WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume fraction effects

  1. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ(0). We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45° angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ(0)∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕ(c), defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ(0)=7.7±1.4° and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θ(m)=28.5±1.0°. Granular material at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ(0)=32.1±1.5° prior to the onset of an avalanche at θ(m)=35.9±0.7°. Both θ(0) and θ(m) increased with ϕ(0) and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θ(R)=22±2°, was independent of ϕ(0). From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ(0), with ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions-including volume fraction-are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches.

  2. The coupled effect of fiber volume fraction and void fraction on hydraulic fluid absorption of quartz/BMI laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdelbrink, Keith R.; Anderson, Jacob P.; Siddique, Zahed; Altan, M. Cengiz

    2016-03-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resin with quartz (AQ581) fiber reinforcement is a composite material frequently used in aerospace applications, such as engine cowlings and radomes. Various composite components used in aircrafts are exposed to different types of hydraulic fluids, which may lead to anomalous absorption behavior over the service life of the composite. Accurate predictive models for absorption of liquid penetrants are particularly important as the composite components are often exposed to long-term degradation due to absorbed moisture, hydraulic fluids, or similar liquid penetrants. Microstructural features such as fiber volume fraction and void fraction can have a significant effect on the absorption behavior of fiber-reinforced composites. In this paper, hydraulic fluid absorption characteristics of quartz/BMI laminates fabricated from prepregs preconditioned at different relative humidity and subsequently cured at different pressures are presented. The composite samples are immersed into hydraulic fluid at room temperature, and were not subjected to any prior degradation. To generate process-induced microvoids, prepregs were conditioned in an environmental chamber at 2% or 99% relative humidity at room temperature for a period of 24 hours prior to laminate fabrication. To alter the fiber volume fraction, the laminates were fabricated at cure pressures of 68.9 kPa (10 psi) or 482.6 kPa (70 psi) via a hot-press. The laminates are shown to have different levels of microvoids and fiber volume fractions, which were observed to affect the absorption dynamics considerably and exhibited clear non-Fickian behavior. A one-dimensional hindered diffusion model (HDM) was shown to be successful in predicting the hydraulic fluid absorption. Model prediction indicates that as the fabrication pressure increased from 68.9 kPa to 482.6 kPa, the maximum fluid content (M∞) decreased from 8.0% wt. to 1.0% wt. The degree of non-Fickian behavior, measured by hindrance coefficient (

  3. The Effects of Fibre Volume Fraction on a Glass-Epoxy Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian LARCO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the analysis of the longitudinal mechanical properties of Glass Fibre Reinforce Plastic (GFRP plates with different fibre volume fraction, Vf, by considering both analytical and experimental methods. The laminate is 0/90 E-glass/epoxy woven composite material made by hand lay-up technique. Fiber volume fraction, determined by ignition loss method, has a direct influence on the ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity of the composite plate. Tensile tests on specimens with different volume fractions allow the identification of the mathematical relationship between the fibre volume fraction and the longitudinal elastic modulus.

  4. Modeling the Effect of Glass Microballoon (GMB) Volume Fraction on Behavior of Sylgard/GMB Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This work was done to support customer questions about whether a Sylgard/Glass Microballoon (GMB) potting material in current use could be replaced with pure Sylgard and if this would significantly change stresses imparted to internal components under thermal cycling conditions. To address these questions, we provide micromechanics analysis of Sylgard/GMB materials using both analytic composite theory and finite element simulations to better understand the role of the GMB volume fraction in determining thermal expansion coefficient, elastic constants, and behavior in both confined and unconfined compression boundary value problems. A key finding is that damage accumulation in the material from breakage of GMBs significantly limits the global stress magnitude and results in a plateau stress behavior over large ranges of compressive strain. The magnitude of this plateau stress is reduced with higher volume fractions of GMBs. This effect is particularly pronounced in confined compression, which we estimate bears the most similarity to the application of interest. This stress-limiting damage mechanism is not present in pure Sylgard, however, and the result is much higher stresses under confined compression. Thus, we recommend that some volume fraction greater than 10% GMBs be used for confined deformation applications.

  5. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    .3, and thus more than one mass-independent isotope effect is inferred. MIF of mercury can be caused by the nuclear volume effect. Schauble, 2007 has calculated nuclear volume fractionation scaling factors for a number of common mercury chemical species in equilibrium with Hg° vapor. From his calculations the nuclear field shift effect is larger in Δ199Hg than in Δ201Hg by approximately a factor of two. The predominant mercury chemical species in fish is methylmercury cysteine. From the experimental studies of Buchachenko and others (2004) on the reaction of methylmercury chloride with creatine kinase it seems reasonable to predicted that the thiol functional groups of cysteine gets enriched in 199Hg and 201Hg. Here the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) produces a kinetic partial separation of isotopes with non-zero nuclear spin quantum numbers from the even-N isotopes. The ratio of enrichment of Δ201Hg /Δ199Hg is predicted from theory to be 1.11, which is the ratio of the magnetic moments of 199Hg and 201Hg. Because mercury possesses two odd-N isotopes, it is possible to detect and evaluate the effects of two distinct, mass-independent isotope fractionating processes. From the data obtained on fish samples, we can deconvolute the contributions of the isotope effects of nuclear mass, spin and volume. For these samples the role of spin or the magnetic isotope effect is the most dominant.

  6. Experimental investigation of temperature and volume fraction variations on the effective thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions (nanofluids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Calvin H.; Peterson, G. P.

    2006-04-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the effects of variations in the temperature and volume fraction on the steady-state effective thermal conductivity of two different nanoparticle suspensions. Copper and aluminum oxide, CuO and Al2O3, nanoparticles with area weighted diameters of 29 and 36 nm, respectively, were blended with distilled water at 2%, 4%, 6%, and 10% volume fractions and the resulting suspensions were evaluated at temperatures ranging from 27.5 to 34.7 °C. The results indicate that the nanoparticle material, diameter, volume fraction, and bulk temperature, all have a significant impact on the effective thermal conductivity of these suspensions. The 6% volume fraction of CuO nanoparticle/distilled water suspension resulted in an increase in the effective thermal conductivity of 1.52 times that of pure distilled water and the 10% Al2O3 nanoparticle/distilled water suspension increased the effective thermal conductivity by a factor of 1.3, at a temperature of 34 °C. A two-factor linear regression analysis based on the temperature and volume fraction was applied and indicated that the experimental results are in stark contrast to the trends predicted by the traditional theoretical models with respect to both temperature and volume fraction. The available models are reviewed and the possible reasons for the unusually high effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Effects of volume fraction condition on thermodynamic restrictions in mixture theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛永红; 苗天德

    2002-01-01

    Volume fraction condition is a true constraint that must be taken into consideration in deducing the thermodynamic restrictions of mixture theory applying the axiom of dissipation. For a process to be admissible, the constraints imposed by the volume fraction condition include not only the equation obtained by taking its material derivative with respect to the motion of a given phase, but also those by taking its spatial gradient. The thermodynamic restrictions are deduced under the complete constraints, the results obtained are consistent for the mixtures with or without a compressible phase,and in which the free energy of each phase depends on the densities of all phases.

  8. Studying the Effect of Volume Fraction of Glass Fiberson the Thermal Conductivity of the Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sellab Hamza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of fiber volume fraction of the glass fiber on the thermal conductivity of the polymer composite material was studied. Different fiber volume fraction of glass fibers were used (3%, 6%, 9%, 12%, and 15%. Specimens were made from polyester which reinforced with glass fibers .The fibers had two arrangements according to the direction of the thermal flow. In the first arrangement the fibers were parallel to the direction of the thermal flow, while the second arrangement was perpendicular; Lee's disk method was used for testing the specimens. The experimental results proved that the values of the thermal conductivity of the specimens was higher when the fibers arranged in parallel direction than that when the fibers arranged in the perpendicular direction. The percentage of increasing of experimental thermal conductivity was 96.91% for parallel arrangement and 13.33% for perpendicular arrangement comparison with its original value before the using of glass fibers. Also the experimental results indicated that the thermal conductivity increases with the increasing of the fiber volume fraction. Minimum value was (0.172 W/m.C for perpendicular arrangement at fiber volume fraction 3% and maximum value was (0.327 W/m.C for parallel arrangement at fiber volume fraction 15%.

