz AC power to all Orbiter subsystems from the three fuel cells in the Electrical Power Generation (EPG) subsystem. Volume 2 continues the presentation of IOA analysis worksheets and contains the potential critical items list.

  13. The METAL System. Volume I and Volume II. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    embryology , plan pathology* iSystematic names (aiae, daisy, fern. etc.) PM plant names] BV beverages - brewing*, bottlin;, distilllng*, liquors*, wine...conflict with MD-I), serology) MD-Q ost eopa thy lD-R embryology (devclopmental animal biology) !D-S si rgery 11-142 MD-T opthalmology :,D-V veterinary... ethics *, logic*, schools of phil., metaphysics* PL__ political science -- > civics, diplomatics*, government, political parties, political economy

  14. Resource Guide for Emotional Disabilities. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keystone Area Education, Elkader, IA.

    The first of a two volume series designed for teachers of students with emotional disabilities, this guide provides information on practical classroom techniques. The following topics are examined through article reprints, checklists, and discussion overviews (sample subtopics in parentheses): behavior management (management plans, intervention…

  15. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  16. Star-planet interactions: I. Stellar rotation and planetary orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Privitera, Giovanni; Eggenberger, Patrick; Vidotto, Aline A; Villaver, Eva; Bianda, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Context. As a star evolves, the planet orbits change with time due to tidal interactions, stellar mass losses, friction and gravitational drag forces, mass accretion and evaporation on/by the planet. Stellar rotation modifies the structure of the star and therefore the way these different processes occur. Changes of the orbits, at their turn, have an impact on the rotation of the star. Aims. Models accounting in a consistent way for these interactions between the orbital evolution of the planet and the evolution of the rotation of the star are still missing. The present work is a first attempt to fill this gap. Methods. We compute the evolution of stellar models including a comprehensive treatment of rotational effects together with the evolution of planetary orbits, so that the exchanges of angular momentum between the star and the planetary orbit are treated in a self-consistent way. The evolution of the rotation of the star accounts for the angular momentum exchange with the planet and also follows the eff...

  17. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume I, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faletra, P.; Beavis, W.; Franz, K.; Musick, C.; Walbridge, S.E.; Myron, H.

    2001-01-01

    This is our first volume of the Undergraduate Journal. It is an approbation of the impressive research performed by summer interns under the guidance of their dedicated mentors. The full-length publications were chosen from a pool of submissions that were reviewed by many of the excellent scientists at our National Laboratories. Most of these students will pursue careers in science, engineering and technology and, hopefully, some of this talent will remain with our labs. We have also included about 125 abstracts that survived the review process. These were submitted from all of our participating National Laboratories.

  18. La Experiencia Mexicana (The Mexican Experience). Volumes I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Neal B.

    Designed to be used as part of a comprehensive social studies program on Mexican culture, this two-volume manual, written in Spanish, offers an instructional package on Mexican culture, stressing an art-architecture perspective, which can be used at the secondary, college and adult levels. The teacher's guide, Volume I, includes a discussion of a…

  19. Orbital evolution of P\\v{r}\\'{i}bram and Neuschwanstein

    CERN Document Server

    Korno\\vs, Leonard; Vere\\vs, Peter; 10.1007/s11038-007-9213-z

    2011-01-01

    The orbital evolution of the two meteorites P\\v{r}\\'{i}bram and Neuschwanstein on almost identical orbits and also several thousand clones were studied in the framework of the N-body problem for 5000 years into the past. The meteorites moved on very similar orbits during the whole investigated interval. We have also searched for photographic meteors and asteroids moving on similar orbits. There were 5 meteors found in the IAU MDC database and 6 NEAs with currently similar orbits to P\\v{r}\\'{i}bram and Neuschwanstein. However, only one meteor 161E1 and one asteroid 2002 QG46 had a similar orbital evolution over the last 2000 years.

  20. UNIX NSW Front End Enhancements. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Implementation UNIX MSG is implemented in the programming language C (D.M. Ritchie, S.C. Johnson, M.E. Lesk, and B.W. Kernighan , "The C Programming Language...8URC-0062 UNCLASSIFIED B BN4b I VOL-1 RADC-TR-81-lbA VOL-1 NL fRADCTR-81-164, Vol I (of two) Final Technical Report June 1981 .. UNIX NSW FRONT END...ABSTRACT (Conti--- on re0-r8. side If necessary and idenfify by block number) The effort to develop a UNIX NSW Front End is part of the National Software

  1. NATO Reference Mobility Model. Edition I. Users Guide. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    11 Operational Modules TABLE I.C.1 Terrain, Vehicle, Driver Attributes Characterized in INRMM Data Base Terrain Vehicle Driver Surface Composition ...C AND GRAEB R~ESISTANCE C~~--------------- ---------- ------ ------a~e e e e epa C C SECTION IA - INITIAILIZATION C FCC = 0. FCTkAK =0. FR = 0. FTC...PLCT CHARS C C COMPUTE SCALE FACTOR C IPT=IN I(0.5b((DATA- BMI •i/SCALE)I C C DETEMINE PRINT CHARACTEF C ;IF(IPT.LE.0 OR.IPT.GT,.1201 RETURN IFl

  2. Battlefield Environment Obscuration Handbook. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    PVC 4 ~.I V tCC 0AI IF POLT.ITYICICH t DATA 001 CHIEN AND SEADER a ALPHIA CILLUADIE a D O0UGLAS FAR FIGURE 5.32. CORRELATION AOFEXPERIMETA DAAONRKTIULT...165-.180, 1976. 53. J.D. Seader and S.S. Ou, Correlation of the Smoking Tendancy of Materials, Fire Research 1, 3-9, 1977. 5-94 SICTION 6 MODELS 6.1

  3. Orbital-Scale Cyclostratigraphy and Ice Volume Fluctuations from Arctic Ocean Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Marzen, R.; DeNinno, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea foraminiferal oxygen isotope curves (δ18Of) are excellent paleoclimate records but are limited as proxies of global ice volume history during orbital glacial-interglacial cycles (GIC) due to the influence of deep-sea bottom water temperature, regional hydrography, ocean circulation and other factors affecting δ18Of. A more direct source of northern hemisphere [NH] ice history comes from central Arctic Ocean (CAO) submarine ridges (Northwind, Mendeleev, Lomonosov) where, at orbital timescales, sedimentation is controlled by the growth and decay of ice sheets, ice shelves, and sea ice. Calcareous microfossil density in CAO sediments is one of many proxies, such as manganese concentrations, grain size, bulk density, color, mineral content, organic geochemistry, and foraminiferal δ18O, that reveal GIC changes in ice cover, biological productivity, and primary and post-depositional sediment processes. In order to better understand NH ice history, we constructed 600-kyr-long stacked records of Arctic foraminiferal and ostracode density (AFD, AOD) from 19 CAO sediment cores following stacking and astronomical tuning procedures used for deep-sea δ18Of curves. Results show discrepancies between the Arctic AFD and AOD curves, the LR04 δ18Of stack (Lisiecki and Raymo 2005, Paleoceanography), the Red Sea and Mediterranean δ18Of sea level curves (Rohling et al. 2014 Nature), and modeled Antarctic Ice Sheet volume, suggesting asynchronous polar ice sheet behavior in the two hemispheres, notably during MIS 3, 5a, 5c, 7d, and 11.

  4. Digital surgical templates for managing high-energy zygomaticomaxillary complex injuries associated with orbital volume change: a quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-Zhen; Shu, Da-Long; Ran, Wei; Guo, Bing; Liao, Xin

    2013-10-01

    This study sought to introduce 3-dimensional (3D) virtual surgical planning and digital rapid-prototyping templates for zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) injuries associated with orbital volume change and to evaluate the surgical outcomes quantitatively. Eight patients who underwent open reduction and fixation for a ZMC injury with orbital volume change were studied. Computed tomographic (CT) scan of the zygomaticomaxillary area was performed before the operation in each case. Scanned data were converted into 3D models using Mimics software (Materialise, Brussels, Belgium) for surgical designs. Virtual surgical reductions and correlated guiding templates were designed using Mimics and Magics software (Materialise). The operations were performed with the help of prefabricated templates to reduce the fractures. A postoperative CT scan of each patient was obtained within 2 weeks after surgery, and quantitative measurements were made to assess the surgical outcomes. Preoperative volumes of the bilateral orbits were compared, and concordance with postoperative volumes of the bilateral orbits was assessed. Twenty-one pairs of distances from 7 marker points to 3 reference planes were measured to assess postoperative facial symmetry. Volumes of the injured orbits were significantly different from volumes of the uninjured orbits preoperatively (P .05). In addition, 19 of the 21 pairs of bilateral distances showed no significant difference postoperatively (P > .05). Quantitative assessment showed that digitally designed, rapid-prototyping templates for ZMC fractures have a positive impact on restoring facial symmetry and concordance of bilateral orbital volumes. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...executes post processor which translates results of the graphics program to machine readable code used by the pen plotter) cr (depressing the carriage

  6. Annual Progress Report FY-82. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Epithelium 591 (FY-8 | F) 9052B Application of Epstein-Barr Virus Markers 592 to Diagnosis and Prognosis of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Occult Tumors of...1551 NSTATUSi I TERI X Fim& STATIrj. DAre: 8/1/76 PATE OF CM-LETON: 9/29/80 KEY WOS: Acute Lvmahoctfc Leukeiia TITLE CF PROJECT: CALGE: # 7612 - ’Therapy...L-Pam C; -t; DATE: 10-02-82 ’. UIT NO.: 1559 STvrus: [1, TERI . _ Fi_ L x STARTTI.. DATE: 09-01-77 PATE OF CO;LETIO:M: 1980 KvY bc.s: Small. Cell

  7. Unveiling the super-orbital modulation of LS I +61 303 in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Shu; Hadasch, Daniela; Rea, Nanda; Caliandro, G Andrea; Chen, Yupeng; Wang, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    From the longest monitoring of LS I +61 303 done to date by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) we found evidence for the long-sought, years- long modulation in the X-ray emission of the source. The time evolution of the modulated fraction in the orbital lightcurves can be well fitted with a sinusoidal function having a super-orbital period of 1667 days, the same as the one reported in non-contemporaneous radio measurements. However, we have found a 281.8 \\pm 44.6 days shift between the super-orbital variability found at radio frequencies extrapolated to the observation time of our campaign and what we found in the super-orbital modulation of the modulated fraction of our X-ray data. We also find a super-orbital modulation in the maximum count rate of the orbital lightcurves, compatible with the former results, including the shift.

  8. Evolution of Galactic Nuclei. I. orbital evolution of IMBH

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubayashi, T; Ebisuzaki, T; Matsubayashi, Tatsushi; Makino, Junichiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2005-01-01

    Resent observations and theoretical interpretations suggest that IMBHs (intermediate-mass black hole) are formed in the centers of young and compact star clusters born close to the center of their parent galaxy. Such a star cluster would sink toward the center of the galaxy, and at the same time stars are stripped out of the cluster by the tidal field of the parent galaxy. We investigated the orbital evolution of the IMBH, after its parent cluster is completely disrupted by the tidal field of the parent galaxy, by means of large-scale N-body simulations. We constructed a model of the central region of our galaxy, with an SMBH (supermassive black hole) and Bahcall-Wolf stellar cusp, and placed an IMBH in a circular orbit of radius 0.086pc. The IMBH sinks toward the SMBH through dynamical friction, but dynamical friction becomes ineffective when the IMBH reached the radius inside which the initial stellar mass is comparable to the IMBH mass. This is because the IMBH kicks out the stars. This behavior is essenti...

  9. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the electrical power distribution and control subsystem, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter EPD and C hardware. The IOA product for the EPD and C analysis consisted of 1671 failure mode analysis worksheets that resulted in 468 potential critical items being identified. Comparison was made to the proposed NASA Post 51-L baseline which consisted of FMEAs and 158 CIL items. Volume 1 contains the EPD and C subsystem description, analysis results, ground rules and assumptions, and some of the IOA worksheets.

  10. The dynamical evolution of molecular clouds near the Galactic Centre - I. Orbital structure and evolutionary timeline

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Longmore, Steven N

    2014-01-01

    We recently proposed that the star-forming potential of dense molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ, i.e. the central few 100 pc) of the Milky Way is linked to their orbital dynamics, potentially giving rise to an absolute-time sequence of star-forming clouds. In this paper, we present an orbital model for the gas stream(s) observed in the CMZ. The model is obtained by integrating orbits in the observed gravitational potential and represents a good fit to the distribution of dense gas, reproducing all of its key properties. The orbit is also consistent with observational constraints not included in the fitting process, such as the velocities of Sgr B2 and the Arches and Quintuplet clusters. It differs from previous models: (1) the orbit is open rather than closed due to the extended mass distribution in the CMZ, (2) its orbital velocity is twice as high as in previous models, and (3) Sgr A$^*$ coincides with the focus of the (eccentric) orbit rather than being offset. Our orbital solution suppor...

  11. TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

  12. Formation flying for electric sails in displaced orbits. Part I: Geometrical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-09-01

    We present a geometrical methodology for analyzing the formation flying of electric solar wind sail based spacecraft that operate in heliocentric, elliptic, displaced orbits. The spacecraft orbit is maintained by adjusting its propulsive acceleration modulus, whose value is estimated using a thrust model that takes into account a variation of the propulsive performance with the sail attitude. The properties of the relative motion of the spacecraft are studied in detail and a geometrical solution is obtained in terms of relative displaced orbital elements, assumed to be small quantities. In particular, for the small eccentricity case (i.e. for a near-circular displaced orbit), the bounds characterized by the extreme values of relative distances are analytically calculated, thus providing an useful mathematical tool for preliminary design of the spacecraft formation structure.

  13. AXAF-I ghost ray study: On orbit case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetz, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of baffles for control of singly reflected (and nonreflected) ghost rays is considered. The theory of baffle design for Wolter Type I grazing incidence optics is reviewed, and a set of sample baffle parameters is obtained subject to the assumptions of nominal mirror figures and perfect manufacture and alignment of baffles. It is found that baffles forward of the optics (in the thermal precollimator) and between the mirror elements (at the CAP) are sufficient to allow the simultaneous ghost image and vignetting requirements to be satisfied for HRMA shells P1H1, P3H3, and P4H4. However, these baffles are not sufficient for the innermost shell P6H6; at best the requirements are slightly violated and there is no margin for tolerances. The addition of a baffle interior to the P6 space at an axial station about one third of the way forward from the aft end of the paraboloid will allow the ghost ray and vignetting requirements to be met. The minimum ghost ray angles and the vignetting angles are sensitive functions of the baffle positions and radii; tolerances of considerably better than 1 mm will be required. The sensitivities are coupled and correlated; further investigations should be undertaken in order to obtain baffle parameters which, combined with likely achievable tolerances, will minimize the risk of the vignetting/ghost ray requirements not being met. The lightweight carbon-epoxy composite used for thermal baffles has insufficient X-ray opacity to be a suitable material for construction of the controlling X-ray baffles; further study is needed to determine an appropriate material and to investigate its thermal and mechanical implications.

  14. Revised SRC-I project baseline. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The SRC Process Area Design Baseline consists of six volumes. The first four were submitted to DOE on 9 September 1981. The fifth volume, summarizing the Category A Engineering Change Proposals (ECPs), was not submitted. The sixth volume, containing proprietary information on Kerr-McGee's Critical Solvent Deashing System, was forwarded to BRHG Synthetic Fuels, Inc. for custody, according to past instructions from DOE, and is available for perusal by authorized DOE representatives. DOE formally accepted the Design Baseline under ICRC Release ECP 4-1001, at the Project Configuration Control Board meeting in Oak Ridge, Tennessee on 5 November 1981. The documentation was then revised by Catalytic, Inc. to incorporate the Category B and C and Post-Baseline Engineering Change Proposals. Volumes I through V of the Revised Design Baseline, dated 22 October 1982, are nonproprietary and they were issued to the DOE via Engineering Change Notice (ECN) 4-1 on 23 February 1983. Volume VI again contains proprieary information on Kerr-McGee Critical Solvent Deashing System; it was issued to Burns and Roe Synthetic Fuels, Inc. Subsequently, updated process descriptions, utility summaries, and errata sheets were issued to the DOE and Burns and Roe Synthetic Fuels, Inc. on nonproprietary Engineering Change Notices 4-2 and 4-3 on 24 May 1983.

  15. The super-orbital variability of LS I +61 303 at all frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Diego F.; Hadasch, Daniela; Li, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Detected from radio to TeV gamma rays, the gamma-ray binary LS I + 61 303 is highly variable across all frequencies. Beside its variability due to the modulation of its emission at the 26.496-day orbital period, the system also presents variability consistent with the so-called superorbital period, of 1667 days. Short and highly luminous X-ray bursts, reminiscent of typical magnetar behavior, have been also detected. I will summarize this phenomenology and present recent analysis of LSI +61 303 using data taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope, putting it in a multi-wavelength context. I will show that the super-orbital modulation of the GeV data is obvious, and that is more prominently seen at orbital phases around apastron. I will also show that the super-orbital evolution also exists in TeV data. Finally, I will present correlation studies between TeV, GeV, X-ray, optical, and radio data and comment on a physical, pulsar-based scenario which could explain the general behavior of this enigmatic binary.

  16. Intramolecular charge ordering in the multi molecular orbital system (TTM-TTP)I3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Robert, Vincent; Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Omori, Yukiko; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2010-06-01

    Starting from the structure of the (TTM-TTP)I3 molecular-based material, we examine the characteristics of frontier molecular orbitals using ab initio (CASSCF/CASPT2) configurations interaction calculations. It is shown that the singly occupied and second-highest-occupied molecular orbitals are close to each other, i.e., this compound should be regarded as a two-orbital system. By dividing virtually the [TTM-TTP] molecule into three fragments, an effective model is constructed to rationalize the origin of this picture. In order to investigate the low-temperature, symmetry breaking experimentally observed in the crystal, the electronic distribution in a pair of [TTM-TTP] molecules is analyzed from CASPT2 calculations. Our inspection supports and explains the speculated intramolecular charge ordering which is likely to give rise to low-energy magnetic properties.

  17. Galileo SSI Observations of Io During Orbits C30 I33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, L.; Turtle, E.; McEwen, A.; Simonelli, D.; Geissler, P.; Williams, D.; Milazzo, M.; Radebaugh, J.; Jaeger, W.; Klaasen, K. P.

    2002-01-01

    New Galileo SSI imaging of Io from orbits C30 I33 will be presented. The aging Galileo spacecraft continues to produce spectacular new results, including the tallest volcanic plume yet found on Io. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  19. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: Forward reaction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the orbiter hardware/software interaction analysis for the AFT reaction control system are presented. The interaction between hardware failure modes and software are examined in order to identify associated issues and risks. All orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are discussed.

  20. Orbital-dependent Rashba coupling in bulk BiTeCl and BiTeI

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2013-02-06

    By all-electron ab initio calculations, the layered polar semiconductor BiTeCl is shown to host giant bulk Rashba spin splitting, similar to the recently reported compound BiTeI. In both materials, the standard Rashba–Bychkov model is no longer applicable, because of huge band extrema shifts even in the absence of spin–orbit coupling and a strong momentum dependence of the Rashba coupling constant (αR). By assuming αR to be orbital dependent, a phenomenological extension of the Rashba–Bychkov model is proposed which explains the splitting behavior of states with small in-plane momentum.

  1. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume I contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Seismic Base Isolation for Department of Energy Facilities held in Marina Del Rey, California, May 13-15, 1992.

  2. Introduction to "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future, Volume I"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Tanioka, Yuichiro

    2016-12-01

    Twenty-five papers on the study of tsunamis are included in Volume I of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future". Six papers examine various aspects of tsunami probability and uncertainty analysis related to hazard assessment. Three papers relate to deterministic hazard and risk assessment. Five more papers present new methods for tsunami warning and detection. Six papers describe new methods for modeling tsunami hydrodynamics. Two papers investigate tsunamis generated by non-seismic sources: landslides and meteorological disturbances. The final three papers describe important case studies of recent and historical events. Collectively, this volume highlights contemporary trends in global tsunami research, both fundamental and applied toward hazard assessment and mitigation.

  3. Mechanisms of enhanced orbital dia- and paramagnetism: application to the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, G A H; Murakawa, H; Bahramy, M S; Arita, R; Kaneko, Y; Tokura, Y; Nagaosa, N

    2012-06-15

    We study the magnetic susceptibility of a layered semiconductor BiTeI with giant Rashba spin splitting both theoretically and experimentally to explore its orbital magnetism. Apart from the core contributions, a large temperature-dependent diamagnetic susceptibility is observed when the Fermi energy E(F) is near the crossing point of the Rashba spin-split conduction bands at the time-reversal symmetry point A. On the other hand, when E(F) is below this band crossing, the susceptibility turns to be paramagnetic. These features are consistent with first-principles calculations, which also predict an enhanced orbital magnetic susceptibility with both positive and negative signs as a function of E(F) due to band (anti)crossings. Based on these observations, we propose two mechanisms for the enhanced paramagnetic orbital susceptibility.

  4. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 2: PEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    User power, duration, and orbit requirements, which were the prime factors influencing power extension package (PEP) design, are discussed. A representative configuration of the PEP concept is presented and the major elements of the system are described as well as the PEP-to-Orbiter and remote manipulator interface provisions.

  5. Results of a 0.03- scale aerodynamic characteristics investigation of Boeing 747 carrier (model no. AX 1319 I-1) mated with a space shuttle orbiter (model 45-0) conducted in the Boeing transonic wind tunnel (CA5), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, D.; Mulkey, T. L.; Lindahl, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The performance, stability, and control characteristics of various carrier aircraft configurations are presented. Aerodynamic characteristics of the carrier mated with the Orbiter, carrier alone, and Orbiter alone were investigated. Carrier support system tare and interference effects were determined. Six-component force and moment data were recorded for the carrier and Orbiter. Buffet onset characteristics of the carrier vertical tail and horizontal tail were recorded. Angles of attack from -3 deg through 26 deg and angles of slideslip between +12 deg and -12 deg were investigated at Mach numbers from 0.15 through 0.70. Photographs are included.

  6. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME I

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  7. Space shuttle orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study. Volume 6: System design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macconochie, I. O.

    1978-01-01

    System studies were made to determine the required changes in shuttle orbiter mass for various changes in aerodynamic shape. These changes are designed to extend the current shuttle orbiter trimmed c.g. envelope to accommodate a greater range of payloads. One of the apparently most viable changes for the amount of c.g. extension obtained involves the removal of the present wing/body fillet and the replacement of this structural element with a forward located fixed canard.

  8. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: AFT reaction control system, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are examined. Potential interaction with the software is examined through an evaluation of the software requirements. The analysis is restricted to flight software requirements and excludes utility/checkout software. The results of the hardware/software interaction analysis for the forward reaction control system are presented.

  9. Seawifs Technical Report Series. Volume 2: Analysis of Orbit Selection for Seawifs: Ascending Versus Descending Node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Gregg, Watson W.

    1992-01-01

    Due to range safety considerations, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color instrument may be required to be launched into a near-noon descending node, as opposed to the ascending node used by the predecessor sensor, the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). The relative importance of ascending versus descending near-noon orbits was assessed here to determine if descending node will meet the scientific requirements of SeaWiFS. Analyses focused on ground coverage, local times of coverage, solar and viewing geometries (zenith and azimuth angles), and sun glint. Differences were found in the areas covered by individual orbits, but were not important when taken over a 16 day repeat time. Local time of coverage was also different: for ascending node orbits the Northern Hemisphere was observed in the morning and the Southern Hemisphere in the afternoon, while for descending node orbits the Northern Hemisphere was observed in the afternoon and the Southern in the morning. There were substantial differences in solar azimuth and spacecraft azimuth angles both at equinox and at the Northern Hemisphere summer solstice. Negligible differences in solar and spacecraft zenith angles, relative azimuth angles, and sun glint were obtained at the equinox. However, large differences were found in solar zenith angles, relative azimuths, and sun glint for the solstice. These differences appeared to compensate across the scan, however, an increase in sun glint in descending node over that in ascending node on the western part of the scan was compensated by a decrease on the eastern part of the scan. Thus, no advantage or disadvantage could be conferred upon either ascending node or descending node for noon orbits. Analyses were also performed for ascending and descending node orbits that deviated from a noon equator crossing time. For ascending node, afternoon orbits produced the lowest mean solar zenith angles in the Northern Hemisphere, and morning orbits produced

  10. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on laser cooling of BeI and MgI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Mingjie, E-mail: wanmingjie1983@sina.com; Huang, Duohui; Shao, Juxiang; Li, Yuanyuan [Computational Physics Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Yibin University, Yibin 644007 (China); Yu, You [College of Optoelectronic Technology, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu 610225 (China); Li, Song [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China)

    2015-10-28

    We present the ab initio study of spin-orbit coupling effects on laser cooling of BeI and MgI molecules. Potential energy curves for the X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2}, A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2}, and 2{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2,1/2} states are calculated using multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davidson corrections. Spectroscopic parameters of BeI and MgI are in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical values. The A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} state of MgI is a repulsive state. It is an unsuitable scheme for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2}(υ′)← X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″) transition for laser cooling of MgI. Highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors f{sub 00} for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2} (υ′ = 0) ← X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″ = 0) transitions and suitable radiative lifetimes τ for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2} (υ′ = 0) of BeI and MgI are obtained. Three laser wavelength drives are required for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2}(υ′)←X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″) transitions of BeI and MgI. The proposed cooling wavelengths of BeI and MgI are both in the violet region. The results imply the feasibility of laser cooling of BeI and MgI, and that laser cooling of BeI is more possible.

  11. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on laser cooling of BeI and MgI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mingjie; Huang, Duohui; Shao, Juxiang; Yu, You; Li, Song; Li, Yuanyuan

    2015-10-28

    We present the ab initio study of spin-orbit coupling effects on laser cooling of BeI and MgI molecules. Potential energy curves for the X(2)Σ(+)(1/2), A(2)Π(1/2,3/2), and 2(2)Π(3/2,1/2) states are calculated using multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davidson corrections. Spectroscopic parameters of BeI and MgI are in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical values. The A(2)Π(3/2) state of MgI is a repulsive state. It is an unsuitable scheme for the A(2)Π(3/2)(υ')← X(2)Σ(+)(1/2) (υ″) transition for laser cooling of MgI. Highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors f00 for the A(2)Π(1/2,3/2) (υ' = 0) ← X(2)Σ(+)(1/2) (υ″ = 0) transitions and suitable radiative lifetimes τ for the A(2)Π(1/2,3/2) (υ' = 0) of BeI and MgI are obtained. Three laser wavelength drives are required for the A(2)Π(1/2,3/2)(υ')←X(2)Σ(+)(1/2) (υ″) transitions of BeI and MgI. The proposed cooling wavelengths of BeI and MgI are both in the violet region. The results imply the feasibility of laser cooling of BeI and MgI, and that laser cooling of BeI is more possible.

  12. Space Biology and Medicine. Volume I; Space and Its Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Mohler, Stanley R.; Gazenko, Oleg G.; Grigoryev, Anatoliy I.

    1993-01-01

    Perhaps one of the greatest gifts that has been given to the people of the world in the last few hundred years has been an emerging sense of the place of our planet and its inhabitants within the context of the vast universe. Our knowledge of the rest of the universe has not come quickly, nor was the process of attaining it only recently begun; however, the unprecedented acceleration of that process has benefitted from a fundamental new aspect of our species that has only manifested itself in the last 30 years or so, the ability to travel in space. Before the space age, the Universe was studied only through observations from the Earth. All that has changed with the beginning of the space age. Machines built by humans have flown to all but one of the nine planets that revolve around our Sun, have ventured billions of miles from the Earth and looked back, and have landed on three other worlds. Spacecraft in orbit around the Earth have viewed the sky at a vast number of electromagnetic wavelengths, detecting the shape of the galaxy and the universe, and even measuring the remnants of the universe's beginning. Human explorers have ventured forth, first for short stays in orbit, then, later, walking upon the Moon and living for long periods in space. As they did so, billions of people on the Earth came to view the Earth in a fundamentally different way, not just as the familiar day to- day backdrop for their lives, but as a small oasis suspended in the night sky above an alien landscape. It is this new view of the Earth that is the true gift of space exploration. Space exploration has at once given us a new perspective on the value of our world, and a new perspective from which to understand how it operates. It has shown us that the Earth is by far the most precious place in the solar system in terms of supporting human life, while revealing that other destinations may still be compelling. The exploration of space has at once become a challenge for humanity to overcome

  13. Super-orbital variability of LS I +61$^{\\circ}$303 at TeV energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Buson, S; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Pedaletti, G; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R; Casares, J; Herrero, A

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray binary LS I +61$^{\\circ}$303 is a well established source from centimeter radio up to very high energy (VHE; E$>$100 GeV). Its broadband emission shows a periodicity of $\\sim$26.5 days, coincident with the orbital period. A longer (super-orbital) period of 1667 $\\pm$ 8 days was discovered in radio and confirmed in optical and high energy (HE; E>100 MeV) gamma-ray observations. We present a four-year campaign performed by MAGIC together with archival data concentrating on a search for a long timescale signature in the VHE emission. We focus on the search for super-orbital modulation of the VHE peak and on the search for correlations between TeV emission and optical determination of the extension of the circumstellar disk. A four-year campaign has been carried out by MAGIC. The source was observed during the orbital phases when the periodic VHE outbursts have occurred ($\\phi$=0.55-0.75). Additionally, we included archival MAGIC observations and data published by the VERITAS collaboration in these ...

  14. Aerodynamic results of a separation test (CA20) conducted at the Boeing transonic wind tunnel using 0.030-scale models of the configuration 140A/B (modified) SSV orbiter (model no. 45-0) and the Boeing 747 carrier (model no. AX 1319 I-1), volume 1. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubala, T.; Esparza, V.; Gillins, R. L.; Petrozzi, M.

    1975-01-01

    A Rockwell built 0.030-scale 45-0 modified Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 14?A/B model and a Boeing built 0.030-scale 747 carrier model were tested to provide six component force and moment data for each vehicle in proximity to the other at a matrix of relative positions, attitudes and test conditions (angles of attack and sideslip were varied). Orbiter model support system tare effects were determined for corrections to obtain support-free aerodynamics. In addition to the balance force data, pressures were measured. Pressure orifices were located at the base of the Orbiter, on either side of the vertical blade strut, and at the mid-root chord on either side of the vertical tail. Strain gages were installed on the Boeing 747 vertical tail to indicate buffet onset. Photographs of aerodynamic configurations tested are shown.

  15. Revised SRC-I project baseline. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky has contracted with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to design, build and operate a first-of-its-kind plant demonstrating the economic, environmental, socioeconomic and technical feasibility of the direct coal liquefaction process known as SRC-I. ICRC has made a massive commitment of time and expertise to design processes, plan and formulate policy, schedules, costs and technical drawings for all plant systems. These fully integrated plans comprise the Project Baseline and are the basis for all future detailed engineering, plant construction, operation, and other work set forth in the contract between ICRC and the DOE. Volumes I and II of the accompanying documents constitute the updated Project Baseline for the SRC-I two-stage liquefaction plant. International Coal Refining Company believes this versatile plant design incorporates the most advanced coal liquefaction system available in the synthetic fuels field. SRC-I two-stage liquefaction, as developed by ICRC, is the way of the future in coal liquefaction because of its product slate flexibility, high process thermal efficiency, and low consumption of hydrogen. The SRC-I Project Baseline design also has made important state-of-the-art advances in areas such as environmental control systems. Because of a lack of funding, the DOE has curtailed the total project effort without specifying a definite renewal date. This precludes the development of revised accurate and meaningful schedules and, hence, escalated project costs. ICRC has revised and updated the original Design Baseline to include in the technical documentation all of the approved but previously non-incorporated Category B and C and new Post-Baseline Engineering Change Proposals.

  16. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    An array deployment assembly, power regulation and control assembly, the necessary interface, and display and control equipment comprise the power extension package (PEP) which is designed to provide increased power and duration, as well as reduce fuel cell cryogen consumption during Spacelab missions. Compatible with all currently defined missions and payloads, PEP imposes minimal weight and volume penalties on sortie missions, and can be installed and removed as needed at the launch site within the normal Orbiter turnaround cycle. The technology on which it is based consists of a modified solar electric propulsion array, standard design regulator and control equipment, and a minimally modified Orbiter design. The requirements from which PEP was derived, and the system and its performance capabilities are described. Features of the recommended project are presented.

  17. Synfuel program analysis. Volume I. Procedures-capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muddiman, J. B.; Whelan, J. W.

    1980-07-01

    This is the first of the two volumes describing the analytic procedures and resulting capabilities developed by Resource Applications (RA) for examining the economic viability, public costs, and national benefits of alternative synfuel projects and integrated programs. This volume is intended for Department of Energy (DOE) and Synthetic Fuel Corporation (SFC) program management personnel and includes a general description of the costing, venture, and portfolio models with enough detail for the reader to be able to specifiy cases and interpret outputs. It also contains an explicit description (with examples) of the types of results which can be obtained when applied to: the analysis of individual projects; the analysis of input uncertainty, i.e., risk; and the analysis of portfolios of such projects, including varying technology mixes and buildup schedules. In all cases, the objective is to obtain, on the one hand, comparative measures of private investment requirements and expected returns (under differing public policies) as they affect the private decision to proceed, and, on the other, public costs and national benefits as they affect public decisions to participate (in what form, in what areas, and to what extent).

  18. The spectroscopic binary system Gl 375. I. Orbital parameters and chromospheric activity

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz, Rodrigo F; Cincunegui, Carolina; Mauas, Pablo J D

    2007-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic binary system Gl 375. We employ medium resolution echelle spectra obtained at the 2.15 m telescope at the Argentinian observatory CASLEO and photometric observations obtained from the ASAS database. We separate the composite spectra into those corresponding to both components. The separated spectra allow us to confirm that the spectral types of both components are similar (dMe3.5) and to obtain precise measurements of the orbital period (P = 1.87844 days), minimum masses (M_1 sin^3 i = 0.35 M_sun and M_2 sin^3 i =0.33 M_sun) and other orbital parameters. The photometric observations exhibit a sinusoidal variation with the same period as the orbital period. We interpret this as signs of active regions carried along with rotation in a tidally synchronized system, and study the evolution of the amplitude of the modulation in longer timescales. Together with the mean magnitude, the modulation exhibits a roughly cyclic variation with a period of around 800 days. This periodicity is also ...

  19. Integrated orbital servicing study follow-on. Volume 2: Technical analysis and system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    In-orbit service functional and physical requirements to support both low and high Earth orbit servicing/maintenance operations were defined, an optimum servicing system configuration was developed and mockups and early prototype hardware were fabricated to demonstrate and validate the concepts selected. Significant issues addressed include criteria for concept selection; representative mission equipment and approaches to their design for serviceability; significant serviceable spacecraft design aspects; servicer mechanism operation in one-g; approaches for the demonstration/simulation; and service mechanism structure design approach.

  20. Space Trajectory Error Analysis Program (STEAP) for halo orbit missions. Volume 1: Analytic and user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, D. V.; Carney, P. C.; Underwood, J. W.; Vogt, E. D.

    1974-01-01

    Development, test, conversion, and documentation of computer software for the mission analysis of missions to halo orbits about libration points in the earth-sun system is reported. The software consisting of two programs called NOMNAL and ERRAN is part of the Space Trajectories Error Analysis Programs (STEAP). The program NOMNAL targets a transfer trajectory from Earth on a given launch date to a specified halo orbit on a required arrival date. Either impulsive or finite thrust insertion maneuvers into halo orbit are permitted by the program. The transfer trajectory is consistent with a realistic launch profile input by the user. The second program ERRAN conducts error analyses of the targeted transfer trajectory. Measurements including range, doppler, star-planet angles, and apparent planet diameter are processed in a Kalman-Schmidt filter to determine the trajectory knowledge uncertainty. Execution errors at injection, midcourse correction and orbit insertion maneuvers are analyzed along with the navigation uncertainty to determine trajectory control uncertainties and fuel-sizing requirements. The program is also capable of generalized covariance analyses.

  1. THE SPACE MOTION OF LEO I: HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROPER MOTION AND IMPLIED ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Van der Marel, Roeland P. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Besla, Gurtina [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for Cosmology, University of California, 4129 Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Majewski, Steven R., E-mail: tsohn@stsci.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    We present the first absolute proper motion measurement of Leo I, based on two epochs of Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC images separated by {approx}5 years in time. The average shift of Leo I stars with respect to {approx}100 background galaxies implies a proper motion of ({mu}{sub W}, {mu}{sub N}) = (0.1140 {+-} 0.0295, -0.1256 {+-} 0.0293) mas yr{sup -1}. The implied Galactocentric velocity vector, corrected for the reflex motion of the Sun, has radial and tangential components V{sub rad} = 167.9 {+-} 2.8 km s{sup -1} and V{sub tan} = 101.0 {+-} 34.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We study the detailed orbital history of Leo I by solving its equations of motion backward in time for a range of plausible mass models for the Milky Way (MW) and its surrounding galaxies. Leo I entered the MW virial radius 2.33 {+-} 0.21 Gyr ago, most likely on its first infall. It had a pericentric approach 1.05 {+-} 0.09 Gyr ago at a Galactocentric distance of 91 {+-} 36 kpc. We associate these timescales with characteristic timescales in Leo I's star formation history, which shows an enhanced star formation activity {approx}2 Gyr ago and quenching {approx}1 Gyr ago. There is no indication from our calculations that other galaxies have significantly influenced Leo I's orbit, although there is a small probability that it may have interacted with either Ursa Minor or Leo II within the last {approx}1 Gyr. For most plausible MW masses, the observed velocity implies that Leo I is bound to the MW. However, it may not be appropriate to include it in models of the MW satellite population that assume dynamical equilibrium, given its recent infall. Solution of the complete (non-radial) timing equations for the Leo I orbit implies an MW mass M{sub MW,vir} = 3.15{sub -1.36}{sup +1.58} x 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }, with the large uncertainty dominated by cosmic scatter. In a companion paper, we compare the new observations to the properties of Leo I subhalo analogs extracted from cosmological

  2. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  3. Crew appliance concepts. Volume 1, appendix A: Bibliography. [manned space shuttle orbiter environmental control and life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, B. W.; Reysa, R. P.; Russell, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A review of crew appliance related literature was made to provide background engineering information for development of conceptual appliance systems for the shuttle orbiter and the modular space station. From this review, a file containing abstracts of 299 appliance-related documents coded according to subject was developed along with a computerized bibliography of 682 references. Trade studies were conducted using information from these references to determine the optimum concepts to satisfy the shuttle and space station mission requirements. An appliance system was devised for each vehicle which has minimum impact to the respective environmental control system with the smallest possible weight, volume, and electrical penalty. Engineering parameters for each appliance concept considered are presented along with the total thermal and electrical loads and weight and volume penalties for each of the optimized appliance systems.

