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Sample records for volume fraction temperature

  1. Influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of glass fibre reinforced plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wegener

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of continuous glass fibre reinforced plastics is investigated in detail. The physical causes of the two effects on the slope of the S-N-curve in fibre direction at R = 0.1 are researched and can be explained with help of micrographs. A new phenomenological approach is presented to model both effects in fibre dominated laminates with different stacking sequences using only the static ultimate strength as an input. Static and fatigue tests of different layups and fibre volume fractions are performed at different temperatures to validate the fatigue life predictions. Additionally it is derived that there is an optimal fibre volume fraction regarding a minimum damage sum. This fibre volume fraction is dependent on a given loading spectra and can be calculated using the phenomenological model.

  2. Viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions. Variation with temperature and water volume fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, Marco A.; Caldas, Jorge Navaes [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Rua General Canabarro, 500, Maracana, Rio, CEP 2057-900 (Brazil); Oliveira, Roberto C. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Cenpes, Cidade Universitaria (Brazil); Rajagopal, Krishnaswamy [LATCA-Laboratorio de Termodinamica e Cinetica Aplicada-Escola de Quimica, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, C.P. 68452, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2005-09-15

    Water-in-oil emulsions are important in the petroleum industry in production operations, where the water content of the emulsion can be as high as 60% in volume, also in petroleum refining operations where generally the water content is low. The effective viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions depends mainly on the volume fraction of dispersed phase and temperature, along with several minor effects, such as shear rate, average droplet size, droplet size distribution, viscosity and density of oil. Using six different crude oils, the effective viscosities of several synthetic water-in-oil emulsions are measured at atmospheric pressure using a dynamic viscosimeter for different shear rates, temperatures and volume fractions of the dispersed phase. The ASTM equation, method D-341, for describing viscosity as a function of temperature is extended to include the variation of dispersed phase volume fraction. The proposed equation gives good correlation between the measured viscosities of water-in-oil emulsions as a function of temperature and the volume fraction of water.

  3. Experimental investigation of temperature and volume fraction variations on the effective thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions (nanofluids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Calvin H.; Peterson, G. P.

    2006-04-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the effects of variations in the temperature and volume fraction on the steady-state effective thermal conductivity of two different nanoparticle suspensions. Copper and aluminum oxide, CuO and Al2O3, nanoparticles with area weighted diameters of 29 and 36 nm, respectively, were blended with distilled water at 2%, 4%, 6%, and 10% volume fractions and the resulting suspensions were evaluated at temperatures ranging from 27.5 to 34.7 °C. The results indicate that the nanoparticle material, diameter, volume fraction, and bulk temperature, all have a significant impact on the effective thermal conductivity of these suspensions. The 6% volume fraction of CuO nanoparticle/distilled water suspension resulted in an increase in the effective thermal conductivity of 1.52 times that of pure distilled water and the 10% Al2O3 nanoparticle/distilled water suspension increased the effective thermal conductivity by a factor of 1.3, at a temperature of 34 °C. A two-factor linear regression analysis based on the temperature and volume fraction was applied and indicated that the experimental results are in stark contrast to the trends predicted by the traditional theoretical models with respect to both temperature and volume fraction. The available models are reviewed and the possible reasons for the unusually high effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids are analyzed and discussed.

  4. Effects of diluents on soot surface temperature and volume fraction in diluted ethylene diffusion flames at pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar Abhinavam

    2014-05-20

    Soot surface temperature and volume fraction are measured in ethylene/air coflowing laminar diffusion flames at high pressures, diluted with one of four diluents (argon, helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) using a two-color technique. Both temperature and soot measurements presented are line-of-sight averages. The results aid in understanding the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of the soot formation and oxidation chemistry with changes in diluents, ultimately leading to possible methods of reducing soot emission from practical combustion hardware. The diluted fuel and coflow exit velocities (top-hat profiles) were matched at all pressures to minimize shear effects. In addition to the velocity-matched flow rates, the mass fluxes were held constant for all pressures. Addition of a diluent has a pronounced effect on both the soot surface temperature and volume fraction, with the helium diluted flame yielding the maximum and carbon dioxide diluted flame yielding minimum soot surface temperature and volume fraction. At low pressures, peak soot volume fraction exists at the tip of the flame, and with an increase in pressure, the location shifts lower to the wings of the flame. Due to the very high diffusivity of helium, significantly higher temperature and volume fraction are measured and explained. Carbon dioxide has the most dramatic soot suppression effect. By comparing the soot yield with previously measured soot precursor concentrations in the same flame, it is clear that the lower soot yield is a result of enhanced oxidation rates rather than a reduction in precursor formation. Copyright © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  5. Measurement of Soot Volume Fraction and Temperature for Oxygen-Enriched Ethylene Combustion Based on Flame Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Yan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for simultaneously visualizing the two-dimensional distributions of temperature and soot volume fraction in an ethylene flame was presented. A single-color charge-coupled device (CCD camera was used to capture the flame image in the visible spectrum considering the broad-response spectrum of the R and G bands of the camera. The directional emissive power of the R and G bands were calibrated and used for measurement. Slightly increased temperatures and reduced soot concentration were predicted in the central flame without self-absorption effects considered, an iterative algorithm was used for eliminating the effect of self-absorption. Nine different cases were presented in the experiment to demonstrate the effects of fuel mass flow rate and oxygen concentration on temperature and soot concentration in three different atmospheres. For ethylene combustion in pure-air atmosphere, as the fuel mass flow rate increased, the maximum temperature slightly decreased, and the maximum soot volume fraction slightly increased. For oxygen fractions of 30%, 40%, and 50% combustion in O2/N2 oxygen-enhanced atmospheres, the maximum flame temperatures were 2276, 2451, and 2678 K, whereas combustion in O2/CO2 atmospheres were 1916, 2322, and 2535 K. The maximum soot volume fractions were 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere and 13.6, 15.3, and 14.8 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/CO2 atmosphere. Compared with the O2/CO2 atmosphere, combustion in the oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere produced higher flame temperature and larger soot volume fraction. Preliminary results indicated that this technique is reliable and can be used for combustion diagnosis.

  6. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  7. The effects of temperature, volume fraction and vibration time on the thermo-physical properties of a carbon nanotube suspension (carbon nanofluid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrollahi, A; Hamidi, A A [Faculty of Engineering, University of Teheran, PO Box 11365-4563, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, A M [Gas Division of Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, PO Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rashidiam@ripi.ir

    2008-08-06

    In this investigation, nanofluids of carbon nanotubes are prepared and the thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of these fluids are measured using a thin layer technique as a function of time of ultrasonication, temperature, and volume fraction. It has been observed that after using the ultrasonic disrupter, the size of agglomerated particles and number of primary particles in a particle cluster was significantly decreased and that the thermal conductivity increased with elapsed ultrasonication time. The clustering of carbon nanotubes was also confirmed microscopically. The strong dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on temperature and volume fraction of nanofluids was attributed to Brownian motion and the interparticle potential, which influences the particle motion. The effect of temperature will become much more evident with an increase in the volume fraction and the agglomeration of the nanoparticles, as observed experimentally. The data obtained from this work have been compared with those of other studies and also with mathematical models at present proven for suspensions. Using a 2.5% volumetric concentration of carbon nanotubes resulted in a 20% increase in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid (ethylene glycol).The volumetric heat capacity also showed a pronounced increase with respect to that of the pure base fluid.

  8. The effects of temperature, volume fraction and vibration time on the thermo-physical properties of a carbon nanotube suspension (carbon nanofluid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrollahi, A; Hamidi, A A; Rashidi, A M

    2008-08-06

    In this investigation, nanofluids of carbon nanotubes are prepared and the thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of these fluids are measured using a thin layer technique as a function of time of ultrasonication, temperature, and volume fraction. It has been observed that after using the ultrasonic disrupter, the size of agglomerated particles and number of primary particles in a particle cluster was significantly decreased and that the thermal conductivity increased with elapsed ultrasonication time. The clustering of carbon nanotubes was also confirmed microscopically. The strong dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on temperature and volume fraction of nanofluids was attributed to Brownian motion and the interparticle potential, which influences the particle motion. The effect of temperature will become much more evident with an increase in the volume fraction and the agglomeration of the nanoparticles, as observed experimentally. The data obtained from this work have been compared with those of other studies and also with mathematical models at present proven for suspensions. Using a 2.5% volumetric concentration of carbon nanotubes resulted in a 20% increase in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid (ethylene glycol).The volumetric heat capacity also showed a pronounced increase with respect to that of the pure base fluid.

  9. Temperature dependence of pin solar cell parameters with intrinsic layers made of pm-Si:H and low crystalline volume fraction {mu}c-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadeh, H. [AECS, Physics Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syria)

    2010-07-15

    A comparison of the temperature dependence of the IV characteristics parameters of hydrogenated silicon pin solar cells with intrinsic layers made of polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) and of {mu}c-Si:H with low crystalline volume fraction has been performed. When using pm-Si:H, higher efficiency and higher filling factors are achieved over a wide temperature range. Diode quality factors of both types of cells show similar temperature dependence. Recombination processes over the whole intrinsic layer dominates the forward current. A change of the cell parameters under illumination is also observed. The transport mechanism of both cells is similar in the temperature range that is important for most applications. Due to its optical and transport properties, pm-Si:H poses a very interesting alternative to {mu}c-Si:H and a-Si:H in the temperature range of normal terrestrial applications. (author)

  10. Temperature, Oxygen, and Soot-Volume-Fraction Measurements in a Turbulent C2H4-Fueled Jet Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearney, Sean P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Winters, Caroline [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farias, Paul Abraham [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grasser, Thomas W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hewson, John C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed set of measurements from a piloted, sooting, turbulent C 2 H 4 - fueled diffusion flame. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to monitor temperature and oxygen, while laser-induced incandescence (LII) is applied for imaging of the soot volume fraction in the challenging jet-flame environment at Reynolds number, Re = 20,000. Single-laser shot results are used to map the mean and rms statistics, as well as probability densities. LII data from the soot-growth region of the flame are used to benchmark the soot source term for one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) modeling of this turbulent flame. The ODT code is then used to predict temperature and oxygen fluctuations higher in the soot oxidation region higher in the flame.

  11. The Debye temperature of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-. delta. and its dependence on the volume fraction of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Phillips, N.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Gordon, J.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Amherst Coll., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    Specific-heat measurements, on polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, YBCO, have shown sample-to-sample variations in the volume fraction of superconductivity, f{sub s}, which is correlated with the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments in the YBCO lattice. At low temperatures the lattice specific heat also varies with f{sub s}, but these variations do not persist above {approximately}20K. The low-temperature data show that {Theta}{sub 0}{sup {minus}3} varies linearly with f{sub 3}, and give values of 520 and 390K for {Theta}{sub o} for fully-superconducting and fully-normal'' YBCO, respectively. These results suggest that the long wavelength phonon modes are altered when Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments are present in the lattice. The fact that different samples have the same lattice specific heat at {approximately}20K and above T{sub c} indicates that the higher energy phonon modes are insensitive to these Cu{sup 2+} moments.

  12. The Debye temperature of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and its dependence on the volume fraction of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Phillips, N.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Gordon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Amherst Coll., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1991-12-01

    Specific-heat measurements, on polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, YBCO, have shown sample-to-sample variations in the volume fraction of superconductivity, f{sub s}, which is correlated with the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments in the YBCO lattice. At low temperatures the lattice specific heat also varies with f{sub s}, but these variations do not persist above {approximately}20K. The low-temperature data show that {Theta}{sub 0}{sup {minus}3} varies linearly with f{sub 3}, and give values of 520 and 390K for {Theta}{sub o} for fully-superconducting and ``fully-normal`` YBCO, respectively. These results suggest that the long wavelength phonon modes are altered when Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments are present in the lattice. The fact that different samples have the same lattice specific heat at {approximately}20K and above T{sub c} indicates that the higher energy phonon modes are insensitive to these Cu{sup 2+} moments.

  13. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, E.; Lizio, D.; Baldari, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as 90Y and to 131I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  14. Volume Fraction of Graphene Platelets in Copper-Graphene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-graphene composite films were deposited on copper foil using electrochemical deposition. Four electrolyte solutions that each consist of 250 mL of graphene oxide suspension in distilled water and increasing volume of 0.2 M solution of CuSO4 in steps of 250 mL were used to deposit the composite films with and without a magnetic stirrer. Graphene oxide in the films was reduced to graphene by hydrogen treatment for 6 hours at 673 K (400 °C). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction for identification of phases, scanning electron microscopy for distribution of graphene, energy dispersive spectrometry for evaluation of elemental composition, electrical resistivity and temperature coefficient of electrical resistance and thermal conductivity. Effective mean field analysis (EMA) was used to determine the volume fraction and electrical conductivity of graphene and interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and copper. The electrical resistivity was reduced from 2.031 to 1.966 μΩ cm and the thermal conductivity was improved from 3.8 to 5.0 W/cm K upon addition of graphene platelets to electrolytic copper. The use of stirrer during deposition of the films increased the average size and the thickness of the graphene platelets and as a result the improvement in electrical conductivity was lower compared to the values obtained without the stirrer. Using the EMA, the volume fraction of graphene platelets that was responsible for the improvement in the electrical conductivity was found to be lower than that for the improvement in the thermal conductivity. The results of the analysis are used to determine the volume fraction of the thinner and the thicker graphene platelets in the composite films.

  15. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fiber Volume Fraction in Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of examining composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a material, an effective tool exists to evaluate composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb waves can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper discusses a study in which Lamb waves were used to examine fiber volume fraction variations of approximately 0.40-0.70 in composites. The Lamb wave measurements were compared to fiber volume fractions obtained from acid digestion tests. Additionally, a model to predict the fiber volume fraction from Lamb wave velocity values was evaluated.

  16. GEANT4 simulation of water volume fraction measurement in dehydrated crude oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Chunguo; XING Guangzhong; LIU Bin

    2007-01-01

    Online measurement of water volume fraction (WVF) in dehydrated crude oil is a difficult task due to very little water in dehydrated crude oil and high precision requirements. We presents a method to measure water volume fraction in dehydrated crude oil with γ-ray densitometry. The Monte Carlo computer simulation packet GEANT4 was used to analyze the WVF measuring sensitivity of the γ-ray densitometry at different γ-ray energies, and effects of temperature, pressure, salinity and oil components on WVF measurement. The results show that the γ-ray densitome-try has high sensitivity in γ-ray energy ranges of 16~25 keV, and it can distinguish WVF changes of 0.0005. The calculated WVF decreases about 0.0002 with 1 ℃ of temperature increase and they have approximately linear relation with temperature when water volume fraction remains the same. Effects of pressure, salinity and oil components on water volume fraction can be neglected. Experiments were done to analyze sensitivity of the γ-ray densitometry. The results, as compared with simulations, demonstrate that simulation method is reliable and it is feasible to gauge low water volume fraction using low energy γ-rays.

  17. Perfusion systems that minimize vascular volume fraction in engineered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truslow, James G; Tien, Joe

    2011-06-01

    This study determines the optimal vascular designs for perfusing engineered tissues. Here, "optimal" describes a geometry that minimizes vascular volume fraction (the fractional volume of a tissue that is occupied by vessels) while maintaining oxygen concentration above a set threshold throughout the tissue. Computational modeling showed that optimal geometries depended on parameters that affected vascular fluid transport and oxygen consumption. Approximate analytical expressions predicted optima that agreed well with the results of modeling. Our results suggest one basis for comparing the effectiveness of designs for microvascular tissue engineering.

  18. Coarsening in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    The coarsening behavior of the gamma-prime precipitate has been examined in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys aged at elevated temperatures for times of up to 5000 h. Although the cube rate law was observed during coarsening, none of the presently available coarsening theories showed complete agreement with the experimental particle size distributions (PSDs). These discrepancies were thought to be due to elastic coherency strains which were not considered by the available models. Increasing the Mo content significantly influenced the PSDs and decreased the coarsening rate of the gamma-prime cubes, as a result of increasing the magnitude of the lattice mismatch. After extended aging times, the gamma-prime cubes underwent massive coalescence into plates at a rate which was much faster than the cuboidal coarsening rate. Once the gamma-prime plates were formed, further coarsening was not observed, and this stabilization of the microstructure was attributed to the development of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces.

  19. The coupled effect of fiber volume fraction and void fraction on hydraulic fluid absorption of quartz/BMI laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdelbrink, Keith R.; Anderson, Jacob P.; Siddique, Zahed; Altan, M. Cengiz

    2016-03-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resin with quartz (AQ581) fiber reinforcement is a composite material frequently used in aerospace applications, such as engine cowlings and radomes. Various composite components used in aircrafts are exposed to different types of hydraulic fluids, which may lead to anomalous absorption behavior over the service life of the composite. Accurate predictive models for absorption of liquid penetrants are particularly important as the composite components are often exposed to long-term degradation due to absorbed moisture, hydraulic fluids, or similar liquid penetrants. Microstructural features such as fiber volume fraction and void fraction can have a significant effect on the absorption behavior of fiber-reinforced composites. In this paper, hydraulic fluid absorption characteristics of quartz/BMI laminates fabricated from prepregs preconditioned at different relative humidity and subsequently cured at different pressures are presented. The composite samples are immersed into hydraulic fluid at room temperature, and were not subjected to any prior degradation. To generate process-induced microvoids, prepregs were conditioned in an environmental chamber at 2% or 99% relative humidity at room temperature for a period of 24 hours prior to laminate fabrication. To alter the fiber volume fraction, the laminates were fabricated at cure pressures of 68.9 kPa (10 psi) or 482.6 kPa (70 psi) via a hot-press. The laminates are shown to have different levels of microvoids and fiber volume fractions, which were observed to affect the absorption dynamics considerably and exhibited clear non-Fickian behavior. A one-dimensional hindered diffusion model (HDM) was shown to be successful in predicting the hydraulic fluid absorption. Model prediction indicates that as the fabrication pressure increased from 68.9 kPa to 482.6 kPa, the maximum fluid content (M∞) decreased from 8.0% wt. to 1.0% wt. The degree of non-Fickian behavior, measured by hindrance coefficient (

  20. Laser-induced incandescence: Towards quantitative soot volume fraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A.P.; Wienbeucker, F.; Beaud, P.; Frey, H.-M.; Gerber, T.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence has recently emerged as a versatile tool for measuring soot volume fraction in a wide range of combustion systems. In this work we investigate the essential features of the method. LII is based on the acquisition of the incandescence of soot when heated through a high power laser pulse. Initial experiments have been performed on a model laboratory flame. The behaviour of the LII signal is studied experimentally. By applying numerical calculations we investigate the possibility to obtain two-dimensional soot volume fraction distributions. For this purpose a combination of LII with other techniques is required. This part is discussed in some extent and the future work is outlined. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  1. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  2. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Osterhoudt, Curtis F. [University of Alaska

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  3. Estimation of liquid volume fraction using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Saeed M.; Langton, Christian M.

    2016-12-01

    It has recently been proposed that the propagation of an ultrasound wave through complex structures, consisting of two-materials of differing ultrasound velocity, may be considered as an array of parallel ‘sonic rays’, the transit time of each determined by their relative proportion; being a minimum (t min) in entire higher velocity material, and a maximum (t max) in entire lower velocity material. An ultrasound transit time spectrum (UTTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays at an individual transit time. It has previously been demonstrated that the solid volume fraction of a solid:liquid composite, specifically acrylic step-wedges immersed in water, may be reliably estimated from the UTTS. The aim of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that the volume fraction of a two-component liquid mixture, of unequal ultrasound velocity, may also be estimated by UTTS. A through-transmission technique incorporating two 1 MHz ultrasound transducers within a horizontally-aligned cylindrical tube-housing was utilised, the proportion of silicone oil to water being varied from 0% to 100%. The liquid volume fraction was estimated from the UTTS at each composition, the coefficient of determination (R 2%) being 98.9  ±  0.7%. The analysis incorporated a novel signal amplitude normalisation technique to compensate for absorption within the silicone oil. It is therefore envisaged that the parallel sonic ray concept and the derived UTTS may be further applied to the quantification of liquid mixture composition assessment.

  4. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  5. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ(0). We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45° angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ(0)∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕ(c), defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ(0)=7.7±1.4° and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θ(m)=28.5±1.0°. Granular material at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ(0)=32.1±1.5° prior to the onset of an avalanche at θ(m)=35.9±0.7°. Both θ(0) and θ(m) increased with ϕ(0) and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θ(R)=22±2°, was independent of ϕ(0). From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ(0), with ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions-including volume fraction-are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches.

  6. VOFI - A library to initialize the volume fraction scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bnà, S.; Manservisi, S.; Scardovelli, R.; Yecko, P.; Zaleski, S.

    2016-03-01

    The VOFI library has been developed to accurately calculate the volume fraction field demarcated by implicitly-defined fluid interfaces in Cartesian grids with cubic cells. The method enlists a number of algorithms to compute the integration limits and the local height function, that is the integrand of a double Gauss-Legendre integration with a variable number of nodes. Tests in two and three dimensions are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and are provided in the software distribution with C/C++ and FORTRAN interfaces.

  7. Physical aging and structural recovery in a colloidal glass subjected to volume-fraction jump conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2016-04-01

    Three important kinetic phenomena have been cataloged by Kovacs in the investigation of molecular glasses during structural recovery or physical aging. These are responses to temperature-jump histories referred to as intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach, and memory effect. Here we use a thermosensitive polystyrene-poly (N -isopropylacrylamide)-poly (acrylic acid) core-shell particle-based dispersion as a colloidal model and by working at a constant number concentration of particles we use temperature changes to create volume-fraction changes. This imposes conditions similar to those defined by Kovacs on the colloidal system. We use creep experiments to probe the physical aging and structural recovery behavior of colloidal glasses in the Kovacs-type histories and compare the results with those seen in molecular glasses. We find that there are similarities in aging dynamics between molecular glasses and colloidal glasses, but differences also persist. For the intrinsic isotherms, the times teq needed for relaxing or evolving into the equilibrium (or stationary) state are relatively insensitive to the volume fraction and the values of teq are longer than the α -relaxation time τα at the same volume fraction. On the other hand, both of these times grow at least exponentially with decreasing temperature in molecular glasses. For the asymmetry of approach, similar nonlinear behavior is observed for both colloidal and molecular glasses. However, the equilibration time teq is the same for both volume-fraction up-jump and down-jump experiments, different from the finding in molecular glasses that it takes longer for the structure to evolve into equilibrium for the temperature up-jump condition than for the temperature down-jump condition. For the two-step volume-fraction jumps, a memory response is observed that is different from observations of structural recovery in two-step temperature histories in molecular glasses. The concentration dependence of the dynamics

  8. Modified algorithm for generating high volume fraction sphere packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Roberto Roselló; Morales, Irvin Pérez; Vanmaercke, Simon; Morfa, Carlos Recarey; Cortés, Lucía Argüelles; Casañas, Harold Díaz-Guzmán

    2015-06-01

    Advancing front packing algorithms have proven to be very efficient in 2D for obtaining high density sets of particles, especially disks. However, the extension of these algorithms to 3D is not a trivial task. In the present paper, an advancing front algorithm for obtaining highly dense sphere packings is presented. It is simpler than other advancing front packing methods in 3D and can also be used with other types of particles. Comparison with respect to other packing methods have been carried out and a significant improvement in the volume fraction (VF) has been observed. Moreover, the quality of packings was evaluated with indicators other than VF. As additional advantage, the number of generated particles with the algorithm is linear with respect to time.

  9. Determination of Acetonitrile Volume Fraction in Mobile Phase by HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yi; WANG Zhi-wu; GU Jing-kai; WANG Ying-wu

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the development and validation of an assay for the determination of acetonitrile in the recycled mobile phase using high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC).The method is based on that the retention in reversed-phase liquid chromatography increases with decreasing concentration of organic phase in the mobile phase.The natural logarithm of the capacity ratio for a given solute is linearly related to the volume fraction of the organic modifier in the mobile phase.For dimethylphthalate and diethylphthalate,the linearity range is 30%--60%,and for biphenyl and terphenyl,the range is 60%-95%.Precision values(RSD) were both <1% and the accuracy(RE) was in the range of ±1%.The assay was successfully applied to the determination of acetonitrile concentration of recycled mobile phase after the distillation of the column eluent in our laboratory.

  10. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  11. The Effects of Fibre Volume Fraction on a Glass-Epoxy Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian LARCO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the analysis of the longitudinal mechanical properties of Glass Fibre Reinforce Plastic (GFRP plates with different fibre volume fraction, Vf, by considering both analytical and experimental methods. The laminate is 0/90 E-glass/epoxy woven composite material made by hand lay-up technique. Fiber volume fraction, determined by ignition loss method, has a direct influence on the ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity of the composite plate. Tensile tests on specimens with different volume fractions allow the identification of the mathematical relationship between the fibre volume fraction and the longitudinal elastic modulus.

  12. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  13. The rheology of hard sphere suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions: An improved differential viscosity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-28

    We propose a simple and general model accounting for the dependence of the viscosity of a hard sphere suspension at arbitrary volume fractions. The model constitutes a continuum-medium description based on a recursive-differential method where correlations between the spheres are introduced through an effective volume fraction. In contrast to other differential methods, the introduction of the effective volume fraction as the integration variable implicitly considers interactions between the spheres of the same recursive stage. The final expression for the viscosity scales with this effective volume fraction, which allows constructing a master curve that contains all the experimental situations considered. The agreement of our expression for the viscosity with experiments at low- and high-shear rates and in the high-frequency limit is remarkable for all volume fractions.

  14. Mechanical behavior of LC4 alloy in semisolid state at high volume fractions of solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of LC4 alloy in the semisolid state at high volume fractions of solid has been studied through unconstrictive compressing test. The results show that peak stress mainly depends on grain boundary's cohesion and instantaneous strain rate sensitivity in the semisolid state, which is similar to that in the solid state. Analyses on microstructures and status of compressive stress of specimen demonstrate that segregation of liquid-solid phase is mainly affected by strain rate and deformation temperature. There are mainly two kinds of flow in liquid phase: either from the region with relatively large hydrostatic compressive stress to the region with relatively small hydrostatic compressive stress or from the grain boundaries perpendicular to the compression axis to the grain boundaries with a certain directional angle to the compression direction. Based on the above results, compressive deformation mechanism mainly depends on deformation temperature, strain rate and stress state.

  15. Tutorial for Collecting and Processing Images of Composite Structures to Determine the Fiber Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite structures have become more common in aerospace components due to their light weight and structural efficiency. In general, the strength and stiffness of a composite structure are directly related to the fiber volume fraction, which is defined as the fraction of fiber volume to total volume of the composite. The most common method to measure the fiber volume fraction is acid digestion, which is a useful method when the total weight of the composite, the fiber weight, and the total weight can easily be obtained. However, acid digestion is a destructive test, so the material will no longer be available for additional characterization. Acid digestion can also be difficult to machine out specific components of a composite structure with complex geometries. These disadvantages of acid digestion led the author to develop a method to calculate the fiber volume fraction. The developed method uses optical microscopy to calculate the fiber area fraction based on images of the cross section of the composite. The fiber area fraction and fiber volume fraction are understood to be the same, based on the assumption that the shape and size of the fibers are consistent in the depth of the composite. This tutorial explains the developed method for optically determining fiber area fraction performed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  16. Effect of volume fraction of ramie cloth on physical and mechanical properties of ramie cloth/UP resin composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Wen-guang; REN Chao

    2006-01-01

    Ramie cloth/UP resin composite was formed at 0.2 MPa and cured at room temperature for 24 h and treated at 80 ℃ for2 h. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites with different volume fractions of ramie cloth were studied. The results show that,with the increase of the volume fraction of the ramie cloth,densities of the composites become greater and greater,though all lower than the theoretical values,the linear shrinkage during the formation decreases from 1.20% of the original UP resin to 0.18% of the composite with 30% of ramie cloth in volume,all the composites also absorb more water than UP resin casting,greater volume fraction of the fiber,more water will be absorbed,but the increase in water absorption becomes smaller and smaller with time. As regards some mechanical properties,the tensile strength,flexural strength,flexural modulus and impact strength are all improved when more ramie fiber is added. Compared with those of pure UP resin casting,the mechanical properties are increased by 93.93%,76.20%,190.18% and 227.26% respectively when the volume fraction of the ramie cloth in the composite is 30%. The differential scanning calorimetry results show that only one peak will appear for the sample without or with less ramie fiber while two peaks will appear when more ramie cloth is added.

  17. PREDICTION OF CARBON CONCENTRATION AND FERRITE VOLUME FRACTION OF HOT-ROLLED STEEL STRIP DURING LAMINAR COOLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation model was presented for predicting the phase fraction transformed and the carbon concentration in austenite for austenite to ferrite transformation during laminar cooling on run-out table in hot rolling strip mill. In this model, the parameter k in Avrami equation was developed for carbon steels. The wide range of chemical composition, the primary austenite grain size, and the retained strain were taken into account. It can be used to predict the ferrite volume fraction and the carbon concentration in austenite of hot-rolled steel strip during laminar cooling on run-out table. The coiling temperature controlling model was also presented to calculate the temperature of steel strip. The transformation kinetics of austenite to ferrite and the evolution of carbon concentration in austenite at different temperatures during cooling were investigated in the hot rolled Q235B strip for thickness of 9.35, 6.4, and 3.2mm. The ferrite volume fraction along the length of the strip was also calculated. The calculated ferrite volume fraction was compared with the log data from hot strip mill and the calculated results were in agreement with the experimental ones. The present study is a part of the prediction of the mechanical properties of hot-rolled steel strip, and it has already been used on-line and off-line in the hot strip mill.

  18. Prediction of Shrinkage Pore Volume Fraction Using a Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to use a dimensionless form of the well-known Niyama criterion to directly predict the amount of shrinkage porosity that forms during solidification of metal alloy castings. The main advancement offered by this method is that it avoids the need to know the threshold Niyama value below which shrinkage porosity forms; such threshold values are generally unknown and alloy dependent. The dimensionless criterion accounts for both the local thermal conditions (as in the original Niyama criterion) and the properties and solidification characteristics of the alloy. Once a dimensionless Niyama criterion value is obtained from casting simulation results, the corresponding shrinkage pore volume fraction can be determined knowing only the solid fraction-temperature curve and the total solidification shrinkage of the alloy. Curves providing the shrinkage pore volume percentage as a function of the dimensionless Niyama criterion are given for WCB steel, aluminum alloy A356, and magnesium alloy AZ91D. The present method is used in a general-purpose casting simulation software package to predict shrinkage porosity in three-dimensional (3-D) castings. Comparisons between simulated and experimental shrinkage porosity results for a WCB steel plate casting demonstrate that this method can reasonably predict shrinkage. Additional simulations for magnesium alloy AZ91D illustrate that this method is applicable to a wide variety of alloys and casting conditions.

  19. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-01-01

    Volume fraction, the single most important parameter in describing trabecular microstructure, can easily be calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions of micro-CT images. This study sought to quantify the accuracy of this measurement. One hundred and sixty human cancellous bone specimens...... which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner...

  20. The dependencies of phase velocity and dispersion on volume fraction in cancellous-bone-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Keith A

    2009-02-01

    Frequency-dependent phase velocity was measured in eight cancellous-bone-mimicking phantoms consisting of suspensions of randomly oriented nylon filaments (simulating trabeculae) in a soft-tissue-mimicking medium (simulating marrow). Trabecular thicknesses ranged from 152 to 356 mum. Volume fractions of nylon filament material ranged from 0% to 10%. Phase velocity varied approximately linearly with frequency over the range from 300 to 700 kHz. The increase in phase velocity (compared with phase velocity in a phantom containing no filaments) at 500 kHz was approximately proportional to volume fraction occupied by nylon filaments. The derivative of phase velocity with respect to frequency was negative and exhibited nonlinear, monotonically decreasing dependence on volume fraction. The dependencies of phase velocity and its derivative on volume fraction in these phantoms were similar to those reported in previous studies on (1) human cancellous bone and (2) phantoms consisting of parallel nylon wires immersed in water.

  1. Centrifugal Step Emulsification can Produce Water in Oil Emulsions with Extremely High Internal Volume Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Schuler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The high throughput preparation of emulsions with high internal volume fractions is important for many different applications, e.g., drug delivery. However, most emulsification techniques reach only low internal volume fractions and need stable flow rates that are often difficult to control. Here, we present a centrifugal high throughput step emulsification disk for the fast and easy production of emulsions with high internal volume fractions above 95%. The disk produces droplets at generation rates of up to 3700 droplets/s and, for the first time, enables the generation of emulsions with internal volume fractions of >97%. The coefficient of variation between droplet sizes is very good (4%. We apply our system to show the in situ generation of gel emulsion. In the future, the recently introduced unit operation of centrifugal step emulsification may be used for the high throughput production of droplets as reaction compartments for clinical diagnostics or as starting material for micromaterial synthesis.

  2. Evaluating Volume Fractions of the Elements for Composite Laminates by Using Dielectric Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周胜; 储才元; 严灏景

    2001-01-01

    A series and parallel model for investigating the capacity of composite laminates and the relationship between the dielectric properties of the composites and its constituents are presented. Volume fractions of the constituents are considered in this study. The expression of the complex dielectric constants for evaluating volume fractions under discrete frequencies is established and the general solutions for the resultant linear simultaneous equations for system are also exploited.The results show that the high accuracy of proposed method is obtained.

  3. MHD flow of dusty nanofluid over a stretching surface with volume fraction of dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Naramgari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed the momentum and heat transfer behavior of MHD nanofluid embedded with conducting dust particles past a stretching surface in the presence of volume fraction of dust particles. The governing equations of the flow and heat transfer are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and then solved numerically using Runge–Kutta based shooting technique. The effect of non-dimensional governing parameters on velocity and temperature profiles of the flow are discussed and presented through graphs. Additionally friction factor and the Nusselt number have also been computed. Under some special conditions, numerical results obtained by the present study were compared with the existed studies. The result of the present study proves to be highly satisfactory. The results indicate that an increase in the interaction between the fluid and particle phase enhances the heat transfer rate and reduces the friction factor.

  4. In situ synthesis of calcium phosphate-polycaprolactone nanocomposites with high ceramic volume fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, C; Gotman, I; Jiang, X; Fuchs, S; Kirkpatrick, C J; Gutmanas, E Y

    2010-06-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate-PCL nanocomposite powders with unusually high ceramic volume fractions (80-95%) and uniform PCL distribution were synthesized by a non-aqueous chemical reaction in the presence of the dissolved polymer. No visible polymer separation occurred during processing. Depending on the reagents combination, either dicalcium phosphate (DCP) or Ca-deficient HA (CDHA) was obtained. CDHA-PCL composite powders were high pressure consolidated at room temperature yielding dense materials with high compressive strengths. Such densification route provides the possibility of incorporating drug and proteins without damaging their biological activity. The CDHA-PCL composites were tested in osteoblastic and endothelial cell line cultures and were found to support the attachment and proliferation of both cell types.

  5. Deuterium Fractionation and Ion-Molecule Reactions at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar; Hugo, Edouard; Gerlich, Dieter

    2005-08-01

    Understanding deuterium fractionation is currently one of the greatest challenges in astrochemistry. In this contribution deuteration experiments of the series CH_n^+, n=2-5, in a low temperature 22-pole ion trap are used to systematically test a simple chemical rule predicting which molecular ion undergoes deuterium exchange in collisions with HD. CH_4^+ turns out to be a problem case, where prediction fails. The method of laser induced reaction (LIR) is used to determine the population ratio of the lowest ortho-to-para states of H_2D^+ relaxed in collisions with H_2. Preliminary results indicate that the ortho-to-para ratio of H_2D^+ is substantially reduced in para-H_2. This points at the important role of nuclear spin in deuterium fractionation, in particular at the destruction of ortho-H_2D^+ in collisions with ortho-H_2. More systematic LIR experiments are needed for a chemical model of deuterium fractionation including state-to-state modifications of the species involved.

  6. Considerations regarding the volume fraction influence on the wear behavior of the fiber reinforced composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2017-08-01

    This paper contains an analysis of the factors that have an influence on the tribological characteristics of the composite material sintered with metal matrix reinforced with carbon fibers. These composites are used generally if it’s needed the wear resistant materials, whereas these composites have high specific strength in conjunction with a good corrosion resistance at low densities and some self-lubricating properties. Through the knowledge of the better tribological properties of the materials and their behavior to wear, can be generated by dry and the wet friction. Thus, where necessary the use of high temperature resistant material with low friction between the elements, carbon fiber composite materials are very suitable because they have: mechanical strength and good ductility, melting temperature on the higher values, higher electrical and thermal conductivity, lower wear speed and lower friction forces. For this purpose, this paper also contains an experimental program based on the evidence of formaldehyde resin made from fiber reinforced Cu-carbon with the aim to specifically determine the volume of fibers fraction for the consolidation of the composite material. In order to determine the friction coefficient and the wear rates of the various fiber reinforced polymer mixtures of carbon have been used special devices with needle-type with steel disc. These tests were conducted in the atmosphere at the room temperature without external lubrication study taking into consideration the sliding different speeds with constant loading task.

  7. Land surface temperature shaped by urban fractions in megacity region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Yonghong; Jia, Gensuo; Hou, Meiting; Fan, Yanguo; Sun, Zhongchang; Zhu, Yuxiang

    2017-02-01

    Large areas of cropland and natural vegetation have been replaced by impervious surfaces during the recent rapid urbanization in China, which has resulted in intensified urban heat island effects and modified local or regional warming trends. However, it is unclear how urban expansion contributes to local temperature change. In this study, we investigated the relationship between land surface temperature (LST) change and the increase of urban land signals. The megacity of Tianjin was chosen for the case study because it is representative of the urbanization process in northern China. A combined analysis of LST and urban land information was conducted based on an urban-rural transect derived from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and QuickBird images. The results indicated that the density of urban land signals has intensified within a 1-km2 grid in the urban center with an impervious land fraction >60 %. However, the construction on urban land is quite different with low-/mid-rise buildings outnumbering high-rise buildings in the urban-rural transect. Based on a statistical moving window analysis, positive correlation ( R 2 > 0.9) is found between LST and urban land signals. Surface temperature change (ΔLST) increases by 0.062 °C, which was probably caused by the 1 % increase of urbanized land (ΔIF) in this case region.

  8. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of six strongly fractionating microorganisms is not affected by growth temperature under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penger, Jörn; Conrad, Ralf; Blaser, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Temperature is the major driving force for many biological as well as chemical reactions and may impact the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes. Thus, a good correlation between temperature and fractionation is observed in many chemical systems that are controlled by an equilibrium isotope effect. In contrast, biological systems that are usually controlled by a kinetic isotope effect are less well studied with respect to temperature effects and have shown contrasting results. We studied three different biological pathways (methylotrophic methanogenesis, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, acetogenesis by the acetyl-CoA pathway) which are characterized by very strong carbon isotope enrichment factors (-50‰ to -83‰). The microorganisms (Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanolobus zinderi, Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus, Thermoanaerobacter kivui) exhibiting these pathways were grown at different temperatures ranging between 25 and 68 °C, and the fractionation factors were determined from 13C/12C isotope discrimination during substrate depletion and product formation. Our experiments showed that the fractionation factors were different for the different metabolic pathways but were not much affected by the different growth temperatures. Slight variations were well within the standard errors of replication and regression analysis. Our results showed that temperature had no significant effect on the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during anaerobic microbial metabolism with relatively strong isotope fractionation.

  9. A Novel Semiautomated Fractional Limb Volume Tool for Rapid and Reproducible Fetal Soft Tissue Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Lauren M; Kim, Sung Yoon; Lee, Sungmin; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lee, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the reproducibility and efficiency of a semiautomated image analysis tool that rapidly provides fetal fractional limb volume measurements. Fifty pregnant women underwent 3-dimensional sonographic examinations for fractional arm and thigh volumes at a mean menstrual age of 31.3 weeks. Manual and semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements were calculated, with the semiautomated measurements calculated by novel software (5D Limb Vol; Samsung Medison, Seoul, Korea). The software applies an image transformation method based on the major axis length, minor axis length, and limb center coordinates. A transformed image is used to perform a global optimization technique for determination of an optimal limb soft tissue boundary. Bland-Altman analysis defined bias with 95% limits of agreement (LOA) between methods, and timing differences between manual versus automated methods were compared by a paired t test. Bland-Altman analysis indicated an acceptable bias with 95% LOA between the manual and semiautomated methods: mean arm volume ± SD, 1.7% ± 4.6% (95% LOA, -7.3% to 10.7%); and mean thigh volume, 0.0% ± 3.8% (95% LOA, -7.5% to 7.5%). The computer-assisted software completed measurements about 5 times faster compared to manual tracings. In conclusion, semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements are significantly faster to calculate when compared to a manual procedure. These results are reproducible and are likely to reduce operator dependency. The addition of computer-assisted fractional limb volume to standard biometry may improve the precision of estimated fetal weight by adding a soft tissue component to the weight estimation process.

  10. Effects of volume fraction condition on thermodynamic restrictions in mixture theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛永红; 苗天德

    2002-01-01

    Volume fraction condition is a true constraint that must be taken into consideration in deducing the thermodynamic restrictions of mixture theory applying the axiom of dissipation. For a process to be admissible, the constraints imposed by the volume fraction condition include not only the equation obtained by taking its material derivative with respect to the motion of a given phase, but also those by taking its spatial gradient. The thermodynamic restrictions are deduced under the complete constraints, the results obtained are consistent for the mixtures with or without a compressible phase,and in which the free energy of each phase depends on the densities of all phases.

  11. Analysis of the Microstructure and Permeability of the Laminates with Different Fiber Volume Fraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yue; LI Wei; LIANG Zi-qing

    2008-01-01

    Microstmctures of laminates produced by epoxy/ carbon fibers with different fiber volume fraction were studied by analyzing the composite cross-sections. The main result of the compaction of reinforcement is the flatting of bundle shape, the reducing of gap and the embedment of bundles among each layer. The void content outside the bundle decreased sharply during the compoction until it is less than that inside the bundle when the fiber volume fraction is over 60%. The resin flow velocity in the fiber tow is 102-104 times greater than the flow velocity out the fiber tow no matter the capillary pressure is taken into account or not.

  12. Vibrations of FGM thin cylindrical shells with exponential volume fraction law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul Ghafar Shah; Tahir Mahmood; Muhammad Nawaz Naeem

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the influence of an exponential volume fraction law on the vibration frequencies of thin functionally graded cylindrical shells is studied. Material properties in the shell thickness direction are graded in accordance with the exponential law. Expressions for the strain-displacement and curvature-displacement relationships are taken from Love's thin shell theory. The Rayleigh-Ritz approach is used to derive the shell eigenfrequency equation. Axial modal dependence is assumed in the characteristic beam functions. Natural frequencies of the shells are observed to be dependent on the constituent volume fractions. The results are compared with those available in the literature for the validity of the present methodology.

  13. Prediction of volume fractions in three-phase flows using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques Salgado, Cesar [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)], E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br; Brandao, Luis E.B. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil); Schirru, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE-DNC/EE-CT, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21941-972-Caixa Postal 68509 (Brazil); Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil); Silva, Ademir Xavier da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE-DNC/EE-CT, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21941-972-Caixa Postal 68509 (Brazil); Ramos, Robson [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    This work presents methodology based on nuclear technique and artificial neural network for volume fraction predictions in annular, stratified and homogeneous oil-water-gas regimes. Using principles of gamma-ray absorption and scattering together with an appropriate geometry, comprised of three detectors and a dual-energy gamma-ray source, it was possible to obtain data, which could be adequately correlated to the volume fractions of each phase by means of neural network. The MCNP-X code was used in order to provide the training data for the network.

  14. Research on Cellular Instabilities of Lean Premixed Syngas Flames under Various Hydrogen Fractions Using a Constant Volume Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Meng Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the intrinsic instabilities of H2/CO lean (φ = 0.4 to φ = 1.0 premixed flames at different hydrogen fractions ranging from 0% to 100% at elevated pressure and room temperature was performed in a constant volume vessel using a Schlieren system. The unstretched laminar burning velocities were compared with data from the previous literature and simulated results. The results indicate that excellent agreements are obtained. The cellular instabilities of syngas-air flames were discussed and critical flame radii were measured. When hydrogen fractions are above 50%, the flame tends to be more stable as the equivalence ratio increases; however, the instability increases for flames of lower hydrogen fractions. For the premixed syngas flame with hydrogen fractions greater than 50%, the decline in cellular instabilities induced by the increase in equivalence ratio can be attributed to a reduction of diffusive-thermal instabilities rather than increased hydrodynamic instabilities. For premixed syngas flames with hydrogen fractions lower than 50%, as the equivalence ratio increases, the cellular instabilities become more evident because the enhanced hydrodynamic instabilities become the dominant effect. For premixed syngas flames, the enhancement of cellular instabilities induced by the increase in hydrogen fraction is the result of both increasing diffusive-thermal and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  15. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Crabeck

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate 3-D images of air-volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4–22 cm sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air-volume fractions 5 mm. While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of air inclusions, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice microstructure (granular and columnar as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration and can help considerably improving parameterization of these processes in sea ice biogeochemical models.

  16. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabeck, Odile; Galley, Ryan; Delille, Bruno; Else, Brent; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Lemes, Marcos; Des Roches, Mathieu; Francus, Pierre; Tison, Jean-Louis; Rysgaard, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate images of air volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air volume fractions bubbles (Ø bubbles (1 mm bubbles (Ø > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of gas bubbles, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice texture (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration.

  17. Influence of bress laminate volume fraction on electromechanical properties of externally laminated coated conductor tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bautista, Zhierwinjay M.; Shin, Hyung Seop [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Hun; Lee, Hun Ju; Moon, Seung Hyun [SuNAM Co Ltd., Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The enhancement of mechanical properties of coated conductor (CC) tapes in practical application are usually achieved by reinforcing through lamination or electroplating metal layers on either sides of the CC tape. Mechanical or electromechanical properties of the CC tapes have been largely affected by the lamination structure under various loading modes such as tension, bending or even cyclic. In this study, the influence of brass laminate volume fraction on electromechanical properties of RCE-DR processed Gadolinium-barium-copper-oxide (GdBCO) CC tapes was investigated. The samples used were composed of single-side and both-side laminate of brass layer to the Cu-stabilized CC tape and their Ic behaviors were compared to those of the Cu-stabilized CC tape without external lamination. The stress/strain dependences of Ic in laminated CC tapes under uniaxial tension were analyzed and the irreversible stress/strain limits were determined. As a result, the increase of brass laminate volume fraction initially increased the irreversible strain limit and became gradual. The corresponding irreversible stress limit, however, showed no difference even though the brass laminate volume fraction increased to 3.4. But the irreversible load limit linearly increased with the brass laminate volume fraction.

  18. Spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction partial-volume irradiation: a swine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medin, P.M.; Foster, R.D.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Sayre, J.W.; McBride, W.H.; Solberg, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation in swine. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A 5-cm-long cervical segment was irradiated in 38-47-week-old Yucatan minipigs using a dedicated, image-guided radiosurgery linear accelerator. The radiation was delivered

  19. Determination of volume fractions of texture components with standard distributions in Euler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hyung; Rollett, A. D.; Oh, K. H.

    2004-03-01

    The intensities of texture components are modeled by Gaussian distribution functions in Euler space. The multiplicities depend on the relation between the texture component and the crystal and sample symmetry elements. Higher multiplicities are associated with higher maximum values in the orientation distribution function (ODF). The ODF generated by Gaussian function shows that the S component has a multiplicity of 1, the brass and copper components, 2, and the Goss and cube components, 4 in the cubic crystal and orthorhombic sample symmetry. Typical texture components were modeled using standard distributions in Euler space to calculate a discrete ODF, and their volume fractions were collected and verified against the volume used to generate the ODF. The volume fraction of a texture component that has a standard spherical distribution can be collected using the misorientation approach. The misorientation approach means integrating the volume-weighted intensity that is located within a specified cut-off misorientation angle from the ideal orientation. The volume fraction of a sharply peaked texture component can be collected exactly with a small cut-off value, but textures with broad distributions (large full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)) need a larger cut-off value. Larger cut-off values require Euler space to be partitioned between texture components in order to avoid overlapping regions. The misorientation approach can be used for texture's volume in Euler space in a general manner. Fiber texture is also modeled with Gaussian distribution, and it is produced by rotation of a crystal located at g 0, around a sample axis. The volume of fiber texture in wire drawing or extrusion also can be calculated easily in the unit triangle with the angle distance approach.

  20. Tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions in breast DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Jeong Seon; Park, Sang Joon; Jung, Yun Sub; Song, Jung Joo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to classify contrast enhancement curves using both three-time-points (3TP) method and clustering approach at full-time points, and to introduce a novel evaluation method using perfusion volume fractions for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. DCE-MRI was applied to 24 lesions (12 malignant, 12 benign). After region growing segmentation for each lesion, hole-filling and 3D morphological erosion and dilation were performed for extracting final lesion volume. 3TP method and k-means clustering at full-time points were applied for classifying kinetic curves into six classes. Intratumoral volume fraction for each class was calculated. ROC and linear discriminant analyses were performed with distributions of the volume fractions for each class, pairwise and whole classes, respectively. The best performance in each class showed accuracy (ACC), 84.7% (sensitivity (SE), 100%; specificity (SP), 66.7% to a single class) to 3TP method, whereas ACC, 73.6% (SE, 41.7%; SP, 100% to a single class) to k-means clustering. The best performance in pairwise classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7% to four class pairs and SE, 58.3%; SP, 91.7% to a single class pair) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 75%; SP, 75% to a single class pair and SE, 66.7%; SP, 83.3% to three class pairs) to k-means clustering. The performance in whole classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7%) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 91.7%; 58.3%) to k-means clustering. The results indicate that tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions is helpful in selecting meaningful kinetic patterns for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions, and that two different classification methods are complementary to each other.

  1. Measurements of γ/γ' Lattice Misfit and γ' Volume Fraction for a Ru-containing Nickel-based Single Crystal Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.P. Tan; J.L. Liu; X P Song; T. Jin; X.F. Sun; Z.Q. Hu

    2011-01-01

    A conventional X-ray difFractometer has been used to determine the -y/y' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction for a Ru-containing nickel-based single crystal superalloy at room temperature. The rocking curve was used to characterize the distribution of subgrains. The diffraction peaks obtained by w-20 scan were used to determine the γ/γ' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction. A three peaks fitting model was proposed. The peak fitting results are in good agreement with the model. The X-ray diffraction results indicate that the nickel-based single crystal superalloy was not a perfect monocrystalline material, which is comprised of many subgrains; and each subgrain also consists of large numbers of mosaic structures. In addition, two anomalous reflection phenomena were found during the experiment and discussed with respect to their occurrence and impact on the measurement. The experimental results show that the γ/γ' lattice misfit and ~/r volume fraction will be various at the different regions of its dendritic microstructure. The average γ/γ' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction of the experimental alloy are approximately-0.2% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, the γ' volume fraction calculated by atom microprobe (AP) data is also basically consistent with the experimental results.

  2. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  3. Volume fraction prediction in biphasic flow using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Cesar M.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The volume fraction is one of the most important parameters used to characterize air-liquid two-phase flows. It is a physical value to determine other parameters, such as the phase's densities and to determine the flow rate of each phase. These parameters are important to predict the flow pattern and to determine a mathematical model for the system. To study, for example, heat transfer and pressure drop. This work presents a methodology for volume fractions prediction in water-gas stratified flow regime using the nuclear technique and artificial intelligence. The volume fractions calculate in biphasic flow systems is complex and the analysis by means of analytical equations becomes very difficult. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means of the artificial neural network. The detection system uses appropriate broad beam geometry, comprised of a ({sup 137}Cs) energy gamma-ray source and a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in order measure transmitted beam whose the counts rates are influenced by the phases composition. These distributions are directly used by the network without any parameterization of the measured signal. The ideal and static theoretical models for stratified regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the network. The detector also was modeled with this code and the results were compared to experimental photopeak efficiency measurements of radiation sources. The proposed network could obtain with satisfactory prediction of the volume fraction in water-gas system, demonstrating to be a promising approach for this purpose. (author)

  4. Modeling the Effect of Glass Microballoon (GMB) Volume Fraction on Behavior of Sylgard/GMB Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This work was done to support customer questions about whether a Sylgard/Glass Microballoon (GMB) potting material in current use could be replaced with pure Sylgard and if this would significantly change stresses imparted to internal components under thermal cycling conditions. To address these questions, we provide micromechanics analysis of Sylgard/GMB materials using both analytic composite theory and finite element simulations to better understand the role of the GMB volume fraction in determining thermal expansion coefficient, elastic constants, and behavior in both confined and unconfined compression boundary value problems. A key finding is that damage accumulation in the material from breakage of GMBs significantly limits the global stress magnitude and results in a plateau stress behavior over large ranges of compressive strain. The magnitude of this plateau stress is reduced with higher volume fractions of GMBs. This effect is particularly pronounced in confined compression, which we estimate bears the most similarity to the application of interest. This stress-limiting damage mechanism is not present in pure Sylgard, however, and the result is much higher stresses under confined compression. Thus, we recommend that some volume fraction greater than 10% GMBs be used for confined deformation applications.