  9. The effect of graphene nanoplatelet volume fraction on water graphene nanofluid thermal conductivity and viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaya, Bernard

    The aim of this thesis is to study the improvement of heat transfer in graphene-water nanofluids. Experiments were conducted with graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) to study the relative benefit of the thermal conductivity improvement in relationship to the potential detriment when considering the effect that more GNP dispersed in the water increases the viscosity of the resulting suspension relative to that of the water. A maximum enhancement ratio for GNP nanofluid thermal conductivity over water was 1.43 at a volume fraction of 0.014. Based upon GNP aspect ratios confirmed in sizing measurements, the DEM model presented by Chu et al., (2012) appears to describe the experimental results of this study when using a fitted interfacial resistance value of 6.25 E -8 m2 K W-1. The well-known Einstein viscosity model for spheres dispersed in fluids was shown to under predict the experimental data. Adjusting the intrinsic model term for spheres from a value of 2.5 to a fitted value of 1938 representative for the GNP of this study provided much closer agreement between measured and predicted values. Heat transfer is a nonlinear function of viscosity and thermal conductivity and heat transfer is predicted to decrease for GNP nanofluids when compared to water alone. Hence the use of nanofluids to enhance heat transfer processes appears not to be viable.

  10. White matter microstructure asymmetry: effects of volume asymmetry on fractional anisotropy asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, H; Hayashi, N; Ohtomo, K

    2013-02-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information regarding white matter microstructure; however, macroscopic fiber architectures can affect DTI measures. A larger brain (fiber tract) has a 'relatively' smaller voxel size, and the voxels are less likely to contain more than one fiber orientation and more likely to have higher fractional anisotropy (FA). Previous DTI studies report left-to-right differences in the white matter; however, these may reflect true microscopic differences or be caused purely by volume differences. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated left-to-right differences in white matter microstructure across the whole brain. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a large number of white matter volume asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. In many white matter regions, FA asymmetry was positively correlated with volume asymmetry. Voxel-wise analysis with adjustment for volume asymmetry revealed many white matter FA asymmetries, including leftward asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus and cingulum. The voxel-wise analysis showed a reduced number of regions with significant FA asymmetry compared with analysis performed without adjustment for volume asymmetry; however, the overall trend of the results was unchanged. The results of the present study suggest that these FA asymmetries are not caused by volume differences and reflect microscopic differences in the white matter.

  11. The Effect of Type and Volume Fraction (Vf) of Steel Fiber on the Mechanical Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanbarpour, S.; Mazaheripour, H.; Mirmoradi, S. H.;

    2010-01-01

    is to investigate the effects of type and volume fraction of steel fiber on the compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC). Design/methodology/approach – For this purpose, Micro wire and Wave type steel fibers...

  12. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect I: Effects of variations of the fuel particle volume fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming; Yan, Xiaoqing; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-05-01

    A new method of modeling the in-pile mechanical behaviors of dispersion nuclear fuel elements is proposed. Considering the irradiation swelling together with the thermal effect, numerical simulations of the in-pile mechanical behaviors are performed with the developed finite element models for different fuel particle volume fractions of the fuel meat. The effects of the particle volume fractions on the mechanical performances of the fuel element are studied. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the particle volume fractions at each burnup; the locations of the maximum first principal stresses shift with increasing burnup; at low burnups, the maximum first principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while at high burnups, the 20% volume fraction case holds the lowest value; (2) at the cladding, the maximum equivalent plastic strains and the tensile principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while the maximum Mises stresses do not follow this order at high burnups; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles increase with the particle volume fractions, and the particles will engender plastic strains until the particle volume fraction reaches high enough.

  13. In vivo gastroprotective effect of nanoparticles: influence of chemical composition and volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Kelly; Adorne, Marcia D; Jornada, Denise S; da Fonseca, Francisco Noé; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2013-01-01

    In nanomedicine, different nanomaterials and nanoparticles have been proposed as therapeutic agents or adjuvants, as well as diagnosis devices. Considering that the principal cause of the ulcerations is the imbalance among the gastric juice secretion and the protection provided by the mucosal barrier and the neutralization of the gastric acid, as well as that nanoparticles are able to accumulate in the gastro-intestinal tissues, we proposed a 2(2) factorial design to evaluate the influence of the chemical composition and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase on the gastric protective effect against ulceration induced by ethanol. Cocoa-theospheres (CT) and lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) (two different kinds of surfaces: lipid and polymeric, respectively) prepared at two different concentrations of soft materials: 4% and 12% (w/v) were produced by high pressure homogenization and solvent displacement methods, respectively. Laser diffraction showed volume-weighted mean diameters ranging from 133 to 207 nm, number median diameters lower than 100 nm and specific surfaces between 41.2 and 51.2 m(2) g(-1). The formulations had pH ranging from 4.7 to 6.3; and zeta potential close to -9 mV due to their coating with polysorbate 80. The ulcer indexes were 0.40 (LNC(4)) and 0.48 (CT(4)) for the lower total administered areas (3.3 and 4.1 m(2)g(-1), respectively), and 0.09 (LNC(12) and CT(12)) for the higher administered areas (10.0 and 12.0 m(2) g(-1), respectively). LNC(4), LNC(12) and CT(12) showed lower levels in the lipid peroxidation assay when compared either to the negative control (saline) or to CT(4). LNC(12) and CT(12) showed similar TBARS levels, as well as CT(4) was similar to the negative control. SEM analysis of the stomach mucosa showed coatings more homogenous and cohesive when LNC formulations were administered compared to the correspondent CT formulations. The higher total area of administered nanoparticles showed film formation. Moreover, LNC(12

  14. Effect of volume fraction of Polypropylene Fiber on Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Rajguru,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the result of polypropylene fiber on mechanical properties of concrete is studied. Polypropylene fibers of 12mm cut length and 6 denier were added at volume fraction of 0%, 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75% & 1 %.The cube, cylinder and beams wear tested under two point loads on UTM. The results showed that the addition of polypropylene fiber significantly improved the compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength, reserve strength and ductility of fiber reinforced concrete.

  15. Effects of diluents on soot surface temperature and volume fraction in diluted ethylene diffusion flames at pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar Abhinavam

    2014-05-20

    Soot surface temperature and volume fraction are measured in ethylene/air coflowing laminar diffusion flames at high pressures, diluted with one of four diluents (argon, helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) using a two-color technique. Both temperature and soot measurements presented are line-of-sight averages. The results aid in understanding the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of the soot formation and oxidation chemistry with changes in diluents, ultimately leading to possible methods of reducing soot emission from practical combustion hardware. The diluted fuel and coflow exit velocities (top-hat profiles) were matched at all pressures to minimize shear effects. In addition to the velocity-matched flow rates, the mass fluxes were held constant for all pressures. Addition of a diluent has a pronounced effect on both the soot surface temperature and volume fraction, with the helium diluted flame yielding the maximum and carbon dioxide diluted flame yielding minimum soot surface temperature and volume fraction. At low pressures, peak soot volume fraction exists at the tip of the flame, and with an increase in pressure, the location shifts lower to the wings of the flame. Due to the very high diffusivity of helium, significantly higher temperature and volume fraction are measured and explained. Carbon dioxide has the most dramatic soot suppression effect. By comparing the soot yield with previously measured soot precursor concentrations in the same flame, it is clear that the lower soot yield is a result of enhanced oxidation rates rather than a reduction in precursor formation. Copyright © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: implications for ash dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scarlato, P.; Andronico, D.; Scollo, S.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first report of experimental measurements of the enhanced settling velocity of volcanic particles as function of particle volume fraction. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behavior of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments using natural basaltic and phonolitic ash. By releasing ash particles at different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement, we measured their terminal velocity, size, and particle volume fraction with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. Enhanced settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle volume fraction. This suggests that particle clustering during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. We provide a quantitative empirical model that allows to calculate, from a given particle size and density, the enhanced velocity resulting from a given particle volume fraction. The proposed model has the potential to serve as a simple tool for the prediction of the terminal velocity of ash of an hypothetical distribution of ash of known particle size and volume fraction. This is of particular importance for advection-diffusion transport model of ash where generally a one-way coupling is adopted, considering only the flow effects on particles. To better quantify the importance of the enhanced settling velocity in ash dispersal, we finally introduced the new formulation in a Lagrangian model calculating for realistic eruptive conditions the resulting ash concentration in the atmosphere and on the ground.