  4. Mars Molniya Orbit Atmospheric Resource Mining. [FY 16 NIAC Phase I Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sforzo, Brandon; Braun, Robert D.; Sibille, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    This NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I study examined the revolutionary concept of performing resource collection and utilization during Mars orbital operations in order to enable the landing of large payloads. An exploration architecture was developed, out of which several mission alternatives were developed. Concepts of operations were then developed for each mission alternative, followed by concepts for spacecraft systems, which were traded to assess their feasibility. A novel architecture using Mars Molniya Orbit Atmospheric Resource Mining is feasible to enable an Earth-independent and pioneering, permanent human presence on Mars by providing a reusable, single-stage-to-orbit transportation system. This will allow cargo and crew to be routinely delivered to and from Mars without transporting propellants from Earth.In Phase I, our study explored how electrical energy could be harnessed from the kinetic energy of the incoming spacecraft and then be used to produce the oxygen necessary for landing. This concept of operations is revolutionary in that its focus is on using in situ resources in complementary and varied forms: the upper atmosphere of Mars is used for aerocapture, which is followed by aerobraking, the kinetic energy of the spacecraft is transformed into usable electrical energy during aerobraking, and the atmospheric composition is the source of oxidizer for a landing under supersonic retropropulsion. This NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I study explores a novel mission architecture to establish routine, Earth-independent transfer of large mass payloads between Earth and the Mars surface and back to Mars orbit. The first stage of routine mission operations involves an atmospheric resource mining aerobraking campaign following aerocapture into a highly elliptical Mars orbit. During each pass through the atmosphere, the vehicle ingests the atmospheric oxidizer and stores it onboard, using solid oxide electrolysis to convert

  5. UNVEILING THE SUPER-ORBITAL MODULATION OF LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 IN X-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jian; Zhang Shu; Chen Yupeng; Wang Jianmin [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Torres, Diego F.; Hadasch, Daniela; Rea, Nanda; Caliandro, G. Andrea, E-mail: jianli@ihep.ac.cn [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Torre C5, 2a planta, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    From the longest monitoring of LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 done to date by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer we found evidence for the long-sought, years-long modulation in the X-ray emission of the source. The time evolution of the modulated fraction in the orbital light curves can be well fitted with a sinusoidal function having a super-orbital period of 1667 days, the same as the one reported in non-contemporaneous radio measurements. However, we have found a 281.8 {+-} 44.6 day shift between the super-orbital variability found at radio frequencies extrapolated to the observation time of our campaign and what we found in the super-orbital modulation of the modulated fraction of our X-ray data. We also find a super-orbital modulation in the maximum count rate of the orbital light curves, compatible with the former results, including the shift.

  6. Spectroscopic binaries among Hipparcos M giants I. Data, orbits, and intrinsic variations

    CERN Document Server

    Famaey, B; Frankowski, A; Van Eck, S; Mayor, M; Udry, S; Jorissen, A

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a follow-up of the vast effort to collect radial velocity data for stars belonging to the Hipparcos survey. We aim at extending the orbital data available for binaries with M giant primaries. The data will be used in the companion papers of this series to (i) derive the binary frequency among M giants and compare it to that of K giants (Paper II), and (ii) analyse the eccentricity-period diagram and the mass-function distribution (Paper III). Keplerian solutions are fitted to radial-velocity data. However, for several stars, no satisfactory solution could be found, despite the fact that the radial-velocity standard deviation is larger than the instrumental error, because M giants suffer from intrinsic radial-velocity variations due to pulsations. We show that these intrinsic radial-velocity variations can be linked with both the average spectral-line width and the photometric variability. We present an extensive collection of spectroscopic orbits for M giants, with 12 new orbits, plus 17 from th...

  7. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power distribution and control subsystem, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C) hardware. The EPD and C hardware performs the functions of distributing, sensing, and controlling 28 volt DC power and of inverting, distributing, sensing, and controlling 117 volt 400 Hz AC power to all Orbiter subsystems from the three fuel cells in the Electrical Power Generation (EPG) subsystem. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 1671 failure modes analyzed, 9 single failures were determined to result in loss of crew or vehicle. Three single failures unique to intact abort were determined to result in possible loss of the crew or vehicle. A possible loss of mission could result if any of 136 single failures occurred. Six of the criticality 1/1 failures are in two rotary and two pushbutton switches that control External Tank and Solid Rocket Booster separation. The other 6 criticality 1/1 failures are fuses, one each per Aft Power Control Assembly (APCA) 4, 5, and 6 and one each per Forward Power Control Assembly (FPCA) 1, 2, and 3, that supply power to certain Main Propulsion System (MPS) valves and Forward Reaction Control System (RCS) circuits.

  8. Spin motion at and near orbital resonance in storage rings with Siberian snakes I. At orbital resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, D.P.; Vogt, M.

    2006-12-15

    Here, and in a sequel, we invoke the invariant spin field to provide an in-depth study of spin motion at and near low order orbital resonances in a simple model for the effects of vertical betatron motion in a storage ring with Siberian Snakes. This leads to a clear understanding, within the model, of the behaviour of the beam polarization at and near so-called snake resonances in proton storage rings. (orig.)

  9. Spin motion at and near orbital resonance in storage rings with Siberian Snakes. Part I: at orbital resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, D P

    2006-01-01

    Here, and in a sequel, we invoke the invariant spin field to provide an in--depth study of spin motion at and near low order orbital resonances in a simple model for the effects of vertical betatron motion in a storage ring with Siberian Snakes. This leads to a clear understanding, within the model, of the behaviour of the beam polarisation at and near so--called snake resonances in proton storage rings.

  10. Multi-Orbital Molecular Compound (TTM-TTP)I3: Effective Model and Fragment Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Omori, Yukiko; Suzumura, Yoshikazu; Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Robert, Vincent; Ishibashi, Shoji; Seo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the molecular compound (TTM-TTP)I3, which exhibits a peculiar intra-molecular charge ordering, has been studied using multi-configuration ab initio calculations. First we derive an effective Hubbard-type model based on the molecular orbitals (MOs) of TTM-TTP; we set up a two-orbital Hamiltonian for the two MOs near the Fermi energy and determine its full parameters: the transfer integrals, the Coulomb and exchange interactions. The tight-binding band structure obtained from these transfer integrals is consistent with the result of the direct band calculation based on density functional theory. Then, by decomposing the frontier MOs into two parts, i.e., fragments, we find that the stacked TTM-TTP molecules can be described by a two-leg ladder model, while the inter-fragment Coulomb energies are scaled to the inverse of their distances. This result indicates that the fragment picture that we proposed earlier [M.-L. Bonnet et al.: J. Chem. Phys. 132 (2010) 214705] successfully describes the low-energy properties of this compound.

  11. The Space Motion of Leo I: Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion and Implied Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, Sangmo Tony; van der Marel, Roeland P; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Majewski, Steven R; Bullock, James S

    2012-01-01

    We present the first absolute proper motion measurement of Leo I, based on two epochs of HST ACS/WFC images separated by ~5 years. The average shift of Leo I stars with respect to ~100 background galaxies implies a proper motion of (mu_W, mu_N) = (0.1140 +/- 0.0295, -0.1256 +/- 0.0293) mas/yr. The implied Galactocentric velocity vector, corrected for the reflex motion of the Sun, has radial and tangential components V_rad = 167.9 +/- 2.8 km/s and V_tan = 101.0 +/- 34.4 km/s, respectively. We study the detailed orbital history of Leo I by solving its equations of motion backward in time for a range of plausible mass models for the Milky Way and its surrounding galaxies. Leo I entered the Milky Way virial radius 2.33 +/- 0.21 Gyr ago, most likely on its first infall. It had a pericentric approach 1.05 +/- 0.09 Gyr ago at a Galactocentric distance of 91 +/- 36 kpc. We associate these time scales with characteristic time scales in Leo I's star formation history, which shows an enhanced star formation activity ~2 ...

  12. Industrial Maintenance, Volume I. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the first of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains two sections. Section 1 overviews the philosophies, purposes, and goals for vocational education in Georgia. Contents of section 2 include a discussion of employability skills, description of the occupational…

  13. Heavy Duty Mechanics Apprenticeship Training, Module One. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Leslie A.; Abercrombie, Richard, Ed.

    This training manual, the first of two volumes, comprises the first six blocks in a nine-block in-service training course for apprentices working in heavy duty mechanics. Addressed in the individual blocks included in this volume are the following topics: shop equipment and practices; procedures for starting, moving, and stopping equipment; the…

  14. 30 CFR 250.1163 - How must I measure gas flaring or venting volumes and liquid hydrocarbon burning volumes, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must I measure gas flaring or venting... SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Flaring, Venting, and Burning Hydrocarbons § 250.1163 How must I measure gas flaring or venting volumes and liquid...

  15. Study of power management technology for orbital multi-100KWe applications. Volume 3: Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildice, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Mid to late 1980's power management technology needs to support development of a general purpose space platform, capable of suplying 100 to 250 KWe to a variety of users in low Earth orbit are examined. A typical, shuttle assembled and supplied space platform is illustred, along with a group of payloads which might reasonably be expected to use such a facility. Examination of platform and user power needs yields a set of power requirements used to evaluate power management options for life cycle cost effectivness. The most cost effective ac/dc and dc systems are evaluated, specifically to develop system details which lead to technology goals, including: array and transmission voltages, best frequency for ac power transmission, and advantages and disadvantages of ac and dc systems for this application. System and component requirements are compared with the state-of-the-art to identify areas where technological development is required.

  16. Study of space shuttle orbiter system management computer function. Volume 1: Analysis, baseline design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A system analysis of the shuttle orbiter baseline system management (SM) computer function is performed. This analysis results in an alternative SM design which is also described. The alternative design exhibits several improvements over the baseline, some of which are increased crew usability, improved flexibility, and improved growth potential. The analysis consists of two parts: an application assessment and an implementation assessment. The former is concerned with the SM user needs and design functional aspects. The latter is concerned with design flexibility, reliability, growth potential, and technical risk. The system analysis is supported by several topical investigations. These include: treatment of false alarms, treatment of off-line items, significant interface parameters, and a design evaluation checklist. An in-depth formulation of techniques, concepts, and guidelines for design of automated performance verification is discussed.

  17. Orbitally modulated photoexcited Si I emission in the eclipsing composite-spectrum binary ζ Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, G. M.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Bennett, P. D.; O'Riain, N.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the little-known phenomenon of orbitally modulated Si I emission at λ 3905.523 Å and λ 4102.936 Å in composite-spectrum binaries, with specific reference to ζ Aurigae (K4 Ib + B5 V). The emission is detected in the isolated spectrum of the B-type dwarf secondary, and while λ 4102 Å is heavily blended with Hδ, λ 3905 Å falls in the B-star's featureless continuum. The narrowness of the emission (vturb ≃ 6 km s-1) demonstrates that it originates in the upper photosphere or deep chromosphere of the K star primary. We propose that photoexcitation by the hot star's UV continuum, followed by recombination and cascades, leads to resonant scattering and subsequent pumping of lower opacity transitions in the singlet and triplet systems of Si I. This process channels the UV continuum into select narrow emission lines. We have also identified weaker photoexcited emission of Fe II at λ 3938.289 Å. The strengths, positions, and widths of the λ 3905 Å emission line vary with orbital phase owing to changes in the dilution of the irradiating flux and in the geometrical aspect of the irradiated hemisphere. Utilizing the inherent spatial resolution provided by the illuminated patch, and assuming that the K star is spherical with isotropic emission, yields vsin i ˜ 5.7 km s-1. Evidence of tidal distortion was deduced from the timing of the rapidly rising phase of the emission just after periastron. Increasing the diagnostic potential requires radiative transfer modelling of the formation and centre-to-limb variation of the emission.

  18. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100kW application. Volume 2: Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbandian, S. J.; French, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary design effort directed toward a low concentration ratio photovoltaic array system based on 1984 technology and capable of delivering multi-hundred kilowatts (300 kW to 100 kW range) in low Earth orbit. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 113 kW to 175 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells, respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pyramidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of 0.5 meters x 0.5 meters. Drawings for the preliminary design configuration and for the test hardware that was fabricated for design evaluation and test are provided.

  19. INTRA/Mod3.2. Manual and Code Description. Volume I - Physical Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jenny; Edlund, O.; Hermann, J.; Johansson, Lise-Lotte

    1999-01-01

    The INTRA Manual consists of two volumes. Volume I of the manual is a thorough description of the code INTRA, the Physical modelling of INTRA and the ruling numerical methods and volume II, the User`s Manual is an input description. This document, the Physical modelling of INTRA, contains code characteristics, integration methods and applications

  20. Inside Out. Writings from the Prison Literacy Project. Volumes I-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prison Literacy Project, Philadelphia, PA.

    These two volumes contain writings designed for the new reader who is in prison. Written by both inmates and external volunteers, the material in these volumes includes poems, stories, and short essays that deal with subjects of interest to prison inmates. To help the new reader, easier-to-read pieces are presented first. Titles in volume I are as…

  1. Quaternary biogenic opal records in the South China Sea: Linkages to East Asian monsoon, global ice volume and orbital forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG RuJian; JIAN ZhiMin; XIAO WenShen; TIAN Jun; LI JianRu; CHEN RongHua; ZHENG YuLong; CHEN JianFang

    2007-01-01

    Particulate fluxes investigated in the central South China Sea (SCS) during 1993-1996 indicate that opal flux can be used to show primary productivity change, which provides a foundation for tracing the evolutionary relationship between the surface productivity and East Asian monsoon in the SCS during the late Quaternary glacial and interglacial periods. Based on the studies of opal % and their mass accumulation rates (MAR) at the six sites recovered from the SCS during the "Resolution" ODP Leg 184 and "Sonne" 95 cruise of the Sino-Germany cooperation, opal % and their MARs increased evidently in the northern sites since 470-900 ka, and they enhanced and reduced, respectively, during the glacial and interglacial periods. Whereas they increased obviously in the southern sites since 420-450 ka,and they augmented and declined, respectively, during the interglacial and glacial periods. The variability in opal % and their MARs in the late Quaternary glacial cyclicity indicate the "seesaw" pattern of surface productivity in the SCS. The winter monsoon intensified during the glacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased, respectively, in the northern and southern SCS. The summer monsoon strengthened during the interglacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased,respectively, in the southern and northern SCS. The cross spectral analyses between the opal % in the northern and southern SCS during the Quaternary and global ice volume (δ18O) and orbital forcing (ETP) indicate that the East Asian winter and summer monsoons could be ascribed to the different drive mechanisms. On the orbital time scale, the global ice volume change could be a dominant factor for the winter monsoon intension and temporal variations. As compared with the winter monsoon, the correlative summer solar radiation with the obliquity and precession in the Northern Hemisphere could be a mostly controlling factor for the summer monsoon intension and temporal variations.

  2. Quaternary biogenic opal records in the South China Sea: Linkages to East Asian monsoon, global ice volume and orbital forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Particulate fluxes investigated in the central South China Sea (SCS) during 1993―1996 indicate that opal flux can be used to show primary productivity change, which provides a foundation for tracing the evolutionary relationship between the surface productivity and East Asian monsoon in the SCS during the late Quaternary glacial and interglacial periods. Based on the studies of opal % and their mass accumulation rates (MAR) at the six sites recovered from the SCS during the “Resolution” ODP Leg 184 and “Sonne” 95 cruise of the Sino-Germany cooperation, opal % and their MARs increased evidently in the northern sites since 470―900 ka, and they enhanced and reduced, respectively, during the glacial and interglacial periods. Whereas they increased obviously in the southern sites since 420―450 ka, and they augmented and declined, respectively, during the interglacial and glacial periods. The vari- ability in opal % and their MARs in the late Quaternary glacial cyclicity indicate the “seesaw” pattern of surface productivity in the SCS. The winter monsoon intensified during the glacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased, respectively, in the northern and southern SCS. The summer monsoon strengthened during the interglacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased, respectively, in the southern and northern SCS. The cross spectral analyses between the opal % in the northern and southern SCS during the Quaternary and global ice volume (δ 18O) and orbital forcing (ETP) indicate that the East Asian winter and summer monsoons could be ascribed to the different drive mechanisms. On the orbital time scale, the global ice volume change could be a dominant factor for the winter monsoon intension and temporal variations. As compared with the winter monsoon, the correlative summer solar radiation with the obliquity and precession in the Northern Hemisphere could be a mostly controlling factor for the summer monsoon intension and

  3. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  4. US Army Armor Reference Data in Three Volumes. Volume I. The Army Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    I I scUi MG oii p ,i .irr 1 64 A-t bPP Tech 0 PlC Roty vi. I SIC POW4 See MG Wa11. C.090 3/4-. 9 1 SO 40! GMt equip Rpirer I Ofpit 90 2 FC...S F5 (S u rvey C m np t) R c r r P I F y) RI SF5 (ee nitmC e t C) R 1 SF5 (Survey Cmpt) P 1 SF5 (iS u e OmP/R oe) P I SF5 (Pa Cek R I SF5 (Survey

  5. Tactical Target Identification (TTI) Laboratory Simulation. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    WWE mA Z0. a. .... . .. . ..~ . Kf w ?f -r - l - A W LLI II I E X JK Z 0( 3( Ui - EU 21* C)- J’ - "M( j j-NI 1J J- -1 iJ J AJ -j - 111 JJ W QS.C.J2-11...L ~ ’.4 wwe WWO- 0-I-I-- Lam Z I- 0A Ia C99 W .- u -ft I.. ww t- &L0 U~~~w Q I-’~0I I- $- *- Q >F0moo"".- 0-t A P4(.) Il-’- 040 *-*m W t Z 412 MW W

  6. Spin-orbit and electron correlation effects on the structure of EF3 (E = I, At, and element 117).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoseok; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2008-12-18

    Structures and vibrational frequencies of group 17 fluorides EF3 (E = I, At, and element 117) are calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory using relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs) with and without spin-orbit terms in order to investigate the effects of spin-orbit interactions and electron correlations on the structures and vibrational frequencies of EF3. Various tests imply that spin-orbit and electron correlation effects estimated presently from Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT calculations with RECPs with and without spin-orbit terms are quite reasonable. Spin-orbit and electron correlation effects generally increase bond lengths and/or angles in both C2v and D3h structures. For IF3, the C2v structure is a global minimum, and the D3h structure is a second-order saddle point in both HF and DFT calculations with and without spin-orbit interactions. Spin-orbit effects for IF3 are negligible in comparison to electron correlation effects. The D3h global minimum is the only minimum structure for (117)F3 in all RECP calculations, and the C2v structure is neither a local minimum nor a saddle point. In the case of AtF3, the C2v structure is found to be a local minimum in all RECP calculations without spin-orbit terms, and the D3h structure becomes a local minimum at the DFT level of theory with and without spin-orbit interactions. In the HF calculation with spin-orbit terms, the D3h structure of AtF3 is a second-order saddle point. AtF3 is a borderline case between the valence-shell-electron-pair-repulsion (VSEPR) structure of IF3 and the non-VSEPR structure of (117)F3. Relativistic effects, including scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects, and electron correlation effects together or separately stabilize the D3h structures more than the C2v structures. As a result, one may suggest that the VSEPR predictions agree very well with the structures optimized by the nonrelativistic HF level of theory even for heavy-atom molecules but not so

  7. Total Dose Hardness Assurance. Volume I. Identification of Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    under Contract F29601-78-C-0022. The project officer for the Air Force was Mr. Roe J. Maier. The program manager and principal investigator for BDM was...Assurance Techniques," AFWL-TR-73-134, 3 Volumes, January 1974. 44. Bruncke, W. C. et al. " Tecniques for Screening Bipolar Transistor Degradation Due to

  8. Environmental law and climate change : Volumes I & II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Two volume set that brings together 54 of the most influential and important scientific journal articles in the field of climate law, thematically grouped together as follows: introducing climate law, theories and approaches, climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, climate justice, lia

  9. The Cabal Seminar. - Volume I: Games, scales, and suslin cardinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kechris, A.S.; Löwe, B.; Steel, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the Los Angeles Caltech-UCLA ‘Cabal Seminar’ were originally published in the 1970s and 1980s. Games, Scales, and Suslin Cardinals is the first of a series of four books collecting the seminal papers from the original volumes together with extensive unpublished material, new paper

  10. Clinical research on the treatment effects of radioactive (125)I seeds interstitial brachytherapy on children with primary orbital rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xin; Ma, Jianmin; Dai, Haojie; Ren, Ling; Li, Quan; Shi, Jitong

    2014-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is one of the most common primary orbital malignancies. However, orbital RMS is a very rare disease, especially in childhood, and the tumor has a high degree of malignancy and rapid development. The objective of the present study was to investigate the clinical treatment effects of radioactive (125)I seeds interstitial brachytherapy on children with primary orbital RMS, which may provide a new method for treating RMS in clinical applications. Radioactive (125)I seeds were used in the present study. Primary lesions from ten children with orbital RMS, including three male and seven female patients, were selected as the targeted areas. The activity, number and spatial location of the seeds were optimized and simulated by applying computer three-dimensional treatment planning system (TPS) software. The interstitial implantation of the radioactive (125)I seeds was conducted on children under general anesthesia according to the TPS simulation results. Quality verifications of the operation were conducted by orbital computed tomography and X-ray plain film at the early stage after operation, and the children were followed up. The patients were followed up by October 2012 with an average follow-up time of 57 ± 17.43 months and a median follow-up time of 55 months. Nine cases achieved complete remission, and one case achieved partial remission, resulting in a total efficiency and survival rate of 100.0 % (10/10). Most patients recovered after treatment or had no radiotherapy side effect after the operations, though 20.0 % of the patients (2/10) experienced corneal opacity, eyeball movement disorder, or loss of sight. Radioactive (125)I seeds interstitial brachytherapy was an effective treatment for children with primary orbital RMS. Results from this study may provide a new clinical approach for the treatment of child patients with primary orbital RMS.

  11. Long-term safety and performance of the orbital atherectomy system for treating calcified coronary artery lesions: 5-Year follow-up in the ORBIT I trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Parloop; Parikh, Parth [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India); Patel, Apurva [Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chag, Milan; Chandarana, Anish [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India); Parikh, Roosha [Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Parikh, Keyur, E-mail: keyur.parikh@cims.me [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India)

    2015-06-15

    Background/Purpose: The ORBIT I trial, a first-in-man study, was conducted to evaluate the safety and performance of the orbital atherectomy system (OAS) in treating de novo calcified coronary lesions. Methods/Materials: Fifty patients were enrolled between May and July 2008 based on several criteria, and were treated with the OAS followed by stent placement. The safety and performance of the OAS were evaluated by procedural success, device success, and overall major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) rates, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI) and need for target lesion revascularization (TLR). Our institution enrolled and treated 33 of the 50 patients and continued follow-up for 5 years. Results: Average age was 54 years and 91% were males. Mean lesion length was 15.9 mm. Device success was 100%, and average number of orbital atherectomy devices (OAD) used per patient was 1.3. Stents were placed directly after OAS in 31/32 patients (96.9%). All stents (average stent per lesion 1.1) were successfully deployed with 0.3% residual stenosis. The overall cumulative MACE rate was 6.1% in-hospital, 9.1% at 30 days, 12.1% at 6 months, 15.2% at 2 years, 18.2% at 3 years and 21.2% at 5 years (4 total cardiac deaths). None of the patients had Q-wave MIs. Angiographic complications were observed in 5 patients. No flow/slow flow due to distal embolization was observed. Conclusions: The ORBIT I trial suggests that OAS treatment continues to offer a safe and effective method to change compliance of calcified coronary lesions to facilitate optimal stent placement in these difficult-to-treat patients.

  12. Domestic Base Factors, Fiscal Year 1979. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Ezw - - N-N- o -- i I-’ CO If)- N WD 00 C 000000.-OW I, l 0- 0 -j ru - v OOOOINN-MO - N LI U 0 Y v ~0 0)-N NNOW000nn V0 C 0 CLY U0 lOW it 0 CI .( C Nt...04 W O - 00 0 WO CD’. - (00100 0.- 0 q 0 0 N 0 0 V 0 EZw L0 001? 00 0 N .C 1- NI - v N I-j -W Nw 0 ND 0 U4 e VOO .- S N N - I N 0 0 v’ N 0 𔃺. ONN 0

  13. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Oxygen Turbopump Technology. Final Report, Volume 1. Design, Fabrication, and Hydrostatic Bearing Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    cc c 58 uju CD C:> ɘ CDC L.) C) 0 crc> 01 2Li L-1 c-.l0 I CD C.- 2.5,Detail Design, cont. assembly error . The most sensitive area for contact is the...exit ports sealed. All transducers sensed within their typi- cal error tolerance at the low pressures being used in the initial tests. Chilldown tests...exterior temp. at turbine TIPO OF (0.25,0) bearing IPmp bearing exit tenperature TPBEC OF PBEI Pmp bearing exit temperature TPBEC OF PBE2 SPump bearing

  14. What the Planner Needs to Know. Volume I. About the Debris Environment. Volume 2. About Debris Clearing Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    a priority basis. Re- visions of inventories and the supply and maintenance of actual clearing operations will then proceed. c VOLUME I WHAT THE...Making Debris Predicition Survey I Potential Emergency | -j Operations - | ’ Clearing Routes, etc.j ± Completed DPS File...three types of primary equipment would be preferred. Mechanics (Grade 2) for maintenance and repair are slightly less critical than experienced

  15. Probability of coincidental similarity among the orbits of small bodies - I. Pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopek, Tadeusz Jan; Bronikowska, Małgorzata

    2017-09-01

    Probability of coincidental clustering among orbits of comets, asteroids and meteoroids depends on many factors like: the size of the orbital sample searched for clusters or the size of the identified group, it is different for groups of 2,3,4,… members. Probability of coincidental clustering is assessed by the numerical simulation, therefore, it depends also on the method used for the synthetic orbits generation. We have tested the impact of some of these factors. For a given size of the orbital sample we have assessed probability of random pairing among several orbital populations of different sizes. We have found how these probabilities vary with the size of the orbital samples. Finally, keeping fixed size of the orbital sample we have shown that the probability of random pairing can be significantly different for the orbital samples obtained by different observation techniques. Also for the user convenience we have obtained several formulae which, for given size of the orbital sample can be used to calculate the similarity threshold corresponding to the small value of the probability of coincidental similarity among two orbits.

  16. Space shuttle orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study. Volume 3: Impact of retrofits for center-of-gravity extension on orbiter thermal-protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunavant, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Heat transfer studies were conducted at Mach 10.3 on space shuttle orbiter models with the S-2 fillet and C-4 canard retrofit moldlines which were generated in aerodynamic and system design studies to increase the allowable c.g. range of the orbiter. Areas of orbiter most strongly affected were the sides where a shear layer which separated along the wing leading edge impinged. Analytical studies of the heating effect on the thermal-protection system were made which indicated that scar weight on the orbiter sides due to allowances for retrofits of the S-2 fillet and C-4 canard is small (less than about 90 kg (200 lbs) in comparison to the total weight of the retrofit).

  17. State Assessment and Testing Programs: An Annotated ERIC Bibliography. Volume I: General References. Volume II: Individual State Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Deborah Elena; Wildemuth, Barbara

    There is a growing body of literature in the ERIC data base pertaining to state educational assessment and testing programs. Volume I of this bibliography includes abstracts of 39 documents and journal articles describing the design and implementation of programs, as well as the technical and political issues which have been addressed by the…

  18. MX Siting Investigation Geotechnical Siting Status Report. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-21

    alluvial basin interjacent to the San Andres and Oscura Mountains to the east and the Rio Grande River to the west. Field activities for the Characterization...FORCE -SAUSO 5.- ORD2W USTVIUNAL, INC.j FN-T R-23D VTHgr t AN;dI~f :1 ~ ~ nv l frLItVl r !X F fas ind..,ovr- r~id -’nncs rax- i’ic rtiI. ’ torrs tti’nt

  19. MHD Advanced Power Train Phase I, Final Report, Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. R. Jones

    1985-08-01

    This appendix provides additional data in support of the MHD/Steam Power Plant Analyses reported in report Volume 5. The data is in the form of 3PA/SUMARY computer code printouts. The order of presentation in all four cases is as follows: (1) Overall Performance; (2) Component/Subsystem Information; (3) Plant Cost Accounts Summary; and (4) Plant Costing Details and Cost of Electricity.

  20. Tectonics, orbital forcing, global climate change, and human evolution in Africa: introduction to the African paleoclimate special volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslin, Mark A; Christensen, Beth

    2007-11-01

    The late Cenozoic climate of Africa is a critical component for understanding human evolution. African climate is controlled by major tectonic changes, global climate transitions, and local variations in orbital forcing. We introduce the special African Paleoclimate Issue of the Journal of Human Evolution by providing a background for and synthesis of the latest work relating to the environmental context for human evolution. Records presented in this special issue suggest that the regional tectonics, appearance of C(4) plants in East Africa, and late Cenozoic global cooling combined to produce a long-term drying trend in East Africa. Of particular importance is the uplift associated with the East African Rift Valley formation, which altered wind flow patterns from a more zonal to more meridinal direction. Results in this volume suggest a marked difference in the climate history of southern and eastern Africa, though both are clearly influenced by the major global climate thresholds crossed in the last 3 million years. Papers in this volume present lake, speleothem, and marine paleoclimate records showing that the East African long-term drying trend is punctuated by episodes of short, alternating periods of extreme wetness and aridity. These periods of extreme climate variability are characterized by the precession-forced appearance and disappearance of large, deep lakes in the East African Rift Valley and paralleled by low and high wind-driven dust loads reaching the adjacent ocean basins. Dating of these records show that over the last 3 million years such periods only occur at the times of major global climatic transitions, such as the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (2.7-2.5 Ma), intensification of the Walker Circulation (1.9-1.7 Ma), and the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution (1-0.7 Ma). Authors in this volume suggest this onset occurs as high latitude forcing in both Hemispheres compresses the Intertropical Convergence Zone so that East Africa

  1. Asteroid Origins Satellite (AOSAT) I: An On-orbit Centrifuge Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightholder, Jack; Thoesen, Andrew; Adamson, Eric; Jakubowski, Jeremy; Nallapu, Ravi; Smallwood, Sarah; Raura, Laksh; Klesh, Andrew; Asphaug, Erik; Thangavelautham, Jekan

    2017-04-01

    Exploration of asteroids, comets and small moons (small bodies) can answer fundamental questions relating to the formation of the solar system, the availability of resources, and the nature of impact hazards. Near-earth asteroids and the small moons of Mars are potential targets of human exploration. But as illustrated by recent missions, small body surface exploration remains challenging, expensive, and fraught with risk. Despite their small size, they are among the most extreme planetary environments, with low and irregular gravity, loosely bound regolith, extreme temperature variation, and the presence of electrically charged dust. Here we describe the Asteroid Origins Satellite (AOSAT-I), an on-orbit, 3U CubeSat centrifuge using a sandwich-sized bed of crushed meteorite fragments to replicate asteroid surface conditions. Demonstration of this CubeSat will provide a low-cost pathway to physical asteroid model validation, shed light on the origin and geophysics of asteroids, and constrain the design of future landers, rovers, resource extractors, and human missions. AOSAT-I will conduct scientific experiments within its payload chamber while operating in two distinct modes: (1) as a nonrotating microgravity laboratory to investigate primary accretion, and (2) as a rotating centrifuge producing artificial milligravity to simulate surface conditions on asteroids, comets and small moons. AOSAT-I takes advantage of low-cost, off-the-shelf components, modular design, and the rapid assembly and instrumentation of the CubeSat standard, to answer fundamental questions in planetary science and reduce cost and risk of future exploration.

  2. The final Galileo SSI observations of Io: Orbits G28-I33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E.P.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; McEwen, A.S.; Radebaugh, J.; Milazzo, M.; Simonelli, D.P.; Geissler, P.; Williams, D.A.; Perry, J.; Jaeger, W.L.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Denk, T.; Phillips, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    We present the observations of Io acquired by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment during the Galileo Millennium Mission (GMM) and the strategy we used to plan the exploration of Io. Despite Galileo's tight restrictions on data volume and downlink capability and several spacecraft and camera anomalies due to the intense radiation close to Jupiter, there were many successful SSI observations during GMM. Four giant, high-latitude plumes, including the largest plume ever observed on Io, were documented over a period of eight months; only faint evidence of such plumes had been seen since the Voyager 2 encounter, despite monitoring by Galileo during the previous five years. Moreover, the source of one of the plumes was Tvashtar Catena, demonstrating that a single site can exhibit remarkably diverse eruption styles - from a curtain of lava fountains, to extensive surface flows, and finally a ??? 400 km high plume - over a relatively short period of time (??? 13 months between orbits 125 and G29). Despite this substantial activity, no evidence of any truly new volcanic center was seen during the six years of Galileo observations. The recent observations also revealed details of mass wasting processes acting on Io. Slumping and landsliding dominate and occur in close proximity to each other, demonstrating spatial variation in material properties over distances of several kilometers. However, despite the ubiquitous evidence for mass wasting, the rate of volcanic resurfacing seems to dominate; the floors of paterae in proximity to mountains are generally free of debris. Finally, the highest resolution observations obtained during Galileo's final encounters with Io provided further evidence for a wide diversity of surface processes at work on Io. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Domestic Base Factors. Fiscal Year 1980. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    t6S LUL CD I.-. fC)C a. cm = I-~ MISL r cc ILCL -DC I oe UJ cn CD C. ... (F, C# :INISSV1O 09,ts LLC" - C CA CID SC) 0) 0 0 C) M01 QC 0C) 0 C D ) DCC 0...I- -qONm C O () 00 0 000v I-) l 4. c- ~ ) O 0 < 40’ 0 U1 ).J cc w ~ 4I < LJ~> 000000010q 0 w 0 MIo U 000C)0-OqN0 Z- co4 z a_401 - w-. 0 :oE 0CI- 0...ID 0 0 C) N 14 C D 0) 0 0I 0) r- CD r- (3)0 CID N 01 0) 10 C- CO - N 0)0 4011) 0- N (D0 N~ CO CO In C) ’I1 ɘ CON 010 In) (110 01 N 0 n - NO 1- (If

  4. Weapon System Costing Methodology for Aircraft Airframes and Basic Structures. Volume I. Technical Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    specifications, or other data, is not to be regarded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or...COSTl COSTC CObTC COSTC CÜSTC COSTC COSTC COsTo CObTC CObTC CObTC CObTC >- COSTC (..au J" I i,. 1L CObTC. ,n .,-L I 1 W i> 1 u , fl

  5. Probability of coincidental similarity among the orbits of small bodies - I. Pairing

    CERN Document Server

    Jopek, Tadeusz J

    2016-01-01

    Probability of coincidental clustering among the orbits of comets, asteroids and meteoroids depends on many factors like: the size of the orbital sample searched for clusters or the size of the identified group, it is different for groups of 2,3,4, ... members. Probability of coincidental clustering is assessed by the numerical simulation, therefore, it depends also on the method used for the synthetic orbits generation. We tested the impact of some of these factors. For a given size of the orbital sample we have assessed probability of random pairing among several orbital populations of different sizes. We have found how these probabilities vary with the size of the orbital samples. Finally, keeping fixed size of the orbital sample we have shown that the probability of random pairing can be significantly different for the orbital samples obtained by different observation techniques. Also for the user convenience we have obtained several formulae which, for given size of the orbital sample, one can use to cal...