  5. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  6. Salinity independent volume fraction prediction in water-gas-oil multiphase flows using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, C.M.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (DIRA/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radiofarmacos

    2011-07-01

    This work investigates the response of a volume fraction prediction system for water-gas-oil multiphase flows considering variations on water salinity. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means the artificial neural networks (ANNs). The detection system uses appropriate fan beam geometry, comprised of a dual-energy gamma-ray source and two NaI(Tl) detectors adequately positioned outside the pipe in order measure transmitted and scattered beams. An ideal and static theoretical model for annular flow regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the ANN. More than 500 simulations have been done, in which water salinity have been ranged from 0 to 16% in order to cover a most practical situations. Validation tests have included values of volume fractions and water salinity different from those used in ANN training phase. The results presented here show that the proposed approach may be successfully applied to material volume fraction prediction on watergas- oil multiphase flows considering practical (real) levels of variations in water salinity. (author)

  7. Stereological evaluation of the volume and volume fraction of newborns' brain compartment and brain in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisari, Mehtap; Ertekin, Tolga; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Cınar, Serife; Doğanay, Selim; Acer, Niyazi

    2012-11-01

    Brain development in early life is thought to be critical period in neurodevelopmental disorder. Knowledge relating to this period is currently quite limited. This study aimed to evaluate the volume relation of total brain (TB), cerebrum, cerebellum and bulbus+pons by the use of Archimedes' principle and stereological (point-counting) method and after that to compare these approaches with each other in newborns. This study was carried out on five newborn cadavers mean weighing 2.220 ± 1.056 g with no signs of neuropathology. The mean (±SD) age of the subjects was 39.7 (±1.5) weeks. The volume and volume fraction of the total brain, cerebrum, cerebellum and bulbus+pons were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images using the point-counting approach of stereological methods and by the use of fluid displacement technique. The mean (±SD) TB, cerebrum, cerebellum and bulbus+pons volumes by fluid displacement were 271.48 ± 78.3, 256.6 ± 71.8, 12.16 ± 6.1 and 2.72 ± 1.6 cm3, respectively. By the Cavalieri principle (point-counting) using sagittal MRIs, they were 262.01 ± 74.9, 248.11 ± 68.03, 11.68 ± 6.1 and 2.21 ± 1.13 cm3, respectively. The mean (± SD) volumes by point-counting technique using axial MR images were 288.06 ± 88.5, 275.2 ± 83.1, 19.75 ± 5.3 and 2.11 ± 0.7 cm3, respectively. There were no differences between the fluid displacement and point-counting (using axial and sagittal images) for all structures (p > 0.05). This study presents the basic data for studies relative to newborn's brain volume fractions according to two methods. Stereological (point-counting) estimation may be accepted a beneficial and new tool for neurological evaluation in vivo research of the brain. Based on these techniques we introduce here, the clinician may evaluate the growth of the brain in a more efficient and precise manner.

  8. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  9. Experimental study on stable isotopic fractionation of evaporating water under varying temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-ying HU; Wei-min BAO; Tao WANG; Si-min QU

    2009-01-01

    The variation of stable isotope ratios in natural waters provides valuable information that can be used to trace water movement. Evaporation plays a crucial role in determining the variation of stable isotopes. In this paper, several evaporation experiments were conducted in order to study the stable isotopic fractionation mechanism of water and analyze the influence of different temperatures on evaporation fractionation. Three group experiments of water evaporation under different temperatures and initial isotopic values were carried out. The results show that fractionation factors of hydrogen and oxygen may increase with temperature, and the average enrichment degree of hydrogen isotope D is 3.432 times that of oxygen isotope 18O. The results also show that the isotopic composition of the initial water has little influence on water evaporation fractionation, which is mainly affected by the state variables in the evaporation process, such as temperature. This research provides experimental data for further understanding the evaporation fractionation mechanism.

  10. Comparative study of bulk metallic glass composites with high-volume-fractioned dendritic and spherical b. c. c. phase precipitates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-yuan Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A dendritic β-phase reinforced bulk metallic glass (BMG composite named as D2 was prepared by rapid quenching of a homogenous Zr60Ti14.67Nb5.33Cu5.56Ni4.44Be10 melt, and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM observation and room-temperature compression test. The microstructure and mechanical properties were compared with those of the spherical β-phase reinforced composite named as composite S2. It was found that the composite D2 contains β-phase dendrites up to 56% in volume-fraction, and exhibits a ductile compressive behavior with plastic strain of 12.7%. As the high-volume-fractioned β-phase dendrites transferred to coarse spherical particles of about 20 μm in diameter in the composite S2, a much improved plastic strain up to 20.4% can be achieved. Micrographs of the fractured samples reveal different interaction modes of the propagating shear bands with the dendritic and spherical β phase inclusions, resulting in different shear strains in the composite samples. The matrix of composite S2 undergoes a significantly larger shear strain than that of the composite D2 before ultimate failure, which is thought to be mainly responsible for the greatly increased global plastic strain of the S2 relative to D2.

  11. Investigation of the Temperature-Dependent Specific Volume of Supported Polystyrene Films Upon Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinru; Roth, Connie

    2015-03-01

    The experimentally observed large changes in the glass transition temperature Tg of ultrathin supported and free-standing polymer films with decreasing thickness h have puzzled the field for more than two decades. An open question at present is what material property changes correspond to the large shifts in film dynamics upon confinement. Thermodynamic theories have predicted that the observed Tg(h) decrease in ultrathin polymer films may be tied to small shifts in the specific volume of the liquid-line above Tg. Here we use ellipsometry to investigate the temperature-dependent specific volume for supported polystyrene (PS) films of different thicknesses. Using the Lorentz-Lorenz parameter as a measure of the relative change in film density, we calculate the specific volume from temperature-dependent measurements of the index of refraction. While the slope of the liquid-line (thermal expansion coefficient) remains constant upon confinement, the Tg(h) decrease is accompanied with a broadening of the transition and a small increase in the glassy-line thermal expansion, consistent with a larger fraction of the sample remaining liquid to lower temperatures. We find that both the liquid and glass specific volume lines shift together with decreasing thickness indicative of small 0.5-1% changes in overall film density with decreasing thickness.

  12. Modeling of Sokoto Daily Average Temperature: A Fractional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the daily average temperature (DAT) series of Sokoto metropolis for the period of 01/01/2003 to. 03/04/2007. ... in Melbourne, Australia, for the period 1981–1990 ..... Advances in Meteorology, 1-2. Period ... paper, Department of Economics.

  13. Effect of volume fraction of Polypropylene Fiber on Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Rajguru,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the result of polypropylene fiber on mechanical properties of concrete is studied. Polypropylene fibers of 12mm cut length and 6 denier were added at volume fraction of 0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75% & 1 %.The cube, cylinder and beams wear tested under two point loads on UTM. The results showed that the addition of polypropylene fiber significantly improved the compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength, reserve strength and ductility of fiber reinforced concrete.

  14. A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, L.

    2014-01-10

    Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.

  15. Fractional calculus approach to study temperature distribution within a spinning satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotindra C. Prajapati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the temperature distribution within spinning satellites and problem is formulated in terms of fractional differential equation. Applying fractional calculus approach, solution of this equation is obtained in terms of Wright generalized hypergeometric function, a generalization of exponential function.

  16. Temperature dependence of the spin polarization in the fractional quantum Hall effects

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    2000-01-01

    Using a Hamiltonian formulation of Composite Fermions that I recently developed with R. Shankar, I compute the dependence of the spin polarization on the temperature for the translationally invariant fractional quantum Hall states at $\

  17. Impact of ribs on flow parameters and laminar heat transfer of water–aluminum oxide nanofluid with different nanoparticle volume fractions in a three-dimensional rectangular microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Ali Akbari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to study the impact of ribs on flow parameters and laminar heat transfer of water–aluminum oxide nanofluid with different nanoparticle volume fractions in a three-dimensional rectangular microchannel. To this aim, compulsory convection heat transfer of water–aluminum oxide nanofluid in a rib-roughened microchannel has been numerically studied. The results of this simulation for rib-roughened three-dimensional microchannel have been evaluated in contrast to the smooth (unribbed three-dimensional microchannel with identical geometrical and heat–fluid boundary conditions. Numerical simulation is performed for different nanoparticle volume fractions for Reynolds numbers of 10 and 100. Cold fluid entering the microchannel is heated in order to apply constant flux to external surface of the microchannel walls and then leaves it. Given the results, the fluid has a higher heat transfer with a hot wall in surfaces with ribs rather than in smooth ones. As Reynolds number, number of ribs, and nanoparticle volume fractions increase, more temperature increase happens in fluid in exit intersection of the microchannel. By investigating Nusselt number and friction factor, it is observed that increase in nanoparticle volume fractions causes nanofluid heat transfer properties to have a higher heat transfer and friction factor compared to the base fluid used in cooling due to an increase in viscosity.

  18. Solid volume fraction estimation of bone:marrow replica models using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of both ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone and its exact dependence upon the material and structural properties. It has recently been proposed that ultrasound wave propagation in cancellous bone may be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays; the transit time of each ray defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. A Transit Time Spectrum (TTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing the lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface aperture of the receive ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the solid volume fraction (SVF) of simplified bone:marrow replica models may be reliably estimated from the corresponding ultrasound transit time spectrum. Transit time spectra were derived via digital deconvolution of the experimentally measured input and output ultrasonic signals, and compared to predicted TTS based on the parallel sonic ray concept, demonstrating agreement in both position and amplitude of spectral peaks. Solid volume fraction was calculated from the TTS; agreement between true (geometric calculation) with predicted (computer simulation) and experimentally-derived values were R(2)=99.9% and R(2)=97.3% respectively. It is therefore envisaged that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) offers the potential to reliably estimate bone mineral density and hence the established T-score parameter for clinical osteoporosis assessment.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Pressure-volume-Temperature Mass Gauging Method Under Microgravity Condition by Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mansu; Park, Hana; Yoo, DonGyu; Jung, Youngsuk; Jeong, Sangkwon

    Gauging the volume or mass of liquid propellant of a rocket vehicle in space is an important issue for its economic feasibility and optimized design of loading mass. Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging method is one of the most suitable measuring techniques in space due to its simplicity and reliability. This paper presents unique experimental results and analyses of PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition by parabolic flight. A vacuum-insulated and cylindrical-shaped liquid nitrogen storage tank with 9.2 L volume is manufactured by observing regulation of parabolic flight. PVT gauging experiments are conducted under low liquid fraction condition from 26% to 32%. Pressure, temperature, and the injected helium mass into the storage tank are measured to obtain the ullage volume by gas state equation. Liquid volume is finally derived by the measured ullage volume and the known total tank volume. Two sets of parabolic flights are conducted and each set is composed of approximately 10 parabolic flights. In the first set of flights, the short initial waiting time (3 ∼ 5 seconds) cannot achieve sufficient thermal equilibrium condition at the beginning. It causes inaccurate gauging results due to insufficient information of the initial helium partial pressure in the tank. The helium injection after 12 second waiting time at microgravity condition with high mass flow rate in the second set of flights achieves successful initial thermal equilibrium states and accurate measurement results of initial helium partial pressure. Liquid volume measurement errors in the second set are within 11%.

  20. Temperature dependence of polyhedral cage volumes in clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.; Jones, C.Y.; Toby, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The polyhedral cage volumes of structure I (sI) (carbon dioxide, methane, trimethylene oxide) and structure II (sII) (methane-ethane, propane, tetrahydrofuran, trimethylene oxide) hydrates are computed from atomic positions determined from neutron powder-diffraction data. The ideal structural formulas for sI and sII are, respectively, S2L6 ?? 46H2O and S16L???8 ?? 136H2O, where S denotes a polyhedral cage with 20 vertices, L a 24-cage, and L??? a 28-cage. The space-filling polyhedral cages are defined by the oxygen atoms of the hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Collectively, the mean cage volume ratio is 1.91 : 1.43 : 1 for the 28-cage : 24-cage : 20-cage, which correspond to equivalent sphere radii of 4.18, 3.79, and 3.37 A??, respectively. At 100 K, mean polyhedral volumes are 303.8, 227.8, and 158.8 A??3 for the 28-cage, 24-cage, and 20-cage, respectively. In general, the 20-cage volume for a sII is larger than that of a sI, although trimethylene oxide is an exception. The temperature dependence of the cage volumes reveals differences between apparently similar cages with similar occupants. In the case of trimethylene oxide hydrate, which forms both sI and sII, the 20-cages common to both structures contract quite differently. From 220 K, the sII 20-cage exhibits a smooth monotonic reduction in size, whereas the sI 20-cage initially expands upon cooling to 160 K, then contracts more rapidly to 10 K, and overall the sI 20-cage is larger than the sII 20-cage. The volumes of the large cages in both structures contract monotonically with decreasing temperature. These differences reflect reoriented motion of the trimethyelene oxide molecule in the 24-cage of sI, consistent with previous spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. For the 20-cages in methane hydrate (sI) and a mixed methane-ethane hydrate (sII), both containing methane as the guest molecule, the temperature dependence of the 20-cage volume in sII is much less than that in sI, but sII is overall

  1. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    .3, and thus more than one mass-independent isotope effect is inferred. MIF of mercury can be caused by the nuclear volume effect. Schauble, 2007 has calculated nuclear volume fractionation scaling factors for a number of common mercury chemical species in equilibrium with Hg° vapor. From his calculations the nuclear field shift effect is larger in Δ199Hg than in Δ201Hg by approximately a factor of two. The predominant mercury chemical species in fish is methylmercury cysteine. From the experimental studies of Buchachenko and others (2004) on the reaction of methylmercury chloride with creatine kinase it seems reasonable to predicted that the thiol functional groups of cysteine gets enriched in 199Hg and 201Hg. Here the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) produces a kinetic partial separation of isotopes with non-zero nuclear spin quantum numbers from the even-N isotopes. The ratio of enrichment of Δ201Hg /Δ199Hg is predicted from theory to be 1.11, which is the ratio of the magnetic moments of 199Hg and 201Hg. Because mercury possesses two odd-N isotopes, it is possible to detect and evaluate the effects of two distinct, mass-independent isotope fractionating processes. From the data obtained on fish samples, we can deconvolute the contributions of the isotope effects of nuclear mass, spin and volume. For these samples the role of spin or the magnetic isotope effect is the most dominant.

  2. Temperature dependency of the triple isotope fractionation relationship for equilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, J. A.; Cao, X.; Bao, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of an approximation to the Bigeleisen-Mayer-Urey model for isotope fractionation has led to the concept of a constant, and later constrained, mass fractionation law for multiple isotopes of the same element. This concept has brought new insights to investigation in photochemistry, radical chemistry, or the contribution of quantum tunneling to chemical and biological processes. Despite previous work indicating that these mass fractionation laws can be highly variable, the concept of a constant relationship remains common in these fields. Using the diatomic case as a first-order approximation, we demonstrate generically that the mass fractionation exponent, θ, can take any value for small fractionations but is less variable for large fractionations. The predicted variability is larger than both theoretical and analytical precision. These deviations from the traditional range of mass-dependence exponents are the largest under cross-over scenarios, but can occur for any scenario with small fractionations. We advocate the use of ∆∆‡M or "change in cap-delta", defined strictly with a slope of at the high-temperature limit, as a necessary, more reliable and more useful descriptor of mass-dependent fractionation. This work can bring new insights and a conventional explanation to low temperature experiments yielding traditionally unusual mass fractionation laws.

  3. Microchemostat array with small-volume fraction replenishment for steady-state microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaewon; Wu, Jianzhang; Polymenis, Michael; Han, Arum

    2013-11-07

    A chemostat is a bioreactor in which microorganisms can be cultured at steady-state by controlling the rate of culture medium inflow and waste outflow, thus maintaining media composition over time. Even though many microbial studies could greatly benefit from studying microbes in steady-state conditions, high instrument cost, complexity, and large reagent consumption hamper the routine use of chemostats. Microfluidic-based chemostats (i.e. microchemostats) can operate with significantly smaller reagent consumption while providing accurate chemostatic conditions at orders of magnitude lower cost compared to conventional chemostats. Also, microchemostats have the potential to significantly increase the throughput by integrating arrays of microchemostats. We present a microchemostat array with a unique two-depth culture chamber design that enables small-volume fraction replenishment of culture medium as low as 1% per replenishment cycle in a 250 nl volume. A system having an array of 8 microchemostats on a 40 × 60 mm(2) footprint could be automatically operated in parallel by a single controller unit as a demonstration for potential high throughput microbial studies. The model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, successfully reached a stable steady-state of different cell densities as a demonstration of the chemostatic functionality by programming the dilution rates. Chemostatic functionality of the system was further confirmed by quantifying the budding index as a function of dilution rate, a strong indicator of growth-dependent cell division. In addition, the small-volume fraction replenishment feature minimized the cell density fluctuation during the culture. The developed system provides a robust, low-cost, and higher throughput solution to furthering studies in microbial physiology.

  4. Finite volume form factors and correlation functions at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Pozsgay, Balázs

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate finite size effects in 1+1 dimensional integrable QFT. In particular we consider matrix elements of local operators (finite volume form factors) and vacuum expectation values and correlation functions at finite temperature. In the first part of the thesis we give a complete description of the finite volume form factors in terms of the infinite volume form factors (solutions of the bootstrap program) and the S-matrix of the theory. The calculations are correct to all orders in the inverse of the volume, only exponentially decaying (residual) finite size effects are neglected. We also consider matrix elements with disconnected pieces and determine the general rule for evaluating such contributions in a finite volume. The analytic results are tested against numerical data obtained by the truncated conformal space approach in the Lee-Yang model and the Ising model in a magnetic field. In a separate section we also evaluate the leading exponential correction (the $\\mu$-term) associate...

  5. Critical temperature and condensed fraction of Bose-Einstein condensation in optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Critical temperature and condensate fraction of Bose-Einstein condensation in the optical lattice are studied. The results show that the critical temperature in optical lattices can be characterized with an equivalent critical temperature in a single lattice, which provide a fast evaluation of critical temperature and condensate fraction of Bose-Einstein condensation confined with pure optical trap. Critical temperature can be estimated with an equivalent critical temperature. It is predicted that critical temperature is proportional to q in q number lattices for superfluid state and should be equal to that in a single lattic for Mott insulate state. Required potential depth or Rabi frequency and maximum atom number in the lattices both for superfluid state and Mott state are presented based on views of thermal mechanical statistics.

  6. A transient method for measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow using acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow by using an acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) method in a transient way is studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the effects of sizes and locations of a single air bubble in a cylindrical cavity with two open ends on resonant frequencies are investigated numerically. Then, a transient measurement system for ARS is established, and the trends of the resonant frequencies (RFs) and resonant amplitudes (RAs) in the cylindrical cavity with gas flux inside are investigated experimentally. The measurement results by the proposed transient method are compared with those by steady-state ones and numerical ones. The numerical results show that the RFs of the cavity are highly sensitive to the volume of the single air bubble. A tiny bubble volume perturbation may cause a prominent RF shift even though the volume of the air bubble is smaller than 0.1% of that of the cavity. When the small air bubble moves, the RF shift will change and reach its maximum value as it is located at the middle of the cavity. As the gas volume fraction of the two-phase flow is low, both the RFs and RAs from the measurement results decrease dramatically with the increasing gas volume, and this decreasing trend gradually becomes even as the gas volume fraction increases further. These experimental results agree with the theoretical ones qualitatively. In addition, the transient method for ARS is more suitable for measuring the gas volume fraction with randomness and instantaneity than the steady-state one, because the latter could not reflect the random and instant characteristics of the mixed fluid due to the time consumption for frequency sweeping. This study will play a very important role in the quantitative measurement of the gas volume fraction of multiphase flows.

  7. Volume fraction instability in an oscillating non-Brownian iso-dense suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roht, Y. L.; Gauthier, G.; Hulin, J. P.; Salin, D.; Chertcoff, R.; Auradou, H.; Ippolito, I.

    2017-06-01

    The instability of an iso-dense non-Brownian suspension of polystyrene beads of diameter 40 μm dispersed in a water-glycerol mixture submitted to a periodic square wave oscillating flow in a Hele-Shaw cell is studied experimentally. The instability gives rise to stationary bead concentration waves transverse to the flow. It has been observed for average particle volume fractions between 0.25 and 0.4, for periods of the square wave flow variation between 0.4 and 10 s and in finite intervals of the amplitude of the fluid displacement. The study shows that the wavelength λ increases roughly linearly with the amplitude of the oscillatory flow; on the other hand, λ is independent of the particle concentration and of the period of oscillation of the flow although the minimum threshold amplitude for observing the instability increases with the period.

  8. Diffusion characteristics and extracellular volume fraction during normoxia and hypoxia in slices of rat neostriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, M E; Nicholson, C

    1991-02-01

    1. Diffusion properties of submerged, superfused slices from the rat neostriatum were measured by quantitative analysis of concentration-time profiles of tetramethylammonium (TMA+) introduced by iontophoresis. TMA+ was sensed at an ion-selective microelectrode (ISM) positioned 100-150 microns from the source pipette. Slice viability was assessed from the extracellular field potentials evoked by intrastriatal electrical stimulation. 2. Under normoxic conditions the extracellular volume fraction (alpha) was 0.21 (range 0.18-0.24), and the tortuosity (lambda) was 1.54, in slices with good field potentials. In slices with poor field potentials, alpha was 0.09-0.16. Extraction of correct alpha and lambda in the slice required evaluation of nonspecific uptake, k', which was 1 x 10(-2) s-1. 3. Slices were made hypoxic by superfusing physiological saline equilibrated with 95% N2-5% CO2 for 10-30 min. Synaptic components of field potentials were inhibited after 3-4 min in hypoxic media. In some experiments extracellular K+ concentration [( K+]o) was monitored with ISMs. During hypoxia, [K+]o rose from an average baseline of 5.1 mM to 7-10 mM. After reoxygenation, [K+]o transiently fell below the original level. 4. The average value for alpha during hypoxia was 0.13 (a 38% decrease), which was significantly different from control (P less than 0.001) and increased progressively during hypoxic exposure. In contrast, tortuosity and k' were unchanged by this treatment. 5. These data represent the first characterization of the diffusion properties of the rat striatal slice and of changes in extracellular volume fraction during hypoxia in a brain slice preparation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Nanoparticle volume fraction with heat and mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow in a nanofluid in the presence of thermo-diffusion under convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, R.; Jeyabalan, C.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the influence of thermophoresis, Brownian motion of the nanoparticles with variable stream conditions in the presence of magnetic field on mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer region of a semi-infinite porous vertical plate in a nanofluid under the convective boundary conditions. The transformed boundary layer ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Maple 18 software with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Numerical results are presented both in tabular and graphical forms illustrating the effects of these parameters with magnetic field on momentum, thermal, nanoparticle volume fraction and solutal concentration boundary layers. The numerical results obtained for the velocity, temperature, volume fraction, and concentration profiles reveal interesting phenomenon, some of these qualitative results are presented through plots. It is interesting to note that the magnetic field plays a dominant role on nanofluid flow under the convective boundary conditions.

  10. Dependence of microwave absorption properties on ferrite volume fraction in MnZn ferrite/rubber radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gama, Adriana M., E-mail: adrianaamg@iae.cta.br [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil); Rezende, Mirabel C., E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil); Dantas, Christine C., E-mail: christineccd@iae.cta.br [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    We report the analysis of measurements of the complex magnetic permeability ({mu}{sub r}) and dielectric permittivity ({epsilon}{sub r}) spectra of a rubber radar absorbing material (RAM) with various MnZn ferrite volume fractions. The transmission/reflection measurements were carried out in a vector network analyzer. Optimum conditions for the maximum microwave absorption were determined by substituting the complex permeability and permittivity in the impedance matching equation. Both the MnZn ferrite content and the RAM thickness effects on the microwave absorption properties, in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, were evaluated. The results show that the complex permeability and permittivity spectra of the RAM increase directly with the ferrite volume fraction. Reflection loss calculations by the impedance matching degree (reflection coefficient) show the dependence of this parameter on both thickness and composition of RAM. - Highlights: > Permeability and permittivity spectra of a MnZn ferrite RAM (2-18 GHz) are given. > Higher MnZn volume fraction favors increase of RAM/'s permeability and permittivity. > Minimum RL as a function of frequency, thickness and MnZn volume fraction given. > Higher thicknesses imply better absorption; optimum band shifts to lower frequencies. > For higher volume fractions, smaller thickness might offer better absorption (>10 GHz).

  11. Studying the Effect of Volume Fraction of Glass Fiberson the Thermal Conductivity of the Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sellab Hamza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of fiber volume fraction of the glass fiber on the thermal conductivity of the polymer composite material was studied. Different fiber volume fraction of glass fibers were used (3%, 6%, 9%, 12%, and 15%. Specimens were made from polyester which reinforced with glass fibers .The fibers had two arrangements according to the direction of the thermal flow. In the first arrangement the fibers were parallel to the direction of the thermal flow, while the second arrangement was perpendicular; Lee's disk method was used for testing the specimens. The experimental results proved that the values of the thermal conductivity of the specimens was higher when the fibers arranged in parallel direction than that when the fibers arranged in the perpendicular direction. The percentage of increasing of experimental thermal conductivity was 96.91% for parallel arrangement and 13.33% for perpendicular arrangement comparison with its original value before the using of glass fibers. Also the experimental results indicated that the thermal conductivity increases with the increasing of the fiber volume fraction. Minimum value was (0.172 W/m.C for perpendicular arrangement at fiber volume fraction 3% and maximum value was (0.327 W/m.C for parallel arrangement at fiber volume fraction 15%.

  12. RESOLVE Survey Photometry and Volume-limited Calibration of the Photometric Gas Fractions Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, Kathleen D; Stark, David V; Moffett, Amanda J; Norris, Mark A; Snyder, Elaine M; Hoversten, Erik A

    2015-01-01

    We present custom-processed UV, optical, and near-IR photometry for the RESOLVE survey, a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass within two subvolumes of the nearby universe (RESOLVE-A and -B), complete down to baryonic mass ~10^9.1-9.3 Msun. In contrast to standard pipeline photometry (e.g., SDSS), our photometry uses optimal background subtraction, avoids suppressing color gradients, and includes systematic errors. With these improvements, we measure brighter magnitudes, larger radii, bluer colors, and a real increase in scatter around the red sequence. Combining stellar masses from our photometry with the RESOLVE-A HI mass census, we create volume-limited calibrations of the photometric gas fractions (PGF) technique, which predicts gas-to-stellar mass ratios (G/S) from galaxy colors and optional additional parameters. We analyze G/S-color residuals vs. potential third parameters, finding that axial ratio is the best independent and physically meaningful third parameter. We define a "modi...

  13. Commercial Practice on Technology for High- Temperature Cracking of C4 Fraction to Increase Propylene Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Darong; Zhang Zhigang

    2003-01-01

    This article refers to the results of small-scale and commercial tests on high-temperature cracking of C4 fraction in FCC unit to increase the propylene yield. The bench tests revealed that the conversion rate of C4 fraction during high-temperature cracking reached 37.38 % and propylene yield was equal to 15.60 % with the conversion rate of C4 olefins equating around 50%. The results of commercial application showed that adoption of the technology for high-temperature cracking of C4 fraction in FCC unit had led to an increase of propylene yield by 2.16 % with no remarkable changes in the yields and properties of other products.

  14. Elastic modulus of Al-Si/SiC metal matrix composites as a function of volume fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh Kumar, S; Rajasekharan, T [Powder Metallurgy Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh PO, Hyderabad-500 058 (India); Seshu Bai, V [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Central University PO, Hyderabad-500 046 (India); Rajkumar, K V; Sharma, G K; Jayakumar, T, E-mail: dearsanthosh@gmail.co [Non-Destructive Evaluation Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Chennai-603 102 (India)

    2009-09-07

    Aluminum alloy matrix composites have emerged as candidate materials for electronic packaging applications in the field of aerospace semiconductor electronics. Composites prepared by the pressureless infiltration technique with high volume fractions in the range 0.41-0.70 were studied using ultrasonic velocity measurements. For different volume fractions of SiC, the longitudinal velocity and shear velocity were found to be in the range of 7600-9300 m s{sup -1} and 4400-5500 m s{sup -1}, respectively. The elastic moduli of the composites were determined from ultrasonic velocities and were analysed as a function of the volume fraction of the reinforcement. The observed variation is discussed in the context of existing theoretical models for the effective elastic moduli of two-phase systems.

  15. Three-dimensional simulations of microstructural evolution in polycrystalline dual-phase materials with constant volume fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Voorhees, P.W.; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal

    2013-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of a polycrystalline dual-phase material with a constant volume fraction of the phases was investigated using large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations. All materials parameters are taken to be isotropic, and microstructures with volume fractions of 50....../50 and 40/60 were examined. After an initial transient, the number of grains decrease from ∼2600 to ∼500. It was found that the mean grain size of grains of both phases obeyed a power law with an exponent of 3, and the microstructural evolution was found to be controlled by diffusion. Steady...... with the topology of single-phase grain structures as determined by experiment and simulation. The evolution of size and number of faces for the minority and majority phase grains in the 40/60 volume fraction simulation is presented and discussed. Non-constant curvature across some interphase boundaries...

  16. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnquist, Norman [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Qi, Xuele [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Raminosoa, Tsarafidy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Salas, Ken [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Samudrala, Omprakash [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Shah, Manoj [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Van Dam, Jeremy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Yin, Weijun [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    This report summarizes the progress made during the April 01, 2010 – December 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-EE0002752 for the U.S. Department of Energy entitled “High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems.” The overall objective of this program is to advance the technology for well fluids lifting systems to meet the foreseeable pressure, temperature, and longevity needs of the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) industry for the coming ten years. In this program, lifting system requirements for EGS wells were established via consultation with industry experts and site visits. A number of artificial lift technologies were evaluated with regard to their applicability to EGS applications; it was determined that a system based on electric submersible pump (ESP) technology was best suited to EGS. Technical barriers were identified and a component-level technology development program was undertaken to address each barrier, with the most challenging being the development of a power-dense, small diameter motor that can operate reliably in a 300°C environment for up to three years. Some of the targeted individual component technologies include permanent magnet motor construction, high-temperature insulation, dielectrics, bearings, seals, thrust washers, and pump impellers/diffusers. Advances were also made in thermal management of electric motors. In addition to the overall system design for a full-scale EGS application, a subscale prototype was designed and fabricated. Like the full-scale design, the subscale prototype features a novel “flow-through-the-bore” permanent magnet electric motor that combines the use of high temperature materials with an internal cooling scheme that limits peak internal temperatures to <330°C. While the full-scale high-volume multi-stage pump is designed to lift up to 80 kg/s of process water, the subscale prototype is based on a production design that can pump 20 kg/s and has been modified

  17. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip. Plastic zone sizes were directly measured using a metallographic technique and allow prediction of an effective matrix stress intensity which agrees with the fiber pressure model if residual stresses

  18. A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    increasing the fiber-volume fraction by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) in order to produce composite structures with aerospace-grade...processed composites. Using a combination of viscosity control, ARL- based VARTM techniques, and a pressure control system, we increased the fiber-volume...content from 50% (ARL’s normal processing range for a particular material system and VARTM process) to over 60%. Future work will focus on

  19. Recommended reference materials for realization of physicochemical properties pressure-volume-temperature relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Herington, E F G

    1977-01-01

    Recommended Reference Materials for Realization of Physicochemical Properties presents recommendations of reference materials for use in measurements involving physicochemical properties, namely, vapor pressure; liquid-vapor critical temperature and critical pressure; orthobaric volumes of liquid and vapor; pressure-volume-temperature properties of the unsaturated vapor or gas; and pressure-volume-temperature properties of the compressed liquid. This monograph focuses on reference materials for vapor pressures at temperatures up to 770 K, as well as critical temperatures and critical pressures

  20. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razam Ab Latip

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid and stearin (solid fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min, end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV, fatty acid composition (FAC, acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP, solid fat content (SFC, thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1 and palmitic (C16:0 respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of

  1. The effect of graphene nanoplatelet volume fraction on water graphene nanofluid thermal conductivity and viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaya, Bernard

    The aim of this thesis is to study the improvement of heat transfer in graphene-water nanofluids. Experiments were conducted with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) to study the relative benefit of the thermal conductivity improvement in relationship to the potential detriment when considering the effect that more GNP dispersed in the water increases the viscosity of the resulting suspension relative to that of the water. A maximum enhancement ratio for GNP nanofluid thermal conductivity over water was 1.43 at a volume fraction of 0.014. Based upon GNP aspect ratios confirmed in sizing measurements, the DEM model presented by Chu et al., (2012) appears to describe the experimental results of this study when using a fitted interfacial resistance value of 6.25 E -8 m2 K W-1. The well-known Einstein viscosity model for spheres dispersed in fluids was shown to under predict the experimental data. Adjusting the intrinsic model term for spheres from a value of 2.5 to a fitted value of 1938 representative for the GNP of this study provided much closer agreement between measured and predicted values. Heat transfer is a nonlinear function of viscosity and thermal conductivity and heat transfer is predicted to decrease for GNP nanofluids when compared to water alone. Hence the use of nanofluids to enhance heat transfer processes appears not to be viable.

  2. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  3. Mapping Bone Mineral Density Obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2017-01-01

    Methods for relating or mapping estimates of volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction (BVF) are outlined mathematically. The methods are based on definitions of bone properties, cited experimental studies and regression relations derived from them for trabecular bone in the proximal femur. Using an experimental range of values in the intertrochanteric region obtained from male and female human subjects, age 18 to 49, the BVF values calculated from four different methods were compared to the experimental average and numerical range. The BVF values computed from the conversion method used data from two sources. One source provided pre bed rest vBMD values in the intertrochanteric region from 24 bed rest subject who participated in a 70 day study. Another source contained preflight vBMD values from 18 astronauts who spent 4 to 6 months on the ISS. To aid the use of a mapping from BMD to BVF, the discussion includes how to formulate them for purpose of computational modeling. An application of the conversions would be used to aid in modeling of time varying changes in vBMD as it relates to changes in BVF via bone remodeling and/or modeling.

  4. Left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic volume in patients with diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovin, Ion S; Ebisu, Keita; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Finta, Laurie A; Oprea, Adriana D; Brandt, Cynthia A; Dziura, James; Wackers, Frans J

    2013-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction can be diagnosed on equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) by a low peak filling rate (PFR) in the setting of a normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The authors evaluated the relationship between diastolic dysfunction, LVEF, and end-diastolic volume (EDV). A total of 408 predominantly asymptomatic patients with an LVEF ≥50% by ERNA were studied. LVEF of patients with a low PFR was compared with the LVEF of patients with a normal PFR. Correlation analyses to evaluate the association between PFR and EDV were also performed. The LVEF of patients with a low PFR was lower than the LVEF of patients with normal PFR (59±7 vs 63%±7%; PPFR (r=-0.04; P=.32). The results did not change when the EDV indices were used. In patients who had repeat scans, there was no correlation between the change in EDV and the change in PFR (r=0.16; P=.2). In asymptomatic patients undergoing ERNA who have normal systolic function, a low PFR can be associated with a lower LVEF, but it is not associated with changes in EDV. This suggests that diastolic dysfunction is associated with mild systolic dysfunction.

  5. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low-dose cardiac CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Nacif, Marcelo S; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher; Summers, Ronald M; Bluemke, David A; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for the detection of focal myocardial scar using a delayed enhancement technique in this paper. CCT, however, has not been previously evaluated for quantification of diffuse myocardial fibrosis. In our investigation, we sought to evaluate the potential of low-dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. ECV is altered under conditions of increased myocardial fibrosis. A framework consisting of three main steps was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation. First, a shape-constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation on postcontrast image. Second, the symmetric demons deformable registration method was applied to register precontrast to postcontrast images. So the correspondences between the voxels from precontrast to postcontrast images were established. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 20 clinical low-dose CCT datasets with precontrast and postcontrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. Surface area and volume fraction of random open-pore systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, H.; Elsner, A.; Stoyan, D.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, explicit approximate formulas are presented for the volume fraction and specific surface area of random open-pore systems with poly-disperse pore size distributions. It is shown that the formulas are valid for broad classes of models for porous media characterized by tunable pore size distributions and a variable degree of inter-penetrability of pores. The formulas for the poly-disperse case are based on expressions derived previously for mono-disperse penetrable-sphere models. The results are obtained by analysis of a series of open-pore models, which are prepared by computer simulation of systems of randomly packed partially penetrable spheres with various poly-disperse size distributions such as gamma, lognormal, and Gaussian. The formulas are applied in a study of atomic layer deposition processes on open-pore systems, and the effective Young's modulus and the effective thermal conductivity of Al2O3 coated porous polypropylene electrodes for lithium ion batteries are predicted.

  7. Role of cardiac CTA in estimating left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robin; Man; Singh; Balkrishna; Man; Singh; Jawahar; Lal; Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction(LVEF)is an impor-tant predictor of cardiac outcome and helps in makingimportant diagnostic and therapeutic decisions suchas the treatment of different types of congestive heartfailure or implantation of devices like cardiac resynchro-nization therapy-defibrillator.LVEF can be measuredby various techniques such as transthoracic echo-cardiography,contrast ventriculography,radionuclidetechniques,cardiac magnetic resonance imaging andcardiac computed tomographic angiography(CTA).Thedevelopment of cardiac CTA using multi-detector rowCT(MDCT)has seen a very rapid improvement in thetechnology for identifying coronary artery stenosis andcoronary artery disease in the last decade.During theacquisition,processing and analysis of data to studycoronary anatomy,MDCT provides a unique opportunityto measure left ventricular volumes and LVEF simulta-neously with the same data set without the need foradditional contrast or radiation exposure.The develop-ment of semi-automated and automated software to measure LVEF has now added uniformity,efficiency and reproducibility of practical value in clinical practice rather than just being a research tool.This article will address the feasibility,the accuracy and the limitations of MDCT in measuring LVEF.

  8. Non-monotonic dependence of Pickering emulsion gel rheology on particle volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganyuk, M; Mohraz, A

    2017-03-29

    The microstructure of Pickering emulsion gels features a tenuous network of faceted droplets, bridged together by shared monolayers of particles. In this investigation, we use standard oscillatory rheometry in conjunction with confocal microscopy to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the role particle bridged interfaces have on the rheology of Pickering emulsion gels. The zero-shear elastic modulus of Pickering emulsion gels shows a non-monotonic dependence on particle loading, with three separate regimes of power-law and linear gel strengthening, and subsequent gel weakening. The transition from power-law to linear scaling is found to coincide with a peak in the volume fraction of particles that participate in bridging, which we indirectly calculate using measureable quantities, and the transition to gel weakening is shown to result from a loss in network connectivity at high particle loadings. These observations are explained via a simple representation of how Pickering emulsion gels arise from an initial population of partially-covered droplets. Based on these considerations, we propose a combined variable related to the initial droplet coverage, to be used in reporting and rationalizing the rheology of Pickering emulsion gels. We demonstrate the applicability of this variable with Pickering emulsions prepared at variable fluid ratios and with different-sized colloidal particles. The results of our investigation have important implications for many technological applications that utilize solid stabilized multi-phase emulsions and require a priori knowledge or engineering of their flow characteristics.

  9. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low dose cardiac CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Songtao; Bluemke, David A.; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has been well validated and allows quantification of myocardial fibrosis in comparison to overall mass of the myocardium. Unfortunately, CMRI is relatively expensive and is contraindicated in patients with intracardiac devices. Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for detection of scar and myocardial stress/rest perfusion. In this paper, we sought to evaluate the potential of low dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. A novel framework was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation, which consists of three main steps. First, a shape constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation for post-contrast image. Second, the symmetric Demons deformable registrations method was applied to register pre-contrast to post-contrast images. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 7 clinical low dose CCT datasets with pre-contrast and post-contrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  10. The Effect of Type and Volume Fraction (Vf) of Steel Fiber on the Mechanical Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanbarpour, S.; Mazaheripour, H.; Mirmoradi, S. H.;

    2010-01-01

    is to investigate the effects of type and volume fraction of steel fiber on the compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC). Design/methodology/approach – For this purpose, Micro wire and Wave type steel fibers...

  11. EFFECT OF IRRADIATION TEMPERATURE ON GENERAL EQUATION OF SOL FRACTION-DOSE RELATIONSHIP FOR FLUOROPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wanxi; XU Jun

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of irradiation temperature on sol fraction-dose relationship of fluoropolymers was studied. It was found that the increasing of irradiation temperature can result in the decreasing of β value of fluoropolymer , which increases the crosslinking probability of fluoropolymer. The relationship between crosslinking parameter β and irradiation temperature (Ti)of fluoropolymer is established as follows:β=2.2 × 10-3Tg +4×10-4 (Tg-Ti )+0.206.β values of some fluoropolymers calculated from the above expression are in agreement with the experimental values.

  12. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: implications for ash dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scarlato, P.; Andronico, D.; Scollo, S.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first report of experimental measurements of the enhanced settling velocity of volcanic particles as function of particle volume fraction. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behavior of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments using natural basaltic and phonolitic ash. By releasing ash particles at different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement, we measured their terminal velocity, size, and particle volume fraction with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. Enhanced settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle volume fraction. This suggests that particle clustering during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. We provide a quantitative empirical model that allows to calculate, from a given particle size and density, the enhanced velocity resulting from a given particle volume fraction. The proposed model has the potential to serve as a simple tool for the prediction of the terminal velocity of ash of an hypothetical distribution of ash of known particle size and volume fraction. This is of particular importance for advection-diffusion transport model of ash where generally a one-way coupling is adopted, considering only the flow effects on particles. To better quantify the importance of the enhanced settling velocity in ash dispersal, we finally introduced the new formulation in a Lagrangian model calculating for realistic eruptive conditions the resulting ash concentration in the atmosphere and on the ground.

  13. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  14. Temperature effects on the fractionation of multiple sulfur isotopes by Thermodesulfobacterium and Desulfovibrio strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Sun, C.; Ono, S.; Lin, L.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction is one of the major mechanisms driving anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in global ocean. While sulfate-reducing prokaryotes are well known to fractionate sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction, unraveling the isotopic compositions of sulfur-bearing minerals preserved in sedimentary records could provide invaluable constraints on the evolution of seawater chemistry and metabolic pathways. Variations in the sulfur isotope fractionations are partly due to inherent differences among species and also affected by environmental conditions. The isotope fractionations caused by microbial sulfate reduction have been interpreted to be a sequence of enzyme-catalyzed isotope fractionation steps. Therefore, the fractionation factor depends on (1) the sulfate flux into and out of the cell, and (2) the flux of sulfur transformation between the internal pools. Whether the multiple sulfur isotope effect could be quantitatively predicted using such a metabolic flux model would provide insights into the cellular machinery catalyzing with sulfate reduction. This study examined the multiple sulfur isotope fractionation patterns associated with a thermophilic Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain and a mesophilic Desulfovibrio gigas over a wide temperature range. The Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain grew between 34 and 79°C with an optimal temperature at 72°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 77°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 8.2 and 31.6‰ with a maximum at 68°C. The D. gigas grew between 10 and 45 °C with an optimal temperature at 30°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 41°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 10.3 and 29.7‰ with higher magnitude at both lower and higher temperatures. The results of multiple sulfur isotope measurements expand the previously reported range and cannot be described by a solution field of the metabolic flux model, which calculates

  15. In vivo gastroprotective effect of nanoparticles: influence of chemical composition and volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Kelly; Adorne, Marcia D; Jornada, Denise S; da Fonseca, Francisco Noé; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2013-01-01

    In nanomedicine, different nanomaterials and nanoparticles have been proposed as therapeutic agents or adjuvants, as well as diagnosis devices. Considering that the principal cause of the ulcerations is the imbalance among the gastric juice secretion and the protection provided by the mucosal barrier and the neutralization of the gastric acid, as well as that nanoparticles are able to accumulate in the gastro-intestinal tissues, we proposed a 2(2) factorial design to evaluate the influence of the chemical composition and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase on the gastric protective effect against ulceration induced by ethanol. Cocoa-theospheres (CT) and lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) (two different kinds of surfaces: lipid and polymeric, respectively) prepared at two different concentrations of soft materials: 4% and 12% (w/v) were produced by high pressure homogenization and solvent displacement methods, respectively. Laser diffraction showed volume-weighted mean diameters ranging from 133 to 207 nm, number median diameters lower than 100 nm and specific surfaces between 41.2 and 51.2 m(2) g(-1). The formulations had pH ranging from 4.7 to 6.3; and zeta potential close to -9 mV due to their coating with polysorbate 80. The ulcer indexes were 0.40 (LNC(4)) and 0.48 (CT(4)) for the lower total administered areas (3.3 and 4.1 m(2)g(-1), respectively), and 0.09 (LNC(12) and CT(12)) for the higher administered areas (10.0 and 12.0 m(2) g(-1), respectively). LNC(4), LNC(12) and CT(12) showed lower levels in the lipid peroxidation assay when compared either to the negative control (saline) or to CT(4). LNC(12) and CT(12) showed similar TBARS levels, as well as CT(4) was similar to the negative control. SEM analysis of the stomach mucosa showed coatings more homogenous and cohesive when LNC formulations were administered compared to the correspondent CT formulations. The higher total area of administered nanoparticles showed film formation. Moreover, LNC(12

  16. Extracellular volume fraction mapping in the myocardium, part 2: initial clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellman Peter

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diffuse myocardial fibrosis, and to a lesser extent global myocardial edema, are important processes in heart disease which are difficult to assess or quantify with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR using conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE or T1-mapping. Measurement of the myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECV circumvents factors that confound T1-weighted images or T1-maps. We hypothesized that quantitative assessment of myocardial ECV would be clinically useful for detecting both focal and diffuse myocardial abnormalities in a variety of common and uncommon heart diseases. Methods A total of 156 subjects were imaged including 62 with normal findings, 33 patients with chronic myocardial infarction (MI, 33 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, 15 with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, 7 with acute myocarditis, 4 with cardiac amyloidosis, and 2 with systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS. Motion corrected ECV maps were generated automatically from T1-maps acquired pre- and post-contrast calibrated by blood hematocrit. Abnormally-elevated ECV was defined as >2SD from the mean ECV in individuals with normal findings. In HCM the size of regions of LGE was quantified as the region >2 SD from remote. Results Mean ECV of 62 normal individuals was 25.4 ± 2.5% (m ± SD, normal range 20.4%-30.4%. Mean ECV within the core of chronic myocardial infarctions (without MVO (N = 33 measured 68.5 ± 8.6% (p  Conclusions ECV mapping appears promising to complement LGE imaging in cases of more homogenously diffuse disease. The ability to display ECV maps in units that are physiologically intuitive and may be interpreted on an absolute scale offers the potential for detection of diffuse disease and measurement of the extent and severity of abnormal regions.

  17. The influence of temperature and grain boundary volume on the resistivity of nanocrystalline nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnbrough, J. E., E-mail: J.E.Darnbrough@bristol.ac.uk; Flewitt, P. E. J. [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Roebuck, B. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Rd, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-14

    The thermal stability and modes of recrystallisation of nanocrystalline nickel has been observed through a conduction-based non-destructive test. Resistivity measurements have been utilised to quantify grain boundary volume fraction and microstructure. This observation makes clear the distinction of the factors that contribute to resistivity and demonstrates that these contributions are related to microstructure, either directly or in-directly. In static systems, the contribution of ordered grains and low-order grain boundary atomic arrangements in small grained material has been measured and correlated with resistivity. Measurements of in-situ resistivity conducted at high temperature gives changes with time which are related to grain growth, during heat treatment. This shows that resistivity can be used as a technique for observing the microstructure and grain growth of small grained material.

  18. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation: Effect of temperature and added salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpabooth, K.; Osuwan, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Petroleum and Petrochemical Coll.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Harwell, J.H. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Applied Surfactant Research

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant present at low concentrations in aqueous streams. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used, and three surfactants were chosen for this study: sodium dodecyl sulfate, cetylpyridinium chloride, and sodium n-hexadecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate. In a previous study the effects of surfactant concentration, air flow rate, liquid- and vapor-phase heights, and sparger type were investigated for these surfactants. Here, the effects of temperature and added salt are studied. It is found that the foam flow rate and enrichment ratio increase whereas the foam wetness and the rate of surfactant recovery decrease with increasing temperature. Increasing the concentration of added salt decreases the CMC of the surfactants. The foam flow rate, foam wetness, and the rate of surfactant recovery increase, while the enrichment ratio decreases with increasing concentration of salt.

  19. SN1987A: evolution of the temperature and ionized fraction of the expanding envelope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林宣滨; 尤峻汉; 程福臻; 徐海光; 傅承启

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the temperature and ionization fraction of the expanding envelope of SN1978A are discussed by use of the recombination theory of hydrogen. Temperature and ionization fraction are two fundamental parameters in the studies of supernova, but they are hard to be determined by the traditional methods. A new approach to their evolutions is proposed based on the fact that the evolutional information of these two parameters must be contained in line variation because the changes in them govern the line variation behavior. The two parameters depend on each other, so they should be calculated simultaneously. By comparing the theoretical Ha light curve deduced from the radiative transfer theory using the escaping probability approximation with the observational, the evolutions of them are achieved.

  20. Fractional-order integral and derivative controller for temperature profile tracking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hyo-Sung Ahn; Varsha Bhambhani; YangQuan Chen

    2009-10-01

    This paper establishes a new strategy to tune a fractional order integral and derivative (ID) controller satisfying gain and phase margins based on Bode’s ideal transfer function as a reference model, for a temperature profile tracking. A systematic analysis resulting in a non-linear equation relating user-defined gain and phase margins to the fractional order controller is derived. The closed-loop system designed has a feature of robustness to gain variations with step responses exhibiting a nearly iso-damping property. This paper aims to apply the analytical tuning procedure to control the heat flow systems at selected points in Quanser experimental platform. Thus, the main purpose of this paper is to examine performances of two different fractional order controllers in temperature profile tracking. From experimental comparisons with the traditional PI/PID controller based on Ziegler–Nichols’ tuning method, it will be shown that the proposed mathodologies are specifically beneficial in controlling temperature in time-delay heat flow systems.

  1. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect I: Effects of variations of the fuel particle volume fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming; Yan, Xiaoqing; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-05-01

    A new method of modeling the in-pile mechanical behaviors of dispersion nuclear fuel elements is proposed. Considering the irradiation swelling together with the thermal effect, numerical simulations of the in-pile mechanical behaviors are performed with the developed finite element models for different fuel particle volume fractions of the fuel meat. The effects of the particle volume fractions on the mechanical performances of the fuel element are studied. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the particle volume fractions at each burnup; the locations of the maximum first principal stresses shift with increasing burnup; at low burnups, the maximum first principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while at high burnups, the 20% volume fraction case holds the lowest value; (2) at the cladding, the maximum equivalent plastic strains and the tensile principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while the maximum Mises stresses do not follow this order at high burnups; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles increase with the particle volume fractions, and the particles will engender plastic strains until the particle volume fraction reaches high enough.

  2. Quantitative grain-scale ferroic domain volume fractions and domain switching strains from three-dimensional X-ray diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Majkut, Marta; Caosyd, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extension of the three-dimensional X-ray diffraction technique to allow the extraction of domain volume fractions in polycrystalline ferroic materials is presented. This method gives access to quantitative domain volume fractions of hundreds of independent embedded grains within...

  3. Theoretical and experimental analysis of a multiphase screw pump, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raebiger, K. [LEISTRITZ Pumpen GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany); Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales (United Kingdom); Maksoud, T.M.A.; Ward, J. [Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales (United Kingdom); Hausmann, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Building Services Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    In the investigation of the pumping behaviour of multiphase screw pumps, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions, theoretical and experimental analyses were performed. A new theoretical screw pump model was developed, which calculates the time-dependent conditions inside the several chambers of a screw pump as well as the exchange of mass and energy between these chambers. By means of the performed experimental analysis, the screw pump model was verified, especially at very high gas volume fractions from 90% to 99%. The experiments, which were conducted with the reference fluids water and air, can be divided mainly into the determination of the steady state pumping behaviour on the one hand and into the analysis of selected transient operating conditions on the other hand, whereas the visualisation of the leakage flows through the circumferential gaps was rounded off the experimental analysis. (author)

  4. Experimental determination of barium isotope fractionation during diffusion and adsorption processes at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuilen, Kirsten; Müller, Thomas; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dietzel, Martin; Küsters, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Variations in barium (Ba) stable isotope abundances measured in low and high temperature environments have recently received increasing attention. The actual processes controlling Ba isotope fractionation, however, remain mostly elusive. In this study, we present the first experimental approach to quantify the contribution of diffusion and adsorption on mass-dependent Ba isotope fractionation during transport of aqueous Ba2+ ions through a porous medium. Experiments have been carried out in which a BaCl2 solution of known isotopic composition diffused through u-shaped glass tubes filled with silica hydrogel at 10 °C and 25 °C for up to 201 days. The diffused Ba was highly fractionated by up to -2.15‰ in δ137/134Ba, despite the low relative difference in atomic mass. The time-dependent isotope fractionation can be successfully reproduced by a diffusive transport model accounting for mass-dependent differences in the effective diffusivities of the Ba isotope species (D137Ba /D134Ba =(m134 /m137) β). Values of β extracted from the transport model were in the range of 0.010-0.011. Independently conducted batch experiments revealed that adsorption of Ba onto the surface of silica hydrogel favoured the heavier Ba isotopes (α = 1.00015 ± 0.00008). The contribution of adsorption on the overall isotope fractionation in the diffusion experiments, however, was found to be small. Our results contribute to the understanding of Ba isotope fractionation processes, which is crucial for interpreting natural isotope variations and the assessment of Ba isotope ratios as geochemical proxies.

  5. Influence of bone volume fraction and architecture on computed large-deformation failure mechanisms in human trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevill, Grant; Eswaran, Senthil K; Gupta, Atul; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis; Keaveny, Tony M

    2006-12-01

    Large-deformation bending and buckling have long been proposed as failure mechanisms by which the strength of trabecular bone can be affected disproportionately to changes in bone density, and thus may represent an important aspect of bone quality. We sought here to quantify the contribution of large-deformation failure mechanisms on strength, to determine the dependence of these effects on bone volume fraction and architecture, and to confirm that the inclusion of large-deformation effects in high-resolution finite element models improves predictions of strength versus experiment. Micro-CT-based finite element models having uniform hard tissue material properties were created from 54 cores of human trabecular bone taken from four anatomic sites (age = 70+/-11; 24 male, 27 female donors), which were subsequently biomechanically tested to failure. Strength predictions were made from the models first including, then excluding, large-deformation failure mechanisms, both for compressive and tensile load cases. As expected, strength predictions versus experimental data for the large-deformation finite element models were significantly improved (p deformation models in both tension and compression. Below a volume fraction of about 0.20, large-deformation failure mechanisms decreased trabecular strength from 5-80% for compressive loading, while effects were negligible above this volume fraction. Step-wise nonlinear multiple regression revealed that structure model index (SMI) and volume fraction (BV/TV) were significant predictors of these reductions in strength (R2 = 0.83, p deformation failure mechanisms on trabecular bone strength is highly heterogeneous and is not well explained by standard architectural metrics.