  17. Theoretical Model for Volume Fraction of UC, 235U Enrichment, and Effective Density of Final U 10Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); McGarrah, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)

    2016-04-12

    The purpose of this document is to provide a theoretical framework for (1) estimating uranium carbide (UC) volume fraction in a final alloy of uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo) as a function of final alloy carbon concentration, and (2) estimating effective 235U enrichment in the U 10Mo matrix after accounting for loss of 235U in forming UC. This report will also serve as a theoretical baseline for effective density of as-cast low-enriched U 10Mo alloy. Therefore, this report will serve as the baseline for quality control of final alloy carbon content

  18. Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin, E-mail: salah-faroughi@gatech.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332-0340 (United States); Huber, Christian [School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332-0340 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    In this study, we propose a theoretical model to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. We consider a wide range of filler volume fraction with sizes ranging from nano- to macro-scale. The model, based on the differential effective medium theory, accounts for particle interactions through two sets of volume fraction corrections. The first correction accounts for a finite volume of composite and the second correction introduces a self-crowding factor that allows us to develop an accurate model for particle interaction even for high volume fraction of fillers. The model is examined to other published models, experiments, and numerical simulations for different types of composites. We observe an excellent agreement between the model and published datasets over a wide range of particle volume fractions and material properties of the composite constituents.

  19. Effect of heat treatment on the distribution and volume fraction of Mg2Si in structural aluminum alloy 6063

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Marahleh, G.

    2006-05-01

    The structure and properties of an aluminum alloy after extrusion in cast and homogenized states are studied. Commercial billets are melted in a horizontal continuous casting installation. After homogenizing the billets are used for fabricating shapes of specified form in an extrusion press. The shapes are subjected to final aging. The volume fraction and the distribution of the second Mg2Si phase are determined after different kinds of treatment. The structure and mechanical properties of shapes obtained from cast and homogenized billets are compared after aging and without aging. The effect of homogenizing on the properties of the alloy after extrusion is analyzed.

  20. Effect of volume fraction of ramie cloth on physical and mechanical properties of ramie cloth/UP resin composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Wen-guang; REN Chao

    2006-01-01

    Ramie cloth/UP resin composite was formed at 0.2 MPa and cured at room temperature for 24 h and treated at 80 ℃ for2 h. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites with different volume fractions of ramie cloth were studied. The results show that,with the increase of the volume fraction of the ramie cloth,densities of the composites become greater and greater,though all lower than the theoretical values,the linear shrinkage during the formation decreases from 1.20% of the original UP resin to 0.18% of the composite with 30% of ramie cloth in volume,all the composites also absorb more water than UP resin casting,greater volume fraction of the fiber,more water will be absorbed,but the increase in water absorption becomes smaller and smaller with time. As regards some mechanical properties,the tensile strength,flexural strength,flexural modulus and impact strength are all improved when more ramie fiber is added. Compared with those of pure UP resin casting,the mechanical properties are increased by 93.93%,76.20%,190.18% and 227.26% respectively when the volume fraction of the ramie cloth in the composite is 30%. The differential scanning calorimetry results show that only one peak will appear for the sample without or with less ramie fiber while two peaks will appear when more ramie cloth is added.

  1. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, E.; Lizio, D.; Baldari, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as 90Y and to 131I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  2. Effects of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction on the electromechanical properties of 3-3 piezoelectric foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, B. V.; Challagulla, K. S.; Venkatesh, T. A.; Hadjiloizi, D. A.; Georgiades, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Unit-cell based finite element models are developed to completely characterize the role of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction in determining the elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric properties as well as relevant figures of merit of 3-3 type piezoelectric foam structures. Eight classes of foam structures which represent structures with different types and degrees of uniformity of porosity distribution are identified; a Base structure (Class I), two H-type foam structures (Classes II, and III), a Cross-type foam structure (Class IV) and four Line-type foam structures (Classes V, VI, VII, and VIII). Three geometric factors that influence the electromechanical properties are identified: (i) the number of pores per face, pore size and the distance between the pores; (ii) pore orientation with respect to poling direction; (iii) the overall symmetry of the pore distribution with respect to the center of the face of the unit cell. To assess the suitability of these structures for such applications as hydrophones, bone implants, medical imaging and diagnostic devices, five figures of merit are determined via the developed finite element model; the piezoelectric coupling constant (K t ), the acoustic impedance (Z), the piezoelectric charge coefficient (d h ), the hydrostatic voltage coefficient (g h ), and the hydrostatic figure of merit (d h g h ). At high material volume fractions, foams with non-uniform Line-type porosity (Classes V and VII) where the pores are preferentially distributed perpendicular to poling direction, are found to exhibit the best combination of desirable piezoelectric figures of merit. For example, at about 50% volume fraction, the d h , g h , and d h g h figures of merit are 55%, 1600% and 2500% higher, respectively, for Classes V and VII of Line-like foam structures compared with the Base structure.

  3. A Computer Simulation of the Effect of the Inert Gas Volume Fraction in Low-Caloric Biogas on the Performance of an Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong Hoon Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A computer simulation of a gas engine was performed to investigate the effects of the inert gas volume fraction in biogas on engine performance, specifically the engine torque and the brakespecific fuel consumption (BSFC using GT-Power®. The engine speeds used in the simulation were 900 and 1800 rpm, while the simulated engine loads were 25, 50, 75 and 100%. The volume fraction of the inert gas N2 in the biogas was varied from 20 to 80% with an interval of 10%. In a simulation of a naturally aspirated gas engine which is operated with an 80% volume fraction of N2 in biogas, the optimal air-fuel ratio in terms of the fuel economy and brake power generation was 3.5. In a simulation of a turbo intercooler gas engine operated with an 80% volume fraction of N2 in biogas, the optimal air-fuel ratios with regard to the fuel economy and brake power generation were 5.0 and 3.5, respectively.

  4. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fiber Volume Fraction in Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of examining composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a material, an effective tool exists to evaluate composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb waves can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper discusses a study in which Lamb waves were used to examine fiber volume fraction variations of approximately 0.40-0.70 in composites. The Lamb wave measurements were compared to fiber volume fractions obtained from acid digestion tests. Additionally, a model to predict the fiber volume fraction from Lamb wave velocity values was evaluated.

  5. Perfusion systems that minimize vascular volume fraction in engineered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truslow, James G; Tien, Joe

    2011-06-01

    This study determines the optimal vascular designs for perfusing engineered tissues. Here, "optimal" describes a geometry that minimizes vascular volume fraction (the fractional volume of a tissue that is occupied by vessels) while maintaining oxygen concentration above a set threshold throughout the tissue. Computational modeling showed that optimal geometries depended on parameters that affected vascular fluid transport and oxygen consumption. Approximate analytical expressions predicted optima that agreed well with the results of modeling. Our results suggest one basis for comparing the effectiveness of designs for microvascular tissue engineering.

  6. The effect of strain path change on subgrain volume fraction determined from in situ X-ray measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, U.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of dislocation structures in individual bulk grains in copper during strain path changes is studied with a new in situ synchrotron technique which combines high angular resolution with fast three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping. Deformed copper contains regions with vanishing...... dislocation density called subgrains bounded by dislocation rich walls. With the new technique reciprocal space maps, consisting of sharp peaks arising from the subgrains superimposed on a cloud of lower intensity arising from the dislocation walls, are obtained, which allows properties such as subgrain...... volume fraction to be quantified. The studied strain path changes are tension-tension sequences. Polycrystalline copper sheets are pre-deformed in tension to 5% strain, and tensile samples are cut with varying angles between the first and second loading axis. The second tensile deformation up...

  7. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip. Plastic zone sizes were directly measured using a metallographic technique and allow prediction of an effective matrix stress intensity which agrees with the fiber pressure model if residual stresses

  8. Wear Behavior of Al-Mg2Si Cast In-situ Composite: Effect of Mg2Si Different Volume Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasinejad, J.; Emamy, M.; Ghorbani, M. R.; Malekan, A.

    2010-06-01

    Al-Mg2Si in situ composites are great candidates for automobile brake discs due to their low density, reasonably high young's modulus and low thermal expansion coefficient. Thus, understanding wear properties of this composite is of a great importance. In this study wear behavior of an in-situ Al-Mg2Si composite, prepared from a simple casting route, has been investigated using a pin-on-disc configuration concerning the effect of Mg2Si volume fractions, 15, 20 and 25% respectively. It was found that the weight loss increases with increase in reinforce volume fraction which can be due to a coarse morphology of primary Mg2Si particles. It was found that the variations of weight loss with sliding distance comprise different regimes of which the mechanisms are discussed.