  6. Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)-Phase I. Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: Proof of Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Meteorological Sensor Array ( MSA )–Phase I, Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: “Proof of Concept”) by Sandra Harrison and Gail Vaucher ARL...Missile Range, NM 88002-5501 ARL-TR-7133 October 2014 Meteorological Sensor Array ( MSA )–Phase I, Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: “Proof...2014–September 30, 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Meteorological Sensor Array ( MSA )–Phase I, Volume 2 (Data Management Tool: “Proof of Concept”) 5a

  7. Advanced Weapon System (AWS) Sensor Prediction Techniques Study. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Week& • ,I I vetrn•rept Rho ar) Same W SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES RADC Project Engineer: Robert H. LaSalle (URRP) It. KEY WORDS (C..w on roveree eoi nolese Nem...languages and structured according to good software engineering principles . One of the most significant conclusions of this study is that the direct...depends only on (x-y), i.e., C(xy) = C(x-y), p(x,y):= p(x-y), and V(x,y) - V(x-y). In terms of Euclidean motions, stationarity implies invariance under

  8. Topics in Optical Materials and Device Research - II. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    34Thermochemical Calculations on the LPCVD of Si3N4 and Si02", Solid State Technology, July 1980 pp.63- 68 . (27) C.E. Ryan, "Recommendations for Low...NY (1968). 5) Marcuse , D., "Theory of Dielectric Optical Waveguides", Academic Press, NY (1974). 6) Marcuse , D., J. Opt. Soc. Am. 66, 216 (1976). 25...34 (Plenum, N.Y., 1979); M.D. Rourke, this volume. 2) M. Sodha and A. Ghatak, "Inhomogeneous Optical Waveguides" (Plenum, N.Y., 1977) Chap. 8.3. 3) D. Marcuse

  9. Rocket Radiation Handbook. Volume I. Rocket Radiation Phenomenology and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    Day i me) Ln 4j 3- 4-j i4 4-4- 4 T_= 4Tý -- AB D O 4-. 0 loo 2020 0 0 0 WaeeghX rm FIGRE -7 CACULTE UNTTEUAED VI SPCTRM ROMAN MIE-FELE 30 K(F ROCKE ...per unit wavelength interval, the radiance per unit wavenumber interval is often useful:’ dW dW dX 2TT hcv 3 1.24796 x 10-15 V3 Watts dv dX dv exp... hcv /kT) - [exp(I.43886 v/T) - I ’ 2. Hb (B.6) The spectral radiance per unit solid angle or spectral "steradiance" is given by (Ref. 2): N (X, T,O) dW f

  10. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume I. Biological,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Cecelia Santus Dorothy Terpln Lama Reynolds Judy Maith I TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. Introduction .................................... 1 II. Subject...concerning yeast3 from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans is also compared to that of the Great Lakes. Jenry, No ma Scott - See: Jessie Finley Klocke, et al...o. 433. Jessie Finley Klocke, et al, lHo. 434. 128 35. lienson, E. Bennette. 1966. A review of Great Lakes benthos research. Univ. MTich. Great

  11. Spectroscopic search for new SW Sextantis stars in the 3-4 hour orbital period range -- I

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Gil, P; Gänsicke, B T

    2006-01-01

    [Abridged] We report on time-resolved optical spectroscopy of ten non-eclipsing nova-like cataclysmic variables in the orbital period range between 3 and 4 hours. Of the ten systems so far observed, HL Aqr, BO Cet, AH Men, V380 Oph, AH Pic, and LN UMa are identified as new members of the SW Sex class. We present improved orbital period measurements for HL Aqr (Porb = 3.254 +- 0.001 h) and V380 Oph (Porb = 3.69857 +- 0.00002 h). BO Cet and V380 Oph exhibit emission-line flaring with periodicities of 20 min and 47 min, respectively. The Halpha line of HL Aqr shows significant blueshifted absorption modulated at the orbital period. Similarly to the emission S-wave of the high-inclination SW Sex stars, this absorption S-wave has its maximum blue velocity at orbital phase ~0.5. We estimate an orbital inclination for HL Aqr in the range 19 < i < 27 deg, which is much lower than that of the emission-dominated, non-eclipsing SW Sex stars (i ~ 60-70 deg). This gives rise to the interesting possibility of many lo...

  12. Fourth international symposium on automotive propulsion systems. Volume I. [Eighteen papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A pre-conference draft is given (in five volumes) of the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Automotive Propulsion Systems, held April 18-22, 1977, in Washington, D.C. Volume I contains eighteen papers; a separate abstract was prepared for each for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  13. A Dynamic Analysis of the Medium Tank Battalion. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-01

    the U.S. Army might employ the Medium Tank Battalion as part of a Heavy Division would te the Midale East and North Africa . The Study had insufficient...V t C4 1 4 . N_ __14 4 in in In AAIn 4jJ 0% W ~ %%I- 0 0% 9 0 %o in o 0% OD - uf tfl PIb u .40 0 4I) >. -A V) 4.0% %0 1D~4 in E4) d) N 0 Ch QU W %0

  14. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR PARTICULATE MATTER, VOLUMES I-III, (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT, 1995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no abstract available for these documents. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the Technical Information Staff at the number listed above.Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter, Volume I, Extern...

  15. Lanchester-Type Models of Warfare. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    based on the principle of uniformitarianism , which holds that physical and biological processes, conditions, and operations do not change over time (i.e...uniformity over time). For example, in geology the doctrine of uniformitarianism holds that the present is the key to the past [61]. This principle

  16. SEMREC3A, Volume I - User’s Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    of GVO, 1972 WGVOME - labor share of GVO, 1972 A0101, etc. = input-output coefficients from metallurgy column of times series of I/0 tables CIME ...used to Jistribute the delivery of the sector in 1970 producers’ prices to each of the four subcomponents. 1 See Gene D. Guill, Deflation of the 18

  17. Enhanced recovery of unconventional gas. Executive summary. Volume I (of 3 volumes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuuskraa, V. A.; Brashear, J. P.; Doscher, T. M.; Elkins, L. E.

    1978-10-01

    R and D efforts in enhanced gas recovery of near-conventional and unconventional gas sources are needed in order to augment domestic supplies. Unconventional gas sources could provide 200 to 220 Tcf of additional gas supply, if a combination of economic incentives and publicly sponsored R and D is used, and as much as 2 to 8 Tcf could be delivered per year by 1990. This volume comprises three parts discussing the public policy issues, proposed research strategy in enhanced gas recovery, and methodology. 14 figures. (DLC)

  18. Failure Analysis Seminar: Techniques and Teams. Seminar Notes. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    and Progress - Evaluate 7* 6 *~ 0 6 9 9 S 9 FAILURE ANALYSIS STRATEGY1 Augustine E. Magistro *. Introduction A primary task of management and systems...by Augustine Magistro , Picatinny Arsenal and Lawrence R. Seggel, U. S. Army Missile Command. The report Is available from the National Technical...to emphasize techniques - Identification and improvement of your leadership styles 2I BIOGRAPHIC SKETCHES: A.E. "Gus" Magistro - Systems Evaluation

  19. Corps of Engineers Hydraulic Design Criteria. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Design Memorandum No. G-7, 1955. (10) Moore, M. 0., "Incrustation in water pipelines ." ASCE, Pipeline Di- vision, Journal, vol 94, PL 1, paper 6161...October 1968), pp 37-T7. 224 -1/1 Revised 6-57 Revised 1-64 Revised 9-70 Revised 3-73 (i)Franke, P. G., "Some roughness values of water pipelines ." L’Energia

  20. Enhance and Test the Remote Seismic Terminal. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    between the two cursors. -. .. .--- " . -. . . •Mo ;Po B17 Period Measures and displays 113744 S the number of samples from the first to the Illy...cknowl edqent Thr or,-.h~ut t 1,h- 1 -, o j ect the wr i t er had the benef it of a c,r.t .nuo _ e:xchar. ce of e wIt h A C . Cann. Work was performed

  1. State energy price system. Volume I: overview and technical documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This study utilizes existing data sources and previous analyses of state-level energy prices to develop consistent state-level energy prices series by fuel type and by end-use sector. The fuels are electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel oil, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. The end-use sectors are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Based upon an evaluation of existing data sources, recommendations were formulated on the feasible approaches for developing a consistent state energy price series. The data series were compiled based upon the approaches approved after a formal EIA review. Detailed documentation was provided, including annual updating procedures. Recommendations were formulated for future improvements in the collection of data or in data processing. Generally, the geographical coverage includes the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information on state-level energy use was generally taken from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Corresponding average US prices are also developed using volumes reported in SEDS. To the extent possible, the prices developed are quantity weighted average retail prices. Both a Btu price series and a physical unit price series are developed for each fuel. The period covered by the data series is 1970 through 1980 for most fuels, though prices for electricity and natural gas extend back to 1960. (PSB)

  2. Spectral multiplexing using stacked volume-phase holographic gratings - I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanutta, A.; Landoni, M.; Riva, M.; Bianco, A.

    2017-08-01

    Many focal-reducer spectrographs, currently available at state-of-the-art telescopes facilities, would benefit from a simple refurbishing that could increase both the resolution and spectral range in order to cope with the progressively challenging scientific requirements, but, in order to make this update appealing, it should minimize the changes in the existing structure of the instrument. In the past, many authors proposed solutions based on stacking subsequently layers of dispersive elements and recording multiple spectra in one shot (multiplexing). Although this idea is promising, it brings several drawbacks and complexities that prevent the straightforward integration of such a device in a spectrograph. Fortunately, nowadays, the situation has changed dramatically, thanks to the successful experience achieved through photopolymeric holographic films, used to fabricate common volume-phase holographic gratings (VPHGs). Thanks to the various advantages made available by these materials in this context, we propose an innovative solution to design a stacked multiplexed VPHG that is able to secure efficiently different spectra in a single shot. This allows us to increase resolution and spectral range enabling astronomers to greatly economize their awarded time at the telescope. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of our solution, both in terms of expected performance and feasibility, supposing the upgrade of the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS).

  3. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  4. Nitric Oxide Measurement Study: Volume I. Optical Calibration,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Doppler broadened line (k""i) is given by Mitchell and Zemansky (1971), 2 k 2 e Z In 2 _N(n"y" 7 ",1" n") f V’V" j’J" (25)1 Me C(A aV )a1 where e is the...broaden- ing. The theories of pressure broadening are discussed in some detail by Breene (1957), Hindmarsh and Farr (1972), and Mitchell and Zemansky ...collisions, AVL, is given by Mitchell and Zemansky (1971), AvL = L (38) Trc where ZL is the collision frequency of a single molecule, c is the velocity

  5. Activation of Salivary Secretion: Coupling of Cell Volume and [Ca2+]i in Single Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foskett, J. Kevin; Melvin, James E.

    1989-06-01

    High-resolution differential interference contrast microscopy and digital imaging of the fluorescent calcium indicator dye fura-2 were performed simultaneously in single rat salivary gland acinar cells to examine the effects of muscarinic stimulation on cell volume and cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Agonist stimulation of fluid secretion is initially associated with a rapid tenfold increase in [Ca2+]i as well as a substantial cell shrinkage. Subsequent changes of cell volume in the continued presence of agonist are tightly coupled to dynamic levels of [Ca2+]i, even during [Ca2+]i oscillations. Experiments with Ca2+ chelators and ionophores showed that physiological elevations of [Ca2+]i are necessary and sufficient to cause changes in cell volume. The relation between [Ca2+]i and cell volume suggests that the latter reflects the secretory state of the acinar cell. Agonist-induced changes in [Ca2+]i, by modulating specific ion permeabilities, result in solute movement into or out of the cell. The resultant cell volume changes may be important in modulating salivary secretion.

  6. Orbital and escape dynamics in barred galaxies - I. The 2D system

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Christof

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use the two-dimensional (2D) version of a new analytical gravitational model in order to explore the orbital as well as the escape dynamics of the stars in a barred galaxy composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar, a flat disk and a dark matter halo component. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted for distinguishing between bounded and escaping motion. Furthermore bounded orbits are further classified into non-escaping regular and trapped chaotic using the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. Our aim is to determine the basins of escape through the two symmetrical escape channels around the Lagrange points $L_2$ and $L_3$ and also to relate them with the corresponding distribution of the escape rates of the orbits. We integrate initial conditions of orbits in several types of planes so as to obtain a more complete view of the overall orbital properties of the dynamical system. We also present evidence that the unstable manifolds which guide the orbits in and out t...

  7. Commentary to "LARES successfully launched in orbit: Satellite and mission description" by A. Paolozzi and I. Ciufolini

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We comment on some statements in a recent paper by Paolozzi and Ciufolini concerning certain remarks raised by us on the realistic accuracy obtainable in testing the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect in the gravitational field of the Earth with the newly launched LARES satellite together with the LAGEOS and LAGEOS II spacecraft in orbit for a long time. The orbital configuration of LARES is different from that of the originally proposed LAGEOS-3. Indeed, while the latter one should have been launched to the same altitude of LAGEOS (i.e. about $h_{\\rm L}=5890$ km) in an orbital plane displaced by $180$ deg with respect to that of LAGEOS ($I_{\\rm L}=110$ deg, $I_{\\rm L3}=70$ deg), LARES currently moves at a much smaller altitude (about $h_{\\rm LR}=1440$ km) and at a slightly different inclination ($I_{\\rm LR} = 69.5$ deg). As independently pointed out in the literature by different authors, the overall accuracy of a LARES-LAGEOS-LAGEOS II Lense-Thirring test may be unfavorably \\textcolor{black}{impacte...

  8. Comparative Performance of High Efficiency Ship Propulsion Systems for Destroyer Hull Types. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-06

    i pi» ■«■■i . ilMi<MI««iPMpM«l««P«nMVHV*W«nPW- AD-A007 340 COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH EFFICIENCY SHIP PROPULSION SYSTEMS...OF HIGH EFFICIENCY SHIP PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR DESTROYER HULL TYPES VOLUME I By Alan J. Stewart 6 December 1974 Approved for Public Release... Ship Propulsion Systems for Destroyer Hull Types 7. AH r:i.iR(JJ Alan J. Stewart 9. Pr.fii-OFIMING OiiüANIi ATION NAMI A’JD AOOMESS Bradford

  9. LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

  10. How I do it: the endoscopic endonasal optic nerve and orbital apex decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquesson, Timothée; Abouaf, Lucie; Berhouma, Moncef; Jouanneau, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    With the refinement of the technique, endoscopic endonasal surgery increases its field of indications. The orbital compartment is among the locations easily reached through the nostril. This anteromedial approach has been described primarily for inflammatory or traumatic diseases, with few data for tumoral diseases. Since 2010, this route has been used at our institution either for decompression or for biopsy of orbital tumoral diseases. Even if further studies are warranted, this strategy proved to be beneficial for patients, with improvements in visual outcome. In this article, the authors summarize their technique and their experience with endonasal endoscopic orbital decompression. Nasal and sphenoidal anatomies determine the feasibility and risks for doing an efficient medial optic or orbit decompression. • Techniques and tools used are those developed for pituitary surgery. • A middle turbinectomy and posterior ethmoidectomy are mandatory to expose the medial wall of the orbit. • The Onodi cell is a key marker for the optic canal and must be opened up with caution. • The lamina papyracea is opened first with a spatula and the optic canal opened up by a gentle drilling under continuous irrigation from distal to proximal. • Drilling might always be used under continuous irrigation to avoid overheating of the optic nerve. An ultrasonic device can be used as well. • The nasal corridor is narrow and instruments may hide the infrared neuronavigation probe. To overcome this issue, a magnetic device could be useful. • Doppler control could be useful to locate the ICA. • The optic canal must be opened up from the tuberculum of the sella to the orbital apex and from the planum (anterior cranial fossa) to the lateral OCR or ICA canal • At the end of the procedure, the optic nerve becomes frequently pulsatile, which is a good marker of decompression.

  11. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-08-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  12. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccucci Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients, skeletal class II (70 patients and skeletal class III (65 patients. Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma. TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI. Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p 3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p 2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p  Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  13. Black hole solutions to the $F_4$-model and their orbits (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Chemissany, W; Ruggeri, D; Trigiante, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we continue the program of the classification of nilpotent orbits using the approach developed in arXiv:1107.5986, within the study of black hole solutions in D=4 supergravities. Our goal in this work is to classify static, single center black hole solutions to a specific N=2 four dimensional "magic" model, with special K\\"ahler scalar manifold ${\\rm Sp}(6,\\mathbb{R})/{\\rm U}(3)$, as orbits of geodesics on the pseudo-quaternionic manifold ${\\rm F}_{4(4)}/[{\\rm SL}(2,\\mathbb{R})\\times {\\rm Sp}(6,\\mathbb{R})]$ with respect to the action of the isometry group ${\\rm F}_{4(4)}$. Our analysis amounts to the classification of the orbits of the geodesic "velocity" vector with respect to the isotropy group $H^*={\\rm SL}(2,\\mathbb{R})\\times {\\rm Sp}(6,\\mathbb{R})$, which include a thorough classification of the \\emph{nilpotent orbits} associated with extremal solutions and reveals a richer structure than the one predicted by the $\\beta-\\gamma$ labels alone, based on the Kostant Sekiguchi approach. We prov...

  14. Life and Death Near Zero: The distribution and evolution of NEA orbits of near-zero MOID, (e, i), and q

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alan W.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Granvik, Mikael

    2016-10-01

    Modeling the distribution of orbits with near-zero orbital parameters requires special attention to the dimensionality of the parameters in question. This is even more true since orbits of near-zero MOID, (e, i), or q are especially interesting as sources or sinks of NEAs. An essentially zero value of MOID (Minimum Orbital Intersection Distance) with respect to the Earth's orbit is a requirement for an impact trajectory, and initially also for ejecta from lunar impacts into heliocentric orbits. The collision cross section of the Earth goes up greatly with decreasing relative encounter velocity, venc, thus the impact flux onto the Earth is enhanced in such low-venc objects, which correspond to near-zero (e,i) orbits. And lunar ejecta that escapes from the Earth-moon system mostly does so at only barely greater than minimum velocity for escape (Gladman, et al., 1995, Icarus 118, 302-321), so the Earth-moon system is both a source and a sink of such low-venc orbits, and understanding the evolution of these populations requires accurately modeling the orbit distributions. Lastly, orbits of very low heliocentric perihelion distance, q, are particularly interesting as a "sink" in the NEA population as asteroids "fall into the sun" (Farinella, et al., 1994, Nature 371, 314-317). Understanding this process, and especially the role of disintegration of small asteroids as they evolve into low-q orbits (Granvik et al., 2016, Nature 530, 303-306), requires accurate modeling of the q distribution that would exist in the absence of a "sink" in the distribution. In this paper, we derive analytical expressions for the expected steady-state distributions near zero of MOID, (e,i), and q in the absence of sources or sinks, compare those to numerical simulations of orbit distributions, and lastly evaluate the distributions of discovered NEAs to try to understand the sources and sinks of NEAs "near zero" of these orbital parameters.

  15. The Nimbus 6 data catalog. Volume 9: Data orbits 6803 through 7619, 1 November - 31 December 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Operations of various experiments during the reporting period are summarized. Orbital elements, data availability times, anomalies in the data, geographic location, and time of data are tabulated. Montages obtained by infrared and microwave radiometers are included.

  16. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 3: PEP analysis and tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The objectives, conclusions, and approaches for accomplishing 19 specific design and analysis activities related to the installation of the power extension package (PEP) into the Orbiter cargo bay are described as well as those related to its deployment, extension, and retraction. The proposed cable handling system designed to transmit power from PEP to the Orbiter by way of the shuttle remote manipulator system is described and a preliminary specification for the gimbal assembly, solar array drive is included.

  17. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume IV - Hydrologic Parameter Data Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-09-01

    Volume IV of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the hydrologic parameter data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  18. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  19. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  20. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  1. Analytical determination of orbital elements using Fourier analysis. I. The radial velocity case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, J.-B.; Ségransan, D.; Buchschacher, N.; Alesina, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe an analytical method for computing the orbital parameters of a planet from the periodogram of a radial velocity signal. The method is very efficient and provides a good approximation of the orbital parameters. The accuracy is mainly limited by the accuracy of the computation of the Fourier decomposition of the signal which is sensitive to sampling and noise. Our method is complementary with more accurate (and more expensive in computer time) numerical algorithms (e.g. Levenberg-Marquardt, Markov chain Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms). Indeed, the analytical approximation can be used as an initial condition to accelerate the convergence of these numerical methods. Our method can be applied iteratively to search for multiple planets in the same system.

  2. Indirect (source-free) integration method. I. Wave-forms from geodesic generic orbits of EMRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Patxi; Aoudia, Sofiane; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Cordier, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    The Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli (RWZ) wave-equation describes Schwarzschild-Droste black hole perturbations. The source term contains a Dirac distribution and its derivative. We have previously designed a method of integration in time domain. It consists of a finite difference scheme where analytic expressions, dealing with the wave-function discontinuity through the jump conditions, replace the direct integration of the source and the potential. Herein, we successfully apply the same method to the geodesic generic orbits of EMRI (Extreme Mass Ratio Inspiral) sources, at second order. An EMRI is a Compact Star (CS) captured by a Super-Massive Black Hole (SMBH). These are considered the best probes for testing gravitation in strong regime. The gravitational wave-forms, the radiated energy and angular momentum at infinity are computed and extensively compared with other methods, for different orbits (circular, elliptic, parabolic, including zoom-whirl).

  3. Indirect (source-free) integration method. I. Wave-forms from geodesic generic orbits of EMRIs

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, P; Spallicci, A; Cordier, S

    2015-01-01

    The Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli (RWZ) wave-equation describes Schwarzschild-Droste black hole perturbations. The source term contains a Dirac distribution and its derivative. We have previously designed a method of integration in time domain. It consists of a finite difference scheme where analytic expressions, dealing with the wave-function discontinuity through the jump conditions, replace the direct integration of the source and the potential. Herein, we successfully apply the same method to the geodesic generic orbits of EMRI (Extreme Mass Ratio Inspiral) sources, at second order. An EMRI is a Compact Star (CS) captured by a Super Massive Black Hole (SMBH). These are considered the best probes for testing gravitation in strong regime. The gravitational wave-forms, the radiated energy and angular momentum at infinity are computed and extensively compared with other methods, for different orbits (circular, elliptic, parabolic, including zoom-whirl).

  4. Star cluster evolution in barred disc galaxies. I. Planar periodic orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Berentzen, I

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of stellar clusters is driven to a large extent by their environment. Several studies so far have considered the effect of tidal fields and their variations, such as, e.g., from giant molecular clouds, galactic discs, or spiral arms. In this paper we will concentrate on a tidal field whose effects on star clusters have not yet been studied, namely that of bars. We present a set of direct N-body simulations of star clusters moving in an analytic potential representing a barred galaxy. We compare the evolution of the clusters moving both on different planar periodic orbits in the barred potential and on circular orbits in a potential obtained by axisymmetrising its mass distribution. We show that both the shape of the underlying orbit and its stability have strong impact on the cluster evolution as well as the morphology and orientation of the tidal tails and the sub-structures therein. We find that the dissolution time-scale of the cluster in our simulations is mainly determined by the ...

  5. Towards a theory of extremely intermittent pulsars I: Does something orbits PSR B1931 + 24 ?

    CERN Document Server

    Mottez, Fabrice; Bonazzola, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether one or many companions are orbiting the extremely intermittent pulsar PSR B1931+24. We constrained our analysis on previous observations of eight fundamental properties of PSR B1931+24. The most puzzling properties are the intermittent nature of the pulsar's activity, with active and quiet phases that alternate quasi-periodically; the variation of the slowing-down rate of its period between active and quiet phases; and because there are no timing residuals, it is highly unlikely that the pulsar has a massive companion. Here, we examine the effects that one putative companion immersed in the magnetospheric plasma or the wind of the pulsar might have, as well as the associated electric current distribution. We analysed several possibilities for the distance and orbit of this hypothetical companion and the nature of its interaction with the neutron star. We show that if the quasi-periodic behaviour of PSR B1931+24 was caused by a companion orbiting the star with a period of 35 or 70 days, ...

  6. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base Program, which deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations, provides periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel, and operating and maintenance) information of significance to DOE. The information allows for evaluation and monitoring of US civilian nuclear power programs and provides a consistent means of evaluation the nuclear option against alternatives. Currently, the EEDB contains 6 nuclear electrical generating plant technical models and 5 comparison coal-fired electrical generating plant technical models. Each of these technical plant models is a complete conceptual design for a single unit, steam electric power generating station located on a standard, hypothetical Middletown site. A description of the site is provided in Appendix A-1 (Volume 2) for nuclear plants, and Appendix A-2 (Volume 2) for coal-fired plants. The EEDB also includes a conceptual design of a coal liquefaction plant for comparison purposes. Volume 1 provides a description of the current Data Base, as of September 30, 1978: gives assumptions and ground rules for the initial-cost update; summarizes the initial cost update, with cost results tabulated; details the initial update of the technical conceptual design, the capital cost, the quantities of commodities and their unit costs, and craft labor man hours and costs for each EEDB program model; and details the fuel-cycle-cost initial update and the operating- and maintenance-cost initial update. Finally, an extensive list of references and a glossary are presented.

  7. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base Program, which deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations, provides periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel, and operating and maintenance) information of significance to DOE. The information allows for evaluation and monitoring of US civilian nuclear power programs and provides a consistent means of evaluation the nuclear option against alternatives. Currently, the EEDB contains 6 nuclear electrical generating plant technical models and 5 comparison coal-fired electrical generating plant technical models. Each of these technical plant models is a complete conceptual design for a single unit, steam electric power generating station located on a standard, hypothetical Middletown site. A description of the site is provided in Appendix A-1 (Volume 2) for nuclear plants, and Appendix A-2 (Volume 2) for coal-fired plants. The EEDB also includes a conceptual design of a coal liquefaction plant for comparison purposes. Volume 1 provides a description of the current Data Base, as of September 30, 1978: gives assumptions and ground rules for the initial-cost update; summarizes the initial cost update, with cost results tabulated; details the initial update of the technical conceptual design, the capital cost, the quantities of commodities and their unit costs, and craft labor man hours and costs for each EEDB program model; and details the fuel-cycle-cost initial update and the operating- and maintenance-cost initial update. Finally, an extensive list of references and a glossary are presented.

  8. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic acid attenuates kanamycin-induced volume reduction in mouse utricular type I hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Stig Åvall; Kirkegaard, Mette; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2006-01-01

    injection. Total volume of the utricle, as well as total number of hair and supporting cells, were estimated on light microscopic sections. Total volume and mean volume of hair cell types I and II and supporting cells were estimated on digital transmission electron micrographs. Total volume of the utricular...... macula, hair cell type I and supporting cells decreased significantly in animals injected with kanamycin but not in animals co-treated with DHB. Hair and supporting cell numbers remained unchanged in all three groups. In conclusion, the kanamycin-induced volume reduction of type I hair cells...

  9. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME II, APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  10. Secondary Program, Report #4, Volume I. Fort Lincoln New Town Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Learning Corp., Washington, DC.

    Since the secondary facilities are not expected to be built until at least 1975, planning and description cannot be as detailed as they were for the First Facility of the Fort Lincoln New Town (FLNT) education system. In attempting to provide a model for a secondary program this report (Vol. I of 2 Volumes) addresses all the major issues that must…

  11. Biennial Survey of Education, 1920-1922. Volume I. Bulletin, 1924, No. 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1924

    1924-01-01

    Volume I of the Biennial Survey of Education for the years 1920-1922 contains the following chapters: (1) A survey of public school finance in the United States (Fletcher H. Swift); (2) Some important school legislation, 1921 and 1922 (William R. Hood); (3) Higher education (George F. Zook; (4) Significant movements in city school systems (W. S.…

  12. Real-time volume rendering of digital medical images on an iOS device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Christian; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Performing high quality 3D visualizations on mobile devices, while tantalizingly close in many areas, is still a quite difficult task. This is especially true for 3D volume rendering of digital medical images. Allowing this would empower medical personnel a powerful tool to diagnose and treat patients and train the next generation of physicians. This research focuses on performing real time volume rendering of digital medical images on iOS devices using custom developed GPU shaders for orthogonal texture slicing. An interactive volume renderer was designed and developed with several new features including dynamic modification of render resolutions, an incremental render loop, a shader-based clipping algorithm to support OpenGL ES 2.0, and an internal backface culling algorithm for properly sorting rendered geometry with alpha blending. The application was developed using several application programming interfaces (APIs) such as OpenSceneGraph (OSG) as the primary graphics renderer coupled with iOS Cocoa Touch for user interaction, and DCMTK for DICOM I/O. The developed application rendered volume datasets over 450 slices up to 50-60 frames per second, depending on the specific model of the iOS device. All rendering is done locally on the device so no Internet connection is required.

  13. X-ray flat-panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam volume CT (CBVCT) under a circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    2001-06-01

    The potential of cone beam volume CT (CBVCT) to improve the data acquisition efficiency for volume tomographic imaging is well recognized. A novel x-ray FPI based CBVCT prototype and its preliminary performance evaluation are presented in this paper. To meet the data sufficiency condition, the CBVCT prototype employs a circle-plus-two-arc orbit accomplished by a tiltable circular gantry. A cone beam filtered back-projection (CB-FBP) algorithm is derived for this data acquisition orbit, which employs a window function in the Radon domain to exclude the redundancy between the Radon information obtained from the circular cone beam (CB) data and that from the arc CB data. The number of projection images along the circular sub-orbit and each arc sub-orbit is 512 and 43, respectively. The reconstruction exactness of the prototype x-ray FPI based CBVCT system is evaluated using a disc phantom in which seven acrylic discs are stacked at fixed intervals. Images reconstructed with this algorithm show that both the contrast and geometric distortion existing in the disc phantom images reconstructed by the Feldkamp algorithm are substantially reduced. Meanwhile, the imaging performance of the prototype, such as modulation transfer function (MTF) and low contrast resolution, are quantitatively evaluated in detail through corresponding phantom studies. Furthermore, the capability of the prototype to reconstruct an ROI within a longitudinally unbounded object is verified. The results obtained from this preliminary performance evaluation encourage an expectation of medical applications of the x-ray FPI based CBVCT under the circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition, particularly the application in image-guided interventional procedures and radiotherapy where the movement of a patient table is to be avoided.

  14. Results of radiotherapy in patients with stage I orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.; Oskam, J.; Koornneef, L.; Dijk, J.D.P. van; Boukes, R.; Bras, J. (Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Heerde, P. van; Bartelink, H. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-09-01

    The results of radiotherapy in early stage orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are described. From 1970-1985, 33 orbital localizations in 30 patients were treated. Total dose applied ranged from 21-57 Gy (2 Gy/fraction), 2/3 off all patients received a 40 Gy dose. Complete response rate was 94% and 10 years actuarial survival was 90%; between patients with low grade or intermediate grade lymphoma no significant difference in survival was observed. No local recurrence was detected during follow up and 20% of the patients developed generalized disease. Two optic nerve neuropathies and 3 retinopathies were observed in 5 patients, 4 of these occurred at a dose level of less than 43 Gy. Keratitis occurred in 58% of the patients treated, a sicca syndrome in 30% and cataract of different grades in 58%. Although local control was excellent, severe complications were observed in 13% of the patients who received a dose of less than 43 Gy. (author). 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Stellar Orbital Studies in Normal Spiral Galaxies I: Restrictions to the Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Villegas, A; Moreno, E

    2013-01-01

    We built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal non-barred or weakly-barred spiral galaxies as defined in the simplest classification of galaxies: the Hubble sequence. For this purpose a three-dimensional self-gravitating model for spiral arms PERLAS is superimposed to the galactic axisymmetric potentials. We analyze the stellar dynamics varying only the pitch angle of the spiral arms, from 4$\\deg$ to 40$\\deg$, for an Sa galaxy, from 8$\\deg$ to 45$\\deg$, for an Sb galaxy, and from 10$\\deg$ to 60$\\deg$, for an Sc galaxy. Self-consistency is indirectly tested through periodic orbital analysis, and through density response studies for each morphological type. Based on ordered behavior, periodic orbits studies show that for pitch angles up to approximately $15\\deg$, $18\\deg$, and $20\\deg$ for Sa, Sb and Sc galaxies, respectively, the density response supports the spiral arms potential, a requisite for the existence of a long-lasting large-scale spiral structure. Beyond those limits, the density ...

  16. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume I. Technical discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). The first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 referenvces and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2. 18 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 4: PEP functional specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The functional, performance, design, and test requirements for the Orbiter power extension package and its associated ground support equipment are defined. Both government and nongovernment standards and specifications are cited for the following subsystems: electrical power, structural/mechanical, avionics, and thermal control. Quality control assurance provisions and preparation for delivery are also discussed.

  19. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 5: PEP environmental specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This specification establishes the natural and induced environments to which the power extension package may be exposed during ground operations and space operations with the shuttle system. Space induced environments are applicable at the Orbiter attach point interface location. All probable environments are systematically listed according to each ground and mission phase.

  20. Crew appliance concepts. Volume 2, appendix B: Shuttle orbiter appliances supporting engineering data. [food management and personal hygiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, B. W.; Reysa, R. P.; Russell, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Technical data collected for the food management and personal hygiene appliances considered for the shuttle orbiter are presented as well as plotted and tabulated trade study results for each appliance. Food storage, food operation, galley cleanup, waste collection/transfer, body cleansing, and personal grooming were analyzed.

  1. A Review of the Definition and Measurement of Poverty: Volume I, Summary Review Paper; Volume II, Annotated Bibliography. The Measure of Poverty, Technical Paper III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Sharon; And Others

    This study reviews the existing literature on a series of issues associated with the defintion and measurement of poverty, and it consists of a summary report covering this research (Volume I), and an annotated bibliography (Volume II). Eleven specific issues were identified and reviewed in this study: (1) the historical definitions of poverty,…

  2. Current Subcounty Allocation Practices: Volume I of the Title I, ESEA, Subcounty Allocation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paller, Alan T.; Gutmann, Babette

    In this report, subcounty allocation of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) funds is described in terms of direct allocation, use of the statutory formula emphasizing census data, United States Office of Education (USOE) regulations, participating states, geographic and administrative overlaps, hold harmless adjustments…

  3. Orbital and superorbital variability of LS I +61 303 at low radio frequencies with GMRT and LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Marcote, B; Paredes, J M; Ishwara-Chandra, C H; Swinbank, J D; Broderick, J W; Markoff, S; Fender, R; Wijers, R A M J; Pooley, G G; Stewart, A J; Bell, M E; Breton, R P; Carbone, D; Corbel, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Grießmeier, J -M; Kuniyoshi, M; Pietka, M; Rowlinson, A; Serylak, M; van der Horst, A J; van Leeuwen, J; Wise, M W; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    LS I +61 303 is a gamma-ray binary that exhibits an outburst at GHz frequencies each orbital cycle of $\\approx$ 26.5 d and a superorbital modulation with a period of $\\approx$ 4.6 yr. We have performed a detailed study of the low-frequency radio emission of LS I +61 303 by analysing all the archival GMRT data at 150, 235 and 610 MHz, and conducting regular LOFAR observations within the Radio Sky Monitor (RSM) at 150 MHz. We have detected the source for the first time at 150 MHz, which is also the first detection of a gamma-ray binary at such a low frequency. We have obtained the light-curves of the source at 150, 235 and 610 MHz, all of them showing orbital modulation. The light-curves at 235 and 610 MHz also show the existence of superorbital variability. A comparison with contemporaneous 15-GHz data shows remarkable differences with these light-curves. At 15 GHz we see clear outbursts, whereas at low frequencies we see variability with wide maxima. The light-curve at 235 MHz seems to be anticorrelated with ...

  4. Site Environmental Report for 2006. Volume I, Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-09-30

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.1 The Site Environmental Report for 2006 summarizes Berkeley Lab’s environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2006. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as “Berkeley Lab,” “the Laboratory,” “Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,” and “LBNL.”) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory’s environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  5. A Search for Collision Orbits in the Free-Fall Three-Body Problem. I. Numerical Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Kiyotaka; Umehara, Hiroaki; Abe, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    A numerical procedure is devised to find binary collision orbits in the free-fall three-body problem. Applying this procedure, families of binary collision orbits are found and a sequence of triple collision orbits are positioned. A property of sets of binary collision orbits which is convenient to search triple collision orbits is found. Important numerical results are formulated and summarized in the final section.

  6. SHTEREOM I SIMPLE WINDOWS® BASED SOFTWARE FOR STEREOLOGY. VOLUME AND NUMBER ESTIMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Oğuzhan Oğuz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Stereology has been earlier defined by Wiebel (1970 to be: "a body of mathematical methods relating to three dimensional parameters defining the structure from two dimensional measurements obtainable on sections of the structure." SHTEREOM I is a simple windows-based software for stereological estimation. In this first part, we describe the implementation of the number and volume estimation tools for unbiased design-based stereology. This software is produced in Visual Basic and can be used on personal computers operated by Microsoft Windows® operating systems that are connected to a conventional camera attached to a microscope and a microcator or a simple dial gauge. Microsoft NET Framework version 1.1 also needs to be downloaded for full use. The features of the SHTEREOM I software are illustrated through examples of stereological estimations in terms of volume and particle numbers for different magnifications (4X–100X. Point-counting grids are available for area estimations and for use with the most efficient volume estimation tool, the Cavalieri technique and are applied to Lizard testicle volume. An unbiased counting frame system is available for number estimations of the objects under investigation, and an on-screen manual stepping module for number estimations through the optical fractionator method is also available for the measurement of increments along the X and Y axes of the microscope stage for the estimation of rat brain hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  7. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  8. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-16

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  9. Morphometric analysis of foramen magnum dimensions and intracranial volume in pediatric Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Sunil V; Thakre, Darpan J; Venkatesh, Prasanna K; Reddy, Kalyan; Hegde, A S

    2010-02-01

    Foramen magnum dimensions and intracranial volume in Chiari I malformations in children were studied, and the statistical relationship between patient demographics, radiological features and foramen magnum morphometry was investigated. Linear measurements were used to calculate the intracranial volume using preoperative magnetic resonance images and computed tomogram images. The area of the foramen magnum was obtained independently using computer imaging software and a regression formula. The result of 21 pediatric patients was compared with a matched control group. The area of the foramen magnum was within the range of the expected value deduced using a formula based on the intracranial volume. There was no statistical difference in the area and linear dimensions of the foramen magnum in the study and control groups. Six patients (28%) had a foramen magnum in close proximity to a spherical shape. The authors provide a simple, accurate and reproducible method of estimating foramen magnum area in the pediatric Chiari I group. The irregular shape of the foramen magnum is accentuated by developmental bony and soft tissue anomalies at the cranio-vertebral junction in Chiari malformation. Consequently, an individualized cross-sectional assessment of the foramen magnum in relation to the hindbrain tissue in the same plane is required to study the initiation and propagation of the Chiari I symptomatology.

  10. 1000 days on orbit: lessons learned from the ACTEX-I flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, R. Scott; Denoyer, Keith K.

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the Air Force Research Laboratory advanced controls technology experiment program. Representing the first space-demonstration of smart structures technology, the ACTEX-I program has met or exceeded all program goals at each stage, beginning with the program initiation in 1991 through launch in 1996 to the conclusion of the Guest Investigator program and program conclusion in 1999. This paper will provide a summary of the ACTEX-I program from the AFRL perspective, focusing on lessons learned from the program both positive and negative.