  6. Determination of the steam volume fraction in the event of loss of cooling of the spent fuel storage pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledkov, R. M.; Galkin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, O. E.; Strebnev, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    When one solves engineering problems related to the cooling of fuel assemblies (FAs) in a spent fuel storage pool (SFSP) and the assessment of nuclear safety of FA storage in an SFSP in the initial event of loss of SFSP cooling, it is essential to determine the coolant density and, consequently, steam volume fractions φ in bundles of fuel elements at a pressure of 0.1-0.5 MPa. Such formulas for calculating φ that remain valid in a wide range of operating parameters and geometric shapes of channels and take the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling into account are currently almost lacking. The results of systematization and analysis of the available formulas for φ are reported in the present study. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained in the process of simulating the conditions of FA cooling in an SFSP in the event of loss of its cooling. Six formulas for calculating the steam volume fraction, which were used in this comparison, were chosen from a total of 11 considered relations. As a result, the formulas producing the most accurate values of φ in the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling were selected. In addition, a relation that allows one to perform more accurate calculations of steam volume fractions in the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling was derived based on the Fedorov formula in the two-group approximation.

  7. Rheological Characterisation of the Flow Behaviour of Wood Plastic Composites in Consideration of Different Volume Fractions of Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, N.; Hansmann, H.; Koch, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the rheological properties of wood plastic composites (WPC) with different polymeric matrices (LDPE, low-density polyethylene and PP, polypropylene) and with different types of wood filler (hardwood flour and softwood flour) have been investigated by means of high pressure capillary rheometry. The volume fraction of wood was varied between 0 and 60 %. The shear thinning behaviour of the WPC melts can be well described by the Ostwald - de Waele power law relationship. The flow consistency index K of the power law shows a good correlation with the volume fraction of wood. Interparticular interaction effects of wood particles can be mathematically taken into account by implementation of an interaction exponent (defined as the ratio between flow exponent of WPC and flow exponent of polymeric matrix). The interaction exponent shows a good correlation with the flow consistency index. On the basis of these relationships the concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate has been modified. Thus, the flow behaviour of the investigated wood filled polymer melts could be well described mathematically by the modified concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate. On this basis, the shear thinning behaviour of WPC can now be estimated with good accuracy, taking into account the volume fraction of wood.

  8. [Automatic calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT--basic evaluation using phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Nanbu, I; Tohyama, J; Ooba, S

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated accuracy of Quantitative Gated SPECT Program that enabled calculation of the left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction by automatically tracing the contour of the cardiac surface. Cardiac phantoms filled with 99mTc-solution were used. Data acquisition was made by 180-degree projection in L type and 360-degree projection in opposed type. Automatic calculation could be done in all processes, which required 3-4 minutes. Reproducibility was sufficient. The adequate cut off value of a prefilter was 0.45. At this value LV volume was 93% of the actual volume in L type acquisition and 95.9% in opposed type acquisition. The LV volume obtained in L type was smaller than that obtained in opposed type (p defects was fair, on the cardiac phantoms with all of 90-degree defects and 180-degree defects of the septal and lateral wall. The LV volume was estimated to be larger on the phantom with 180-degree defect of the anterior wall, and to be smaller on the phantom of 180-degree defect of the inferoposterior wall. Because tracing was deviated anteriorly at the defects. In the patients with similar conditions to 180-degree defect of the anterior wall or inferoposterior wall, the LV volume should be carefully evaluated.

  9. Automatic calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Basic evaluation using phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Yoshimi; Nanbu, Ichirou [Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital (Japan); Tohyama, Junko; Ooba, Satoru

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated accuracy of Quantitative Gated SPECT Program that enabled calculation of the left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction by automatically tracing the contour of the cardiac surface. Cardiac phantoms filled with {sup 99m}Tc-solution were used. Data acquisition was made by 180-degree projection in L type and 360-degree projection in opposed type. Automatic calculation could be done in all processes, which required 3-4 minutes. Reproducibility was sufficient. The adequate cut off value of a prefilter was 0.45. At this value LV volume was 93% of the actual volume in L type acquisition and 95.9% in opposed type acquisition. The LV volume obtained in L type was smaller than that obtained in opposed type (p<0.05). The tracing of the defects was fair, on the cardiac phantoms with all of 90-degree defects and 180-degree defects of the septal and lateral wall. The LV volume was estimated to be larger on the phantom with 180-degree defect of the anterior wall, and to be smaller on the phantom of 180-degree defect of the inferoposterior wall. Because tracing was deviated anteriorly at the defects. In the patients with similar conditions to 180-degree defect of the anterior wall or inferoposterior wall, the LV volume should be carefully evaluated. (author)

  10. Correlation between Cohesive Energy Density, Fractional Free Volume, and Gas Transport Properties of Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kubica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport properties of the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA materials to He, N2, O2, and CO2 are correlated with two polymer molecular structure parameters, that is, cohesive energy density (CED and fractional free volume (FFV, determined by the group contribution method. In our preceding paper, the attempt was made to approximate EVA permeability using a linear function of 1/FFV as predicted by the free volume theory. However, the deviations from this relationship appeared to be significant. In this paper, it is shown that permeation of gas molecules is controlled not only by free volume but also by the polymer cohesive energy. Moreover, the behavior of CO2 was found to differ significantly from that of other gases. In this instance, the correlation is much better when diffusivity instead of permeability is taken into account in a modified transport model.

  11. Pyrolysis temperature affects phosphorus transformation in biochar: Chemical fractionation and (31)P NMR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, You; Shao, Hongbo; Sun, Junna

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling or reuse by pyrolyzing crop residue has recently elicited increased research interest. However, the effects of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions on P species have not been fully understood. Such knowledge is important in identifying the agronomic and environmental uses of biochar. Residues of three main Chinese agricultural crops and the biochars (produced at 300°C-600°C) derived from these crops were used to determine P transformations during pyrolysis. Hedley sequential fractionation and (31)P NMR analyses were used in the investigation. Our results showed that P transformation in biochar was significantly affected by pyrolysis temperature regardless of feedstock (Wheat straw, maize straw and peanut husk). Pyrolysis treatment transformed water soluble P into a labile (NaHCO3-Pi) or semi-labile pool (NaOH-Pi) and into a stable pool (Dil. HCl P and residual-P). At the same time, organic P was transformed into inorganic P fractions which was identified by the rapid decomposition of organic P detected with solution (31)P NMR. The P transformation during pyrolysis process suggested more stable P was formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. This result was also evidenced by the presence of less soluble or stable P species, such as such as poly-P, crandallite (CaAl3(OH)5(PO4)2) and Wavellite (Al3(OH)3(PO4)2·5H2O), as detected by solid-state (31)P NMR in biochars formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, a significant proportion of less soluble pyrophosphate was identified by solution (2%-35%) and solid-state (8%-53%) (31)P NMR, which was also responsible for the stable P forms at higher pyrolysis temperature although their solubility or stability requires further investigation. Results suggested that a relatively lower pyrolysis temperature retains P availability regardless of feedstock during pyrolysis process. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin, E-mail: salah-faroughi@gatech.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332-0340 (United States); Huber, Christian [School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332-0340 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    In this study, we propose a theoretical model to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. We consider a wide range of filler volume fraction with sizes ranging from nano- to macro-scale. The model, based on the differential effective medium theory, accounts for particle interactions through two sets of volume fraction corrections. The first correction accounts for a finite volume of composite and the second correction introduces a self-crowding factor that allows us to develop an accurate model for particle interaction even for high volume fraction of fillers. The model is examined to other published models, experiments, and numerical simulations for different types of composites. We observe an excellent agreement between the model and published datasets over a wide range of particle volume fractions and material properties of the composite constituents.

  13. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, Yasutaka [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Mizuta, Masahiro [Laboratory of Advanced Data Science, Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Kita-11, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0811 (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  14. Effect of Weight Fractions of Jute Fiber on Tensile Strength and Deflection Temperature of Jute Fiber/Polypropylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, S.; Juwono, A. L.; Roseno, S.

    2017-05-01

    Jute is one of eco-friendly natural fiber with relatively low cost and high volume production. This study aimed to determine the effect of weight fractions of jute fiber as a reinforcement in polypropylene (PP) to obtain an optimum properties of PP/jute fiber composites. Jute fiber was pre-treated through alkalization. The PP was initially produced by extrusion process, followed by fabricated the composites by compiling the PP matrix and jute fibers into lamina using a hot-press method. The results of tensile test and heat deflection temperature test showed that the addition of 40wt% jute fiber to the PP increased the tensile strength about 19.7 % up to (38.2±4.9)MPa, the Young modulus about 79.8 % up to (3.20±0.26)GPa, and the heat deflection temperature about 143% up to (143.3±1.14)°C compared to pristine PP. Based on Scanning Electron Microscopy observation on the fracture surfaces, it was shown that the mode of failure on the composites failure surfaces was “fiber pull-out”, which due to the poor interface bond between the fiber and the matrix.

  15. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of carbon monoxide: Wavelength, pressure and temperature dependency.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Davis, Ryan; Ahmed, Musahid; Jackson, Teresa L.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2012-01-03

    Several absorption bands exist in the VUV region of Carbon monoxide (CO). Emission spectra indicate that these bands are all predissociative. An experimental investigation of CO photodissociation by vacuum ultraviolet photons (90 to 108 nm; ~13 to 11 eV) from the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron and direct measurement of the associated oxygen isotopic composition of the products are presented here. A wavelength dependency of the oxygen isotopic composition in the photodissociation product was observed. Slope values (δ'{sup 18}O/ δ'{sup 17}O) ranging from 0.76 to 1.32 were observed in oxygen three-isotope space (δ'{sup 18}O vs. δ'{sup 17}O) which correlated with increasing synchrotron photon energy, and indicate a dependency of the upper electronic state specific dissociation dynamics (e.g., perturbation and coupling associated with a particular state). An unprecedented magnitude in isotope separation was observed for photodissociation at the 105 and 107 nm synchrotron bands and are found to be associated with accidental predissociation of the vibrational states ({nu} = 0 and 1) of the upper electronic state E{sup 1}Π. For each synchrotron band, a large (few hundred per mil) extent of isotopic fractionation was observed and the range of fractionation is a combination of column density and exposure time. A significant temperature dependency in oxygen isotopic fractionation was observed, indicating a rotational level dependency in the predissociation process.

  16. PROTEIN FRACTIONATION AND UTILIZATION OF SOYBEAN AND REDBEAN AS AFFECTED BY DIFFERENT DRYING TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuraga Jayanegara

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of different drying temperature on chemical composition, in vitro rumen fermentation and digestibility of soybean and redbean. Soybean and redbean were dried in an oven set at four different drying temperatures, i.e. 50, 60, 70 and 80 oC for 24 h in three replicates. Dried samples were then milled and used further for chemical composition determination (proximate analysis, Van Soest analysis and protein fraction and in vitro rumen fermentation assay. Parameters measured in the in vitro assay were gas production, digestibility, pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acids (VFA. Data obtained were analyzed by using analysis of variance and a posthoc test namely Duncan’s multiple range test. Results revealed that neutral detergent insoluble crude protein (NDICP content increased at higher drying temperature (70 or 80 oC for both soybean and redbean (P<0.05 but at different magnitude. As with NDICP, higher temperature led to a higher acid detergent insoluble crude protein (ADICP both in soybean and redbean (P<0.05. Higher temperature decreased gas production rate (GPR of both beans (P<0.05. Drying of soybean at 70 or 80 oC decreased crude protein digestibility (CPD of soybean than dried at 50 or 60 oC (P<0.05. Higher drying temperature resulted in a lower NH3 concentration (P<0.05. It can be concluded that drying temperature at 50 or 60 oC is safe to maintain nutritional quality of soybean and redbean.

  17. Initial estimates of the temperature and fractional areas of fires at the World Trade Center Disaster from AVIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. O.; Clark, R. N.; Boardman, J.; Pavri, B.; Sarture, C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements, algorithms, analyses, and results of the fire temperature and fractional area determinations with AVIRIS calibrated spectra at the World Trade Center site in September 2001.

  18. Fractional watt Vuillemier cryogenic refrigerator program engineering notebook. Volume 1: Thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    The cryogenic refrigerator thermal design calculations establish design approach and basic sizing of the machine's elements. After the basic design is defined, effort concentrates on matching the thermodynamic design with that of the heat transfer devices (heat exchangers and regenerators). Typically, the heat transfer device configurations and volumes are adjusted to improve their heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. These adjustments imply that changes be made to the active displaced volumes, compensating for the influence of the heat transfer devices on the thermodynamic processes of the working fluid. Then, once the active volumes are changed, the heat transfer devices require adjustment to account for the variations in flows, pressure levels, and heat loads. This iterative process is continued until the thermodynamic cycle parameters match the design of the heat transfer devices. By examing several matched designs, a near-optimum refrigerator is selected.

  19. Long-Memory and the Sea Level-Temperature Relationship: A Fractional Cointegration Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa-Santaulària, Daniel; Heres, David R.; Martínez-Hernández, L. Catalina

    2014-01-01

    Through thermal expansion of oceans and melting of land-based ice, global warming is very likely contributing to the sea level rise observed during the 20th century. The amount by which further increases in global average temperature could affect sea level is only known with large uncertainties due to the limited capacity of physics-based models to predict sea levels from global surface temperatures. Semi-empirical approaches have been implemented to estimate the statistical relationship between these two variables providing an alternative measure on which to base potentially disrupting impacts on coastal communities and ecosystems. However, only a few of these semi-empirical applications had addressed the spurious inference that is likely to be drawn when one nonstationary process is regressed on another. Furthermore, it has been shown that spurious effects are not eliminated by stationary processes when these possess strong long memory. Our results indicate that both global temperature and sea level indeed present the characteristics of long memory processes. Nevertheless, we find that these variables are fractionally cointegrated when sea-ice extent is incorporated as an instrumental variable for temperature which in our estimations has a statistically significant positive impact on global sea level. PMID:25426638

  20. Effects of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction on the electromechanical properties of 3-3 piezoelectric foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, B. V.; Challagulla, K. S.; Venkatesh, T. A.; Hadjiloizi, D. A.; Georgiades, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Unit-cell based finite element models are developed to completely characterize the role of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction in determining the elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric properties as well as relevant figures of merit of 3-3 type piezoelectric foam structures. Eight classes of foam structures which represent structures with different types and degrees of uniformity of porosity distribution are identified; a Base structure (Class I), two H-type foam structures (Classes II, and III), a Cross-type foam structure (Class IV) and four Line-type foam structures (Classes V, VI, VII, and VIII). Three geometric factors that influence the electromechanical properties are identified: (i) the number of pores per face, pore size and the distance between the pores; (ii) pore orientation with respect to poling direction; (iii) the overall symmetry of the pore distribution with respect to the center of the face of the unit cell. To assess the suitability of these structures for such applications as hydrophones, bone implants, medical imaging and diagnostic devices, five figures of merit are determined via the developed finite element model; the piezoelectric coupling constant (K t ), the acoustic impedance (Z), the piezoelectric charge coefficient (d h ), the hydrostatic voltage coefficient (g h ), and the hydrostatic figure of merit (d h g h ). At high material volume fractions, foams with non-uniform Line-type porosity (Classes V and VII) where the pores are preferentially distributed perpendicular to poling direction, are found to exhibit the best combination of desirable piezoelectric figures of merit. For example, at about 50% volume fraction, the d h , g h , and d h g h figures of merit are 55%, 1600% and 2500% higher, respectively, for Classes V and VII of Line-like foam structures compared with the Base structure.

  1. Determination of respirable mass concentration using a high volume air sampler and a sedimentation method for fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.

    1995-12-31

    A preliminary study of a new method for determining respirable mass concentration is described. This method uses a high volume air sampler and subsequent fractionation of the collected mass using a particle sedimentation technique. Side-by-side comparisons of this method with cyclones were made in the field and in the laboratory. There was good agreement among the samplers in the laboratory, but poor agreement in the field. The effect of wind on the samplers` capture efficiencies is the primary hypothesized source of error among the field results. The field test took place at the construction site of a hazardous waste landfill located on the Hanford Reservation.

  2. Theoretical Model for Volume Fraction of UC, 235U Enrichment, and Effective Density of Final U 10Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); McGarrah, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)

    2016-04-12

    The purpose of this document is to provide a theoretical framework for (1) estimating uranium carbide (UC) volume fraction in a final alloy of uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo) as a function of final alloy carbon concentration, and (2) estimating effective 235U enrichment in the U 10Mo matrix after accounting for loss of 235U in forming UC. This report will also serve as a theoretical baseline for effective density of as-cast low-enriched U 10Mo alloy. Therefore, this report will serve as the baseline for quality control of final alloy carbon content

  3. Effect of heat treatment on the distribution and volume fraction of Mg2Si in structural aluminum alloy 6063

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Marahleh, G.

    2006-05-01

    The structure and properties of an aluminum alloy after extrusion in cast and homogenized states are studied. Commercial billets are melted in a horizontal continuous casting installation. After homogenizing the billets are used for fabricating shapes of specified form in an extrusion press. The shapes are subjected to final aging. The volume fraction and the distribution of the second Mg2Si phase are determined after different kinds of treatment. The structure and mechanical properties of shapes obtained from cast and homogenized billets are compared after aging and without aging. The effect of homogenizing on the properties of the alloy after extrusion is analyzed.

  4. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Aldershvile, J;

    2011-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) was determined by first passage radionuclide cardiography and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multigated radionuclide cardiography in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease. The results were evaluated against those obtained by the invasive dye dilution...... or thermodilution and left ventricular cardioangiographic techniques. In a paired comparison the mean difference between the invasive and radionuclide SV was -1 ml (SED 3.1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p less than 0.01). Radionuclide LVEF values also correlated well with cardioangiographic measurements...

  5. On a closed form approach to the fractional neutron point kinetics equation with temperature feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, Marcelo; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Vilhena, Marco T.M.B., E-mail: marceloschramm@hotmail.com, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.br, E-mail: mtmbvilhena@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica; Petersen, Claudio Z., E-mail: claudiopetersen@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Departamento de Matematica; Alvim, Antonio C.M., E-mail: alvim@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa em Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    Following the quest to find analytical solutions, we extend the methodology applied successfully to timely fractional neutron point kinetics (FNPK) equations by adding the effects of temperature. The FNPK equations with temperature feedback correspond to a nonlinear system and “stiff” type for the neutron density and the concentration of delayed neutron precursors. These variables determine the behavior of a nuclear reactor power with time and are influenced by the position of control rods, for example. The solutions of kinetics equations provide time information about the dynamics in a nuclear reactor in operation and are useful, for example, to understand the power fluctuations with time that occur during startup or shutdown of the reactor, due to adjustments of the control rods. The inclusion of temperature feedback in the model introduces an estimate of the transient behavior of the power and other variables, which are strongly coupled. Normally, a single value of reactivity is used across the energy spectrum. Especially in case of power change, the neutron energy spectrum changes as well as physical parameters such as the average cross sections. However, even knowing the importance of temperature effects on the control of the reactor power, the character of the set of nonlinear equations governing this system makes it difficult to obtain a purely analytical solution. Studies have been published in this sense, using numerical approaches. Here the idea is to consider temperature effects to make the model more realistic and thus solve it in a semi-analytical way. Therefore, the main objective of this paper is to obtain an analytical representation of fractional neutron point kinetics equations with temperature feedback, without having to resort to approximations inherent in numerical methods. To this end, we will use the decomposition method, which has been successfully used by the authors to solve neutron point kinetics problems. The results obtained will

  6. Prediction of the Soil Water Characteristic from Soil Particle Volume Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Modelling water distribution and flow in partially saturated soils requires knowledge of the soil-water characteristic (SWC). However, measurement of the SWC is challenging and time-consuming, and in some cases not feasible. This study introduces two predictive models (Xw-model and Xw......*-model) for the SWC, derived from readily available soil properties such as texture and bulk density. A total of 46 soils from different horizons at 15 locations across Denmark were used for models evaluation. The Xw-model predicts the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric fines content (organic matter...... (organic matter, clay, silt, fine and coarse sand), variably included in the model depending on the pF value. The volumetric content of a particular soil particle size fraction was included in the model if it was assumed to contribute to the pore size fraction still occupied with water at the given p...

  7. Experimental density data and excess molar volumes of coconut biodiesel + n-hexadecane and coconut biodiesel + diesel at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. R. Mesquita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The density of the pure component (n-hexadecane, pure pseudo-components (coconut biodiesel and diesel and pseudo-binary mixtures of coconut biodiesel with n-hexadecane (or + diesel were measured at temperatures 293.15, 313.15, 333.15, 353.15 and 373.15 K and atmospheric pressure, over the entire composition range (mole fractions from 0.1 to 0.9, with a step de 0.1. Densities were determined using an Anton Paar SVM 3000 viscodensimeter. Experimental density values decreased with the increase of the temperature. The excess molar volumes of the pseudo-binary mixtures were calculated by using the experimental values of density. Excess molar volumes were correlated with the Redlich-Kister polynomial expansions. Excess molar volumes show positive and negative values in the two systems studied. Excess partial volumes at infinite dilution were calculated for coconut biodiesel, n-hexadecane and diesel in the mixtures studied.

  8. A proposed magnetic digital temperature transducer, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, T. E.; Tchernev, D. I.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the feasibility of using the discontinuous permeability versus temperature characteristics of some magnetic materials for a digital temperature transducer and a thermally controlled ON-OFF switch. Simple logic converts the number of output pulse to a digital word recognizable by the system. Efforts have been concentrated on materials with Curie temperatures between 0 and 100 C. One compound has the composition Mn(5-x)Fe(x)Ge3 where the amount of iron determines the transition temperature. The other compound is Ni-Zn ferrite and has the compositon Ni(1-x)Zn(x)Fe(1.95)O4 where the nickel: zinc ratio determines the transition temperature. A detailed report of materials prepared is presented. Toroidal inductors of the material have been constructed and the change in inductance with temperature measured. In view of these initial measurements, it is felt that a transducer utilizing the permeability versus temperature characteristics of these materials has promise as a reliable and sensitive solid state digital temperature transducer.

  9. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  10. Optimization of protein fractionation by skim milk microfiltration: Choice of ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Camilla Elise; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Rukke, Elling-Olav; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Schüller, Reidar B; Skeie, Siv B

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature influence the protein fractionation of skim milk by cross flow microfiltration (MF). Microfiltration was performed at a uniform transmembrane pressure with constant permeate flux to a volume concentration factor of 2.5. Three different membrane pore sizes, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20µm, were used at a filtration temperature of 50°C. Furthermore, at pore size 0.10µm, 2 different filtration temperatures were investigated: 50 and 60°C. The transmission of proteins increased with increasing pore size, giving the permeate from MF with the 0.20-µm membrane a significantly higher concentration of native whey proteins compared with the permeates from the 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes (0.50, 0.24, and 0.39%, respectively). Significant amounts of caseins permeated the 0.20-µm membrane (1.4%), giving a permeate with a whitish appearance and a casein distribution (αS2-CN: αS1-CN: κ-CN: β-CN) similar to that of skim milk. The 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes were able to retain all caseins (only negligible amounts were detected). A permeate free from casein is beneficial in the production of native whey protein concentrates and in applications where transparency is an important functional characteristic. Microfiltration of skim milk at 50°C with the 0.10-µm membrane resulted in a permeate containing significantly more native whey proteins than the permeate from MF at 60°C. The more rapid increase in transmembrane pressure and the significantly lower concentration of caseins in the retentate at 60°C indicated that a higher concentration of caseins deposited on the membrane, and consequently reduced the native whey protein transmission. Optimal protein fractionation of skim milk into a casein-rich retentate and a permeate with native whey proteins were obtained by 0.10-µm MF at 50°C.

  11. Effect of high pressure high temperature processing on the volatile fraction of differently coloured carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Palmers, Stijn; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Carle, Reinhold; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2014-06-15

    To get deeper insight into the effect of high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing on the volatile fraction of carrots, differently coloured cultivars exhibiting orange, purple, red and yellow hues were investigated. The impact of HPHT sterilisation was compared with thermal sterilisation based on equivalent microbiological inactivation. The results of this study demonstrated HPHT sterilisation to exert a distinct effect on important chemical reactions in comparison to thermal sterilisation. A comprehensive integration of MS-based metabolomic fingerprinting (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and chemometric tools has been implemented as an untargeted multivariate screening tool to identify differences. In all carrot cultivars, two dominant discriminative quality-related reactions were found: oxidative degradation and the Maillard reaction. Regarding the first reaction, oxidative terpenes, free fatty acids and carotenoids degradation products were detected at higher levels after HPHT sterilisation. Regarding the latter reaction, HPHT sterilisation appeared to suppress the formation of Maillard and Strecker degradation products.

  12. The effects of scraping therapy on local temperature and blood perfusion volume in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin-Yan; Yang, Jin-Sheng; Zhu, Bing; Yang, Li; Wang, Ying-Ying; Gao, Xin-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We aim to study the therapeutic effects of scraping by investigating the changes of temperature and local blood perfusion volume in healthy subjects after scraping stimulation, and to explore the mechanism of scraping stimulation from the points of microcirculation and energy metabolism. Methods. Twenty-three health subjects were included in this study. Local blood perfusion volume and body surface temperature was detected at 5 min before scraping stimulation, 0, 15, 30, 60 and 90 min after scraping using Laser Doppler imager and infrared thermograph. Results. Significant increase was noted in the blood perfusion volume in the scraping area within 90 minutes compared to the baseline level and non-scraping area (P scraping area, an increase of body temperature with an average of 1°C was observed after scraping stimulation (P Scraping can significantly improve the blood perfusion volume and increase the temperature in the scraping area, promoting the local blood circulation and energy metabolism.

  13. Agreement of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes between adenosine stress TL-201 gated SPECT and echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, M. S. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Ewha, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, D. H.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, Y. J.; Kang, D. H. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated TI-201 SPECT measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) have shown high correlation with conventional methods. However, how much these parameters measured by TI-201 gated SPECT differ from those by echocardiography has not been assessed. Adenosine stress (Ad-G) and redistribution TI-201 gated SPECT (Re-G) and resting echocardiography were conducted in 337 patients (184 male, 153 female). EDV, ESV and LVEF measured by QGS software were compared with the results by echocardiography. Patients with arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation or frequent premature contractions) or evidence of fixed or reversible perfusion defects on TI-201 SPECT were excluded. EF, EDV and ESV measured by Ad-G (63.3{+-}9.8,73.8{+-}30.2,29.1{+-}20.1) and Re-G (65.2{+-}11.6,69.1{+-}30.1,26.5{+-}20.3) correlated well with those by Echo (61.4{+-}7.9,78.3{+-}2.7, 30.7{+-} 17.5 ; r of Ad-G=0.547, 0.850, 0.827, p<0.001 ; r of Re-G=0.585, 0.838, 0.819, p<0.001). However the difference (mean, SD, SEE of Echo - gated SPECT) was statistically significant (EF: Ad-G=1.71, 8.92, 0.48, Re-G=3.59, 10.39, 0.56, p<0.001 ; EDV: Ad-G=4.75, 16.21, 0.88, Re-G=9.53, 16.77, 0.91, p<0.001 ; ESV: Ad-G=1.75, 11.35, 0.61, p<0.05, Re-G=4.29, 11.7, 0.63, p<0.001). Bland-Altman plots showed that the difference of EDV and ESV did not vary in any systematic way over the range of measurement, whereas the difference of EF increased with increasing average EF by Echo and gated-SPECT. The difference of EF, EDV, and ESV between Ad-G and Echo was significantly smaller than those between Re-G and Echo (p<0.001). Gated TI-201 SPECT underestimates EDV and ESV over a wide range of volume. As a result, EF by gated TI-201 SPECT is overestimated especially in patients with small LV volume. Ad-G is preferable to Re-G in assessing left ventricular ejection fraction and volume in place of Echo because of smaller bias.

  14. The Effects of Scraping Therapy on Local Temperature and Blood Perfusion Volume in Healthy Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Qin-Yan Xu; Jin-Sheng Yang; Bing Zhu; Li Yang; Ying-Ying Wang; Xin-Yan Gao

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We aim to study the therapeutic effects of scraping by investigating the changes of temperature and local blood perfusion volume in healthy subjects after scraping stimulation, and to explore the mechanism of scraping stimulation from the points of microcirculation and energy metabolism. Methods. Twenty-three health subjects were included in this study. Local blood perfusion volume and body surface temperature was detected at 5 min before scraping stimulation, 0, 15, 30, 60 and 90 ...

  15. Quantitative sodium MRI of the human brain at 9.4 T provides assessment of tissue sodium concentration and cell volume fraction during normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulborn, Keith; Lui, Elaine; Guntin, Jonathan; Jamil, Saad; Sun, Ziqi; Claiborne, Theodore C; Atkinson, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ion homeostasis is a fundamental property of viable tissue, allowing the tissue sodium concentration to be modeled as the tissue cell volume fraction. The modern neuropathology literature using ex vivo tissue from selected brain regions indicates that human brain cell density remains constant during normal aging and attributes the volume loss that occurs with advancing age to changes in neuronal size and dendritic arborization. Quantitative sodium MRI performed with the enhanced sensitivity of ultrahigh-field 9.4 T has been used to investigate tissue cell volume fraction during normal aging. This cross-sectional study (n = 49; 21-80 years) finds that the in vivo tissue cell volume fraction remains constant in all regions of the brain with advancing age in individuals who remain cognitively normal, extending the ex vivo literature reporting constant neuronal cell density across the normal adult age range. Cell volume fraction, as measured by quantitative sodium MRI, is decreased in diseases of cell loss, such as stroke, on a time scale of minutes to hours, and in response to treatment of brain tumors on a time scale of days to weeks. Neurodegenerative diseases often have prodromal periods of decades in which regional neuronal cell loss occurs prior to clinical presentation. If tissue cell volume fraction can detect such early pathology, this quantitative parameter may permit the objective measurement of preclinical disease progression. This current study in cognitively normal aging individuals provides the basis for the pursuance of investigations directed towards such neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. The effect of bonding environment on iron isotope fractionation between minerals at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2017-01-01

    Central to understanding the processes that drive stable isotope fractionation in nature is their quantification under controlled experimental conditions. The polyvalent element iron, given its abundance in terrestrial rocks, exerts controls on the structural and chemical properties of minerals and melts. The iron isotope compositions of typical high temperature minerals are, however, poorly constrained and their dependence on intensive (e.g. fO2) and extensive (e.g. compositional) variables is unknown. In this work, experiments involving a reference phase, 2 M FeCl2·4H2O(l), together with an oxide mix corresponding to the bulk composition of the chosen mineral were performed in a piston cylinder in Ag capsules. The oxide mix crystallised in situ at 1073 K and 1 GPa, in equilibrium with the iron chloride, and was held for 72 h. In order to characterise the effect of co-ordination and oxidation state on the isotope composition independently, exclusively Fe2+ minerals were substituted in: VIII-fold almandine, VI-fold ilmenite, fayalite and IV-fold chromite and hercynite. Δ57FeMin-FeCl2 increases in the order VIII ion. The composition of the VIFe2+-bearing minerals is similar to that of the aqueous FeCl2 fluid. To the degree that this represents the speciation of iron in fluids exsolving from magmas, the fractionation between them should be small, unless the iron is hosted in magnetite. By contrast, predominantly Fe2+-bearing mantle garnets should preserve a much lighter δ57Fe than their lower pressure spinel counterparts, a signature that may be reflected in partial melts from these lithologies. As the Fe-O bond lengths in fayalite and ilmenite are comparable, their isotope compositions overlap, suggesting that high Ti mare basalts acquired their heavy isotopic signature from ilmenite that crystallised late during lunar magma ocean solidification.

  17. 2D and 3D milled surface roughness of high volume fraction SiCp/Al composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on surface roughness generated by high speed milling of high volume fraction (65% silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminum matrix (SiCp/Al composites. Typical 2D (Ra and Rz and 3D (Sa and Sq surface roughness parameters were selected to evaluate the influence of the milling parameters on the surface quality in comparison with aluminum alloy. The 3D topography of the milled surface was studied as well. The results indicate that 3D parameters (Sa and Sq are more capable to describe the influence of the milling parameters on the surface quality, and among them Sq is preferable due to its good sensitivity. Sq decreases with milling speed and increases with feed rate. The influence of axial depth of cut (ADOC is negligible.

  18. The effect of strain path change on subgrain volume fraction determined from in situ X-ray measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, U.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of dislocation structures in individual bulk grains in copper during strain path changes is studied with a new in situ synchrotron technique which combines high angular resolution with fast three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping. Deformed copper contains regions with vanishing...... dislocation density called subgrains bounded by dislocation rich walls. With the new technique reciprocal space maps, consisting of sharp peaks arising from the subgrains superimposed on a cloud of lower intensity arising from the dislocation walls, are obtained, which allows properties such as subgrain...... volume fraction to be quantified. The studied strain path changes are tension-tension sequences. Polycrystalline copper sheets are pre-deformed in tension to 5% strain, and tensile samples are cut with varying angles between the first and second loading axis. The second tensile deformation up...

  19. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  20. Effect of oral alcohol on left ventricular ejection fraction, volumes, and segmental wall motion in normals and in patients with recent myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, L; Gopalaswamy, C; Yang, D; Patel, D; Kim, B S; Patel, C; Becker, W H

    1985-11-01

    A first-pass nuclear angiogram and a multiple-gated acquisition study were obtained in 10 normal physicians and in 10 patients with a 7-to-10 day old transmural myocardial infarction. After the scan the subjects drank 2 oz. of whiskey. After 60 minutes, the multiple-gated acquisition study was repeated. In the normal group the left ventricular ejection fraction was 68% before and 72% after alcohol. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased from 89 to 97 ml while the left ventricular end-systolic volume decreased from 29 to 27 ml. The stroke volume rose from 61 to 70 ml/beat (p less than 0.05). The cardiac output increased from 4.0 to 5.0 l/min (p less than 0.05). In the infarction group, the left ventricular ejection fraction was 58% before and 56% after alcohol administration. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume fell from 111 to 96 ml, while the left ventricular end-systolic volume declined from 50 to 44 ml. The stroke volume fell from 61 to 52 ml/beat, while the cardiac output fell from 4.5 to 3.8 l/min. In the left ventricular infarction zones, alcohol produced in 9 of the 10 cardiac patients a decline in the left ventricular regional ejection fraction. In the normal group, alcohol produced no significant changes in the regional ejection fraction. The normal and the postinfarction patients responded differently to alcohol.

  1. A fractional transient model for the viscoplastic response of polymers based on a micro-mechanism of free volume distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spathis, G.; Kontou, E.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, the nonlinear viscoelastic/viscoplastic response of polymeric materials is described by introducing essential modifications on a model developed in previous works. A constitutive equation of viscoelasticity, based on the transient network theory, is introduced in a more generalized form, which takes into account volume changes during deformation. This time-dependent equation accounts for the nonlinearity and viscoplasticity at small elastic and finite plastic strain regime. The present description was proved to be more flexible, given that it contains a relaxation function that has been derived by considering instead of first order kinetics a fractional derivative that controls the rate of molecular chain detachment from their junctions. Therefore, the new equation has a more global character, appropriate for cases where heavy tails are expected. On the basis of the distributed nature of free volume, a new functional form of the rate of plastic deformation is developed, which is combined with a proper kinematic formulation and leads to the separation of the total strain into the elastic and plastic part. A three-dimensional constitutive equation is then derived for an isotropic, compressible medium. This analysis was proved to be capable of capturing the main aspects of inelastic response as well as the instability stage taking place at the tertiary creep, related to the creep failure.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume in peripheral arterial disease: initial findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten PAD patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the peripheral arteries, followed by one DCE MRI examination of the musculature of the calf. Healthy control subjects were examined twice on different days to determine normative values and the interreader and interscan reproducibility of the technique. The MRI protocol comprised dynamic imaging of contrast agent wash-in under reactive hyperemia conditions of the calf musculature. Using pharmacokinetic modeling the hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume (V(p, unit: % of the anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was calculated. RESULTS: V(p was significantly lower for all muscle groups in PAD patients (4.3±1.6%, 5.0±3.3% and 6.1±3.6% for anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, respectively compared to healthy control subjects (9.1±2.0%, 8.9±1.9% and 9.3±2.1%. Differences in V(p between muscle groups were not significant. The coefficient of variation of V(p varied from 10-14% and 11-16% at interscan and interreader level, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using DCE MRI after contrast-enhanced MR angiography with gadofosveset enables reproducible assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. V(p was lower in PAD patients than in healthy controls, which reflects a promising functional (hemodynamic biomarker for the

  3. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 20 Appendix S - Historical Sea Ice Area Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  4. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 21 Appendix T - Forecast Sea Ice Area Fraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  5. Relationships between evaprorative fraction and remotely sensed vegetation index and microwave brightness temperature for semiarid rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, W. P.; Schimugge, T. J.; Humes, K. S.; Jackson, T. J.; Parry, R.; Weltz, M. A.; Moran, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experiment Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band instrument (21-cm wavelength) that can provide estimates of near-surface soil moisture over a variety of surfaces. Aircraft observations in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths collected on selected days also were used to compute a vegetation index. Continuous micrometeorological measurements and daily soil moisture samples were obtained at eight locations during experimental period. Two sites were instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes to monitor the soil moisture profile. The fraction of available energy used for evapotranspiration was computed by taking the ratio of latent heat flux (LE) to the sum of net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G). This ratio is commonly called the evaporative fraction (EF) and normally varies between 0 and 1 under daytime convective conditions with minimal advection. A wide range of environmental conditions existed during the field campaign, resulting in average EF values for the study area varying from 0.4 to 0.8 and values of TB ranging from 220 to 280 K. Comparison between measured TB and EF for the eight locations showed an inverse relationship. Other days were included in the analysis by estimating TB with the soil moisture data. Because transpiration from the vegetation is more strongly coupled to root zone soil moisture, significant scatter in this relationship existed at high values of TB or dry near-surface soil moisture conditions. The variation in EF under dry near-surface soil moisture conditions was correlated to the amount of vegetation cover estimated with a remotely sensed vegetation index. These findings indicate that information obtained from optical and microwave data can be used for quantifying the energy balance of semiarid areas. The microwave data can indicate

  6. Relationships between Evaporative Fraction and Remotely Sensed Vegetation Index and Microwave Brightness Temperature for Semiarid Rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, W. P.; Schmugge, T. J.; Humes, K. S.; Jackson, T. J.; Parry, R.; Weltz, M. A.; Moran, M. S.

    1993-12-01

    Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band instrument (21-cm wavelength) that can provide estimates of near-surface soil moisture over a variety of surfaces. Aircraft observations in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths collected on selected days also were used to compute a vegetation index. Continuous micrometeorological measurements and daily soil moisture samples were obtained at eight locations during the experimental period. Two sites were instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes to monitor the soil moisture profile. The fraction of available energy used for evapotranspiration was computed by taking the ratio of latent heat flux (LE) to the sum of net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G). This ratio is commonly called the evaporative fraction (EF) and normally varies between 0 and 1 under daytime convective conditions with minimal advection. A wide range of environmental conditions existed during the field campaign, resulting in average EF values for the study area varying from 0.4 to 0.8 and values of TB ranging from 220 to 280 K. Comparison between measured TB and EF for the eight locations showed an inverse relationship with a significant correlation (r2 = 0.69). Other days were included in the analysis by estimating TB with the soil moisture data. Because transpiration from the vegetation is more strongly coupled to root zone soil moisture, significant scatter in this relationship existed at high values of TB or dry near-surface soil moisture conditions. It caused a substantial reduction in the correlation with r2 = 0.40 or only 40% of the variation in EF being explained by TB. The variation in EF under dry near-surface soil moisture conditions was correlated to the amount of vegetation cover estimated with a remotely sensed vegetation index. These

  7. Fractional Boltzmann equation for multiple scattering of resonance radiation in low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchaikin, V V; Sibatov, R T, E-mail: vuchaikin@gmail.com, E-mail: ren_sib@bk.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, 432000, 42 Leo Tolstoy str., Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-08

    The fractional Boltzmann equation for resonance radiation transport in plasma is proposed. We start with the standard Boltzmann equation; averaging over photon frequencies leads to the appearance of a fractional derivative. This fact is in accordance with the conception of latent variables leading to hereditary and non-local dynamics (in particular, fractional dynamics). The presence of a fractional material derivative in the equation is concordant with heavy tailed distribution of photon path lengths and with spatiotemporal coupling peculiar to the process. We discuss some methods of solving the obtained equation and demonstrate numerical results in some simple cases.

  8. Calcium and strontium isotope fractionation during precipitation from aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and reaction rate; II. Aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKhatib, Mahmoud; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2017-07-01

    In order to study Strontium (Sr) partitioning and isotope fractionation of Sr and Calcium (Ca) in aragonite we performed precipitation experiments decoupling temperature and precipitation rates (R∗, μmol/m2 h) in the interval of about 2.3-4.5 μmol/m2 h. Aragonite is the only pure solid phase precipitated from a stirred solutions exposed to an atmosphere of NH3 and CO2 gases throughout the spontaneous decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. The order of reaction with respect to Ca ions is one and independent of temperature. However, the order of reaction with respect to the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is temperature dependent and decreases from three via two to one as temperature increases from 12.5 and 25.0 to 37.5 °C, respectively. Strontium distribution coefficient (DSr) increases with decreasing temperature. However, R∗ responds differently depending on the initial Sr/Ca concentration and temperature: at 37.5 °C DSr increase as a function of increasing R∗ but decrease for 12.5 and 25 °C. Not seen at 12.5 and 37.5 °C but at 25 °C the DSr-R∗ gradient is also changing sign depending on the initial Sr/Ca ratio. Magnesium (Mg) adsorption coefficient between aragonite and aqueous solution (DMg) decreases with temperature but increases with R∗ in the range of 2.4-3.8 μmol/m2 h. Strontium isotope fractionation (Δ88/86Sraragonite-aq) follows the kinetic type of fractionation and become increasingly negative as a function of R∗ for all temperatures. In contrast Ca isotope fractionation (Δ44/40Caaragonite-aq) shows a different behavior than the Sr isotopes. At low temperatures (12.5 and 25 °C) Ca isotope fractionation (Δ44/40Caaragonite-aq) becomes positive as a function of R∗. In contrast, at 37.5 °C and as a function of increasing R∗ the Δ44/40Caaragonite-aq show a Sr type like behavior and becomes increasingly negative. Concerning both the discrepant behavior of DSr as a function of temperature as well as for the Ca isotope fractionation as a

  9. Copper isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low temperature geochemistry and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moynier, Frédéric; Abe, Minori; Nemoto, Keisuke; Albarède, Francis

    2013-06-01

    Isotope fractionation between the common Cu species present in solution (Cu+, Cu2+, hydroxide, chloride, sulfide, carbonate, oxalate, and ascorbate) has been investigated using both ab initio methods and experimental solvent extraction techniques. In order to establish unambiguously the existence of equilibrium isotope fractionation (as opposed to kinetic isotope fractionation), we first performed laboratory-scale liquid-liquid distribution experiments. Upon exchange between HCl medium and a macrocyclic complex, the 65Cu/63Cu ratio fractionated by -1.06‰ to -0.39‰. The acidity dependence of the fractionation was appropriately explained by ligand exchange reactions between hydrated H2O and Cl- via intramolecular vibrations. The magnitude of the Cu isotope fractionation among important Cu ligands was also estimated by ab initio methods. The magnitude of the nuclear field shift effect to the Cu isotope fractionation represents only ˜3% of the mass-dependent fractionation. The theoretical estimation was expanded to chlorides, hydroxides, sulfides, sulfates, and carbonates under different conditions of pH. Copper isotope fractionation of up to 2‰ is expected for different forms of Cu present in seawater and for different sediments (carbonates, hydroxides, and sulfides). We found that Cu in dissolved carbonates and sulfates is isotopically much heavier (+0.6‰) than free Cu. Isotope fractionation of Cu in hydroxide is minimal. The relevance of these new results to the understanding of metabolic processes was also discussed. Copper is an essential element used by a large number of proteins for electron transfer. Further theoretical estimates of δ65Cu in hydrated Cu(I) and Cu(II) ions, Cu(II) ascorbates, and Cu(II) oxalate predict Cu isotope fractionation during the breakdown of ascorbate into oxalate and account for the isotopically heavy Cu found in animal kidneys.

  10. Effect of biochar application and soil temperature on characteristics of organic matter associated with aggregate-size and density fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Michael; Grunwald, Dennis; Marhan, Sven; Poll, Christian; Bamminger, Chris; Ludwig, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Potential increases in soil temperature due to climate change might result in intensified soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and thus higher CO2 emissions. Management options to increase and stabilize SOM include the application of biochar. However, the effects of biochar amendments under elevated soil temperatures on SOM dynamics are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of biochar application and elevated soil temperature on the amount and composition of OM associated with fractions of different turnover kinetics. Samples were taken from four treatments of the Hohenheim Climate Change Experiment with the factors temperature (ambient or elevated by 2.5 °C in 4 cm depth, six years before sampling) and biochar (control and 30 t / ha Miscanthus pyrolysis biochar, one year before sampling) in two depths (0 - 5 and 5 - 15 cm). Basal respiration and microbial biomass C were analyzed within an incubation experiment. Aggregate size-fractions were separated by wet-sieving and the free light, occluded light (oLF), and heavy fractions were isolated by density fractionation. All fractions were analyzed for organic C and δ13C as well as by infrared spectroscopy. Preliminary data suggest that biochar significantly increased basal respiration and that the microbial biomass C was significantly affected by elevated temperature. No biochar-C was found in the microbial biomass. Biochar and elevated temperature had only minor effects on the organic C associated with aggregate-size classes, although biochar was incorporated into all fractions already after one year of application. Biochar application significantly increased the organic C associated with oLF. In most samples affected by biochar, the proportion of C=O groups was significantly increased. The results suggest that already after one year, biochar-mineral interactions were formed leading to an aggregate occlusion of applied biochar. At least in the short-term, the effect of biochar on

  11. Effect of Local Temperature on the Detecting for Pulse Wave of Local Blood Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available [Objective] Temperature of a subject's external body parts is an interference condition in pulse wave of local blood volume measurement. It is necessary to rule it out. By changing the influence factors, an experiment to research the effect of temperature of subjected part in pulse wave of local blood volume measurement was carried out. [Methods] When the 32 experimenters' left middle finger temperature fall below to 20°C, pulse wave of local blood volume would be recorded detected in real-time until the temperature returned to the measured values before the experiment [Results] While the temperature of subjected part ranged from 26°C to 31°C, the parameters of K', K1', K2' and the amplitude of pulse wave remain basically unchanged. [Conclusion] As a result of the research data, it is stipulated that the pulse wave of local blood volume can be measured only if the finger temperature is in the range of 26-31°C.

  12. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  13. Calcium isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low-temperature geochemistry, biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2017-03-09

    Stable Ca isotopes are fractionated between bones, urine and blood of animals and between soils, roots and leaves of plants by >1000 ppm for the (44)Ca/(40)Ca ratio. These isotopic variations have important implications to understand Ca transport and fluxes in living organisms; however, the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation are unclear. Here we present ab initio calculations for the isotopic fractionation between various aqueous species of Ca and show that this fractionation can be up to 3000 ppm. We show that the Ca isotopic fractionation between soil solutions and plant roots can be explained by the difference of isotopic fractionation between the different first shell hydration degree of Ca(2+) and that the isotopic fractionation between roots and leaves is controlled by the precipitation of Ca-oxalates. The isotopic fractionation between blood and urine is due to the complexation of heavy Ca with citrate and oxalates in urine. Calculations are presented for additional Ca species that may be useful to interpret future Ca isotopic measurements.

  14. Calcium isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low-temperature geochemistry, biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Stable Ca isotopes are fractionated between bones, urine and blood of animals and between soils, roots and leaves of plants by >1000 ppm for the 44Ca/40Ca ratio. These isotopic variations have important implications to understand Ca transport and fluxes in living organisms; however, the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation are unclear. Here we present ab initio calculations for the isotopic fractionation between various aqueous species of Ca and show that this fractionation can be up to 3000 ppm. We show that the Ca isotopic fractionation between soil solutions and plant roots can be explained by the difference of isotopic fractionation between the different first shell hydration degree of Ca2+ and that the isotopic fractionation between roots and leaves is controlled by the precipitation of Ca-oxalates. The isotopic fractionation between blood and urine is due to the complexation of heavy Ca with citrate and oxalates in urine. Calculations are presented for additional Ca species that may be useful to interpret future Ca isotopic measurements. PMID:28276502

  15. One-point functions in finite volume/temperature: a case study

    CERN Document Server

    Szécsényi, I M; Watts, G M T

    2013-01-01

    We consider finite volume (or equivalently, finite temperature) expectation values of local operators in integrable quantum field theories using a combination of numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the truncated conformal space approach, when supplemented with a recently proposed renormalization group, can be sufficiently extended to the low-energy regime that it can be matched with high precision by the low-temperature expansion proposed by Leclair and Mussardo. Besides verifying the consistency of the two descriptions, their combination leads to an evaluation of expectation values which is valid to a very high precision for all volume/temperature scales. As a side result of the investigation, we also discuss some unexpected singularities in the framework recently proposed by Pozsgay and Tak\\'acs for the description of matrix elements of local operators in finite volume, and show that while some of these singularities are resolved by the inclusion of the class of exponential finite size cor...

  16. Validation of Interstitial Fractional Volume Quantification by Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maa, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the accuracy of fractional interstitial volume determination in low perfused and low vascularized tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The fractional interstitial volume (ve) was determined in the medial thigh muscle of 12 female pigs by using a 3-dimensional gradient echo sequence with k-space sharing and administering gadolinium-based contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine). Analysis was performed using 3 pharmacokinetic models: the simple Tofts model (TM), the extended TM (ETM), and the 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM). We investigated the effect of varying acquisition durations (ADs) on the model parameter estimates of the 3 models and compared the ve values with the results of histological examinations of muscle sections of the medial thigh muscle. Histological measurements yielded a median value (25%-75% quartile) of 4.8% (3.7%-6.2%) for ve. The interstitial fractional volume determined by DCE-MRI was comparable to the histological results but varied strongly with AD for the TM and ETM. For the TM and the ETM, the results were virtually the same. Choosing arterial hematocrit to Hcta = 0.4, the lowest median ve value determined by DCE-MRI was 5.2% (3.3%-6.1%) for the ETM at a 6-minute AD. The maximum ve value determined with the ETM at a 15-minute AD was 7.7% (4.5%-9.0%). The variation with AD of median ve values obtained with the 2CXM was much smaller: 6.2% (3.1%-9.2%) for the 6-minute AD and 6.3% (4.3%-9.8%) for the 15-minute AD. The best fit for the 2CXM was found at the 10-minute AD with ve values of 6.6% (3.7%-8.2%). No significant correlation between the histological and any DCE-MRI modeling results was found. Considering the expected accuracy of histological measurements, the medians of the MR modeling results were in good agreement with the histological prediction. A parameter determination uncertainty was identified with the use of the TMs. This is due to underfitting and

  17. Research Update for: A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites (ARL-TR-6057)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    increasing the fiber-volume fraction by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) in order to produce composite structures with aerospace grade...processed composites. Using a combination of viscosity control, U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) based VARTM techniques, and a pressure control...system, we have shown an increase in fiber-volume content from 50% (ARL’s normal processing range for a particular material system and VARTM process) to

  18. Dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations on daily or alternate day schedule outside the linear quadratic model: Proof of concept and early results. A substitute to volume fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Kumar, Narendra; Tripathi, Manjul; Oinam, Arun S; Ahuja, Chirag K; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kaur, Rupinder; Bhatt, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery (DFGKRS) on a daily schedule beyond the linear quadratic (LQ) model, for large volume arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Between 2012-16, 14 patients of large AVMs (median volume 26.5 cc) unsuitable for surgery or embolization were treated in 2-3 of DFGKRS sessions. The Leksell G frame was kept in situ during the whole procedure. 86% (n = 12) patients had radiologic evidence of bleed, and 43% (n = 6) had presented with a history of seizures. 57% (n = 8) patients received a daily treatment for 3 days and 43% (n = 6) were on an alternate day (2 fractions) regimen. The marginal dose was split into 2 or 3 fractions of the ideal prescription dose of a single fraction of 23-25 Gy. The median follow up period was 35.6 months (8-57 months). In the three-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 8.9-11.5 Gy, while in the two-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 11.3-15 Gy at 50% per fraction. Headache (43%, n = 6) was the most common early postoperative complication, which was controlled with short course steroids. Follow up evaluation of at least three years was achieved in seven patients, who have shown complete nidus obliteration in 43% patients while the obliteration has been in the range of 50-99% in rest of the patients. Overall, there was a 67.8% reduction in the AVM volume at 3 years. Nidus obliteration at 3 years showed a significant rank order correlation with the cumulative prescription dose (p 0.95, P value 0.01), with attainment of near-total (more than 95%) obliteration rates beyond 29 Gy of the cumulative prescription dose. No patient receiving a cumulative prescription dose of less than 31 Gy had any severe adverse reaction. In co-variate adjusted ordinal regression, only the cumulative prescription dose had a significant correlation with common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) severity (P value 0.04), independent of age, AVM volume

  19. Imaging water velocity and volume fraction distributions in water continuous multiphase flows using inductive flow tomography and electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an inductive flow tomography (IFT) system, employing a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM) and novel reconstruction techniques, for measuring the local water velocity distribution in water continuous single and multiphase flows. A series of experiments were carried out in vertical-upward and upward-inclined single phase water flows and ‘water continuous’ gas-water and oil-gas-water flows in which the velocity profiles ranged from axisymmetric (single phase and vertical-upward multiphase flows) to highly asymmetric (upward-inclined multiphase flows). Using potential difference measurements obtained from the electrode array of the EMFM, local axial velocity distributions of the continuous water phase were reconstructed using two different IFT reconstruction algorithms denoted RT#1, which assumes that the overall water velocity profile comprises the sum of a series of polynomial velocity components, and RT#2, which is similar to RT#1 but which assumes that the zero’th order velocity component may be replaced by an axisymmetric ‘power law’ velocity distribution. During each experiment, measurement of the local water volume fraction distribution was also made using the well-established technique of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By integrating the product of the local axial water velocity and the local water volume fraction in the cross section an estimate of the water volumetric flow rate was made which was compared with a reference measurement of the water volumetric flow rate. In vertical upward flows RT#2 was found to give rise to water velocity profiles which are consistent with the previous literature although the profiles obtained in the multiphase flows had relatively higher central velocity peaks than was observed for the single phase profiles. This observation was almost certainly a result of the transfer of axial momentum from the less dense dispersed phases to the water

  20. Axi-symmetric generalized thermoelastic diffusion problem with two-temperature and initial stress under fractional order heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Sunita; Kalkal, Kapil Kumar; Sheoran, Sandeep Singh

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model of fractional order two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity with diffusion and initial stress is proposed to analyze the transient wave phenomenon in an infinite thermoelastic half-space. The governing equations are derived in cylindrical coordinates for a two dimensional axi-symmetric problem. The analytical solution is procured by employing the Laplace and Hankel transforms for time and space variables respectively. The solutions are investigated in detail for a time dependent heat source. By using numerical inversion method of integral transforms, we obtain the solutions for displacement, stress, temperature and diffusion fields in physical domain. Computations are carried out for copper material and displayed graphically. The effect of fractional order parameter, two-temperature parameter, diffusion, initial stress and time on the different thermoelastic and diffusion fields is analyzed on the basis of analytical and numerical results. Some special cases have also been deduced from the present investigation.