  9. The effects of temperature, volume fraction and vibration time on the thermo-physical properties of a carbon nanotube suspension (carbon nanofluid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrollahi, A; Hamidi, A A [Faculty of Engineering, University of Teheran, PO Box 11365-4563, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, A M [Gas Division of Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, PO Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rashidiam@ripi.ir

    2008-08-06

    In this investigation, nanofluids of carbon nanotubes are prepared and the thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of these fluids are measured using a thin layer technique as a function of time of ultrasonication, temperature, and volume fraction. It has been observed that after using the ultrasonic disrupter, the size of agglomerated particles and number of primary particles in a particle cluster was significantly decreased and that the thermal conductivity increased with elapsed ultrasonication time. The clustering of carbon nanotubes was also confirmed microscopically. The strong dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on temperature and volume fraction of nanofluids was attributed to Brownian motion and the interparticle potential, which influences the particle motion. The effect of temperature will become much more evident with an increase in the volume fraction and the agglomeration of the nanoparticles, as observed experimentally. The data obtained from this work have been compared with those of other studies and also with mathematical models at present proven for suspensions. Using a 2.5% volumetric concentration of carbon nanotubes resulted in a 20% increase in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid (ethylene glycol).The volumetric heat capacity also showed a pronounced increase with respect to that of the pure base fluid.

  10. The effects of temperature, volume fraction and vibration time on the thermo-physical properties of a carbon nanotube suspension (carbon nanofluid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrollahi, A; Hamidi, A A; Rashidi, A M

    2008-08-06

    In this investigation, nanofluids of carbon nanotubes are prepared and the thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of these fluids are measured using a thin layer technique as a function of time of ultrasonication, temperature, and volume fraction. It has been observed that after using the ultrasonic disrupter, the size of agglomerated particles and number of primary particles in a particle cluster was significantly decreased and that the thermal conductivity increased with elapsed ultrasonication time. The clustering of carbon nanotubes was also confirmed microscopically. The strong dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on temperature and volume fraction of nanofluids was attributed to Brownian motion and the interparticle potential, which influences the particle motion. The effect of temperature will become much more evident with an increase in the volume fraction and the agglomeration of the nanoparticles, as observed experimentally. The data obtained from this work have been compared with those of other studies and also with mathematical models at present proven for suspensions. Using a 2.5% volumetric concentration of carbon nanotubes resulted in a 20% increase in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid (ethylene glycol).The volumetric heat capacity also showed a pronounced increase with respect to that of the pure base fluid.

  11. Large volume TENAX {sup registered} extraction of the bioaccessible fraction of sediment-associated organic compounds for a subsequent effect-directed analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, K.; Brack, W. [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre or Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Effect-Directed Analysis

    2007-06-15

    Background, Aim and Scope: Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is a powerful tool for the identification of key toxicants in complex environmental samples. In most cases, EDA is based on total extraction of organic contaminants leading to an erroneous prioritization with regard to hazard and risk. Bioaccessibility-directed extraction aims to discriminate between contaminants that take part in partitioning between sediment and biota in a relevant time frame and those that are enclosed in structures, that do not allow rapid desorption. Standard protocols of targeted extraction of rapidly desorbing, and thus bioaccessible fraction using TENAX {sup registered} are based only on small amounts of sediment. In order to get sufficient amounts of extracts for subsequent biotesting, fractionation, and structure elucidation a large volume extraction technique needs to be developed applying one selected extraction time and excluding toxic procedural blanks. Materials and Methods: Desorption behaviour of sediment contaminants was determined by a consecutive solid-solid extraction of sediment using TENAX {sup registered} fitting a tri-compartment model on experimental data. Time needed to remove the rapidly desorbing fraction trap was calculated to select a fixed extraction time for single extraction procedures. Up-scaling by about a factor of 100 provided a large volume extraction technique for EDA. Reproducibility and comparability to small volume approach were proved. Blanks of respective TENAX {sup registered} mass were investigated using Scenedesmus vacuolatus and Artemia salina as test organisms. Results: Desorption kinetics showed that 12 to 30 % of sediment associated pollutants are available for rapid desorption. t{sub r}ap is compound dependent and covers a range of 2 to 18 h. On that basis a fixed extraction time of 24 h was selected. Validation of large volume approach was done by the means of comparison to small method and reproducibility. The large volume showed a good

  12. The effect of the volume fraction and viscosity on the compression and tension behavior of the cobalt-ferrite magneto-rheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shokrollahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of the volume fraction and bimodal distribution of solid particles on the compression and tension behavior of the Co-ferrite-based magneto-rheological fluids (MRFs containing silicon oil as a carrier. Hence, Co-ferrite particles (CoFe2O4 with two various sizes were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and mixed so as to prepare the bimodal MRF. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM were conducted to examine the structural and magnetic properties, respectively. The results indicated that the increase of the volume fraction has a direct increasing influence on the values of the compression and tension strengths of fluids. In addition, the compression and tension strengths of the mixed MRF sample (1.274 and 0.647 MPa containing 60 and 550 nm samples were higher than those of the MRF sample with the same volume fraction and uniform particle size of 550 nm.

  13. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: insights from joint experimental and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; de’ Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Most of the current ash transport and dispersion models neglect particle-fluid (two-way) and particle-fluid plus particle-particle (four-way) reciprocal interactions during particle fallout from volcanic plumes. These interactions, a function of particle concentration in the plume, could play an important role, explaining, for example, discrepancies between observed and modelled ash deposits. Aiming at a more accurate prediction of volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation, the settling of ash particles at particle volume fractions (ϕp) ranging 10‑7-10‑3 was performed in laboratory experiments and reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account first the two-way and then the four-way coupling. Results show that the velocity of particles settling together can exceed the velocity of particles settling individually by up to 4 times for ϕp ~ 10‑3. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results reveal that, during the sedimentation process, the settling velocity is largely enhanced by particle-fluid interactions but partly hindered by particle-particle interactions with increasing ϕp. Combining the experimental and numerical results, we provide an empirical model allowing correction of the settling velocity of particles of any size, density, and shape, as a function of ϕp. These corrections will impact volcanic plume modelling results as well as remote sensing retrieval techniques for plume parameters.

  14. Effect of particle volume fraction on the settling velocity of volcanic ash particles: insights from joint experimental and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; de’ Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Most of the current ash transport and dispersion models neglect particle-fluid (two-way) and particle-fluid plus particle-particle (four-way) reciprocal interactions during particle fallout from volcanic plumes. These interactions, a function of particle concentration in the plume, could play an important role, explaining, for example, discrepancies between observed and modelled ash deposits. Aiming at a more accurate prediction of volcanic ash dispersal and sedimentation, the settling of ash particles at particle volume fractions (ϕp) ranging 10−7-10−3 was performed in laboratory experiments and reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account first the two-way and then the four-way coupling. Results show that the velocity of particles settling together can exceed the velocity of particles settling individually by up to 4 times for ϕp ~ 10−3. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results reveal that, during the sedimentation process, the settling velocity is largely enhanced by particle-fluid interactions but partly hindered by particle-particle interactions with increasing ϕp. Combining the experimental and numerical results, we provide an empirical model allowing correction of the settling velocity of particles of any size, density, and shape, as a function of ϕp. These corrections will impact volcanic plume modelling results as well as remote sensing retrieval techniques for plume parameters. PMID:28045056

  15. A mathematical model for the effects of volume fraction and fiber aspect ratio of biomass mixture during enzymatic hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Norazaliza Mohd; Wang, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Renewable energy or biofuel from lignocellulosic biomass is an alternative way to replace the depleting fossil fuels. The production cost can be reduced by increasing the concentration of biomass particles. However, lignocellulosic biomass is a suspension of natural fibres, and processing at high solid concentration is a challenging task. Thus, understanding the factors that affect the rheology of biomass suspension is crucial in order to maximize the production at a minimum cost. Our aim was to develop a mathematical model for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by combining three scales: the macroscopic flow field, the mesoscopic particle orientation, and the microscopic reactive kinetics. The governing equations for the flow field, particle stress, kinetic equations, and particle orientation were coupled and were simultaneously solved using a finite element method based software, COMSOL. One of the main results was the changes in rheology of biomass suspension were not only due to the decrease in volume fraction of particles, but also due the types of fibres. The results from the simulation model agreed qualitatively with the experimental findings. This approach has enables us to obtain better predictive capabilities, hence increasing our understanding on the behaviour of biomass suspension.

  16. The Effect of Volume Fraction of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Natural Frequencies of Polymer Composite Cone-Shaped Shell Made from Poly(Methyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Meysami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of volume fraction of single-walled carbon nanotubes on natural frequencies of polymer composite cone-shaped shells made from Poly(Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA is studied. In order to determine the characterization of materials reinforced with nanoparticles, the molecular dynamics and mixture rule has been used. The motion equations of composite shell based on the classical thin shells theory using Hamilton’s principle are obtained. Then, using the Ritz method, approximate analytical solution of the natural frequency is presented. Results indicate that the nanotubes have a noticeable effect on the natural frequencies.