  11. Lower Orbital Frontal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafantaris, Vivian; Kingsley, Peter; Ardekani, Babak; Saito, Ema; Lencz, Todd; Lim, Kelvin; Szeszko, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Patients with bipolar I disorder demonstrated white matter abnormalities in white matter regions as seen through the use of diffusion tensor imaging. The findings suggest that white matter abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder may be useful in constructing neurobiological models of the disorder.

  12. Fermi LAT Observations of LS I +61 303: First Detection of an Orbital Modulation in GeV Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Federal City Coll. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Grenoble, CEN; /more authors..

    2012-04-02

    This Letter presents the first results from the observations of LS I +61{sup o}303 using Large Area Telescope data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope between 2008 August and 2009 March. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated at 26.6 {+-} 0.5 days. This constitutes the first detection of orbital periodicity in high-energy gamma rays (20 MeV-100 GeV, HE). The light curve is characterized by a broad peak after periastron, as well as a smaller peak just before apastron. The spectrum is best represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux above 100 MeV of 0.82 {+-} 0.03(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst) 10{sup -6} ph cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 6.3 {+-} 1.1(stat) {+-} 0.4(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 2.21 {+-} 0.04(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). There is no significant spectral change with orbital phase. The phase of maximum emission, close to periastron, hints at inverse Compton scattering as the main radiation mechanism. However, previous very high-energy gamma ray (>100 GeV, VHE) observations by MAGIC and VERITAS show peak emission close to apastron. This and the energy cutoff seen with Fermi suggest that the link between HE and VHE gamma rays is nontrivial.

  13. Pressure loads and aerodynamic force information for the -89A space shuttle orbiter configuration, volume 2. [for structural strength analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on an 0.0405 scale representation of the Rockwell -89A Light Weight Space Shuttle Orbiter. The test purpose was to obtain pressure loads data in the presence of the ground for orbiter structural strength analysis. Aerodynamic force data was also recorded to allow correlation with all pressure loads information. Angles of attack from minus 3 deg to 18 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg, plus or minus 50 deg, and plus or minus 10 deg were tested in the presence of the NAAL ground plane. Static pressure bugs were used to obtain a pressure loads survey of the basic configuration, elevon deflections of 5 deg, 10 deg, 15 deg, and minus 20 deg and a rudder deflection of minus 15 deg, at a tunnel dynamic pressure of 40 psi. The test procedure was to locate a maximum of 30 static pressure bugs on the model surface at various locations calculated to prevent aerodynamic and physical interference. Then by various combinations of location the pressure bugs output was to define a complete pressure survey for the fuselages, wing, vertical tail, and main landing gear door.

  14. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dobson, Patrick F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Gautier, Donald L. [Dr. Donald Dautier, LLC., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the California Legislature passed Senate Bill 4 (SB 4), setting the framework for regulation of well stimulation technologies in California, including hydraulic fracturing. SB 4 also requires the California Natural Resources Agency to conduct an independent scientific study of well stimulation technologies in California to assess current and potential future practices, including the likelihood that well stimulation technologies could enable extensive new petroleum production in the state, evaluate the impacts of well stimulation technologies and the gaps in data that preclude this understanding, identify risks associated with current practices, and identify alternative practices which might limit these risks. The study is issued in three volumes. This document, Volume I, provides the factual basis describing well stimulation technologies, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II discusses how well stimulation affects water, the atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, traffic, light and noise levels; it will also explore human health hazards, and identify data gaps and alternative practices. Volume III presents case studies to assess environmental issues and qualitative

  15. The EBLM project. I. Physical and orbital parameters, including spin-orbit angles, of two low-mass eclipsing binaries on opposite sides of the brown dwarf limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Hebb, L.; Anderson, D. R.; Cargile, P.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P.; Naef, D.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Stassun, K.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a series of papers aiming to study the dozens of low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBLM), with F, G, K primaries, that have been discovered in the course of the WASP survey. Our objects are mostly single-line binaries whose eclipses have been detected by WASP and were initially followed up as potential planetary transit candidates. These have bright primaries, which facilitates spectroscopic observations during transit and allows the study of the spin-orbit distribution of F, G, K+M eclipsing binaries through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Here we report on the spin-orbit angle of WASP-30b, a transiting brown dwarf, and improve its orbital parameters. We also present the mass, radius, spin-orbit angle and orbital parameters of a new eclipsing binary, J1219-39b (1SWAPJ121921.03-395125.6, TYC 7760-484-1), which, with a mass of 95 ± 2 Mjup, is close to the limit between brown dwarfs and stars. We find that both objects have projected spin-orbit angles aligned with their primaries' rotation. Neither primaries are synchronous. J1219-39b has a modestly eccentric orbit and is in agreement with the theoretical mass-radius relationship, whereas WASP-30b lies above it. Using WASP-South photometric observations (Sutherland, South Africa) confirmed with radial velocity measurement from the CORALIE spectrograph, photometry from the EulerCam camera (both mounted on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope), radial velocities from the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO's 3.6 m Telescope (prog ID 085.C-0393), and photometry from the robotic 60 cm TRAPPIST telescope, all located at ESO, La Silla, Chile. The data is publicly available at the CDS Strasbourg and on demand to the main author.Tables A.1-A.3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometry tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A18

  16. Evaluation of Large Volume SrI2(Eu) Scintillator Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, B W; Cherepy, N J; Drury, O B; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Magyar, A F; Payne, S A; Burger, A; Boatner, L A; Ramey, J O; Shah, K S; Hawrami, R

    2010-11-18

    There is an ever increasing demand for gamma-ray detectors which can achieve good energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and room-temperature operation. We are working to address each of these requirements through the development of large volume SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator detectors. In this work, we have evaluated a variety of SrI{sub 2} crystals with volumes >10 cm{sup 3}. The goal of this research was to examine the causes of energy resolution degradation for larger detectors and to determine what can be done to mitigate these effects. Testing both packaged and unpackaged detectors, we have consistently achieved better resolution with the packaged detectors. Using a collimated gamma-ray source, it was determined that better energy resolution for the packaged detectors is correlated with better light collection uniformity. A number of packaged detectors were fabricated and tested and the best spectroscopic performance was achieved for a 3% Eu doped crystal with an energy resolution of 2.93% FWHM at 662keV. Simulations of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals were also performed to better understand the light transport physics in scintillators and are reported. This study has important implications for the development of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) detectors for national security purposes.

  17. Orbits of massive satellite galaxies - I. A close look at the Large Magellanic Cloud and a new orbital history for M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ekta; Besla, Gurtina; Sohn, Sangmo Tony

    2017-02-01

    The Milky Way (MW) and M31 both harbour massive satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and M33, which may comprise up to 10 per cent of their host's total mass. Massive satellites can change the orbital barycentre of the host-satellite system by tens of kiloparsec and are cosmologically expected to harbour dwarf satellite galaxies of their own. Assessing the impact of these effects crucially depends on the orbital histories of the LMC and M33. Here, we revisit the dynamics of the MW-LMC system and present the first detailed analysis of the M31-M33 system utilizing high-precision proper motions and statistics from the dark-matter-only Illustris cosmological simulation. With the latest Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements of M31, we reliably constrain M33's interaction history with its host. In particular, like the LMC, M33 is either on its first passage (tinf picture and provide further insight about their host masses. We conclude that, cosmologically, massive satellites such as the LMC and M33 are likely completing their first orbits about their hosts. We also find that the orbital energies of such analogues prefer an MW halo mass ˜1.5 × 1012 M⊙ and an M31 halo mass ≥1.5 × 1012 M⊙. Despite conventional wisdom, we conclude it is highly improbable that M33 made a close (<100 kpc) approach to M31 recently (tperi < 3 Gyr ago). Such orbits are rare (<1 per cent) within the 4σ error space allowed by observations. This conclusion cannot be explained by perturbative effects through four-body encounters amongst the MW, M31, M33, and the LMC. This surprising result implies that we must search for a new explanation for M33's strongly warped gas and stellar discs.

  18. Effective Extraction Mechanism of Volume-Produced Ions in the NIPPER I Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Ramos

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available A mass spectrometer system is developed to extract and analyze hydrogen ions from a volume plasma hydrogen ion source. A 180° magnetic deflection-type mass analyzer is coupled to NIPPER I (National Institute of Physics Plasma Experimental Rig I, a negative ion source. Hydrogen plasma is produced from a low pressure gas (10-2 Torr with a transition of the glow discharge (254 volts, 75 mA to an arc plasma (78 volts, 14 amperes in a few seconds. The usually cylindrical plasma is converted into a sheet configuration using a pair of Sm-Co magnets. This optimizes ion current extraction by reducing (a the ion loss to the discharge anode and (b the decay of the ion current produced in the plasma. Negative hydrogen ions (H- are volume-produced by dissociative attachment of low energy electrons to highly vibrational excited hydrogen molecules.The extraction of H- ions from this volume source is optimized by the proper choice of apertures of the limiting electrodes and of the applied bias potential. A proper combination of extraction electrodes gives an optimum H- current extracted without the electrons. When one of the extraction electrodes is biased negatively near the value of the plasma floating potential, a maximum H- current is also obtained. The methods of effective extraction of H- are discussed.

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy in stage I seminoma: Is there a role for further reduction of treatment volume?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, Frank; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H. [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2005-03-01

    An analysis was performed to determine whether a cranial reduction of the portals to the T11/T12 junction instead of the common T10/T11 junction would alter the outcome of patients with stage I seminoma. Of 163 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed testicular seminoma referred to the authors' institution between April 1992 and April 1999, 80 patients with stage I seminoma were treated with cranially reduced para-aortic treatment fields reaching from the top of T12 to the bottom of L4. Median total dose was 20.0 Gy (range, 19.8-27.2 Gy). Patients were followed-up by the use of CT in regular intervals. After a median follow-up of 7.1 years (range, 4.1-11.1 years), four patients (5%) had relapsed resulting in an actuarial 5-year relapse-free survival of 95%. No patients relapsed within the cranially reduced treatment volume above the top of T12. The cranial reduction of the para-aortic treatment fields resulted in a median reduction of treatment volume of 16% (range, 13-21%). The achieved median reduction in treatment volume of 16% appears to be relevant and is not associated with an increased relapse rate. This approach is recommended in analogy to the surgical approach in NSGCT to further minimize the risk of radiation-related late effects.

  20. Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-05-25

    As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

  1. Introduction to "Tsunami Science: Ten Years After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. Volume I"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Geist, Eric L.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Borrero, Jose C.

    2015-03-01

    Twenty-two papers on the study of tsunamis are included in Volume I of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Tsunami Science: Ten Years after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami." Eight papers examine various aspects of past events with an emphasis on case and regional studies. Five papers are on tsunami warning and forecast, including the improvement of existing tsunami warning systems and the development of new warning systems in the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean region. Three more papers present the results of analytical studies and discuss benchmark problems. Four papers report the impacts of tsunamis, including the detailed calculation of inundation onshore and into rivers and probabilistic analysis for engineering purposes. The final two papers relate to important investigations of the source and tsunami generation. Overall, the volume not only addresses the pivotal 2004 Indian Ocean (Sumatra) and 2011 Japan (Tohoku) tsunamis, but also examines the tsunami hazard posed to other critical coasts in the world.

  2. Assessment of control technology for stationary sources. Volume I: technical discussion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minicucci, D.; Herther, M.; Babb, L.; Kuby, W.

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a reference document for use by the Air Resources Board, local air pollution control districts, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that describes technological options available for the control of emissions from stationary sources located in California. Control technologies were examined for 10 industry groups and six air pollutants. Volume I, Technical Discussion, includes an overall introduction to the project, descriptions of its major elements, background information for each industry group addressed, and the project bibliography. In Volume II, Control Technology Data Tables, qualitative descriptions of control options for the various sources and quantitative information on control technology cost, efficiency, reliability, energy consumption, other environmental impacts, and application status are presented in tabular format. Also included is a code list that classifies the stationary sources examined by industry, process and emission source.

  3. Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 2: Shuttle orbiter crew and equipment translation concepts and EVA workstation concept development and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    EVA crewman/equipment translational concepts are developed for a shuttle orbiter payload application. Also considered are EVA workstation systems to meet orbiter and payload requirements for integration of workstations into candidate orbiter payload worksites.

  4. Orbits of Massive Satellite Galaxies: I. A Close Look at the Large Magellanic Cloud and a New Orbital History for M33

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ekta; Sohn, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The Milky Way (MW) and M31 both harbor massive satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and M33, which may comprise up to 10 per cent of their host's total mass. Massive satellites can change the orbital barycentre of the host-satellite system by tens of kiloparsecs and are cosmologically expected to harbor dwarf satellite galaxies of their own. Assessing the impact of these effects depends crucially on the orbital histories of the LMC and M33. Here, we revisit the dynamics of the MW-LMC system and present the first detailed analysis of the M31-M33 system utilizing high precision proper motions and statistics from the dark matter-only Illustris cosmological simulation. With the latest Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements of M31, we reliably constrain M33's interaction history with its host. In particular, like the LMC, M33 is either on its first passage (t_{inf} =2x10^12 Msun), it is on a long period orbit of about 6 Gyr. Cosmological analogs of the LMC and M33 identified in Illustris...

  5. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume I. Technical report. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Chan, Y.K.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume I gives a brief overview of the SIMWEST program and describes the two NASA defined simulation studies.

  6. Second-generation heliostat development. Volume I. Sections 1. 0 to 3. 0. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The Northrup heliostat, the major component elements, and the rationale for the approach selected are described in detail. The performance evaluation is presented, including weight, deflections, stress levels, and, in the case of the drive unit, torque, speed, and efficiency performance. System studies are summarized, including wind loads and moments, mirror module trade studies, rack structure trades, drive unit trade studies, and stow position trade studies. The results of the electronic and mechanical tests are summarized. Included in Vol. I is a brief summary of the whole 4-volume report. (LEW)

  7. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This volume contains two chapters. In Chapter I, Overview, the following subjects are briefly described: supply data, EIA projection series and scenarios, demand data and assumptions, and supply assumptions - oil and gas availabilities. Chapter II contains supply and demand data tables and sources used by the PIES Integrating Model for the mid-range scenario target years 1985 and 1990. Tabulated information is presented for demand, price, and elasticity data; coal data; imports data; oil and gas data; refineries data; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal data; transportation data; and utilities data.

  8. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study, 1985. Volume 5: Work breakdown structure and dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James H.; Callan, Daniel R.

    1985-01-01

    To establish consistency and visibility within the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) program, a preliminary work breakdown structure (WBS) and dictionary were developed. The dictionary contains definitions of terms to be used in conjunction with the WBS so that a clear understanding of the content of the hardware, function, and cost elements may be established. The OTV WBS matrix is a two-dimensional structure which shows the interrelationship of these dimensions: the hardware elements dimension and the phase and function dimension. The dimension of time cannot be shown graphically, but must be considered. Each cost entry varies with time so that it is necessary to know these cost values by year for budget planning and approval as well as for establishing cost streams for discounting purposes in the economic analysis. While a multiple dimensional approach may at first appear complex, it actually provides benefits which outweigh any concern. This structural interrelationship provides the capability to view and analyze the OTV costs from a number of different financial and management aspects. Cost may be summed by hardware groupings, phases, or functions. The WBS may be used in a number of dimensional or single listing format applications.

  9. An update on the OpenOrbiter I Mission and its paradigm's benefits for the defense, homeland security and intelligence communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    The OpenOrbiter I spacecraft is the culmination of significant work on reducing the cost levels of a CubeSat-class spacecraft. By redesigning the spacecraft from the ground up, down to the component level, to use readily available electronic and physical components, the cost of CubeSat construction has been significantly reduced. This paper provides an overview of the OpenOrbiter I mission, to date. It then focuses on the benefits that can be provided by the lower-cost, low-risk spacecraft. The paper discusses the prospective utility of this mission paradigm for the defense, homeland security and intelligence communities.

  10. A Review of the Availability of Primary Scientific and Technical Documents within the United States, Volume I. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James L.

    Volume I of this three-volume final report contains a summary of the objectives and results of a study conducted by Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), a Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS), to determine the availability of the scientific and technical primary literature which the user identifies through the use of secondary services…

  11. Volumes and doses for external radiotherapy - Definitions and recommendations; Volum og doser i ekstern straaleterapi - Definisjoner og anbefalinger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levernes, Sverre (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The report contains definitions of volume and dose parameters for external radiotherapy. In addition the report contains recommendations for use, documentation and minimum reporting for radiotherapy of the individual patient.(Author)

  12. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, Executive Summary, Volume I, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, David; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    1988-06-01

    This Executive Summary, Volume I, of the lower Flathead System Fisheries Study Final Report, was prepared to provide a study overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists. The contents provide an introduction to the study and its objectives, a short description of the study area, a discussion of the major findings and conclusions of the study, and the description of fisheries management alternatives available to managers of the lower Flathead system. Technical reports were prepared for those portions of the study dealing with the lower Flathead River and its tributaries, Volume II, and the South Bay of Flathead Lake, Volume III. The annual hydrographic regime of the Flathead system, consisting of upper rivers, lake and lower river, has been modified by the construction and operation of two major hydroelectric facilities, Hungry Horse Dam on the south fork Flathead River and Kerr Dam at the outlet of Flathead Lake. The modified hydrographic regime has resulted in significant impacts to kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) and several species of trout. Kerr Dam, closed in 1938, controls Flathead Lake levels between 878.7 m (2883 ft) and 881.8 m (2893 ft) and discharges into the lower Flathead River. Kerr Dam is a 63.4 m (208 ft) high concrete arch structure located 7.2 km (4.5 miles) downstream from the outlet of Flathead Lake. The facility is used by Montana Power Company primarily for system frequency load control with some use for low level base load. 77 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

  14. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development: I. Preliminary design report. Phase I. Volume 5. Appendixes H, I, J, and K. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume of the report includes the following appendices: H) conceptual design description of the electrical systems; I) control and instrumentation; J) OTEC power module assembly; and K) cost estimates for each of the cost components. (WHK)

  15. Variability in the orbital profiles of the X-ray emission of the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Diego F; Li, Jian; Rea, Nanda; Caliandro, G Andrea; Hadasch, Daniela; Chen, Yupeng; Wang, Jianmin; Ray, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    We report on the analysis of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) monitoring observations of the $\\gamma$-ray binary system LS I +61 303, covering 35 full cycles of its orbital motion. This constitutes the largest continuous X-ray monitoring dataset analyzed to date for this source. Such an extended analysis allows us to report: a) the discovery of variability in the orbital profiles of the X- ray emission, b) the existence of a few (recent) short flares on top of the overall behavior typical of the source, which, given the PCA field-of-view, may or may not be associated with LS I +61 303, and c) the determination of the orbital periodicity using soft X-ray data alone.

  16. Hippocampal subfield volumes in short- and long-term lithium-treated patients with bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Alessio; Sani, Gabriele; Dacquino, Claudia; Piras, Fabrizio; De Rossi, Pietro; Caltagirone, Carlo; Coryell, William; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BP) may experience hippocampal atrophy. Lithium exposure has been associated with increased hippocampal volumes. However, its effects on hippocampal subfields remain to be clarified. We investigated the effects of short- and long-term lithium exposure on the hippocampus and its subfields in patients affected by bipolar I disorder (BP-I). Hippocampal subfields and total hippocampal volumes were measured in 60 subjects divided into four groups: 15 patients with BP-I who were never exposed to lithium [no-exposure group (NE)], 15 patients with BP-I exposed to lithium for lithium for > 24 months [long-exposure group (LE)], and 15 healthy control subjects (HC). The SE and NE groups showed smaller total hippocampal volumes and smaller bilateral cornu ammonis CA2-3, CA4-dentate gyrus (DG), presubiculum, and subiculum volumes compared with HC. The LE group showed larger total hippocampal volumes and bilateral CA2-3, left CA4-DG, left presubiculum, and right subiculum volumes compared with the NE group, and larger volumes of the right CA2-3, left CA4-DG, left presubiculum, and right subiculum compared with the SE group. No differences were found between the LE group and HC or between the SE and NE groups. Long-term, but not short-term, exposure to lithium treatment may exert neuroprotective effects on specific hippocampal subfields linked to disease progression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Partner orbits and action differences on compact factors of the hyperbolic plane. I: Sieber-Richter pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, H. M.; Kunze, M.

    2015-03-01

    Physicists have argued that periodic orbit bunching leads to universal spectral fluctuations for chaotic quantum systems. To establish a more detailed mathematical understanding of this fact, it is first necessary to look more closely at the classical side of the problem and determine orbit pairs consisting of orbits which have similar actions. In this paper we consider the geodesic flow on compact factors of the hyperbolic plane as a classical chaotic system. We prove the existence of a periodic partner orbit for a given periodic orbit which has a small-angle self-crossing in configuration space which is a ‘2-encounter’ such configurations are called ‘Sieber-Richter pairs’ in physics literature. Furthermore, we derive an estimate for the action difference of the partners. In the second part of this paper (Huynh, submitted), an inductive argument is provided to deal with higher-order encounters.

  18. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume I. Evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    The EES pilot program was initiated in August 1977, when 10 states were selected on a competitive basis for participation. The pilot states (Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) devoted the first 6 months to start-up activities. This document is a follow-up report to the three volume Evaluation Summary of the first year of the pilot EES program published in September 1979. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the impacts and costs of the two years of the pilot program, and to check the consistency of findings over the two year period. The analysis addresses the following: (1) were the impact findings of Year I and Year II consistent, or did Year I and Year II attitudes and behavior vary. If variation existed, could it be attributed to program changes as the EES progressed from a start-up phase (Year I) to more normal service delivery (Year II); and (2) did costs of service delivery change (again reflecting start-up and normal service delivery costs). Did cost changes affect conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of delivering services to different target audiences.

  19. Special issue: Terrestrial fluids, earthquakes and volcanoes: The Hiroshi Wakita volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Nemesio M.; King, Chi-Yu; Gurrieri, Sergio; McGee, Kenneth A.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial Fluids, Earthquakes and Volcanoes: The Hiroshi Wakita Volume I is a special publication to honor Professor Hiroshi Wakita for his scientific contributions. This volume consists of 17 original papers dealing with various aspects of the role of terrestrial fluids in earthquake and volcanic processes, which reflect Prof. Wakita’s wide scope of research interests.Professor Wakita co-founded the Laboratory for Earthquake Chemistry in 1978 and served as its director from 1988 until his retirement from the university in 1997. He has made the laboratory a leading world center for studying earthquakes and volcanic activities by means of geochemical and hydrological methods. Together with his research team and a number of foreign guest researchers that he attracted, he has made many significant contributions in the above-mentioned scientific fields of interest. This achievement is a testimony to not only his scientific talent, but also his enthusiasm, his open mindedness, and his drive in obtaining both human and financial support.

  20. The origin and history of alteration and carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain ignimbrites. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    This document contains Volume I of the report entitled The Origin and History of Alteration and Carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain Ignimbrites by Jerry S. Szymanski and a related correspondence with comments by Donald E. Livingston. In the Great Basin, the flow of terrestrial heat through the crust is affected in part by the flow of fluids. At Yucca Mountain, the role of fluids in crustal heat transport is manifested at the surface by youthful calcretes, sinters, bedrock veins, hydrothermal eruption breccias and hydrothermal alteration. This report discusses evidence for recent metasomatism high in the stratigraphic section at Yucca Mountain. Over the last several hundred years, episodes of calcite emplacement contemporaneous with local mafic volcanism have occurred at intervals that are not long in comparison with the isolation time required for a High-Level Radioactive Waste repository.

  1. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100 kW application. Volume 1: Design, analysis and development tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary design effort directed toward a low concentration ratio photovoltaic array system capable of delivering multihundred kilowatts (300 kW to 1000 kW range) in low earth orbit is described. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 113 kW to 175 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells, respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pyramidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of .25 sq. m. The structural analysis and design trades leading to the baseline design are discussed. It describes the configuration, as well as optical, thermal and electrical performance analyses that support the design and overall performance estimates for the array are described.

  2. 99mTc-albumin can replace 125I-albumin to determine plasma volume repeatedly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, Peter K; Damgaard, Morten; Stokholm, Knud H

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Plasma volume assessment may be of importance in several disorders. The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of plasma volume measurements by technetium-labeled human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-HSA) with a simultaneously performed plasma volume determination with iod......OBJECTIVE: Plasma volume assessment may be of importance in several disorders. The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of plasma volume measurements by technetium-labeled human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-HSA) with a simultaneously performed plasma volume determination...

  3. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This Volume II of Phase I of the Energy Economic Data Base Program contains appendices. Appendix A-1 provides the site and environmental data, derived from Appendix A of Guide for Economic Evaluation of Nuclear Reactor Plant Designs, USAEC Report NUS-531, modified to reflect current requirements. These data form the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the routine and accidental release of radioactive liquids and gases to the environment. Appendix A-2 provides the site and environmental data as derived from Appendix A of NUS-531, and modified to reflect coal-plant siting, forming the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the release of liquids and gases to the environment. A description of the topography of the hypothetical city, Middletown, is given. Appendix B provides an overall summary of the conclusions of NUS' work on all NUS tasks in support of the nuclear fuel-cycle work in Phase I. Appendix C-1 introduces the concepts involved and addresses methods of calculation of fixed charges applicable to investor-owned utilities, as used in the EEDB. Appendix C-2 consists of review and revision of each plant's fuel cycle and operating and maintenance costs in accordance with the EEDB update procedures. In Appendix D, NSSS Capital Costs for a Mature LMFBR Industry, much information is provided on plant description, cost estimate, comparison and discussion, drawings, and equipment list. (MCW)

  4. Endo Atmospheric-Exo Atmospheric Radar Modeling. Volume II. Part I. Computer Program Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    dimension of the clutter volume in degrees AZO00 0 F Clutter volume starting azimuth angle. MM 0 1 Number of clutter volume azimuth increments. ELEXT 0 F...DELAZ - AZEXT/MM DELEL Elevation increment between clutter scatterers. DELEL = ELEXT /NN ICFLG This parameter is set to 1 if the clutter model has been

  5. Background Study of Intact Stability Standards for Dynamically Supported Craft. Volume I - VI. Categorized Bibliographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    Important to Program to Program I - ,.upporting Material REFERENCE EVAI.UATION AND SUBJEI ICT INDEX U) C01Q 4) H a Hal UL0 U .J [,1 -i4 L) I-4 I.,.-4 H...1111 iit eIIIi * I.C.eil vu ’ ict I tes 1 1, I% . l / 1 . ASIJ I 10-tI10 it) 1. Retiumuk-.i : yott Kimm aua iv; t . I .e Serf I o I I Lilt ACVS. VI "A...o -Ist I c . ofI l’tlztI o o i1 MAY o I Sbt i ps" , liv 1ll r - elt . SNAREVtA I AA , May 196 . Set’ BOLIt N(u. n (18. tfiOt*RN~FR "Flid-DlYth,1i~t c

  6. A Fast Frequency-Domain Algorithm for Gravitational Self-Force: I, Circular Orbits in Schwarzschild Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Akcay, Sarp

    2010-01-01

    Fast, reliable orbital evolutions of compact objects around massive black holes will be needed as input for gravitational wave search algorithms in the data stream generated by the planned Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Currently, the state of the art is a time-domain code by [Phys. Rev. D{\\bf 81}, 084021, (2010)] that computes the gravitational self-force on a point-particle in an eccentric orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. Currently, time-domain codes take up to a few days to compute just one point in parameter space. In a series of articles, we advocate the use of a frequency-domain approach to the problem of gravitational self-force (GSF) with the ultimate goal of orbital evolution in mind. Here, we compute the GSF for a particle in a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime. We solve the linearized Einstein equations for the metric perturbation in Lorenz gauge. Our frequency-domain code reproduces the time-domain results for the GSF up to $\\sim 1000$ times faster for small orbital rad...

  7. Orbital Architectures of Planet-Hosting Binaries: I. Forming Five Small Planets in the Truncated Disk of Kepler-444A

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuy, Trent J; Kraus, Adam L; Isaacson, Howard; Mann, Andrew W; Ireland, Michael J; Howard, Andrew W; Huber, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results from our Keck program investigating the orbital architectures of planet-hosting multiple star systems. Kepler-444 is a metal-poor triple star system that hosts five sub-Earth-sized planets orbiting the primary star (Kepler-444A), as well as a spatially unresolved pair of M dwarfs (Kepler-444BC) at a projected distance of 1.8" (66 AU). We combine our Keck/NIRC2 adaptive optics astrometry with multi-epoch Keck/HIRES RVs of all three stars to determine a precise orbit for the BC pair around A, given their empirically constrained masses. We measure minimal astrometric motion ($1.0\\pm0.6$ mas yr$^{-1}$, or $0.17\\pm0.10$ km s$^{-1}$), but our RVs reveal significant orbital velocity ($1.7\\pm0.2$ km s$^{-1}$) and acceleration ($7.8\\pm0.5$ m s$^{-1}$ yr$^{-1}$). We determine a highly eccentric stellar orbit ($e=0.864\\pm0.023$) that brings the tight M dwarf pair within $5.0^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$ AU of the planetary system. We validate that the system is dynamically stable in its present configurat...

  8. New Precision Orbits of Bright Double-Lined Spectroscopic Binaries. I: RR Lyncis, 12 Bootis, and HR 6169

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkin, J; Fekel, Francis C.; Tomkin, Jocelyn

    2006-01-01

    Radial velocities from the 2.1 m telescope at McDonald Observatory supplemented with radial velocities from the coude' feed telescope at KPNO provide new precise orbits for the double-lined spectroscopic binaries RR Lyn (A3/A8/A6), 12 Boo (F8IV), and HR 6169 (A2V). We derive orbital dimensions and minimum masses with accuracies of 0.06 to 0.9 %. The three systems, which have V magnitudes of 5.54, 4.83, and 6.42, respectively, are all sufficiently bright that they are easily within the grasp of modern optical interferometers and so afford the prospect, when our spectroscopic observations are complemented by interferometric observations, of fully-determined orbits, precise masses, and distances. In the case of RR Lyn, which is also a detached eclipsing binary with a well-determined orbital inclination, we are able to determine the semimajor axis of the relative orbit, a = 29.32 +/- 0.04 Rsun, primary and secondary radii of 2.57 +/- 0.02 Rsun and 1.59 +/- 0.03 Rsun, respectively; and primary and secondary masses...

  9. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume III - Groundwater Recharge and Discharge Data Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume III of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the data covering groundwater recharge and discharge. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  10. Orbital cellulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and ... in the space around the eye. An orbital cellulitis infection can get worse very quickly. A person with ...

  11. Summary Report on Phase I Results from the 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission, Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ryan, R. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been confined to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture beyond the Earth/Moon system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from Earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In September 2014, NASA, in partnership with Made In Space, Inc., launched the 3D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration mission to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on orbit using fused deposition modeling. This Technical Publication summarizes the results of testing to date of the ground control and flight prints from the first phase of this ISS payload.

  12. Structures and stabilities of group 17 fluorides EF3 (E = I, At, and element 117) with spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Dong; Wang, Fan

    2012-12-05

    In this work, a recently developed CCSD(T) approach with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) as well as density functional theory (DFT) using various exchange-correlation (XC) functionals are employed to investigate structures and stabilities of group 17 fluorides EF(3) (E = I, At, and element 117). These molecules are predicted to have bent T-shaped C(2v) structures according to the second-order Jahn-Teller (SOJT) effects or the valance shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory. For IF(3) and (117)F(3), our results are consistent with previous SOC-DFT calculations. However, different XC functionals provide different results for AtF(3) and our SOC-CCSD(T) calculations show that both the C(2v) and D(3h) structures are minima on the potential energy surface and the C(2v) structure is the global minimum for AtF(3). The performance of XC functionals on structures and stabilities of IF(3) and AtF(3) is found to depend on the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange (HFX) included in the XC functionals and the M06-2X functional with 54% of HFX providing results that agree best with CCSD(T) results. In addition, although both the C(2v) and D(3h) structures are minima for AtF(3), the energy barrier between them is only 8 kJ mol(-1) for the C(2v) structure and 0.05 kJ mol(-1) for the D(3h) structure. This indicates that the D(3h) structure could not possibly be observed experimentally and AtF(3) can convert easily between the three C(2v) structures. The SOJT term is shown to be reduced by electron correlation for IF(3) and AtF(3). On the other hand, although SOC decreases the energy difference between the C(2v) and D(3h) structures and reduces the deviation of the C(2v) structure from the D(3h) structure, it decreases the frequency of the bond bending mode, which may indicate that SOC actually increases the SOJT term. This could be related to mixing of spin-singlet E' states to low-energy spin-triplet states due to SOC.

  13. Molecular-orbital decomposition of the ionization continuum for a diatomic molecule by angle- and energy-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. I. Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hongkun; Zare, Richard N.

    1996-03-01

    A theoretical formalism is developed for the quantum-state-specific photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) from the direct photoionization of a diatomic molecule in which both the ionizing state and the state of the ion follow Hund's case (b) coupling. The formalism is based on the molecular-orbital decomposition of the ionization continuum and therefore fully incorporates the molecular nature of the photoelectron-ion scattering within the independent electron approximation. The resulting expression for the quantum-state-specific PADs is dependent on two distinct types of dynamical quantities, one that pertains only to the ionization continuum and the other that depends both on the ionizing state and the ionization continuum. Specifically, the electronic dipole-moment matrix element rlλ exp(iηlλ) for the ejection of a photoelectron with orbital angular momentum quantum number l making a projection λ on the internuclear axis is expressed as ΣαλŪlαλλ exp (iπτ¯αλλ) Mαλλ, where Ūλ is the electronic transformation matrix, τ¯αλλ is the scattering phase shift associated with the αλth continuum molecular orbital, and Mαλλ is the real electronic dipole-moment matrix element that connects the ionizing orbital to the αλth continuum molecular orbital. Because Ūλ and τ¯αλλ depend only on the dynamics in the ionization continuum, this formalism allows maximal exploitation of the commonality between photoionization processes from different ionizing states. It also makes possible the direct experimental investigation of scattering matrices for the photoelectron-ion scattering and thus the dynamics in the ionization continuum by studying the quantum-state-specific PADs, as illustrated in the companion article on the photoionization of NO.

  14. Spectroscopic search for new SW Sextantis stars in the 3-4 hour orbital period range -- I

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    [Abridged] We report on time-resolved optical spectroscopy of ten non-eclipsing nova-like cataclysmic variables in the orbital period range between 3 and 4 hours. Of the ten systems so far observed, HL Aqr, BO Cet, AH Men, V380 Oph, AH Pic, and LN UMa are identified as new members of the SW Sex class. We present improved orbital period measurements for HL Aqr (Porb = 3.254 +- 0.001 h) and V380 Oph (Porb = 3.69857 +- 0.00002 h). BO Cet and V380 Oph exhibit emission-line flaring with periodicit...

  15. Finite-Volume Partially-Quenched Two-Pion Amplitudes in the I=0 Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, C J D; Pallante, E; Sachrajda, Christopher T C; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the finite-volume two-pion matrix elements and correlation functions of the I=0 scalar operator, in full and partially quenched QCD, at one-loop order in chiral perturbation theory. In partially quenched QCD, when the sea and valence light quark masses are not equal, the lack of unitarity leads to the same inconsistencies as in quenched QCD and the matrix elements cannot be determined. It is possible, however, to overcome this problem by requiring the masses of the valence and sea quarks to be equal for the u and d quarks while keeping the strange quark (s) quenched (or partially quenched), but only in the kinematic region where the two-pion energy is below the two-kaon threshold. Although our results are obtained at NLO in chiral perturbation theory, they are more general and are also valid for non-leptonic kaon decays (we also study the matrix elements of (8,1) operators, such as the QCD penguin operator Q6). We point out that even in full QCD, where any problems caused by the lack of ...

  16. Effect of burial depth on seismic signals. Volume I. Final report 1976-1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, N.; Thomas, F.J.; Trulio, J.; Woodie, W.L.

    1979-05-01

    This report discusses a calculational program aimed at improving the U.S. capability to verify a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) by seismic means. The analysis emphasizes shallow bursts, examining both body-wave and surface-wave effects. Two-dimensional inelastic source calculations, using Applied Theory's AFTON program, were made on a representative set of 150 KT explosions. Simple elastic theory is reviewed, indicating the primary body wave from a buried explosion receives positive or negative reinforcement from the free-surface reflection. The more refined calculations, which include inelastic and gravitational effects, indicate a 'reflection' amplitude smaller than that calculated for the elastic case. More important, the reflected wave is relatively delayed in time, so that transitions between positive and negative reinforcement occur at shallower depths of burial. A surface-wave model is developed, based on Green's function. Many problems were encountered in modifying the AFTON source-data program to provide information that was accurate for long-period displacements, and to extrapolate calculations well beyond the reasonable truncation times for the program. Preliminary conclusions are made concerning the need for inelastic source calculations; depth-of-burial effects on signal generation; the resulting yield estimation; possible improved yield estimation procedures; and topographic effects. Volume I presents summaries of the body-wave and surface-wave calculations to date.

  17. Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U. S. Volume I. Sources, trends, and costs of control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, H.W. (comp.)

    1976-05-01

    Volume I deals with sources (what the emissions are and where they come from), trends (quantities of emissions and their dispersion with time), and costs of control (what it takes in time, energy, and money to meet minimum standards). Volume II concerns itself with the public health effects of energy production and utilization. Volume III summarizes the various techniques for controlling emissions, technological as well as economic, social, and political. (For abstracts of Vols. II and III, see ERDA Energy Research Abstracts, Vol. 2, Absts. 5764 and 5670, respectively) Each volume is divided into sections dealing with the atmosphere, water, land, and social activities--each division indicating a particular sphere of man's environment affected by energy production and use. The sources of information that were used in this study included textbooks, journal articles, technical reports, memoranda, letters, and personal communications. These are cited in the text at the end of each subsection and on the applicable tables and figures.