  1. Temperature Dependence and Recoil-free Fraction Effects in Olivines Across the Mg-Fe Solid Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklute, E. C.; Rothstein, Y.; Dyar, M. D.; Schaefer, M. W.; Menzies, O. N.; Bland, P. A.; Berry, F. J.

    2005-01-01

    Olivine and pyroxene are the major ferromagnesian minerals in most meteorite types and in mafic igneous rocks that are dominant at the surface of the Earth. It is probable that they are the major mineralogical components at the surface of any planetary body that has undergone differentiation processes. In situ mineralogical studies of the rocks and soils on Mars suggest that olivine is a widespread mineral on that planet s surface (particularly at the Gusev site) and that it has been relatively unaffected by alteration. Thus an understanding of the characteristics of Mossbauer spectra of olivine is of great importance in interpreting MER results. However, variable temperature Mossbauer spectra of olivine, which are needed to quantify recoil-free fraction effects and to understand the temperature dependence of olivine spectra, are lacking in the literature. Thus, we present here a study of the temperature dependence and recoil-free fraction of a series of synthetic olivines.

  2. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and its temperature-resolved carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei; Ci, Zhijia

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) can improve our understanding of the chemical properties, formation processes and sources of WSOC in aerosols. We developed a method that can examine different temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC and used this method to characterize aerosol samples (n = 102) collected from an urban site in Beijing in 2010-2011. The aerosol composition data including inorganic ions, elements and temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC were used as input of positive matrix factorization (PMF) model to investigate the sources of WSOC. The results showed that the mean concentrations of WSOC were 10.2 μg m- 3 with increased values in winter and decreased values in summer, while WSOC/OC ratios (mean: 51.7%) were higher in spring and summer than in fall and winter. The sampling artifacts of WSOC (18.2%) were higher than those of OC (13.4%). Though WSOC was significantly influenced by biomass burning in spring and winter, the strong correlations between WSOC and other secondary components suggested that WSOC was secondary in nature. Results of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of OC and WSOC showed that WSOC/OC ratios for different carbon fractions had the highest value of 0.92 and lowest value of 0.30. PMF analysis identified four factors, three of which were associated with three organic polar compounds groups (low, medium, and high molecular weight compounds) based on their thermal evolution features, and one of which was attributed to inorganic secondary formation processes. Annually, the contributions of four factors were 20.5%, 46.2%, 12.4% and 20.9%, respectively.

  3. Experimental determination of Fe isotope fractionation between liquid metal, silicate and sulfide at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H. M.; Wood, B. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2007-12-01

    There is evidence for significant equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation (≤0.26‰/amu) between metal and troilite (FeS) in iron meteorites (Williams et al., EPSL (250) 2006) and a smaller fractionation (Gessmann and Wood, EPSL (200) 2002; Wood et al., EPSL (in revision) 2007). Metal, sulfide and silicate fractions were separated from mounted and sectioned experimental charges using a computer-controlled micromill (New Wave-Merchantek). Sample dissolution, Fe purification and isotopic analysis followed established procedures (Williams et al., EPSL (235) 2005). In agreement with another preliminary high-pressure experimental study (Poitrasson and Roskosz, LPSC XXXVIII 2007) we find no appreciable fractionation between liquid iron metal and basaltic melt. However, there is a resolvable Fe isotope fractionation between silicate melt and Fe-S alloy which ranges from 0.12±0.04 to 0.15±0.04‰/amu for separate experiments (errors are propagated based on the 2 SD errors of replicate analyses). The Fe isotope compositions of coexisting phases from these experiments define a positive linear relationship with a slope that is, within error, equal to unity, implying isotopic equilibrium. No relationship between apparent fractionation factor and pressure or temperature is detectable within the range covered by the experiments. The fractionation factors determined from our experiments overlap with the average equilibrium fractionation factor obtained between silicate melt and pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) of 0.18±0.02‰/amu at 0.5GPa and 1114-1274K (Schuessler et al., GCA (71) 2007) and are also broadly consistent with silicate-FeS fractionation factors inferred indirectly from iron meteorites and pallasites which range from ~0.16 to 0.24‰/amu. Taken together these observations suggest that resolvable stable isotope fractionation between Fe-S alloys and silicate melts can take place at extreme pressure and temperature conditions and that isotopically light Fe can be sequestered into

  4. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: insights from joint experimental and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; de’ Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Most of the current ash transport and dispersion models neglect particle-fluid (two-way) and particle-fluid plus particle-particle (four-way) reciprocal interactions during particle fallout from volcanic plumes. These interactions, a function of particle concentration in the plume, could play an important role, explaining, for example, discrepancies between observed and modelled ash deposits. Aiming at a more accurate prediction of volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation, the settling of ash particles at particle volume fractions (ϕp) ranging 10‑7-10‑3 was performed in laboratory experiments and reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account first the two-way and then the four-way coupling. Results show that the velocity of particles settling together can exceed the velocity of particles settling individually by up to 4 times for ϕp ~ 10‑3. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results reveal that, during the sedimentation process, the settling velocity is largely enhanced by particle-fluid interactions but partly hindered by particle-particle interactions with increasing ϕp. Combining the experimental and numerical results, we provide an empirical model allowing correction of the settling velocity of particles of any size, density, and shape, as a function of ϕp. These corrections will impact volcanic plume modelling results as well as remote sensing retrieval techniques for plume parameters.

  5. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: insights from joint experimental and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; de’ Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Most of the current ash transport and dispersion models neglect particle-fluid (two-way) and particle-fluid plus particle-particle (four-way) reciprocal interactions during particle fallout from volcanic plumes. These interactions, a function of particle concentration in the plume, could play an important role, explaining, for example, discrepancies between observed and modelled ash deposits. Aiming at a more accurate prediction of volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation, the settling of ash particles at particle volume fractions (ϕp) ranging 10−7-10−3 was performed in laboratory experiments and reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account first the two-way and then the four-way coupling. Results show that the velocity of particles settling together can exceed the velocity of particles settling individually by up to 4 times for ϕp ~ 10−3. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results reveal that, during the sedimentation process, the settling velocity is largely enhanced by particle-fluid interactions but partly hindered by particle-particle interactions with increasing ϕp. Combining the experimental and numerical results, we provide an empirical model allowing correction of the settling velocity of particles of any size, density, and shape, as a function of ϕp. These corrections will impact volcanic plume modelling results as well as remote sensing retrieval techniques for plume parameters. PMID:28045056

  6. DNS of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kidanemariam, Aman G; Doychev, Todor; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation of turbulent open channel flow over a smooth horizontal wall in the presence of finite-size, heavy particles. The spherical particles have a diameter of approximately 7 wall units, a density of 1.7 times the fluid density and a solid volume fraction of 0.0005. The value of the Galileo number is set to 16.5, while the Shields parameter measures approximately 0.2. Under these conditions, the particles are predominantly located in the vicinity of the bottom wall, where they exhibit strong preferential concentration which we quantify by means of Voronoi analysis and by computing the particle-conditioned concentration field. As observed in previous studies with similar parameter values, the mean streamwise particle velocity is smaller than that of the fluid. We propose a new definition of the fluid velocity "seen" by finite-size particles based on an average over a spherical surface segment, from which we deduce in the present case that the particles are instantaneousl...

  7. The flow past a circular patch of vegetation with a low submergence depth and low solid volume fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkil, Gokhan

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the Solid Volume Fraction (SVF) on the flow structure within and past a circular array of surface-mounted cylinders that extends over 75% of the water depth, h is investigated using Detached Eddy Simulation (DES). This set up mimics the case of a submerged patch of rigid vegetation in a channel. The diameter of the cylinders in the array is d = 0.02D, where D is the diameter of the circular array. The channel Reynolds number is close to 20,000 and the Reynolds number defined with D is around 24,000. DES is conducted for SVF = 10% and 25%. It is found that as the SVF increases, fairly strong horseshoe vortex system forms around the upstream face of the vegetation patch, the strength of the separated shear layers on the sides of the vegetation patch increases and the length of the recirculation region behind the patch decreases. While an increase of the SVF results in a large increase of the turbulent kinetic energy in the wake, the opposite is observed within the porous vegetation patch.

  8. A mathematical model for the effects of volume fraction and fiber aspect ratio of biomass mixture during enzymatic hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Norazaliza Mohd; Wang, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Renewable energy or biofuel from lignocellulosic biomass is an alternative way to replace the depleting fossil fuels. The production cost can be reduced by increasing the concentration of biomass particles. However, lignocellulosic biomass is a suspension of natural fibres, and processing at high solid concentration is a challenging task. Thus, understanding the factors that affect the rheology of biomass suspension is crucial in order to maximize the production at a minimum cost. Our aim was to develop a mathematical model for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by combining three scales: the macroscopic flow field, the mesoscopic particle orientation, and the microscopic reactive kinetics. The governing equations for the flow field, particle stress, kinetic equations, and particle orientation were coupled and were simultaneously solved using a finite element method based software, COMSOL. One of the main results was the changes in rheology of biomass suspension were not only due to the decrease in volume fraction of particles, but also due the types of fibres. The results from the simulation model agreed qualitatively with the experimental findings. This approach has enables us to obtain better predictive capabilities, hence increasing our understanding on the behaviour of biomass suspension.

  9. HOT ROLLING OF A FERRITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN A STECKEL MILL: THERMOMECHANICAL AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CARACTERIZATION AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF THE EVOLUTION OF RECRYSTALLIZED VOLUME FRACTION OF FERRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Schuwarten Júnior

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A thermomechanical and a microstructure caracterization and a mathematical model of the evolution of the recrystallized volume fraction of ferrite in hot rolling in a Steckel mill have been carried out here. The proposed model is able to reasonably predict the observed in hot rolling, that is, there is 100% recrystallization of ferrite after roughing and partial recrystallization only after finishing

  10. Pre-chemotherapy values for left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated tomographic radionuclide angiography using a cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarmark, Christian; Haase, Christine; Jensen, Maria Maj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using equilibrium radionuclide angiography is an established method for assessment of left ventricular function. The purpose of this study was to establish normative data on left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fractio...

  11. A Computer Simulation of the Effect of the Inert Gas Volume Fraction in Low-Caloric Biogas on the Performance of an Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong Hoon Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A computer simulation of a gas engine was performed to investigate the effects of the inert gas volume fraction in biogas on engine performance, specifically the engine torque and the brakespecific fuel consumption (BSFC using GT-Power®. The engine speeds used in the simulation were 900 and 1800 rpm, while the simulated engine loads were 25, 50, 75 and 100%. The volume fraction of the inert gas N2 in the biogas was varied from 20 to 80% with an interval of 10%. In a simulation of a naturally aspirated gas engine which is operated with an 80% volume fraction of N2 in biogas, the optimal air-fuel ratio in terms of the fuel economy and brake power generation was 3.5. In a simulation of a turbo intercooler gas engine operated with an 80% volume fraction of N2 in biogas, the optimal air-fuel ratios with regard to the fuel economy and brake power generation were 5.0 and 3.5, respectively.

  12. Determination of the Surface and Volume Porosity, on the Basis of the Main Fraction of the Polifractional Matrix of Moulding and Core Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko R.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the hereby paper is to present the developed model of determining the volume and surface porosity based on the main fraction of polifractional materials, its experimental verification and utilisation for the interpretation of effects accompanying the formation of a moulding sand apparent density, porosity and permeability in the blowing processes of the core and moulds technology.

  13. Measurement of oil volume fraction and velocity distributions in vertical oil-in-water flows using ERT and a local probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua; WANG Mi; WU Ying-xiang; MA Yi-xin; WILLIAMS Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a high performance dual-plane electrical resistance tomography (ERT) system and a local dual-sensor conductance probe to measure the vertical upward oil-in-water pipe flows in which the mean oil volume fraction is up to 23.1%.A sensitivity coefficient back-projection (SBP) algorithm was adopted to reconstruct the flow distributions and a cross correlation method was applied to obtain the oil velocity distributions. The oil volume fraction and velocity distributions obtained from both measurement techniques were compared and good agreement was found, which indicates that the ERT technique can be used to measure the low fraction oil-water flows. Finally, the factors affecting measurement precision were discussed.

  14. Characterizing the kinetics of volume recovery in glasses by instantaneous temperature-jump experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, R.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Cohen, R.E.; Letton, A.

    1982-03-01

    This article proposes a temperature-jump (T-jump) approach for characterizing the kinetics of volume recovery in glassy materials. The kinetic characterization is based on the Kovacs-Aklonis model. This incorporates a retardation-time spectrum which shifts according to both the temperature and the instantaneous volume. The proposed experiments involve measuring the change in recovery rate caused by an abrupt temperature jump. Although an analogous procedure has been used to determine the activation energy for linear viscoelastic creep, the analysis for volume recovery is complicated by its inherent nonlinearity. Nevertheless, accounting for the nonlinearity by a reduction of the time scale permits the T-jump results to be analyzed. In particular, the T-jump approach can be used to: (i) test a particular functional form for the shift factor; and (ii) determine the previously unmeasurable parameter x, which defines the relative importance of the temperature dependence and the volume dependence in this function. In addition, numerical simulations indicate that the proposed method can be implemented in the laboratory. 7 figures.

  15. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  16. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  17. Analysis of volume expansion data for periclase, lime, corundum and spinel at high temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Singh; H Chandra; R Shyam; A Singh

    2012-08-01

    We have presented an analysis of the volume expansion data for periclase (MgO), lime (CaO), corundum (Al2O3) and spinel (MgAl2O4) determined experimentally by Fiquet et al (1999) from 300K up to 3000K. The thermal equation of state due to Suzuki et al (1979) and Shanker et al (1997) are used to study the relationships between thermal pressure and volume expansion for the entire range of temperatures starting from room temperature up to the melting temperatures of the solids under study. Comparison of the results obtained in the present study with the corresponding experimental data reveal that the thermal pressure changes with temperature almost linearly up to quite high temperatures. At extremely high temperatures close to the melting temperatures thermal pressure deviates significantly from linearity. This prediction is consistent with other recent investigations. A quantitative analysis based on the theory of anharmonic effects has been presented to account for the nonlinear variation of the thermal pressure at high temperatures.

  18. Influence of fast pyrolysis temperature on biochar labile fraction and short-term carbon loss in a loamy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Ibrahim, Norazana;

    2011-01-01

    Production of bio-oil, gas and biochar from pyrolysis of biomass is considered a promising technology for combined production of bioenergy and recalcitrant carbon (C) suitable for sequestration in soil. Using a fast pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) the present study investigated the relation......, emphasizing the importance of knowing the biochar labile fraction when evaluating a specific biochars C sequestration potential. The pyrolysis temperature influenced the outputs of biochar, bio-oil and syngas significantly, as well as the stability of the biochar produced. Contrary to slow pyrolysis a fast...... in soil. As these labile carbohydrates are rapidly mineralized, their presence lowers the biochar-C sequestration potential. By raising the pyrolysis temperature, biochar with none or low contents of these fractions can be produced, but this will be on the expense of the biochar quantity. The yield of CO2...

  19. Advanced fractional crystallisation and homogenization of large-volume rhyolite before the Oraefajokull 1362 AD plinian eruption, SE Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbekk, R. S.; Tronnes, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    In the 50 km wide Icelandic rift zones rhyolite magma is generated by partial melting of hydrated metabasaltic crust, subsiding under the weight of the growing volcanic pile. This mechanism of silicic melt formation is indicated by the basalt-rhyolite bimodality and rhyolite O-isotope composition. The low 18/16O-isotope ratios of rift zone rhyolites trace the high-latitude meteoric water component of the subsiding hydrated basalts [1]. The rhyolites of the volcanic flank zones (VFZ), however, have generally as heavy oxygen as the associated alkaline to transitional basalts and intermediate volcanics [2,3]. The minor volcanic loading of the older, thicker and stronger VFZ crust is insufficient for significant subsidence, and less pronounced basalt-rhyolite bimodality combined with other geochemical features support silicic melt generation by fractional crystallization. An extreme case in Icelandic, as well as global, perspective is the rhyolite magma of the plinian eruption from the large VFZ-volcano, Oraefajokull, in 1362 AD [4]. Glass, mineral and bulk tephra analyses show no chemical variation exceeding the analytical precision for the entire erupted volume of 2 km3 DRE. This applies even to the glass shards from distant locations in Greenland, Norway and Ireland. The total phenocryst content is 0.5-1 wt percent, with oligoclase (An14 Ab81 Or5.5), fayalite (Fa99.7 Fo0.3) and hedenbergite (Wo44.7 En2.6 Fs52.7) constituting 50- 80, 10-25 and 10-25 percent of the total phenocrysts, respectively. The extreme mineral compositions (especially pure fayalite and hedenbergite) resemble those of the granophyres in the Skaergaard and Bushveld complexes and differ from all other investigated rhyolites. The advanced fractionation and homogenisation to form the erupted 2 km3 DRE rhyolite is petrogenetically challenging, and a parental magma chamber of 20-40 km3 seems like a conservative estimate. The time-scale of the historic magma chamber evolution under Oraefajokull is

  20. Bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy are better determinants of trabecular bone stiffness than other morphological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquer, Ghislain; Musy, Sarah N; Wandel, Jasmin; Gross, Thomas; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-06-01

    As our population ages, more individuals suffer from osteoporosis. This disease leads to impaired trabecular architecture and increased fracture risk. It is essential to understand how morphological and mechanical properties of the cancellous bone are related. Morphology-elasticity relationships based on bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric anisotropy explain up to 98% of the variation in elastic properties. Yet, other morphological variables such as individual trabeculae segmentation (ITS) and trabecular bone score (TBS) could improve the stiffness predictions. A total of 743 micro-computed tomography (μCT) reconstructions of cubic trabecular bone samples extracted from femur, radius, vertebrae, and iliac crest were analyzed. Their morphology was assessed via 25 variables and their stiffness tensor (CFE) was computed from six independent load cases using micro finite element (μFE) analyses. Variance inflation factors were calculated to evaluate collinearity between morphological variables and decide upon their inclusion in morphology-elasticity relationships. The statistically admissible morphological variables were included in a multiple linear regression model of the dependent variable CFE. The contribution of each independent variable was evaluated (ANOVA). Our results show that BV/TV is the best determinant of CFE(r(2) adj  = 0.889), especially in combination with fabric anisotropy (r(2) adj  = 0.968). Including the other independent predictors hardly affected the amount of variance explained by the model (r(2) adj  = 0.975). Across all anatomical sites, BV/TV explained 87% of the variance of the bone elastic properties. Fabric anisotropy further described 10% of the bone stiffness, but the improvement in variance explanation by adding other independent factors was marginal (variables do not bring any further contribution. These overall conclusions remain to be confirmed for specific bone diseases and postelastic properties.

  1. Bone volume fraction explains the variation in strength and stiffness of cancellous bone affected by metastatic cancer and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Ara; von Stechow, Dietrich; Zurakowski, David; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2008-12-01

    Preventing nontraumatic fractures in millions of patients with osteoporosis or metastatic cancer may significantly reduce the associated morbidity and reduce health-care expenditures incurred by these fractures. Predicting fracture occurrence requires an accurate understanding of the relationship between bone structure and the mechanical properties governing bone fracture that can be readily measured. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a single analytic relationship with either bone tissue mineral density or bone volume fraction (BV/TV) as independent variables could predict the strength and stiffness of normal and pathologic cancellous bone affected by osteoporosis or metastatic cancer. After obtaining institutional review board approval and informed consent, 15 patients underwent excisional biopsy of metastatic prostate, breast, lung, ovarian, or colon cancer from the spine and/or femur to obtain 41 metastatic cancer specimens. In addition, 96 noncancer specimens were excised from 43 age- and site-matched cadavers. All specimens were imaged using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and backscatter emission imaging and tested mechanically by uniaxial compression and nanoindentation. The minimum BV/TV, measured using quantitative micro-CT, accounted for 84% of the variation in bone stiffness and strength for all cancellous bone specimens. While relationships relating bone density to strength and stiffness have been derived empirically for normal and osteoporotic bone, these relationships have not been applied to skeletal metastases. This simple analytic relationship will facilitate large-scale screening and prediction of fracture risk for normal and pathologic cancellous bone using clinical CT systems to determine the load capacity of bones altered by metastatic cancer, osteoporosis, or both.

  2. Temperature-driven volume transition in hydrogels: Phase-coexistence and interface localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, E. N. M.; Nardinocchi, P.; Sciarra, G.

    2016-05-01

    We study volume transition phenomenon in hydrogels within the framework of Flory-Rehner thermodynamic modelling; we show that starting from different models for the Flory parameter different conclusions can be achieved, in terms of admissible coexisting equilibria of the system. In particular, with explicit reference to a one-dimensional problem we establish the ranges of both temperature and traction which allow for the coexistence of a swollen and a shrunk phase. Through consideration of an augmented Flory-Rehner free-energy, which also accounts for the gradient of volume changes, we determine the position of the interface between the coexisting phases, and capture the connection profile between them.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175°C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115°C and 145°C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175°C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145°C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H(2)O(2) modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H(2)O(2) displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

  4. Fatigue monitoring and analysis of orthotropic steel deck considering traffic volume and ambient temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; YongSheng; DING; YouLiang

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue has gradually become a serious issue for orthotropic steel deck used for long-span bridges. Two fatigue effects, namely number of stress cycles and equivalent stress amplitude, were introduced as investigated parameters in this paper. Investigation was focused on their relationships with traffic volume and ambient temperature by using 7-months fatigue monitoring data of an actual bridge. A fatigue analytical model considering temperature-induced changes in material property of asphalt pavement was established for verifying these relationships. The analysis results revealed that the number of stress cycles and equivalent stress amplitude showed a linear correlation with the traffic volume and ambient temperature, respectively, and that the rib-to-deck welded joint was much more sensitive to the traffic volume and ambient temperature than the rib-to-rib welded joint. The applicability of the code-recommended model for fatigue vehicle loading was also discussed, which revealed that the deterministic vehicle loading model requires improvement to account for significant randomness of the actual traffic conditions.

  5. Free-volume evolution and its temperature dependence during rolling of Cu60Zr20Ti20 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Q.P.; Li, J.F.; Zhou, Y.H.

    2005-01-01

    The free-volume evolution during rolling Cu60Zr20Ti20 bulk metallic glass at room and cryogenic temperatures has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. When the specimen is rolled at cryogenic temperature, the free-volume content increases as the rolling proceeds first...

  6. A Simple Mercury-Free Laboratory Apparatus to Study the Relationship between Pressure, Volume, and Temperature in a Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Donna; Sweeney, William V.; Mills, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive mercury-free apparatus to measure the change in volume of a gas as a function of pressure at different temperatures is described. The apparatus is simpler than many found in the literature and can be used to study variations in pressure, volume, and temperature. (Contains 1 table and 7 figures.)

  7. A Simple Mercury-Free Laboratory Apparatus to Study the Relationship between Pressure, Volume, and Temperature in a Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Donna; Sweeney, William V.; Mills, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive mercury-free apparatus to measure the change in volume of a gas as a function of pressure at different temperatures is described. The apparatus is simpler than many found in the literature and can be used to study variations in pressure, volume, and temperature. (Contains 1 table and 7 figures.)

  8. Two-temperature theory in magneto-thermoelasticity with fractional order dual-phase-lag heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezzat, Magdy A., E-mail: maezzat2000@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters in Al Bukayriyyah, Al-Qassim University, Al-Qassim (Saudi Arabia); El-Karamany, Ahmed S., E-mail: qaramani@gmail.com [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Nizwa University, P.O. Box 1357, Nizwa 611 (Oman); Ezzat, Shereen M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters in Al Bukayriyyah, Al-Qassim University, Al-Qassim (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model fractional order dual-phase-lag heat conduction law. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We applied the model on a perfect conducting half-space of elastic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some theories of generalized thermoelasticity follow as limit cases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer State space approach is adopted for the solution of one-dimensional problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model will improve the efficiency of thermoelectric material. - Abstract: A new mathematical model of two-temperature magneto-thermoelasticity is constructed where the fractional order dual-phase-lag heat conduction law is considered. The state space approach developed in Ezzat (2008) is adopted for the solution of one-dimensional application for a perfect conducting half-space of elastic material, which is thermally shocked in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The Laplace transform technique is used. A numerical method is employed for the inversion of the Laplace transforms. According to the numerical results and its graphs, conclusion about the new theory has been constructed. Some theories of generalized thermoelasticity follow as limit cases. Some comparisons have been shown in figures to estimate effects of temperature discrepancy and fractional order parameter on all the studied fields.

  9. Effect of Temperature, Fractional Deformation, and Cooling Rate on the Structure and Properties of Steel 09GNB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodzhaspirov, G. E.; Sulyagin, R. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of temperature, divisibility of deformation, and cooling rate in high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTTMT) on the structure and mechanical properties of low-alloy steel 09GNB is studied. The steel is used as a high-strength material for the production of offshore structures, strips, and other welded articles. The study is performed using the method of experimental design where the parameters are fractional deformation (number of passes in rolling), final temperature of the deformation, and rate of post-deformation cooling. The results of the experiments are used to construct regression equations describing the qualitative and quantitative effect of the parameters of HTTMT on the mechanical properties of the steel. Microstructure and fracture surfaces of the steel are analyzed.

  10. Vertebrate blood cell volume increases with temperature: implications for aerobic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Gillooly

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic activity levels increase with body temperature across vertebrates. Differences in these levels, from highly active to sedentary, are reflected in their ecology and behavior. Yet, the changes in the cardiovascular system that allow for greater oxygen supply at higher temperatures, and thus greater aerobic activity, remain unclear. Here we show that the total volume of red blood cells in the body increases exponentially with temperature across vertebrates, after controlling for effects of body size and taxonomy. These changes are accompanied by increases in relative heart mass, an indicator of aerobic activity. The results point to one way vertebrates may increase oxygen supply to meet the demands of greater activity at higher temperatures.

  11. Transmitted wavefront error of a volume phase holographic grating at cryogenic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David; Taylor, Gordon D; Baillie, Thomas E C; Montgomery, David

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the results of transmitted wavefront error (WFE) measurements on a volume phase holographic (VPH) grating operating at a temperature of 120 K. The VPH grating was mounted in a cryogenically compatible optical mount and tested in situ in a cryostat. The nominal root mean square (RMS) wavefront error at room temperature was 19 nm measured over a 50 mm diameter test aperture. The WFE remained at 18 nm RMS when the grating was cooled. This important result demonstrates that excellent WFE performance can be obtained with cooled VPH gratings, as required for use in future cryogenic infrared astronomical spectrometers planned for the European Extremely Large Telescope.

  12. Wear Behavior of Al-Mg2Si Cast In-situ Composite: Effect of Mg2Si Different Volume Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasinejad, J.; Emamy, M.; Ghorbani, M. R.; Malekan, A.

    2010-06-01

    Al-Mg2Si in situ composites are great candidates for automobile brake discs due to their low density, reasonably high young's modulus and low thermal expansion coefficient. Thus, understanding wear properties of this composite is of a great importance. In this study wear behavior of an in-situ Al-Mg2Si composite, prepared from a simple casting route, has been investigated using a pin-on-disc configuration concerning the effect of Mg2Si volume fractions, 15, 20 and 25% respectively. It was found that the weight loss increases with increase in reinforce volume fraction which can be due to a coarse morphology of primary Mg2Si particles. It was found that the variations of weight loss with sliding distance comprise different regimes of which the mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Effect of temperature on volume change behaviour of statically compacted kaolin clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileme Ogechi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several soils are subjected to high temperature due to the environment where they are located or activities around them. For instance, upper layer of soils in tropical regions, soils around geothermal structures, clay barriers around nuclear waste repository systems. Numerous studies have pointed out that high temperature affects the hydro-mechanical properties of soils. Notwithstanding already existing studies, the influence of temperature on soils is still a challenge, as most of these studies are soil specific and cannot be inferred as the behaviour of all soils. This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of temperature on the volume change behaviour of statically compacted kaolin clay. Compacted samples were tested at varying temperatures using a suction controlled oedometer cell. The influence of temperature on the magnitude of volumetric strain occurring during mechanical and thermal loading was investigated. The study showed that an increase in temperature increased the magnitude of volumetric strain of the soil on loading. Additionally, the results presented in the light of LC curve showed that an increase in temperature resulted in the contraction and a change in the position of the LC curve.

  14. Large volume TENAX {sup registered} extraction of the bioaccessible fraction of sediment-associated organic compounds for a subsequent effect-directed analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, K.; Brack, W. [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre or Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Effect-Directed Analysis

    2007-06-15

    Background, Aim and Scope: Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is a powerful tool for the identification of key toxicants in complex environmental samples. In most cases, EDA is based on total extraction of organic contaminants leading to an erroneous prioritization with regard to hazard and risk. Bioaccessibility-directed extraction aims to discriminate between contaminants that take part in partitioning between sediment and biota in a relevant time frame and those that are enclosed in structures, that do not allow rapid desorption. Standard protocols of targeted extraction of rapidly desorbing, and thus bioaccessible fraction using TENAX {sup registered} are based only on small amounts of sediment. In order to get sufficient amounts of extracts for subsequent biotesting, fractionation, and structure elucidation a large volume extraction technique needs to be developed applying one selected extraction time and excluding toxic procedural blanks. Materials and Methods: Desorption behaviour of sediment contaminants was determined by a consecutive solid-solid extraction of sediment using TENAX {sup registered} fitting a tri-compartment model on experimental data. Time needed to remove the rapidly desorbing fraction trap was calculated to select a fixed extraction time for single extraction procedures. Up-scaling by about a factor of 100 provided a large volume extraction technique for EDA. Reproducibility and comparability to small volume approach were proved. Blanks of respective TENAX {sup registered} mass were investigated using Scenedesmus vacuolatus and Artemia salina as test organisms. Results: Desorption kinetics showed that 12 to 30 % of sediment associated pollutants are available for rapid desorption. t{sub r}ap is compound dependent and covers a range of 2 to 18 h. On that basis a fixed extraction time of 24 h was selected. Validation of large volume approach was done by the means of comparison to small method and reproducibility. The large volume showed a good

  15. Axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus measured by q-space imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Kamiya

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies suggest that compression and stretching of the corticospinal tract (CST potentially cause treatable gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. Measurement of axon diameter with diffusion MRI has recently been used to investigate microstructural alterations in neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated alterations in the axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction of the CST in iNPH by q-space imaging (QSI analysis. METHODS: Nineteen patients with iNPH and 10 age-matched controls were recruited. QSI data were obtained with a 3-T system by using a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence with the diffusion gradient applied parallel to the antero-posterior axis. By using a two-component low-q fit model, the root mean square displacements of intra-axonal space ( =  axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the CST were calculated at the levels of the internal capsule and body of the lateral ventricle, respectively. RESULTS: Wilcoxon's rank-sum test revealed a significant increase in CST intra-axonal volume fraction at the paraventricular level in patients (p<0.001, whereas no significant difference was observed in the axon diameter. At the level of the internal capsule, neither axon diameter nor intra-axonal volume fraction differed significantly between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that in patients with iNPH, the CST does not undergo irreversible axonal damage but is rather compressed and/or stretched owing to pressure from the enlarged ventricle. These analyses of axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction yield insights into microstructural alterations of the CST in iNPH.

  16. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  17. The effect of the volume fraction and viscosity on the compression and tension behavior of the cobalt-ferrite magneto-rheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shokrollahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of the volume fraction and bimodal distribution of solid particles on the compression and tension behavior of the Co-ferrite-based magneto-rheological fluids (MRFs containing silicon oil as a carrier. Hence, Co-ferrite particles (CoFe2O4 with two various sizes were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and mixed so as to prepare the bimodal MRF. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM were conducted to examine the structural and magnetic properties, respectively. The results indicated that the increase of the volume fraction has a direct increasing influence on the values of the compression and tension strengths of fluids. In addition, the compression and tension strengths of the mixed MRF sample (1.274 and 0.647 MPa containing 60 and 550 nm samples were higher than those of the MRF sample with the same volume fraction and uniform particle size of 550 nm.

  18. Ozonolysis of beta-pinene: temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol mass fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ravikant; Donahue, Neil M; Pandis, Spyros N

    2008-07-15

    The SOA formation from beta-pinene ozonolysis at modest precursor concentrations (2-40 ppb) was investigated in the temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. The presence of inert seeds and high ozone concentrations is necessary to minimize losses of semivolatile vapors to the walls of the smog chamber. beta-pinene secondary organic aerosol production increases significantly with decreasing temperature. An increase by a factor of 2-3, depending on the reacted beta-pinene concentration, was observed as the temperature decreased from 40 to 0 degrees C. This increase appearsto be due mainly to the shifting of partitioning of the semivolatile SOA componentstoward the particulate phase and not to a change of the beta-pinene product distribution with temperature. The measurements are used to develop a new temperature-dependent parametrization for the four-component basis-set. The parametrization predicts much higher SOA production for beta-pinene ozonolysis for typical atmospheric conditions than the values that have been suggested by previous studies.

  19. Changes in the temperature-dependent specific volume of supported polystyrene films with film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinru; Roth, Connie B.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have measured or predicted thickness-dependent shifts in density or specific volume of polymer films as a possible means of understanding changes in the glass transition temperature Tg(h) with decreasing film thickness with some experimental works claiming unrealistically large (25%-30%) increases in film density with decreasing thickness. Here we use ellipsometry to measure the temperature-dependent index of refraction of polystyrene (PS) films supported on silicon and investigate the validity of the commonly used Lorentz-Lorenz equation for inferring changes in density or specific volume from very thin films. We find that the density (specific volume) of these supported PS films does not vary by more than ±0.4% of the bulk value for film thicknesses above 30 nm, and that the small variations we do observe are uncorrelated with any free volume explanation for the Tg(h) decrease exhibited by these films. We conclude that the derivation of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation becomes invalid for very thin films as the film thickness approaches ˜20 nm, and that reports of large density changes greater than ±1% of bulk for films thinner than this likely suffer from breakdown in the validity of this equation or in the difficulties associated with accurately measuring the index of refraction of such thin films. For larger film thicknesses, we do observed small variations in the effective specific volume of the films of 0.4 ± 0.2%, outside of our experimental error. These shifts occur simultaneously in both the liquid and glassy regimes uniformly together starting at film thicknesses less than ˜120 nm but appear to be uncorrelated with Tg(h) decreases; possible causes for these variations are discussed.

  20. Study of flow fractionation characteristics of magnetic chromatography utilizing high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fukui, Yoshihiro Shoji, Jun Ogawa, Tetsuo Oka, Mitsugi Yamaguchi, Takao Sato, Manabu Ooizumi, Hiroshi Imaizumi and Takeshi Ohara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical simulation of separating magnetic particles with different magnetic susceptibilities by magnetic chromatography using a high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The transient transport is numerically simulated for two kinds of particles having different magnetic susceptibilities. The time evolutions were calculated for the particle concentration in the narrow channel of the spiral arrangement placed in the magnetic field. The field is produced by the highly magnetized high-temperature superconducting bulk magnet. The numerical results show the flow velocity difference of the particle transport corresponding to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility, as well as the possible separation of paramagnetic particles of 20 nm diameter.

  1. Effect of Coarse Particle Volume Fraction on the Yield Stress of Muddy Sediments from Marennes Oléron Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pantet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal erosion results from a combination of various factors, both natural and humaninduced, which have different time and space patterns. In addition, uncertainties still remain about the interactions of the forcing agents, as well as on the significance of non-local causes of erosion. We focused about the surface sediments in the Marennes Oléron bay, after a general description of the site that has many various activities. The superficial sediments show a mechanical behavior, mainly depends on the fine fraction for a composition that contains up to 60% of sandy material. Fine sediments fraction has a typical yield stress depending naturally of concentration or water content. This yield could be modified slightly or significantly by adding silt or sand. As a result, the rheological measurement sensitivity allows us to characterize five typical sediments that correlate with solid fraction and fine fraction.

  2. Temperature dependence on free volume in cured natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, W.; Somoza, A.; Silva, L.; Consolati, G.; Quasso, F.; Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    A systematic study on the evolution of free volume as a function of the temperature in vulcanized at 433 K natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) in 25-75, 50-50, 75-25 NR-SBR (percent content of pure NR and SBR, respectively) blends was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. All samples were prepared with sulfur and TBBS (n-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) as accelerator. The glass transition temperatures of the samples studied were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and from lifetime data. In general, a sigmoidal-like complex behavior of the long-lived lifetime component, linked to the nanohole free volume, as a function of the temperature was found. For SBR, the slope of the ortho-positronium lifetime against temperature curves could be well-fitted using a linear function. For blends and also for NR, two different linear functions were necessary. This last behavior is explained in terms of the supercooled process involving a reconfiguration of the elastomeric chains. In the case of blends, the state of cure of NR and SBR in each NR-SBR sample was also taken into account in the discussion of the results obtained. Besides, thermal expansion coefficients of the free volumes in the transition and glassy region of all compounds were estimated. The differences observed in the values of this parameter are discussed by taking into account the morphology and formulation of each blend, the crosslink densities, and the role of the interphases formed between both NR and SBR elastomers.

  3. Pressure-volume-temperature and excess molar volume prediction of amorphous and crystallizable polymer blends by equation of state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fakhri Yousefi; Hajir Karimi; Maryam Gomar

    2015-01-01

    In this work the statistical mechanical equation of state was developed for volumetric properties of crystal ine and amorphous polymer blends. The Ihm–Song–Mason equations of state (ISMEOS) based on temperature and density at melting point (Tm andρm) as scaling constants were developed for crystalline polymers such as poly(propylene glycol)+poly(ethylene glycol)-200 (PPG+PEG-200), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-300 (PEGME-350)+PEG-200 and PEGME-350+PEG-600. Furthermore, for amorphous polymer blends con-taining poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO)+polystyrene (PS) and PS+poly(vinylmethylether) (PVME), the density and surface tension at glass transition (ρg andγg) were used for estimation of second Virial coefficient. The calculation of second Virial coefficients (B2), effective van der Waals co-volume (b) and correction factor (α) was required for judgment about applicability of this model. The obtained results by ISMEOS for crys-talline and amorphous polymer blends were in good agreement with the experimental data with absolute aver-age deviations of 0.84%and 1.04%, respectively.

  4. Influence of Parameters of Quenching and Partitioning Process on Microstructure and Fraction of Retained Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shirali

    2015-07-01

    of partitioning temperature made the retained austenite films become thicker and its volume fraction increase. On the other hand, by increasing the quenching temperature, carbon content of retained austenite increased sharply.

  5. Excess Molar Volumes and Viscosities of Binary Mixture of Diethyl Carbonate+Ethanol at Different Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Peisheng; LI Nannan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to report excess molar volumes and dynamic viscosities of the binary mixture of diethyl carbonate (DEC)+ethanol. Densities and viscosities of the binary mixture of DEC+ethanol at temperatures 293.15 K-343.15 K and atmospheric pressure were determined over the entire composition range. Densities of the binary mixture of DEC+ethanol were measured by using a vibrating U-shaped sample tube densimeter. Viscosities were determined by using Ubbelohde suspended-level viscometer. Densities are accurate to 1.0×10-5 g·cm-3, and viscosities are reproducible within ±0.003 mPa·s. From these data, excess molar volumes and deviations in viscosity were calculated. Positive excess molar volumes and negative deviations in viscosity for DEC+ethanol system are due to the strong specific interactions.All excess molar vo-lumes and deviations in viscosity fit to the Redlich-Kister polynomial equation.The fitting parameters were presented,and the average deviations and standard deviations were also calculated.The errors of correlation are very small.It proves that it is valuable for estimating densities and viscosities of the binary mixture by the correlated equation.

  6. Microcomputed tomographic analysis of human condyles in unilateral condylar hyperplasia: increased cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume fraction with reduced mineralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karssemakers, L H E; Nolte, J W; Tuinzing, D B; Langenbach, G E J; Raijmakers, P G; Becking, A G

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral condylar hyperplasia or hyperactivity is a disorder of growth that affects the mandible, and our aim was to visualise the 3-dimensional bony microstructure of resected mandibular condyles of affected patients. We prospectively studied 17 patients with a clinical presentation of progressive mandibular asymmetry and an abnormal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scan. All patients were treated by condylectomy to arrest progression. The resected condyles were scanned with micro-CT (18 μm resolution). Rectangular volumes of interest were selected in 4 quadrants (lateromedial and superoinferior) of the trabecular bone of each condyle. Variables of bone architecture (volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and separation, degree of mineralisation, and degree of structural anisotrophy) were calculated with routine morphometric software. Eight of the 17 resected condyles showed clear destruction of the subchondral layer of cortical bone. There was a significant superoinferior gradient for all trabecular variables. Mean (SD) bone volume fraction (25.1 (6) %), trabecular number (1.69 (0.26) mm(-1)), trabecular thickness (0.17 (0.03) mm), and degree of mineralisation (695.39 (39.83) mg HA/cm(3)) were higher in the superior region. Trabecular separation (0.6 (0.16) mm) and structural anisotropy (1.84 (0.28)) were higher in the inferior region. The micro-CT analysis showed increased cortical porosity in many of the condyles studied. It also showed a higher bone volume fraction, greater trabecular thickness and trabecular separation, greater trabecular number, and less mineralisation in the condyles of the 17 patients compared with the known architecture of unaffected mandibular condyles.

  7. 含掺合料混凝土水化产物体积分数计算及其影响因素%Calculation of concrete with mineral admixture hydration products volume fraction and its influential factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴福飞; 董双快; 宫经伟; 陈亮亮; 李东生; 侍克斌

    2016-01-01

    Powers theory proposes calculation method for the pure volume of cement hydration products, which does not apply to calculate the volume of cementitious materials with mineral admixture. The formula of cementitious materials volume was proposed that based on the basic principles of cement and mineral admixture hydration, and the proposed method of reliability was verified by the results of Powers theoretical model and volume fraction of cement hydration products. On this basis, the factor such as water-cement ratio, the ratio of admixture and types was further researched for the volumes of cementitious materials hydration products. Mixture in test were designed 2 water-cement ratio (0.30 and 0.40, respectively), two content (20% and 60%, respectively) of mineral admixture, and 3 kinds of mineral admixture (lithium slag, fly ash and steel slag, respectively), forming paste that was stirred according with the designed ratio in 5 mL centrifuge tube in a blender and curing to 1, 7, 14, 28, 60 and 90 d in curing room (temperature was (20±1)℃, humidity was not less than 95%), and then testing reaction extent of cement and mineral admixture (such as fly ash, steel slag. lithium slag) according with the chemical bound water and HCl dissolution method. The results showed that hydration extent of lithium slag, fly ash and steel slag at 28d decreased by 46.63%, 69.56% and 74.82% (P<0.05) when mineral admixture content varied from 20% to 60% and water-cement ratio was 0.30. Hydration extent of cement at 28 d was increased by 7.25% when water-cement ratio increased from 0.30 to 0.40. When mineral admixture content varied from 20% to 60%, hydration extent of lithium slag, fly ash and steel slag at 28 d increased by 24.14% 18.56%, 17.61% and 8.84%, 12.21%, and 29.37% (P<0.05), respectively. In contrast, the influence of the mineral admixture content was bigger than water-cement ratio for the hydration extent of composite cementitious materials. In different water-cement ratio

  8. Thermoregulation During Extended Exercise in the Heat: Comparisons of Fluid Volume and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailes, Walter S; Cuddy, John S; Cochrane, Kyle; Ruby, Brent C

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the physiological and thermoregulatory responses of individuals exercising in the heat (US military red flag conditions, wet-bulb globe temperature 31.5-32.2ºC) while consuming varied volumes of ambient temperature water and ice slurry. Participants (N = 12) walked on a treadmill for 3 hours at approximately 40% peak aerobic capacity in a hot environment while consuming ambient temperature (35.5°C) water (W), ice slurry (0°C, two-thirds shaved ice and one-third water) at a ratio of 2 g·kg(-1) body mass every 10 minutes (FS), and reduced volume ice slurry as described at a rate of 1 g·kg(-1) body mass every 10 minutes (HS). Trials were completed at least 14 days apart, in a randomized, repeated measures design. Percent body weight loss was higher during the HS trial (1.8 ± 0.01%) compared with FS (0.5 ± 0.01%; P thermoregulation and other physiological responses for extended work in hot environments. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A back analysis of the temperature field in the combustion volume space during underground coal gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liang; Hou Chaohu; Chen Jiansheng; Xu Jiting

    2011-01-01

    The exact shape and size of the gasification channel during underground coal gasification (UGC) are of vital importance for the safety and stability of the upper parts of the geological formation.In practice existing geological measurements are insufficient to obtain such information because the coal seam is typically deeply buried and the geological conditions are often complex.This paper introduces a cylindrical model for the gasification channel.The rock and soil masses are assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic and the effect of seepage on the temperature field was neglected.The theory of heat conduction was used to write the equation predicting the temperature field around the gasification channel.The idea of an excess temperature was introduced to solve the equations.Applying this model to UCG in the field for an influence radius,r,of 70 m gave the model parameters,u1,2.3..,of 2.4,5.5,8.7...By adjusting the radius (2,4,or 6 m) reasonable temperatures of the gasification channel were found for 4 m.The temperature distribution in the vertical direction,and the combustion volume,were also calculated.Comparison to field measurements shows that the results obtained from the proposed model are very close to practice.

  10. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  11. Evaluation of the programmed temperature vaporiser for large-volume injection of biological samples in gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, M.W J; de Zeeuw, R.A; Franke, J.P.; de Jong, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    The use of a programmed temperature vaporiser (PTV) with a packed liner was evaluated for the injection of large volumes (up to 100 mu l) of plasma extracts in a gas chromatograph. Solvent purity, which is essential when large volumes are injected into the GC system, was determined. Special attentio

  12. Temperature-dependent phase transitions in zeptoliter volumes of a complex biological membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim P; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hohlbauch, Sophia; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); King, William P [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Voitchovsky, Kislon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Contera, Sonia Antoranz [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-04

    Phase transitions in purple membrane have been a topic of debate for the past two decades. In this work we present studies of a reversible transition of purple membrane in the 50-60 deg. C range in zeptoliter volumes under different heating regimes (global heating and local heating). The temperature of the reversible phase transition is 52 {+-} 5 deg. C for both local and global heating, supporting the hypothesis that this transition is mainly due to a structural rearrangement of bR molecules and trimers. To achieve high resolution measurements of temperature-dependent phase transitions, a new scanning probe microscopy-based method was developed. We believe that our new technique can be extended to other biological systems and can contribute to the understanding of inhomogeneous phase transitions in complex systems.

  13. Temperature-dependent phase transitions of a complex biological membrane in zeptoliter volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Hohlbauch, Sophia [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; King, William P [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Voitchovsky, K [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Contera, S Antoranz [University of Oxford; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions in purple membrane have been a topic of debate for the past two decades. In this work we present studies of a reversible transition of purple membrane in the 50 60 C range in zeptoliter volumes under different heating regimes (global heating and local heating). The temperature of the reversible phase transition is 52 5 C for both local and global heating, supporting the hypothesis that this transition is mainly due to a structural rearrangement of bR molecules and trimers. To achieve high resolution measurements of temperature-dependent phase transitions, a new scanning probe microscopy-based method was developed. We believe that our new technique can be extended to other biological systems and can contribute to the understanding of inhomogeneous phase transitions in complex systems.

  14. Fractionation of metals by sequential extraction procedures (BCR and Tessier) in soil exposed to fire of wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajkovic, Hana; Rončević, Sanda; Nemet, Ivan; Prohić, Esad; Leontić-Vazdar, Dana

    2017-04-01

    Forest fire presents serious problem, especially in Mediterranean Region. Effects of fire are numerous, from climate change and deforestation to loss of soil organic matter and changes in soil properties. One of the effects, not well documented, is possible redistribution and/or remobilisation of pollutants previously deposited in the soil, due to the new physical and chemical soil properties and changes in equilibrium conditions. For understanding and predicting possible redistribution and/or remobilisation of potential pollutants from soil, affected by fire different in temperature, several laboratory investigations were carried out. To evaluate the influence of organic matter on soil under fire, three soil samples were analysed and compared: (a) the one with added coniferous organic matter; (b) deciduous organic matter (b) and (c) soil without additional organic matter. Type of organic matter is closely related to pH of soil, as pH is influencing the mobility of some pollutants, e.g. metals. For that reason pH was also measured through all experimental steps. Each of mentioned soil samples (a, b and c) were heated at 1+3 different temperatures (25°C, 200°C, 500°C and 850°C). After heating, whereby fire effect on soil was simulated, samples were analysed by BCR protocol with the addition of a first step of sequential extraction procedure by Tessier and analysis of residual by aqua regia. Element fractionation of heavy metals by this procedure was used to determine the amounts of selected elements (Al, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn). Selected metal concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Further on, loss of organic matter was calculated after each heating procedure as well as the mineral composition. The mineral composition was determined using an X-ray diffraction. From obtained results, it can be concluded that temperature has an influence on concentration of elements in specific step of

  15. Identification of myocardial diffuse fibrosis by 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping: averaging to improve precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Vassilios S; Wassilew, Katharina; Cameron, Donnie; Heng, Ee Ling; Nyktari, Evangelia; Asimakopoulos, George; de Souza, Anthony; Giri, Shivraman; Pierce, Iain; Jabbour, Andrew; Firmin, David; Frenneaux, Michael; Gatehouse, Peter; Pennell, Dudley J; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2017-06-12

    Our objectives involved identifying whether repeated averaging in basal and mid left ventricular myocardial levels improves precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction for 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping versus assessment at a single ventricular level. For assessment of T 1 mapping precision, a cohort of 15 healthy volunteers underwent two CMR scans on separate days using an 11 heartbeat MOLLI with a 5(3)3 beat scheme to measure native T 1 and a 4(1)3(1)2 beat post-contrast scheme to measure post-contrast T 1, allowing calculation of partition coefficient and ECV. To assess correlation of T 1 mapping with collagen volume fraction, a separate cohort of ten aortic stenosis patients scheduled to undergo surgery underwent one CMR scan with this 11 heartbeat MOLLI scheme, followed by intraoperative tru-cut myocardial biopsy. Six models of myocardial diffuse fibrosis assessment were established with incremental inclusion of imaging by averaging of the basal and mid-myocardial left ventricular levels, and each model was assessed for precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction. A model using 11 heart beat MOLLI imaging of two basal and two mid ventricular level averaged T 1 maps provided improved precision (Intraclass correlation 0.93 vs 0.84) and correlation with histology (R (2) = 0.83 vs 0.36) for diffuse fibrosis compared to a single mid-ventricular level alone. ECV was more precise and correlated better than native T 1 mapping. T 1 mapping sequences with repeated averaging could be considered for applications of 11 heartbeat MOLLI, especially when small changes in native T 1/ECV might affect clinical management.

  16. Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) Gauging of an Isothermal Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurized with Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging of a liquid oxygen/liquid nitrogen tank pressurized with gaseous helium that was supplied by a high-pressure cryogenic tank simulating a cold helium supply bottle on a spacecraft. The fluid inside the test tank was kept isothermal by frequent operation of a liquid circulation pump and spray system, and the propellant tank was suspended from load cells to obtain a high-accuracy reference standard for the gauging measurements. Liquid quantity gauging errors of less than 2 percent of the tank volume were obtained when quasi-steady-state conditions existed in the propellant and helium supply tanks. Accurate gauging required careful attention to, and corrections for, second-order effects of helium solubility in the liquid propellant plus differences in the propellant/helium composition and temperature in the various plumbing lines attached to the tanks. On the basis of results from a helium solubility test, a model was developed to predict the amount of helium dissolved in the liquid as a function of cumulative pump operation time. Use of this model allowed correction of the basic PVT gauging calculations and attainment of the reported gauging accuracy. This helium solubility model is system specific, but it may be adaptable to other hardware systems.