  17. On the influence of local fluctuations in volume fraction of constituents on the effective properties of nonlinear composites. Application to porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gărăjeu, M.; Suquet, P.

    2007-04-01

    Composite materials often exhibit local fluctuations in the volume fraction of their individual constituents. This paper studies the influence of such small fluctuations on the effective properties of composites. A general asymptotic expansion of these properties in terms of powers of the amplitude of the fluctuations is given first. Then, this general result is applied to porous materials. As is well-known, the effective yield surface of ductile voided materials is accurately described by Gurson's criterion. Suitable extensions for viscoplastic solids have also been proposed. The question addressed in the present study pertains to nonuniform distributions of voids in a typical volume element or in other words to the presence of matrix-rich and pore-rich zones in the material. It is shown numerically and analytically that such deviations from a uniform distribution result in a weakening of the macroscopic carrying capacity of the material.

  18. Effect of Coarse Particle Volume Fraction on the Yield Stress of Muddy Sediments from Marennes Oléron Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pantet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal erosion results from a combination of various factors, both natural and humaninduced, which have different time and space patterns. In addition, uncertainties still remain about the interactions of the forcing agents, as well as on the significance of non-local causes of erosion. We focused about the surface sediments in the Marennes Oléron bay, after a general description of the site that has many various activities. The superficial sediments show a mechanical behavior, mainly depends on the fine fraction for a composition that contains up to 60% of sandy material. Fine sediments fraction has a typical yield stress depending naturally of concentration or water content. This yield could be modified slightly or significantly by adding silt or sand. As a result, the rheological measurement sensitivity allows us to characterize five typical sediments that correlate with solid fraction and fine fraction.

  19. Effect of oral alcohol on left ventricular ejection fraction, volumes, and segmental wall motion in normals and in patients with recent myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, L; Gopalaswamy, C; Yang, D; Patel, D; Kim, B S; Patel, C; Becker, W H

    1985-11-01

    A first-pass nuclear angiogram and a multiple-gated acquisition study were obtained in 10 normal physicians and in 10 patients with a 7-to-10 day old transmural myocardial infarction. After the scan the subjects drank 2 oz. of whiskey. After 60 minutes, the multiple-gated acquisition study was repeated. In the normal group the left ventricular ejection fraction was 68% before and 72% after alcohol. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased from 89 to 97 ml while the left ventricular end-systolic volume decreased from 29 to 27 ml. The stroke volume rose from 61 to 70 ml/beat (p less than 0.05). The cardiac output increased from 4.0 to 5.0 l/min (p less than 0.05). In the infarction group, the left ventricular ejection fraction was 58% before and 56% after alcohol administration. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume fell from 111 to 96 ml, while the left ventricular end-systolic volume declined from 50 to 44 ml. The stroke volume fell from 61 to 52 ml/beat, while the cardiac output fell from 4.5 to 3.8 l/min. In the left ventricular infarction zones, alcohol produced in 9 of the 10 cardiac patients a decline in the left ventricular regional ejection fraction. In the normal group, alcohol produced no significant changes in the regional ejection fraction. The normal and the postinfarction patients responded differently to alcohol.

  20. The rheology of hard sphere suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions: An improved differential viscosity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-28

    We propose a simple and general model accounting for the dependence of the viscosity of a hard sphere suspension at arbitrary volume fractions. The model constitutes a continuum-medium description based on a recursive-differential method where correlations between the spheres are introduced through an effective volume fraction. In contrast to other differential methods, the introduction of the effective volume fraction as the integration variable implicitly considers interactions between the spheres of the same recursive stage. The final expression for the viscosity scales with this effective volume fraction, which allows constructing a master curve that contains all the experimental situations considered. The agreement of our expression for the viscosity with experiments at low- and high-shear rates and in the high-frequency limit is remarkable for all volume fractions.

  1. Volume Fraction of Graphene Platelets in Copper-Graphene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-graphene composite films were deposited on copper foil using electrochemical deposition. Four electrolyte solutions that each consist of 250 mL of graphene oxide suspension in distilled water and increasing volume of 0.2 M solution of CuSO4 in steps of 250 mL were used to deposit the composite films with and without a magnetic stirrer. Graphene oxide in the films was reduced to graphene by hydrogen treatment for 6 hours at 673 K (400 °C). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction for identification of phases, scanning electron microscopy for distribution of graphene, energy dispersive spectrometry for evaluation of elemental composition, electrical resistivity and temperature coefficient of electrical resistance and thermal conductivity. Effective mean field analysis (EMA) was used to determine the volume fraction and electrical conductivity of graphene and interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and copper. The electrical resistivity was reduced from 2.031 to 1.966 μΩ cm and the thermal conductivity was improved from 3.8 to 5.0 W/cm K upon addition of graphene platelets to electrolytic copper. The use of stirrer during deposition of the films increased the average size and the thickness of the graphene platelets and as a result the improvement in electrical conductivity was lower compared to the values obtained without the stirrer. Using the EMA, the volume fraction of graphene platelets that was responsible for the improvement in the electrical conductivity was found to be lower than that for the improvement in the thermal conductivity. The results of the analysis are used to determine the volume fraction of the thinner and the thicker graphene platelets in the composite films.

  2. Different nano-particles volume fraction and Hartmann number effects on flow and heat transfer of water-silver nanofluid under the variable heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Tehrani, Pezhman; Karimipour, Arash; Afrand, Masoud; Mousavi, Sayedali

    2017-01-01

    Nanofluid flow and heat transfer composed of water-silver nanoparticles is investigated numerically inside a microchannel. Finite volume approach (FVM) is applied and the effects of gravity are ignored. The whole length of Microchannel is considered in three sections as l1=l3=0.151 and l2=0.71. The linear variable heat flux affects the microchannel wall in the length of l2 while a magnetic field with strength of B0 is considered over the whole domain of it. The influences of different values of Hartmann number (Ha=0, 10, 20), volume fraction of the nanoparticles (ɸ=0, 0.02, 0.04) and Reynolds number (Re=10, 50, 200) on the hydrodynamic and thermal properties of flow are reported. The investigation of slip velocity variations under the effects of a magnetic field are presented for the first time (to the best knowledge of author) while the non-dimensional slip coefficient are selected as B=0.01, 0.05, 0.1 at different states.

  3. Evaluation of the Effect of Fiber Volume Fraction on the Mechanical Properties of a Polymer Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of utilization of the fibres made from bagass as reinforcement in polyester matrix composite was evaluated. The various composite formulations were prepared using 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 15% and 20% bagass fibres as the reinforcement. For tensile strength, samples were prepared according to ASTM D412 and tensile strength of standard and conditioned samples was calculated, using INSTRON 1195 at a fixed crosshead speed of 10mm min-1, for microhardness, the sample was indented using Durometer following ASTM procedure No.D2240 and the reading is noted from the calibrated scale. It was observed that The UTS, Modulus of elasticity and extension to break of the polyester resin matrix composite increase with the amount of bagass fibre up to a certain threshold and then begins to reduce with further increase in the amount of bagass fibre. It was concluded that the bagass fibres are providing a reinforcement effect in polyester matrix composites and the maximum reinforcement is achieved at around 10% by weight of bagass fibre content.

  4. Influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of glass fibre reinforced plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wegener

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of continuous glass fibre reinforced plastics is investigated in detail. The physical causes of the two effects on the slope of the S-N-curve in fibre direction at R = 0.1 are researched and can be explained with help of micrographs. A new phenomenological approach is presented to model both effects in fibre dominated laminates with different stacking sequences using only the static ultimate strength as an input. Static and fatigue tests of different layups and fibre volume fractions are performed at different temperatures to validate the fatigue life predictions. Additionally it is derived that there is an optimal fibre volume fraction regarding a minimum damage sum. This fibre volume fraction is dependent on a given loading spectra and can be calculated using the phenomenological model.

  5. Laser-induced incandescence: Towards quantitative soot volume fraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A.P.; Wienbeucker, F.; Beaud, P.; Frey, H.-M.; Gerber, T.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence has recently emerged as a versatile tool for measuring soot volume fraction in a wide range of combustion systems. In this work we investigate the essential features of the method. LII is based on the acquisition of the incandescence of soot when heated through a high power laser pulse. Initial experiments have been performed on a model laboratory flame. The behaviour of the LII signal is studied experimentally. By applying numerical calculations we investigate the possibility to obtain two-dimensional soot volume fraction distributions. For this purpose a combination of LII with other techniques is required. This part is discussed in some extent and the future work is outlined. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  6. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  7. Estimation of liquid volume fraction using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Saeed M.; Langton, Christian M.