  18. Orbital alignment dependence of electron transfer cross sections. I : H+-Na(3p) near the matching velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, U.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Holme, N.C.R.; Kmit, M.; Lauritsen, J.H.V.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Richter, C.; Thomsen, J.W.; Andersen, N.; Nielsen, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results for the influence of target excitation and orbital alignment on the charge exchange process for the system H+-Na(3s,3p). The experimental velocity range covers for the first time the region around and beyond the "matching velocity" of 0.47 a.u.

  19. STUDY ON COPOLYMER EPOXY RESIN MATRIX WITHOUT SHRINKAGE PART I VOLUME CHANGE DURING CURE PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pingsheng; ZHOU Zhiqiang; WANG Gengchao; PAN Caiyuan; WU Renjie

    1988-01-01

    The volume change of the copolymer epoxy resins can be controlled by copolymerizing epoxy resin E51 with 3,9-di (5-norbornene-2, 2)-1, 5, 7, 11-tetraoxaspiro [5, 5] undecane (NSOC). During curing,the volume changes of copolymer epoxy resins with various amounts of NSOC were measured with a dilatometer. Cure process does not produce volume change when epoxy resin E51: NSOC is 5.88: 1 in equivalent.

  20. Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

  1. Association of thyroid gland volume, serum insulin-like growth factor-I, and anthropometric variables in euthyroid prepubertal children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Few studies have focused on the interrelation between thyroid size, anthropometric variables, and IGF-I in adults, but such data are lacking for children. We have investigated thyroid gland volume and several hormonal and anthropometric variables in prepubertal children...

  2. Feasibility and impact of the measurement of extracellular fluid volume simultaneous with GFR by I-125-iothalamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Folkert W.; Muntinga, Jaap H. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Navis, Gerjan

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility, validity, and possible applications of the assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) simultaneous with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed in a series of validation studies using the constant infusion method of I-125-iothalamate (IOT). In 48 subjects with a broad ra

  3. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 8: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report -- Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80{sup +}{trademark} Standard Design. This volume 8 provides a description of instrumentation and controls.

  4. 40 CFR 80.599 - How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel... June 30, 2013. July 1, 2013 May 31, 2014. (2) (b) Volume balance for motor vehicle diesel fuel. (1) A facility's motor vehicle diesel fuel volume balance is calculated as follows: MVB = MVI−MVO−MVINVCHG...

  5. How To Set Up Your Own Small Business. Volumes I-II and Overhead Transparencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallek, Max

    This two-volume textbook and collection of overhead transparency masters is intended for use in a course in setting up a small business. The following topics are covered in the first volume: getting off to a good start, doing market research, forecasting sales, financing a small business, understanding the different legal needs of different types…

  6. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 2: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report - Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These documents describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{sup TM} Standard Design. This report, Volume 2, in conjunction with Volume 3, provides the design of structures, components, equipment and systems.

  7. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 3: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report - Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These documents describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{sup TM} Standard Design. This report, Volume 3, in conjunction with Volume 2, provides the design of structures, components, equipment and systems.

  8. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 17: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report -- Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describes the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design. This Volume 17 provides Appendix A of this report, closure of unresolved and Genetic Safety Issues.

  9. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 10: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report -- Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80{sup +}{trademark} Standard Design. This volume 10 discusses the Steam and Power Conversion System and Radioactive Waste Management.

  10. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 16: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report - Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design. This Volume 16 details the application of Human Factors Engineering in the design process.

  11. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 18: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report -- Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design. This Volume 18 provides Appendix B, Probabilistic Risk Assessment.

  12. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 11: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report -- Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80{sup +}{trademark} Standard Design. This volume 11 discusses Radiation Protection, Conduct of Operations, and the Initial Test Program.

  13. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 9: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report -- Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These volumes describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80{sup +}{trademark} Standard Design. This volume 9 discusses Electric Power and Auxiliary Systems.

  14. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 7: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report - Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These documents describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{sup TM} Standard Design. This report, Volume 7, in conjunction with Volume 6, provides a description of engineered safety features.

  15. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 6: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report - Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These documents describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{sup TM} Standard Design. This report, Volume 6, in conjunction with Volume 7, provides a description of engineered safety features.

  16. Atomic orbital-based SOS-MP2 with tensor hypercontraction. I. GPU-based tensor construction and exploiting sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenchen; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a tensor hypercontracted (THC) scaled opposite spin second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (SOS-MP2) method. By using THC, we reduce the formal scaling of SOS-MP2 with respect to molecular size from quartic to cubic. We achieve further efficiency by exploiting sparsity in the atomic orbitals and using graphical processing units (GPUs) to accelerate integral construction and matrix multiplication. The practical scaling of GPU-accelerated atomic orbital-based THC-SOS-MP2 calculations is found to be N2.6 for reference data sets of water clusters and alanine polypeptides containing up to 1600 basis functions. The errors in correlation energy with respect to density-fitting-SOS-MP2 are less than 0.5 kcal/mol for all systems tested (up to 162 atoms).

  17. A CFD Analysis of Hydrogen Leakage During On-Pad Purge in the ORION/ARES I Shared Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Edwards, Daryl A.

    2011-01-01

    A common open volume is created by the stacking of the Orion vehicle onto the Ares I Upper Stage. Called the Shared Volume, both vehicles contribute to its gas, fluid, and thermal environment. One of these environments is related to hazardous hydrogen gas. While both vehicles use inert purge gas to mitigate any hazardous gas buildup, there are concerns that hydrogen gas may still accumulate and that the Ares I Hazardous Gas Detection System will not be sufficient for monitoring the integrated volume. This Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to examine these topics. Results of the analysis conclude that the Ares I Hazardous Gas Detection System will be able to sample the vent effluent containing the highest hydrogen concentrations. A second conclusion is that hydrogen does not accumulate under the Orion Service Module (SM) avionics ring as diffusion and purge flow mixing sufficiently dilute the hydrogen to safe concentrations. Finally the hydrogen concentrations within the Orion SM engine nozzle may slightly exceed the 1 percent volume fraction when the entire worse case maximum full leak is directed vertically into the engine nozzle.

  18. Axial length and orbital volume analysis of PHPV eyes in Children%永存原始玻璃体增生症患儿眼轴长度及眶容积分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡毅倩; 董洋; 王诗园; 冯华章; 周秀莉; 余文晶

    2014-01-01

    目的 初步探讨永存原始玻璃体增生症(persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous,PHPV)患儿眼眶发育状况及其与眼轴发育、病变类型间关系.方法 对2009年3月至2011年8月在上海交通大学医学院附属新华医院就诊的18例PHPV患儿进行眼部超声检查、眼轴长度测量及CT三维重建眶容积分析.结果 患儿平均年龄10个月(最小56 d,最大24个月),均单眼发病.患眼轴长(17.8±3.2) mm,眶容积(12.5±2.9) cm3;健眼轴长(20.4±2.7) mm,眶容积(13.5±3.1) cm3.患眼轴长及眶容积均显著<对侧眼,差异有统计学意义(t值=-5.517、-5.701,P值=3.772× 104、2.598×10-5).根据超声特征,按病变累及玻璃体前部、后部或全程,分成A组(4例)、B组(5例)、C组(9例),计三组.A组患眼与对侧眼间眼轴长度及眶容积差异均无统计学意义(t值=-1.151、-2.485,P值=0.333、0.089);B组患眼轴长及眶容积均<对侧眼(t值=-2.835、-2.809,P值=0.047、0.048).C组患眼轴长及眶容积均显著<对侧眼(t值=-8.472、-5.365,P值=2.885×10-5、0.001).C组双眼轴长差值显著>A、B两组(P值=0.001、0.008),C组双眼眶容积差均值最大,但与其他组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).眶容积与眼轴长度呈较强差异有统计学意义(r=0.486,P=0.003).双眼眶容积差值与眼轴长度差值差异有统计学意义(r=0.560,P=0.016).结论 PHPV患眼眼轴发育及眶容积发育均受阻,两者存在正相关关系.单纯前部玻璃体增殖影响不明显,前后混合型影响显著.CT三维重建是有效的眶容积测量方法.%Objective To study the orbital volume development and its relationship with the axial length and pathological type in children PHPV eyes.Methods Eighteen cases of children who were diagnosed PHPV in Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Medical School of Shanghai Jiaotong University from March 2009 to August 2011 performed ultrasonography of the eye and reconstructed computed tomography of the orbital

  19. Energy development in the Southwest: problems of water, fish, and wildlife in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spofford, W.O. Jr.; Parker, A.L.; Kneese, A.V. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    This two-volume set is based primarily on an RFF forum held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in October 1976. Most of the papers in the book were presented at this forum. All of them were revised and updated after the forum; some were partly or even wholly rewritten. Some of the papers depend directly on research results reported in others, and therefore major revisions were necessary to integrate these papers. Two new papers were added after the forum was held, as was the appendix and five new discussions. This volume, Vol. I, contains the introductory chapter, 6 other papers (chapters), and an appendix; a separate abstract was prepared for each.

  20. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (11th, Montreal, Canada, July 19-25, 1987). Volumes I-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Jacques C., Ed.; And Others

    The Proceedings of PME-XI has been published in three separate volumes because of the large total of 161 individual conference papers reported. Volume I contains four plenary papers, all on the subject of "constructivism," and 44 commented papers arranged under 4 themes. Volume II contains 56 papers (39 commented; 17 uncommented)…

  1. Proceedings of the International Conference for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (18th, Lisbon, Portugal, July 29-August 3, 1994). Volumes I-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Ponte, Joao Pedro, Ed.; Matos, Joao Filipe, Ed.

    The Proceedings of PME-XVIII have been published in four separate volumes because of the large number of individual conference papers reported. Volume I contains brief reports for 11 Working Groups and 8 Discussion Groups, 55 "Short Oral Communications," 28 Posters, 5 Plenary Panel reports, and 4 Plenary Session reports. Volume II…

  2. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (17th, Tsukuba, Japan, July 18-23, 1993). Volumes I-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Ichiei, Ed.; And Others

    The Proceedings of PME-XVII has been published in three volumes because of the large number of papers presented at the conference. Volume I contains a brief Plenary Panel report, 4 full-scale Plenary Addresses, the brief reports of 10 Working Groups and 4 Discussion Groups, and a total of 23 Research Reports grouped under 4 themes. Volume II…

  3. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Rod

    1986-02-01

    This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

  4. JANNAF 30th Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee Meeting. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. L. (Editor); Becker, D. L. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume, the first of three volumes, is a compilation of 22 unclassified/unlimited technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 30th Propellant Development & Characterization Subcommittee Meeting, held on 18-21 March 2002 at the Sheraton Colorado Springs Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colorado. The papers presented herein reflect work performed in the areas of green energetic materials (GEM) development; liquid and gel propellant development; propellant surveillance and aging; and propellant chemistry test methods.

  5. Influence of thyroid volume reduction on absorbed dose in 131I therapy studied by using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaur, Rahman; Sikander, M. Mirza; Waheed, Arshed; Nasir, M. Mirza; Waheed, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    A simulation study has been performed to quantify the effect of volume reduction on the thyroid absorbed dose per decay and to investigate the variation of energy deposition per decay due to β- and γ-activity of 131I with volume/mass of thyroid, for water, ICRP- and ICRU-soft tissue taken as thyroid material. A Monte Carlo model of the thyroid, in the Geant4 radiation transport simulation toolkit was constructed to compute the β- and γ-absorbed dose in the simulated thyroid phantom for various values of its volume. The effect of the size and shape of the thyroid on energy deposition per decay has also been studied by using spherical, ellipsoidal and cylindrical models for the thyroid and varying its volume in 1-25 cm3 range. The relative differences of Geant4 results for different models with each other and MCNP results lie well below 1.870%. The maximum relative difference among the Geant4 estimated results for water with ICRP and ICRU soft tissues is not more than 0.225%. S-values for ellipsoidal, spherical and cylindrical thyroid models were estimated and the relative difference with published results lies within 3.095%. The absorbed fraction values for beta particles show a good agreement with published values within 2.105% deviation. The Geant4 based simulation results of absorbed fractions for gammas again show a good agreement with the corresponding MCNP and EGS4 results (±6.667%) but have 29.032% higher values than that of MIRD calculated values. Consistent with previous studies, the reduction of the thyroid volume is found to have a substantial effect on the absorbed dose. Geant4 simulations confirm dose dependence on the volume/mass of thyroid in agreement with MCNP and EGS4 computed values but are substantially different from MIRD8 data. Therefore, inclusion of size/mass dependence is indicated for 131I radiotherapy of the thyroid.

  6. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion

  7. Evaluation of Areas for Off-Road Recreational Motorcycle Use. Volume I. Evaluation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    r , % 4 - e d I - A:T J N .Cf ii𔃿 T- ’’ a,,’’Aq’nee-,N I t’ NN-M V - T N o al I ’brtas -qee , " N i,’ ’A n, e i ’ no neC l’ DALN-M0 PRC Cuca -.T1T

  8. Task Descriptions in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 7. Volume 2, Radiologic Technologist Tasks Dealing with Patient Procedures. Part I: Tasks 7 through 386.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor

    Part I of the second of four volumes in Research Report No. 7 of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS), this book contains 76 task descriptions covering most of the medical activities carried out by radiologic technologists. Chapter I of this volume defines "tasks" and tells how the descriptions were developed. Chapter 2 lists the…

  9. On the Orbital Evolution of a Giant Planet Pair Embedded in a Gaseous Disk. I. Jupiter-Saturn Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2010-05-01

    We carry out a series of high-resolution (1024 × 1024) hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the orbital evolution of Jupiter and Saturn embedded in a gaseous protostellar disk. Our work extends the results in the classical papers of Masset & Snellgrove and Morbidelli & Crida by exploring various surface density profiles (σ), where σ vprop r -α. The stability of the mean motion resonances (MMRs) caused by the convergent migration of the two planets is studied as well. Our results show that (1) the gap formation process of Saturn is greatly delayed by the tidal perturbation of Jupiter. These perturbations cause inward or outward runaway migration of Saturn, depending on the density profiles on the disk. (2) The convergent migration rate increases as α increases and the type of MMRs depends on α as well. When 0 4/3, Saturn passes through the 2:1 MMR with Jupiter and is captured into the 3:2 MMR. (3) The 3:2 MMR turns out to be unstable when the eccentricity of Saturn (es ) increases too high. The critical value above which instability will set in is es ~ 0.15. We also observe that the two planets are trapped into 2:1 MMR after the break of 3:2 MMR. This process may provide useful information for the formation of orbital configuration between Jupiter and Saturn in the solar system.

  10. Association of thyroid gland volume, serum insulin-like growth factor-I, and anthropometric variables in euthyroid prepubertal children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, M.; Hegedus, L.; Feldt-Rasmussen, U.;

    2009-01-01

    . DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 859 prepubertal euthyroid Danish children aged 4-9 yr underwent a thorough clinical investigation, including anthropometrical measurements and determination of TSH, thyroid hormones, autoantibodies, urinary iodine excretion, and thyroid volume (TV) by ultrasound...... significantly associated with TV. Family history of thyroid disease and presence of incidental abnormal ultrasound findings were also positively associated with TV (P = 0.025 and 0.022, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort of prepubertal Danish children, the GH/IGF-I-axis was positively correlated......CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Few studies have focused on the interrelation between thyroid size, anthropometric variables, and IGF-I in adults, but such data are lacking for children. We have investigated thyroid gland volume and several hormonal and anthropometric variables in prepubertal children...

  11. Space Shuttle Orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study. Volume 8: Effects of configuration modifications on the aerodynamic characteristics of the 140 A/B Orbiter at a Mach number of 5.97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics at M=5.97 for the 140 A/B Space Shuttle Orbiter configuration and for the configuration modified by geometric changes in the wing planform fillet region and the fuselage forebody are presented. The modifications, designed to extend the orbiter's longitudinal trim capability to more forward center of gravity locations, include reshaping the baseline wing fillet, changing the fuselage forebody camber, and adding canards. The Langley 20 inch Mach 6 Tunnel at a Reynolds number of approximately 6 million based on fuselage reference length was used. The angle of attack range of the investigation varied from about 15 deg to 35 deg at 0 deg and -5 deg sideslip angles. Data are obtained with the elevators and body flap deflected at appropriate negative and positive conditions to assess the trim limits.

  12. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume I. The Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rajendra K.; Freeman, III, Richard F.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 20 power plants located on the Great Lakes has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV.

  13. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume I. Country data, AF-CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Volumes 1 through 4 include energy-related information concerning 57 countries. Additional volumes (5 through 11) present review information on international organizations, summaries of energy-related international agreements, and fact sheets on nuclear facilities. Country data on Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Burma, Canada, China, and Colombia are included in Volume 1. The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  14. Space shuttle orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study: Volume 2: Effects of configuration modifications on the aerodynamic characteristics of the 140 A/B orbiter at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. P.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the LaRC 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel to determine effects of fuselage nose and wing fillet modifications on the transonic aerodynamic characteristics of a space shuttle orbiter configuration. In addition to reshaping the baseline wing planform fillet, small canards were added to the configuration. The modifications considered were of interest in extending the forward center-of-gravity boundary for the configuration.

  15. Calculation of two-centre two-electron integrals over Slater-type orbitals revisited. I. Coulomb and hybrid integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Lesiuk, Michał

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, which constitutes the first part of the series, we consider calculation of two-centre Coulomb and hybrid integrals over Slater-type orbitals (STOs). General formulae for these integrals are derived with no restrictions on the values of the quantum numbers and nonlinear parameters. Direct integration over the coordinates of one of the electrons leaves us with the set of overlap-like integrals which are evaluated by using two distinct methods. The first one is based on the transformation to the ellipsoidal coordinates system and the second utilises a recursive scheme for consecutive increase of the angular momenta in the integrand. In both methods simple one-dimensional numerical integrations are used in order to avoid severe digital erosion connected with the straightforward use of the alternative analytical formulae. It is discussed that the numerical integration does not introduce a large computational overhead since the integrands are well-behaved functions, calculated recursively with decent...

  16. Guide to Technical Documents. Volume I. May 1949 through December 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-12-01

    mgaiding Ik* *<|ui|ia*Ht R>SSI tnatiuitl«n Nanuat lui Skiil -N>iunl«u luk* Oil lainvi ooo i;in, ivt i«%%, i J tvik, um...Coapsny, AM07J27 This report, strictly speaking , is neither a feasibil- ity study nor a prelimnary engineering investigation, even though it

  17. Humboldt Bay Wetlands Review and Baylands Analysis. Volume I. Summary and Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    have been , arried out ii; the Humboldt area. The estim t.ed ]e,(I of .... .. . .. ... ... ... . . ... .l l-"... . .. . . . . . ., , i I...of the two better describes the poter .- tial for a given area to be a source of energy for the major food webs in the estuary. ib) Secondary

  18. PDC 2016. Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference - Volume I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Participatory Design in an Era of Participation : Introduction to volume 1 Participatory Design is a diverse collection of principles and practices aimed at making technologies, tools, environments, businesses and social institutions more responsive to human needs. A central tenet of Participator...

  19. Cerebral Palsy and Related Disorders, Prevention and Early Care: An Annotated Bibliography. Volume I, Part One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembolt, Raymond R., Comp.; Roth, Beth, Comp.

    Presented alphabetically by author's name in the first of a two volume annotated bibliography are 602 abstracts of scientific and public education literature on cerebral palsy published through 1971. The entries are said to focus on children under 2 years of age whose development has been delayed by the condition. The bibliography is explained to…

  20. A DDC Bibliography on Computers in Information Sciences. Volume I. Information Sciences Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The unclassified and unlimited bibliography compiles references dealing specifically with the role of computers in information sciences. The volume contains 249 annotated references grouped under two major headings: Time Shared, On-Line, and Real Time Systems, and Computer Components. The references are arranged in accesion number (AD-number)…

  1. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  2. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume I. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater collection system workers to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. This volume is directed primarily towards entry-level operators and the operators of ponds, package plants, or small treatment plants. Ten chapters examine the…

  3. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase I report. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, H.S.

    1977-10-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) baseline large module time estimates, (2) baseline intermediate module time estimates, (3) baseline small module time estimates, (4) alternate concept estimates, (5) maintenance equipment concepts, (6) additional reactor design definition, and (7) TOCOMO supplements. (MOW)

  4. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Health Assistant. Volume I, Units 1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This volume consists of the first four units of a basic core curriculum that is intended for all health workers. The units deal with the following topics: (1) the health care facility, the long-term care facility, the health team, and the nursing team; (2) verbal and nonverbal communication, written communication, human behavior, ethical behavior,…

  5. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  6. A DDC Bibliography on Computers in Information Sciences. Volume I. Information Sciences Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The unclassified and unlimited bibliography compiles references dealing specifically with the role of computers in information sciences. The volume contains 249 annotated references grouped under two major headings: Time Shared, On-Line, and Real Time Systems, and Computer Components. The references are arranged in accesion number (AD-number)…

  7. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  8. An Evaluation of the Nutrition Services for the Elderly. Volume I. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    This document is part of a five-volume nationwide study of Nutrition Services operations and elderly citizens participating in congregate dining and home delivery services authorized by Title III-C of the Older Americans' Act. The Nutrition Services address a number of problems faced by the nation's elderly, such as dietary inadequacy, declining…

  9. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 4: Amendment I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-21

    This report, entitled Combustion Engineering Standard Safety Analysis Report - Design Certification (CESSAR-DC), has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. These documents describe the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{sup TM} Standard Design. This report, Volume 4, provides a description of the reactor, reactor internals, fuel assemblies, and associated design requirements.

  10. Animal Science Technology. An Experimental Developmental Program. Volume I, Report of the Developmental Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Herman G.; And Others

    In 1961, administrative personnel at Delhi College in New York observed that formal training programs for animal science technicians were virtually nonexistant. Response to this apparent need resulted in the initiation of perhaps the first 2-year Animal Science Technology Program in the nation. This two-volume report is the result of an extensive…

  11. Engineering Drawing Practices - Volume I of II: Aerospace and Ground Support Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual establishes the essential requirements and reference documents for the preparation and revision of digital product definition data sets prepared for or by NASA at KSC. This volume is only applicable to KSC in-house programs/projects. These requirements do not apply to the preparation of illustrations, artwork, or figures in technical publications.

  12. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report.

  13. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME I: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume represents the analysis of case study facilities' experience with waterbased adhesive use and retrofit requirements. (NOTE: The coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry was selected as part of NRMRL'S support of the 33/50 Program because of its significan...

  14. Operation and Maintenance of Wastewater Collection Systems. Volume I. Third Edition. A Field Study Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    Proper installations, inspections, operations, maintenance and repairs of wastewater collection, conveyance and treatment facilities have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs, and the effectiveness of these facilities. This manual is the first volume of a two-part program designed to provide wastewater collection system…

  15. Lorain Harbor, Ohio. Commercial Navigation Study. Volume I. Main Report and Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    2 2 2 t Wharf, above :OutfittLnl and: z I I Erie Ave. Sr. :Repair 2 : 2 2 -. Reagan arine :mooring Reagan Morine 2 - 2 8 -10: - IVeh. Supply Wharf...restricted drafts. 51 It (I Photo 7. Launclhing of the EDGAR SPEER (August 15, 1980) (Note amount of available river width occupiedby the vessel...Photo 8. EDGAR SPEER docked at AmShip being passed by a 630-foot vessel. (Note constricted channel.) July 1980. 52 I I-- o b. Channel Modifications on

  16. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  17. User's manual for the BNW-I optimization code for dry-cooled power plants. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.J.; Daniel, D.J.; De Mier, W.V.; Faletti, D.W.; Wiles, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    This User's Manual provides information on the use and operation of three versions of BNW-I, a computer code developed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as a part of its activities under the ERDA Dry Cooling Tower Program. These three versions of BNW-I were used as reported elsewhere to obtain comparative incremental costs of electrical power production by two advanced concepts (one using plastic heat exchangers and one using ammonia as an intermediate heat transfer fluid) and a state-of-the-art system. The computer program offers a comprehensive method of evaluating the cost savings potential of dry-cooled heat rejection systems and components for power plants. This method goes beyond simple ''figure-of-merit'' optimization of the cooling tower and includes such items as the cost of replacement capacity needed on an annual basis and the optimum split between plant scale-up and replacement capacity, as well as the purchase and operating costs of all major heat rejection components. Hence, the BNW-I code is a useful tool for determining potential cost savings of new heat transfer surfaces, new piping or other components as part of an optimized system for a dry-cooled power plant.

  18. Space Shuttle Orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study. Volume 4: Effects of configuration modifications on the aerodynamic characteristics of the 139B orbiter at Mach 20.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallion, W. I.; Stone, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Force tests were conducted at Mach 20.3 to determine the effect of several forebody, wing-fillet, and canard modifications on the hypersonic trim capability of a 139B Space Shuttle Orbiter model. Force and moment data were obtained at angles of attack of 10 deg to 54 deg at zero sideslip angle and at a Reynolds number of 1,900,000 based on body length. The results indicated that wing-fillet and canard modifications would increase the allowable forward trimmed center-of-gravity capability by as much as 3.0 percent of the body length.

  19. Active Control Synthesis for Flexible Vehicles. Volume I. KONPACT theoretical Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    scx ^;^6 aileron de,leotion to reduce b^— K = aileron feedback gains This equation generates additional constraints on...8217 Ml’ E«9• 519 * 509* 59* * 52» • S«1’ 511’ 501’ S9f I S2t" I W I 512’ SCZ ’ 591’ 521’ S00’ S10’ 500’« M..i;«r"«:’U;;«;r-«;’^;;;;r...J9t M E2I ’T ;p" M SUM :9li• 526- SPP ■ S9i- ??/• EB9• 519- SC91 E05. SP«?1 chij • SCl- £9f S2t • sez- S»2-

  20. Hydride heat pump. Volume I. Users manual for HYCSOS system design program. [HYCSOS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, R.; Moritz, P.

    1978-05-01

    A method for the design and costing of a metal hydride heat pump for residential use and a computer program, HYCSOS, which automates that method are described. The system analyzed is one in which a metal hydride heat pump can provide space heating and space cooling powered by energy from solar collectors and electric power generated from solar energy. The principles and basic design of the system are presented, and the computer program is described giving detailed design and performance equations used in the program. The operation of the program is explained, and a sample run is presented. This computer program is part of an effort to design, cost, and evaluate a hydride heat pump for residential use. The computer program is written in standard Fortran IV and was run on a CDC Cyber 74 and Cyber 174 computer. A listing of the program is included as an appendix. This report is Volume 1 of a two-volume document.

  1. HARD PAN I Test Series - Test and Instrumentation Plans. Volume 2. Instrumentation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    CMCMCMVOlOCMCM^-^-tOm CMCMCOCOCMCMlf) I I r— I 00 3 a; Lü LU LÜ LU CMco^ mvoP ^ooo» CMCMCMCMCMCMC^JCM O i— CM CO...O O O in vo r«> GO o> o OOOO oooo S S 8 ^-CMfO^- mvoP ^eooiOi— CM**) §r-^-i— ^r-^-r—i— i— i— <MCMCMCM

  2. GREAT I Study of the Upper Mississippi River. Technical Appendixes. Volume 9. Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    nl op n (11 sa . ’Jv ir ea i to tihe river. i igh potent al for oulturaL rcju-, , ijmi -t .; :rve’ r ,xi red he [ore i~se . ipprecjiAl)JC ioCial jinp ...Wisconsin Albert Quie, Minnesota " Robert 1. Ray, Iowa Sen . Rudy Boschwiv -, Minnesota " John Culve:, Iowa Dave Durenber,er, Minnesota Roger Jepsen, Iowa

  3. Advanced Helicopter Structural Design Investigation. Volume I. Investigation of Advanced Structural Component Design Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    Design I, K 3 r 8 C6 Std Day — K f I1 4 Troop Payload ~ (9601b) ^^^s^^^ Condition ~ *^jP(P/L = 9601b) ■a 1 4 Xmsn^^ / Limit...POST JoiWTMtMBBS,SILL MEWSE«»,! ACC.E55 DOO« SUPPORT STRUCT f PjMfC 1 IM MASTER MALE MOLD DIAQSC Ailo MSCMALC ,1 nif -i» INTO ^s(.R

  4. Defense Systems Management Review, Volume I. Numbers 7-8. Autumn 1978,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Directions for NATO i) r $I,l/ ,am I Perr ,;In this arnc/e, l~’isc~/ on ,rm:irA ’. ~~~~~~~ the .4; tat,, ’,? H eel, and Space ikvhn, ’/os~; ‘ont~rence a...1’~ NEW DIRECTIONS FOR NAT O Dr. William J. Perr y Nearly thirty years ago, the North Atlantic Alliance united IS democratic

  5. Doctrinal Guidelines for Quantitative Vulnerability Assessments of Infrastructure-Related Risks. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    local impact for one year to a bombing event at a shopping mall and the national impact for five years. Nonetheless, they are not meant to limit...so big (e.g., small enough to carry in a shopping bag or backpack) and so the volume is likely limited to a certain, assumable range, and if the... RFID Radio Frequency Identification ROI Return on Investment SARS Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome SCADA Supervisory Control and Data

  6. Army Staff Automated Administrative Support System (ARSTADS) Report. Phase I. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    of administrative technologies. Volume 11 contains specifics on a Isystem -to test-that eanepnt- DO WJIT 43 EDONWOF INOV GOIS @NOLETE Unclassified...correct and edit their material (92%). (3) Eighty-six percent of the administrative personnel reported having to retype papers for aesthetic, editorial or...classified material stored is less than ten percent. (c) most elements use the TAFFS system; however, files are not purged or properly maintained in all

  7. STOL Aircraft Structural Vibration Prediction Method. Volume I. Prediction Procedure and Aircraft Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    1UrN/ td to U4& G0overnmepntl only ,’/ tat and evauation;, statement applied In August 1979. Other iwqwet for this document must be referiud to AF F/i...8217 I" IAO 4.1 NmUQ Uj 0MO U i wOP*f n I- f" A- 0 1ru.. V4Ob o, N 94 * * 10 N A’N-A" W ~ ~ W N ft 40 .wO-0 o r4 a V4 0 *g4 0~ w BWg a-4 19 W m N 4 N 4

  8. Structured assessment approach: Version I. Applied demonstration of output results. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, 1.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility (HFCF) and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the third volume, Applied Demonstration of Output Results, of a four-volume document. It presents the outputs for each of the four levels of the SAA Version 1 computational package. Two types of outputs are discussed: detailed output findings and summary output tables. The summary output tables are used to aggregate the detailed output findings in a condensed form for NRC analyst consumption. Specific output results are presented for an HFCF, which is described in Volume II.

  9. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

  10. VLF P-Static Noise Reduction In Aircraft. Volume I. Current Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    to the (grounded) probe. (For portable operation, an alligator clamp lead is provided for connection to a suitable ground reference.) It may also be...of patents or other rights of third WetCatMdWsTea penies wiief may result from its ue. No license is granted by imnpi a- Ws os i-i ea tion or

  11. Decentralized Computing Technology for Fault-Tolerant, Survivable C3I systems. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    the operation invocation. Functional Description Alpha Release I Programming Model .A-61 Obec; l~d Object2 Object3 Object4 noe nodej oe nodee a) NODE...FAILURE Object,1 ha Object2 Object3 Object4 AV Orphan nod;i nodej nodek b) NODE FAILURE Object, h~a Object2 Object3 Object4 node1 node-, node

  12. Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)-Phase I. Volume 3 (Pre-Field Campaign Sensor Calibration)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302 Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law ...calibration exercises were conducted. The first exercise examined the MSA-Phase I dynamic sensors (ultrasonic anemometers); the second assessed the MSA...Phase I thermodynamic sensors (barometers, thermometers, hygrometers, and pyranometers). This report documents the results of a detailed calibration

  13. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume I, introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This guide consists of seven volumes which describe records useful for conducting health-related research at the DOE`s Rocky Flats Plant. Volume I is an introduction, and the remaining six volumes are arranged by the following categories: administrative and general, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, workplace and environmental monitoring, and employee occupational exposure and health. Volume I briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Project and provides information on the methodology used to inventory and describe the records series contained in subsequent volumes. Volume II describes records concerning administrative functions and general information. Volume III describes records series relating to the construction and routine maintenance of plant buildings and the purchase and installation of equipment. Volume IV describes records pertaining to the inventory and production of nuclear materials and weapon components. Records series include materials inventories, manufacturing specifications, engineering orders, transfer and shipment records, and War Reserve Bomb Books. Volume V describes records series pertaining to the storage, handling, treatment, and disposal of radioactive, chemical, or mixed materials produced or used at Rocky Flats. Volume VI describes records series pertaining to monitoring of the workplace and of the environment outside of buildings onsite and offsite. Volume VII describes records series pertaining to the health and occupational exposures of employees and visitors.

  14. Orbit graphs and face-transitivity of k-orbit polytopes

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Gabe

    2012-01-01

    The orbit graph of a k-orbit polytope is a graph on k nodes that shows how the flag orbits are related by flag adjacency. Using orbit graphs, we classify k-orbit polytopes and determine when a k-orbit polytope is i-transitive. We then provide an explicit classification of three-orbit polytopes, and we describe a generating set for their automorphism groups.

  15. SeaWiFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 5; The SeaWiFS Solar Radiation-Based Calibration and the Transfer-to-Orbit Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Slater, Philip N.; Holmes, Alan W.

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation-based calibration (SRBC) of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) was performed on 1 November 1993. Measurements were made outdoors in the courtyard of the instrument manufacturer. SeaWiFS viewed the solar irradiance reflected from the sensor's diffuser in the same manner as viewed on orbit. The calibration included measurements using a solar radiometer designed to determine the transmittances of principal atmospheric constituents. The primary uncertainties in the outdoor measurements are the transmission of the atmosphere and the reflectance of the diffuser. Their combined uncertainty is about 5 or 6%. The SRBC also requires knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum. Four solar models are used. When averaged over the responses of the SeaWiFS bands, the irradiance models agree at the 3.6% level, with the greatest difference for SeaWiFS band 8. The calibration coefficients from the SRBC are lower than those from the laboratory calibration of the instrument in 1997. For a representative solar model, the ratios of the SRBC coefficients to laboratory values average 0.962 with a standard deviation of 0.012. The greatest relative difference is 0.946 for band 8. These values are within the estimated uncertainties of the calibration measurements. For the transfer-to-orbit experiment, the measurements in the manufacturer's courtyard are used to predict the digital counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit (August 1, 1997). This experiment requires an estimate of the relative change in the diffuser response for the period between the launch of the instrument and its first solar measurements on orbit (September 9, 1997). In relative terms, the counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit averaged 1.3% higher than predicted, with a standard deviation of 1.2% and a greatest difference of 2.4% or band 7. The estimated uncertainty for the transfer-to-orbit experiment is about 3 or 4%.

  16. User’s Manual for the AFSATCOM Terminal Upgrades Life Cycle Cost Model. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    roimber ot groupings. onuly the average - 11(1 to he1 ,pecif ie elt br mo, of the parameters A c r-,e Lt. I I ! iew. thev lidit it-tt lonl anld class if...training by the production contractor; - Type 2 is Air Force service training performed by Type 1 trainees ; - Recurring training is that necessitated...class hours per day for a type 2 training class. PALl = average daily pay and allowance during training for a type I trainee . PAL2B = average daily pay

  17. Oceanic Area System Improvement Study (OASIS). Volume I. Executive Summary and Improvement Alternatives Development and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    h ich is shown in Tabla O2 t ha4v :x outib RLs othyr- improvements) would tJM"PJ sysc r"Oar jeyi - -VMG - 3-s &3V)c ee, 2ari4cularly ina one CAR fli...Al 2.867000 (3) :, 6-.0 Xii ’ / i~s i 2 52.399990 5.0-iK (1)? iscua eio corresponding to disc~yio in(ref. 5,6) \\(2) Parame trs corresponding to

  18. Evaluation of line focus solar central power systems. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-15

    An evaluation was completed to ascertain the applicability of line focus technologies to electrical power applications and to compare their performance and cost potential with point focus central receiver power systems. It was concluded that although the high temperature line focus (SRI) and fixed mirror line focus (GA) concepts duplicate the heat source characteristics and power conversion technology of the central receiver concepts these configurations do not offer a sufficient improvement in cost to warrant full scale development. The systems are, however, less complex than their point focus counterpart and should the central receiver system development falter they provide reasonable technology alternatives. This volume is an executive summary. (WHK)

  19. Guide to the selection, training, and licensing or certification of reprocessing plant operators. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-06-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 55, establishes procedures and criteria for the licensing of operators, including senior operators, in ''Production and Utilization Facilities'', which includes plants for reprocessing irradiated fuel. A training guide is presented which will facilitate the licensing of operators for nuclear reprocessing plants by offering generalized descriptions of the basic principles (theory) and the unit operations (mechanics) employed in reprocessing spent fuels. In the present volume, details about the portions of a training program that are of major interest to management are presented. (JSR)

  20. Economic Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) study. Volume I. ERTG design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-12-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and evaluate an ERTG design for a high power, Curium-244 fueled system based on the tubular thermoelectric module technology; (2) to prepare a program plan for the development of a flight qualified ERTG; and (3) to estimate the costs associated with the production of one, ten and twenty flight qualified ERTG's. This volume presents the Reference Design ERTG approach, the results of the engineering trade studies leading to its selection, and the Second Generation ERTG Design proposed for development. (WHK)

  1. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 11: Analysis of selected orbit propagation models for the SeaWiFS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Frederick S.; Hoisington, Charles M.; Gregg, Watson W.; Coronado, Patrick L.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Indest, A. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of orbit propagation models was performed by the Mission Operations element of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project, which has overall responsibility for the instrument scheduling. The orbit propagators selected for this analysis are widely available general perturbations models. The analysis includes both absolute accuracy determination and comparisons of different versions of the models. The results show that all of the models tested meet accuracy requirements for scheduling and data acquisition purposes. For internal Project use the SGP4 propagator, developed by the North American Air Defense (NORAD) Command, has been selected. This model includes atmospheric drag effects and, therefore, provides better accuracy. For High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) ground stations, which have less stringent accuracy requirements, the publicly available Brouwer-Lyddane models are recommended. The SeaWiFS Project will make available portable source code for a version of this model developed by the Data Capture Facility (DCF).