  17. Development of an evaluation method of fission product release fraction from High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-11-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) uses coated particles as fuel. Current coated particle is a microsphere of fuel kernel with TRISO coatings. The TRISO coatings consist of a low-density, porous pyrolytic carbon (PyC) buffer layer adjacent to the spherical fuel kernel, followed by an inner isotropic PyC layer, a SiC layer and a final (outer) PyC layer. An evaluation method of fission product release behavior during the normal operation was developed. Key issues of fission gas release model were: (1) fission gas releases from matrix contamination uranium and through-coatings failed particle were separately modeled and (2) burnup and fast neutron irradiation effects were newly considered. For metallic fission product, fractional release of cesium from coated fuel particles was investigated by comparing measured data in an irradiation test which contained three kinds of fuel particles; artificially bored particles simulating through-coatings failed particles, as-manufactured SiC-failed particles and intact particles. Through the comparison of measured and calculated fractional releases, an equivalent diffusion coefficient of SiC layer in the SiC-failed particle was introduced. This report describes the developed model together with validation result of the release model. (author)

  18. The Effect of Volume Fraction of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Natural Frequencies of Polymer Composite Cone-Shaped Shell Made from Poly(Methyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Meysami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of volume fraction of single-walled carbon nanotubes on natural frequencies of polymer composite cone-shaped shells made from Poly(Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA is studied. In order to determine the characterization of materials reinforced with nanoparticles, the molecular dynamics and mixture rule has been used. The motion equations of composite shell based on the classical thin shells theory using Hamilton’s principle are obtained. Then, using the Ritz method, approximate analytical solution of the natural frequency is presented. Results indicate that the nanotubes have a noticeable effect on the natural frequencies.

  19. On the influence of local fluctuations in volume fraction of constituents on the effective properties of nonlinear composites. Application to porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gărăjeu, M.; Suquet, P.

    2007-04-01

    Composite materials often exhibit local fluctuations in the volume fraction of their individual constituents. This paper studies the influence of such small fluctuations on the effective properties of composites. A general asymptotic expansion of these properties in terms of powers of the amplitude of the fluctuations is given first. Then, this general result is applied to porous materials. As is well-known, the effective yield surface of ductile voided materials is accurately described by Gurson's criterion. Suitable extensions for viscoplastic solids have also been proposed. The question addressed in the present study pertains to nonuniform distributions of voids in a typical volume element or in other words to the presence of matrix-rich and pore-rich zones in the material. It is shown numerically and analytically that such deviations from a uniform distribution result in a weakening of the macroscopic carrying capacity of the material.

  20. Evolution of temperature and chemical parameters during composting of the pig slurry solid fraction amended with natural zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venglovsky, J; Sasakova, N; Vargova, M; Pacajova, Z; Placha, I; Petrovsky, M; Harichova, D

    2005-01-01

    A 3-month experiment was conducted at a 300 kg scale to observe decomposition processes in pig slurry solids amended with two different doses of natural Slovak zeolite-clinoptilolite (substrates S1 and S2, 1% and 2% of zeolite by weight, respectively) in comparison with the control (unamended solids). The experimental and control substrates were stored outdoors in sheltered static piles at ambient temperatures ranging from 8.0 to 34.7 degrees C. The solid fraction (SF) of pig slurry was obtained by separation on vibration sieves prior to slurry treatment with activated sludge. The initial water content of the SF was 77.1% and no water was added to the piles during the storage. The temperature in the core of the piles was recorded throughout the experiment. By day 3 and 5 of storage (1% and 2% zeolite, resp.), the temperature in the substrates S1 and S2 exceeded 55 degrees C and remained above this level for 15 days while the highest temperature recorded in the control during the experiment was 29.8 degrees C. Samples from the core of the piles were taken periodically to determine pH, dry matter at 105 degrees C (DM), ash (550 degrees C/4 h), ammonia nitrogen (N-NH(4)(+)), nitrate nitrogen (N-NO(3)(-)), total nitrogen (N(t)), total phosphorus (P(t)); total organic carbon (TOC) was computed. The results showed that pH levels in S1 and S2 remained below that in the control for most of the thermophilic stage. This may be related to water-soluble ammonia and the affinity of zeolites to ammonium ions. A significant decrease in the level of ammonia nitrogen in water extracts from S1 and S2 was observed between days 5 and 35 in comparison with the control. The values of ash also differed and corresponded to the intensity of the decomposition processes in the respective substrates.

  1. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onukwufor, John O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q{sub 10} values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and

  2. Excess Molar Volume,Viscosity and Heat Capacity for the Mixture of 1,2—Propanediol—Water at Different Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨长生; 马沛生; 唐多强; 靳凤民

    2003-01-01

    Experimental densities,viscosities and heat capacities at different emperatures were presented over the entire mole fraction range for the binary mixture of 1,2-propanediol and water,Density values were used in the determination of excess molar volumes,VE,At the same time,the excess viscosity was in vestigated,The values of VE and ηE were fitted to the Redlich-kister equation.Good agreement was observed,The excess volumes are negative over the entire range of composition.They show an U-shaped-concentration dependence and decrease in abolute values with increase of temperature,Values of ηE are negative over the entire range of the composition,and has a trend very similar to that of VE ,The analysis shows that at any temperature the specific heat of mixture is a linear function of the composition as x1>20%,All the extended lines intersect at one point.An empirical equation is obtained to calculate the specific heat to mixture at any composition and temperature in the experimental range.

  3. 3-D Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Complex Fiber Geometry RaFC Materials with High Volume Fraction and High Aspect Ratio based on ABAQUS PYTHON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, BoCheng

    2011-12-01

    Organic and inorganic fiber reinforced composites with innumerable fiber orientation distributions and fiber geometries are abundantly available in several natural and synthetic structures. Inorganic glass fiber composites have been introduced to numerous applications due to their economical fabrication and tailored structural properties. Numerical characterization of such composite material systems is necessitated due to their intrinsic statistical nature, which renders extensive experimentation prohibitively time consuming and costly. To predict various mechanical behavior and characterizations of Uni-Directional Fiber Composites (UDFC) and Random Fiber Composites (RaFC), we numerically developed Representative Volume Elements (RVE) with high accuracy and efficiency and with complex fiber geometric representations encountered in uni-directional and random fiber networks. In this thesis, the numerical simulations of unidirectional RaFC fiber strand RVE models (VF>70%) are first presented by programming in ABAQUS PYTHON. Secondly, when the cross sectional aspect ratios (AR) of the second phase fiber inclusions are not necessarily one, various types of RVE models with different cross sectional shape fibers are simulated and discussed. A modified random sequential absorption algorithm is applied to enhance the volume fraction number (VF) of the RVE, which the mechanical properties represents the composite material. Thirdly, based on a Spatial Segment Shortest Distance (SSSD) algorithm, a 3-Dimentional RaFC material RVE model is simulated in ABAQUS PYTHON with randomly oriented and distributed straight fibers of high fiber aspect ratio (AR=100:1) and volume fraction (VF=31.8%). Fourthly, the piecewise multi-segments fiber geometry is obtained in MATLAB environment by a modified SSSD algorithm. Finally, numerical methods including the polynomial curve fitting and piecewise quadratic and cubic B-spline interpolation are applied to optimize the RaFC fiber geometries

  4. THE CHANGE OF TOTAL PROTEIN FRACTION OF MUSCLE TISSUE OF PORK WITH BIO- AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL SPECIFIC IN THE PROCESS OF COOKING AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Shalimova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The character of changes in total protein fraction of muscle tissue of pork with PSE defects in the process of cooking at temperatures ranging from 40 to 72 g.C in steps of 2 g.C is investigated. Our studies have revealed differences in the change of state the total fraction of muscle proteins with defects PSE pork during cooking.

  5. Impact of epoetin alfa on left ventricular structure, function, and pressure volume relations as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance: the heart failure preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) anemia trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S

    2013-01-01

    Anemia, a common comorbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. The authors quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A prospective, randomized single-blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa vs placebo for 24 weeks in which a subgroup (n=22) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated. Patients (75±10 years, 64% women) with HFPEF (EF=63%±15%) with an average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dL were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose-adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared with placebo (PHFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR imaging.

  6. Fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume is reliably related to absolute depth during vertical displacements in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graham K; Holbrook, Robert Iain; de Perera, Theresa Burt

    2010-09-06

    Fish must orient in three dimensions as they navigate through space, but it is unknown whether they are assisted by a sense of depth. In principle, depth can be estimated directly from hydrostatic pressure, but although teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to changes in pressure, they appear unable to measure absolute pressure. Teleosts sense changes in pressure via changes in the volume of their gas-filled swim-bladder, but because the amount of gas it contains is varied to regulate buoyancy, this cannot act as a long-term steady reference for inferring absolute pressure. In consequence, it is generally thought that teleosts are unable to sense depth using hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overturn this received wisdom by showing from a theoretical physical perspective that absolute depth could be estimated during fast, steady vertical displacements by combining a measurement of vertical speed with a measurement of the fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume. This mechanism works even if the amount of gas in the swim-bladder varies, provided that this variation occurs over much longer time scales than changes in volume during displacements. There is therefore no a priori physical justification for assuming that teleost fish cannot sense absolute depth by using hydrostatic pressure cues.

  7. A High-Temperature, "Volume-Type" ECR Ion Source for RIB Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alton, G.D.; Liu, Y.; Reed, C.A.; Williams, C.; Zhang, T.

    1999-03-29

    A high temperature, low-charge-state, "volume-type" source has been designed for use in the nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research radioactive ion beam (RIB) programs at the Holifield Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF). The source utilizes electromagnetic coils to generate a large and uniformly distributed central magnetic field with magnitude (875 G) chosen to be in electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) with single- frequency (2.45 GHz) microwave radiation. Among the features of the source includti a variable mirror-ratio at ion extraction as required for optimizing low-charge state ion beam generation, a right-hand, circularly-polarized RF injection system to overcome the relatively-low, cutoff-density, (nC - 7.4x10'0/cm3) associated with the use of 2.45 GHz microwave radiatiom, and a high temperature, Ir- or Re-coated-Ta plasma chamber to reduce the residence times of radioactive species that are adsorbed on the walls of the chamber. No provisions are made for radial plasma confinement due to the sensitivity of permanent magnets to degradation by the huge fluxes of neutrons incumbent during target irradiation, routinely used for this purpose. Aspects of the design features of the source are described in this report.

  8. Evolution of temperature and chemical parameters during composting of the pig slurry solid fraction amended with natural zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venglovsky, J.; Sasakova, N.; Vargova, M.; Pacajova, Z.; Placha, I.; Pretrovsky, M.; Harichova, D. [University of Veterinary Medicine, Kosice (Slovakia). Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine

    2005-01-01

    A 3-month experiment was conducted at a 300 kg scale to observe decomposition processes in pig slurry solids amended with two different doses of natural Slovak zeolite-clinoptilolite (substrates S1 and S2, 1% and 2% of zeolite by weight, respectively) in comparison with the control (unamended solids). The experimental and control substrates were stored outdoors in sheltered static piles at ambient temperatures ranging from 8.0 to 34.7{sup o}C. The solid fraction (SF) of pig slurry was obtained by separation on vibration sieves prior to slurry treatment with activated sludge. The initial water content of the SF was 77.1% and no water was added to the piles during the storage. The temperature in the core of the piles was recorded throughout the experiment. By day 3 and 5 of storage (1% and 2% zeolite, resp.), the temperature in the substrates S1 and S2 exceeded 55{sup o}C and remained above this level for 15 days while the highest temperature recorded in the control during the experiment was 29.8{sup o}C. Samples from the core of the piles were taken periodically to determine pH, dry matter at 105{sup o}C (DM), ash (550{sup o} C/4 h), ammonia nitrogen (N-NH{sub 4}{sup +}), nitrate nitrogen (N-NO{sub 3}{sup -}), total nitrogen (N{sub t}), total phosphorus (P{sub t}); total organic carbon (TOC) was computed. The results showed that pH levels in S1 and S2 remained below that in the control for most of the thermophilic stage. This may be related to water-soluble ammonia and the affinity of zeolites to ammonium ions. A significant decrease in the level of ammonia nitrogen in water extracts from S1 and S2 was observed between days 5 and 35 in comparison with the control. The values of ash also differed and corresponded to the intensity of the decomposition processes in the respective substrates. (author)

  9. Dosimetric consequences of tumor volume changes after kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography for non-operative lung cancer during adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Hu; Ximing Xu; Guangjin Yuan; Wei Ge; Liming Xu; Aihua Zhang; Junjian Deng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate tumor volume changes with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and their dosimetric consequences for non-operative lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Eighteen patients with non-operative lung cancer who received IMRT consisting of 1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction and five fractions per week or stereotactic radiotherapy with 5-8 Gy/fraction and three fractions a week were studied. kV-CBCT was performed once per week during IMRT and at every fraction during stereotactic radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on the kV-CBCT images, and adaptive treatment plans were created using merged kV-CBCT and primary planning computed tomogra-phy image sets. Tumor volume changes and dosimetric parameters, including the minimum dose to 95%(D95) or 1% (D1) of the planning target volume (PTV), mean lung dose (MLD), and volume of lung tissue that received more than 5 (V5), 10 (V10), 20 (V20), and 30 (V30) Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The average maximum change in GTV observed during IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radio-therapy was -25.85% (range, -13.09% --56.76%). The D95 and D1 of PTV for the adaptive treatment plans in all patients were not significantly different from those for the initial or former adaptive treatment plans. In patients with tumor volume changes of >20% in the third or fourth week of treatment during IMRT, adap-tive treatment plans offered clinically meaningful decreases in MLD and V5, V10, V20, and V30; however, in patients with tumor volume changes of 20% in the third or fourth week of treatment.

  10. How do jet time, pressure and bone volume fraction influence the drilling depth when waterjet drilling in porcine bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Dunnen, Steven; Dankelman, Jenny; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M

    2016-09-01

    Using water jets for orthopedic procedures that require bone drilling can be beneficial due to the absence of thermal damage and the always sharp cut. Previously, the influence of the water jet diameter and bone architectural properties on the drilling depth have been determined. To develop water jet instruments that can safely drill in orthopedic surgery, the impact of the two remaining primary factors were determined: the jet time (tjet [s]) and pressure (P [MPa]). To this end, 84 holes were drilled in porcine tali and femora with water jets using Ø 0.4mm nozzle. tjet was varied between 1, 3 and 5s and P between 50 and 70MPa. Drilling depths Lhole (mm), diameters Dhole (mm) and the volume of mineralized bone per unit volume (BV/TV) were determined with microCT scans. A non-linear regression analysis resulted in the predictive equation: Lhole= 0.22 * tjet(0.18) * (1.2-BV/TV) * (P-29) (R(2)=0.904). The established relation between the machine settings and drilling depth allows surgeons to adjust jet time and pressure for the patient׳s BV/TV to drill holes at a predetermined depth. For developers, the relation allows design decisions to be made that influence the dimensions, flexibility and accuracy of water jet instruments. For a pressure of 50MPa, the potential hole depth spread indicated by the 95% confidence interval is drilling can be applied in orthopedic surgery to drill holes in bone with controlled depth.

  11. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  12. A stable algorithm for calculating phase equilibria with capillarity at specified moles, volume and temperature using a dynamic model

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-09-30

    Capillary pressure can significantly affect the phase properties and flow of liquid-gas fluids in porous media, and thus, the phase equilibrium calculation incorporating capillary pressure is crucial to simulate such problems accurately. Recently, the phase equilibrium calculation at specified moles, volume and temperature (NVT-flash) becomes an attractive issue. In this paper, capillarity is incorporated into the phase equilibrium calculation at specified moles, volume and temperature. A dynamical model for such problem is developed for the first time by using the laws of thermodynamics and Onsager\\'s reciprocal principle. This model consists of the evolutionary equations for moles and volume, and it can characterize the evolutionary process from a non-equilibrium state to an equilibrium state in the presence of capillarity effect at specified moles, volume and temperature. The phase equilibrium equations are naturally derived. To simulate the proposed dynamical model efficiently, we adopt the convex-concave splitting of the total Helmholtz energy, and propose a thermodynamically stable numerical algorithm, which is proved to preserve the second law of thermodynamics at the discrete level. Using the thermodynamical relations, we derive a phase stability condition with capillarity effect at specified moles, volume and temperature. Moreover, we propose a stable numerical algorithm for the phase stability testing, which can provide the feasible initial conditions. The performance of the proposed methods in predicting phase properties under capillarity effect is demonstrated on various cases of pure substance and mixture systems.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of high volume fraction Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite powders by high-energy milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, B. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Suryanarayana, C. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States)]. E-mail: csuryana@mail.ucf.edu; An, L. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2455 (United States); Vaidyanathan, R. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2455 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal matrix composite (MMC) powders with volume fractions of 20, 30, and 50% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were synthesized by high-energy milling of the blended component powders. The particle sizes of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} studied were 50 nm, 150 nm, and 5 {mu}m. A uniform distribution of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforcement in the Al matrix was successfully obtained after milling the powders for a period of 20 h at a ball-to-powder ratio of 10:1 in a SPEX mill. The uniform distribution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the Al matrix was confirmed by characterizing these nanocomposite powders by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray mapping, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques.

  14. Revisiting the Lick Observatory Supernova Search Volume-Limited Sample: Updated Classifications and Revised Stripped-envelope Supernova Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Shivvers, Isaac; Zheng, Weikang; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Liu, Yuqian; Matheson, Thomas; Pastorello, Andrea; Graur, Or; Foley, Ryan J; Chornock, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Leaman, Jesse; Benetti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volumetric sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classifications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volumetric sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify...

  15. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND AIRFLOW ON VOLUME DEVELOPMENT DURING BAKING AND ITS INFLUENCE ON QUALITY OF CAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NURUL ATIQAH SANI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Volume and texture of cake are among the important parameters in measuring the quality of cake. The processing conditions play important roles in producing cakes of good quality. Recent studies focused more on the formulation and the manipulation of baking temperature, humidity and time instead of airflow condition. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of baking temperature and airflow on the volume development of cake and final cake quality such as volume development, firmness, springiness and moisture content. The cake was baked at three different temperatures (160oC, 170oC, and 180oC, and two different airflow conditions. Baking time, height changes of batter, texture and moisture content of cake were compared to identify the differences or similarities on the final product as the process conditions varied. Results showed that, airflow has more significant effects towards the product quality compared to baking temperature especially on baking time which was 25.58 - 45.16%, and the rate of height changes which was 0.7 mm/min. However, different baking temperatures had more significant effects towards volume expansion which was 2.86 – 8.37% and the springiness of cake which was 3.44% compared to airflow conditions.

  16. Effects of nano anatase-rutile TiO2 volume fraction with natural dye containing anthocyanin on the dye sensitized solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustini, S.; Wahyuono, R. A.; Sawitri, D.; Risanti, D. D.

    2013-09-01

    Since its first development, efforts to improve efficiency of Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) are continuously carried out, either through selection of dye materials, the type of semiconductor, counter electrode design or the sandwiched structure. It is widely known that anatase and rutile are phases of TiO2 that often being used for fabrication of DSSC. Rutile is thermodynamically more stable phase having band-gap suitable for absorption of sunlight spectrum. On the other hand, anatase has higher electrical conductivity, capability to adsorp dye as well as higher electron diffusion coefficient than those of rutile. Present research uses mangosteen pericarp and Rhoeo spathacea extracted in ethanol as natural dye containing anthocyanin. These dyes were characterized by using UV-Vis and FTIR, showing that the absorption maxima peaks obtained at 389 nm and 413 nm, for mangosteen and Rhoeo spathacea, respectively. The nano TiO2 was prepared by means of co-precipitation method. The particle size were 9-11 nm and 54.5 nm for anatase and rutile, respectively, according to Scherrer's equation. DSSCs were fabricated in various volume fractions of anatase and rutile TiO2. The fabricated DSSCs were tested under 17 mW/cm2 of solar irradiation. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of DSSCs employing 75%: 25% volume fraction of anatase and rutile TiO2 have outstanding result than others. The highest conversion efficiencies of 0.037% and 0.013% are obtained for DSSC employing natural dye extract from mangosteen pericarp and Rhoeo spathacea, respectively.

  17. Effect the addition of 10% (volume fraction) chromium on the mechanical properties of NiAlCr processed by powder metallurgy; Efecto de la adicion de un 10% en volumen de cromo en el comportamiento a traccion de aleaciones pulvimetalurgicas NiAlCr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Barriocanal, J.; Garces, G.; Perez, P.; Adeva, P.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical properties of Ni{sub 3}Al-Cr reinforced with 10% in volume fraction of chromium particles produced by powder metallurgy have been studied. For this purpose, milled powders with composition of Ni-20.9Al-8Cr-0.49B (% st.) with and without the addition of 10% in volume fraction of chromium particles have been produced. Both alloys were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). After HIP, heat treatment was applied to homogenize the microstructure. The chromium reinforcement has an important effect in the yield strength and ultimate strength increase. The reinforced alloy presents a yield strength of 1300 MPa at room temperature with respect to 800 MPa for the un-reinforced material. After heat treatment, the yield strength of both alloys does not change significantly. However, a decrease in ductility and ultimate tensile strength have been observed. (Author) 4 refs.

  18. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  19. Temperature effect on leaf water deuterium enrichment and isotopic fractionation during leaf lipid biosynthesis: results from controlled growth of C3 and C4 land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youping; Grice, Kliti; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Farquhar, Graham D; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen isotopic ratios ((2)H/(1)H) of land plant leaf water and the carbon-bound hydrogen of leaf wax lipids are valuable indicators for climatic, physiological, metabolic and geochemical studies. Temperature will exert a profound effect on the stable isotopic composition of leaf water and leaf lipids as it directly influences the isotopic equilibrium (IE) during leaf water evaporation and cellular water dissociation. It is also expected to affect the kinetics of enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, and therefore the balance of hydrogen inputs along different biochemical routes. We conducted a controlled growth experiment to examine the effect of temperature on the stable hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water and the biological and biochemical isotopic fractionations during lipid biosynthesis. We find that leaf water (2)H enrichment at 20°C is lower than that at 30°C. This is contrary to the expectation that at lower temperatures leaf water should be more enriched in (2)H due to a larger equilibrium isotope effect associated with evapotranspiration from the leaf if all other variables are held constant. A hypothesis is presented to explain the apparent discrepancy whereby lower temperature-induced down-regulation of available aquaporin water channels and/or partial closure of transmembrane water channel forces water flow to "detour" to a more convoluted apoplastic pathway, effectively increasing the length over which diffusion acts against advection as described by the Péclet effect (Farquhar and Lloyd, 1993) and decreasing the average leaf water enrichment. The impact of temperature on leaf water enrichment is not reflected in the biological isotopic fractionation or the biochemical isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis. Neither the biological nor biochemical fractionations at 20°C are significantly different from that at 30°C, implying that temperature has a negligible effect on the isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis.

  20. Different nano-particles volume fraction and Hartmann number effects on flow and heat transfer of water-silver nanofluid under the variable heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Tehrani, Pezhman; Karimipour, Arash; Afrand, Masoud; Mousavi, Sayedali

    2017-01-01

    Nanofluid flow and heat transfer composed of water-silver nanoparticles is investigated numerically inside a microchannel. Finite volume approach (FVM) is applied and the effects of gravity are ignored. The whole length of Microchannel is considered in three sections as l1=l3=0.151 and l2=0.71. The linear variable heat flux affects the microchannel wall in the length of l2 while a magnetic field with strength of B0 is considered over the whole domain of it. The influences of different values of Hartmann number (Ha=0, 10, 20), volume fraction of the nanoparticles (ɸ=0, 0.02, 0.04) and Reynolds number (Re=10, 50, 200) on the hydrodynamic and thermal properties of flow are reported. The investigation of slip velocity variations under the effects of a magnetic field are presented for the first time (to the best knowledge of author) while the non-dimensional slip coefficient are selected as B=0.01, 0.05, 0.1 at different states.

  1. Cerebral white matter fractional anisotropy and tract volume as measured by MR imaging are associated with impaired cognitive and motor function in pediatric posterior fossa tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckriegel, Stefan M; Bruhn, Harald; Thomale, Ulrich W; Hernáiz Driever, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Disease and therapy cause brain damage and subsequent functional loss in pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors. Treatment-related toxicity factors are resection in patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and, additionally, cranio-spinal irradiation together with chemotherapy in patients with medulloblastoma (MB). We tested whether damage to white matter (WM) as revealed by diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) correlated with specific cognitive and motor impairments in survivors of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. Eighteen MB (mean age ± SD, 15.2 ± 4.9 y) and 14 PA (12.6 ± 5.0 y) survivors were investigated with DTI on a 3-Tesla-MR system. We identified fractional anisotropy (FA) of WM, the volume ratio of WM to gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid (WM/GM + CSF), and volume of specific frontocerebellar tracts. Ataxia was assessed using the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), while the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children determined full-scale intelligence quotients (FSIQ). Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (ANT) was used to assess processing speed. Handwriting automation was analyzed using a digitizing graphic tablet. The WM/GM + CSF ratio correlated significantly with cognitive measures (IQ, P = 0.002; ANT baseline speed, P = 0.04; ANT shifting attention, P = 0.004). FA of skeletonized tracts correlated significantly with FSIQ (P = 0.008), ANT baseline speed (P = 0.028) and ANT shifting attention (P = 0.045). Moreover, frontocerebellar tract volumes correlated with both the FSIQ (P = 0.011) and ICARS (P = 0.007). DTI provides a method for quantification of WM damage by tumor and by therapy-associated effects in survivors of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. DTI-derived WM integrity may be a representative marker for cognitive and motor deterioration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Si isotope fractionation between Si-poor metal and silicate melt at pressure-temperature conditions relevant to metal segregation in small planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempl, J.; Vroon, P. Z.; Zinngrebe, E.; van Westrenen, W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental investigations of Si isotope fractionation between Si-bearing metal alloy and silicate phases have to date been limited to high pressure (1-7 GPa) and high temperature (1800-2200 °C) conditions at highly reducing conditions, to optimize applicability of results to early core formation processes in the Earth. Here, we assess the extent and mechanism of Si isotopic fractionation at conditions relevant to metal segregation in small (km-scale) planetary bodies, using samples obtained from an industrial-scale blast furnace of Tata Steel (IJmuiden, the Netherlands). During the low-pressure, high-temperature process of steelmaking inhomogeneous blast furnace burden consisting of pre- and untreated iron ore, iron silicates and coke is reduced to oxygen fugacities near the C-CO buffer, resulting in the segregation of a metal phase containing only ∼0.3 wt% Si. Seven sample sets, each comprising a metal alloy and a silicate slag, were taken during tapping of the blast furnace at tapping temperatures between 1400 °C and 1600 °C. We find large isotopic mass fractionation between metal and silicate, with Δ30Sisilicate-metal varying between 0.7‰ and 1.6‰, values that are as high as previously obtained in high-pressure, highly reduced experiments. A model for metal-silicate Si isotope fractionation in blast furnaces can explain both the sense and magnitude of fractionation, if the presence of SiO-bearing vapour is explicitly taken into account. Our data indicate that significant Si isotope fractionation can occur between metal and silicate at low-pressure, high-temperature and only mildly reducing conditions for which Si solubility in molten Fe-rich metal is low. This suggests an important role for SiO at low confining pressures. Our data can be applied to models of aubrite meteorite formation through high-temperature differentiation of an enstatite chondrite parent body. Our calculations suggest a far larger degree of rehomogenisation during differentiation

  3. T2’-Imaging to Assess Cerebral Oxygen Extraction Fraction in Carotid Occlusive Disease: Influence of Cerebral Autoregulation and Cerebral Blood Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichmann, Ralf; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Hattingen, Elke; Singer, Oliver C.; Wagner, Marlies

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative T2'-mapping detects regional changes of the relation of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) by using their different magnetic properties in gradient echo imaging and might therefore be a surrogate marker of increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in cerebral hypoperfusion. Since elevations of cerebral blood volume (CBV) with consecutive accumulation of Hb might also increase the fraction of deoxygenated Hb and, through this, decrease the T2’-values in these patients we evaluated the relationship between T2’-values and CBV in patients with unilateral high-grade large-artery stenosis. Materials and Methods Data from 16 patients (13 male, 3 female; mean age 53 years) with unilateral symptomatic or asymptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis/occlusion were analyzed. MRI included perfusion-weighted imaging and high-resolution T2’-mapping. Representative relative (r)CBV-values were analyzed in areas of decreased T2’ with different degrees of perfusion delay and compared to corresponding contralateral areas. Results No significant elevations in cerebral rCBV were detected within areas with significantly decreased T2’-values. In contrast, rCBV was significantly decreased (pperfusion delay and decreased T2’. Furthermore, no significant correlation between T2’- and rCBV-values was found. Conclusions rCBV is not significantly increased in areas of decreased T2’ and in areas of restricted perfusion in patients with unilateral high-grade stenosis. Therefore, T2’ should only be influenced by changes of oxygen metabolism, regarding our patient collective especially by an increase of the OEF. T2’-mapping is suitable to detect altered oxygen consumption in chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:27560515

  4. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants: 2. Defects on active MRI implants causing hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grönemeyer Dietrich HW

    2006-05-01

    investigations. The finite volume analysis calculates the time developing temperature maps for the model of a broken linear metallic wire embedded in tissue. Half of the total hot spot power loss is assumed to diffuse into both wire parts at the location of a defect. The energy is distributed from there by heat conduction. Additionally the effect of blood perfusion and blood flow is respected in some simulations because the simultaneous appearance of all worst case conditions, especially the absence of blood perfusion and blood flow near the hot spot, is very unlikely for vessel implants. Results The analytical solution as worst case scenario as well as the finite volume analysis for near worst case situations show not negligible volumes with critical temperature increases for part of the modeled hot spot situations. MR investigations with a high rf-pulse density lasting below a minute can establish volumes of several cubic millimeters with temperature increases high enough to start cell destruction. Longer exposure times can involve volumes larger than 100 mm3. Even temperature increases in the range of thermal ablation are reached for substantial volumes. MR sequence exposure time and hot spot power loss are the primary factors influencing the volume with critical temperature increases. Wire radius, wire material as well as the physiological parameters blood perfusion and blood flow inside larger vessels reduce the volume with critical temperature increases, but do not exclude a volume with critical tissue heating for resonators with a large product of resonator volume and quality factor. Conclusion The worst case scenario assumes thermal equilibrium for a hot spot embedded in homogeneous tissue without any cooling due to blood perfusion or flow. The finite volume analysis can calculate the results for near and not close to worst case conditions. For both cases a substantial volume can reach a critical temperature increase in a short time. The analytical solution, as absolute

  5. Composition and Temperature Dependence of Excess Volume of Heavy Oil-Stocks Mixtures + (Gas oil or Toluene or Reformate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahad Z. Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Binary mixtures of three, heavy oil-stocks was subjected to density measurements at temperatures of 30, 35 and 40 °C. and precise data was acquired on the volumetric behavior of these systems. The results are reported in terms of equations for excess specific volumes of mixtures. The heavy oil-stocks used were of good varity, namely 40 stock, 60 stock, and 150 stock. The lightest one is 40 stock with API gravity 33.69 while 60 stock is a middle type and 150 stock is a heavy one, with API gravity 27.74 and 23.79 respectively. Temperatures in the range of 30-40 °C have a minor effect on excess volume of heavy oil-stock binary mixture thus, insignificant expansion or shrinkage is observed by increasing the temperature this effect becomes more significant although the heavy oil-stocks is spiked with hydrocarbons like (gas oil, toluene and reformate. Blending of Heavy oil-stocks with hydrocarbons spikes (gas oil, toluene and reformate form non-ideal mixtures, for which excess volume can be positive or negative depending on nature species. Spiking of Heavy oil-stocks with either gas oil or reformate resulted in negative excess volume. This shrinkage is greater for the lowest boiling point spike as in the case of reformate, While, the presence of methyl groups in aromatic rings results in a positive excess volume, as shown in toluene when blended with 40 stock but a negative excess volume was found when blended with 60 stock and 150 stock. The API gravity of heavy oil-stocks has an effect on excess volume when the oil-stocks spiked with hydrocarbons like (gas oil, toluene and reformate. This 40 stocks as a typical light types resulted in minimum negative excess volume of -0.47 at 30 °C, when it was spiked with the gas oil; while the spiked heavy oil-stock with kerosene shows a maximum excess volume of -15.56 at 40 °C.

  6. Soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents measurements of the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. This technique uses a high-speed camera coupled with two narrowband filters (550. nm and 650. nm, 10. nm FWHM). After calibration, statistical analysis shows that the uncertainty of the two-color temperature is less than 5%, while it is about 50% for the KL factor. This technique is then applied to the spray combustion of biodiesel and diesel fuels under an ambient oxygen concentration of 21% and ambient temperatures of 800, 1000 and 1200. K. The heat release result shows higher energy utilization efficiency for biodiesel compared to diesel under all conditions; meanwhile, diesel shows a higher pressure increase due to its higher heating value. Biodiesel yields a lower temperature inside the flame area, a longer soot lift-off length, and a smaller soot area compared to diesel. Both the KL factor and the total soot with biodiesel are lower than with diesel throughout the entire combustion process, and this difference becomes larger as the ambient temperature decreases. Biodiesel shows approximately 50-100. K lower temperatures than diesel at the quasi-steady stage for 1000 and 1200. K ambient temperature, while diesel shows a lower temperature than biodiesel at 800. K ambient. This result may raise the question of how important the flame temperature is in explaining the higher NO. x emissions often observed during biodiesel combustion. Other factors may also play an important role in controlling NO. x emissions. Both biodiesel and diesel temperature measurements show a monotonic dependence on the ambient temperature. However, the ambient temperature appears to have a more significant effect on the soot formation and oxidation in diesel combustion, while biodiesel combustion soot characteristics shows relative insensitivity to the ambient temperature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Volume Fraction of Ordered α2 Phase Precipitated in Ti-Al-Sn-Zr Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun ZHANG; Na PENG; Xinan WANG; LI Li; Qingjiang WANG

    2007-01-01

    An ideal method has been established for calculating the precipitation of α2 ordered phase in near-α titanium alloys based on the theory on the critical electron concentration for the precipitation of α 2 ordered phase in near-α titanium alloys. With complete precipitation of α2 phase in near-α titanium alloys, the alloys can be considered to be composed of two parts: (1) the α2 ordered phase with the stoichiometric atomic ratio of Ti3X; (2) the disorder solid solution with the critical composition in which the α2 ordered phase is just unable to precipitate. By using this method, the volume fractions of α2 ordered phase precipitated in Ti-Al, Ti-Sn,Ti-Al-Sn-Zr alloys with various Al, Sn and/or Zr contents have been calculated. The influences of Al and Sn on the precipitation of α2 ordered phase are discussed. The calculating results show substantial agreement with the experimental ones.

  8. Native T1 Relaxation Time and Extracellular Volume Fraction as Accurate Markers of Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in Heart Valve Disease - Comparison With Targeted Left Ventricular Myocardial Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockova, Radka; Kacer, Petr; Pirk, Jan; Maly, Jiri; Sukupova, Lucie; Sikula, Viktor; Kotrc, Martin; Barciakova, Lucia; Honsova, Eva; Maly, Marek; Kautzner, Josef; Sedmera, David; Penicka, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between the cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived native T1 relaxation time and myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) fraction and the extent of diffuse myocardial fibrosis (DMF) on targeted myocardial left ventricular (LV) biopsy. The study population consisted of 40 patients (age 63±8 years, 65% male) undergoing valve and/or ascending aorta surgery for severe aortic stenosis (77.5%), root dilatation (7.5%) or valve regurgitation (15%). The T1 relaxation time was assessed in the basal interventricular septum pre- and 10-min post-contrast administration using the modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery sequence prior to surgery. LV myocardial biopsy specimen was obtained during surgery from the basal interventricular septal segment matched with the T1 mapping assessment. The percentage of myocardial collagen was quantified using picrosirius red staining. The average percentage of myocardial collagen was 22.0±14.8%. Both native T1 relaxation time with cutoff value ≥1,010 ms (sensitivity=90%, specificity=73%, area under the curve=0.82) and ECV with cutoff value ≥0.32 (sensitivity=80%, specificity=90%, area under the curve=0.85) showed high accuracy to identify severe (>30%) DMF. The native T1 relaxation time showed significant correlation with LV mass (P<0.01). Native T1 relaxation time and ECV at 10 min after contrast administration are accurate markers of DMF. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1202-1209).

  9. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the permanent dent depth and energy absorption of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  10. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the maximum deflection and impact load of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  11. Large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations for phase coarsening at ultrahigh volume fraction on high-performance architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Wang, K. G.; Jones, Jim E.

    2016-06-01

    A parallel algorithm for large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations of phase coarsening is developed and implemented on high-performance architectures. From the large-scale simulations, a new kinetics in phase coarsening in the region of ultrahigh volume fraction is found. The parallel implementation is capable of harnessing the greater computer power available from high-performance architectures. The parallelized code enables increase in three-dimensional simulation system size up to a 5123 grid cube. Through the parallelized code, practical runtime can be achieved for three-dimensional large-scale simulations, and the statistical significance of the results from these high resolution parallel simulations are greatly improved over those obtainable from serial simulations. A detailed performance analysis on speed-up and scalability is presented, showing good scalability which improves with increasing problem size. In addition, a model for prediction of runtime is developed, which shows a good agreement with actual run time from numerical tests.

  12. Effects of Temperature and Water Soluble Fraction of Palm Biodiesel and Diesel Fuel on Hatchability and Survival of First Stage Larvae of Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puncharas Gorcharoenwat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of temperature and water soluble fraction (WSF of biodiesel and diesel on hatchability and survival of early stage Macrobrachium rosenbergii were investigated at the temperature of 25, 28, 31 and 34oC. The purpose of this study was to determine toxic effects of biodiesel and diesel on incubation period, hatchability, and survival of the first larval stage. The results showed a significant difference of incubation period among temperatures. The highest temperature (34°C resulted in the shortest incubation period (15 days while the lowest temperature (25°C gave the longest incubation period (19 days. One hundred percent of hatchability was found at temperature 28 and 31°C in the control group. The lowest hatchability occurred at 100% of WSF of palm biodiesel. The hatchability and survival of eggs through the first stage larvae in control and WSF of biodiesel decreased in higher temperature. However, in 50% WSF of diesel, the highest temperature (34°C increased the hatchability and survival whereas 100% WSF of diesel, no larval survival could be found. In comparison between WSF of biodiesel and diesel on newly hatched larvae, the diesel was more toxic to the larvae than that of the biodiesel. Regarding temperature and WSF of biodiesel and diesel effects on the first larval stage of M. rosenbergii, clearly diesel was more harmful to the larvae than biodiesel.

  13. Commercial Test on Technology for High-Temperature Cracking of C5 Fraction to Decrease Olefin Content of Gasoline in DCCU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Yong

    2005-01-01

    During June and July 2003, Jingmen Petrochemical Company carded out the commercial test on technology for high-temperature cracking of C5 fraction to decrease olefin content of gasoline in DCCU.The test results showed that the olefin content of DCC gasoline had decreased from 68.32m% to 42.5m%,meanwhile the propylene yield increased by 0.90m%.

  14. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, [Formula: see text], where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians

  15. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, π(d2)2, where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians (interquartile range

  16. Correction to "What is a fractional derivative?" by Ortigueira and Machado [Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 293, 15 July 2015, Pages 4-13. Special issue on Fractional PDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katugampola, Udita N.

    2016-09-01

    There is a debate among contemporary mathematicians about what it really means by a fractional derivative. The question arose as a consequence of introducing a 'new' definition of a fractional derivative in [1]. In a reply, Ortigueira and Machado [2] came up with several very important criteria to determine whether a given derivative is a fractional derivative. According to their criterion, the new fractional derivative, called conformable fractional derivative, introduced by Khalil et al. [1] turns out not to be a fractional derivative, but rather a controlled or conformable derivative. In proving the claim the authors in [2] use an example [2, p. 6]. It turns out that the explanation given there needs some corrections and it is the sole purpose of this note.

  17. Pressure--volume--temperature properties of perfluorocyclobutane: equations of state, virial coefficients, and intermolecular potential energy functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douslin, D.R.; Moore, R.T.; Waddington, G.

    1959-11-01

    Studies of the pressure-volume-temperature properties of perfluorocyclobutane, in the ranges 3-394 atm and 30-350/sup 0/, yielded values of gas compressibility, critical constants, vapor pressure and orthobaric liquid and vapor densities. The results were correlated by the Beattie Bridgeman, Benedict Webb Rubin, and Martin-Hou equations of state and by the Stockmayer and the Kihara intermolecular potential energy functions. The merits of the several correlational methods are discussed.

  18. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants with cylindrical symmetry: 1. Properly working devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnorr Jörg

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active Magnetic Resonance Imaging implants are constructed as resonators tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system with a specific field strength. The resonating circuit may be embedded into or added to the normal metallic implant structure. The resonators build inductively coupled wireless transmit and receive coils and can amplify the signal, normally decreased by eddy currents, inside metallic structures without affecting the rest of the spin ensemble. During magnetic resonance imaging the resonators generate heat, which is additional to the usual one described by the specific absorption rate. This induces temperature increases of the tissue around the circuit paths and inside the lumen of an active implant and may negatively influence patient safety. Methods This investigation provides an overview of the supplementary power absorbed by active implants with a cylindrical geometry, corresponding to vessel implants such as stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters. The knowledge of the overall absorbed power is used in a finite volume analysis to estimate temperature maps around different implant structures inside homogeneous tissue under worst-case assumptions. The "worst-case scenario" assumes thermal heat conduction without blood perfusion inside the tissue around the implant and mostly without any cooling due to blood flow inside vessels. Results The additional power loss of a resonator is proportional to the volume and the quality factor, as well as the field strength of the MRI system and the specific absorption rate of the applied sequence. For properly working devices the finite volume analysis showed only tolerable heating during MRI investigations in most cases. Only resonators transforming a few hundred mW into heat may reach temperature increases over 5 K. This requires resonators with volumes of several ten cubic centimeters, short inductor circuit paths with only a few 10 cm and a quality

  19. Giant volume magnetostriction in the Y{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} single crystal at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S. A., E-mail: nikitin@phys.msu.ru; Pankratov, N. Yu.; Smarzhevskaya, A. I.; Politova, G. A. [Physics Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Pastushenkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yupast@mail.ru; Skokov, K. P. [Physics Faculty, Tver State University, 170100 Tver (Russian Federation); Moral, A. del [Laboratorio de Magnetismo de Slidos, Departamento de Fisica de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragn, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza-C.S.I.C, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-05-21

    An investigation of the Y{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} compound belonging to the class of intermetallic alloys of rare-earth and 3d-transition metals is presented. The magnetization, magnetostriction, and thermal expansion of the Y{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} single crystal were studied. The forced magnetostriction and magnetostriction constants were investigated in the temperature range of the magnetic ordering close to the room temperature. The giant field induced volume magnetostriction was discovered in the room temperature region in the magnetic field up to 1.2 T. The contributions of both anisotropic single-ion and isotropic pair exchange interactions to the volume magnetostriction and magnetostriction constants were determined. The experimental results were interpreted within the framework of the Standard Theory of Magnetostriction and the Landau thermodynamic theory. It was found out that the giant values of the volume magnetostriction were caused by the strong dependence of the 3d-electron Coulomb charge repulsion on the deformations and width of the 3d-electron energy band.

  20. 前处理对高体积分数SiCp/Al复合材料化学镀镍的影响∗%Influence of pretreatment on electroless nickel plating on high volume fraction SiCp/Al composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建云; 张灿铭; 李普同; 崔霞

    2014-01-01

    对高体积分数 SiCp/Al 复合材料进行前处理,再化学镀镍。研究了除油、粗化、活化对 SiCp/Al复合材料化学镀镍的影响。分析了镀镍层的显微组织。结果表明,有机溶剂除油比碱液除油效果好。H2 O2系粗化比 HF 系粗化更为适宜。在由醋酸镍、次亚磷酸钠和乙醇组成的活化剂中室温浸润,然后160℃温度下热还原30 min,化学镀镍镀速较高。前处理后在 SiCp/Al 复合材料表面化学镀镍可沉积上致密、均匀、结合良好的镀镍层。%The high volume fraction SiCp/Al composite was processed by pretreatment,then it was proceeded by electroless nickel plating.The influence of deoiling,roughening,activating on electroless nickel plating on SiCp/Al composite was investigated.The microstructure of electroless nickel plating on composite was ana-lyzed.The results show that organic solvent was better than alkaline solvent for deoiling.H2 O2 system was more appropriate than HF system for roughening.Infiltrating in activation solution consisted nickel acetate,so-dium hypophosphite and alcohol at room temperature,then thermo deoxidizing at 160 ℃ temperature for 30 min,the procedure makes electroless nickel plating rate higher.After pretreatment,electroless nickel plating deposited on SiCp/Al composite surface was dense,uniform,firmly combined.

  1. Assessment of changes in vascularity and blood volume in canine sarcomas and squamous cell carcinomas during fractionated radiation therapy using quantified contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bley, Carla Rohrer; Laluhová, Dagmar; Roos, Malgorzata; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    Radiation therapy does not only target tumour cells but also affects tumour vascularity. In the present study, changes in tumour vascularity and blood volume were investigated in five grade 1 oral fibrosarcomas, eight other sarcomas (non-oral soft tissue and bone sarcomas) and 12 squamous cell carcinomas in dogs during fractionated radiation therapy (total dose, 45-56 Gy). Contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound was performed before fraction 1, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 15 or 16 (sarcomas) or 17 (squamous cell carcinomas). Prior to treatment, median vascularity and blood volume were significantly higher in squamous cell carcinomas (P=0.0005 and 0.001), whereas measurements did not differ between oral fibrosarcomas and other sarcomas (P=0.88 and 0.999). During the course of radiation therapy, only small, non-significant changes in vascularity and blood volume were observed in all three tumour histology groups (P=0.08 and P=0.213), whereas median tumour volume significantly decreased until the end of treatment (P=0.04 for fibrosarcomas and other sarcomas, P=0.008 for squamous cell carcinomas). It appeared that there was a proportional decrease in tumour volume, vascularity and blood volume. Doppler measurements did not predict progression free interval or survival in any of the three tumour groups (P=0.06-0.86). However, the number of tumours investigated was small and therefore, the results can only be considered preliminary.

  2. Impact of the target volume (prostate alone vs. prostate with seminal vesicles) and fraction dose (1.8 Gy vs. 2.0 Gy) on quality of life changes after external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, Michael J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Fischedick, Karin; Holy, Richard; Klotz, Jens; Nussen, Sandra; Krenkel, Barbara

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the impact of the clinical target volume (CTV) and fraction dose on quality of life (QoL) after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: a group of 283 patients has been surveyed prospectively before, at the last day, at a median time of 2 months and 15 months after EBRT (70.2-72 Gy) using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). FBRT of prostate alone (P, n = 70) versus prostate with seminal vesicles (PS, n = 213) was compared. Differences of fraction doses (1.8 Gy, n = 80, vs. 2.0 Gy, n = 69) have been evaluated in the patient group receiving a total dose of 72 Gy. Results: significantly higher bladder and rectum volumes were found at all dose levels for the patients with PS versus P within the CTV (p < 0.001). Similar volumes resulted in the groups with different fraction doses. Paradoxically, bowel function scores decreased significantly less 2 and 15 months after EBRT of PS versus P. 2 months after EBRT, patients with a fraction dose of 2.0 Gy versus 1.8 Gy reported pain with urination ({>=} once a day in 12% vs. 3%; p = 0.04) and painful bowel movements ({>=} rarely in 46% vs. 29%; p = 0.05) more frequently. No long-term differences were found. Conclusion: the risk of adverse QoL changes after EBRT for prostate cancer cannot be derived from the dose-volume histogram alone. Seminal vesicles can be included in the CTV up to a moderate total dose without adverse effects on QoL. Apart from a longer recovery period, higher fraction doses were not associated with higher toxicity. (orig.)

  3. The Surface-to-volume Ratio of the Synthesis Reactor Vessel Governing the Low Temperature Crystallization of ZSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Hidayati Mukaromah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite ZSM-5 is one of major catalysts in petroleum and fine-chemical industries. The synthesis of zeolite ZSM-5 is usually carried out at high temperature above 100 °C using the immense amount of organic structure-directing agents (OSDA. It is interesting to note that fine-tuning the initial gel mixture can be used to enhance the typical slow crystallization rate of ZSM-5. Herein, we report the effect of the surface-to-volume ratio of the reactor vessel to the crystallization of ZSM-5 at low temperature. The surface-to-volume ratio of the reactor vessel could influence the heat-transfer during the synthesis which further governed the crystallization of ZSM-5. It was found that the higher the surface-to-volume of the reactor, the more crystalline of the resulting products. The product with the highest crystallinity exhibited a nearly-spherical morphology composed of smaller ZSM-5 crystallites. This phenomenon allowed the presence of inter-crystallite mesopores which is an advantage for the catalytic reaction using bulky molecules.

  4. Fast and accurate determination of 3D temperature distribution using fraction-step semi-implicit method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Wei; Hoppe, Ralph; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we proposed a method to numerically determinate 3-dimensional thermal response due to electromagnetic exposure quickly and accurately. Due to the stability criterion the explicit finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method works fast only if the spatial step is not set very small. In this paper, the semi-implicit Crank-Nicholson method for time domain discretization with unconditional time stability is proposed, where the idea of fractional steps method was utilized in 3-dimension so that an efficient numerical implementation is obtained. Compared with the explicit FDTD, with similar numerical precision, the proposed method takes less than 1/200 of the execution time.

  5. QrtzGeotherm: A revised algorithm for quartz solubility geothermometry to estimate geothermal reservoir temperature and vapor fraction with multivariate analytical uncertainty propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra P.

    2012-11-01

    The quartz solubility geothermometry to calculate geothermal reservoir temperature and vapor fraction with multivariate analytical uncertainty propagation is programmed as two classes, SiO2TD and QrtzGeotherm in Visual Basic in Visual Studio 2010 (VB.NET). The class, SiO2TD calculates the total discharge concentration, SiO2TD and its uncertainty, SiO2TDErr from the analytical concentration of silica, SiO2msd and uncertainty, SiO2msdErr of separated water, sampled after N-separations of vapor and liquid. The class, QrtzGeotherm uses the following properties as input parameters: (i) HRes-reservoir enthalpy (kJ/kg), (ii) HResErr-uncertainty in the reservoir enthalpy (kJ/kg), (iii) SiO2TD-total discharge silica concentration (ppm), (iv) SiO2TDErr-uncertainty in the total discharge silica concentration (ppm) (v) GeoEq-number of quartz solubility regression equation, (vi) TempGuess-a guess value of the reservoir temperature (°C). The properties corresponding to the output parameters are (i) TempRes-reservoir temperature (K), (ii) TempResErr-uncertainty in the reservoir temperature (K), (iii) VaporRes-reservoir vapor fraction and (iv) VaporResErr-uncertainty in the reservoir vapor fraction. Similarly, it has a method, SiO2Eqn(EqNo, Temp) to provide the silica solubility as function of temperature corresponding to the regression equation. Four quartz solubility equations along the liquid-vapor saturation curve: (i) a quadratic equation of 1/T and pressure, (ii) a linear equation relating log SiO2to the inverse of absolute temperature (T), (iii) a polynomial of T including logarithmic terms and (iv) temperature as a polynomial of SiO2including logarithmic terms are programmed. A demonstration program, QGeotherm is written VB.NET. Similarly, the applicability of classes SiO2TD and QrtzGeotherm in MS-Excel is illustrated considering Los Azufres geothermal field as an example.

  6. Evaluation of blackbody radiation shift with temperature associated fractional uncertainty at 10E-18 level for 40Ca+ ion optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ping; Shu, Hua-lin; Yuan, Jin-bo; Shang, Juan-juan; Cui, Kai-feng; Chao, Si-jia; Wang, Shao-mao; Liu, Dao-xin; Huang, Xue-ren

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, blackbody radiation (BBR) temperature rise seen by the $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ion confined in a miniature Paul trap and its uncertainty have been evaluated via finite-element method (FEM) modelling. The FEM model was validated by comparing with thermal camera measurements, which were calibrated by PT1000 resistance thermometer, at several points on a dummy trap. The input modelling parameters were analyzed carefully in detail, and their contributions to the uncertainty of environment temperature were evaluated on the validated FEM model. The result shows that the temperature rise seen by $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ion is 1.72 K with an uncertainty of 0.46 K. It results in a contribution of 2.2 mHz to the systematic uncertainty of $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ion optical clock, corresponding to a fractional uncertainty 5.4$\\times$10$^{-18}$. This is much smaller than the uncertainty caused by the BBR shift coefficient, which is evaluated to be 4.8 mHz and at 10$^{-17}$ level in fractional frequency units.

  7. Evaluation of blackbody radiation shift with temperature-associated fractional uncertainty at 10-18 level for 40Ca+ ion optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Cao, Jian; Shu, Hua-lin; Yuan, Jin-bo; Shang, Jun-juan; Cui, Kai-feng; Chao, Si-jia; Wang, Shao-mao; Liu, Dao-xin; Huang, Xue-ren

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the blackbody radiation (BBR) temperature rise experienced by a 40Ca+ ion confined in a miniature Paul trap and its uncertainty have been evaluated via finite-element method (FEM) modelling. The FEM model was validated through comparisons with thermal camera measurements at several points on a dummy trap. Before the validation, the thermal camera was calibrated by using a PT1000 resistance thermometer. The input modelling parameters were analyzed carefully, and their contributions to the uncertainty of the trap environment temperature were evaluated using the validated FEM model. The result shows that the temperature rise experienced by the 40Ca+ ion is 1.72 K with an uncertainty of 0.46 K. It results in a contribution of 2.2 mHz to the systematic uncertainty of a 40Ca+ ion optical clock, corresponding to a fractional uncertainty 5.4 × 10-18. This is much smaller than the uncertainty caused by the BBR shift coefficient, which is evaluated to be 4.8 mHz and at the 10-17 level in fractional frequency units.

  8. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  9. Effects of subsurface volume scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihm, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of volumetric scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature are examined for a broad range of feasible lunar rock population distributions. Mie-scattering phase functions and the radiative transfer method are utilized. Surveyor and Apollo data relevant to lunar rock size distributions are discussed, and parameters are chosen for nine scattering models which liberally cover the range of studied rock population distributions. Scattering model brightness temperature predictions are analyzed in terms of the lunar disk center emission averaged over a lunation for wavelengths of 3-30 cm. The effects of scattering on the amplitude of disk center brightness temperature variations and resultant deductions of regolith electrical loss are examined. Constraints on the global scale variability of subsurface scatterers imposed by microwave brightness temperature maps are considered.