    2016-12-01

    It has recently been proposed that the propagation of an ultrasound wave through complex structures, consisting of two-materials of differing ultrasound velocity, may be considered as an array of parallel ‘sonic rays’, the transit time of each determined by their relative proportion; being a minimum (t min) in entire higher velocity material, and a maximum (t max) in entire lower velocity material. An ultrasound transit time spectrum (UTTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays at an individual transit time. It has previously been demonstrated that the solid volume fraction of a solid:liquid composite, specifically acrylic step-wedges immersed in water, may be reliably estimated from the UTTS. The aim of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that the volume fraction of a two-component liquid mixture, of unequal ultrasound velocity, may also be estimated by UTTS. A through-transmission technique incorporating two 1 MHz ultrasound transducers within a horizontally-aligned cylindrical tube-housing was utilised, the proportion of silicone oil to water being varied from 0% to 100%. The liquid volume fraction was estimated from the UTTS at each composition, the coefficient of determination (R 2%) being 98.9  ±  0.7%. The analysis incorporated a novel signal amplitude normalisation technique to compensate for absorption within the silicone oil. It is therefore envisaged that the parallel sonic ray concept and the derived UTTS may be further applied to the quantification of liquid mixture composition assessment.

  8. Effects of nano anatase-rutile TiO2 volume fraction with natural dye containing anthocyanin on the dye sensitized solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustini, S.; Wahyuono, R. A.; Sawitri, D.; Risanti, D. D.

    2013-09-01

    Since its first development, efforts to improve efficiency of Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) are continuously carried out, either through selection of dye materials, the type of semiconductor, counter electrode design or the sandwiched structure. It is widely known that anatase and rutile are phases of TiO2 that often being used for fabrication of DSSC. Rutile is thermodynamically more stable phase having band-gap suitable for absorption of sunlight spectrum. On the other hand, anatase has higher electrical conductivity, capability to adsorp dye as well as higher electron diffusion coefficient than those of rutile. Present research uses mangosteen pericarp and Rhoeo spathacea extracted in ethanol as natural dye containing anthocyanin. These dyes were characterized by using UV-Vis and FTIR, showing that the absorption maxima peaks obtained at 389 nm and 413 nm, for mangosteen and Rhoeo spathacea, respectively. The nano TiO2 was prepared by means of co-precipitation method. The particle size were 9-11 nm and 54.5 nm for anatase and rutile, respectively, according to Scherrer's equation. DSSCs were fabricated in various volume fractions of anatase and rutile TiO2. The fabricated DSSCs were tested under 17 mW/cm2 of solar irradiation. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of DSSCs employing 75%: 25% volume fraction of anatase and rutile TiO2 have outstanding result than others. The highest conversion efficiencies of 0.037% and 0.013% are obtained for DSSC employing natural dye extract from mangosteen pericarp and Rhoeo spathacea, respectively.

  9. GEANT4 simulation of water volume fraction measurement in dehydrated crude oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Chunguo; XING Guangzhong; LIU Bin

    2007-01-01

    Online measurement of water volume fraction (WVF) in dehydrated crude oil is a difficult task due to very little water in dehydrated crude oil and high precision requirements. We presents a method to measure water volume fraction in dehydrated crude oil with γ-ray densitometry. The Monte Carlo computer simulation packet GEANT4 was used to analyze the WVF measuring sensitivity of the γ-ray densitometry at different γ-ray energies, and effects of temperature, pressure, salinity and oil components on WVF measurement. The results show that the γ-ray densitome-try has high sensitivity in γ-ray energy ranges of 16~25 keV, and it can distinguish WVF changes of 0.0005. The calculated WVF decreases about 0.0002 with 1 ℃ of temperature increase and they have approximately linear relation with temperature when water volume fraction remains the same. Effects of pressure, salinity and oil components on water volume fraction can be neglected. Experiments were done to analyze sensitivity of the γ-ray densitometry. The results, as compared with simulations, demonstrate that simulation method is reliable and it is feasible to gauge low water volume fraction using low energy γ-rays.

  10. Viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions. Variation with temperature and water volume fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, Marco A.; Caldas, Jorge Navaes [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Rua General Canabarro, 500, Maracana, Rio, CEP 2057-900 (Brazil); Oliveira, Roberto C. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Cenpes, Cidade Universitaria (Brazil); Rajagopal, Krishnaswamy [LATCA-Laboratorio de Termodinamica e Cinetica Aplicada-Escola de Quimica, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, C.P. 68452, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2005-09-15

    Water-in-oil emulsions are important in the petroleum industry in production operations, where the water content of the emulsion can be as high as 60% in volume, also in petroleum refining operations where generally the water content is low. The effective viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions depends mainly on the volume fraction of dispersed phase and temperature, along with several minor effects, such as shear rate, average droplet size, droplet size distribution, viscosity and density of oil. Using six different crude oils, the effective viscosities of several synthetic water-in-oil emulsions are measured at atmospheric pressure using a dynamic viscosimeter for different shear rates, temperatures and volume fractions of the dispersed phase. The ASTM equation, method D-341, for describing viscosity as a function of temperature is extended to include the variation of dispersed phase volume fraction. The proposed equation gives good correlation between the measured viscosities of water-in-oil emulsions as a function of temperature and the volume fraction of water.

  11. VOFI - A library to initialize the volume fraction scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bnà, S.; Manservisi, S.; Scardovelli, R.; Yecko, P.; Zaleski, S.

    2016-03-01

    The VOFI library has been developed to accurately calculate the volume fraction field demarcated by implicitly-defined fluid interfaces in Cartesian grids with cubic cells. The method enlists a number of algorithms to compute the integration limits and the local height function, that is the integrand of a double Gauss-Legendre integration with a variable number of nodes. Tests in two and three dimensions are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and are provided in the software distribution with C/C++ and FORTRAN interfaces.

  12. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Volume Fraction of Ordered α2 Phase Precipitated in Ti-Al-Sn-Zr Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun ZHANG; Na PENG; Xinan WANG; LI Li; Qingjiang WANG

    2007-01-01

    An ideal method has been established for calculating the precipitation of α2 ordered phase in near-α titanium alloys based on the theory on the critical electron concentration for the precipitation of α 2 ordered phase in near-α titanium alloys. With complete precipitation of α2 phase in near-α titanium alloys, the alloys can be considered to be composed of two parts: (1) the α2 ordered phase with the stoichiometric atomic ratio of Ti3X; (2) the disorder solid solution with the critical composition in which the α2 ordered phase is just unable to precipitate. By using this method, the volume fractions of α2 ordered phase precipitated in Ti-Al, Ti-Sn,Ti-Al-Sn-Zr alloys with various Al, Sn and/or Zr contents have been calculated. The influences of Al and Sn on the precipitation of α2 ordered phase are discussed. The calculating results show substantial agreement with the experimental ones.

  13. Modified algorithm for generating high volume fraction sphere packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Roberto Roselló; Morales, Irvin Pérez; Vanmaercke, Simon; Morfa, Carlos Recarey; Cortés, Lucía Argüelles; Casañas, Harold Díaz-Guzmán

    2015-06-01

    Advancing front packing algorithms have proven to be very efficient in 2D for obtaining high density sets of particles, especially disks. However, the extension of these algorithms to 3D is not a trivial task. In the present paper, an advancing front algorithm for obtaining highly dense sphere packings is presented. It is simpler than other advancing front packing methods in 3D and can also be used with other types of particles. Comparison with respect to other packing methods have been carried out and a significant improvement in the volume fraction (VF) has been observed. Moreover, the quality of packings was evaluated with indicators other than VF. As additional advantage, the number of generated particles with the algorithm is linear with respect to time.

  14. Determination of Acetonitrile Volume Fraction in Mobile Phase by HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yi; WANG Zhi-wu; GU Jing-kai; WANG Ying-wu

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the development and validation of an assay for the determination of acetonitrile in the recycled mobile phase using high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC).The method is based on that the retention in reversed-phase liquid chromatography increases with decreasing concentration of organic phase in the mobile phase.The natural logarithm of the capacity ratio for a given solute is linearly related to the volume fraction of the organic modifier in the mobile phase.For dimethylphthalate and diethylphthalate,the linearity range is 30%--60%,and for biphenyl and terphenyl,the range is 60%-95%.Precision values(RSD) were both <1% and the accuracy(RE) was in the range of ±1%.The assay was successfully applied to the determination of acetonitrile concentration of recycled mobile phase after the distillation of the column eluent in our laboratory.