  2. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Volume 3, part B: The modelling, dynamics, and stability of large Earth pointing orbiting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of large orbiting flexible beams, and platforms and dish type structures oriented along the local horizontal are treated both analytically and numerically. It is assumed that such structures could be gravitationally stabilized by attaching a rigid light-weight dumbbell at the center of mass by a spring loaded hinge which also could provide viscous damping. For the beam, the small amplitude inplane pitch motion, dumbbell librational motion, and the anti-symmetric elastic modes are all coupled. The three dimensional equations of motion for a circular flat plate and shallow spherical shell in orbit with a two-degree-of freedom gimballed dumbbell are also developed and show that only those elastic modes described by a single nodal diameter line are influenced by the dumbbell motion. Stability criteria are developed for all the examples and a sensitivity study of the system response characteristics to the key system parameters is carried out.

  3. Space shuttle orbiter trimmed center of gravity extension study. Volume 1: Effects of configuration modifications on the aerodynamic characteristics of the 140 A/B orbiter at Mach 10.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, P. T.

    1975-01-01

    Longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics were obtained on several modified versions of the Rockwell International 140 A/B orbiter (0.010 scale). These modifications, designed to extend trim capability to center-of-gravity locations forward of the 65 percent fuselage station, consisted of two forebodies, two canard trimmers, and two body-wing fillets. Tests were performed over an angle-of-attack range of 12 to 36 degrees at a Reynolds number of 1.03 million based on body reference length. Data were obtained with the elevons and body flap deflected at the full-up and full-down design values. This investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley continuous flow hypersonic tunnel.

  4. Job Language Performance Requirements for MOS 13B, Cannon Crewman. Volume I & II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    broken manage . brought medic S but mouth to mouth resuscitation causes obstruction certain pause checking pinched check pliable * chest position... woods super user vehicle I \\S 51 • o - M OS : TASK: 031-503-1006 TASK TITLE: GIVE VOCAL, VISUAL AND OR SOUND ALAR.MS FOR CHL11CAL OR BIOLOGCAL ATTACK...examine handcrank holes insulating inspection insulation I.N’ knot pliers maintenance reels rt/splice operator section sections pass (v) sets perform

  5. Force Management Methods Task II. Volume I. Summary and Analysis Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    iiDi’stLII.J TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE INTRODUCTION 1 2 FORCE MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW 2 K 2.1 FORCE MANAGEMENT DEFINITION 4 2.2 FORCE MANAGEMENT ELEMENTS...34A w toIW W" r z a . 0a to, to co f. go-I I % at,, o" -, .... w a 1.45.4 -- - to~1.. S. h - .ar.. ]h. 2.1 FORCE MANAGEMENT DEFINITION The MIL-STD-1530A

  6. AFCRL Infrared Sky Survey. Volume I. Catalog of Observations at 4, 11, and 20 Microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-14

    for the success of the rocket program. We wish to particularly acknowledge Paul Hartnett, Daniel Nardello, Ed LaBlanc, Larry Smart, and Thomaw...nnnAC CD’ NIIS V40c- " N 10- -2 MDI LW SOLOW -MW0 M40100 W M t10 to~1 t-- W 4M In.W-I’- 40-I (-MW too 0~~ SIn l Cl. m al 4w * OSO. - 40 CP m C4 f 0

  7. I. Interaction of ammonia with single crystal rhodium catalysts. II. Hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption on a W(111) surface: a theoretical molecular orbital approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavere, A.

    1979-01-01

    Rates of ammonia decomposition on (110), (100), and (111) single crystal faces of rhodium were measured at 580 to 725/sup 0/K and 10/sup -3/ to 500 x 10/sup -3/ torr. The decomposition rates were proportional to P/sub NH/sub 3//sup/1/2/ and P/sub NH/sub 3// at low and high hydrogen pressures, respectively. The H/sub 2/ kinetic order varied from 0 (low P/sub H/sub 2//) to -1.0 (high P/sub H/). The rate was independent of N/sub 2/ pressure. NH/sub 3/ decomposes about 1.5 times faster than ND/sub 3/ on the (110) and (111) faces. Rates on the (110) surface are over 10 times as rapid as on the (111). LEED, Auger, and flash desorption experiments indicated that boron was a significant surface poison and that the Rh(110) surface was essentially nitrogen-free. A rate expression is derived from a model involving surface species Rh/sub 2/NH, RhH, and RhN on a nearly bare RH surface. The rate limiting process involves the concurrent dehydrogenation of Rh/sub 2/NH and desorption of N/sub 2/. A decreasing NH/sub 3/ order (< 1/2) at high P/sub NH/sub 3// and low T is due to buildup of surface intermediates. The relative bonding energies of hydrogen and nitrogen chemisorbed at three sites on a W(111) surface were obtained via the extended Hueckel molecular orbital theory. The preferred site for both H and N chemisorption was determined as the TOP position, i.e., a single coordination site on top of a protruding W atom. The W(111) surface was simulated by truncated arrays of seven tungsten atoms. The basis set for the calculations included the tungsten valence orbitals plus the filled 5p orbitals needed for repulsion at small internuclear distances. N adsorption in the three-fold holes available on the W(111) lattices used disrupted the W--W bonds sufficiently to cause the overall bond energy to be less than for the single coordination site. The dissymmetry between the three-fold lattices and the four-fold W d orbitals may also be a contributing factor.

  8. A study in derived algebraic geometry volume I : correspondences and duality

    CERN Document Server

    Gaitsgory, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Derived algebraic geometry is a far-reaching generalization of algebraic geometry. It has found numerous applications in various parts of mathematics, most prominently in representation theory. This volume develops the theory of ind-coherent sheaves in the context of derived algebraic geometry. Ind-coherent sheaves are a "renormalization" of quasi-coherent sheaves and provide a natural setting for Grothendieck-Serre duality as well as geometric incarnations of numerous categories of interest in representation theory. This volume consists of three parts and an appendix. The first part is a survey of homotopical algebra in the setting of \\infty-categories and the basics of derived algebraic geometry. The second part builds the theory of ind-coherent sheaves as a functor out of the category of correspondences and studies the relationship between ind-coherent and quasi-coherent sheaves. The third part sets up the general machinery of the \\mathrm{(}\\infty, 2\\mathrm{)}-category of correspondences needed for the sec...

  9. Choice of high-apogee AES orbits on the basis of the qualitative methods of the theory of perturbations and situational analysis. Part I. Situational studies based on orbital tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorenko, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    The paper discusses the problems of the choice of high-apogee orbits of artificial Earth satellites (AES), proceeding from the tasks of space experiments aimed at studying near-earth space and taking into account the features of the orbital evolution and ballistic lifetime. The suggested methods of the choice of orbits consist of two components. The first is based on the use of mathematical models of studied regions of near-earth space and various techniques of situation analysis, among which the annual and daily orbital tori developed by the author about 35 years ago are key. The second component is based on qualitative methods of the theory of perturbations of high-apogee AES orbits developed by M.L. Lidov more than 50 years ago.

  10. Solar central receiver hybrid power system, Phase I. Volume 3. Appendices. Final technical report, October 1978-August 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    A design study for a central receiver/fossil fuel hybrid power system using molten salts for heat transfer and heat storage is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (A) parametric salt piping data; (B) sample heat exchanger calculations; (C) salt chemistry and salt/materials compatibility evaluation; (D) heliostat field coordinates; (E) data lists; (F) STEAEC program input data; (G) hybrid receiver design drawings; (H) hybrid receiver absorber tube thermal math model; (I) piping stress analysis; (J) 100-MWe 18-hour storage solar central receiver hybrid power system capital cost worksheets; and (K) 500-MWe 18-hour solar central receiver hybrid power system cost breakdown. (WHK)

  11. Homogeneous orbit closures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lindenstrauss, Elon

    2011-01-01

    We give new classes of examples of orbits of the diagonal group in the space of unit volume lattices in R^d for d > 2 with nice (homogeneous) orbit closures, as well as examples of orbits with explicitly computable but irregular orbit closures. We give Diophantine applications to the former, for instance we show that if x is the cubic root of 2 then for any y,z in R liminf |n|=0 (as |n| goes to infinity), where denotes the distance of a real number c to the integers.

  12. A Localized Molecular Orbital Study of the Halogen Substitution Effect on (103)Rh NMR Shielding in [Cp*RhX2]2, Where X = Cl, Br, or I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaeva, Irina V; Mainichev, Dmitry A; Kozlova, Svetlana G

    2016-03-24

    (103)Rh NMR parameters and the bonding structure of three complexes of [Cp*RhX2]2, where X = Cl, Br, or I, have been studied with the help of natural bond orbitals (NBOs) and natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs). The complexes of [Cp*RhX2]2, where X = Cl, Br, or I, have similar bonding structures, with the major difference being in the degree of covalency of the Rh-X bonds. The decomposition of (103)Rh NMR shielding into diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and spin-orbit terms shows that normal halogen dependence (NHD) of the (103)Rh NMR shift is defined mostly by the paramagnetic term, with the spin-orbit term being significantly smaller. The decomposition of (103)Rh shielding into spin-free NBO and NLMO contributions shows that (103)Rh shielding is dominated by Rh d-orbital deshielding contributions. We explain the NHD of the (103)Rh NMR shift with the increase in the energies of the virtual antibonding Rh-X orbitals along the X = Cl, Br, and I series.

  13. Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985 to 2000 time frame. Volume I. Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J.D.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-01

    The findings of a study of opportunities for commercialization of systems capable of producing hydrogen from solar energy are presented in two volumes. A compendium of monographs by specialists in the fields of solar energy conversion technologies, hydrogen production technologies and related technology descriptions from the general literature comprise Volume II. This data base was used to support an evaluation and selection process that identified four candidate solar/hydrogen systems best suited to commercialization within the next two decades. Volume I first reviews the background of the work and the methods used. Then an evaluation of the hydrogen product costs that might be achieved by the four selected candidate systems (photovoltaic/water electrolysis, thermal-heat engine/water electrolysis, wind energy/water electrolysis, small hydrogen/water electrolysis) is compared with the pricing structure and practices of the commodity gas market. Subsequently, product cost and market price match is noted to exist in the small user sector of the hydrogen marketplace. Barriers to and historical time lags in, commercialization of new technologies are then reviewed. Finally, recommendations for development and demonstration programs designed to accelerate the commercialization of the candidate systems are presented.

  14. Cryogenic Tests of Volume-Phase Holographic Gratings: I. Results at 200 K

    CERN Document Server

    Tamura, N; Luke, P N; Blackburn, C; Robertson, D J; Dipper, N A; Sharples, R M; Allington-Smith, J R; Tamura, Naoyuki; Murray, Graham J.; Luke, Peter; Blackburn, Colin; Robertson, David J.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Sharples, Ray M.; Allington-Smith, Jeremy R.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from cryogenic tests of a Volume-Phase Holographic (VPH) grating at 200 K measured at near-infrared wavelengths. The aims of these tests were to see whether the diffraction efficiency and angular dispersion of a VPH grating are significantly different at a low temperature from those at a room temperature, and to see how many cooling and heating cycles the grating can withstand. We have completed 5 cycles between room temperature and 200 K, and find that the performance is nearly independent of temperature, at least over the temperature range which we are investigating. In future, we will not only try more cycles between these temperatures but also perform measurements at a much lower temperature (e.g., 80 K).

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Reionization in Large Cosmological Volumes I: Numerical Methods and Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Michael L; So, Geoffrey C; Harkness, Robsert P

    2013-01-01

    We describe an extension of the {\\em Enzo} code to enable the direct numerical simulation of inhomogeneous reionization in large cosmological volumes. By direct we mean all dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties are solved self-consistently on the same mesh, as opposed to a postprocessing approach which coarse-grains the radiative transfer. We do, however, employ a simple subgrid model for star formation, which we calibrate to observations. The numerical method presented is a modification of an earlier method presented in Reynolds et al. Radiation transport is done in the grey flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation, which is solved by implicit time integration split off from the gas energy and ionization equations, which are solved separately. This results in a faster and more robust scheme for cosmological applications compared to the earlier method. The FLD equation is solved using the {\\em hypre} optimally scalable geometric multigrid solver from LLNL. By treating the ionizing radiation as a gri...

  16. Southwest Project: resource/institutional requirements analysis. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This project provides information which could be used by DOE in formulating their plans for commercialization and market penetration of central station solar electric generating plants in the southwestern region of the United States. The area of interest includes Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The project evaluated the potential integration of central station solar electric generating facilities into the existing electric grids of the region through the year 2000 by making use of system planning methodology which is commonly used throughout the electric utility industry. The technologies included: wind energy conversion, solar thermal electric, solar photovoltaic conversion, and hybrid (solar thermal repowering) solar electric systems. The participants in this project included 12 electric utility companies and a state power authority in the southwestern United States as well as a major consulting engineering firm. A broad synopsis of information found in Volumes II, III, and IV is presented. (MCW)

  17. Management of radioactive waste gases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume I. Comparison of alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.G.; Prout, W.E.; Buckner, J.T.; Buckner, M.R.

    1980-12-01

    Alternatives were compared for collection and fixation of radioactive waste gases released during normal operation of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for transportation and storage/disposal of the resulting waste forms. The study used a numerical rating scheme to evaluate and compare the alternatives for krypton-85, iodine-129, and carbon-14; whereas a subjective evaluation, based on published reports and engineering judgement, was made for transportation and storage/disposal options. Based on these evaluations, certain alternatives are recommended for an integrated scheme for waste management of each of the subject waste gases. Phase II of this project, which is concerned with the development of performance criteria for the waste forms associated with the subject gases, will be completed by the end of 1980. This work will be documented as Volume II of this report.

  18. Potential use of geothermal resources in the Snake River Basin: an environmental overview. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    Environmental baseline data for the Snake River Plain known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) are evaluated for geothermal development. The objective is to achieve a sound data base prior to geothermal development. These KGRAs are: Vulcan Hot Springs, Crane Creek, Castle Creek, Bruneau, Mountain Home, Raft River, Island Park, and Yellowstone. Air quality, meteorology, hydrology, water quality, soils, land use, geology, subsidence, seismicity, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, demography, socioeconomics, and heritage resources are analyzed. This program includes a summary of environmental concerns related to geothermal development in each of the KGRAs, an annotated bibliography of reference materials (Volume II), detailed reports on the various program elements for each of the KGRAs, a program plan identifying future research needs, and a comprehensive data file.

  19. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 10 Appendix I - Historical Evaporation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  20. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume III. Collector subsystem. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    The Honeywell collector subsystem features a low-profile, multifaceted heliostat designed to provide high reflectivity and accurate angular and spatial positioning of the redirected solar energy under all conditions of wind load and mirror attitude within the design operational envelope. The heliostats are arranged in a circular field around a cavity receiver on a tower halfway south of the field center. A calibration array mounted on the receiver tower provides capability to measure individual heliostat beam location and energy periodically. This information and weather data from the collector field are transmitted to a computerized control subsystem that addresses the individual heliostat to correct pointing errors and determine when the mirrors need cleaning. This volume contains a detailed subsystem design description, a presentation of the design process, and the results of the SRE heliostat test program.

  1. Algorithms and computer codes for atomic and molecular quantum scattering theory. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, L. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The goals of this workshop are to identify which of the existing computer codes for solving the coupled equations of quantum molecular scattering theory perform most efficiently on a variety of test problems, and to make tested versions of those codes available to the chemistry community through the NRCC software library. To this end, many of the most active developers and users of these codes have been invited to discuss the methods and to solve a set of test problems using the LBL computers. The first volume of this workshop report is a collection of the manuscripts of the talks that were presented at the first meeting held at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois June 25-27, 1979. It is hoped that this will serve as an up-to-date reference to the most popular methods with their latest refinements and implementations.

  2. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of driven amorphous materials. I. Internal degrees of freedom and volume deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Langer, J S

    2009-09-01

    This is the first of three papers devoted to the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of amorphous materials. Our focus here is on the role of internal degrees of freedom in determining the dynamics of such systems. For illustrative purposes, we study a solid whose internal degrees of freedom are vacancies that govern irreversible volume changes. Using this model, we compare a thermodynamic theory based on the Clausius-Duhem inequality to a statistical analysis based directly on the law of increase of entropy. The statistical theory is used first to derive the Clausius-Duhem inequality. We then use the theory to go beyond those results and obtain detailed equations of motion, including a rate factor that is enhanced by deformation-induced noisy fluctuations. The statistical analysis points to the need for understanding how both energy and entropy are shared by the vacancies and their environments.

  3. Man-Materiel Systems. Questionnaire and Interview Design (Subjective Testing Techniques). Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-25

    paragraph H-10, appendix H). o 4-19 ’*~ mS ’ ■ » I TECOM Pan 602-1. Vol I (5) Method» of Ranking. There are several methods of wording...Background of participants 3-4 Basic multipla choica quastion 4-12 Bias r • • • 5-3. 9-2. Laading quaations 5-3. L adad words 5-4...quaationnaira daalgn 2-1 Mathoda of ranking 4-20 Mlddla catagorlaa 4-9. 4-31 Multipla cholca quaatlona 4-12 Basic aultipla cholca 4-12 Exaaplaa

  4. Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Computer Program C81 with DATAMAP interface. Volume I. User’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    for the last 22-type card) Col 2 - 5 KVl, Code of variable I Col 7 - 10 KV2, Code of variable 2 Col 12 - 15 KV3 , Code of variable 3 Col 20 KEY (I...plot on Printer only) Col 31 - 40 SCI, Minimum scale for KVI Col 41 - 50 SC2, Minimum scale for KV2 Col 51 - 60 SC3, Minimum scale for KV3 See Section 9...for the code numbers to be used for KVI, KV2, and KV3 . 141 / 3.3 STABILITY ANALYSIS USING MOVING BLOCK FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM CARD 31 (12) Col. 2

  5. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation. Verification Study - Pahroc Valley, Nevada. Volume I. Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    RESISTANCE l(c), tsf NOTES: 1. Data are for coarse-gralned soils teste in Big Smoky, Reveille,Railroad. Pine, Wah Wii. Stone Cabin. Reveille and Hot Creek...34 --_ -_ _-,, t’ DD I ’JAN73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 6 IS OBSO ETE SFC U TY CLA SF CAT,13N OF THIS PAGE (Rh,, DPat. F.nteed) DD , o2, 117--3 oiroN F...Mobile Advanced ICBM system and presents the geological, geophysical, and soils engineering data upon which the evaluation is based. It is one of a

  6. VIPS: A Visual Imagery and Perception System; the Result of a Protocol Analysis. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-05-01

    f ’J 83 2 AA-SYS (Assimilation - Acca^oj.** jn Proctss’ Piaget U96’’’, \\9^0) ^as defied ^"d a-scussed ’-e tu^damentai ^ssimi.jtion...1970] Jean Pagel tlrM^yr^liym He* »ork BJ-, c Boo»i, 1970 [Pokier, 1^69] M.c"aei I Posne’ AB^t’aetO" »nd lie process Ot recogntnon. In Bower

  7. Remedial Investigation Addendum Report Data Item A009. Volume 4: Appendices I-Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Thelypteris noveboracensis FAG Marsh Fern Thelypteris the lypteroides FAGW+ 3 Forbs Jack-In-The-Pulpit Arisaema triphyllum FAGW- Swamp Milkweed Asciepias...evaluated using Reference Doses (RfDs) and Cancer Slope Factors (CSFs) which are specific to absorbed doses. Most oral RfDs and CSFs are based on...34standard" exposure scenarios and they correspond toI fixed levels of risk (i.e., a Hazard Quotient (HQ) of 1, or lifetime cancer risk of lx10Ś

  8. Manpower Planning Handbook. Volume I. NavCommSta Transmitter Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    00 00 <s 00 « 0C 00 oo 00 flO A-62 - pn^^^^R^ Bpp MBflnHMWn wHI Iffli 1 Q la H z o O ■k o H CC < z o s OC O > < D M I t/J Z...a M I t/l Q Z o o UJ f5 (T • in r»5 vO evi CO CM (VJ s. in V • CVJ in v CM O) cr in «o in • ro v CM «5 CM TO IM

  9. Radiation effects and tritium technology for fusion reactors. Volume I. Proceedings of the international conference, Gatlinburg, Tennessee, October 1--3, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.S.; Wiffen, F.W.; Bishop, J.L.; Breeden, B.K. (eds.)

    1976-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 included papers in Vol. I. The topics covered in this volume include swelling and microstructures in thermonuclear reactor materials. Some papers on modeling and damage analysis are included. (MOW)

  10. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic acid attenuates kanamycin-induced volume reduction in mouse utricular type I hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Stig Åvall; Kirkegaard, Mette; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2006-01-01

    The aminoglycoside kanamycin is a commonly used antibiotic, but unfortunately it is oto- and nephrotoxic in large doses. The negative effects are thought to be due to the formation of free radicals which is why strong antioxidants and iron chelators like 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) are of great...... interest. This study estimates cellular quantitative changes in the utricular macula of mice following systemic treatment with kanamycin alone or in combination with DHB. The animals were injected with either saline, kanamycin or kanamycin+DHB for 15 days and perfusion fixed three weeks after last...... macula, hair cell type I and supporting cells decreased significantly in animals injected with kanamycin but not in animals co-treated with DHB. Hair and supporting cell numbers remained unchanged in all three groups. In conclusion, the kanamycin-induced volume reduction of type I hair cells...

  11. An Assessment of the Hypothetical Impact of Drug Abuse on Combat Capability. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    25 I .4 Jill 1.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAt BIURIA OF gMANI£ IWOI) A LEVEL AD SAI-80-113-WA AN ASSESSMENT OF THE HYPOTHETICAL IMPACTo OF...potential loss of unit effectiveness in each of these units. The resulting measure of unit effectiveness provides a powerful analy- tic tool for comparing

  12. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part I. Cultural Resources Survey, Dry Lake Valley, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Artemisia nova) but also include cliffrose (Cowania mexicana ) and broom snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothreae) as dominant species. Other species include... CULTURA Ale ~~REOUC SURVEYa AREASczCAvE L CU 11U CUUI 3-2 E-TR-48-III-I 69 was used because it is considered intensive by the Bureau of Land Management and

  13. I'm "Only" Bleeding: Education as the Practice of Violence against Children. Counterpoints Volume 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Alan A.

    This book explores the construction of the idea of the child as a product of adult needs and school as a place where children may be confined until they are considered socially useful. Drawing parallels with folk singer Bob Dylan's song, "It's All Right, Ma, I'm Only Bleeding," the book argues that the United States' educational system practices a…

  14. Helicopter Transmission Vibration and Noise Reduction Program. Volume I. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    Althwxyh the AolI~ion of 3 finito . u1,pmunt pgableum is rigorous, the6 co,,otrudtion of aq fnito eloantat modal, is Somewhat of an art as op.oe to ~ Pr#e and...Rotor Transmission Ring Gearl Modified Configuration and ~lesuuting Spectrum (at 80% Torque, 7460 RPM Sync Shaft Speed). 1 85 the elemento with hilhest

  15. Standard Procedures for Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    that prevents thIN vehlcle from lsirg used j for trans1ortation of sltUllws tio thle fighting front. i-kill ls ei uldidld as follows: -:xpedlent it. 5, 1...Also avoid the use of innuendo, humor, sarcasm , emotion, melodramatics, and the like. c. Jargon must not be used. Although it might improve

  16. Theater Nuclear Force Survivability, Security and Safety Instrumentation. Volume I. Engineering Development Phase - Fiscal Year 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-31

    consumption. A-4 * ~~7110-T~ I1 VA *J. C -k ayN AA-5 The bubble memory controller has built-in capability for data error detection and correction in addition... Rand Corp Vector Research, Inc ATTN: Library ATTN: S. Bonder ATTN: W. Jones Santa Fe Corp ATTN: D. Paolucci Dlst-4

  17. Accomplishing Shipyard Work for the United States Navy: Institutions, Systems and Operations. Volume I. Basic Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    8217Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SI4SAs) are 269 geographical areas making up the fifty states and Puerto Rico. These areas are defined by the U.S...8217 * (2) Development of revised basing policies to provide I~o ovrhals f telv mothsduration or longer, the Navy has a policy of teprrlycagn tesi ’ home

  18. Investigation of Rotating Stall Phenomena in Axial Flow Compressors. Volume I. Basic Studies of Rotating Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    Hz at -800 screen rpm (26.7 Hz). Inspection of thc inlet dyna- mic pressure, q, , records at rotating sta.l inception shows that as negative screen...of tma .’nes% of these 4iszu~ancrei. - - -_ ~ I- S. . . .. In the following analysis, we will consider the response of the blade row to a distortion

  19. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation Conterminous United States. Volume I. Coarse Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    Inventory of resources and uses, phase I, Arizona state water plan: State of Arizona, pl. 1. Ashford, T., 1972, Geoseismic history of Rincon Field...Resources Rept. 2, 60 p. Emery, 1971, Hydrology of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado: U.S. Geol. Survey Hydrol. Inv. Atlas HA-381. Erickson

  20. I + (H2O)2 → HI + (H2O)OH Forward and Reverse Reactions. CCSD(T) Studies Including Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Guoliang; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-03-03

    The potential energy profile for the atomic iodine plus water dimer reaction I + (H2O)2 → HI + (H2O)OH has been explored using the "Gold Standard" CCSD(T) method with quadruple-ζ correlation-consistent basis sets. The corresponding information for the reverse reaction HI + (H2O)OH → I + (H2O)2 is also derived. Both zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVEs) and spin-orbit (SO) coupling are considered, and these notably alter the classical energetics. On the basis of the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ-PP results, including ZPVE and SO coupling, the forward reaction is found to be endothermic by 47.4 kcal/mol, implying a significant exothermicity for the reverse reaction. The entrance complex I···(H2O)2 is bound by 1.8 kcal/mol, and this dissociation energy is significantly affected by SO coupling. The reaction barrier lies 45.1 kcal/mol higher than the reactants. The exit complex HI···(H2O)OH is bound by 3.0 kcal/mol relative to the asymptotic limit. At every level of theory, the reverse reaction HI + (H2O)OH → I + (H2O)2 proceeds without a barrier. Compared with the analogous water monomer reaction I + H2O → HI + OH, the additional water molecule reduces the relative energies of the entrance stationary point, transition state, and exit complex by 3-5 kcal/mol. The I + (H2O)2 reaction is related to the valence isoelectronic bromine and chlorine reactions but is distinctly different from the F + (H2O)2 system.

  1. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Ke(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Vogan, D. , Dixmier algebras, sheets and representation theory (in Actes du colloque en I' honneur de Jacques Dixmier),Progress in Math. 92, Boston: Birkhauser Verlag, 1990, 333-397.[2]McGovern, W., Dixmier Algebras and Orbit Method, Operator Algebras, Unitary Representations and Invariant Theory,Boston: Birkhauser, 1990, 397-416.[3]Liang, K. , Parabolic inductions of nilpotent geometric orbit datum, Chinese Science Bulletin (in Chinese) , 1996, 41 (23):2116-2118.[4]Vogan, D., Representations of Real Reductive Lie Groups, Boston-Basel-Stuttgart: Birkhauser, 1981.[5]Lustig, G., Spaltenstein, N., Induced unipotent class, J. London Math. Soc., 1997, 19. 41-52.[6]Collingwood, D. H. , McGovern, W. M. , Nilpotent Orbits in Semisimple Lie Algebras, New York: Van Nostremt Reinhold,1993.

  2. Effect of π Orbital on I/V Characteristics and Transmission in Molecular Diode Structures with Au Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mallaiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The electronic transport properties of electrons in a molecules are observed by using Non equilibrium Green’s function(NEGF. We present a extremely through and careful computational approach well ordered method to do a framework analysis of donor (CH3 and acceptor (CN molecules connected between the Au(111 contacts, and also observed current progress through molecular devices depends on number of bonds or not. Such observations implementation through not possible by standard quantum chemistry soft wares. The results shows I-V characteristics, Transport spectrum and Transport analysis can effectively tune the molecules works like a conventional semi-conductor based diodes, these results invoke to design the logic gates and logic circuits.

  3. CsI-Silicon Particle detector for Heavy ions Orbiting in Storage rings (CsISiPHOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, M. A.; Dillmann, I.; Bosch, F.; Faestermann, T.; Gao, B.; Gernhäuser, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Maier, L.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Sanjari, M. S.; Spillmann, U.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Weick, H.

    2016-11-01

    A heavy-ion detector was developed for decay studies in the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. This detector serves as a prototype for the in-pocket particle detectors for future experiments with the Collector Ring (CR) at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). The detector includes a stack of six silicon pad sensors, a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD), and a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector. It was used successfully in a recent experiment for the detection of the β+-decay of highly charged 142Pm60+ ions. Based on the ΔE / E technique for particle identification and an energy resolution of 0.9% for ΔE and 0.5% for E (Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM)), the detector is well-suited to distinguish neighbouring isobars in the region of interest.

  4. The USAF Stability and Control Digital DATCOM. Volume I. Users Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    8217 Increment in lift due to thrust, 13 Eqn. 4.6.1-c 21 XBARP Y 13 22 DEUDA 3e /3a( 4.6.1 Eqn. 4.6.i-m 13: ~u 23-42 DCLNP (ACL)Np 4.6.1 Eqn. 4.6.1-I 13 43-62...T) 30 22 XBARIN XIN 30 23 XIN0CR IN/Cr 30 24 DEUDA ac /a 4.4.1 Eqn. 4.6.1-m 30u 25 EPSLON 30 26 ATJ (cT)j 4.6.1 Eqn. 4.6.1-a 30 27-46 DCLNJ (ACL)N

  5. Cultural Resources Investigations at Redstone Arsenal, Madison County, Alabama. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    research and development in the field of rocketry (Joiner and Jolliff 1969). Plans were drawn up immediately to relo- cdte existing research into the...0 11 %.)S~ ft- w o obtam- 06-h %. Cu .0-- - c5 ~ 0 m 0 " th so - 50 4.fOl .41 .C .6 4 - css I U.~ -2S 4 - ~ wU-v# ft -) at 0- ’a 5 - - 4. a--d 4

  6. An Annotated Bibliography of Patents Related to Coastal Engineering. Volume I. 1967-1970. Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    EATRFDCONFACILIT:Y I?:CLUDIIPC FASE UNIT AlND PODUCTION’. FLUID HqANDLING UNIT 3536157 UN1DERWA.TER ICUONS .OURCES 3536!.99 F IRE EXTENCUtl:HI::G CIL SLICY SEPARATOR...Corpus Christi. and Sam G. Gibbs keywords: Embedment anchor; Offshore con- ’ad M~1 %1, JurdA. Houston. Tex, assignors to Shell struction; Offshore

  7. A Study of Strategic Lessons Learned in Vietnam. Volume I. The Enemy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-30

    International and Oomestic Constraints on Policy 7-2 I. Interna ional Constraints 7-2 2. Domestic Constraints 7-4 3. Military Constraints 7-8 0. Major...of South Vietnam’s better commanders and better units that defeated the offensive. In the finai campaigns of March-April 1975. the logistica ...organi- zation established for the supervision of the 1954 Geneva Agreements in Indochina. Also known as ICSC - The Interna - tional Control and

  8. Qualification Standards for Personnel Responsible for Hazardous or Noxious Chemicals in Bulk. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    a systems approach for handling vinyl chloride monomer ; however, their manuals were not made available for proprietary reasons. Chemical distribution... Price UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 82 P.rm DOT F 17N.1 (8 72) R.p,oductlon of completed page author Ized V...Allyl Chloride 3 3 2 3 2 1 2 2 0 1 Fl.ew.able Liquid . Grade B, Class B Poison Minoetbyl Ethano— 1 1 3 1 1 3 3 0 0 Combustible Liquid. l i ne

  9. Biological Survey, Buffalo River and Outer Harbor of Buffalo, New York. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    these areas; and .’ , provide a functional assessment of the ecological components studied and evaluate their significance with and without project...the biological impact of spoil disposal in these areas; and I- -2- (5) To provide a functional assessment of the ecological components studied and...spreading dogbane, comon milkweed and grapevines characterize this section. Grasses occur throughout *Lth red fescue most common. The coarse meadow

  10. The Foreign Area Officer Program. Volume I. The Role of the Military Advisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-05-01

    attended the MAPA or MAO C&SC, and are not MAOP members. Some of these positions are advisory posi- tions. For purposes of this report, we did not...determine whether there is a comparable problem at the MAAG end--i.e. , requisitioning MAPA or MAO C&SC graduates and not getting them—or to what...U. S. Army training in advisor functions and roles is incorporated in the Military Assistance Programmer/Advisor ( MAPA ) and Military Assistance

  11. Chemical Laser Systems: An Engineering Approach. Volume I. Chemical Laser Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-31

    9f13.6** I**,T66**T*O ..,F13%*9* ofli/ mflLOS lNov -T3p,.W4WP m*,fl3.AT66#%XAXP 00,113.6) OUTLOS 1SO0 71* VflWA~.OT?.’ API IN[TH CAVITY FLOW MA% CHOWfn...PROAPAN (Cf API %USNOUTINI Wtr% OVERLAY PMS PAGE 0-41 L CUtPROUTItNP OSVSPW,0.(lMWSMWP.T%fltP0,MI.MB)I.ArAPI.LI4TT, iSiS 01100 P w~wSP.LiM*.flMMWP...VAW m*’El3.6,. M30/6 OUTSCS 1110 _T3?**MCS w*9El3*6s* X60 *.766vVCS m.,E13.*0, M3Os’, OUTSCS 1170 -T3?9*MOPT *0sE13*6o0 XKsT66**VOPY m~vE13*6v* ŗ*9/t

  12. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  13. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator \\& in the Technical Design Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  14. Orbital Spacecraft Consumables Resupply System (OSCRS): Monopropellant application to space station and OMV automatic refueling impacts of an ELV launch, volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The use of orbital spacecraft consumables resupply system (OSCRS) at the Space Station is investigated, its use with the orbital maneuvering vehicle, and launch of the OSCRS on an expendable launch vehicles. A system requirements evaluation was performed initially to identify any unique requirements that would impact the design of OSCRS when used at the Space Station. Space Station documents were reviewed to establish requirements and to identify interfaces between the OSCRS, Shuttle, and Space Station, especially the Servicing Facility. The interfaces between OSCRS and the Shuttle consists of an avionics interface for command and control and a structural interface for launch support and for grappling with the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. For use of the OSCRS at the Space Station, three configurations were evaluated using the results of the interface definition to increase the efficiency of OSCRS and to decrease the launch weight by Station-basing specific OSCRS subsystems. A modular OSCRS was developed in which the major subsystems were Station-based where possible. The configuration of an OSCRS was defined for transport of water to the Space Station.

  15. The EBLM Project I-Physical and orbital parameters, including spin-orbit angles, of two low-mass eclipsing binaries on opposite sides of the Brown Dwarf limit

    CERN Document Server

    Triaud, Amaury H M J; Anderson, David R; Cargile, Phill; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Doyle, Amanda P; Faedi, Francesca; Gillon, Michaël; Chew, Yilen Gomez Maqueo; Hellier, Coel; Jehin, Emmanuel; Maxted, Pierre; Naef, Dominique; Pepe, Francesco; Pollacco, Don; Queloz, Didier; Ségransan, Damien; Smalley, Barry; Stassun, Keivan; Udry, Stéphane; West, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a series of papers aiming to study the dozens of low mass eclipsing binaries (EBLM), with F, G, K primaries, that have been discovered in the course of the WASP survey. Our objects are mostly single-line binaries whose eclipses have been detected by WASP and were initially followed up as potential planetary transit candidates. These have bright primaries, which facilitates spectroscopic observations during transit and allows the study of the spin-orbit distribution of F, G, K+M eclipsing binaries through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Here we report on the spin-orbit angle of WASP-30b, a transiting brown dwarf, and improve its orbital parameters. We also present the mass, radius, spin-orbit angle and orbital parameters of a new eclipsing binary, J1219-39b (1SWAPJ121921.03-395125.6, TYC 7760-484-1), which, with a mass of 95 +/- 2 Mjup, is close to the limit between brown dwarfs and stars. We find that both objects orbit in planes that appear aligned with their primaries' equatorial plane...