  10. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume II. High-temperature proppant testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Data were obtained from a newly built proppant tester, operated at actual geothermal temperatures. The short term test results show that most proppants are temperature sensitive, particularly at the higher closure stresses. Many materials have been tested using a standard short-term test, i.e., fracture-free sand, bauxite, and a resin-coated sand retained good permeability at the high fluid temperatures in brine over a range of closure stresses. The tests were designed to simulate normal closure stress ranges for geothermal wells which are estimated to be from 2000 to 6000 psi. Although the ultra high closure stresses in oil and gas wells need not be considered with present geothermal resources, there is a definite need for chemically inert proppants that will retain high permeability for long time periods in the high temperature formations.

  11. Effect of organic ligands on Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during low-temperature precipitation of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Purgstaller, Bettina; Baldermann, Andre; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Calcite growth experiments have been performed at 25 oC and 1 bar pCO2 in the presence of aqueous Mg and six organic ligands in the concentration range from 10-5 to 10-3 M. These experiments were performed in order to quantify the effect of distinct organic ligands on the Mg partitioning and Mg stable isotope fractionation during its incorporation in calcite at similar growth rates normalized to total surface area. The organic ligands used in this study comprise of (i) acetate acid, (ii) citrate, (iii) glutamate, (iv) salicylate, (v) glycine and (vi) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), containing carboxyl- and amino-groups. These fuctional groups are required for bacterial activity and growth as well as related to biotic and abiotic mineralization processes occurring in sedimentary and earliest diagenetic aquatic environments (e.g. soil, cave, lacustrine, marine). The results obtained in this study indicate that the presence of organic ligands promotes an increase in the partition coefficient of Mg in calcite (DMg = (Mg/Ca)calcite (Mg/Ca)fluid). This behaviour can be explained by the temporal formation of aqueous Mg-ligand complexes that are subsequently adsorbed on the calcite surfaces and thereby reducing the active growth sites of calcite. The increase of DMg values as a function of the supersaturation degree of calcite in the fluid phase can be described by the linear equation LogDMg =0.3694 (±0.0329)×SIcalcite - 1.9066 (±0.0147); R2=0.92 In contrast, the presence of organic ligands, with exception of citrate, does not significantly affect the Mg isotope fractionation factor between calcite and reactive fluid (Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid = -2.5 ±0.1). Citrate likely exhibits larger fractionation between the Mg-ligand complexes and free aqueous Mg2+, compared to the other organic ligands studied in this work, as evidenced by the smaller Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid values. These results indicate that in Earth's surface calcite precipitating environments that are

  12. Determination of volume fraction in biphasic flows oil-gas and water-gas using artificial neural network and gamma densitometry; Determinacao de fracoes de volume em fluxos bifasicos oleo-gas e agua-gas utilizando redes neurais artificiais e densitometria gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Philippe Netto Belache

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a methodology based on the principles of gamma ray attenuation to identify volume fractions in biphasic systems composed of oil-gas-water and gas which are found in the offshore oil industry. This methodology is based on the acknowledgment counts per second on the photopeak energy using a detection system composed of a NaI (Tl) detector, a source of {sup 137}Cs without collimation positioned at 180 ° relative to the detector on a smooth stratified flow regime. The mathematical modeling for computational simulation using the code MCNP-X was performed using the experimental measurements of the detector characteristics (energy resolution and efficiency), characteristics of the material water and oil (density and coefficient attenuation) and measurement of the volume fractions. To predict these fractions were used artificial neural networks (ANNs), and to obtain an adequate training the ANNs for the prediction of volume fractions were simulated a larger number of volume fractions in MCNP-X. The experimental data were used in the set data necessary for validation of ANNs and the data generated using the computer code MCNP-X were used in training and test sets of the ANNs. Were used ANNs of type feed-forward Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and analyzed two functions of training, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) and gradient descent with momentum (GDM), both using the Backpropagation training algorithm. The ANNs identified correctly the volume fractions of the multiphase system with mean relative errors lower than 1.21 %, enabling the application of this methodology for this purpose. (author)

  13. Measuring of Volume Fraction for SiC Particles in SiCP/Al Composite%SiC颗粒增强铝基复合材料中SiC颗粒体积分数的测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    木二珍; 李强

    2013-01-01

    利用金相法和XRD定量分析法对SiC颗粒增强铝基复合材料的SiC颗粒体积分数进行测定.用定量金相法测得SiC增强铝基复合材料SiC颗粒的体积分数为58.6%,用XRD定量分析法测得的体积分数为62.7%.%The volume fraction for SiC particle was measured by metallographic method and XRD quantitative analysis.The volume fraction for SiC particles is 56.1% for metallographic method and 62.7% for XRD quantitative analysis.

  14. Thermal decomposition of expanded polystyrene in a pebble bed reactor to get higher liquid fraction yield at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, R S; Gopinath, S; Razdan, P; Delattre, C; Nirmala, G S; Natarajan, R

    2008-11-01

    Expanded polystyrene is one of the polymers produced in large quantities due to its versatile application in different fields. This polymer is one of the most intractable components in municipal solid waste. Disposal of polymeric material by pyrolysis or catalytic cracking yields valuable hydrocarbon fuels or monomers. Literature reports different types of reactors and arrangements that have uniform temperatures during pyrolysis and catalytic cracking. The present study focuses on reducing the temperature to maximize the quantity of styrene monomer in the liquid product. A bench scale reactor has been developed to recover the styrene monomer and other valuable chemicals. Experiments were carried under partial oxidation and vacuum conditions in the temperature range of 300-500 degrees C. In the pyrolysis optimization studies, the best atmospheric condition was determined to be vacuum, the pyrolysis temperature should be 500 degrees C, yield of liquid product obtained was 91.7% and yield of styrene obtained was 85.5%. In the characterization studies, distillation and IR spectroscopy experiments were carried out. The remaining of the liquid product comprises of benzene, ethyl benzene, and styrene dimers and trimers.

  15. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  16. Purification of nattokinase by reverse micelles extraction from fermentation broth: effect of temperature and phase volume ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Guo; Xing, Jian-Min; Chang, Tian-Shi; Liu, Hui-Zhou

    2006-03-01

    Nattokinase is a novel fibrinolytic enzyme that is considered to be a promising agent for thrombosis therapy. In this study, reverse micelles extraction was applied to purify and concentrate nattokinase from fermentation broth. The effects of temperature and phase volume ratio used for the forward and backward extraction on the extraction process were examined. The optimal temperature for forward and backward extraction were 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C respectively. Nattokinase became more thermosensitive during reverse micelles extraction. And it could be enriched in the stripping phase eight times during backward extraction. It was found that nattokinase could be purified by AOT reverse micelles with up to 80% activity recovery and with a purification factor of 3.9.

  17. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 6 Appendix E - Historical Minimum Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  18. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 4 Appendix C - Historical Maximum Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  19. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 2 Appendix A - Historical Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  20. TiO2 film properties as a function of processing temperature, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbons, E. T.; Sladek, K. J.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Thin film TiO2 was produced at 150 C by chemical vapor deposition using hydrolysis of tetraisopropyl titanate. Films were amorphous as grown, but annealing in air caused crystallization, with anatase formed beginning at 350 C and rutile at 700 C. Density and index of refraction increased substantially with increasing anneal temperature, while etch susceptibility in HF and H2SO4 decreased. Comparison with literature data showed two groups of processes. One group yields films having properties that gradually approach those of rutile with increasing process temperature. The other group gives rutile directly at moderate temperatures. Deposition of amorphous film followed by etching and annealing is suggested as a means for pattern definition.

  1. Results of temperature gradient and heat flow in Santiam Pass Area, Oregon, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B.L.; Gardner, M.C.; Koenig, J.B.

    1981-08-01

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) There is a weakly defined thermal anomaly within the area examined by temperature-gradient holes in the Santiam Pass area. This is a relict anomaly showing differences in permeability between the High Cascades and Western Cascades areas, more than a fundamental difference in shallow crustal temperatures. (2) The anomaly as defined by the 60 F isotherms at 400 feet follows a north-south trend immediately westward of the Cascade axis in the boundary region. It is clear that all holes spudded into High Cascades rocks result in isothermal and reversal gradients. Holes spudded in Western Cascades rocks result in positive gradients. (3) Cold groundwater flow influences and masks temperature gradients in the High Cascades to a depth of at least 700 feet, especially eastward from the major north-south trending faults. Pleistocene and Holocene rocks are very permeable aquifers. (4) Shallow gradient drilling in the lowlands westward of the faults provides more interpretable information than shallow drilling in the cold-water recharge zones. Topographic and climatological effects can be filtered out of the temperature gradient results. (5) The thermal anomaly seems to have 2 centers: one in the Belknap-Foley area, and one northward in the Sand Mountain area. The anomalies may or may not be connected along a north-south trend. (6) A geothermal effect is seen in holes downslope of the Western-High Cascade boundary. Mixing with cold waters is a powerful influence on temperature gradient data. (7) The temperature-gradient program has not yet examined and defined the geothermal resources potential of the area eastward of the Western Cascades-High Cascades boundary. Holes to 1500-2000 feet in depth are required to penetrate the high permeability-cold groundwater regime. (8) Drilling conditions are unfavorable. There are very few accessible level drill sites. Seasonal access problems and environmental restrictions together with frequent lost

  2. Influence of T-semi attached rib on turbulent flow and heat transfer parameters of a silver-water nanofluid with different volume fractions in a three-dimensional trapezoidal microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Habibollah; Karimipour, Arash; Safaei, Mohammad Reza; Semiromi, Davood Toghraie; Akbari, Omid Ali

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at exploring influence of T-semi attached rib on the turbulent flow and heat transfer parameters of a silver-water nanofluid with different volume fractions in a three-dimensional trapezoidal microchannel. For this purpose, convection heat transfer of the silver-water nanofluid in a ribbed microchannel was numerically studied under a constant heat flux on upper and lower walls as well as isolated side walls. Calculations were done for a range of Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 16,000, and in four different sorts of serrations with proportion of rib width to hole of serration width (R/W). The results of this research are presented as the coefficient of friction, Nusselt number, heat transfer coefficient and thermal efficiency, four different R/W microchannels. The results of numerical modeling showed that the fluid's convection heat transfer coefficient is increased as the Reynolds number and volume fraction of solid nanoparticle are increased. For R/W=0.5, it was also maximum for all the volume fractions of nanoparticle and different Reynolds numbers in comparison to other similar R/W situations. That's while friction coefficient, pressure drop and pumping power is maximum for serration with R/W=0 compared to other serration ratios which lead to decreased fluid-heat transfer performance.

  3. Fetal cardiac ventricular volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Neil; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S.; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Lee, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify fetal cardiovascular parameters with Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™) utilizing the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”. Study Design A cross-sectional study was designed consisting of patients with normal pregnancies between 19 and 40 weeks of gestation. After STIC datasets were acquired, analysis was performed offline (4DView) and the following cardiovascular parameters were evaluated: ventricular volume in end systole and end diastole, stroke volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction. To account for fetal size, cardiac output was also expressed as a function of head circumference, abdominal circumference, or femoral diaphysis length. Regression models were fitted for each cardiovascular parameter to assess the effect of gestational age and paired comparisons were made between the left and right ventricles. Results 1) Two hundred and seventeen patients were retrospectively identified, of whom 184 had adequate STIC datasets (85% acceptance); 2) ventricular volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and adjusted cardiac output increased with gestational age; whereas, the ejection fraction decreased as gestation advanced; 3) the right ventricle was larger than the left in both systole (Right: 0.50 ml, IQR: 0.2 – 0.9; vs. Left: 0.27 ml, IQR: 0.1 – 0.5; p<0.001) and diastole (Right: 1.20 ml, IQR: 0.7 – 2.2; vs. Left: 1.03 ml, IQR: 0.5 – 1.7; p<0.001); 4) there were no differences between the left and right ventricle with respect to stroke volume, cardiac output, or adjusted cardiac output; and 5) the left ventricular ejection fraction was greater than the right (Left: 72.2%, IQR: 64 – 78; vs. Right: 62.4%, IQR: 56 – 69; p<0.001). Conclusion Fetal echocardiography, utilizing STIC and VOCAL™ with the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”, allows assessment of fetal cardiovascular parameters. Normal fetal cardiovascular physiology is characterized by ventricular

  4. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  5. On the representative volume element of asphalt concrete at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasteanu, Mihai; Cannone Falchetto, Augusto; Velasquez, Raul; Le, Jia-Liang

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of characterizing asphalt mixtures' rheological and failure properties at low temperatures by means of the Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) is investigated in this paper. The main issue is the use of thin beams of asphalt mixture in experimental procedures that may not capture the true behavior of the material used to construct an asphalt pavement.

  6. Temperature and relative density of atomic hydrogen in a multicusp H sup minus volume source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneteau, A.M.; Hollos, G.; Bacal, M. (Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises, Laboratoire du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, (France)); Bretagne, J. (Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, LA73 du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France))

    1990-06-15

    The Balmer {beta} and {gamma} line shapes have been analyzed to determine the relative density and the temperature of hydrogen atoms in magnetic multicusp plasma generators. Results for a 90-V, 4--40-mTorr, 1--18-A conventional multicusp plasma generator and a 50-V, 4-mTorr, 1--15-A hybrid multicusp plasma generator are presented. The relative number density of hydrogen atoms increased smoothly with pressure and discharge current but never exceeded 10%. The absolute atomic number density in a 90-V 10-A discharge varied in proportion with pressure. The atomic temperature (in the 0.1--0.4-eV range) decreased with pressure and slowly increased with the discharge current. The role of atoms in the processes determining the H{sup {minus}} temperature and the H{sub 2} vibrational and rotational temperatures is discussed. The results confirm that in multicusp negative-ion sources collisional excitation of ground state atoms and molecules by energetic electrons is the dominant process in Balmer-{beta} and -{gamma} light emission.

  7. Atomic temperature and density in multicusp H sup minus volume sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneteau, A.M.; Hollos, G.; Leroy, R.; Berlemont, P.; Bacal, M. (Laboratoire du C.N.R.S., Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)); Bertagne, J. (Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, LA73 du CNRS, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France))

    1990-08-05

    The Balmer {beta} and {gamma} line shapes have been analyzed to determine the relative density and the temperature of hydrogen atoms in magnetic multicusp plasma generators. Results for a 90 V, 4--40 mTorr, 1--18 A conventional multicusp plasma generator and a 50 V, 4 mTorr, 1--15 A hybrid multicusp plasma generator are presented. The relative number density of hydrogen atoms increases smoothly with pressure and discharge current but never exceeds 10%. The absolute atomic number density in a 90 V--10 A discharge varies in proportion with pressure. The atomic temperature (in the 0.1--0.4 eV range) decreases with pressure and slowly increases with the discharge current. The role of atoms in the processes determining the H{sup {minus}} temperature and the H{sub 2} vibrational and rotational temperatures is discussed. The results confirm that in multicusp negative ion sources collisional excitation of ground-state atoms and molecules by energetic electrons is the dominant process in Balmer {beta} and {gamma} light emission.

  8. Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The results are presented of an exhaustive literature search and evaluation concerning the properties and economics of commercially available nonmetallic well casing and screens. These materials were studied in terms of their use in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction.

  9. Influence of the temperature, volume and type of solution in the mercury vaporization of dental amalgam residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Raquel dalla [Department of Chemical Engineering, State University of Maringa, Maringa - PR (Brazil)], E-mail: raqueldc_eng@yahoo.com.br; Cossich, Eneida Sala; Tavares, Celia Regina Granhen [Department of Chemical Engineering, State University of Maringa, Maringa - PR (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    One of the qualitative methods for the identification of mercury vapor is what it occurs as a way of chemical reaction between palladium chloride and metallic mercury. Palladium chloride ribbons with yellowish coloration put in contact with the vaporized mercury of dental amalgam residue, liberates palladium and forms mercury chloride in your surface, and starts to have black coloration; this form identify the presence of the mercury vapor in the system. This work studies the influence of temperature, volume and type of barrier-solution in the vaporization of mercury during the period of storage of dental amalgam residues, aiming to establish the best conditions for storage of these residues. It was found that for all tested solutions, the longest storage times without any occurrence of mercury vaporization were obtained in the lowest temperatures tested and the largest solution volumes of barrier-solution. The radiographic effluent presented bigger efficacy in the reduction of the volatilization, increasing the period when the residue was stored, however the analysis of this solution after the vaporization test showed the presence of organic mercury. These results show that water is the most efficient barrier against the vaporization of mercury, since it did not result in organic mercury formation in the effluent solution from the storage process.

  10. KRISTALISASI PELARUT SUHU RENDAH PADA PEMBUATAN FRAKSI KAYA VITAMIN E MENGANDUNG TOKOTRIENOL DARI DISTILAT ASAM LEMAK MINYAK SAWIT [Low Temperature Solvent Crystallizationin Tocotrienol Containing Vitamin E Rich Fraction Preparation from Palm Fatty Acid Distillate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kgs Ahmadi1*,

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD is a by-product of physical refining of CPO (Crude Palm Oil in deodorization process. PFAD is a potential source of natural vitamin E, that besides tocopherol, also contains tocotrienol. Both have functions as antioxidant and vitamin. This research studied a method for obtaining vitamin E rich fraction that contained tocotrienol by low temperature hexane solvent crystallization. The elucidation factors were ratio of solvent to unsaponifiable fraction of PFAD(5:1, 6:1, and 7:1 and crystallization temperature (-20, -10, and 0°C. The experiment was conducted in factorial completely randomized design. The research showed that PFAD contains high tocotrienol. Low temperature solvent crystallization of unsaponifiable fraction gave 33.88% increase ofvitamin E concentration compared to control. Temperature and ratio of solvent to unsaponifiable fraction affected enrichment of vitamin E in PFAD. Later, saponification increased vitamin E content in unsaponifiable fraction of PFAD. Enrichment of tocopherol was higher than that of tocotrienol, supposed as a result of improper separation process in crystallization stage. Modulation of Vitamin E concentration during saponification of PFAD increased antioxidant activity compared to unsaponifiable fraction. The best result was achieved at ratio of solvent to unsaponifiable fraction of 6:1 and crystallization temperature of -10°C.

  11. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies.

  12. X-ray diffraction and electroresistance measurements under high pressure and temperature using a large-volume cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principi, E; Minicucci, M [CNISM, CNR-INFM SOFT and Dipartimento di Fisica Universita degli Studi di Camerino via Madonna delle Carceri 62032, Camerino (Italy); Di Cicco, A

    2008-07-15

    In this communication we report about original experimental techniques for in-house x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements under high-temperature and high pressure conditions, using large volume cells in the opposite anvil recessed geometry. The high-pressure devices we are currently using are a compact Paris-Edinburgh (PE) V5 150 Tons press and a 50 Tons standard hydraulic press, coupled usually with WC anvils and 10 mm or 7 mm boron-epoxy or pyrophyllite biconical gaskets for x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements respectively. Limiting pressures, using such a non-toroidal sample assembly and WC anvils, are about 10 GPa on samples of large sizes (10-20 mm{sup 3}). Samples can be heated using an hollow graphite cylinder as a crucible reaching temperatures as high as 2300 K, while the temperature can be measured up to 1300 K by using a K-type thermocouple. The highly automated setup developed for resistance measurements is described in details. In particular, we present electroresistance measurements of Bi melting under pressure and measurements of the Ge and LiF EOS (equation of state) at high temperature and pressure obtained using x-ray diffraction showing the sensitivity of the techniques. The relevance of these experiments to the exploitation of the potential of equipments available at synchrotron radiation facilities is emphasized.

  13. Additional experiments on flowability improvements of aviation fuels at low temperatures, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockemer, F. J.; Deane, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study flow improver additives and scale-model fuel heating systems for use with aviation hydrocarbon fuel at low temperatures. Test were performed in a facility that simulated the heat transfer and temperature profiles anticipated in wing fuel tanks during flight of long-range commercial aircraft. The results are presented of experiments conducted in a test tank simulating a section of an outer wing integral fuel tank approximately full-scale in height, chilled through heat exchange panels bonded to the upper and lower horizontal surfaces. A separate system heated lubricating oil externally by a controllable electric heater, to transfer heat to fuel pumped from the test tank through an oil-to-fuel heat exchanger, and to recirculate the heated fuel back to the test tank.

  14. A high-throughput platform for low-volume high-temperature/pressure sealed vessel solvent extractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damm, Markus [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microwave Chemistry (CDLMC) and Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Kappe, C. Oliver, E-mail: oliver.kappe@uni-graz.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microwave Chemistry (CDLMC) and Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parallel low-volume coffee extractions in sealed-vessel HPLC/GC vials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extractions are performed at high temperatures and pressures (200 Degree-Sign C/20 bar). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid caffeine determination from the liquid phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Headspace analysis of volatiles using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). - Abstract: A high-throughput platform for performing parallel solvent extractions in sealed HPLC/GC vials inside a microwave reactor is described. The system consist of a strongly microwave-absorbing silicon carbide plate with 20 cylindrical wells of appropriate dimensions to be fitted with standard HPLC/GC autosampler vials serving as extraction vessels. Due to the possibility of heating up to four heating platforms simultaneously (80 vials), efficient parallel analytical-scale solvent extractions can be performed using volumes of 0.5-1.5 mL at a maximum temperature/pressure limit of 200 Degree-Sign C/20 bar. Since the extraction and subsequent analysis by either gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass detection (GC-MS or LC-MS) is performed directly from the autosampler vial, errors caused by sample transfer can be minimized. The platform was evaluated for the extraction and quantification of caffeine from commercial coffee powders assessing different solvent types, extraction temperatures and times. For example, 141 {+-} 11 {mu}g caffeine (5 mg coffee powder) were extracted during a single extraction cycle using methanol as extraction solvent, whereas only 90 {+-} 11 were obtained performing the extraction in methylene chloride, applying the same reaction conditions (90 Degree-Sign C, 10 min). In multiple extraction experiments a total of {approx}150 {mu}g caffeine was extracted from 5 mg commercial coffee powder. In addition to the quantitative caffeine determination, a comparative qualitative analysis of the liquid phase coffee

  15. Effects of gelation temperature on Mozzarella-type curd made from buffalo and cows' milk: 2. Curd yield, overall quality and casein fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Imtiaz; Yan, Jen; Grandison, Alistair S; Bell, Alan E

    2012-12-01

    The overall quality of Mozzarella-type curds made from buffalo and cows' milks were measured at gelation temperatures of 28, 34 and 39°C, and cutting times of 45, 60, 75 and 90min after chymosin addition. The curd yield and moisture content decreased with increasing gelation temperature, while whey fat losses increased. The effect of higher gelation temperature (39°C) was more pronounced in cows' milk than buffalo milk. This results in more fat losses and lower yields in both milk samples at a gelation temperature of 39°C. The minimum losses of fat and protein in rennet whey occurred at a gelation temperature of 34°C in both milk samples. The curd yield was higher in buffalo milk as compared to cows' milk. This is due to difference in total solids (fat and protein contents) of the two types of bovine milk. The different cutting times had a small effect on the yield and overall quality of curds made from both milk types. Curd moisture and loss tangent have a strong relationship with respect to effects of gelation temperature. Two different curd drainage methods (centrifugation and Buchner funnel filtration) were used to compare the final overall quality of Mozzarella-type curds made from both milk types. The α(s1) and β casein fractions were found to be in different proportions in the two milk types. The total- and casein bound-calcium were higher in buffalo milk than cows' milk. The total protein, casein and fat were also found to be higher in buffalo milk than cows' milk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 高温下非传统稳定同位素分馏%Non-traditional stable isotope fractionation at high temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄方

    2011-01-01

    The last ten years have seen big progress and wide applications of a novel field, non-traditional stable isotope (NTSI) geochemistry, to high temperature geo-science studies. Invention of multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) led to the big breakthrough of analytical methods for heavy stable isotopes. This contribution summarizes Ii, Fe, and Mg isotope studies on igneous rocks and minerals, as representative of NTSI geochemistry. Ii isotopes have been widely applied to the studies of mantle geochemistry, recycling of subducted materials, and metamorphism to constrain the source of magma and kinetic diffusion process. Fe isotope fractionation is related to partitioning of multi-valent Fe between Fe-bearing phases, which can occur in the course of mantle metasomatism, partial melting, and fractional crystallization. Mg isotopic compositions of igneous rocks most likely reflect the source signatures. Variation of Mg isotopic ratios of mantle peridotites is trivial and this provides a homogenous background for Mg isotope fractionation in low temperature processes. Furthermore, Cl, Si, Cu, Ca, and U isotopes are also promising in the future geochemical studies. Experimental studies and theoretical simulation for the mechanisms of isotope fractionation provide important guidances for understanding the NTIS data. Experimental studies show that light and heavy isotopes have different migration velocity at high temperature processes such as chemical diffusion, evaporation, and desublimation, which could produce significant kinetic isotope fractionation. Equilibrium isotopic fractionation could occur among mineral, melt, and fluid when chemical environment of the isotopes are different between the phases. Recent thermal diffusion and migration experiments on silicate material reveal a " new" mechanism of magma differentiation and isotope fractionation. Along a temperature gradient in silicate magma, large elemental variation and isotopic

  17. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com; Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  18. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: animal tissue evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Robert Y; McDonald, Nancy; Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν¯fat) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν¯fat in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μs of the remaining fatless tissue. The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, νfat for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν¯fat were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10(-5) sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μs was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μs of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μs of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. For chicken and beef composites, ν¯fat=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μs for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μs of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the differences did not vary from zero in a statistically significant way thereby validating the methods. The methodology to

  19. A study of partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol at various temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M L Parmar; R K Awasthi; M K Guleria

    2004-01-01

    Partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid have been determined in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% by weight of ethanol) at different temperatures and acid concentrations from the solution density measurements. The data have been evaluated by using Masson equation and the obtained parameters have been interpreted in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The partial molar volumes vary with temperature as a power series of temperature. Structure making/breaking capacities of the organic acids have been inferred from the sign of [2$\\phi^{0}_{v}$/2], i.e. secondderivative of partial molar volume with respect to temperature at constant pressure. Both the organic acids behave as structure breakers in water and water + ethanol.

  20. Automated quantification of aortic regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction using the digital colour Doppler velocity profile integration method in patients with aortic regurgitation

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, Y.; Hozumi, T; Mori, I.; Sugioka, K; Yamamuro, A; Akasaka, T; Homma, S; Yoshida, K.; Yoshikawa, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: The recently introduced automated cardiac flow measurement (ACM) technique provides a quick and an accurate automated calculation of stroke volume and cardiac output. This is obtained by spatio-temporal integration of digital Doppler velocity profile data.

  1. Assessment of mass fraction and melting temperature for the application of limestone concrete and siliceous concrete to nuclear reactor basemat considering molten core-concrete interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jae; Kim, Do Gyeum [Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Leon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung Suk [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core-concrete interaction analysis.

  2. Effect of High-Temperature Curing Methods on the Compressive Strength Development of Concrete Containing High Volumes of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonsuk Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the high-temperature curing methods on the compressive strength of concrete containing high volumes of ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS. GGBS was used to replace Portland cement at a replacement ratio of 60% by binder mass. The high-temperature curing parameters used in this study were the delay period, temperature rise, peak temperature (PT, peak period, and temperature down. Test results demonstrate that the compressive strength of the samples with PTs of 65°C and 75°C was about 88% higher than that of the samples with a PT of 55°C after 1 day. According to this investigation, there might be optimum high-temperature curing conditions for preparing a concrete containing high volumes of GGBS, and incorporating GGBS into precast concrete mixes can be a very effective tool in increasing the applicability of this by-product.

  3. Use of a theoretical equation of state to interpret time-dependent free volume in polymer glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curro, J.G.; Lagasse, R.R.; Simha, R.

    1981-10-01

    Many physical properties of polymer glasses change spontaneously during isothermal aging by a process commonly modeled as collapse of free volume. The model has not been verified rigorously because free volume cannot be unambiguously measured. In the present investigation we tentatively identify the free-volume fraction with the fraction of empty sites in the equation of state of Simha and Somcynsky. With this theory, volume recovery measurements can be analyzed to yield directly the time-dependent, free-volume fraction. Using this approach, recent volume measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) are analyzed. The resulting free-volume fractions are then used in the Doolittle equation to predict the shift in stress relaxation curves at 23 /sup 0/C. These predicted shift factors agree with the experimental measurements of Cizmecioglu et al. In addition, it is shown that previous assumptions concerning temperature dependence of free volume are inconsistent with the theory.

  4. Use of a theoretical equation of state to interpret time-dependent free volume in polymer glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curro, J. G.; Lagasse, R. R.; Simha, R.

    1981-10-01

    Many physical properties of polymer glasses change spontaneously during isothermal aging by a process commonly modeled as collapse of free volume. The model has not been verified rigorously because free volume cannot be unambiguously measured. In the present investigation we tentatively identify the free-volume fraction with the fraction of empty sites in the equation of state of Simha and Somcynsky. With this theory, volume recovery measurements can be analyzed to yield directly the time-dependent, free-volume fraction. Using this approach, recent volume measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) are analyzed. The resulting free-volume fractions are then used in the Doolittle equation to predict the shift in stress relaxation curves at 23 °C. These predicted shift factors agree with the experimental measurements of Cizmecioglu et al. In addition, it is shown that previous assumptions concerning temperature dependence of free volume are inconsistent with the theory.

  5. Dynamic behaviors of various volume rate steel-fiber reinforced reactive powder concrete after high temperature burnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Baojun; Wang, Liwen; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic strain-stress curves of reactive powder concrete under high strain rate (10/s-100/s) were determined by improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A plumbum pulse shaper was used to ensure the symmetrical stress in the specimens before fracture and avoid the fluctuation of test data due to input shaky stress pulse. A time modified method was induced for data processing in order to get accurate SHPB results. The results of experiment showed after high temperature burnt, different volume rate (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%) steel-fiber reinforced reactive power concrete had the same changing tendency of residual mechanics behaviors, e.g. after 400 centigrade burnt, the residual compression strength was about 70% of material strength without burnt under 100/s. After 800 centigrade burnt, the compression strength is about 30% under 100/s while the deformation ability increased. At meanwhile, steel fiber had improved the mechanism of reinforcing effect and toughening effect of concrete material after burnt. With increasing of steel fiber volume rate, dynamic residual behavior of samples was improved. Microcosmic characteristics and energy absorption were induced for explaining the experiment results.

  6. Chemical and isotopic fractionation of wet andesite in a temperature gradient: Experiments and models suggesting a new mechanism of magma differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Lundstrom, C. C.; Glessner, J.; Ianno, A.; Boudreau, A.; Li, J.; Ferré, E. C.; Marshak, S.; DeFrates, J.

    2009-02-01

    Piston-cylinder experiments were conducted to investigate the behavior of partially molten wet andesite held within an imposed temperature gradient at 0.5 GPa. In one experiment, homogenous andesite powder (USGS rock standard AGV-1) with 4 wt.% H 2O was sealed in a double capsule assembly for 66 days. The temperature at one end of this charge was held at 950 °C, and the temperature at the other end was kept at 350 °C. During the experiment, thermal migration (i.e., diffusion in a thermal gradient) took place, and the andesite underwent compositional and mineralogical differentiation. The run product can be broadly divided into three portions: (1) the top third, at the hot end, contained 100% melt; (2) the middle-third contained crystalline phases plus progressively less melt; and (3) the bottom third, at the cold end, consisted of a fine-grained, almost entirely crystalline solid of granitic composition. Bulk major- and trace-element compositions change down temperature gradient, reflecting the systematic change in modal mineralogy. These changes mimic differentiation trends produced by fractional crystallization. The change in composition throughout the run product indicates that a fully connected hydrous silicate melt existed throughout the charge, even in the crystalline, cold bottom region. Electron Backscatter Diffraction analysis of the run product indicates that no preferred crystallographic orientation of minerals developed in the run product. However, a significant anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was observed, suggesting that new crystals of magnetite were elongated in the direction of the thermal gradient. Further, petrographic observation reveals alignment of hornblende parallel to the thermal gradient. Finally, the upper half of the run product shows large systematic variations in Fe-Mg isotopic composition reflecting thermal diffusion, with the hot end systematically enriched in light isotopes. The overall δ 56Fe IRMM-14 and δ 26Mg DSM-3

  7. Shaping of the axial power density distribution in the core to minimize the vapor volume fraction at the outlet of the VVER-1200 fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savander, V. I.; Shumskiy, B. E.; Pinegin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of decreasing the vapor fraction at the VVER-1200 fuel assembly outlet by shaping the axial power density field is considered. The power density field was shaped by axial redistribution of the concentration of the burnable gadolinium poison in the Gd-containing fuel rods. The mathematical modeling of the VVER-1200 core was performed using the NOSTRA computer code.

  8. Fractional Echoes

    CERN Document Server

    Karras, G; Billard, F; Lavorel, B; Siour, G; Hartmann, J -M; Faucher, O; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiple of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide the first experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  9. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  10. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  11. Fractional randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  12. 导流介质对VARTM复合材料纤维分布及空隙率的影响%Effects of Infusion Media on Fiber Volume Fraction Distribution and Void Content in Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖家美; 陈显明; 王德盼; 鄢冬冬; 王科

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the size of infusion media on resin flow behavior,fiber volume fraction distribution and void content in vacuum assisted resin transfer molding(VARTM) were studied.The results showed that with the increase of infusion media size, the resin flow rate increased exponentially;the fiber volume fraction showed a tendency to increase after the first decrease,and the infusion media boundary was just the high and low fiber volume fraction line;the void content increased first and then decreased and increased tremendously at last,varied from 3.86% to 19.92%.%研究了导流介质尺寸对真空辅助树脂传递模塑(VARTM)工艺中树脂流动行为的影响,以及对复合材料制品中纤维分布和空隙率的影响。结果表明,随着导流介质尺寸的增加,树脂在增强体中的流动速度加快,并呈现指数加速趋势;制品中纤维体积含量呈现先减少后增大的趋势,并且以导流介质边界为纤维体积含量高低的分界线;复合材料制品的空隙率范围在3.86%~19.92%,空隙率呈现先增大后减小再加速增大的趋势。

  13. High-temperature, large-volume, lavalike ash-flow tuffs without calderas in southwestern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekren, E.B.; McIntyre, David H.; Bennett, Earl H.

    1984-01-01

    Rhyolitic rocks were erupted from vents in and adjacent to the Owyhee Mountains and Owyhee Plateau of southwestern Idaho from 16 m.y. ago to about 10 m.y. ago. They were deposited on a highly irregular surface developed on a variety of basement rocks that include granitic rocks of Cretaceous age, quartz latite and rhyodacite tuffs and lava flows of Eocene age, andesitic and basaltic lava flows of Oligocene age, and latitic and basaltic lava flows of early Miocene age. The rhyolitic rocks are principally welded tuffs that, regardless of their source, have one feature in common-namely internal characteristics indicating en-masse, viscous lavalike flowage. The flowage features commonly include considerable thicknesses of flow breccia at the bases of various cooling units. On the basis of the tabular nature of the rhyolitic deposits, their broad areal extents, and the local preservation of pyroclastic textures at the bases, tops, and distal ends of some of the deposits, we have concluded that the rocks were emplaced as ash flows at extremely high temperatures and that they coalesced to liquids before final emplacement and cooling. Temperatures of l090?C and higher are indicated by iron-titanium oxide compositions. Rhyolites that are about 16 m.y. old are preserved mostly in the downdropped eastern and western flanks of the Silver City Range and they are inferred to have been erupted from the Silver City Range. They rarely contain more than about 2 percent phenocrysts that consist of quartz and subequal amounts of plagioclase and alkali feldspar; commonly, they contain biotite, and they are the only rhyolitic rocks in the area to do so. The several rhyolitic units that are 14 m.y. to about 10 m.y. old contain only pyroxene-principally ferriferous and intermediate pigeonites-as mafic constituents. The rhyolites of the Silver City Range comprise many cooling units, none of which can be traced for great distances. Rocks erupted from the Owyhee Plateau include two sequences

  14. 钢纤维掺量对活性粉末混凝土力学性能的影响%On the Influence of Steel Fiber Volume Fraction on Mechanical Properties of Reactive Powder Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠彦忠; 王德弘; 李秋晨; 贾玉琢; 肖琦

    2011-01-01

    Basic mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of reactive powder concrete were experimentally investigated.The influence of steel fiber volume fraction on mechanical properties of RPC was analyzed.A fitted relation expression between flexural strength and splitting tensile strength was obtained.A mathematical expression for compressive stress-strain curve of reactive powder concrete was established for different steel fiber volume fractions based on experimental analysis.Results show that compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of reactive powder concrete specimens increase along with the steel fiber content increase when the steel fiber volume fraction is in the range from 1.0 % to 3.5 %.When the steel fiber volume fraction is higher than 3.5%, its compressive strength decreases, the splitting tensile strength increases slightly, however, its flexural strength increases obviously.%通过实验研究了活性粉末混凝土的基本力学性能(杭压强度、劈拉强度和杭折强度),分析了钢纤维掺量对活性粉末混凝土力学性能的影响,拟合得到了杭折强度与劈拉强度之间的关系表达式.在实验分析的基础上,建立了不同钢纤维体积含量活性粉末混凝土受压应力-应变全曲线的数学表达式.研究结果表明:钢纤维体积含量在1.0%~3.5%之间时,活性粉末混凝土的抗压强度、臂拉强度和抗折强度均随着钢纤维掺量的增加而增大;当钢纤维体积含量超过3.5%后,活性粉末混凝土杭压强度下降,臂拉强度略有提高,而杭折强度仍有明显的提高.

  15. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  16. Partial molar volumes and partial molar adiabatic compressibilities of a short chain perfluorosurfactant: Sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Elena [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ruso, Juan M. [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: faruso@usc.es; Prieto, Gerardo [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sarmiento, Felix [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2005-12-15

    Density and ultrasound measurements of sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at T = (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, and 323.15) K have been obtained. From these results partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibilities were calculated. Deviations from the Debye-Hueckel limiting law provide evidence for limited association at lower concentrations. The change of the partial molar volume and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation was calculated. Variations of the change of partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation are discussed in terms of temperature.

  17. Results of volume-staged fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery for large complex arteriovenous malformations: obliteration rates and clinical outcomes of an evolving treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzin, Alberto; Panni, Pietro; Spatola, Giorgio; Vecchio, Antonella Del; Gallotti, Alberto L; Gigliotti, Carmen R; Cavalli, Andrea; Donofrio, Carmine A; Mortini, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE There are few reported series regarding volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for the treatment of large, complex, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The object of this study was to report the results of using volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery for patients affected by large and complex AVMs. METHODS Data from 20 patients with large AVMs were prospectively included in the authors' AVM database between 2004 and 2012. A staging strategy was used when treating lesion volumes larger than 10 cm(3). Hemorrhage and seizures were the presenting clinical feature for 6 (30%) and 8 (40%) patients, respectively. The median AVM volume was 15.9 cm(3) (range 10.1-34.3 cm(3)). The mean interval between stages (± standard deviation) was 15 months (± 9 months). The median margin dose for each stage was 20 Gy (range 18-25 Gy). RESULTS Obliteration was confirmed in 8 (42%) patients after a mean follow-up of 45 months (range 19-87 months). A significant reduction (> 75%) of the original nidal volume was achieved in 4 (20%) patients. Engel Class I-II seizure status was reported by 75% of patients presenting with seizures (50% Engel Class I and 25% Engel Class II) after radiosurgery. After radiosurgery, 71.5% (5/7) of patients who had presented with a worsening neurological deficit reported a complete resolution or amelioration. None of the patients who presented acutely because of hemorrhage experienced a new bleeding episode during follow-up. One (5%) patient developed radionecrosis that caused sensorimotor hemisyndrome. Two (10%) patients sustained a bleeding episode after GKRS, although only 1 (5%) was symptomatic. High nidal flow rate and a time interval between stages of less than 11.7 months were factors significantly associated with AVM obliteration (p = 0.021 and p = 0.041, respectively). Patient age younger than 44 years was significantly associated with a greater than 75% reduction in AVM volume but not with AVM obliteration (p = 0

  18. Effect of high temperature curing on the compressive strength of concrete incorporating large volumes of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Villarreal, R. [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The effect of using different types of heat treatment on the compressive strength of concrete with and without large volumes of fly ash was studied. Curing of concrete is important to obtain a good quality concrete, but it is important to keep concrete from drying until the originally water-filled space in fresh cement paste has been filled to the desired extent by the products of hydration. In hot weather, high temperature promotes faster drying of concrete so a given degree of hydration is reached more rapidly than at lower temperatures. The provision of moist curing is advantageous because of a gradual gain in strength and because of reduced plastic shrinkage and drying shrinkage-cracking. The portland cement content in all the mixtures used in this study was 200 kg per cubic metre and the amount of fly ash varied from 0 to 33, 43, 50 and 56 per cent by mass of the total binder. A superplasticizer was used to obtain 200-220 mm slump. The compressive strength was tested at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 days and at 6 months. Results showed that, using ASTM standard curing, the compressive strength of portland cement concrete made at 35 degrees C was reduced by about 12 per cent at 28 days compared to that of the concrete made at 23 degrees C. The AASHTO curing strength was found to be a bit higher than with the ASTM curing. The concrete made at 35 degrees C showed no loss of strength when continuous moist-curing was applied. The fly ash concrete mixtures that were cast at 35 degrees C were cured by covering them with membrane curing compounds and placed under ambient conditions. It was crucial to allow enough curing water to promote the pozzolanic reaction. The membrane curing did not allow the ingress of water to the concrete mass. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 13 figs.

  19. Giant volume magnetostriction and colossal magnetoresistance at room temperature in La(0.7)Ba(0.3)MnO(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demin, R V; Koroleva, L I; Mukovskii, Ya M

    2005-01-12

    Giant volume magnetostriction at room temperature is found for the first time in a La(0.7)Ba(0.3)MnO(3) single crystal, achieving 2.54 × 10(-4) in a magnetic field of 8.2 kOe. An even greater value of the volume magnetostriction, equal to 4 × 10(-4) in the same magnetic field, is observed at the Curie point T(C) = 310 K.Volume magnetostriction and magnetoresistance exhibit similar dependences on temperature and magnetic field in the T(C)-region, that is explained by the presence in this compound of a magnetic two-phase ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic state due to strong s-d exchange.

  20. High-throughput sequencing-based microbial characterization of size fractionated biomass in an anoxic anammox reactor for low-strength wastewater at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenru; Yang, Dianhai; Chen, Wenjing; Gu, Xiao

    2017-05-01

    The microbial characterization of three size-fractionated sludge obtained from a suspended-growth anoxic anammox reactor treating low-strength wastewater at low temperatures were investigated by using high-throughput sequencing. Particularly, the spatial variability in relative abundance of microorganisms involved in nitrogen metabolism were analyzed in detail. Results showed that population segregation did occur in the reactor. It was found, for the first time, that the genus Nitrotoga was enriched only in large granules (>400μm). Three anammox genus including Candidatus Jettenia, Brocadia and Kuenenia were detected. Among them, Candidatus Brocadia and Kuenenia preferred to grow in large-sized granules (>400μm), whereas Candidatus Jettenia dominated in small- and moderate-sized sludge (<400μm). The members of genus Candidatus Jettenia appeared to play the vital role in nitrogen removal, since sludge with diameters smaller than 400μm accounted for 81.55% of the total biomass. However, further studies are required to identify the activity of different-size sludge.

  1. Studi Numerik Karakteristik Pengeringan Batubara pada Fluidized Bed Coal Dyer Terhadap Pengaruh Variasi Temperatur Air Heater dengan Tube Heater Tersusun Staggered dan Perbandingan Volume Chamber dan Volume Batubara Sebesar 50%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Sarah Novrizqa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia mempunyai sumber daya batubara yang cukup besar dan sebagian besar sumber daya tersebut termasuk ke dalam batubara peringkat rendah berupa lignit dan sub-bituminus yang memiliki kadar air yang tinggi. Tingginya kadar air menyebabkan rendahnya nilai kalor, sehingga pemanfaatan batubara jenis ini menjadi terbatas dan sulit untuk dipasarkan. Oleh karena itu perlu adanya teknologi pengeringan yang dapat meningkatkan nilai kalor dari batubara tersebut. Dalam proses pengeringan akan melibatkan perpindahan panas dan massa. Proses ini akan didefinisikan dalam suatu studi numerik, dimana penelitian ini dilakukan dengan metode numerik dengan software Fluent 6.3.26. Pemilihan kondisi simulasi digunakan model turbulensi k-ε realizable dan skema interpolasi first-order upwind. Serta mempelajari pengaruh temperatur inlet udara pengering yang divariasikan. Variasi temperatur adalah 316 K, 327 K, 339 K. Dari penelitian ini  dapat diketahui nilai drying rate serta pengaruh temperatur dan posisi batubara dalam proses pengeringan pada drying chamber fluidized bed coal dryer dengan tube heater tersusun staggered serta pengaruh dari perbandingan volume batubara dengan volume chamber sebesar 50%. Moisture content batubara yang paling banyak berkurang dialami oleh temperature outlet terbesar yaitu 339 K dari 0,22 hingga 0,0167. Laju pengeringan yang memiliki waktu paling cepat yaitu pada temperatur 339 K, sekitar 1100 detik, sedangkan yang memiliki waktu paling lama yaitu pada temperatur 316 K, sekitar 4600 detik.

  2. Temperature-controlled micro-TLC: a versatile green chemistry and fast analytical tool for separation and preliminary screening of steroids fraction from biological and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Slączka, Magdalena M; Zarzycka, Magdalena B; Bartoszuk, Małgorzata A; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta; Baran, Michał J

    2011-11-01

    This paper is a continuation of our previous research focusing on development of micro-TLC methodology under temperature-controlled conditions. The main goal of present paper is to demonstrate separation and detection capability of micro-TLC technique involving simple analytical protocols without multi-steps sample pre-purification. One of the advantages of planar chromatography over its column counterpart is that each TLC run can be performed using non-previously used stationary phase. Therefore, it is possible to fractionate or separate complex samples characterized by heavy biological matrix loading. In present studies components of interest, mainly steroids, were isolated from biological samples like fish bile using single pre-treatment steps involving direct organic liquid extraction and/or deproteinization by freeze-drying method. Low-molecular mass compounds with polarity ranging from estetrol to progesterone derived from the environmental samples (lake water, untreated and treated sewage waters) were concentrated using optimized solid-phase extraction (SPE). Specific bands patterns for samples derived from surface water of the Middle Pomerania in northern part of Poland can be easily observed on obtained micro-TLC chromatograms. This approach can be useful as simple and non-expensive complementary method for fast control and screening of treated sewage water discharged by the municipal wastewater treatment plants. Moreover, our experimental results show the potential of micro-TLC as an efficient tool for retention measurements of a wide range of steroids under reversed-phase (RP) chromatographic conditions. These data can be used for further optimalization of SPE or HPLC systems working under RP conditions. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that micro-TLC based analytical approach can be applied as an effective method for the internal standard (IS) substance search. Generally, described methodology can be applied for fast fractionation or screening of the

  3. Ethanol-gasoline volume fraction estimation of vehicles%车用乙醇汽油体积分数估计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑太雄; 王波; 李永福; 陈琳

    2015-01-01

    为获得精确的乙醇体积分数,在发动机进气模型的基础上,设计了高增益观测器估计歧管压力,并对观测器误差进行了收敛性和稳定性分析。设计PI控制器对空燃比进行控制,使过量空气系数趋于理论值。利用PI控制器输出的燃油反馈信号,通过积分清零运算得出化学计量空燃比(Rs ),根据 Rs 与乙醇体积分数的关系计算得出乙醇体积分数估计值。仿真结果表明:乙醇体积分数估计时间在2s以内,估计误差绝对值小于1%,满足汽车的排放性和经济性要求。%For acquiring a precise estimation of ethanol proportion , based on the engine air charge model ,the high gain observer was designed to estimate the manifold absolute pressure ,and property of convergence and stability were analyzed to the observer errors .PI controller was proposed to con‐trol the air to fuel ratio ,which compelled the excess air coefficient to the theoretical value .After‐wards ,the fuel feedback signal from the PI control was utilized ,and the stoichiometric air‐to‐fuel rati‐o (Rs ) was achieved through the integral zero clearing operation .At last ,ethanol volume fracrion es‐timation value was calculated based on the relationship between the Rs and the ethanol volume fracri‐on .Simulation results show that the estimated time of the ethanol volume fracrion is within 2 s ,and the absolute value of the estimated error is less than 1% ,w hich meets the emissions and fuel economy of the vehicles .

  4. Effects of slice orientation on reproducibility of sequential assessment of right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction: short-axis vs transverse SSFP cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Luigia; Lamacie, Mariana M; Jimenez Juan, Laura; Deva, Djeven; Wald, Rachel M; Ley, Sebastian; Hanneman, Kate; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2016-09-22

    Test-retest reproducibility is of utmost importance in follow-up of right ventricular (RV) volumes and function; optimal slice orientation though is not yet known. We compared test-retest reproducibility and intra-/inter-observer variability of right ventricular (RV) volumes and function assessed with short-axis and transverse cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Eighteen volunteers underwent cine CMR for RV assessment obtaining ventricular coverage in short-axis and transverse slice orientation. Additional 2D phase contrast flow imaging of the main pulmonary artery (MPA) was performed. After complete repositioning repeat acquisitions were performed. Data sets were contoured by two blinded observers. Statistical analysis included Student's t-test, Bland-Altman plots, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and 2-way ANOVA, SEM and minimal detectable difference calculations. Heart rates (65.0 ± 7.4 vs. 67.6 ± 9.9 bpm; P = 0.1) and MPA flow (89.8 ± 16.6 vs. 87.2 ± 14.9 mL; P = 0.1) did not differ between imaging sessions. EDV and ESV demonstrated an inter-study bias of 0.4 %[-9.5 %,10.3 %] and 2.1 %[-12.3 %,16.4 %] for short-axis and 1.1 %[-7.3 %,9.4 %] and 0.8 %[-16.0 %,17.6 %] for transverse orientation, respectively. There was no significant interaction between imaging orientation and interstudy reproducibility (p = 0.395-0.824), intra-observer variability (p = 0.726-0.862) or inter-observer variability (p = 0.447-0.706) by 2-way ANOVA. Inter-observer agreement by ICC was greater for short axis versus transverse orientation for all parameters (0.769-0.986 vs. 0.625-0.983, respectively). Minimal detectable differences for short axis and transverse orientations were 10.1 mL/11.5 mL for EDV, 8.3 mL/8.4 mL for ESV and 4.1 % vs. 4.7 % for EF, respectively. Short-axis and transverse orientation both provide reliable and reproducible measures for follow-up of RV volumes and global function. Therefore

  5. Rate and peak concentrations of off-gas emissions in stored wood pellets--sensitivities to temperature, relative humidity, and headspace volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, Tumuluru Jaya; Bi, Xiaotao T; Lim, C Jim; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Melin, Staffan

    2009-11-01

    Wood pellets emit CO, CO(2), CH(4), and other volatiles during storage. Increased concentration of these gases in a sealed storage causes depletion of concentration of oxygen. The storage environment becomes toxic to those who operate in and around these storages. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature, moisture, and the relative size of storage headspace on emissions from wood pellets in an enclosed space. Twelve 10-l plastic containers were used to study the effects of headspace ratio (25, 50, and 75% of container volume) and temperatures (10-50 degrees C). Another eight containers were set in uncontrolled storage relative humidity (RH) and temperature. Concentrations of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) were measured by gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that emissions of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) from stored wood pellets are more sensitive to storage temperature than to RH and the relative volume of headspace. Higher peak emission factors are associated with higher temperatures. Increased headspace volume ratio increases peak off-gas emissions because of the availability of oxygen associated with pellet decomposition. Increased RH in the enclosed container increases the rate of off-gas emissions of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) and oxygen depletion.

  6. Fractional motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo I., E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il [Holon Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Shlesinger, Michael F., E-mail: mike.shlesinger@navy.mil [Office of Naval Research, Code 30, 875 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Brownian motion is the archetypal model for random transport processes in science and engineering. Brownian motion displays neither wild fluctuations (the “Noah effect”), nor long-range correlations (the “Joseph effect”). The quintessential model for processes displaying the Noah effect is Lévy motion, the quintessential model for processes displaying the Joseph effect is fractional Brownian motion, and the prototypical model for processes displaying both the Noah and Joseph effects is fractional Lévy motion. In this paper we review these four random-motion models–henceforth termed “fractional motions” –via a unified physical setting that is based on Langevin’s equation, the Einstein–Smoluchowski paradigm, and stochastic scaling limits. The unified setting explains the universal macroscopic emergence of fractional motions, and predicts–according to microscopic-level details–which of the four fractional motions will emerge on the macroscopic level. The statistical properties of fractional motions are classified and parametrized by two exponents—a “Noah exponent” governing their fluctuations, and a “Joseph exponent” governing their dispersions and correlations. This self-contained review provides a concise and cohesive introduction to fractional motions.

  7. A Coupled Mean Field / Gurson-Tvergaard Micromechanical Model For Ductile Fracture In Multiphase Materials With Large Volume Fraction of Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thibaut; Piérard, Olivier; Lani, Frédéric

    2007-04-01

    In the framework of the European project PROHIPP (New design and manufacturing processes for high pressure fluid power product — NMP 2-CT-2004-50546), CENAERO develops a library of constitutive models used to predict the mechanical response of a family of cast iron. The present contribution focuses on one particular microstructure, corresponding to a ferrite matrix containing spheroidal graphite and isolated inclusions of pearlite. An incremental mean field homogenisation scheme such as the one developed by Doghri and Ouaar is used. In the present application, the ferrite matrix is described by a Gurson type constitutive law (porous plasticity) while the pearlite inclusions are assumed to obey the classical isotropic J2 plasticity. The predictions of the micromechanical model are compared to the results of Finite Element simulations performed on three-dimensional representative volume elements (RVEs).