  15. 导流介质对VARTM复合材料纤维分布及空隙率的影响%Effects of Infusion Media on Fiber Volume Fraction Distribution and Void Content in Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖家美; 陈显明; 王德盼; 鄢冬冬; 王科

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the size of infusion media on resin flow behavior,fiber volume fraction distribution and void content in vacuum assisted resin transfer molding(VARTM) were studied.The results showed that with the increase of infusion media size, the resin flow rate increased exponentially;the fiber volume fraction showed a tendency to increase after the first decrease,and the infusion media boundary was just the high and low fiber volume fraction line;the void content increased first and then decreased and increased tremendously at last,varied from 3.86% to 19.92%.%研究了导流介质尺寸对真空辅助树脂传递模塑(VARTM)工艺中树脂流动行为的影响,以及对复合材料制品中纤维分布和空隙率的影响。结果表明,随着导流介质尺寸的增加,树脂在增强体中的流动速度加快,并呈现指数加速趋势;制品中纤维体积含量呈现先减少后增大的趋势,并且以导流介质边界为纤维体积含量高低的分界线;复合材料制品的空隙率范围在3.86%~19.92%,空隙率呈现先增大后减小再加速增大的趋势。

  16. Packing Effect of Excluded Volume on Hard-Sphere Colloids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖长明; 金国钧; 马余强

    2001-01-01

    We apply the principle of maximum entropy to consider the excluded volume effect on the phase separation of binary mixtures consisting of hard spheres with two different diameters. We show that a critical volume fraction of hard spheres exists locating the packing of large spheres. In particular, through numerical calculation, we have found that the critical volume fraction becomes lower when the ratio α = σ1/σ2 of large-to-small sphere diameters increases, but becomes higher when the ratio of the large sphere volume fraction to the total volume fraction of large and small spheres increases.

  17. Coarsening in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    The coarsening behavior of the gamma-prime precipitate has been examined in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys aged at elevated temperatures for times of up to 5000 h. Although the cube rate law was observed during coarsening, none of the presently available coarsening theories showed complete agreement with the experimental particle size distributions (PSDs). These discrepancies were thought to be due to elastic coherency strains which were not considered by the available models. Increasing the Mo content significantly influenced the PSDs and decreased the coarsening rate of the gamma-prime cubes, as a result of increasing the magnitude of the lattice mismatch. After extended aging times, the gamma-prime cubes underwent massive coalescence into plates at a rate which was much faster than the cuboidal coarsening rate. Once the gamma-prime plates were formed, further coarsening was not observed, and this stabilization of the microstructure was attributed to the development of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces.

  18. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  19. Effects of slice orientation on reproducibility of sequential assessment of right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction: short-axis vs transverse SSFP cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Luigia; Lamacie, Mariana M; Jimenez Juan, Laura; Deva, Djeven; Wald, Rachel M; Ley, Sebastian; Hanneman, Kate; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2016-09-22

    Test-retest reproducibility is of utmost importance in follow-up of right ventricular (RV) volumes and function; optimal slice orientation though is not yet known. We compared test-retest reproducibility and intra-/inter-observer variability of right ventricular (RV) volumes and function assessed with short-axis and transverse cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Eighteen volunteers underwent cine CMR for RV assessment obtaining ventricular coverage in short-axis and transverse slice orientation. Additional 2D phase contrast flow imaging of the main pulmonary artery (MPA) was performed. After complete repositioning repeat acquisitions were performed. Data sets were contoured by two blinded observers. Statistical analysis included Student's t-test, Bland-Altman plots, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and 2-way ANOVA, SEM and minimal detectable difference calculations. Heart rates (65.0 ± 7.4 vs. 67.6 ± 9.9 bpm; P = 0.1) and MPA flow (89.8 ± 16.6 vs. 87.2 ± 14.9 mL; P = 0.1) did not differ between imaging sessions. EDV and ESV demonstrated an inter-study bias of 0.4 %[-9.5 %,10.3 %] and 2.1 %[-12.3 %,16.4 %] for short-axis and 1.1 %[-7.3 %,9.4 %] and 0.8 %[-16.0 %,17.6 %] for transverse orientation, respectively. There was no significant interaction between imaging orientation and interstudy reproducibility (p = 0.395-0.824), intra-observer variability (p = 0.726-0.862) or inter-observer variability (p = 0.447-0.706) by 2-way ANOVA. Inter-observer agreement by ICC was greater for short axis versus transverse orientation for all parameters (0.769-0.986 vs. 0.625-0.983, respectively). Minimal detectable differences for short axis and transverse orientations were 10.1 mL/11.5 mL for EDV, 8.3 mL/8.4 mL for ESV and 4.1 % vs. 4.7 % for EF, respectively. Short-axis and transverse orientation both provide reliable and reproducible measures for follow-up of RV volumes and global function. Therefore

  20. Physical aging and structural recovery in a colloidal glass subjected to volume-fraction jump conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2016-04-01

    Three important kinetic phenomena have been cataloged by Kovacs in the investigation of molecular glasses during structural recovery or physical aging. These are responses to temperature-jump histories referred to as intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach, and memory effect. Here we use a thermosensitive polystyrene-poly (N -isopropylacrylamide)-poly (acrylic acid) core-shell particle-based dispersion as a colloidal model and by working at a constant number concentration of particles we use temperature changes to create volume-fraction changes. This imposes conditions similar to those defined by Kovacs on the colloidal system. We use creep experiments to probe the physical aging and structural recovery behavior of colloidal glasses in the Kovacs-type histories and compare the results with those seen in molecular glasses. We find that there are similarities in aging dynamics between molecular glasses and colloidal glasses, but differences also persist. For the intrinsic isotherms, the times teq needed for relaxing or evolving into the equilibrium (or stationary) state are relatively insensitive to the volume fraction and the values of teq are longer than the α -relaxation time τα at the same volume fraction. On the other hand, both of these times grow at least exponentially with decreasing temperature in molecular glasses. For the asymmetry of approach, similar nonlinear behavior is observed for both colloidal and molecular glasses. However, the equilibration time teq is the same for both volume-fraction up-jump and down-jump experiments, different from the finding in molecular glasses that it takes longer for the structure to evolve into equilibrium for the temperature up-jump condition than for the temperature down-jump condition. For the two-step volume-fraction jumps, a memory response is observed that is different from observations of structural recovery in two-step temperature histories in molecular glasses. The concentration dependence of the dynamics

  1. Tutorial for Collecting and Processing Images of Composite Structures to Determine the Fiber Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite structures have become more common in aerospace components due to their light weight and structural efficiency. In general, the strength and stiffness of a composite structure are directly related to the fiber volume fraction, which is defined as the fraction of fiber volume to total volume of the composite. The most common method to measure the fiber volume fraction is acid digestion, which is a useful method when the total weight of the composite, the fiber weight, and the total weight can easily be obtained. However, acid digestion is a destructive test, so the material will no longer be available for additional characterization. Acid digestion can also be difficult to machine out specific components of a composite structure with complex geometries. These disadvantages of acid digestion led the author to develop a method to calculate the fiber volume fraction. The developed method uses optical microscopy to calculate the fiber area fraction based on images of the cross section of the composite. The fiber area fraction and fiber volume fraction are understood to be the same, based on the assumption that the shape and size of the fibers are consistent in the depth of the composite. This tutorial explains the developed method for optically determining fiber area fraction performed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  2. Effect of soil fulvic and humic acid on binding of Pb to goethite–water interface: Linear additivity and volume fractions of HS in the Stern layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, J.; Koopal, L.K.; Weng, L.; Wang, J.; Tan, W.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of soil fulvic (JGFA) and humic acid (JGHA) on Pb binding to goethite were investigated with batch experiments and modeling. The CD-MUSIC and NICA-Donnan model could describe the Pb binding to, respectively, the binary Pb–goethite and Pb–HS systems. The adsorption of humic substances (HS

  3. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-01-01

    Volume fraction, the single most important parameter in describing trabecular microstructure, can easily be calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions of micro-CT images. This study sought to quantify the accuracy of this measurement. One hundred and sixty human cancellous bone specimens...... which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner...