  16. The U.S. Air Service in World War I. Volume IV. Postwar Review,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    annotation to a mini- mum. All ef the documents reproduced here nave been taken from a microfilm copy of Edgar S. Gorroll, "History of the Air Service, AEF...World War I He directed that such information be sent to Col. Edgar S. Gorrell. Assistant Chief of Staff. who was compiling the history of the Air...piingurvaiuonapigs Commanding ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ orin wither the bebogt2oraie h dsiiitt and ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Orhs Frar’.cc.ri 14 th tulran ilno al o orepc Theion tops

  17. Representative Command Post Configurations, C3 Structures, and Reference Data. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-31

    TJI/0! 0, LIKAS INFCCOPERATOR mmTmOE1110"m - -.- an SKI WeI TIpO .o..< - UN THAN do Ma uSIm TIo a D CIM 1 0 ~To NtEN INTRABATTERY WIRE COMMUNICATIONS...CONFIGURATIONS ------ None ISOLATOR. SHOCK MX P/N 438904-1(21 MTj14/GRC.106 CROSSBAR. LONG SM-C-508645(2) 2359/78w Figure D-4. Radio AN/GRC-106. R.7 (2-9) 160

  18. History of the X-20A Dyna-Soar. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-10-01

    of the approved program. garch 15 The Secretary of Defense directed the Air Force to conduct a comparison of the militar7 potentials of Dyns-,Soar...1, IX-1. 15. ma WAR, 8, 16 Apr. 1960. 16. TWX, AFDAT-89082, Hqe. USAF to Hq.. ARDC, 26 Apr. 1960, Dcc . 124. 17. SDR 19, Hqs. USAF, 21 Juljy 1960, Doc...Johnston, Ch., Booster Br., Dyna-Soar WSPO, WADD, 27 Dec. 1960, subj.: Record of Presentations on Proposed Use of Titan I1 an a Dyna-Soar Booster, Dcc

  19. GREAT I Study of the Upper Mississippi River. Technical Appendixes. Volume 5. Fish and Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    made in the backwaters. 3. PLAN OF ACTION The FWMWG action plan as stated on April 30, 1975, reads : 41 * .- ’m i + - - -’",- - - - " ,’F "The...Dorosoma ceedianum) Mooneye (HiodoiniterisusY A A C Northern Pike (Esox lucius) A A A Carp (yprinus carpio A A A Suckers ( Catostomidae ) A CD A Blue...chiefly of fish 2 and 3 years old. The most significant year class shifted from age 3 to age 2 over the five surveys. Most of the sauger taken were age 3

  20. Orbital pseudotumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman ... 423. Review Date 8/20/2016 Updated by: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La ...

  1. Foreign body orbital cyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanfard, Younes; Heegard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology......Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology...

  2. Grid-connected ICES preliminary feasibility analysis and evaluation. Final report. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-30

    A group of hospitals, clinics, research facilities, and medical education facilities, known as the HEAL Complex, was chosen as the site (in New Orleans) for the demonstration of a Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES). The contract work included a preliminary energy supply/demand assessment of the Demonstration Community, a preliminary feasibility analysis and conceptual design of a candidate Demonstration System, preliminary assessment of institutional factors, preparation of a detailed work management plan for subsequent phases of the demonstration program, firming-up of commitments from participating parties, and reporting thereon. This Phase I study has indicated that a central ICES plant producing steam, chilled water, and by-product electricity to serve the HEAL Complex is technically and economically feasible to the extent that Phase II, Detailed Feasibility and Preliminary Design, should be implemented. (MCW)

  3. Distributed technologies in California's energy future. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.; Craig, P.; McGuire, C.B.; Simmons, M. (eds.)

    1977-09-01

    This interim report contains eight of the eighteen chapters included in the complete report. In Chapter I, pertinent data, facts, and observations are made following an initial summary. Chapter II is an introduction, citing especially the writings of Amory Lovins. The criteria used in defining distributed systems, suggested by Lovins, are that the technologies be renewable, environmentally benign, local, subject to graceful failure, foolproof, flexible, comprehensible, and matched in energy quality. The following chapters are: The Energy Predicament; The California Setting; Energy Resources for California's Future; Alternative Energy Futures for California; Issues and Problems; and Directions for Future Work. Six appendices deal with residential heating loads and air conditioning, allocations, co-generation, population projections, and the California wind energy resource. (MCW)

  4. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  5. Feasibility and impact of the measurement of extracellular fluid volume simultaneous with GFR by 125I-iothalamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Folkert W; Muntinga, Jaap H J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Navis, Gerjan

    2008-09-01

    The feasibility, validity, and possible applications of the assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) simultaneous with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed in a series of validation studies using the constant infusion method of (125)I-iothalamate (IOT). In 48 subjects with a broad range of GFR, distribution volume (V(d)) of IOT corresponded well with V(d) bromide (16.71 +/- 3.0 and 16.73 +/- 3.2 l, respectively, not significant), with a strong correlation (r = 0.933, P IOT during strictly standardized (50 mmol Na(+)/d) sodium intake. An increase in dietary sodium intake (200 mmol Na(+)/d) induced a corresponding rise in V(d) IOT of 1.11 +/- 1.5 l (P IOT. After appropriate validation, also other GFR tracers could be used for such a simultaneous estimation, providing a valuable resource of data on ECFV in renal studies and, moreover, allowing GFR to be indexed to the body fluid compartment it clears: the ECFV.

  6. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research. Phase II - Volume I; Truss Braced Wing Design Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.; Allen, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, consisting of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, Georgia Tech, Virginia Tech, NextGen Aeronautics, and Microcraft. A multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) environment defined the geometry that was further refined for the updated SUGAR High TBW configuration. Airfoil shapes were tested in the NASA TCT facility, and an aeroelastic model was tested in the NASA TDT facility. Flutter suppression was successfully demonstrated using control laws derived from test system ID data and analysis models. Aeroelastic impacts for the TBW design are manageable and smaller than assumed in Phase I. Flutter analysis of TBW designs need to include pre-load and large displacement non-linear effects to obtain a reasonable match to test data. With the updated performance and sizing, fuel burn and energy use is reduced by 54% compared to the SUGAR Free current technology Baseline (Goal 60%). Use of the unducted fan version of the engine reduces fuel burn and energy by 56% compared to the Baseline. Technology development roadmaps were updated, and an airport compatibility analysis established feasibility of a folding wing aircraft at existing airports.

  7. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume I. Posture statement, outlook and program review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Activities of all elements of the Department of Energy (DOE) except those of FERC are reported. Chapter I, the Posture Statement, gives an overview of the policies, programs, and strategies of DOE. It describes the national energy policy and its effects, sets out the current state of energy supply and demand in the US and around the world, describes the present assessment of future energy availability, and outlines the strategy for 1982. Additional chapters detail the major programs in the following Offices or Assistant Secretaryships: Conservation, Fossil Fuel, Nuclear Energy, Renewable Energy Resources, Electric Energy Systems and Energy Storage, Environment, Energy Supporting Research, Energy Production and Power Marketing, Energy Information, Economic Regulation, General Science, Defense, International Programs, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, Energy Contingency Planning, and Administration. Information is included in appendices on foreign direct investment in US energy sources and supplies for 1979, exports of energy resources by foreign companies, major recipients of DOE funding, DOE actions taken regarding disclosure of energy assets by DOE employees, and financial assistance programs. (MCW)

  8. A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship. Volume I - Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-01-01

    During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as for other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over a 100 sites in 30 States and one U.S. Territory. Hundreds of thousands of acres of residually contaminated soils, contaminated groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination, and contaminated buildings are present at many sites across the country. These sites range in size from less than one acre, containing only a single facility, to large sites spanning over 100,000 acres with huge uranium enrichment plants and plutonium processing canyons. Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program has made significant progress in addressing this environmental legacy. Millions of cubic meters of waste have been removed, stabilized, or disposed of, resulting in significant risk and cost reduction. In addition, DOE began disposing of transuranic (i.e., plutonium-contaminated) waste in the nation’s first deep geologic repository – the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. DOE is now carrying out its long-term stewardship obligations at dozens of sites, including smaller sites where DOE has completed cleanup work for the entire site and many larger sites where DOE has remediated portions of the site.

  9. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume I: report text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste's origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

  10. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

  11. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

  12. Northern Cheyenne Tribe and energy development in southeastern Montana. Volume I. Social, cultural, and economic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstrom, J.; Boggs, J.P.; Owens, N.J.; Sooktis, J.

    1977-10-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the social, cultural, and economic aspects of life on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation. Aspects of the development of their large coal resources are emphasized. A history of the Northern Cheyenne country is given in the introduction. Chapter I examines why a local rural area like southeast Montana (of which the reservation is a part) has a hard time controlling the economic development that takes place there. Chapter II examines the special place the reservation has within the regional economy. Chapter III looks at some of the many aspects of Cheyenne culture that have survived despite repeated efforts by white authorities to suppress or assimilate the culture out of existence. Chapter IV presents the attitudes of the Cheyenne people about alternative kinds of economic development that could take place on the reservation. Chapter V outlines the theoretical approach used in considering the issues in this report. Two theories are examined--acculturation and differentiation theories. The next chapter reviews the kinds of concerns any development option must take into account if it is to be consistent with Cheyenne culture and aspirations. Community development must go hand in hand and should not be seen as something to patch up or rebuild a community disrupted by extractive economic ''development.'' The second part of thechapter focuses on the critical importance of tribal participation in any studies done on which economic development decisions are to be based. The final chapter reviews the data collected during the 1975 study. (MCW)

  13. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume I: Particles and Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobrecht, J.; Gaeggeler, H.; Herlach, D.; Junker, K.; Kettle, P.-R.; Kubik, P.; Zehnder, A. [eds.

    2000-07-01

    lthough originally planned for fundamental research in nuclear physics, the particle beams of pions, muons, protons and neutrons are now used in a large variety of disciplines in both natural science and medicine. The beams at PSI have the world's highest intensities and therefore allow certain experiments to be performed, which would not be possible elsewhere. The highlight of research this year was the first-ever determination of the chemical properties of the superheavy element {sup 107} Bohrium. This was undertaken, by an international team led by H. Gaeggeler of PSI's Laboratory for Radiochemistry. Bohrium was produced by bombarding a Berkelium target with Neon ions from the Injector I cyclotron and six atoms were detected after having passed through an online gas chromatography device. At the Laboratory for Particle Physics the focus has shifted from nuclear physics to elementary particle physics with about a fifty-fifty split between investigations of rare processes or particle decays using the high intensity muon, pion and recently also polarized neutron beams of PSI, and research at the highest energy frontier at CERN (Geneva) and DESY (Hamburg). Important space instrumentation has been contributed by the Laboratory for Astrophysics to the European Space Agency and NASA satellite programmes. The Laboratory for Micro and Nanotechnology continued to focus on research into molecular nanotechnology and SiGeC nanostructures, the latter with the aim of producing silicon based optoelectronics. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided.

  14. Flexible roof drill for low coal. Volume 1. Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoup, N.H.; Kendall, L.A.

    1977-08-30

    The Phase I report documents the effort expended by the Washington State University (WSU) research team towards meeting the terms of the contract and provides a working document for the research team during the later phases of this research project. The flexible shaft drill concepts for thin seam coal were based upon operational specifications prepared by the WSU research team after consultation with the Coal Mine Productivity Task Force of the US Steel Corporation. Investigations disclosed that a flexible shaft drill should be designed to withstand a torque load of 3000 in.-lb, a thrust load of 6000 lb, a mean feed rate of 3 ft/min (feed rate range should be 1 to 6 ft/min), withdrawal rate of 40 ft/min, and have the ability to drill an 8-ft deep hole within +- 10/sup 0/ of the vertical centerline. In order to maintain this alignment, a straight starter section would be used at the drill bit end of the drill. The length of this starter section varies with hole tolerance; based on drill hole measurements in soft, semi-consolidated shale a minimum starter section length of about 9 in. was chosen. After considering a number of alternative types of flexible shafts, it was concluded that the flexible shaft should be made up of short rigid segments interlocked at their interfaces with intermeshed teeth. Three interlocking clutch teeth at the interface were selected because to increasing the number of clutch teeth would increase the stress in each tooth to a prohibitively high level. Segments should have some restraining devices at the connecting interfaces preventing the segments from separating. This interfacial restraint should allow the segments to transmit tension loads across the interface. This is desirable so that the drill string can be withdrawn from the hole by applying tensile force to the segments.

  15. The 2009 Mars Telecommunications Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. R.; Depaula, R.; Diehl, R. E.; Edwards, C. D.; Fitzgerald, R. J.; Franklin, S. F.; Gibbs, R. G.; Kerridge, S. A.; Komarek, T. A.; Noreen, G. K.

    The first spacecraft with a primary function of providing communication links while orbiting a foreign planet has begun development for a launch in 2009. NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would use three radio bands to magnify the benefits of other future Mars missions and enable some types of missions otherwise impractical. It would serve as the Mars hub for a growing interplanetary Internet. And it would pioneer the use of planet-to-planet laser communications to demonstrate the possibility for even great networking capabilities in the future. During its nearly 10-year mission in orbit, Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would aid navigation of arriving spacecraft to their martian landing sites and monitor critical events during landings and orbit insertions. In addition, it would enable data-transmission volumes great enough to bring a virtual Mars presence to the public through a range of Internet and video features.

  16. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  17. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Preliminary design report. Volume 3. Appendixes D, E, and F. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume includes the appendices: D) system equipment (hardware breakdown structure; 10-MW hardware listing; list of support and maintenance equipment, tools and spare parts; sacrificial anodes; M.A.N. brush; and Alclad 3004 data); E) heat exchanger supporting data (analyses/configuration, contract tooling, manufacturing plan, specification, and evaporator ammonia liquid distribution system); and F) rotating machinery (performance characteristics, radial inflow turbine; item descriptions; weight calculation-rotor; producibility analysis; long lead-time items; spares; support equipment; non recurring costs; performance characteristics-axial flow turbine; Worthington pump data; and American M.A.N. Corporation data). Also included is attachment 1 to the phase I final report which presents details of the system modeling; design, materials considerations, and systems analysis of the baseline module; system cost analysis; and supporting data. (WHK)

  18. Quality Horizons. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-15

    PRODUCTS PRODUCTS Bruel & Kjaer Standard Electric GOVERNMENT AGENCIES US Embassy Office of Defense Cooperation Ministry of Commerce Royal Danish Air Force...Combined Material Agency (DCMA) BELGIUM COMMERCIAL & MILITARY PRODUCTS MBLE (Manufacture Beige DeLampes St De Materiel Electronique ) GOVERnMENT AGENCIES

  19. Volume I: Select Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Single word terminology is much more difficult to access based on the occurrences of homographs . In the NVTC’s dictionary for example, the entry...These unigrams must be verfied with a human ground truth because of the appearance of homographs , as mentioned earlier. The third proposed method

  20. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  1. Increased hippocampal, thalamus and amygdala volume in long-term lithium-treated bipolar I disorder patients compared with unmedicated patients and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Jaramillo, Carlos; Vargas, Cristian; Díaz-Zuluaga, Ana M; Palacio, Juan David; Castrillón, Gabriel; Bearden, Carrie; Vieta, Eduard

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in bipolar I disorder (BD-I) suggest that lithium is associated with increased volumes of cortico-limbic structures. However, more rigorous control of confounding factors is needed to obtain further support for this hypothesis. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in brain volumes among long-term lithium-treated BD-I patients, unmedicated BD-I patients, and healthy controls. This was a cross-sectional study with 32 euthymic BD-I patients (16 on lithium monotherapy for a mean of 180 months, and 16 receiving no medication for at least the 2 months prior to the study) and 20 healthy controls. Patients were euthymic (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS] lithium for at least 6 months. Brain images were acquired on a 1.5 Tesla MRI (Phillips, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) and segmented to generate volumetric measures of cortical and subcortical brain areas, ventricles and global brain. Significant differences were found in the volumes of the left amygdala (P=.0003), right amygdala (P=.030), left hippocampus (P=.022), left thalamus (P=.022), and right thalamus (P=.019) in long-term lithium-treated BD-I patients, compared to unmedicated patients and controls, after multivariable adjustment. No differences were observed in global brain volume or in ventricular size among the three groups. Likewise, there was no correlation between serum lithium levels and the increase in size in the described brain areas. The structural differences found among the three groups, and specifically those between long-term lithium-treated and unmedicated BD-I patients, indicate increased limbic structure volumes in lithium-treated patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The International Space Station on-orbit tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierotti, Elizabeth; Atodaria, Jitu

    2001-02-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program has identified specific Orbital Replaceable Units (ORUs) as candidates for on-orbit intermediate level maintenance. Performing intermediate level maintenance on-orbit will allow sparing at the Shop Replaceable Unit (SRU) level rather than the ORU level. This will minimize cost and volume to transport replaceable units to and from orbit, minimize stowage on-orbit, and maximize on-orbit spare availability that will in turn minimize system downtime. To accomplish on-orbit intermediate level maintenance, additional requirements for fault isolation and confidence testing must be implemented. Test equipment used on-ground to perform fault isolation and acceptance testing is large and heavy. Consideration for weight and volume is an important factor for any test equipment that is to be transported, used and stowed on-orbit. This paper summarizes a phased approach to testing electronic hardware on-orbit with minimal additional weight and volume for the test equipment. .

  3. Topics in orbit equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Kechris, Alexander S

    2004-01-01

    This volume provides a self-contained introduction to some topics in orbit equivalence theory, a branch of ergodic theory. The first two chapters focus on hyperfiniteness and amenability. Included here are proofs of Dye's theorem that probability measure-preserving, ergodic actions of the integers are orbit equivalent and of the theorem of Connes-Feldman-Weiss identifying amenability and hyperfiniteness for non-singular equivalence relations. The presentation here is often influenced by descriptive set theory, and Borel and generic analogs of various results are discussed. The final chapter is a detailed account of Gaboriau's recent results on the theory of costs for equivalence relations and groups and its applications to proving rigidity theorems for actions of free groups.

  4. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁科; 侯自新

    2001-01-01

    Vogan conjectured that the parabolic induction of orbit data is independent of the choice of the parabolic subgroup. In this paper we first give the parabolic induction of orbit covers, whose relationship with geometric orbit datum is also induced. Hence we show a geometric interpretation of orbit data and finally prove the conjugation for geometric orbit datum using geometric method.

  5. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  6. A volume-limited sample of X-ray galaxy groups and clusters - I. Radial entropy and cooling time profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Panagoulia, Electra; Sanders, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    We present the first results of our study of a sample of 101 X-ray galaxy groups and clusters, which is volume-limited in each of three X-ray luminosity bins. The aim of this work is to study the properties of the innermost ICM in the cores of our groups and clusters, and to determine the effect of non-gravitational processes, such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, on the ICM. The entropy of the ICM is of special interest, as it bears the imprint of the thermal history of a cluster, and it also determines a cluster's global properties. Entropy profiles can therefore be used to examine any deviations from cluster self-similarity, as well as the effects of feedback on the ICM. We find that the entropy profiles are well-fitted by a simple powerlaw model, of the form $K(r) = \\alpha\\times(r/100 \\rm{kpc})^{\\beta}$, where $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ are constants. We do not find evidence for the existence of an "entropy floor", i.e. our entropy profiles do not flatten out at small radii, as suggested by some previ...

  7. Does {sup 131}I-treatment of goitre result in an acute increase in the volume a function of the thyroid gland?; Medfoerer {sup 131}I-behandling af strufma en akut foroegelse af glandula thyreoideas volumen og funktion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, B.; Faber, J.O.; Hegedues, L.

    1995-12-01

    Many textbooks claim that radioiodine ({sup 131}I) treatment should be avoided in treatment of a goitre with substernal extension, due to fear of acute swelling of the gland with resulting respiratory problems. We examined patients with multinodular goitre, either nontoxic (n=20) or toxic (n=10) after treatment with {sup 131}I. An ultrasonically determined thyroid volume and thyroid function variables were investigated before and two, seven, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after treatment. In nontoxic goitres the thyroid volume did not increase significantly, the maximum increase in the median volume being 4% on day 7. Serum levels of free T{sub 3} and free T{sub 4} indices increased by 20% (day 7) and 13% (day 14) (p=0.002), respectively. Likewise thyroid volume in toxic nodular goitre did not change significantly after {sup 131}I treatment. None of the patients presented symptoms of tracheal compression. We conclude that {sup 131}I treatment of nontoxic as well as toxic multinodular goitre does not seem to increase thyroid volume. (au) 18 refs.

  8. Orbital Volumetry in Graves' Orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Bakri, Moug; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Thomsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    .6 cm(3) in controls, 8.7 ± 8.0 cm(3) in GO without DON, and 9.4 ± 3.1 cm(3) in GO with DON. The muscle and fat volumes were higher in patients with GO than in controls (P orbits with and without DON were not significantly different. The volume of the optic nerve were...... similar in the 3 groups. The number of apical, coronal 2 mm thick slices with no fat was 2.9 ± 0.9 in normal orbits, it was 4.1 ± 1.0 in GO orbits without DON and 5.3 ± 0.8 in GO orbits with DON (P = 0.007). Conclusion. Apical muscle enlargement may be more important than orbital fat enlargement......Purpose. We wanted to investigate the relative significance of fat and muscle enlargement in the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in Graves' orbitopathy (GO). Methods. Preoperative coronal CT scans of 13 patients with and without DON who subsequently underwent orbital decompression...

  9. Proceedings of the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (11th, Austin, Texas, April 24-26, 1997). Volumes I-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearout, Robert D., Ed.

    This set of proceedings documents includes 407 papers representative of the 1,825 papers and posters presented at a conference on undergraduate research. Volume I contains papers on the arts and humanities. Examples of topics include collaborative art, music composition using computer technology, interpreting Roman morality, gay marriage, and…

  10. Preventing Cancer in the Workplace and Community. Volume I. Cancer, the Worker and the Workplace. A Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Virginia C., Ed.; And Others

    This first volume of a two-volume set on prevention of cancer in the workplace is a teacher's guide designed to serve as a basis for lecture presentations and class discussions within the context of a formal course setting and structure. The course is organized into nine modules that can be taught using a lecture and discussion format in single…

  11. Contemporary American Success Stories. Famous People of Asian Ancestry. Volume I. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    As part of a five-volume series this volume presents biographical sketches of persons of Asian American heritage who have made contributions to American life. Asian Americans have often been subjected to racial and ethnic prejudice, as have other easily identifiable groups of Americans. The series, written at a reading level of grades 5 to 6, but…

  12. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 2. Final report, September 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1995-09-01

    This report describes work pertaining to the development of models for coal gasification and combustion processes. This volume, volume 1, part 2, contains research progress in the areas of large particle oxidation at high temperatures, large particle, thick-bed submodels, sulfur oxide/nitrogen oxides submodels, and comprehensive model development and evaluation.

  13. Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I, EQUALANT II, and EQUALANT III projects from 1963-02-15 to 1964-07-09 (NODC Accession 0071432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I,...

  14. Orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  15. LIFE Materials: Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M

    2008-12-19

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical, and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report (Volume 8 - Molten-salt Fuels) is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermo-chemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenges are not insurmountable, and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  16. Inflammation of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Exams, Study Finds Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Orbit (Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor) By James ... Introduction to Eye Socket Disorders Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors ...

  17. Grey matter volume abnormalities in patients with bipolar I depressive disorder and unipolar depressive disorder: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Li; Liao, Mei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Lifeng; Peng, Hongjun; He, Zhong; Li, Zexuan; Li, Weihui; Lu, Shaojia; Ding, Yuqiang; Li, Lingjiang

    2015-02-01

    Bipolar disorder and unipolar depressive disorder (UD) may be different in brain structure. In the present study, we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to quantify the grey matter volumes in 23 patients with bipolar I depressive disorder (BP1) and 23 patients with UD, and 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) using magnetic resonance imaging. We found that compared with the HC and UD groups, the BP1 group showed reduced grey matter volumes in the right inferior frontal gyrus and middle cingulate gyrus, while the UD group showed reduced volume in the right inferior frontal gyrus compared to HCs. In addition, correlation analyses revealed that the grey matter volumes of these regions were negatively correlated with the Hamilton depression rating scores. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that decreased grey matter volume of the right inferior frontal gyrus is a common abnormality in BP1 and UD, and decreased grey matter volume in the right middle cingulate gyrus may be specific to BP1.

  18. Ab initio analytical Raman intensities for periodic systems through a coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham method in an atomic orbital basis. I. Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Kirtman, Bernard; Rérat, Michel; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto

    2013-10-28

    We present a fully analytical formulation for calculating Raman intensities of crystalline periodic systems using a local basis set. Numerical differentiation with respect to atomic coordinates and with respect to wavevectors is entirely avoided as is the determination of crystal orbital coefficient derivatives with respect to nuclear displacements. Instead, our method utilizes the orbital energy-weighted density matrix and is based on the self-consistent solution of first- and second-order Coupled Perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham equations for the electronic response to external electric fields at the equilibrium geometry. This method has also been implemented in the Crystal program, which uses a Gaussian type basis set.

  19. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-01-01

    Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only...

  20. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

  1. Proceedings of solar energy storage options. Volume I. An intensive workshop on thermal energy storage for solar heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 28 papers presented. Panel chairmen's summaries are included; the complete panel reports will be published in Volume II of the Solar Energy Storage Options Workshop proceedings. (WHK)

  2. GW quasiparticle band gap of the hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite CH$_3$NH$_3$PbI$_3$: Effect of spin-orbit interaction, semicore electrons, and self-consistency

    OpenAIRE

    Filip, Marina R.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    We study the quasiparticle band gap of the hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite CH$_3$NH$_3$PbI$_3$, using many-body perturbation theory based on the $GW$ approximation. We perform a systematic analysis of the band gap sensitivity to relativistic spin-orbit effects, to the description of semicore Pb-5$d$ and I-4$d$ electrons, and to the starting Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. We find that the inclusion of semicore states increases the calculated band gap by 0.2 eV, and self-consistency on ...

  3. Testing and Evaluating C3I Systems That Employ AI. Volume 1. Handbook for Testing Expert Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-31

    implements the multiattribute utility analysis ( MAUA ) framework for testing and evaluating expert systems described in Volume 1. Volume 1 is intended as...our methods may wish to skim Chapter 7, "Pulling It All Together," first. He or she may then wish to review the attributes in the MAUA hierarchy...presented in the latter half of Chapter 3, "Proposed MAUA Framework for Testing and Evaluating Expert Systems." A detailed example of the method is given

  4. Calculation of wave-functions with frozen orbitals in mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods. Part I. Application of the Huzinaga equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczy, György G

    2013-04-05

    Mixed quantum mechanics/quantum mechanics (QM/QM) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods make computations feasible for extended chemical systems by separating them into subsystems that are treated at different level of sophistication. In many applications, the subsystems are covalently bound and the use of frozen localized orbitals at the boundary is a possible way to separate the subsystems and to ensure a sensible description of the electronic structure near to the boundary. A complication in these methods is that orthogonality between optimized and frozen orbitals has to be warranted and this is usually achieved by an explicit orthogonalization of the basis set to the frozen orbitals. An alternative to this approach is proposed by calculating the wave-function from the Huzinaga equation that guaranties orthogonality to the frozen orbitals without basis set orthogonalization. The theoretical background and the practical aspects of the application of the Huzinaga equation in mixed methods are discussed. Forces have been derived to perform geometry optimization with wave-functions from the Huzinaga equation. Various properties have been calculated by applying the Huzinaga equation for the central QM subsystem, representing the environment by point charges and using frozen strictly localized orbitals to connect the subsystems. It is shown that a two to three bond separation of the chemical or physical event from the frozen bonds allows a very good reproduction (typically around 1 kcal/mol) of standard Hartree-Fock-Roothaan results. The proposed scheme provides an appropriate framework for mixed QM/QM and QM/MM methods.

  5. Orbital liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Pertierra, A M; Morales-Baños, D R; Martínez-Nava, L R; Garrido-Sánchez, G A; López-Hernández, C M; Velasco-Ramos, P

    2017-02-01

    The case is presented of a 46-year-old male with right eye proptosis and conjunctival hyperaemia, of 18 months onset. A well-defined intraconal mass was found in the computed tomography. In magnetic resonance this was hypo-intense on T1, enhanced with gadolinium and hyperintense on T2. Excisional biopsy was performed, which was reported as a well-differentiated liposarcoma in the histopathology study. Liposarcoma is a malignant adipose tissue tumour. It is very rare in the orbit, with 5 histological types, the most common being myxoid. The treatment of choice is wide surgical excision and may be accompanied with radiotherapy. As it is an infiltrative tumour, It has a high rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. From one Reeb orbit to two

    CERN Document Server

    Cristofaro-Gardiner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We show that every (possibly degenerate) contact form on the three-sphere giving the tight contact structure has at least two embedded Reeb orbits. The same holds for any closed contact three-manifold satisfying a weak version of the "Volume Conjecture" in embedded contact homology. The Volume Conjecture itself, which is expected to hold for every closed contact three-manifold, implies that either there are at least three embedded Reeb orbits, or there are two embedded Reeb orbits with an explicit upper bound on the product of their symplectic actions.

  7. Ka-Band Reliability Improvement. Part I. Volume III. Ka-Band SATCOM Set Analysis. Appendix C

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    SECURIT L S1 ICATION OF THIS PAGE flWbon flati Frtir-d NO ADDRESS ( IBFORE COLEING FRORMTTS 2. OW ACIESIOr REA E WO’S CAT MBER IS DISTA RII BITA T Y...wYwI 4 - # .1. z I op W 1 0 . . . ..a, I 𔃾*1 4l I c, . 4g c co n . ......... %%C C CoCs. 4 3’. 1 .I4 ." . . . ., 11 *1 Ir %, I -’ulx - I. . .,Z. 4 1. r

  8. Non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma of the sino-nasal region penetrating to the orbit and cranial cavity; Chloniak nieziarniczy zatok przynosowych wnikajacy do oczodolu i jamy czaszki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, E.; Piotrowski, S.; Grono, L.; Zalewska-Rzezniczak, I. [Szpital Morski im. PCK, Gdynia-Redlowo (Poland)]|[Szpital Miejski im. J. Brudzinskiego, Gdynia (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    In case presented in this report non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma occupied the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses with penetrating to the orbit and middle cranial fossa. The patient suffered from ophthalmic symptoms like ptosis, exophthalmus and diplopia. Chemotherapy in COP - pattern and MV radiotherapy in total dose 4600 cGy were applied. Full remission was achieved. The patient is alive after more than 2 years without recurrence of the disease. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig.

  9. A numerical investigation of wind accretion in persistent Supergiant X-ray Binaries I - Structure of the flow at the orbital scale

    CERN Document Server

    Mellah, I El

    2016-01-01

    Classical Supergiant X-ray Binaries host a neutron star orbiting a supergiant OB star and display persistent X-ray luminosities of 10$^{35}$ to 10$^{37}$ erg/s. The stellar wind from the massive companion is believed to be the main source of matter accreted by the compact object. With this first paper, we introduce a ballistic model to characterize the structure of the wind at the orbital scale as it accelerates, from the stellar surface to the vicinity of the accretor. Thanks to the parametrization we retained and the numerical pipeline we designed, we can investigate the supersonic flow and the subsequent observables as a function of a reduced set of characteristic numbers and scales. We show that the shape of the permanent flow is entirely determined by the mass ratio, the filling factor, the Eddington factor and the $\\alpha$-force multiplier which drives the stellar wind acceleration. Provided scales such as the orbital period are known, we can trace back the observables to evaluate the mass accretion rat...

  10. IRIA State-of-the-Art Report: Optical-Mechanical, Active/Passive Imaging Systems. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    J. Klein, " Optical Antenna Gain 2: Receiving Antennas", Applied Optics, Optical Society of America, Washington, DC, Volume 13, 1974.7 149 ~RIM V...Fourier Optics, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, 1968. 227 SRIM [2-18] J. J. Degnan and B. J. Klein, " Optical Antenna Gain 2: Receiving Antennas" A lied Optics...and B. J. Klein, " Optical Antenna Gain 2: Receiving Antennas", Applied Optics, Optical Society of America, Washington, DC, Volume 13, 1974, pp.2397

  11. Low dose four-dimensional computerized tomography with volume rendering reconstruction for primary hyperparathyroidism: How I do it?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy; A; Platz; Moshim; Kukar; Rania; Elmarzouky; William; Cance; Ahmed; Abdelhalim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Modification of 4-dimensional computed tomography(4D-CT)technique with volume rendering reconstruc-tions and significant dose reduction is a safe and ac-curate method of pre-operative localization for primary hyperparathyroidism.Modified low dose 4D-CT with volume rendering reconstructions provides precise preoperative localization and is associated with a sig-nificant reduction in radiation exposure compared to classic preoperative localizing techniques.It should be considered the preoperative localization study of choice for primary hyperparathyroidism.

  12. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume II. System description and system analysis. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    Honeywell conducted a parametric analysis of the 10-MW(e) solar pilot plant requirements and expected performance and established an optimum system design. The main analytical simulation tools were the optical (ray trace) and the dynamic simulation models. These are described in detail in Books 2 and 3 of this volume under separate cover. In making design decisions, available performance and cost data were used to provide a design reflecting the overall requirements and economics of a commercial-scale plant. This volume contains a description of this analysis/design process and resultant system/subsystem design and performance.

  13. Small Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Borsten, L; Ferrara, S; Marrani, A; Rubens, W

    2012-01-01

    We study both the "large" and "small" U-duality charge orbits of extremal black holes appearing in D = 5 and D = 4 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories with symmetric scalar manifolds. We exploit a formalism based on cubic Jordan algebras and their associated Freudenthal triple systems, in order to derive the minimal charge representatives, their stabilizers and the associated "moduli spaces". After recalling N = 8 maximal supergravity, we consider N = 2 and N = 4 theories coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets, as well as N = 2 magic, STU, ST^2 and T^3 models. While the STU model may be considered as part of the general N = 2 sequence, albeit with an additional triality symmetry, the ST^2 and T^3 models demand a separate treatment, since their representative Jordan algebras are Euclidean or only admit non-zero elements of rank 3, respectively. Finally, we also consider minimally coupled N = 2, matter coupled N = 3, and "pure" N = 5 theories.

  14. An Analysis of the Requirements for and the Costs and Benefits of the National Microwave Landing System (MLS). Volume I,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Uf 2 ft ~ ~ 1 N00000N00000" t -w )U 4 ft Ift ~ f 2 _j I I IiU U~ I 0*ow f9 0 0J ’ In "A g.- --ino9 Aooi o 0( 0O N% 0 00 oo owo LA o2 V W N...4 p. Z bpp ,. A J r-. b--b- -b-. ~ b-b-- l-b- p~t-.,-. p~A 4 i~~4~) L~ *4 0 - 2b-0 0 0 1I x A 2J.J -Ff .1 2.., K4AT 4 -0 0, .’zp I-I~ ccI * Iir

  15. L'empresa xarxa a Catalunya : TIC, productivitat, competitivitat, salaris i rendiment a les empreses de Catalunya. Informe final de recerca (volum I)

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaseca i Requena, Jordi; Torrent i Sellens, Joan; Batalla i Busquets, Josep Maria; Cabañero Pisa, Carlos Fernando; Castillo Merino, David; Colomé i Perales, Rosa; Díaz Chao, Ángel; Ficapal-Cusí, Pilar; Garay Tamajón, Lluís; Jiménez Zarco, Ana Isabel; Lladós Masllorens, Josep; Martínez Argüelles, Maria Jesús; Meseguer Artola, Antoni; Pacheco Bernal, Carmen; Plana Erta, Dolors

    2007-01-01

    El projecte de recerca L'empresa xarxa a Catalunya. TIC, productivitat, competitivitat, salaris i beneficis a l'empresa catalana té com a objectiu principal constatar que la consolidació d'un nou model estratègic, organitzatiu i d'activitat empresarial, vinculat amb la inversió i l'ús de les TIC (o empresa xarxa), modifica substancialment els patrons de comportament dels resultats empresarials, en especial la productivitat, la competitivitat, les retribucions dels treballadors i el benefici. ...

  16. Updates in Orbital Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nila; F.Moeloek

    1993-01-01

    Orbital anatomy, the clinical features of orbital tumors, the recent development of the diagnosis and management of orbital tumors were described. The incidence of orbital tumors in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in the past years were introduced. The principle of management of orbital tumors and their prognosis were discussed.

  17. An Evaluation of the Mulligan Stew 4-H Television Series for Extension Service, USDA. Volume I: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Sydelle Stone; And Others

    Conducted on over 3,000 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade children in six states, this study documents changes in nutrition-related knowledge and behaviors which can be related to participating in the Mulligan Stew televsion series. This volume contains a summary of the findings of the study and recommendations. After participating in the series,…

  18. International conference on high-energy physics. Volume 1. Sessions I to III. [Geneva, June 27-July 4, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Volume 1 of the conference proceedings contains sessions on neutrino physics and weak interactions, e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics, and theory. Five of the papers have already been cited in ERA, and can be found by reference to the entry CONF-790642-- in the Report Number Index. The remaining 30 will be processed as they are received on the Atomindex tape. (RWR)

  19. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume I. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    This series presents biographical sketches of famous Americans of Hispanic descent. The biographies in the projected eight volume series for elementary school children represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures with national origins in the United States or Latin America, with careers…

  20. Parmelia sulcata lichen transplants positioning towards wind direction (Part I): precipitation volumes, total element deposition and lichen element content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, A.P.; Freitas, M.C.; Wolterbeek, H. Th.; Verburg, T.

    2009-01-01

    Parmelia sulcata transplants were used in three different exposure systems, focused on three different influxes: free influx, horizontal influx and vertical influx. The total element deposition and the precipitation volumes were found to be positively correlated for Fe and Ni only. The element conte

  1. Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-05-25

    Volume 2 contains flowsheets and equipment specifications for the following parts of the plant: cooling water systems, process water supply, potable water supply, nitrogen system, compressed air system, flares, incinerators, fuels and interconnecting systems (pipes). The instrumentation requirements are included. (LTN)

  2. Developing Successful Proposals in Women's Educational Equity, Volume I: The Guide = Desarrollo de propuestas exitosas relacionadas con la equidad educativa de la mujer, volumen I: La guia. Volume II: The Supplement. Volume III: The Swipe File. Volume IV: Workshop Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Walter R.; And Others

    Four volumes present materials and a training workshop on proposal writing. The materials aim to give people the skills and resources with which to translate their ideas into fully developed grant proposals for projects related to educational equity for women. However, the information is applicable to most other funding procedures. The first…

  3. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only because of the threatened vision loss associated with orbital cellulitis but also because of the potential for central nervous system complications including cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, and death. "nOrbital imaging should be obtained in all patients suspected of having orbital cellulitis. CT is preferred to MR imaging, as the orbital tissues have high con-trast and the bone can be well visualized. Orbital CT scanning allows localization of the disease process to the preseptal area, the extraconal or intraconal fat, or the subperiosteal space. Axial CT views allow evaluation of the medial orbit and ethmoid sinuses, whereas coronal scans image the orbital roof and floor and the frontal and maxillary sinuses. If direct coronal imaging is not possible, reconstruction of thin axial cuts may help the assessment of the orbital roof and floor. Potential sources of orbital cellulitis such as sinusitis, dental infection, and facial cellulitis are often detectable on CT imaging. "nIn this presentation, the imaging considerations of the orbital infections; including imaging differentiation criteria of all types of orbital infections are reviewed.