  8. Excess Molar Volume, Viscosity and Heat Capacity for the Binary Mixture of p-Xylene and Acetic Acid at Different Temperatures%对二甲苯和醋酸二元液体混合物在不同温度下的超额摩尔体积、粘度和热容

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨长生; 马沛生; 唐多强; 尹秋响; 赵长伟

    2002-01-01

    Experimental densities, viscosities and heat capacities at different temperatures were presented overthe entire range of mole fraction for the binary mixture of p-xylene and acetic acid. Density values were used in thedetermination of excess molar volumes, VE. At the same time, the excess viscosity and excess molar heat capacitieswere calculated. The values of VE, ηE and cpE were fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. Good agreements wereobserved. The excess molar volumes are positive with a large maximum value located in the central concentrationrange. The excess viscosity has an opposite trend to the excess molar volume VE. ηE values are negative over theentire range of the mixture. The cure of dependence of cEp on concentration has a special shape. The molecularinteraction between p-xylene and acetic acid is discussed.

  9. Evolution of shear bands, free volume, and structure in room temperature rolled Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuanli; Shi, Bo; Ma, Zhikun; Li, Jiangong, E-mail: lijg@lzu.edu.cn

    2015-01-19

    The evolution of the shear band, free volume, and structure in room temperature rolled Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass was investigated. It was found that the average shear band density increases monotonously with increasing strain. For the room temperature rolled Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass with a strain of 99%, a high density of shear bands with an average spacing of 31 nm was observed. The absolute free volume content was determined based on the free volume model and found to increase monotonously with increasing strain. The free volume content in the room temperature rolled Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass with a strain of 99% is 34% higher than its as-cast counterpart. Neither phase separation nor crystallization occurs in all the deformed samples. The coordination number of the first coordination shell decreases and the degree of disorder of atomic arrangement increases with increasing strain.

  10. Decoupling crystalline volume fraction and V{sub OC} in microcrystalline silicon pin solar cells by using a {mu}c-Si:F:H intrinsic layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Johnson, E.V.; Djeridane, Y.; Abramov, A.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2008-08-15

    Microcrystalline silicon thin film pin solar cells with a highly crystallized intrinsic {mu}c-Si:F:H absorber were prepared by RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition using SiF{sub 4} as the gas precursor. The cells were produced with a vacuum break between the doped layer and intrinsic layer depositions, and the effect of different subsequent interface treatment processes was studied. The use of an intrinsic {mu}c-Si:H p/i buffer layer before the first air break increased the short circuit current density from 22.3 mA/cm{sup 2} to 24.7 mA/cm{sup 2}. However, the use of a hydrogen-plasma treatment after both air breaks without an interface buffer layer improved both the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. Although the material used for the absorber layer showed a very high crystalline fraction and thus an increased spectral response at long wavelengths, an open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.523 V was nevertheless observed. Such a value of V{sub OC} is higher than is typically obtained in devices that employ a highly crystallized absorber as reported in the literature (see abstract figure). Using a hydrogen-plasma treatment, a single junction {mu}c-Si:F:H pin solar cell with an efficiency of 8.3% was achieved. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Polymer fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, A. F.

    1985-04-09

    Soluble polymers are fractionated according to molecular weight by cryogenically comminuting the polymer and introducing the polymer particles, while still in the active state induced by cryogenic grinding, into a liquid having a solvent power selected to produce a coacervate fraction containing high molecular weight polymer species and a dilute polymer solution containing lower molecular weight polymer species. The coacervate may be physically separated from the solution and finds use in the production of antimisting jet fuels and the like.

  12. Cooperative rearranging region size and free volume in As-Se glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiter, A; Saiter, J-M; Golovchak, R; Shpotyuk, M; Shpotyuk, O

    2009-02-18

    Glasses of the As-Se system have been used as model objects of the covalent disordered inorganic polymers to investigate the correlation between the cooperative rearranging region (CRR) size determined at the glass transition temperature and the free volume fraction in the glassy state. The CRR size has been determined using temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry data according to Donth's approach, while the free volume fraction in the investigated materials has been estimated using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy data. The obtained results testify that the appearance of open-volume defects greater than 80 Å(3) leads to a significant decrease in the CRR size.

  13. Cooperative rearranging region size and free volume in As-Se glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiter, A; Saiter, J-M [Laboratoire PBM, UMR 6522, LECAP, Institut des Materiaux de Rouen, Universite de Rouen, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Golovchak, R; Shpotyuk, M; Shpotyuk, O [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska street, Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)

    2009-02-18

    Glasses of the As-Se system have been used as model objects of the covalent disordered inorganic polymers to investigate the correlation between the cooperative rearranging region (CRR) size determined at the glass transition temperature and the free volume fraction in the glassy state. The CRR size has been determined using temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry data according to Donth's approach, while the free volume fraction in the investigated materials has been estimated using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy data. The obtained results testify that the appearance of open-volume defects greater than 80 A{sup 3} leads to a significant decrease in the CRR size.

  14. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes assessment: comparison with cardiac computed tomography; Comparacao entre a afericao da fracao de ejecao e dos volumes do ventriculo esquerdo, medidos com ecocardiografia tridimensional em tempo real e com tomografia computadorizada ultra-rapida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Marcelo L.C.; Nomura, Cesar H.; Tranchesi Junior, Bernardino; Oliveira, Wercules A. de; Naccarato, Gustavo; Serpa, Bruna S.; Cury, Alexandre; Passos, Rodrigo B.D.; Nobrega, Marcel V. da; Funari, Marcelo B.G.; Pfefermam, Abhaham; Makdisse, Marcia; Fischer, Claudio H.; Morhy, Samira S., E-mail: luiz766@terra.com.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    Background and objective: Few studies addressed the comparison between real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) concerning left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes assessment. We sought to compare both techniques regarding left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction function and volumes analysis. Methods: we studied by RT3DE (Philips IE 33, And, MA, USA) and by CCT (Toshiba, 64-slice, Otawara, Japan) 41 consecutive patients (29 males, 58 ± 11 yrs). We analysed by both techniques LVEF, LVEDV, LVESV. RT3DE and CCT data were compared by coefficients of determination (r: Pearson), Bland and Altman test and linear regression, 95% CI. Results: RT3DE data: LVEF ranged from 56.7 to 78.9 % (65.3 + 5.7 ); LVEDV ranged from 49.6 to 178.2 (88 + 27.5) mL; LVESV from 11.4 to 78 ( 33.9 + 13.7) mL. CCT data: LVEF ranged from 53 to 86 % (67.3 + 7.9 ); LVEDV ranged from 51 to 186 (106.4 + 30.7) mL; LVESV from 7 to 72 ( 35.1 + 13.8) mL. Correlations relative to RT3DE and CCT were: LVEF (r: 0. 7877, p<0.0001, 95 % CI 0.6327 to 0.8853 ); LVEDV (r:0.7671, p<0.0001, 95 % CI 0.5974 to 0.8745); LVESV (r: 0.8121, p<0.0001, 95 % CI 0.6659 to 0.8957). Conclusions: it was observed adequate correlation between real-time 3D echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography concerning ejection fraction and volumes assessment. (author)

  15. Comparison of multi-echo dixon methods with volume interpolated breath-hold gradient magnetic resonance imaging in fat-signal fraction quantification of paravaertebral muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Hak Sun; Lee, Young Han [Dept. of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-10-15

    To assess whether multi-echo Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with simultaneous T2{sup *} estimation and correction yields more accurate fat-signal fraction (FF) measurement of the lumbar paravertebral muscles, in comparison with non-T2{sup *}-corrected two-echo Dixon or T2{sup *}-corrected three-echo Dixon, using the FF measurements from single-voxel MR spectroscopy as the reference standard. Sixty patients with low back pain underwent MR imaging with a 1.5T scanner. FF mapping images automatically obtained using T2{sup *}-corrected Dixon technique with two (non-T2{sup *}-corrected), three, and six echoes, were compared with images from single-voxel MR spectroscopy at the paravertebral muscles on levels L4 through L5. FFs were measured directly by two radiologists, who independently drew the region of interest on the mapping images from the three sequences. A total of 117 spectroscopic measurements were performed either bilaterally (57 of 60 subjects) or unilaterally (3 of 60 subjects). The mean spectroscopic FF was 14.3 ± 11.7% (range, 1.9-63.7%). Interobserver agreement was excellent between the two radiologists. Lin's concordance correlation between the spectroscopic findings and all the imaging-based FFs were statistically significant (p < 0.001). FFs obtained from the T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequences showed a significantly better concordance with the spectroscopic data, with its concordance correlation coefficient being 0.99 and 0.98 (p < 0.001), as compared with two- or three-echo methods. T2{sup *}-corrected six-echo Dixon sequence would be a better option than two- or three-echo methods for noninvasive quantification of lumbar muscle fat quantification.

  16. Volume of larvae Is the most important single predictor of mass temperatures in the forensically important Calliphorid, Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, S. V.; Slone, D.H.; Capinera, J.L.; Turco, M. P.

    2017-01-01

    Calliphorid species form larval aggregations that are capable of generating heat above ambient temperature. We wanted to determine the relationship between volume, number of larvae, and different combinations of instars on larval mass heat generation. We compared different numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) larvae (40, 100, 250, 600, and 2,000), and different combinations of instars (∼50/50 first and second instars, 100% second instars, ∼50/50 second and third instars, and 100% third instars) at two different ambient temperatures (20 and 30 °C). We compared 13 candidate multiple regression models that were fitted to the data; the models were then scored and ranked with Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion. The results indicate that although instar, age, treatment temperature, elapsed time, and number of larvae in a mass were significant, larval volume was the best predictor of larval mass temperatures. The volume of a larval mass may need to be taken into consideration for determination of a postmortem interval.

  17. Volume of Larvae Is the Most Important Single Predictor of Mass Temperatures in the Forensically Important Calliphorid, Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, S V; Slone, D H; Capinera, J L; Turco, M P

    2017-01-01

    Calliphorid species form larval aggregations that are capable of generating heat above ambient temperature. We wanted to determine the relationship between volume, number of larvae, and different combinations of instars on larval mass heat generation. We compared different numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) larvae (40, 100, 250, 600, and 2,000), and different combinations of instars (∼50/50 first and second instars, 100% second instars, ∼50/50 second and third instars, and 100% third instars) at two different ambient temperatures (20 and 30 °C). We compared 13 candidate multiple regression models that were fitted to the data; the models were then scored and ranked with Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion. The results indicate that although instar, age, treatment temperature, elapsed time, and number of larvae in a mass were significant, larval volume was the best predictor of larval mass temperatures. The volume of a larval mass may need to be taken into consideration for determination of a postmortem interval.

  18. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  19. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, N. P.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.; Orton, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm-2s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm-2s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm-2s at TE  =  80, 100 ms scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms) T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  20. Development of SRC-I product analysis. Volume 2. Evaluation of analytical techniques for SRC-I characterization, recycle solvent studies, and product fractionation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweighardt, F.K.; Kingsley, I.S.; Cooper, F.E.; Kamzelski, A.Z.; Parees, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    A data analysis was performed to determine the relationship between the Wilsonville Solvent Quality test result and SRC liquefaction process parameters. The data base studied covers the years 1979 to 1982, Wilsonville runs 133 to 234. Only process-defined material balance data sets were included to best represent steady-state operation. Each material balance period provided 48 variables from which common process conditions were selected by imposing a range of acceptable deviations from a norm, e.g., a reactor hydrogen pressure of 2000 +- 100 psi. Data for all variables vs. solvent quality were plotted, and in some cases variables were compared with each other to determine common trends, e.g. gas production vs. hydrogen consumption. The plotted data produced no discernible trends. Separating the data by coal type (mine location) and identifying common process conditions with coal types still provided no absolute correlations with solvent quality. However, the effect of the weight percent pyrite present in the feed coal produced a consistent trend. A coal containing more than 1.2% pyrite and less than 0.1% sulfate sulfur yielded results in which any one correlation would cluster about a central point. It was observed that, on average, Kentucky Fies and Pyro mine coal and Indiana V coal clustered together, while Kentucky Lafayette and Dotiki mine coals clustered together. These data point clusters for the variables tested were nearly independent of reactor pressure, space rate, and temperature. One unusual observation of all the data points, independent of process conditions, was that at each change of feed coal, the sum of hydrocarbon and heteroatom gas production was greatest for the first 30 days, after which gas production reached a steady state dependent on process conditions, primarily temperature.

  1. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lijun, E-mail: lijunxu@buaa.edu.cn; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang [School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronic Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory of Precision Opto-Mechatronics Technology, Beijing 100191 (China); Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-01-15

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm{sup −1} (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm{sup −1} (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  2. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  3. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  4. Temperature monitoring in large volume spread footing foundations: case study "Parque da Cidade" - São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Couto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In recent years, the construction of foundation elements from large-volume reinforced concrete is becoming increasingly common. This implies a potential increase in the risk of cracks of thermal origin, due to the heat of hydration of cement. Under these circumstances, these concrete elements need to be treated using the mass concrete theory, widespread in dam construction, but little used when designing buildings. This paper aims to present a case study about the procedures and problems involved in the construction of a spread footing with a volume of approximately 800m³ designed for the foundation of a shopping center in São Paulo, Brazil.

  5. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  6. Journal of Superconductivity. Volume 8, Number 4. Special Issue: Miami University Workshop on High-Temperature Superconductivity. Part 1,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    complete numerical solutions Xxx- 2(T) and Xyy -2 (T) for an MMP superconductor as a of the BCS gap equation for the MMP model function of temperature. A...squares) The temperature and Xyy -2 show a linear temperature variation at low T dependence predicted for the anisotropic orthorhombic as is observed...processes in genetic material; radiosensitivity and new Editor-in-Chief: Y.M. Polukarov the manufacturing industry from a funda- methods of radio-protection

  7. Differentiation between focal malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of the spine with T2{sup *}-corrected fat-signal fraction map using a three -echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo dixon sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Kim, Sung Jun; Chung, Tae Sub; Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Choon Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kanneengiesser, Stephan [MR Applications Development, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Paek, Moon Young [Siemens Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Taek; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the feasibility of T2{sup *}-corrected fat-signal fraction (FF) map by using the three-echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo (VIBE) Dixon sequence to differentiate between malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of vertebrae. We assessed 32 lesions from 32 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging after being referred for assessment of a known or possible vertebral marrow abnormality. The lesions were divided into 21 malignant marrow-replacing lesions and 11 benign red marrow depositions. Three sequences for the parameter measurements were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR imaging scanner as follows: three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence for FF; conventional T1-weighted imaging for the lesion-disc ratio (LDR); pre- and post-gadolinium enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images for the contrast-enhancement ratio (CER). A region of interest was drawn for each lesion for parameter measurements. The areas under the curve (AUC) of the parameters and their sensitivities and specificities at the most ideal cutoff values from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were obtained. AUC, sensitivity, and specificity were respectively compared between FF and CER. The AUCs of FF, LDR, and CER were 0.96, 0.80, and 0.72, respectively. In the comparison of diagnostic performance between the FF and CER, the FF showed a significantly larger AUC as compared to the CER (p = 0.030), although the difference of sensitivity (p = 0.157) and specificity (p = 0.157) were not significant. Fat-signal fraction measurement using T2{sup *}-corrected three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence is feasible and has a more accurate diagnostic performance, than the CER, in distinguishing benign red marrow deposition from malignant bone marrow-replacing lesions.

  8. Defining the optimal conditions for catalytic cracking of oil fractions of different fraction and chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhorov, Yu.M.; Panchenkov, G.M.; Pivovarova, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    The optimum average benzene output for catalytic cracking (CC), temperature and speed of feed for raw materials of different fractions and chemical composition in the catalyzer KMTsP (microspher.) and Tseokar-2 (ball-type). Two gas oil fractions of different oils and a filtrate of paraffin production were used as raw materials. The CC was conducted in a device with an immovaeble layer of catalyzer at temperatures of 400-550/sup 0/ and a volume feed speed of 0.4-3.0 h/sup -1/. It is shown that during CC of more aromatic raw material, high temperatures are essential for benzene output. The values obtained from studying CC on catalyzer having the same chemistry but different fraction composition are the same. Using the Tseokar-2 resulted in a lower benzene output than was expected considering the chemical composition of the filtrate. This was due to the decrease in active Pv during coagulation of the catalyzer granules compared to the KMTsP. Conclusions are drawn concerning the need to consder the chemical composition of the cracking raw material before choosing the conditions for the process. The many cycle ArU is an undesirable component of the raw material and should be removed.

  9. Density and molar volumes of imidazolium-based ionic liquid mixtures and prediction by the Jouyban-Acree model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Noraini Abd; Sairi, Nor Asrina; Mat, Ahmad Nazeer Che; Khoubnasabjafari, Mehry; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2016-11-01

    The density of imidazolium-based ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethylphosphate with sulfolane were measured at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed at T= (293 - 343) K over the complete mole fractions. Physical and thermodynamic properties such as molar volumes, V0, and excess molar volumes, VE for this binary mixtures were derived from the experimental density data. The Jouyban-Acree model was exploited to correlate the physicochemical properties (PCPs) of binary mixtures at various mole fractions and temperatures.

  10. Densities and volume properties of (water + tert-butanol) over the temperature range of (274.15 to 348.15) K at pressure of 0.1 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, Gennadiy I., E-mail: gie@isc-ras.r [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Makarov, Dmitriy M. [Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics of Molecular and Ion-Molecular Solutions, Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Akademicheskaya Street, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The densities of {l_brace}water (1) + tert-butanol (2){r_brace} binary mixture were measured over the temperature range (274.15 to 348.15) K at atmospheric pressure using 'Anton Paar' digital vibrating-tube densimeter. Density measurements were carried out over the whole concentration range at (308.15 to 348.15) K. The following volume parameters were calculated: excess molar volumes and thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture, partial molar volumes and partial molar thermal isobaric expansivities of the components. Concentration dependences of excess molar volumes were fitted with Redlich-Kister equation. The results of partial molar volume calculations using four equations were compared. It was established that for low alcohol concentrations at T {<=} 208 K the inflection points at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.02 were observed at concentration dependences of specific volume. The concentration dependences of partial molar volumes of both water and tert-butanol had extremes at low alcohol content. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of water had some inversion at x{sub 2} {approx} 0.65. The temperature dependence of partial molar volumes of tert-butanol at infinite dilution had minimum at {approx}288 K. It was discovered that concentration dependences of thermal isobaric expansivities of the mixture at small alcohol content and low temperatures passed through minimum.

  11. pH-driven solubilization and isoelectric precipitation of proteins from the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima-effects of osmotic shock, water volume and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilg, Jenny Veide; Undeland, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    In the light of the global search for novel and sustainable protein sources, macroalgal proteins are becoming an attractive target. To date, mainly red and green macroalgae have been investigated in this respect, whereas the brown species are less studied, possibly because of the lower content of protein. In a biorefinery context, however, the protein content of brown macroalgae can still be economically interesting due to fast growth and the possibility to co-extract other compounds, such as alginates. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, scalable pH shift-based protein isolation technique applicable on wet Saccharina latissima biomass. Factors investigated were extraction volume, temperature, protein solubilization pH, osmoshock pretreatment and protein precipitation pH. Maximum protein solubility was obtained at pH 12, where 34 % of the total protein content could be extracted with 5.56 volumes of extraction solution (20 volumes on dry weight (dw) basis). Osmoshocking significantly increased the yield, and 20, 40 and 60 volumes of water (dw basis) gave 45.1, 46.8 and 59.5 % yield, respectively. The temperature during osmoshocking did not significantly affect the extraction yield, and extended time (16 vs. 1 or 2 h) reduced protein yield. Precipitation of solubilized proteins was possible below pH 4; the highest precipitation yield, 34.5 %, was obtained at pH 2. After combined alkaline extraction and acid precipitation, 16.01 % of the Saccharina proteins were recovered, which can be considered acceptable in comparison to other studies on algae but leaves some room for improvement when compared to protein extraction from, for instance, soy.

  12. Effect of Methanol Volume Fractions in Gasoline on Anti-Swelling Property of Rubber Materials%甲醇体积分数不同的甲醇汽油对橡胶材料膨胀性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊娥; 闫锋; 张文鹏

    2013-01-01

    Because of inherent characters of rubber materials,there exists some differences on anti-swelling property of rubber materials in gasoline with different methanol volume fraction.Immersion tests in gasoline 93# or gasoline with different methanol proportions are conducted to show the anti-swelling property of 3 rubber materials commonly used in motor vehicles.The results show that silicone rubber has better anti-swelling property in gasoline with high methanol proportion; on the contrary,fluorine rubber has good resistance to swelling in low-proportion-methanol gasoline; Nitrile Rubber has good antiswelling property in all gasoline with different proportion of methanol.%由于橡胶材料自身的特性不同,对甲醇体积分数不同的甲醇汽油的抗膨胀性存在差异,采用汽车上常见的3种橡胶材料分别在93#汽油和不同甲醇体积分数的甲醇汽油中进行浸泡实验.试验结果表明,硅橡胶在高比例甲醇汽油中抗膨胀性较好,氟橡胶在低比例甲醇汽油中抗膨胀性较好,而丁腈类橡胶在不同比例甲醇汽油中均有很好的抗膨胀性.

  13. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  14. Measurement and Modeling of Resistivity as a Microscale Tool to Quantify the Volume Fraction of Lenticular (alpha)' Particles in a Partially Transformed (delta)-phase Pu-Ga Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Johnson, D L; Mayhall, D J; Schwartz, A J

    2005-07-13

    We have measured and modeled the change in electrical resistivity due to partial transformation to the martensitic {alpha}{prime}-phase in a {delta}-phase Pu-Ga matrix. The primary objective is to relate the change in resistance, measured with a 4-probe technique during the transformation, to the volume fraction of the {alpha}{prime} phase created in the microstructure. Analysis by finite element methods suggests that considerable differences in the resistivity may be anticipated depending on the orientational and morphological configurations of the {alpha}{prime} particles. Finite element analysis of the computed resistance of an assembly of lenticular shaped particles indicates that series resistor or parallel resistor approximations are inaccurate and can lead to an underestimation of the predicted amount of {alpha}{prime} in the sample by 15% or more. Comparison of the resistivity of a simulated network of partially transformed grains or portions of grains suggests that a correction to the measured resistivity allows quantification of the amount of {alpha}{prime} phase in the microstructure with minimal consideration of how the {alpha}{prime} morphology may evolve. It is found that the average of the series and parallel resistor approximations provide the most accurate relationship between the measured resistivity and the amount of {alpha}{prime} phase. The methods described here are applicable to any evolving two-phase microstructure in which the resistance difference between the two phases is measurable.

  15. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 4 - Atlas of temperature / salinity frequency distributions (2 disc set) (NODC Accession 0101473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas presents more than 80,000 plots of the empirical frequency distributions of temperature and salinity for each 5-degree square area of the North Atlantic...

  16. Influence of temperature and pretreatments on the anaerobic digestion of wastewater grown microalgae in a laboratory-scale accumulating-volume reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Viljami; Craggs, Rupert; Rintala, Jukka

    2014-06-15

    This laboratory-scale study investigated the performance of a low-cost anaerobic digester for microalgae. Low (∼2%) solids content wastewater-grown microalgal biomass (MB) was digested in an unmixed, accumulating-volume reactor (AVR) with solid and liquid separation that enabled a long solids retention time. AVRs (2 or 20 L) were operated at 20 °C, 37 °C or ambient temperature (8-21 °C), and the influence of two pretreatments - low-temperature thermal (50-57 °C) and freeze-thaw - on algal digestion were studied. The highest methane yield from untreated MB was in the 37 °C AVR with 225 L CH4 kg volatile solids (VS)(-1), compared with 180 L CH4 kg VS(-1)added in a conventional, 37 °C completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and 101 L CH4 kg VS(-1)added in the 20 °C AVR. Freeze-thaw and low-temperature thermal pretreatments promoted protein hydrolysis and increased methane yields by 32-50% at 20 °C, compared with untreated MB. Pretreatments also increased the mineralisation of nitrogen (41-57%) and phosphorus (76-84%) during digestion. MB digestion at ambient temperature was comparable with digestion at 20 °C, until temperature dropped below 16 °C.

  17. The effect of different pyrolysis temperatures on the speciation and availability in soil of P in biochar produced from the solid fraction of manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Sander; Harmer, Sarah L; Bekiaris, Georgios;

    2017-01-01

    had little effect on P speciation; however, as the temperature increased above 600 °C, the P gradually became more thermodynamically stable in species such as apatite. At very high temperatures above 1000 °C, there were indications of reduced forms of P. Biochar production decreased the immediate...

  18. Volume-translated cubic EoS and PC-SAFT density models and a free volume-based viscosity model for hydrocarbons at extreme temperature and pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.; Soong, Yee; Baled, Hseen O.; Enick, Robert M.; Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; McHugh, Mark A.

    2013-12-01

    This research focuses on providing the petroleum reservoir engineering community with robust models of hydrocarbon density and viscosity at the extreme temperature and pressure conditions (up to 533 K and 276 MPa, respectively) characteristic of ultra-deep reservoirs, such as those associated with the deepwater wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Our strategy is to base the volume-translated (VT) Peng–Robinson (PR) and Soave–Redlich–Kwong (SRK) cubic equations of state (EoSs) and perturbed-chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) on an extensive data base of high temperature (278–533 K), high pressure (6.9–276 MPa) density rather than fitting the models to low pressure saturated liquid density data. This high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) data base consists of literature data for hydrocarbons ranging from methane to C{sub 40}. The three new models developed in this work, HTHP VT-PR EoS, HTHP VT-SRK EoS, and hybrid PC-SAFT, yield mean absolute percent deviation values (MAPD) for HTHP hydrocarbon density of ~2.0%, ~1.5%, and <1.0%, respectively. An effort was also made to provide accurate hydrocarbon viscosity models based on literature data. Viscosity values are estimated with the frictional theory (f-theory) and free volume (FV) theory of viscosity. The best results were obtained when the PC-SAFT equation was used to obtain both the attractive and repulsive pressure inputs to f-theory, and the density input to FV theory. Both viscosity models provide accurate results at pressures to 100 MPa but experimental and model results can deviate by more than 25% at pressures above 200 MPa.

  19. High Temperature Silicides and Refractory Alloys Symposium Held in Boston, Massachusetts on November 29 -December 2, 1993. Volume 322

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-02

    Kinetics, M. Atzmon, J.M.E. Harper, A.L. Greer, M.R. Libera, 1993, ISBN: 1-55899-207-3 Volume 312- Common Themes and Mechanisms of Epitaxial Growth, P...characteristics. Table TH1. Commercial Refractory Metals and Alloys and Associated Melting Processes Base Metal Alloy Additions, wt. % How Made Nb EBM Nb 171... EBM ; EBM +VAM; PHM Nb 7.5Ta EBM +VAM Nb 45-48Ti EBM +VAM; PHM. Nb 44TI-25Ta PHM Nb 55Tt PEIM Ta ERM Ta 2.5W EBM +VAM Ta low EBM +VAM Ta 4ONb EBM + YAM Mo(Low

  20. Excess Molar Volume of Binary Systems Containing Mesitylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morávková, L.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of density measurements for binary systems containing 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (mesitylene with a variety of organic compounds at atmospheric pressure. Literature data of the binary systems were divided into nine basic groups by the type of contained organic compound with mesitylene. The excess molar volumes calculated from the experimental density values have been compared with literature data. Densities were measured by a few experimental methods, namely using a pycnometer, a dilatometer or a commercial apparatus. The overview of the experimental data and shape of the excess molar volume curve versus mole fraction is presented in this paper. The excess molar volumes were correlated by Redlich–Kister equation. The standard deviations for fitting of excess molar volume versus mole fraction are compared. Found literature data cover a huge temperature range from (288.15 to 343.15 K.

  1. The effect of different pyrolysis temperatures on the speciation and availability in soil of P in biochar produced from the solid fraction of manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Sander; Harmer, Sarah L; Bekiaris, Georgios; Christel, Wibke; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Jensen, Lars Stoumann; Lombi, Enzo

    2017-02-01

    Biochar application to agricultural land has been proposed as a means for improving phosphorus (P) availability in soil. The purpose of the current study was to understand how pyrolysis temperature affects P speciation in biochar and how this affects availability of P in the amended soil. Biochar was produced at different temperatures from digestate solids. The primary species of P in digestate solids were simple calcium phosphates. However, a high co-occurrence of magnesium (Mg) and P, indicated that struvite or other magnesium phosphates may also be important species. At low temperatures, pyrolysis had little effect on P speciation; however, as the temperature increased above 600 °C, the P gradually became more thermodynamically stable in species such as apatite. At very high temperatures above 1000 °C, there were indications of reduced forms of P. Biochar production decreased the immediate availability of P in comparison with the original digestate solids. However, for biochar produced at low temperatures, availability quickly increased to the same levels as in the digestate solids. For biochar produced at higher temperatures, availability remained depressed for much longer. The low availability of P in the biochar produced at high temperatures can probably be explained by the formation of less soluble P species in the biochar. In contrast, the transient decrease of availability of the P in the biochar produced at low temperatures can be explained by mechanisms, such as sorption on biochar, which gradually decreases because of oxidation of the biochar surfaces or changes in pH around the biochar particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High-temperature liquid-metal technology review. A Bimonthly Technical Progress Review, Volume 7, Number 2, April 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1969-04-01

    The purpose of the High-Temperature Liquid-Metal Technology Review is to provide up-to-date information on the various research and development programs in the United States in the field of high-temperature liquid-metal technology. The method is to publish reviews prepared by members of the Department of Applied Science of the Brookhaven National Laboratory on current topical and progress reports submitted by contracting organizations. When results and conclusions are reported, it is intended that the individual reviews become both summaries and critiques. Thirteen reviews are presented in this issue.

  3. The fractionation of adipose tissue procedure to obtain stromal vascular fractions for regenerative purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Joris A.; Stevens, Hieronymus P.; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is clinically used to reduce dermal scarring and to restore volume loss. The therapeutic benefit on tissue damage more likely depends on the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue than on the adipocyte fraction. This stromal vascular fraction can be obt

  4. The Fractionation of Adipose Tissue (FAT) procedure to obtain stromal vascular fractions for regenerative purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Joris A; Stevens, Hieronymus P; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is clinically used to reduce dermal scarring and to restore volume loss. The therapeutic benefit on tissue damage more likely depends on the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue than on the adipocyte fraction. This stromal vascular fraction can be obt

  5. The fractionation of adipose tissue procedure to obtain stromal vascular fractions for regenerative purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Joris A.; Stevens, Hieronymus P.; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is clinically used to reduce dermal scarring and to restore volume loss. The therapeutic benefit on tissue damage more likely depends on the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue than on the adipocyte fraction. This stromal vascular fraction can be obt

  6. Excess Molar Volume, Viscosity and Heat Capacity for the Mixture of 1,2-Propanediol-Water at Different Temperatures%1,2-丙二醇水溶液在不同温度下的超额摩尔体积黏度和热容

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨长生; 马沛生; 唐多强; 靳凤民

    2003-01-01

    Experimental densities, viscosities and heat capacities at different temperatures were presented over the entire mole fraction range for the binary mixture of 1,2-propanediol and water. Density values were used in the determination of excess molar volumes, VE. At the same time, the excess viscosity was investigated. The values of VE and ηE were fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. Good agreement was observed. The excess volumes are negative over the entire range of composition. They show an U-shaped-concentration dependence and decrease in absolute values with increase of temperature. Values of ηE are negative over the entire range of the composition, and has a trend very similar to that of VE . The analysis shows that at any temperature the specific heat of mixture is a linear function of the composition as x1>20%. All the extended lines intersect at one point. An empirical equation is obtained to calculate the specific heat to mixture at any composition and temperature in the experimental range.

  7. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-02-25

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick’s law of diffusion for multi-component fluids and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The mobility is obtained from diffusion coefficients by relating the gradient of chemical potential to the gradient of molar density. The evolution equation for moles of each component is derived using the discretization of diffusion equations, while the volume evolution equation is constructed based on the mechanical mechanism and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. It is proven that the proposed evolution system can well model the VT-flash problem, and moreover, it possesses the property of total energy decay. By using the Euler time scheme to discretize this evolution system, we develop an energy stable algorithm with an adaptive choice strategy of time steps, which allows us to calculate the suitable time step size to guarantee the physical properties of moles and volumes, including positivity, maximum limits, and correct definition of the Helmhotz free energy function. The proposed evolution method is also proven to be energy-stable under the proposed time step choice. Numerical examples are tested to demonstrate efficiency and robustness of the proposed method.

  8. Fractional complex transforms for fractional differential equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ibrahim, Rabha W

    2012-01-01

    The fractional complex transform is employed to convert fractional differential equations analytically in the sense of the Srivastava-Owa fractional operator and its generalization in the unit disk...

  9. Application of S7-300 PLC in Temperature Control System for Fractionating Tower%S7-300PLC在精馏塔温度控制系统中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈曦; 赵德瑞; 吕湘晔

    2011-01-01

    针对精馏塔温度系统结构复杂和精确度要求高等特点,采用西门子S7-300可编程控制器PIE对系统温度进行控制.控制回路采用单参数模糊PID调制法;同时,将单参数模糊PID控制和可编程控制器的逻辑判断指令结合起来,使PID控制更为灵活,较好地满足了生产过程的要求.实际运行结果验证了PLC应用于精馏塔温度控制系统的可行性及精确性.%Aiming at the features of the temperature system of fractionating tower, i.e.complex structure and high precision requirement, the temperature is controlled by adopting Siemens S7-300 programmable controller.The single parameter fuzzy PID modulation method is used in the control loop.In addition, the single parameter fuzzy PID control is combined with the logic judgment instruction in programmable controller,thus PID control becomes more flexible, and better meets the requirements of productive process.The result of practical operation verifies the feasibility and precision of using PLC in temperature control system of fractionating tower.

  10. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, C.

    1984-01-01

    This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

  11. Fractional complex transform for fractional differential equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lİ, Zheng Biao; HE, Ji Huan

    2010-01-01

    Fractional complex transform is proposed to convert fractional differential equations into ordinary differential equations, so that all analytical methods devoted to advanced calculus can be easily...

  12. 反应温度对加氢残渣油四组分含量和结构的影响%Influence of reaction temperature on the content and structure of four fractions in residue hydrotreating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙昱东; 杨朝合; 谷志杰; 韩忠祥

    2013-01-01

    以沙轻减渣为原料,在高压釜内研究了不同反应温度下加氢反应前后渣油的四组分含量及其结构组成变化.结果表明,加氢残渣油中的饱和分含量明显增加,而芳香分和胶质的含量均降低,四组分含量随反应温度的升高均呈现规律性变化.加氢后四组分的H/C摩尔比和平均相对分子质量均降低,芳碳分率增加.随反应温度升高,四组分的H/C摩尔比和平均相对分子质量降低,烷基碳分率降低;芳香分、胶质和沥青质的芳碳分率增加;胶质和沥青质的总环数和芳环数均降低.渣油加氢过程中四组分都发生了明显的氢解和脱烷基反应.加氢反应中,胶质和沥青质结构单元间的各种桥键可发生明显地断裂,导致其结构单元数减少,且结构单元数随反应温度的升高而减少.%The changes of the content and structure of four fractions in the vacuum residue of Saudi Arabia light crude oil ( ALVR) pre- and post hydrotreating were investigated in an autoclave at different reaction temperatures. The results showed that after the hydrotreating, the saturate content is increased greatly, while the aromatic and resin contents are decreased in the hydrotreated residue; the contents of four fractions changes regularly with the increase of the reaction temperature. The H/C mol ratio and molecular weight of four fractions in the hydrotreated residue are decreased while the fraction of aromatic carbons (fa) is increased after the hydrotreating. With the increase of reaction temperature, the H/C mol ratio, molecular weight and the fraction of paraffin carbons (fp) of four fractions are decreased, while fa and the content of resin and asphaltene are increased in the hydrotreated residue; meanwhile, the total rings and aromatic rings of resin and asphaltene are decreased. The four fractions in the residue have undergone hydrogenolysis and hydrodealkylation during the hydrotreating. Bridge bonds between the units of

  13. Volatile Compounds Detected in Coconut Shell Liquid Smoke through Pyrolysis at a Fractioning Temperature of 350-420 C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslin Hadanu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the volatile components of liquid smoke from coconut shells obtained through the pyrolysis process at fraction 350-420 °C. The volatile compounds of liquid smoke from a coconut shell were analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Nineteen peaks were detected by GC-MS in the coconut shell liquid smoke, and 19 compounds also were identified. The volatile compounds were identified as follows based on their function group’s composition percentage: phenol (90.75%, carbonyl (3.71%, alcohol (1.81%, and benzene (3.73%, respectively. The liquid smoke contains a high ratio of phenol derivatives (90.75% in volatile profile. The phenol derivatives were the major volatile compounds found in the coconut shell liquid smoke.

  14. The effects of post-treatments and temperature on recovering the methane potential of > 2 mm solid fraction of digested cow manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Rintala, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    batch assays at 5-20 degrees C and at 35-55 degrees C to evaluate the treatment effects both under long-term (340 d) storage of solids and during active digestion (30 d), respectively. The effects of different treatments on the methane production of the solids varied with incubation temperatures...... and time. However, in all cases, methane productions at 15 degrees C and lower were slow and low for both untreated and treated solids even after long-term incubation. At 35 and 55 degrees C more methane was recovered from untreated solids producing up to 61-82 ml g(-1) volatile solids (VS)(added) in 30 d...... and 179-215 ml g(-1) VSadded in 340 d. Only chemical treatment with or without thermal treatment enhanced the methane yields while some treatments even decreased the yields. An increase in temperature to 35 degrees C of the assays incubated for 6 months at...

  15. The Behavior of Temperature Decreasing and Fraction Solid Increasing in Solid-Liquid Coexisting Zone in Solidification Process of Aluminum Alloy Weld Metal

    OpenAIRE

    Shozaburo, Ohta; Kimioku, Asai; Musashi Institute of Technology

    1993-01-01

    It is the ultimate purpose of this investigation to elucidate the fundamental phenomena in cooling and solidification process and to establish reasonably the methos of estimating hot cracking sensitivity and preventing aluminum alloy weld from hot cracking. In this raport, temperature measurement was carried out by CA thermocouple in cooling and solidification process on TIG arc spot welds of commercial aluminum alloys 2024 and 5083 and various analyses were performed. On the basis of the mea...

  16. Effect of organic ligands on Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during low-temperature precipitation of calcite in the absence of growth rate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Purgstaller, Bettina; Baldermann, Andre; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Calcite growth rate has been previously shown to be the dominating parameter controlling both Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during calcite growth. In natural calcite precipitation environments - characterized by abundant organic material - the presence of dissolved organic molecules may affect these two parameters. In order to assess the role of organic molecules, steady state calcite growth experiments have been performed at 25 °C, 1 bar pCO2 and constant, within analytical uncertainty growth rate (rp = 10-7.4 mol m-2 s-1) in the presence of aqueous Mg and six organic ligands in the concentration range from 0.01 to 10 mM. The organic ligands used in this study are: (i) acetic acid, (ii) citric acid, (iii) glutamic acid, (iv) salycilic acid, (v) glycine, and (vi) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). These contain one or more carboxyl- and amino-groups that are commonly present in natural organic substances found in lacustrine, fluvial, soil, cave, as well as in marine and earliest diagenetic porewater environments. Results shown here indicate that the presence of these carboxyl- and amino-groups promotes an increase in the partition coefficient of Mg in calcite (DMg = (Mg/Ca)calcite/(Mg/Ca)fluid) that can be attributed to their adsorption onto the calcite surfaces and the subsequent reduction of the active sites of growth. This increase of DMg values as a function of the supersaturation degree of calcite in the fluid phase can be described by the linear equation:

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Evidence for Surface-Induced Carbon and Nitrogen Fractionation during Diamond Crystallization at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim N. Reutsky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic and trace element variations within single diamond crystals are widely known from both natural stones and synthetic crystals. A number of processes can produce variations in carbon isotope composition and nitrogen abundance in the course of diamond crystallization. Here, we present evidence of carbon and nitrogen fractionation related to the growing surfaces of a diamond. We document that difference in the carbon isotope composition between cubic and octahedral growth sectors is solvent-dependent and varies from 0.7‰ in a carbonate system to 0.4‰ in a metal-carbon system. Ab initio calculations suggest up to 4‰ instantaneous 13C depletion of cubic faces in comparison to octahedral faces when grown simultaneously. Cubic growth sectors always have lower nitrogen abundance in comparison to octahedral sectors within synthetic diamond crystals in both carbonate and metal-carbon systems. The stability of any particular growth faces of a diamond crystal depends upon the degree of carbon association in the solution. Octahedron is the dominant form in a high-associated solution while the cube is the dominant form in a low-associated solution. Fine-scale data from natural crystals potentially can provide information on the form of carbon, which was present in the growth media.

  18. Meadow based Fraction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an involutive meadow a precise definition of fractions is formulated and on that basis formal definitions of various classes of fractions are given. The definitions follow the fractions as terms paradigm. That paradigm is compared with two competing paradigms for storytelling on fractions: fractions as values and fractions as pairs.

  19. Effects of ambient temperature and oxygen concentration on diesel spray combustion using a single-nozzle injector in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2013-09-02

    This work investigates the effects of ambient conditions on diesel spray combustion in an optically accessible, constant volume chamber using a single-nozzle fuel injector. The ambient O2 concentration was varied between five discrete values from 10% to 21% and three different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K). These conditions simulate different exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels and ambient temperatures in diesel engines. Both conventional diesel combustion and low temperature combustion (LTC) modes were observed under these conditions. A transient analysis and a quasi-steady state analysis are employed in this article. The transient analysis focuses on the flame development from beginning to the end, illustrating how the flame structure changes during this process; the quasi-steady state analysis focuses on the stable flame structure. The transient analysis was conducted using high-speed imaging of both OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL). In addition, three different images were acquired using an ICCD camera, corresponding to OH* chemiluminescence, narrow-band flame emission at 430 nm (Band A) and at 470 nm (Band B), and were used to investigate the quasi-steady state combustion process. From the transient analysis, it was found that the NL signal becomes stronger and confined to narrow regions when the temperature and O2 concentration increase during the development of flame. The OH* intensity is much lower for the 10% ambient O2 and 800 K conditions compared to the higher temperatures and O2 levels. This implies the occurrence of LTC under these conditions. Results from the quasi-steady combustion stage indicate that high-temperature reactions effectively oxidize the soot in the downstream locations where only OH* signal is observed. In addition, an area was calculated for each spectral region, and results show that the area of Band A and Band B emissions in these images is larger than the area of OH* emissions at the lower O2

  20. Formation of Medium Carbon TRIP Steel Microstructure During Annealing in the Intercritical Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokosza A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research conducted on austenite formation in the microstructure of 41MnSi6-5 TRIP steel during annealing in the intercritical temperature range. The influence of the annealing temperature on the volume fraction of retained austenite in the microstructure of the investigated steel after water quenching was also determined.

  1. T1 mapping of the myocardium: intra-individual assessment of post-contrast T1 time evolution and extracellular volume fraction at 3T for Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawel Nadine

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Myocardial T1 relaxation time (T1 time and extracellular volume fraction (ECV are altered in patients with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to perform an intra-individual assessment of normal T1 time and ECV for two different contrast agents. Methods A modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI sequence was acquired at 3 T in 24 healthy subjects (8 men; 28 ± 6 years at mid-ventricular short axis pre-contrast and every 5 min between 5-45 min after injection of a bolus of 0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; Magnevist® (exam 1 and 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA; Multihance® (exam 2 during two separate scanning sessions. T1 times were measured in myocardium and blood on generated T1 maps. ECVs were calculated as ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood*1−hematocrit. Results Mean pre-contrast T1 relaxation times for myocardium and blood were similar for both the first and second CMR exam (p > 0.5. Overall mean post-contrast myocardial T1 time was 15 ± 2 ms (2.5 ± 0.7% shorter for Gd-DTPA at 0.15 mmol/kg compared to Gd-BOPTA at 0.1 mmol/kg (p  0.05. Between 5 and 45 minutes after contrast injection, mean ECV values increased linearly with time for both contrast agents from 0.27 ± 0.03 to 0.30 ± 0.03 (p pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time (CV 4.5% [exam 1] and 3.0% [exam 2], respectively. ECV with Gd-DTPA was highly correlated to ECV by Gd-BOPTA (r = 0.803; p  Conclusion In comparison to pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time, variation in ECV values of normal subjects is larger. However, absolute differences in ECV between Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA were small and rank correlation was high. There is a small and linear increase in ECV over time, therefore ideally images should be acquired at the same delay after contrast injection.

  2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermodynamic Prediction of Liquid Fraction vs Temperature for Two High-Performance Alloys for Semi-Solid Processing (Al-Si-Cu-Mg (319s) and Al-Cu-Ag (201))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duyao; Atkinson, Helen V.; Dong, Hongbiao; Zhu, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    There is a need to extend the application of semi-solid processing (SSP) to higher performance alloys such as 319s (Al-Si-Cu-Mg) and 201 (Al-Cu-Ag). The melting of these two alloys was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermodynamic prediction. The alloys had been processed by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) stirring before receipt to produce a microstructure suitable for SSP. The DSC results for the as-received MHD material were compared with those for material which has been taken through a complete DSC cycle and then reheated for a second DSC run. The effects of microsegregation were then analyzed. A higher liquid fraction for a particular temperature is found in the second DSC run than the first. Microstructural observations suggest this is because the intermetallics which form during the first cooling cycle tend to co-located. Quaternary and ternary reactions then occur during the second DSC heat and the co-location leads to enhanced peaks. The calculated liquid fraction is lower with 10 K/min DSC heating rate comparing with 3 K/min at a given temperature. The DSC scan rate must therefore be carefully considered if it is to be used to identify temperature parameters or the suitability of alloys for SSP. In addition, the starting material for DSC must represent the starting material for the SSP. With thermodynamic prediction, the equilibrium condition will provide better guidance for the thixoforming of MHD stirred starting material than the Scheil condition. The Scheil mode approximates more closely with a strongly microsegregated state.

  3. Time evolution of the high temperature region formed by laser induced breakdown and of the development of the flame kernel in the constant volume combustion vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, J.; Nakatsuka, N.; Morimoto, I.; Akamatsu, F.

    2017-02-01

    The lean combustion is one of the key techniques for the advanced internal combustion systems due to the requirement of the higher thermal efficiency. Since the successful ignition must be guaranteed even in the lean combustion, advanced ignition systems have been developed in this decade. Laser ignition is one of the advanced ignition systems which have the profits of the flexibility in the position and the timing of ignition. To develop this ignition system for the actual combustion system, it is required to reveal the underlying physics of the laser ignition. Particularly, the time evolution of high temperature region formed by laser induced breakdown should be discussed. In this study, therefore, the time evolution of the high temperature region formed by the laser induced breakdown and the development of flame kernel were observed by using high-speed imaging. The ignition trials of methane/air lean premixed mixture were carried out in the constant volume combustion vessel to obtain minimum laser pulse energy for ignition (MPE). Results showed that the light emission from plasma formed by laser induced breakdown remained at least in several tens nano-seconds. In addition, there were large differences between the breakdown threshold and the MPE, which meant that the breakdown threshold did not determine the minimum pulse energy for ignition.

  4. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lili [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Schobert, Harold H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

  5. Experimental study on the relationship between average isotopic fractionation factor and evaporation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao WANG

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic fractionation is the foundation of tracing water cycle using hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Isotopic fractionation factors in evaporation from free water body are mainly affected by temperature and relative humidity, and greatly vary with these atmospheric factors in a day. Evaporation rate can properly reveal the effects of atmospheric factors. Therefore, there should be a certain function relationship existing in isotopic fractionation factors and evaporation rate. An average isotopic fractionation factor was defined to describe isotopic differences between vapor and liquid phases in evaporation with time interval of hours or days. The relationship of average isotopic fractionation factor and evaporation based on isotopic mass balance was investigated through an evaporation pan experiment with no inflow. The experimental results showed that the isotopic compositions of residual water became more enrichment with time; the average isotopic fractionation factor was affected by air temperature, relative humidity and other atmospheric factors, and had a good functional relation with evaporation rate. The values of average isotopic fractionation factor could be easily calculated with the known of evaporation rate, the initial volume of water in pan and isotopic compositions of residual water.

  6. Experimental, in-situ carbon solution mechanisms and isotope fractionation in and between (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melt and silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2017-02-01

    Our understanding of materials transport processes in the Earth relies on characterizing the behavior of fluid and melt in silicate-(C-O-H) systems at high temperature and pressure. Here, Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine structure of and carbon isotope partitioning between melts and fluids in alkali aluminosilicate-C-O-H systems. The experimental data were recorded in-situ while the samples were at equilibrium in a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell at temperatures and pressures to 825 °C and >1300 MPa, respectively. The carbon solution equilibrium in both (C-O-H)-saturated melt and coexisting, silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid is 2CO3 + H2O + 2Qn + 1 = 2HCO3 + 2Qn. In the Qn-notation, the superscript, n, is the number of bridging oxygen in silicate structural units. At least one oxygen in CO3 and HCO3 groups likely is shared with silicate tetrahedra. The structural behavior of volatile components described with this equilibrium governs carbon isotope fractionation factors between melt and fluid. For example, the ΔH equals 3.2 ± 0.7 kJ/mol for the bulk 13C/12C exchange equilibrium between fluid and melt. From these experimental data, it is suggested that at deep crustal and upper mantle temperatures and pressures, the δ13C-differences between coexisting silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid and (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melts may change by more than 100‰ as a function of temperature in the range of magmatic processes. Absent information on temperature and pressure, the use of carbon isotopes of mantle-derived magma to derive isotopic composition of magma source regions in the Earth's interior, therefore, should be exercised with care.

  7. Fractionalized Fermi liquid in a Kondo-Heisenberg model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvelik, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Kondo-Heisenberg model is used as a controllable tool to demonstrate the existence of a peculiar metallic state with unbroken translational symmetry where the Fermi surface volume is not controlled by the total electron density. I use a nonperturbative approach where the strongest interactions are taken into account by means of exact solution, and corrections are controllable. In agreement with the general requirements formulated by T. Senthil et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 216403 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.216403], the resulting metallic state represents a fractionalized Fermi liquid where well defined quasiparticles coexist with gapped fractionalized collective excitations. The system undergoes a phase transition to an ordered phase (charge density wave or superconducting), at the transition temperature which is parametrically small in comparison to the quasiparticle Fermi energy.

  8. Liquid-Vapor Argon Isotope Fractionation from the Triple Point to the Critical Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, J. T.; Linderstrøm-Lang, C. U.; Bigeleisen, J.

    1972-01-01

    are compared at the same molar volume. The isotope fractionation factor α for 36Ar∕40Ar between liquid and vapor has been measured from the triple point to the critical temperature. The results are compared with previous vapor pressure data, which cover the range 84–102°K. Although the agreement is within....... The fractionation factor approaches zero at the critical temperature with a nonclassical critical index equal to 0.42±0.02.〈∇2Uc〉/ρc in liquid argon is derived from the experimental fractionation data and calculations of 〈∇2Ug〉/ρg for a number of potential functions for gaseous argon....

  9. Dietary Prebiotics and Bioactive Milk Fractions Improve NREM Sleep, Enhance REM Sleep Rebound and Attenuate the Stress-Induced Decrease in Diurnal Temperature and Gut Microbial Alpha Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S.; Roller, Rachel; Mika, Agnieszka; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Knight, Rob; Chichlowski, Maciej; Berg, Brian M.; Fleshner, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Severe, repeated or chronic stress produces negative health outcomes including disruptions of the sleep/wake cycle and gut microbial dysbiosis. Diets rich in prebiotics and glycoproteins impact the gut microbiota and may increase gut microbial species that reduce the impact of stress. This experiment tested the hypothesis that consumption of dietary prebiotics, lactoferrin (Lf) and milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) will reduce the negative physiological impacts of stress. Male F344 rats, postnatal day (PND) 24, received a diet with prebiotics, Lf and MFGM (test) or a calorically matched control diet. Fecal samples were collected on PND 35/70/91 for 16S rRNA sequencing to examine microbial composition and, in a subset of rats; Lactobacillus rhamnosus was measured using selective culture. On PND 59, biotelemetry devices were implanted to record sleep/wake electroencephalographic (EEG). Rats were exposed to an acute stressor (100, 1.5 mA, tail shocks) on PND 87 and recordings continued until PND 94. Test diet, compared to control diet, increased fecal Lactobacillus rhamnosus colony forming units (CFU), facilitated non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep consolidation (PND 71/72) and enhanced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep rebound after stressor exposure (PND 87). Rats fed control diet had stress-induced reductions in alpha diversity and diurnal amplitude of temperature, which were attenuated by the test diet (PND 91). Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed a significant linear relationship between early-life Deferribacteres (PND 35) and longer NREM sleep episodes (PND 71/72). A diet containing prebiotics, Lf and MFGM enhanced sleep quality, which was related to changes in gut bacteria and modulated the impact of stress on sleep, diurnal rhythms and the gut microbiota. PMID:28119579

  10. Some problems of the theory of quantum statistical systems with an energy spectrum of the fractional-power type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Meilanov, R. P.

    2012-10-01

    We consider the problem of the effective interaction potential in a quantum many-particle system leading to the fractional-power dispersion law. We show that passing to fractional-order derivatives is equivalent to introducing a pair interparticle potential. We consider the case of a degenerate electron gas. Using the van der Waals equation, we study the equation of state for systems with a fractional-power spectrum. We obtain a relation between the van der Waals constant and the phenomenological parameter α, the fractional-derivative order. We obtain a relation between energy, pressure, and volume for such systems: the coefficient of the thermal energy is a simple function of α. We consider Bose—Einstein condensation in a system with a fractional-power spectrum. The critical condensation temperature for 1 ideal system, where α = 2.