  4. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may al...

  5. Bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, P D; Char, D. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral orbital lesions are rare. The differential diagnosis includes orbital pseudotumour, metastasis, leukaemia, lymphoma, Wegener's granulomatosis, and neurofibromatosis. We report what we believe to be the first case of bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

  6. Power law relationship between cell cycle duration and cell volume in the early embryonic development of <i>Caenorhabditis elegansi>

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu eArata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell size is a critical factor for cell cycle regulation. In Xenopus embryos after midblastula transition, the cell cycle duration elongates in a power law relationship with the cell radius squared. This correlation has been explained by the model that cell surface area is a candidate to determine cell cycle duration. However, it remains unknown whether this second power law is conserved in other animal embryos. Here, we found that the relationship between cell cycle duration and cell size in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos exhibited a power law distribution. Interestingly, the powers of the time-size relationship could be grouped into at least three classes: highly size-correlated, moderately size-correlated, and potentially a size-noncorrelated class according to C. elegans founder cell lineages (1.2, 0.81, and Xenopus and C. elegans, while the absolute powers in C. elegans were different from that in Xenopus. Furthermore, we found that the volume ratio between the nucleus and cell exhibited a power law relationship in the size-correlated classes. The power of the volume relationship was closest to that of the time-size relationship in the highly size-correlated class. This correlation raised the possibility that the time-size relationship, at least in the highly size-correlated class, is explained by the volume ratio of nuclear size and cell size. Thus, our quantitative measurements shed a light on the possibility that early embryonic C. elegans cell cycle duration is coordinated with cell size as a result of geometric constraints between intracellular structures.

  7. Dragline roller track improvement. Volume I. Evaluation of low hardness dragline track materials in rolling contact. Final report, September 30, 1976-July 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunfee, J.; Leonard, L.; Rumbarger, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Franklin Research Center (FRC), a Division of the Franklin Institute, was contracted by the Bureau of Mines to improve walking dragline roller tracks. The contract was subsequently transferred to the Department of Energy. The period from September 1977 to September 1978 covered laboratory rolling contact rig tests to evaluate typical low hardness dragline track materials. The results of this work are covered by DOE/ET/9121-1 Final Report, Volume I. The period from September 1978 to July 1980 covered field measurements of dragline roller circle loadings. The results of this work are covered by DOE/ET/9121-2 Final Report, Volume II. The laboratory rolling contact rig test results indicate that forged vacuum degassed air melt steel materials are recommended over air-melt cast materials for rollers and tracks. The steels tested exhibited good freedom from sensitivity to stress raisers like brinell marks and small holes or discontinuities (Volume I). The largest unknown in a recommended method for life testing roller tracks is the condition of the upper rotating frame structure and the lower tub supporting structure.

  8. Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

  9. ORBITAL MANIFESTATIONS OF SINUS DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothirmayi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To study the orbital manifestations in patients with sinus disease. METHODS : Patients wit h paranasal sinus disease presenting to OPD at Government ENT Hospital, AMC, Visakhapatnam from January 2012 to June 2014 were screened for orbital manifestations. Out of these, thirteen patients with orbital disease were referred to GREH, AMC, Visakhapatn am and were thoroughly investigated and managed appropriately. RESULTS : Out of the 14 patients 4 were female and 10 were male. Age ranged from 19 years to 70 years. 5 had maxillary sinus disease (4 - carcinoma and 1 case of mucormycosis. Frontal sinus dis ease was seen in two patients, one fibrous dysplasia and one malignancy. Five patients had ethmoidal sinus disease of which three patients were found to have ethmoidal sinus tumour (Malignant melanoma, Squamous cell Carcinoma. More than two sinuses were i nvolved in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS : Early screening of patients with sinus disease by an Ophthalmologist can help in preventing severe vision threatening orbital complications.

  10. Trends in lumber processing in the western United States. Part I: board foot Scribner volume per cubic foot of timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Keegan; Todd A. Morgan; Keith A. Blatner; Jean M. Daniels

    2010-01-01

    This article describes trends in board foot Scribner volume per cubic foot of timber for logs processed by sawmills in the western United States. Board foot to cubic foot (BF/CF) ratios for the period from 2000 through 2006 ranged from 3.70 in Montana to 5.71 in the Four Corners Region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). Sawmills in the Four Corners Region,...

  11. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  12. Development of an Interactive Control Engineering Computer Analysis Package (ICECAP) for Discrete and Continuous Systems. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    and Full-State Feedback Controller Design via Pole-Placement Methods (3) 2.3.1.26 Z-Domain Stability Analysis (2) 2.3.1.26.1 Jury- Blanchard Test (2...0 0 C) tn EM- ’-I- raz E rzru I-iIV 0 4.1 0 02 Uz0 󈧭 $0 4 94a 00 E-4’ U 0LIII-4 C,0 M STRUCTURE CHARTS 0 H I 044 z 0 E-40 :0. 1.4 A-14 STRUCTURE...featuring AC analysis, transient analysis, DC, noise, sensitivity, driving point impedance, Fourier, temperature , distortion, transfer characteristics

  13. The orbits of subdwarf B + main-sequence binaries. I: The sdB+G0 system PG 1104+243

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, J; Degroote, P; De Smedt, K; Green, E M; Heber, U; Van Winckel, H; Acke, B; Bloemen, S; De Cat, P; Exter, K; Lampens, P; Lombaert, R; Masseron, T; Menu, J; Neyskens, P; Raskin, G; Smolders, K; Tkachenko, A; Ringat, E; Rauch, T

    2012-01-01

    The predicted orbital period histogram of an sdB population is bimodal with a peak at short ( 250 days) periods. Observationally, there are many short-period sdB systems known, but only very few long-period sdB binaries are identified. As these predictions are based on poorly understood binary interaction processes, it is of prime importance to confront the predictions to observational data. In this contribution we aim to determine the absolute dimensions of the long-period sdB+MS binary system PG1104+243. High-resolution spectroscopy time-series were obtained with HERMES at the Mercator telescope at La Palma, and analyzed to obtain radial velocities of both components. Photometry from the literature was used to construct the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the binary. Atmosphere models were used to fit this SED and determine the surface gravity and temperature of both components. The gravitational redshift provided an independent confirmation of the surface gravity of the sdB component. An orbital peri...

  14. Dynamical Masses of Young M Dwarfs. I. Masses and Orbital Parameters of GJ 3305 AB, the Wide Binary Companion to the Imaged Exoplanet Host 51 Eri

    CERN Document Server

    Montet, Benjamin T; Shkolnik, Evgenya L; Deck, Katherine M; Wang, Ji; Horch, Elliott P; Liu, Michael C; Hillenbrand, Lynne A; Kraus, Adam L; Charbonneau, David

    2015-01-01

    We combine new high resolution imaging and spectroscopy from Keck/NIRC2, Discovery Channel Telescope/DSSI, and Keck/HIRES with published astrometry and radial velocities to measure individual masses and orbital elements of the GJ 3305 AB system, a young (~20 Myr) M+M binary (unresolved spectral type M0) member of the beta Pictoris moving group comoving with the imaged exoplanet host 51 Eri. We measure a total system mass of 1.10 \\pm 0.04 M_sun, a period of 29.16 \\pm 0.65$ yr, a semimajor axis of 9.80 \\pm 0.15 AU, and an eccentricity of 0.19 \\pm 0.02. The primary component has a dynamical mass of 0.65 \\pm 0.05 M_sun and the secondary has a mass of 0.44 \\pm 0.05 M_sun. The recently updated BHAC15 models are consistent with the masses of both stars to within 1.5 sigma. Given the observed masses the models predict an age of the GJ 3305 AB system of 28 +15/-6 Myr. Based on the the observed system architecture and our dynamical mass measurement, it is unlikely that the orbit of 51 Eri b has been significantly alter...

  15. The VLT/NaCo Large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs in wide orbits: I- Sample definition and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Desidera, S; Messina, S; Carson, J; Hagelberg, J; Schlieder, J E; Biazzo, K; Alcala, J M; Chauvin, G; Vigan, A; Beuzit, J L; Bonavita, M; Bonnefoy, M; Delorme, P; D'Orazi, V; Esposito, M; Feldt, M; Girardi, L; Gratton, R; Henning, T; Lagrange, A M; Lanzafame, A C; Launhardt, R; Marmier, M; Melo, C; Meyer, M; Mouillet, D; Moutou, C; Segransan, D; Udry, S; Zaidi, C M

    2014-01-01

    Young, nearby stars are ideal targets to search for planets using the direct imaging technique. The determination of stellar parameters is crucial for the interpretation of imaging survey results particularly since the luminosity of substellar objects has a strong dependence on system age. We have conducted a large program with NaCo at the VLT in order to search for planets and brown dwarfs in wide orbits around 86 stars. A large fraction of the targets observed with NaCo were poorly investigated in the literature. We performed a study to characterize the fundamental properties (age, distance, mass) of the stars in our sample. To improve target age determinations, we compiled and analyzed a complete set of age diagnostics. We measured spectroscopic parameters and age diagnostics using dedicated observations acquired with FEROS and CORALIE spectrographs at La Silla Observatory. We also made extensive use of archival spectroscopic data and results available in the literature. Additionally, we exploited photomet...

  16. M1 transitions between superdeformed states in {sup 194,195}Tl: The fingerprint of the i{sub 13/2} proton intruder orbital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azaiez, F.; Duprat, J.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.F.; Aiche, M.; Bastin, G.; Beausang, C.W.; Bourgeois, C.; Clark, R.M.; Deloncle, I.; Duffait, R.; Gale, S.J.; Gall, B.; Hannachi, F.; Hibbert, I.; Joyce, M.J.; Kaci, A.; Kelly, W.H.; Korichi, A.; Le Coz, Y.; Meyer, M.; Perrin, N.; Poffe, N.; Porquet, M.G.; Redon, N.; Sergolle, H.; Schuck, C.; Simpson, J.; Wadsworth, R. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, 91 Orsay (France)]|[Oliver Lodge Lab., Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)]|[C.S.N.S.M., IN2P3-CNRS, 91 Orsay (France)]|[Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury Lab., Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)]|[Inst. de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Claude Bernard, 69 Villeurbanne (France)]|[Dept. of Physics, Univ. of York (United Kingdom)]|[Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)]|[Univ. of Oxford, Dept. of Physics (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Recent data from the EUROGAM array have revealed dipole transitions linking signature partner superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Tl and {sup 195}Tl nuclei. Measurements of the decay branching ratios, taken together with the average quadrupole moment of the neighboring superdeformed nuclei, enable the absolute M1 strengths to be determined. From these data and using the strong coupling model, we find that two SD bands in {sup 195}Tl are due to the 81st proton being in the [642]5/2{sup +} orbital and four from the six SD bands in {sup 194}Tl correspond to a configuration where the intrinsic spins of the single proton and single neutron are aligned. (orig.).

  17. Atmosphere expansion and mass loss of close-orbit giant exoplanets heated by stellar XUV. I. Modeling of hydrodynamic escape of upper atmospheric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F. [Institute of Laser Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khodachenko, M. L.; Sasunov, Yu. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Acad. Sci., Graz (Austria); Erkaev, N. V., E-mail: maxim.khodachenko@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Computational Modelling, SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-10

    In the present series of papers we propose a consistent description of the mass loss process. To study in a comprehensive way the effects of the intrinsic magnetic field of a close-orbit giant exoplanet (a so-called hot Jupiter) on atmospheric material escape and the formation of a planetary inner magnetosphere, we start with a hydrodynamic model of an upper atmosphere expansion in this paper. While considering a simple hydrogen atmosphere model, we focus on the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of radiative heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas with its consequent expansion in the outer space. Primary attention is paid to an investigation of the role of the specific conditions at the inner and outer boundaries of the simulation domain, under which different regimes of material escape (free and restricted flow) are formed. A comparative study is performed of different processes, such as X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) heating, material ionization and recombination, H{sub 3}{sup +} cooling, adiabatic and Lyα cooling, and Lyα reabsorption. We confirm the basic consistency of the outcomes of our modeling with the results of other hydrodynamic models of expanding planetary atmospheres. In particular, we determine that, under the typical conditions of an orbital distance of 0.05 AU around a Sun-type star, a hot Jupiter plasma envelope may reach maximum temperatures up to ∼9000 K with a hydrodynamic escape speed of ∼9 km s{sup –1}, resulting in mass loss rates of ∼(4-7) · 10{sup 10} g s{sup –1}. In the range of the considered stellar-planetary parameters and XUV fluxes, that is close to the mass loss in the energy-limited case. The inclusion of planetary intrinsic magnetic fields in the model is a subject of the follow-up paper (Paper II).

  18. Panel Optimization with Integrated Software (POIS). Volume I. PANDA--Interactive Program for Preliminary Minimum Weight Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Sheinman (61], which are based on multi-term, two-dimensional trigonometric expansions. PANDA overestimates the shear buckling loads for curved panels...design of stiffened cylinders under axial compression," AIA J, Vol. 13, pp 750-755 (1975) [34] I. Sheinman and G. J. Simitses, "Buckling analysis of...1978) 136] G. J. Simitses and I. Sheinman , "Optimization of geometrically imperfect stiffened cylindrical shells under axial compression," Comp

  19. Magnetic Helicity Estimations in Models and Observations of the Solar Magnetic Field. Part I: Finite Volume Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, Gherardo; Pariat, Etienne; Anfinogentov, Sergey; Chen, Feng; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Guo, Yang; Liu, Yang; Moraitis, Kostas; Thalmann, Julia K.; Yang, Shangbin

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity of ideal magneto-hydrodynamics characterized by an inverse turbulent cascade. Accordingly, it is often invoked as one of the basic physical quantities driving the generation and structuring of magnetic fields in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We provide here the first systematic comparison of six existing methods for the estimation of the helicity of magnetic fields known in a finite volume. All such methods are reviewed, benchmarked, and compared with each other, and specifically tested for accuracy and sensitivity to errors. To that purpose, we consider four groups of numerical tests, ranging from solutions of the three-dimensional, force-free equilibrium, to magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Almost all methods are found to produce the same value of magnetic helicity within few percent in all tests. In the more solar-relevant and realistic of the tests employed here, the simulation of an eruptive flux rope, the spread in the computed values obtained by all but one method is only 3 %, indicating the reliability and mutual consistency of such methods in appropriate parameter ranges. However, methods show differences in the sensitivity to numerical resolution and to errors in the solenoidal property of the input fields. In addition to finite volume methods, we also briefly discuss a method that estimates helicity from the field lines' twist, and one that exploits the field's value at one boundary and a coronal minimal connectivity instead of a pre-defined three-dimensional magnetic-field solution.

  20. Remedial investigation report. Alpena combat readiness training center Alpena County Regional Airport, Michigan Air National Guard, Alpena, Michigan. Volume 3. Appendices A - I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Remedial Investigation Report of Sites 1-9 at Alpens CRTC,. Alpena MI. Volume III Appendicies A-I. A remedial investigation was performed on 9 sites at the Alpena CRTC to determine the extent of contamination at the sites. The sites involved in this investigation include: Site 1 POL Storage Area; Site 2 Motor Pool Area; Site 3 Former Garage; Site 4 Third Fire Training Area; Site 5 Second Fire Training Area; Site 3 Former Landfill; Site 7 First Fire Training Area; Site 8 Former Hanger 9; Site 10 Hazardous Waste Storage Area. Soil and groundwater contamination above state action levels was found at the sites An FS has been initiated.

  1. Orbital dystopia due to orbital roof defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Eun Young; Joo, Hong Sil; Byeon, Jun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review of patients who presented with delayed dystopia as a consequence of an orbital roof defect due to fractures and nontraumatic causes to search for a correlation between orbital roof defect size and surgical indications for the treatment thereof. Retrospective analyses were performed in 7 patients, all of whom presented with delayed dystopia due to orbital roof defects, between January 2001 and June 2011. The causes of orbital roof defects were displaced orbital roof fractures (5 cases), tumor (1 case), and congenital sphenoid dysplasia (1 case). All 7 patients had initially been treated conservatively and later presented with significant dystopia. The sizes of the defects were calculated on computed tomographic scans. Among the 7 patients, aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid, which caused ocular symptoms, in 1 patient with minimal displaced orbital roof and reconstruction with calvarial bone, titanium micromesh, or Medpor in 6 other patients were performed. The minimal size of the orbital roof in patients who underwent orbital roof reconstruction was 1.2 cm (defect height) x 1.0 cm (defect length), 0.94 cm(2). For all patients with orbital dystopia, displacement of the globe was corrected without any complications, regardless of whether the patient was evaluated grossly or by radiology. In this retrospective study, continuous monitoring of clinical signs and active surgical management should be considered for cases in which an orbital roof defect is detected, even if no definite symptoms are noted, to prevent delayed sequelae.

  2. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  3. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils.- Volume I-Galicia; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles. Volumen I.- Galicia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C.; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; roquero, C.; Magister, M.

    1998-12-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Galicia. (Author) 30 refs.

  4. Magnetic helicity estimations in models and observations of the solar magnetic field. Part I: Finite volume methods

    CERN Document Server

    Valori, Gherardo; Anfinogentov, Sergey; Chen, Feng; Georgoulis, Manolis K; Guo, Yang; Liu, Yang; Moraitis, Kostas; Thalmann, Julia K; Yang, Shangbin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity of ideal magneto-hydrodynamics characterized by an inverse turbulent cascade. Accordingly, it is often invoked as one of the basic physical quantities driving the generation and structuring of magnetic fields in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We provide here the first systematic comparison of six existing methods for the estimation of the helicity of magnetic fields known in a finite volume. All such methods are reviewed, benchmarked, and compared with each other, and specifically tested for accuracy and sensitivity to errors. To that purpose, we consider four groups of numerical tests, ranging from solutions of the three-dimensional, force-free equilibrium, to magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Almost all methods are found to produce the same value of magnetic helicity within few percent in all tests. In the more solar-relevant and realistic of the tests employed here, the simulation of an eruptive flux rope, the spread in the computed ...

  5. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, C.

    1984-01-01

    This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

  6. Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project. Phase 2: coal, hydroelectric and energy alternatives. Volume I. Beluga Coal District Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, G.; Lane, D.; Edblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    This volume deals with the problems and procedures inherent in the development of the Beluga Coal District. Socio-economic implications of the development and management alternatives are discussed. A review of permits and approvals necessary for the initial development of Beluga Coal Field is presented. Major land tenure issues in the Beluga Coal District as well as existing transportation routes and proposed routes and sites are discussed. The various coal technologies which might be employed at Beluga are described. Transportation options and associated costs of transporting coal from the mine site area to a connecting point with a major, longer distance transportation made and of transporting coal both within and outside (exportation) the state are discussed. Some environmental issues involved in the development of the Beluga Coal Field are presented. (DMC)

  7. Measures of Effectiveness-CONUS Reorganization 1973 (As Pertains to FORSCOM, TRADOC, HSC, OTEA and CAA). Volume I. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    Victor B. Vroom , ed., Netbods of Orgational research VMverstlyK of Fitt*)urX Press, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1967. Carol B. Weiss, Evaluation Research, Pentice... H . Hamilton, et al General Research Corporation Prepared for: Office of the Chief of Staff (Army) November 1974 II 11ft TOW MM -0f_-" -’L " O" F m...Final Report ation 1973 Vol I .. -ul ivie Sc..aIry motumm H iLmilzn DIC 19-69-C-0017 G. G. Cold "sA £0 1,00 O NT ,abs? k 4m aIS Ganeral Research

  8. (99m) Tc-labelled human serum albumin cannot replace (125) I-labelled human serum albumin to determine plasma volume in patients with liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulrik Lütken; Henriksen, Jens H; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    -labelled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) and iodine-labelled human serum albumin (125I-HSA), as the former may have advantages at repeated measurements and the latter is the classical gold standard. Study population and methods In 88 patients, (64 with liver disease, mainly cirrhosis, and 24 patients without......Summary Background and aims Determination of plasma volume (PV) is important in several clinical situations. Thus, patients with liver disease often have augmented PV as part of their sodium–water retention. This study was undertaken to compare PV determination by two indicators: technetium...... liver disease), simultaneous measurements of PV were taken with 99mTc-HSA and 125I-HSA after 1 h in the supine position. Blood samples were obtained before and 10 min after quantitative injection of the two indicators. In a subset of patients (n = 32), the measurements were repeated within 1 h. Results...

  9. Disseminated orbital actinomycetoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanbhag Nita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous infection. Lower extremities are commonly involved. A 20-year-old male came with complaints of multiple sinuses on scalp, left eyelid swelling with a sinus and dystopia, since one year. On examination there was relative proptosis in left eye of 2 mm. Computed tomography scan showed soft tissue swelling of the pre-septal area of the left upper eyelid with orbital involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed increased left orbital volume and evident dystopia. Microbiology testing of the erosive scalp and lid lesions showed genus Nocardia, suggestive of actinomycetoma. This case is presented as it shows an unusual involvement of the orbit.

  10. Microbe-I: fungal biota analyses of the Japanese experimental module KIBO of the International Space Station before launch and after being in orbit for about 460 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kazuo; Nishiyama, Yayoi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Sugita, Takashi; Tsukii, Yuuji; Takatori, Kosuke; Benno, Yoshimi; Makimura, Koichi

    2011-12-01

    In addition to the crew, microbes also find their way aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Therefore, microbial monitoring is necessary for the health and safety of the crew and for general maintenance of the facilities of this station. Samples were collected from three sites in the Japanese experimental module KIBO on the ISS (air diffuser, handrail, and surfaces) for analysis of fungal biota approximately 1 year after this module had docked with the ISS. Samples taken from KIBO before launch and from our laboratory were used as controls. In the case of KIBO, both microbe detection sheet (MDS) and swab culture tests of orbital samples were negative. The MDS were also examined by field emission-scanning electron microscopy; no microbial structures were detected. However, fungal DNAs were detected by real-time PCR and analyzed by the clone library method; Alternaria sp. and Malassezia spp. were the dominant species before launch and in space, respectively. The dominant species found in specimens from the air conditioner diffuser, lab bench, door push panel, and facility surfaces on our laboratory (ground controls) were Inonotus sp., Cladosporium sp., Malassezia spp., and Pezicula sp., respectively. The fungi in the KIBO were probably derived from contamination due to humans, while those in our laboratory came from the environment (e.g., the soil). In conclusion, the cleanliness in KIBO was equivalent to that in a clean room environment on the ground.

  11. Issues Related to Recruitment of Enlisted Personnel for the Reserve Components. Major Findings and Recommendations, 1979 Tracking Study. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    seeking a moonlight job to have higher enlistment propensity.) It would bt. wal uahle to ,.’ plore mor(, lully the con.traint:, different work situations...begin questionnaire (M 1DIN EX- ODE 6) DAT Associates for Research in Behavior, Inc. October 1979 I 3401 Market Street Jb 0894 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  12. Study for Improving the Definition of the Army Objective Force Methodology, Phase II (IDOFOR II). Volume I. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    UNCLASSIFIED CAA-S-81-17-VOL-13 N MF__ 11111 32 11111 I.’ ’ 0 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TESi CHART NATIONAL BURfAU OJf STANDARDS 1%3 A, • 1 - - H DISCLAIMER The...Support Agency USAREUR United States Army, Europe USMC United States Marine Corps VERT Venture Evaluation Review Technique VULCAN short-range, 20mm air

  13. GREAT I Study of the Upper Mississippi River. Technical Appendixes. Volume 2. Floodplain Management, Dredged Material Uses, Dredging Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    The Impacts of Dredge Spoil Placement on the Upper Mississippi River. Luther College, Decorah, Iowa. Meritt, F. S. 1968. Standard Handbook for Civil...L, bend equal to the length of the towboat and tow (Figure 1). I fh± ,L- flection arrle is knoan for a particular condition, a reasonzL3v z;cu- rate

  14. The Logistics of Oil Spill Dispersant Application. Volume I. Logistics-Related Properties of Oil Spill Dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    IN FRESH AND SEAWATER(I) (3)Product Mean Minimum Dispersant-to-Oil Ratio Name on Venezuelan Lago Medio Crude Oil (4) 0C in Fresh Water in Salt Water...higher terminal velocity, adding to the mixing energy. Orienting the nozzles aft can be expected to reduce the relative velocity of the drops, and result

  15. Environmental Inventory and Analysis for Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Volume I. Pine Bluff Metropolitan Area, Arkansas Urban Water Management Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-03

    Source: Citizens’ Advisory Camittee, pers. comm. VIlI-19 144 3 0 3 CULTURA IX CULTURAL RESOURCES A. INTRODUCTION. Cultural resources include resources...the fluted points of the Clovis and Folsom types. These earliest Indians cvidently were nomadic and hunted large herd animals such as the mammoth and

  16. User Guide for Air Force Base Automotive Transportation Simulation Model -BATS. Volume I. Data Collection and Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    signal time in seconds on the 10-180 north-south roadway, if any. If there is no left turn signal and left turns are made through opposing traffic...seconds on the 10-180 east-west roadway, if any. If there is no left turn signal and left turns are made through opposing traffic during Phase I, enter a

  17. Phase I: the pipeline-gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant engineering and design. Volume 18. Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-05-01

    Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the process and project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. The design has been completed and is being reported in 24 volumes. This is Volume 18 which reports the design of Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment. The objective of the Waste Water Treatment system is to collect and treat all plant liquid effluent streams. The system is designed to permit recycle and reuse of the treated waste water. Plant Section 2700 is composed of primary, secondary, and tertiary waste water treatment methods plus an evaporation system which eliminates liquid discharge from the plant. The Waste Water Treatment Section is designed to produce 130 pounds per hour of sludge that is buried in a landfill on the plant site. The evaporated water is condensed and provides a portion of the make-up water to Plant Section 2400 - Cooling Water.

  18. Phase I: the pipeline-gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant engineering and design. Volume 17. Plant section 2500 - Plant and Instrument Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-05-01

    Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the process and project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. The design has been completed and is being reported in 24 volumes. This is Volume 17 which reports the design of Plant Section 2500 - Plant and Instrument Air. The plant and instrument air system is designed to provide dry, compressed air for a multitude of uses in plant operations and maintenance. A single centrifugal air compressor provides the total plant and instrument air requirements. An air drying system reduces the dew point of the plant and instrument air. Plant Section 2500 is designed to provide air at 100/sup 0/F and 100 psig. Both plant and instrument air are dried to a -40/sup 0/F dew point. Normal plant and instrument air requirements total 1430 standard cubic feet per minute.

  19. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  20. Effects of Meso-Scale and Small-Scale Interactions on Global Climate. Volume I. Orographic Effects on Global Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-28

    take place near the obstacle, far removed from the upper atmosphere. This suggested another approach; the introduction of strong artificial ...most probably an in- valid procedure, resulting in much higher "ground" velocities than is found at 1.5 km on the Sierra Nevac’.a. This artifici ...west of the San Juan Mountains and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in New Mexico. The grids represented by TOP04 and 5-76 II I

  1. Climatic Atlas of the Outer Continental Shelf Waters and Coastal Regions of Alaska. Volume I. Gulf of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    publication of two times that of a swimmer and one and one-half times NOAA’s Environmental Data Service. that of a person in the passive position. Figure 8...exceeded * D.-,o- and e ras foar -a 11oa , .o.,o eend from the Imt 0313 33 05., .h begi 1,, ph#f I of ,e month f already ,n 9pogs and o ooari. d an

  2. GREAT I: A Study of the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 2. Floodplain Management, Dredged Material Uses, Dredging Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    watershed. Fertile topsoils are washed into creeks and streams dur- ing rainstorms and spring snowmelt and eventually reach the Mississippi River...second and third years. McMahon and Eckblad (1975) also tried whey and found it was conducive to seed germination and plant growth. They felt whey ...penetrate this crust, therefore enhancing its value. Because the 40 - i Upper Mississippi River is in the heart of America’s dairy country and whey is

  3. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Final report. Volume I. Systems requirements and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Studies leading to the development of two 400 MW Offshore Thermal Energy Conversion Commercial Plants are presented. This volume includes a summary of three tasks: task IIA--systems evaluation and requirements; task IIB--evaluation plan; task III--technology review; and task IV--systems integration evaluation. Task IIA includes the definition of top level requirements and an assessment of factors critical to the selection of hull configuration and size, quantification of payload requirements and characteristics, and sensitivity of system characteristics to site selection. Task IIB includes development of a methodology for systematically evaluating the candidate hullforms, based on interrelationships and priorities developed during task IIA. Task III includes the assessment of current technology and identification of deficiencies in relation to OTEC requirements and the development of plans to correct such deficiencies. Task IV involves the formal evaluation of the six candidate hullforms in relation to sit and plant capacity to quantify cost/size/capability relationships, leading to selection of an optimum commercial plant. (WHK)

  4. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator R&D in the Technical Design Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Hélène Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  5. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may also be observed. Prompt intravenous antibiotic treatment should be started, and surgical drainage may be performed if patient shows failure to improve in 48 hours despite optimal management. Without treatment, the clinical course may progress to subperiosteal or orbital abscess, and even to cavernous sinus thrombosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: Supplement 52-6

  6. Theoretical Modeling of Molecular and Electron Kinetic Processes. Volume I. Theoretical Formulation of Analysis and Description of Computer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    to motivate the form of the results for inelastic binary collisions characterized by an isotropic scattering cross section. For an inelastic...which are excited or ionized by the e -beam . Strictly speaking , the reverse process for reaction (101. 1) should also be included, although its...ETC F/S 20/5 THEORETICAL MODELING OF MOLECULAR AND ELECTRON KINETIC PROCESS~— efl ~ (rj)JAN 79 W B LACINA NO OO i~—78—C—Ofl9UNCLASSIFIED NRTC—79—7R

  7. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume I. Review of the Literature on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-to 1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    Microbeam 51 7. Embryology 82 8. Studies on Normal Animals 91 9. Tumor Studies 159 10. Clinical Studies 188 11. Ophthalmology 232 12. Dental Studies 263...o f e:xnosures 7wacs cad st. Cn3 side of the lesion was Mnainted w-ith 1 7=ns blue. I-oia=io wsCarried out in a fch.eck-er- boar-d ditiuinZt 1...ocular structures. Abstr. - Biological sessions - Boston laser conference, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. Aug 5-7, 1964. 53. Polyak , S.L.: The

  8. 16TH Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Trueman C-130/Hercules HF Notch Antenna" David Gaudine 0940 "I-IF Towel-Bar Antenna Location Study Aboard an H3 Sikorsky Saad N. Tabet, Cart D. Myers...needed. For this reason an anatomically based model was obtained from Dr Om Gandhi of the University of Utah. This data is supported by programs, which...FRance, EDF-DER, Service IPN, D~partement SID, 1 Avenue du GCnrral-de-Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex, May 1993. [8] C. M. Furse and 0. P. Gandhi

  9. Environmental Monitoring and Characterization of Radiation Sources on UF Campus Using a Large Volume NaI Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Jesse A.; Gardiner, Hannah E.; Jordan, Kelly A.; Baciak, James E.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental radiation surveys are important for applications such as safety and regulations. This is especially true for areas exposed to emissions from nuclear reactors, such as the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR). At the University of Florida, surveys are performed using the RSX-1 NaI detector, developed by Radiation Solutions Inc. The detector uses incoming gamma rays and an Advanced Digital Spectrometer module to produce a linear energy spectrum. These spectra can then be analyzed in real time with a personal computer using the built in software, RadAssist. We report on radiation levels around the University of Florida campus using two mobile detection platforms, car-borne and cart-borne. The car-borne surveys provide a larger, broader map of campus radiation levels. On the other hand, cart-borne surveys provide a more detailed radiation map because of its ability to reach places on campus cars cannot go. Throughout the survey data, there are consistent radon decay product energy peaks in addition to other sources such as medical I-131 found in a large crowd of people. Finally, we investigate further applications of this mobile detection platform, such as tracking the Ar-41 plume emitted from the UFTR and detection of potential environmental hazards.

  10. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  11. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  12. Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery is an extensive collection of over 2,600 high- and moderate-resolution photographs produced by all five of the Lunar Orbiter...

  13. ASC Champ Orbit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite.......This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite....

  14. Polygons in billiard orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Don, Henk

    2011-01-01

    We study the geometry of billiard orbits on rectangular billiards. A truncated billiard orbit induces a partition of the rectangle into polygons. We prove that thirteen is a sharp upper bound for the number of different areas of these polygons.

  15. Traumatic transconjunctival orbital emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Stroh, E M; Finger, P T

    1990-01-01

    Orbital emphysema can be produced by trans-conjunctival migration of air from a high pressure airgun. In an industrial accident an 8 mm conjunctival laceration was produced in the superior fornix which acted as a portal of entry for air into the subconjunctival, subcutaneous, and retrobulbar spaces. Computed tomography revealed no evidence of orbital fracture and showed that traumatic orbital emphysema occurred without a broken orbital bone.

  16. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  17. Characterization of Aluminum Honeycomb and Experimentation for Model Development and Validation, Volume I: Discovery and Characterization Experiments for High-Density Aluminum Honeycomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Korellis, John S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Lee, Kenneth L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Scheffel, Simon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Hinnerichs, Terry Dean [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solid Mechanics; Neilsen, Michael K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Mechanics Development; Scherzinger, William Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solid Mechanics

    2006-08-01

    Honeycomb is a structure that consists of two-dimensional regular arrays of open cells. High-density aluminum honeycomb has been used in weapon assemblies to mitigate shock and protect payload because of its excellent crush properties. In order to use honeycomb efficiently and to certify the payload is protected by the honeycomb under various loading conditions, a validated honeycomb crush model is required and the mechanical properties of the honeycombs need to be fully characterized. Volume I of this report documents an experimental study of the crush behavior of high-density honeycombs. Two sets of honeycombs were included in this investigation: commercial grade for initial exploratory experiments, and weapon grade, which satisfied B61 specifications. This investigation also includes developing proper experimental methods for crush characterization, conducting discovery experiments to explore crush behaviors for model improvement, and identifying experimental and material uncertainties.

  18. Proceedings to the workshops 'What comes beyond the Standard model', 2000, 2001, 2002, Volume 2 Proceedings (Part I)

    CERN Document Server

    Borstnik, N M; Froggatt, Colin D; Lukman, D

    2003-01-01

    Contents (Part 1): 1.Derivation of Lorentz Invariance and Three Space Dimensions in Generic Field Theory (C D. Froggatt and H. B. Nielsen) 2.Unitary Representations, Noncompact Groups SO(q; d - q)...(N. Mankoc Borstnik, H. B. Nielsen and D. Lukman) 3.Weyl Spinor of SO(1; 13), Families of Spinors ...(A. Borstnik Bracic and N. Mankoc Borstnik) 4.A Tight Packing Problem (A. Kleppe) 5.Why so Few Particle Species? ... (D.L. Bennett and A. Kleppe) 6.About Number of Families (D. Lukman, A. Kleppe and N.S. Mankoc Borstnik) 7.Coupling Constant Unification in Spin-Charge Unifying Model ....(N. Mankoc Borstnik and H. B. Nielsen) (Contents of Part 2 not included in Part I: 8.Renormalization of Coupling Constants in the Minimal SUSY Models (R. B. Nevzorov, K. A. Ter-Martirosyan and M. A. Trusov) 9.Multiple Point Model and Phase Transition Couplings ...(L.V. Laperashvili, D.A. Ryzhikh and H.B. Nielsen) 10.Family Replicated Fit of All Quark and Lepton Masses and Mixings (H. B. Nielsen and Y. Takanishi) 11.Family Replicated ...

  19. Descriptive Summaries for Program Elements of the Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army Program FY 1981. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    1 0 ,Z C~a PC mU s- " 63* :C s.~ 6 00 3l 6.1 -WU" 10 or USO 0 39 0 41 1 L 2 aU 41a4 -w15 I4 b. .. 41 . A a w41 U 1 C a C a go- S .0 a .0 C 0 0 .C 4...8217. 1 41 ) ) z 3) 3M0 to cc c IU 33 W 1 3 Id tic .4 m3 0 0 ) 0O M ~ ~ ~ o �)3 6,.. v > c’𔃽-4-30.~40 00 36a 1 0 2d 𔃺 3’.3 0 . 3 3 3 1: M . . 0 0 0 3...h V’ :1. v1~0 14 U 0 31 c 0 60- O 1 a- V .0 1U 14*a64 .2~2142.U "~ .u0w ~1~3 64 40. 6 C0 Cc IS) tic a .- m3 Ed Am.11 0*0 ~0a* ... 6 v A - 20. 0 61

  20. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) Flow Control Valve (FCV) Poppet Eddy Current (EC) Inspection Probability of Detection (POD) Study. Volume 2; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Prosser, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The Director of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), requested an independent assessment of the anomalous gaseous hydrogen (GH2) flow incident on the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Orbiter Vehicle (OV)-105 during the Space Transportation System (STS)-126 mission. The main propulsion system (MPS) engine #2 GH2 flow control valve (FCV) LV-57 transition from low towards high flow position without being commanded. Post-flight examination revealed that the FCV LV-57 poppet had experienced a fatigue failure that liberated a section of the poppet flange. The NESC assessment provided a peer review of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), stress analysis, and impact testing. A probability of detection (POD) study was requested by the SSP Orbiter Project for the eddy current (EC) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that were developed to inspect the flight FCV poppets. This report contains the Appendices to the main report.