  11. Improving the Sensitivity, Resolution, and Peak Capacity of Gradient Elution in Capillary Liquid Chromatography with Large-Volume Injections by Using Temperature-Assisted On-Column Solute Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rachael E; Groskreutz, Stephen R; Weber, Stephen G

    2016-05-17

    Capillary HPLC (cLC) with gradient elution is the separation method of choice for the fields of proteomics and metabolomics. This is due to the complementary nature of cLC flow rates and electrospray or nanospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The small column diameters result in good mass sensitivity. Good concentration sensitivity is also possible by injection of relatively large volumes of solution and relying on solvent-based solute focusing. However, if the injection volume is too large or solutes are poorly retained during injection, volume overload occurs which leads to altered peak shapes, decreased sensitivity, and lower peak capacity. Solutes that elute early even with the use of a solvent gradient are especially vulnerable to this problem. In this paper, we describe a simple, automated instrumental method, temperature-assisted on-column solute focusing (TASF), that is capable of focusing large volume injections of small molecules and peptides under gradient conditions. By injecting a large sample volume while cooling a short segment of the column inlet at subambient temperatures, solutes are concentrated into narrow bands at the head of the column. Rapidly raising the temperature of this segment of the column leads to separations with less peak broadening in comparison to solvent focusing alone. For large volume injections of both mixtures of small molecules and a bovine serum albumin tryptic digest, TASF improved the peak shape and resolution in chromatograms. TASF showed the most dramatic improvements with shallow gradients, which is particularly useful for biological applications. Results demonstrate the ability of TASF with gradient elution to improve the sensitivity, resolution, and peak capacity of volume overloaded samples beyond gradient compression alone. Additionally, we have developed and validated a double extrapolation method for predicting retention factors at extremes of temperature and mobile phase composition. Using this method

  12. Assessing the quality of bottom water temperatures from the Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) in the Northwest Atlantic Shelf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bai; Tanaka, Kisei R.; Chen, Yong; Brady, Damian C.; Thomas, Andrew C.

    2017-09-01

    The Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) is an advanced coastal circulation model widely utilized for its ability to simulate spatially and temporally evolving three-dimensional geophysical conditions of complex and dynamic coastal regions. While a body of literature evaluates model skill in surface fields, independent studies validating model skill in bottom fields over large spatial and temporal scales are scarce because these fields cannot be remotely sensed. In this study, an evaluation of FVCOM skill in modeling bottom water temperature was conducted by comparison to hourly in situ observed bottom temperatures recorded by the Environmental Monitors on Lobster Traps (eMOLT), a program that attached thermistors to commercial lobster traps from 2001 to 2013. Over 2 × 106 pairs of FVCOM-eMOLT records were evaluated by a series of statistical measures to quantify accuracy and precision of the modeled data across the Northwest Atlantic Shelf region. The overall comparison between modeled and observed data indicates reliable skill of FVCOM (r2 = 0.72; root mean squared error = 2.28 °C). Seasonally, the average absolute errors show higher model skill in spring, fall and winter than summer. We speculate that this is due to the increased difficulty of modeling high frequency variability in the exact position of the thermocline and frontal zones. The spatial patterns of the residuals suggest that there is improved similarity between modeled and observed data at higher latitudes. We speculate that this is due to increased tidal mixing at higher latitudes in our study area that reduces stratification in winter, allowing improved model accuracy. Modeled bottom water temperatures around Cape Cod, the continental shelf edges, and at one location at the entrance to Penobscot Bay were characterized by relatively high errors. Constraints for future uses of FVCOM bottom water temperature are provided based on the uncertainties in temporal-spatial patterns. This study is

  13. Quantifying the Effects of Water Temperature, Soap Volume, Lather Time, and Antimicrobial Soap as Variables in the Removal of Escherichia coli ATCC 11229 from Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Dane A; Macinga, David R; Shumaker, David J; Bellino, Roberto; Arbogast, James W; Schaffner, Donald W

    2017-06-01

    The literature on hand washing, while extensive, often contains conflicting data, and key variables are only superficially studied or not studied at all. Some hand washing recommendations are made without scientific support, and agreement between recommendations is limited. The influence of key variables such as soap volume, lather time, water temperature, and product formulation on hand washing efficacy was investigated in the present study. Baseline conditions were 1 mL of a bland (nonantimicrobial) soap, a 5-s lather time, and 38°C (100°F) water temperature. A nonpathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229) was the challenge microorganism. Twenty volunteers (10 men and 10 women) participated in the study, and each test condition had 20 replicates. An antimicrobial soap formulation (1% chloroxylenol) was not significantly more effective than the bland soap for removing E. coli under a variety of test conditions. Overall, the mean reduction was 1.94 log CFU (range, 1.83 to 2.10 log CFU) with the antimicrobial soap and 2.22 log CFU (range, 1.91 to 2.54 log CFU) with the bland soap. Overall, lather time significantly influenced efficacy in one scenario, in which a 0.5-log greater reduction was observed after 20 s with bland soap compared with the baseline wash (P = 0.020). Water temperature as high as 38°C (100°F) and as low as 15°C (60°F) did not have a significant effect on the reduction of bacteria during hand washing; however, the energy usage differed between these temperatures. No significant differences were observed in mean log reductions experienced by men and women (both 2.08 log CFU; P = 0.988). A large part of the variability in the data was associated with the behaviors of the volunteers. Understanding what behaviors and human factors most influence hand washing may help researchers find techniques to optimize the effectiveness of hand washing.

  14. Matrix fractional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  15. Volume dependence of the exchange interaction and Curie temperature in Co2MGa (M = Ti and Fe): A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. B.; Altounian, Z.

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic moment, exchange interaction and Curie temperature (TC) have been calculated for Co2TiGa and Co2FeGa by a first-principles density functional calculation combined with a linear response method. The exchange interaction is dominated by Co-Co pairs in Co2TiGa while that of Co2FeGa is mainly contributed by Fe-Co pairs. Based on the mean field multiple-sublattices model, the estimated TC is about 114 K for M = Ti and 1270 K for M = Fe, calculated with the experimental lattice constant, in good agreement with the experimental values (128 K and 1093 K for M = Ti and Fe, respectively). With increasing lattice constant, a, from 95% to 105% of the experimental value (aexp .), the moment per formula unit mf.u. changes from 0.43 μB to 1.0 μB and TC increases from 27 K to 142 K in Co2TiGa. However, mf.u. increases slightly from 4.98 μB to 5.40 μB while TC decreases from 1330 K to 1190 K with increasing a from 95% to 105% of aexp . in Co2FeGa. These different volume dependences of TC are ascribed to the weak ferromagnetism in Co2TiGa and the strong ferromagnetism in Co2FeGa.

  16. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  17. Free volumes and gas transport in polymers: amine-modified epoxy resins as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pushkar N; Roilo, David; Brusa, Roberto S; Miotello, Antonio; Aghion, Stefano; Ferragut, Rafael; Checchetto, Riccardo

    2016-02-07

    The CO2 transport process was studied in a series of amine-modified epoxy resins having different cross-linking densities but the same chemical environment for the penetrant molecules. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to monitor the free volume structure of the samples and experimentally evaluate their fractional free volume fh(T) and its temperature evolution. The analysis of the free volume hole size distribution showed that all the holes have a size large enough to accommodate the penetrant molecules at temperatures T above the glass transition temperature Tg. The measured gas diffusion constants at T > Tg have been reproduced in the framework of the free volume theory of diffusion using a novel procedure based on the use of fh(T) as an input experimental parameter.

  18. Quantitative Measurements of Soot Volume Fractions in Diesel Engine Using Laser-Induced Incandescence Method%利用激光诱导炽光法定量测量柴油机缸内燃烧过程碳烟体积分数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐青龙; 张鹏; 刘海峰; 尧命发

    2015-01-01

    激光诱导炽光(LII)法是一种用于测量火焰中碳烟体积分数的光学测试方法.本文介绍了LII的基本原理以及LII实现定量测量的常见标定方法,建立了一套基于双色法-激光诱导炽光法(2C-LII)的用于柴油机缸内燃烧过程碳烟体积分数定量测量的测试系统,该测试系统采用双成像原理,可以实现多点标定和全视场范围内的碳烟体积分数测量.在一台工作在1200 r∙min-1、喷油量21 mg的光学单缸柴油机上,研究了60、100和140 MPa三个不同喷油压力下,缸内燃烧过程碳烟的分布情况,结果表明,碳烟自发光出现在燃烧放热率峰值之后,且随着喷油压力提高,碳烟发光持续期缩短,碳烟发光强度降低.测试区域内火焰中的碳烟体积分数范围约为0-50×10-6.不同喷油压力下,碳烟生成初期、碳烟峰值和碳烟氧化三个阶段内平均碳烟体积分数的范围分别是:5×10-6-9×10-6,15×10-6-20×10-6和14×10-6-16×10-6.喷油压力提高后火焰中的碳烟分布区域面积增大,平均碳烟体积分数减小,碳烟体积分数的空间分布趋于均匀.%Laser-induced incandescence (LII) is an optical diagnostic method used to measure the soot volume fraction in a flame. In this paper, the principle of LII and the calibration methods normal y used are introduced. Based on two-color LII theory, a quantitative test system for determining the in-cylinder soot volume fraction was established. A dual imaging setup was used, which can achieve multipoint calibration and ful field-of-view quantification of soot in a diesel engine chamber. An investigation was carried out on an optical diesel engine with the conditions 1200 r∙min-1 and 21 mg fuel injection per cycle, with various injection pressures (60, 100, and 140 MPa). The results show that the natural soot incandescence emerged after the peak rate of combustion heat release. With increasing injection pressure, the duration of natural soot

  19. High-temperature fractionation of stable iron isotopes in terrestrial and extra-terrestrial samples determined by ultra-precise measurements with a 57Fe-58Fe double spike and MC-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, M.; Baker, J.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed techniques for precise stable Fe isotope measurement utilising a 57Fe-58Fe double spike and pseudo-high-resolution MC-ICPMS. Instrumental mass bias is corrected using a 57Fe-58Fe double spike with a spike 58Fe/57Fe ratio of 1.012. Fe isotope analyses are carried out on a Nu Plasma MC-ICPMS with a DSN-100 desolvating nebuliser system. The MC-ICPMS is operated in pseudo-high-resolution mode with a mass resolution of ca. 3000 on all Fe isotopes permitting resolution of Fe isotope peaks from argide interferences. Residual interferences in the form of tails from these Ar-based interferences are corrected for by normalizing data to analyses of bracketing standards of the IRMM-014 standard. Repeated measurement of IRMM-014 yields an external reproducibility of 0.02‰ (2sd, n=26) on δ56Fe. Fe is separated from samples using conventional anion-exchange techniques. Replicate digestions of the JF-2 alkali feldspar standard yield an external reproducibility of 0.025‰ (2sd, n=5). Based on those results, error models predict that precisions of ≤ 0.01‰ (2sd) are attainable for standards and samples by combining multiple measurements of several sample digestions. We will present ultra-precise measurements of an array of international rock standards utilizing these techniques. We have obtained precise stable Fe isotope results on silicate minerals from a range of terrestrial magmatic rocks (basalt to rhyolite) and basaltic meteorites (angrites and eucrites). These results indicate that substantial stable Fe isotope fractionations (δ56Fe = -1.0 to 0.85‰) exist in high-temperature magmatic systems on Earth, which appear to be redox-controlled. Fe2+-dominated minerals like olivine display marked enrichment in light isotopes of Fe (δ56Fe = -0.35 to -0.30‰) compared to the host basaltic melt (δ56Fe = 0.05 to 0.22‰). Conversely, clinopyroxene typically has a stable Fe isotope composition only slightly lower or similar to the host melt. Notably

  20. The X-ray/SZ view of the virial region. II. Gas mass fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, Dominique; Molendi, Silvano; Vazza, Franco; Paltani, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Several recent studies used the hot gas fraction of galaxy clusters as a standard ruler to constrain dark energy, which provides competitive results compared to other techniques. This method, however, relies on the assumption that the baryon fraction in clusters agrees with the cosmic value Omega_b/Omega_m, and does not differ from one system to another. We test this hypothesis by measuring the gas mass fraction over the entire cluster volume in a sample of local clusters. Combining the SZ thermal pressure from Planck and the X-ray gas density from ROSAT, we measured for the first time the average gas fraction (fgas) out to the virial radius and beyond in a large sample of clusters. We also obtained azimuthally-averaged measurements of the gas fraction for 18 individual systems, which we used to compute the scatter of fgas around the mean value at different radii and its dependence on the cluster's temperature. The gas mass fraction increases with radius and reaches the cosmic baryon fraction close to R200. A...

  1. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA is an airborne infrared limb imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 High Altitude LOng Range (HALO research aircraft during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3 volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra that are spectrally sampled every 0.625 cm−1. A total of 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line of sight. Simultaneous in situ observations by the Basic Halo Measurement and Sensor System (BAHAMAS, the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH, an ozone detector named Fairo, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large extent be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  2. Influence of imidazolium based green solvents on volume phase transition temperature of crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Jung; Reddy, P Madhusudhana; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Huang, Hsin-Chun

    2015-01-28

    The volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel in water in the presence of five imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) was studied. The VPTT of PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel can be modulated to different extents by the addition of different amounts of ILs. The modulations in VPTT values can be attributed to the IL-induced alterations in hydrophobic, hydrophilic and hydrogen bonding interactions of PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel with the neighboring solvent and molecular chains. The influence of ILs having a common cation, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([Bmim]) and different anions, such as iodide (I-), tetrafluoroborate (BF4-), chloride (Cl-), acetate (CH3COO-) and hydrogen sulfate (HSO4-), on the phase transition of PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel was monitored by the aid of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, the interfacial properties between aqueous IL and polymer surface were scrutinized with the help of contact angle (CA) measurements. The overall specific ranking of ILs in preserving the hydration layer around the PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel in water was [Bmim][I]>[Bmim][BF4]>[Bmim][Cl]>[Bmim][Ac]>[Bmim][HSO4]. The trend of these ILs followed the well-known Hofmeister series. Interestingly, the PNIPAM-co-AA hydrogel in water shows abnormal salting-out property in the presence of [Bmim][BF4] at higher concentration and this abnormal behavior can be explained based on the lack of sufficient binding sites on the macromolecule for higher number of [Bmim][BF4] at a higher concentration.

  3. Fracciones de fósforo en suelos del Caldenal Pampeano expuestos a distintas temperaturas de quema Phosphorus fractions in soils of the Pampean Caldenal expose to different burn temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Urioste

    2009-12-01

    fracciones de fósforo. Sólo en el suelo franco el calentamiento a 300 ºC produjo una disminución neta de P posiblemente debido a la volatilización de compuestos orgánicos.Cattle production is one of the main productive activities in the Caldenal area of La Pampa Province, and burning is used to increase forage production. However, there are very few reports in the literature on the effect of controlled burning on soil phosphorus fraction content. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of burn temperatures on organic and inorganic phosphorus fractions of a sandy loam and a loam soil. Superficial soil samples (0-5 cm without plant cover were air dried and heated at 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 ºC, and a non-heated sample was left as control. In every sample, the P content was determined by a sequential extraction procedure using the following extractants: sodium bicarbonate (Pi-HCO3, sodium hydroxide (Pi-NaOH and Po-NaOH clorhidric acid (Pi-HCl and sulfuric acid (P-H2SO4. In general, the effect of burn temperature on the analyzed fraction’s content was similar in both soils. In general, heating at 300 ºC or higher temperatures increased Pi-HCO3 and Pi-NaOH content and decreased P-H2SO4 and Po-NaOH content, possibly due to organic matter decomposition at these temperatures and the consequent increase in available inorganic phosphorus. When soils were heated at 300ºC, increases in Pi-HCl content were registered in the sandy loam soil, whereas this fraction decreased in loam soil. Heating both soils at 600 ºC caused an increase in Pi-HCl related to higher pH values, indicating a decrease in Ca-phosphates. Burns involving soil temperatures no higher than 300 ºC do not produce changes in phosphorus fraction content. Heating at 300ºC produced a net decrease in P only in the loam soil, possibly due to the volatilization of organic materials.

  4. Cellular Automaton Simulation For Volume Changes Of Solidifying Nodular Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burbelko A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Volume changes of the binary Fe-C alloy with nodular graphite were forecast by means of the Cellular Automaton Finite Differences (CA-FD model of solidification. Simulations were performed in 2D space for differing carbon content. Dependences of phase density on temperature were considered in the computations; additionally density of the liquid phase and austenite were deemed as a function of carbon concentration. Changes of the specific volume were forecast on the base of the phase volume fractions and changes of phase density. Density of modeled material was calculated as weighted average of densities of each phase.

  5. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude.

  6. Dough performance, quality and shelf life of flat bread supplemented with fractions of germinated date seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejri-Zarifi, Sudiyeh; Ahmadian-Kouchaksaraei, Zahra; Pourfarzad, Amir; Khodaparast, Mohammad Hossein Haddad

    2014-12-01

    Germinated palm date seeds were milled into two fractions: germ and residue. Dough rheological characteristics, baking (specific volume and sensory evaluation), and textural properties (at first day and during storage for 5 days) were determined in Barbari flat bread. Germ and residue fractions were incorporated at various levels ranged in 0.5-3 g/100 g of wheat flour. Water absorption, arrival time and gelatination temperature were decreased by germ fraction but accompanied by an increasing effect on the mixing tolerance index and degree of softening in most levels. Although improvement in dough stability was monitored but specific volume of bread was not affected by both fractions. Texture analysis of bread samples during 5 days of storage indicated that both fractions of germinated date seeds were able to diminish bread staling. Avrami non-linear regression equation was chosen as useful mathematical model to properly study bread hardening kinetics. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) allowed discriminating among dough and bread specialties. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) models were applied to determine the relationships between sensory and instrumental data.

  7. The relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in cooling basaltic magma chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritani, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    In a cooling magma chamber, magmatic differentiation can proceed both by fractionation of crystals from the main molten part of the magma body (homogeneous fractionation) and by mixing of the main magma with fractionated melt derived from low-temperature mush zones (boundary layer fractionation). In this study, the relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in basaltic magma bodies were examined using a thermodynamics-based mass balance model. Model calculations show that boundary layer fractionation cannot be a dominant fractionation mechanism when magma chambers are located at low pressures (magmatic evolution. On the other hand, boundary layer fractionation can occur effectively when magmas are hydrous (> ~ 2 wt.%), such as arc basalt, and the magma chambers are located at depth (> ~ 100 MPa). Because the melt derived from mush zones is enriched in alkalis and H 2O, crystallization from the main magma is suppressed by mixing with the mush melt as a consequence of depression of the liquidus temperature. Therefore, homogeneous fractionation is more effectively suppressed in magma chambers in which boundary layer fractionation is more active. If magmatic differentiation proceeds primarily by boundary layer fractionation, magmas can remain free of crystals for long periods during magmatic evolution.

  8. Temperature-based on-column solute focusing in capillary liquid chromatography reduces peak broadening from pre-column dispersion and volume overload when used alone or with solvent-based focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groskreutz, Stephen R; Horner, Anthony R; Weber, Stephen G

    2015-07-31

    On-column focusing is essential for satisfactory performance using capillary scale columns. On-column focusing results from generating transient conditions at the head of the column that lead to high solute retention. Solvent-based on-column focusing is a well-known approach to achieve this. Temperature-assisted on-column focusing (TASF) can also be effective. TASF improves focusing by cooling a short segment of the column inlet to a temperature that is lower than the column temperature during the injection and then rapidly heating the focusing segment to the match the column temperature. A troublesome feature of an earlier implementation of TASF was the need to leave the capillary column unpacked in that portion of the column inside the fitting connecting it to the injection valve. We have overcome that problem in this work by packing the head of the column with solid silica spheres. In addition, technical improvements to the TASF instrumentation include: selection of a more powerful thermo-electric cooler to create faster temperature changes and electronic control for easy incorporation into conventional capillary instruments. Used in conjunction with solvent-based focusing and with isocratic elution, volumes of paraben samples (esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) up to 4.5-times the column liquid volume can be injected without significant bandspreading due to volume overload. Interestingly, the shapes of the peaks from the lowest volume injections that we can make, 30nL, are improved when using TASF. TASF is very effective at reducing the detrimental effects of pre-column dispersion using isocratic elution. Finally, we show that TASF can be used to focus the neuropeptide galanin in a sample solvent with elution strength stronger than the mobile phase. Here, the stronger solvent is necessitated by the need to prevent peptide adsorption prior to and during analysis.

  9. Applications of fractional calculus in physics

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Fractional calculus is a collection of relatively little-known mathematical results concerning generalizations of differentiation and integration to noninteger orders. While these results have been accumulated over centuries in various branches of mathematics, they have until recently found little appreciation or application in physics and other mathematically oriented sciences. This situation is beginning to change, and there are now a growing number of research areas in physics which employ fractional calculus.This volume provides an introduction to fractional calculus for physicists, and co

  10. Meaning of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, D. A. K.; Suryadi, D.; Suratno, T.; Mulyana, E.; Kurniawan, H.

    2017-02-01

    Introducing fractions is identical to divide an object. Suppose we divide the apple into two parts. One divided into two parts, the question arises whether one part can be called a half or not. Based on this activity, how can students give meaning to fractions. This study aims at designing a different fractions lesson by applying Didactical Design Research. In doing so, we undertook several research phases: 1) thinking what is fractions and why students should learn this concept; 2) designing didactical situation based on identified learning obstacles; and 3) reflecting retrospectively on the lesson design and its implementation as to redesign the fractions lesson. Our analysis revealed that most students held epistemological obstacles in giving meaning of fractions because they only know fractions as numbers that have numerator and denominator. By positioning ourselves as students, we discuss the ideal design to help students in constructing the meaning of fractions.

  11. Fractional Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Edelman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the results of the preliminary investigation of fractional dynamical systems based on the results of numerical simulations of fractional maps. Fractional maps are equivalent to fractional differential equations describing systems experiencing periodic kicks. Their properties depend on the value of two parameters: the non-linearity parameter, which arises from the corresponding regular dynamical systems; and the memory parameter which is the order of the fractional derivative in the corresponding non-linear fractional differential equations. The examples of the fractional Standard and Logistic maps demonstrate that phase space of non-linear fractional dynamical systems may contain periodic sinks, attracting slow diverging trajectories, attracting accelerator mode trajectories, chaotic attractors, and cascade of bifurcations type trajectories whose properties are different from properties of attractors in regular dynamical systems. The author argues that discovered properties s...

  12. Valor prognóstico da fração de volume de colágeno na cardiomiopatia hipertrófica Valor pronóstico de la fracción de volumen de colágeno en la cardiomiopatía hipertrófica Prognostic value of the collagen volume fraction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Arteaga

    2009-03-01

    ó, con éxito, biopsia endomiocárdica del ventrículo derecho en 21 pacientes sintomáticos con CMH. La fracción de volumen de colágeno (FVC miocárdico se determinó por medio de histología. Se determinó la FVC también en fragmentos de nueve corazones normales de individuos fallecidos por causas no cardiacas. Respecto a la FVC, se dividieron a los pacientes en grupos supra e inframedianos (FVC elevada y FVC baja, respectivamente, y se compararon las características clínicas y ecocardiográficas y las curvas de sobrevida. RESULTADOS: Entre los pacientes, la FVC tuvo variación del 1,86% al 29,9%, con mediana en el 6,19%. Ya en los corazones normales, del 0,13% al 1,46%, mediana en el 0,36% (p6,19%, sin que se observara diferencias basales. Sin embargo, tras un período de seguimiento promedio de 110 meses, cuatro muertes ocurrieron (dos súbitas, y otras dos por insuficiencia cardiaca en el grupo con FVC mayor, mientras que los pacientes del grupo con FVC menor estaban vivos al final del período (p=0,02. CONCLUSIÓN: Por primera vez, se asoció prospectivamente la fibrosis miocárdica a un peor diagnóstico en pacientes con CMH. Se deben encaminar esfuerzos hacia la cuantificación de la fibrosis en la CMH, al aceptar que la asociación con el pronóstico puede auxiliar tanto en la estratificación de riesgo para implante de desfibrilador, como en la prescripción de fármacos potencialmente reparadores miocárdicos.BACKGROUND: In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, interstitial myocardial fibrosis is an important histological modification that has been associated with sudden death and evolution toward myocardial dilation. OBJECTIVE:To prospectively evaluate the prognostic value of the collagen volume fraction in HCM. METHODS: An endomyocardial biopsy of the right ventricle was successfully performed in 21 symptomatic patients with HCM. The myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF was determined by histology. The CVF was also determined in fragments of nine normal

  13. Riemann-Liouville and Weyl fractional oscillator processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, S.C. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor DE (Malaysia)]. E-mail: sclim@mmu.edu.my; Eab, Chai Hok [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)]. E-mail: chaihok.e@chula.ac.th

    2006-06-26

    Two types of oscillator processes can be obtained as solutions to fractional Langevin equation based on Riemann-Liouville and Weyl fractional integro-differential operators. The relation between these fractional oscillator processes and the corresponding fractional Brownian motion is considered. Generalization of the Weyl fractional oscillator process to positive temperature can be carried out and its partition function can be calculated using the zeta function regularization method.

  14. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-10-16

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  15. Precision volume measurement system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  16. On continued fraction algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Ionica

    2010-01-01

    Is there a good continued fraction approximation between every two bad ones? What is the entropy of the natural extension for alpha-Rosen fractions? How do you find multi-dimensional continued fractions with a guaranteed quality in polynomial time? These, and many more, questions are answered in thi

  17. DIY Fraction Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  18. On continued fraction algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Ionica

    2010-01-01

    Is there a good continued fraction approximation between every two bad ones? What is the entropy of the natural extension for alpha-Rosen fractions? How do you find multi-dimensional continued fractions with a guaranteed quality in polynomial time? These, and many more, questions are answered in thi

  19. Si3N4颗粒体积分数对Si3N4/Al复合材料微观组织和力学性能的影响%Effect of volume fraction on microstructure and mechanical properties of Si3N4/Al composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修子扬; 陈国钦; 武高辉; 杨文澍; 刘艳梅

    2011-01-01

    采用压力浸渗法制备Si3N4体积分数分别为45%、50%和55%的颗粒增强铝基复合材料(Si3N4/Al).研究Si3N4体积分数和T6热处理对Si3N4/Al复合材料微观组织和力学性能的影响.结果表明:Si3N4颗粒分散均匀,Si3N4/Al复合材料浸渗良好,没有明显的孔洞和铸造缺陷;在Si3N4颗粒附近的铝基体中,可以观察到高密度位错;Si3N4/Al复合材料的弯曲强度随着Si3N4体积分数的增大而降低;T6热处理能提高复合材料的强度;复合材料的弹性模量随着Si3N4体积分数的增加而线性增加;在低Si3N4体积分数时,可以观察到更多的撕裂棱和韧窝;T6热处理对断口形貌的影响较小.%Si3N4 particles reinforced aluminium matrix composites (Si3N4/Al) with different particle volume fractions (45%,50%,and 55%) were fabricated by pressure infiltration method.The effects of Si3N4 volume fraction and T6 treatment on mierostructure and mechanical properties of Si3N4/Al composite were investigated.The results show that Si3N4/Al composites are well infiltrated with good particles dispersion and no apparent porosity or significant casting defects are observed.High density of dislocations in Al matrix around Si3N4 particles is observed.The bending strength of Si3N4/Al composites decreases with an increase in Si3N4 volume fraction,and can be greatly improved by T6 treatment.Elastic modulus of composites increases linearly with Si3N4 volume fraction.At a lower Si3N4 volume fraction,more tearing ridge and dimples with elongation are observed.T6 heat treatment shows minor effect on the fracture surface of composite.

  20. 环境温度对指端容积脉搏波检测精度的影响%Effect of local temperature on the detecting for pulse wave of local blood volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高鑫; 闫亭亭; 邵常哲; 杨琳; 张松; 杨益民

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨环境温度对指端容积脉搏波的影响.方法 用凉水将32名受试者手指温度降至20℃,检测其容积脉搏波,并用温度计实时检测温度,记录波形,至手指温度恢复到实验前测量数值.结果 当被测部位温度在26~31℃时,所获得的容积脉搏波参数K′、K1′、K2′及容积脉搏波幅值均无显著差异.结论 当手指温度高于26℃时可进行指端容积脉搏波的检测,在26~31℃检测获得的容积脉搏波的基本参数无显著差异.%To investigate the effect of temperature on subjected part in pulse wave of local blood volume measurement. Methods When the 32 experimenters' finger temperature fall below 20 ℃ , their pulse waves of local blood volume are recorded until the temperature returns to the original and the temperature of finger are real-time detected. Results While the temperature of subjected part ranges from 26℃ to 31℃, the parameters of K', Kt', K2'and the amplitude of pulse wave are unchanged. Conclusions Only if the finger temperature is in the range of 26℃to 31℃ , can the pulse wave of local blood volume be measured.

  1. Solar production of industrial process steam ranging in temperature from 300/sup 0/F to 550/sup 0/F (Phase I). Volume 2. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-30

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) equipment requisitions, (2) instrument list, (3) mechanical subcontract requisition, (4) electrical subcontract requisition, (5) site preparation and subcontract requisition, (6) building subcontract requisition, and (7) job specifications. (MOW)

  2. The fractional oscillator process with two indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, S C [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Teo, L P [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: sclim@mmu.edu.my, E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2009-02-13

    We introduce a new fractional oscillator process which can be obtained as a solution of a stochastic differential equation with two fractional orders. Basic properties such as fractal dimension and short-range dependence of the process are studied by considering the asymptotic properties of its covariance function. By considering the fractional oscillator process as the velocity of a diffusion process, we derive the corresponding diffusion constant, fluctuation-dissipation relation and mean-square displacement. The fractional oscillator process can also be regarded as a one-dimensional fractional Euclidean Klein-Gordon field, which can be obtained by applying the Parisi-Wu stochastic quantization method to a nonlocal Euclidean action. The Casimir energy associated with the fractional field at positive temperature is calculated by using the zeta function regularization technique.

  3. Fractional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powerful mathematical tool for solving fractional differential equations.

  4. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, a generalized Smith chart is introduced here to represent fractional order circuit elements. It is shown that the standard Smith chart is a special case of the generalized fractional order Smith chart. With illustrations drawn for both the conventional integer based lumped elements and the fractional elements, a graphical technique supported by the analytical method is presented to plot impedances on the fractional Smith chart. The concept is then applied towards impedance matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  5. Advanced processing of lead titanate-polyimide composites for high temperature piezoelectric sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanbareh, H.; Hegde, M.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    High performance polymer-ceramic composites are presented as promising candidates for high temperature piezoelectric sensing applications. lead-titanate (PT) ceramic particulate is incorporated into a polyetherimide polymer matrix, (PEI) at a specific volume fraction of 20% in the forms of 0-3 and q

  6. Fractional Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, José; Luo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Fractional Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, vibration and control with analytical, numerical, and experimental results. This book provides an overview of recent discoveries in fractional control, delves into fractional variational principles and differential equations, and applies advanced techniques in fractional calculus to solving complicated mathematical and physical problems.Finally, this book also discusses the role that fractional order modeling can play in complex systems for engineering and science. Discusses how fractional dynamics and control can be used to solve nonlinear science and complexity issues Shows how fractional differential equations and models can be used to solve turbulence and wave equations in mechanics and gravity theories and Schrodinger’s equation  Presents factional relaxation modeling of dielectric materials and wave equations for dielectrics  Develops new methods for control and synchronization of...

  7. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  8. Free volume under shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-01

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems — particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  9. The radiosurgery fractionation quandary: single fraction or hypofractionation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, John P; Soltys, Scott G; Lo, Simon S; Beal, Kathryn; Shrieve, Dennis C; Brown, Paul D

    2017-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), typically administered in a single session, is widely employed to safely, efficiently, and effectively treat small intracranial lesions. However, for large lesions or those in close proximity to critical structures, it can be difficult to obtain an acceptable balance of tumor control while avoiding damage to normal tissue when single-fraction SRS is utilized. Treating a lesion in 2 to 5 fractions of SRS (termed "hypofractionated SRS" [HF-SRS]) potentially provides the ability to treat a lesion with a total dose of radiation that provides both adequate tumor control and acceptable toxicity. Indeed, studies of HF-SRS in large brain metastases, vestibular schwannomas, meningiomas, and gliomas suggest that a superior balance of tumor control and toxicity is observed compared with single-fraction SRS. Nonetheless, a great deal of effort remains to understand radiobiologic mechanisms for HF-SRS driving the dose-volume response relationship for tumors and normal tissues and to utilize this fundamental knowledge and the results of clinic studies to optimize HF-SRS. In particular, the application of HF-SRS in the setting of immunomodulatory cancer therapies offers special challenges and opportunities.

  10. Packing Effect of Excluded Volume on Hard-Sphere Colloids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖长明; 金国钧; 马余强

    2001-01-01

    We apply the principle of maximum entropy to consider the excluded volume effect on the phase separation of binary mixtures consisting of hard spheres with two different diameters. We show that a critical volume fraction of hard spheres exists locating the packing of large spheres. In particular, through numerical calculation, we have found that the critical volume fraction becomes lower when the ratio α = σ1/σ2 of large-to-small sphere diameters increases, but becomes higher when the ratio of the large sphere volume fraction to the total volume fraction of large and small spheres increases.

  11. Effect of temperature on composition of tar generated from pyrolysis of organic fraction of municipal solid waste%温度对城市有机垃圾热解焦油成分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张尚毅; 刘国涛; 唐利兰; 谢梦佩

    2016-01-01

    A series of batch experiments were performed to characterize the composition change of tars generated from pyrolysis of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) at the final pyrolysis temperatures of 600, 700 and 800℃, respectively. The carbon content in the tars increased from 74.49% to 83.42% with the pyrolysis temperature increased from 600 to 800℃. Although the aromaticity of tars was higher than OFMSW and lower than chars, the polarity of tars was lower than both OFMSW and chars. Decreases in H/C and O/C ratios in tars were observed with the increase in final pyrolysis temperature. The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the dominant components of tars, increased from 54.06% to 83.45% when the pyrolysis temperature rose from 600 to 800°C. Naphthalene and its derivatives were main components of PAHs, and they accounted for 50.72%, 46.80% and 39.26% of total PAHs in tars that were obtained at 600, 700, 800℃, respectively. The pyrolysis tars generated from OFMSW could be utilized as carbon based matrix composites and the raw materials for the production of dyes, resins, solvents, and insect repellents, etc.%以城市有机垃圾热解焦油为对象,研究了不同热解终温下(600~800℃)焦油的特性及其随温度的变化规律.结果表明:随着热解终温从600℃升高至800℃,焦油中C含量从74.49%增至83.42%;焦油的芳香化程度高于原料而低于热解炭,焦油的极性低于原料和热解炭,随着热解终温的升高,焦油的H/C和O/C逐渐降低;多环芳烃(PAHs)是焦油的主要成分,随着热解终温从600℃升高至800℃,其含量从54.06%增至83.45%;萘及其衍生物是焦油PAHs的主要成分,其含量在热解终温600、700、800℃时分别占PAHs的50.72%、46.80%、39.26%.研究结果证明了垃圾热解焦油可用作碳基复合材料和作为制备染料、树脂、溶剂、驱虫剂等的原料.

  12. High temperature deformation of silicon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Cataluna (Spain); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain); Houbaert, Yvan, E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Petrov, Roumen, E-mail: Roumen.Petrov@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Kestens, Leo, E-mail: Leo.kestens@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium); Colas, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.colas@uanl.edu.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The microstructure and texture development during high temperature plane strain compression of 2% in weight silicon steel was studied. The tests were carried out at a constant strain rate of 5 s{sup -1} with reductions of 25, 35 and 75% at temperatures varying from 800 to 1100 Degree-Sign C. The changes in microstructure and texture were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction. The microstructure close to the surface of the samples was equiaxed, which is attributed to the shear caused by friction, whereas that at the centre of the specimens was made of a mixture of elongated and fine equiaxed grains, the last ones attributed to the action of dynamic recovery followed by recrystallization. It was found that the volume fraction of these equiaxed grains augmented as reduction and temperature increased; a 0.7 volume fraction was accomplished with a 75% reduction at 1100 Degree-Sign C. The texture of the equiaxed and elongated grains was found to vary with the increase of deformation and temperature, as the {gamma}-fibre tends to disappear and the {alpha}-fibre to increase towards the higher temperature range. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The plastic deformation of a silicon containing steel is studied by plane strain compression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equiaxed and elongated grains develop in different regions of the sample due to recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Texture, by EBSD, is revealed to be similar in either type of grains.

  13. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  14. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  15. Fractional graph theory a rational approach to the theory of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Scheinerman, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    A unified treatment of the most important results in the study of fractional graph concepts, this volume explores the various ways in which integer-valued concepts can be modified to derive nonintegral values. It begins with the general fractional theory of hypergraphs and presents in-depth coverage of fundamental and advanced topics. Subjects include fractional matching, fractional coloring, fractional edge coloring, fractional arboricity via matroid methods, and fractional isomorphism. The final chapter examines additional topics such as fractional domination, fractional intersection numbers

  16. Fractionation of five technical lignins by selective extraction in green solvents and characterization of isolated fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeriu, C.G.; Fitigau, F.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Frissen, A.E.; Stoutjesdijk, J.H.; Peter, F.

    2014-01-01

    Lignins from softwood, hardwood, grass and wheat straw were fractionated by selective extraction at ambient temperature using green solvents like acetone/water solutions of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 90% (v/v) acetone and ethyl acetate. A comparison between the isolated fractions and unfractionated lignins

  17. Fractional Pure Birth Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Orsingher, Enzo; 10.3150/09-BEJ235

    2010-01-01

    We consider a fractional version of the classical non-linear birth process of which the Yule-Furry model is a particular case. Fractionality is obtained by replacing the first-order time derivative in the difference-differential equations which govern the probability law of the process, with the Dzherbashyan-Caputo fractional derivative. We derive the probability distribution of the number $ \\mathcal{N}_\

  18. Fractional vortex Hilbert's Hotel

    CERN Document Server

    Gbur, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the unusual mathematics of transfinite numbers, in particular a nearly perfect realization of Hilbert's famous hotel paradox, manifests in the propagation of light through fractional vortex plates. It is shown how a fractional vortex plate can be used, in principle, to create any number of "open rooms," i.e. topological charges, simultaneously. Fractional vortex plates are therefore demonstrated to create a singularity of topological charge, in which the vortex state is completely undefined and in fact arbitrary.

  19. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, J F; Bernal, J J; Tkach, V I; Guía, M

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  20. 288.15K-308.15K(Poloxamerl88+乙醇/丙酮+水)三元体系的密度和黏度%Density and Viscosity of Ternary Systems (Poloxamer 188 + Ethanol/Acetone + Water) at Temperatures from 288.15 K to 308.15 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘谦; 张颂红; 沈绍传; 贠军贤; 姚克俭

    2011-01-01

    The densities and viscosities of ternary systems (Poloxamer 188 + ethanol/acetone + water) were measured at 288. i 5, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 K and atmospheric pressure for different mass fractions of Poloxamer 188 (0 to 0.02) in aqueous solution and different solvent volume fractions of ethanol/acetone (0 to 0.3) in Poloxamer 188 aqueous solution. The densities were measured by a pycnometer, while the viscosities were measured using two Ubbelohde capillary viscometers. The correlations of density and viscosity of these ternary systems are obtained by fitting the experimental data at different temperatures, mass fractions and volume fractions.

  1. Partial molar volume and partial molar compressibility of four homologous {alpha}-amino acids in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, K., E-mail: krpal25@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Government College of Engg., Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamilnadu (India); Edwin Gladson, S., E-mail: aseg_win@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, St. Xavier' s Catholic College of Engg., Chunkankadai 629 003, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: Partial molar volume indicates strong solute-cosolute interaction in the NaF solution. Partial molar compressibility results compliment partial molar volume results. Hydration number proves that sodium fluoride has dehydration effect on amino acids. Interactions between sodium fluoride and (NH{sub 3}{sup +},COO{sup -}) group of amino acid are stronger. - Abstract: Density and ultrasonic speed of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine) in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions {l_brace}(0.1 to 0.5) M{r_brace} have been measured at T = (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K. Apparent molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}), partial molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer volumes ({Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}) and hydration number (n{sub H}) are evaluated using density data. Adiabatic compressibility ({beta}{sub s}), change ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}), and relative change in compressibility ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}/{beta}{sub 0}), apparent molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}), partial molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer compressibility ({Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), and hydration number (n{sub H}) have been calculated using ultrasonic speed data. The linear correlation of V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},{Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} and {Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} for a homologous series of amino acids have been used utilised to calculate the contribution of charged end groups (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, COO{sup -}), CH{sub 2} group and other alkyl chain of the amino acids. The analysis shows that the ion-ion interactions are much stronger than ion-hydrophobic interactions over the entire concentration range of sodium fluoride. It is observed that sodium fluoride has a strong dehydration effect on amino acids.

  2. Communication: Influence of nanophase segregation on ion transport in room temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Philip J; Wang, Yangyang; Holt, Adam P; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-04-21

    We report measurements of the ionic conductivity, shear viscosity, and structural dynamics in a homologous series of quaternary ammonium ionic liquids (ILs) and a prototypical imidazolium-based IL over a wide range of temperatures down to the glass transition. We find that the ionic conductivity of these materials generally decreases, while the shear viscosity correspondingly increases, with increasing volume fraction of aliphatic side groups. Upon crossing an aliphatic volume fraction of ∼0.40, we observe a sharp, order-of-magnitude decrease in ionic conductivity and enhancement of viscosity, which coincides with the presence of long-lived, nanometer-sized alkyl aggregates. These strong changes in dynamics are not mirrored in the ionicity of these ILs, which decreases nearly linearly with aliphatic volume fraction. Our results demonstrate that nanophase segregation in neat ILs strongly reduces ionic conductivity primarily due to an aggregation-induced suppression of dynamics.

  3. Fração de ejeção e volumes do ventrículo esquerdo medidos com eco 3D e com tomografia ultra-rápida Fracción de eyección y volúmenes del ventrículo izquierdo medidos con eco- 3DTR y con tomografía ultrarrápida Left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes as measured by 3d echocardiography and ultrafast computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luiz Campos Vieira

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: O ecocardiograma tridimensional em tempo real (ECO 3D e a tomografia computadorizada ultra-rápida (CT são dois novos métodos de análise da fração de ejeção e dos volumes do VE. OBJETIVO: Comparar as medidas da FEVE e dos volumes do VE aferidos pelo ECO 3D e pela CT ultra-rápida. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados pelo ECO 3D e pela CT ultra-rápida de 64 cortes, 39 pacientes consecutivos (27 homens, média etária de 57±12 anos. Foram analisados: FEVE e volumes do VE. Análise estatística: coeficiente de correlação (r: Pearson, teste de Bland & Altman, teste de regressão linear, 95 % IC, pFUNDAMENTO: La ecocardiografía tridimensional en tiempo real (Eco-3DTR y la tomografía computarizada ultrarrápida (TC ultrarrápida son dos nuevos métodos de análisis de la fracción de eyección (FE y de los volúmenes del ventrículo izquierdo (VI. OBJETIVO: Comparar las mediciones de la fracción de eyección del ventrículo izquierdo (FEVI y de los volúmenes del VI apurados por la Eco-3DTR y por la TC ultrarrápida. MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron, mediante la Eco-3DTR y la TC ultrarrápida de 64 cortes, a 39 pacientes consecutivos (27 varones, promedio de edad de 57±12 años. Se analizaron: FEVI y volúmenes del VI. Análisis estadístico: coeficiente de correlación (r: Pearson, prueba de Bland & Altman, prueba de regresión lineal, 95 % IC, pBACKGROUND: Real-time three-dimensional echocargiography (RT-3D-Echo and ultrafast computed tomography (CT are two novel methods for the analysis of LV ejection fraction and volumes. OBJECTIVE: To compare LVEF and volume measurements as obtained using RT-3D-Echo and ultrafast CT. METHODS: Thirty nine consecutive patients (27 men, mean age of 57±12 years were studied using RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT. LVEF and LV volumes were analyzed. Statistical analysis: coefficient of correlation (r: Pearson, Bland-Altman analysis, linear regression analysis, 95% CI, p<0.05. RESULTS: RT-3D

  4. Quantitative analysis of cardiac function: Comparison of electrocardiogram dual gated single photon emission tomography, planar radionuclide ventriculogram and contrast ventriculography in the determination of LV volume and ejection fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziada, G.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Higazy, E.; Mohamed, M.M.; Bahar, R.; Hayat, N.; Yousof, A.M.

    1987-03-01

    A dual gated tomography (DGT) program for end systolic and end diastolic acquisition and subsequent processing for calculation of LVEF, end diastolic and end systolic volumes (EDV, ESV) has been evaluated in 20 healthy volunteers (25 years-40 years) and 45 patients (25 years-60 years): 20 with ischaemic heart disease and 25 with valvular heart disease (VHD). All had biplane multigated blood pool (MUGA) studies in the 40/sup 0/ LAO projection using in vivo /sup 99m/Tc-R BCs, immediately followed by DG. The results in the patients group were correlated with contrast ventriculography (CV). In the volunteer group, the normal values for LVEF, EDV and ESV measured with DGT were found to be 63%+10%, 91 ml + 6 ml and 30 ml + 6ml and r value for the LVEF=0.91 compared with MUGA. In the IHD group, r values compared with CV were 0.915 and 0.97 for the EDV and ESV and 0.934 for the LVEF. Compared with the MUGA, the r value for LVEF was 0.883. In the VHD group, r values were 0.98 for both the EDV and ESV and 0.948 for the LVEF (P<0.002) compared with CV and 0.789 for the LVEF compared with the MUGA. We feel that DGT is an accurate and reproducible technique for LV function measurements.

  5. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert C.; Jones, Samuel T.; Pollard, Anthony

    2017-04-04

    The present invention relates to a method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also disclosed are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  6. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  7. Temperature-induced spectrum response of a volume grating as an effective strategy for holographic sensing in an acrylamide polymer part II: physical mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Yu, Dan; Zhou, Ke; Mao, Dongyao; Liu, Langbo; Wang, Hui; Wang, Weibo; Song, Qinggong

    2016-12-10

    The temperature response mechanism of a diffraction spectrum in a holographic grating is characterized. Two possible major factors, changes in the refractive index and thermal expansion, are measured and analyzed to identify the sensing physical mechanism. Average refractive indices at various temperatures and relative humidity values are independently measured. Thermal optical coefficients of polymers are estimated quantitatively to evaluate the temperature response capability of the refractive index. Angle selectivity of multiplexing gratings is scanned at various temperatures to obtain magnitudes of Bragg angle detuning. The linear thermal expansion coefficients are extracted by the nonlinear fitting reading angle dependence of angle detuning. The significance of the thermal optical coefficient and the thermal expansion coefficient for holographic sensing is discussed. Finally, the primary factor for temperature-induced wavelength blueshift is analyzed theoretically.

  8. Fractional and noncommutative spacetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arzano, M.; Calcagni, M.; Oriti, D.; Scalisi, M.

    2011-01-01

    We establish a mapping between fractional and noncommutative spacetimes in configuration space. Depending on the scale at which the relation is considered, there arise two possibilities. For a fractional spacetime with log-oscillatory measure, the effective measure near the fundamental scale determi

  9. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  10. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  11. An Appetite for Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  12. Categories of Fractions Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The theory of categories of fractions as originally developed by Gabriel and Zisman is reviewed in a pedagogical manner giving detailed proofs of all statements. A weakening of the category of fractions axioms used by Higson is discussed and shown to be equivalent to the original axioms.

  13. On fractional programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajona-Xandri, C.; Martinez-Legaz, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper studies the minimax fractional programming problem, assuming quasiconvexity of the objective function, under the lower subdifferentiability viewpoint. Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions and dual properties are found. We present applications of this theory to find the Pareto efficient solutions of a multiobjective fractional problem and to solve several economic models.

  14. Generalized Fractional Derivative Anisotropic Viscoelastic Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry H. Hilton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotropic linear and nonlinear fractional derivative constitutive relations are formulated and examined in terms of many parameter generalized Kelvin models and are analytically extended to cover general anisotropic homogeneous or non-homogeneous as well as functionally graded viscoelastic material behavior. Equivalent integral constitutive relations, which are computationally more powerful, are derived from fractional differential ones and the associated anisotropic temperature-moisture-degree-of-cure shift functions and reduced times are established. Approximate Fourier transform inversions for fractional derivative relations are formulated and their accuracy is evaluated. The efficacy of integer and fractional derivative constitutive relations is compared and the preferential use of either characterization in analyzing isotropic and anisotropic real materials must be examined on a case-by-case basis. Approximate protocols for curve fitting analytical fractional derivative results to experimental data are formulated and evaluated.

  15. 氧体积分数对木质和玉米秸秆燃烧特性的影响%Effect of volume fraction of oxygen on combustion characteristics of wood pellets and corn stalks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭好义; 姚昆; 蒋绍坚; 王育青; 彭福来

    2014-01-01

    采用TG-DTG-DSC联用技术对木质颗粒和玉米秸秆颗粒的燃烧特性进行了实验,考察了在不同含氧气氛中两种生物质的可燃特性、着火特性、燃烧稳定性、燃尽特性及综合燃烧特性的影响,计算了燃烧动力学参数。结果表明:随着氧体积分数的增大,两种生物质的着火温度和燃尽温度降低,燃烧稳定性判别指数、可燃性指数和综合燃烧特性指数增大;木质颗粒的着火温度和前期燃尽指数高于玉米秸秆,后期燃尽指数低于玉米秸秆,木质颗粒比玉米秸秆颗粒更难热分解,氧气体积分数对玉米秸秆颗粒燃烧特性影响要大于木质颗粒;生物质在低温阶段的活化能要大于高温阶段的活化能,两阶段的活化能随着氧气体积分数的增大而减小。%Thermo gravimetric experiments of corn stalks and wood pellets were performed by using TG-DTG-DSC thermal analysis technology. The effect of oxygen concentration on combustible characteristics,ignition characteristics,combustion stability characteristics,burn-out characteristics and synthetic combustion characteristics were discussed,and the combustion kinetics parameters were identified.Results show that with increase of oxygen concentration the ignition temperature,burn-out temperature decreased,the j udgement index of combustion stability,the combustible characteristics index and synthetic combustion characteristics index increased;the ignition temperature and the prophase burn-out characteristics index of wood pellets are higher than that of corn stalks,the later burn-out characteristics index is smaller than corn stalks,the wood pellets are more difficult to pyrolysis than corn stalks,the combustion characteristics of corn stalks is evidently affected by oxygen content.The corresponding reaction activation energy is larger at the low temperature phase than that at high temperature phase,the reaction activation energy of two stage decrease

  16. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    , quenched in oil, and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the sub-zero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5 K...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding, a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. Copyright © 2011....

  17. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    austenitized and quenched in oil and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample agnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the subzero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. A mechanism is proposed that explains the occurrence of isothermal martensite formation....

  18. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    , quenched in oil, and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the sub-zero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5 K...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding, a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. Copyright © 2011 by ASTM International....

  19. Size-dependent hysteresis and phase formation kinetics during temperature cycling of metal nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirinyan, A S [Department of Physics, Kiev Taras Shevchenko National University, Academic Glushkova Avenue, 2, Building 1, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Bilogorodskyy, Y S [Department of Physics, Cherkasy B Khmelnytskiy National University, 81, Shevchenko Street, Cherkasy 18031 (Ukraine); Wilde, G [Institut fuer Materialphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schmelzer, J W P [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, Wismarsche Strasse 43-45, Rostock 18051 (Germany)

    2011-06-22

    We present a description of the evolution of a polymorphically transforming metal nanoparticle ensemble subjected to a temperature cycling with constant rates of temperature change. The calculations of the time dependence of the volume fraction of the new phase show the existence of size-dependent hysteresis and its main features. The statistical analysis makes it possible to introduce and determine the size-dependent superheating limit and supercooling limit.

  20. Fractionated dynamic headspace sampling in the analysis of matrices of vegetable origin in the food field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Erica; Cagliero, Cecilia; Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bicchi, Carlo; Sgorbini, Barbara

    2017-03-17

    Recent technological advances in dynamic headspace sampling (D-HS) and the possibility to automate this sampling method have lead to a marked improvement in its the performance, a strong renewal of interest in it, and have extended its fields of application. The introduction of in-parallel and in-series automatic multi-sampling and of new trapping materials, plus the possibility to design an effective sampling process by correctly applying the breakthrough volume theory, have make profiling more representative, and have enhanced selectivity, and flexibility, also offering the possibility of fractionated enrichment in particular for high-volatility compounds. This study deals with fractionated D-HS ability to produce a sample representative of the volatile fraction of solid or liquid matrices. Experiments were carried out on a model equimolar (0.5mM) EtOH/water solution, comprising 16 compounds with different polarities and volatilities, structures ranging from C5 to C15 and vapor pressures from 4.15kPa (2,3-pentandione) to 0.004kPa (t-β-caryophyllene), and on an Arabica roasted coffee powder. Three trapping materials were considered: Tenax TA™ (TX), Polydimethylsiloxane foam (PDMS), and a three-carbon cartridge Carbopack B/Carbopack C/Carbosieve S-III™ (CBS). The influence of several parameters on the design of successful fractionated D-HS sampling. Including the physical and chemical characteristics of analytes and matrix, trapping material, analyte breakthrough, purge gas volumes, and sampling temperature, were investigated. The results show that, by appropriately choosing sampling conditions, fractionated D-HS sampling, based on component volatility, can produce a fast and representative profile of the matrix volatile fraction, with total recoveries comparable to those obtained by full evaporation D-HS for liquid samples, and very high concentration factors for solid samples.

  1. Morphology-induced low temperature conductivity in ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbas, Aykut; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Olvera de la Cruz Team

    Ionic liquids exhibit nano-scale liquid crystalline order depending on the polymeric details of salt molecules. The resulting morphology and temperature behavior are key factors in determining the room temperature conductivity of ionic liquids. Here we discuss the phase behavior and related ionic conductivities of dry ionic liquids with volume fractions close to unity by using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Temperature dependence, effective persistence length of tails, and excluded volume symmetry of amphiphilic ionic liquid molecules are investigated in large scale systems with short and long-range electrostatics. Our results suggest that by adjusting stiffness of the amphiphilic molecules and excluded volume interactions, lamellar or interconnected 3D phases can be obtained. Resu