  4. A transient method for measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow using acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow by using an acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) method in a transient way is studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the effects of sizes and locations of a single air bubble in a cylindrical cavity with two open ends on resonant frequencies are investigated numerically. Then, a transient measurement system for ARS is established, and the trends of the resonant frequencies (RFs) and resonant amplitudes (RAs) in the cylindrical cavity with gas flux inside are investigated experimentally. The measurement results by the proposed transient method are compared with those by steady-state ones and numerical ones. The numerical results show that the RFs of the cavity are highly sensitive to the volume of the single air bubble. A tiny bubble volume perturbation may cause a prominent RF shift even though the volume of the air bubble is smaller than 0.1% of that of the cavity. When the small air bubble moves, the RF shift will change and reach its maximum value as it is located at the middle of the cavity. As the gas volume fraction of the two-phase flow is low, both the RFs and RAs from the measurement results decrease dramatically with the increasing gas volume, and this decreasing trend gradually becomes even as the gas volume fraction increases further. These experimental results agree with the theoretical ones qualitatively. In addition, the transient method for ARS is more suitable for measuring the gas volume fraction with randomness and instantaneity than the steady-state one, because the latter could not reflect the random and instant characteristics of the mixed fluid due to the time consumption for frequency sweeping. This study will play a very important role in the quantitative measurement of the gas volume fraction of multiphase flows.

  5. Nootropic Effects of Filipendula Vulgaris Moench Water Extract Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I; Amelchenko, V P

    2015-07-01

    Nootropic activity of water extract fractions from aerial parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench was demonstrated on the models of hermetic volume hypoxia, conditioned passive avoidance response, open field test, and forced swimming with a load. The fractions stimulated hypoxic resistance, normalized orientation and exploratory behavior, improved conditioned response reproduction during testing after hypoxic injury, and increased exercise tolerance. Fractionation of the extract led to dissociation of the effect components, which suggests that individual constituents have specific characteristics. Ethylacetate fraction exhibited most pronounced nootropic activity and was superior to plant extract by some characteristics. The detected effects seemed to be caused by modulation of the hippocampus activity the under the effects of phenol and triterpene compounds.

  6. Dependence of microwave absorption properties on ferrite volume fraction in MnZn ferrite/rubber radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gama, Adriana M., E-mail: adrianaamg@iae.cta.br [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil); Rezende, Mirabel C., E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil); Dantas, Christine C., E-mail: christineccd@iae.cta.br [Divisao de Materiais (AMR), Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial - DCTA (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    We report the analysis of measurements of the complex magnetic permeability ({mu}{sub r}) and dielectric permittivity ({epsilon}{sub r}) spectra of a rubber radar absorbing material (RAM) with various MnZn ferrite volume fractions. The transmission/reflection measurements were carried out in a vector network analyzer. Optimum conditions for the maximum microwave absorption were determined by substituting the complex permeability and permittivity in the impedance matching equation. Both the MnZn ferrite content and the RAM thickness effects on the microwave absorption properties, in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, were evaluated. The results show that the complex permeability and permittivity spectra of the RAM increase directly with the ferrite volume fraction. Reflection loss calculations by the impedance matching degree (reflection coefficient) show the dependence of this parameter on both thickness and composition of RAM. - Highlights: > Permeability and permittivity spectra of a MnZn ferrite RAM (2-18 GHz) are given. > Higher MnZn volume fraction favors increase of RAM/'s permeability and permittivity. > Minimum RL as a function of frequency, thickness and MnZn volume fraction given. > Higher thicknesses imply better absorption; optimum band shifts to lower frequencies. > For higher volume fractions, smaller thickness might offer better absorption (>10 GHz).

  7. The dependencies of phase velocity and dispersion on volume fraction in cancellous-bone-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Keith A

    2009-02-01

    Frequency-dependent phase velocity was measured in eight cancellous-bone-mimicking phantoms consisting of suspensions of randomly oriented nylon filaments (simulating trabeculae) in a soft-tissue-mimicking medium (simulating marrow). Trabecular thicknesses ranged from 152 to 356 mum. Volume fractions of nylon filament material ranged from 0% to 10%. Phase velocity varied approximately linearly with frequency over the range from 300 to 700 kHz. The increase in phase velocity (compared with phase velocity in a phantom containing no filaments) at 500 kHz was approximately proportional to volume fraction occupied by nylon filaments. The derivative of phase velocity with respect to frequency was negative and exhibited nonlinear, monotonically decreasing dependence on volume fraction. The dependencies of phase velocity and its derivative on volume fraction in these phantoms were similar to those reported in previous studies on (1) human cancellous bone and (2) phantoms consisting of parallel nylon wires immersed in water.

  8. Centrifugal Step Emulsification can Produce Water in Oil Emulsions with Extremely High Internal Volume Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Schuler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The high throughput preparation of emulsions with high internal volume fractions is important for many different applications, e.g., drug delivery. However, most emulsification techniques reach only low internal volume fractions and need stable flow rates that are often difficult to control. Here, we present a centrifugal high throughput step emulsification disk for the fast and easy production of emulsions with high internal volume fractions above 95%. The disk produces droplets at generation rates of up to 3700 droplets/s and, for the first time, enables the generation of emulsions with internal volume fractions of >97%. The coefficient of variation between droplet sizes is very good (4%. We apply our system to show the in situ generation of gel emulsion. In the future, the recently introduced unit operation of centrifugal step emulsification may be used for the high throughput production of droplets as reaction compartments for clinical diagnostics or as starting material for micromaterial synthesis.

  9. Elastic modulus of Al-Si/SiC metal matrix composites as a function of volume fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh Kumar, S; Rajasekharan, T [Powder Metallurgy Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh PO, Hyderabad-500 058 (India); Seshu Bai, V [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Central University PO, Hyderabad-500 046 (India); Rajkumar, K V; Sharma, G K; Jayakumar, T, E-mail: dearsanthosh@gmail.co [Non-Destructive Evaluation Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Chennai-603 102 (India)

    2009-09-07

    Aluminum alloy matrix composites have emerged as candidate materials for electronic packaging applications in the field of aerospace semiconductor electronics. Composites prepared by the pressureless infiltration technique with high volume fractions in the range 0.41-0.70 were studied using ultrasonic velocity measurements. For different volume fractions of SiC, the longitudinal velocity and shear velocity were found to be in the range of 7600-9300 m s{sup -1} and 4400-5500 m s{sup -1}, respectively. The elastic moduli of the composites were determined from ultrasonic velocities and were analysed as a function of the volume fraction of the reinforcement. The observed variation is discussed in the context of existing theoretical models for the effective elastic moduli of two-phase systems.

  10. Evaluating Volume Fractions of the Elements for Composite Laminates by Using Dielectric Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周胜; 储才元; 严灏景

    2001-01-01

    A series and parallel model for investigating the capacity of composite laminates and the relationship between the dielectric properties of the composites and its constituents are presented. Volume fractions of the constituents are considered in this study. The expression of the complex dielectric constants for evaluating volume fractions under discrete frequencies is established and the general solutions for the resultant linear simultaneous equations for system are also exploited.The results show that the high accuracy of proposed method is obtained.

  11. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O;

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  12. Solid volume fraction estimation of bone:marrow replica models using ultrasound transit time spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2016-02-01

    The acceptance of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the assessment of osteoporosis suffers from a limited understanding of both ultrasound wave propagation through cancellous bone and its exact dependence upon the material and structural properties. It has recently been proposed that ultrasound wave propagation in cancellous bone may be described by a concept of parallel sonic rays; the transit time of each ray defined by the proportion of bone and marrow propagated. A Transit Time Spectrum (TTS) describes the proportion of sonic rays having a particular transit time, effectively describing the lateral inhomogeneity of transit times over the surface aperture of the receive ultrasound transducer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the solid volume fraction (SVF) of simplified bone:marrow replica models may be reliably estimated from the corresponding ultrasound transit time spectrum. Transit time spectra were derived via digital deconvolution of the experimentally measured input and output ultrasonic signals, and compared to predicted TTS based on the parallel sonic ray concept, demonstrating agreement in both position and amplitude of spectral peaks. Solid volume fraction was calculated from the TTS; agreement between true (geometric calculation) with predicted (computer simulation) and experimentally-derived values were R(2)=99.9% and R(2)=97.3% respectively. It is therefore envisaged that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) offers the potential to reliably estimate bone mineral density and hence the established T-score parameter for clinical osteoporosis assessment.

  13. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  14. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, Yasutaka [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Mizuta, Masahiro [Laboratory of Advanced Data Science, Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Kita-11, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0811 (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  15. Volume-effect in radiation therapy part one: volume-effect and tumour; L'effet volume en radiotherapie premiere partie: effet volume et tumeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Wu, J. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou (AP-HP), Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Caudry, M.; Trouette, R.; Vendrely, V.; Causse, N.; Recaldini, L.; Dahan, O.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint-Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2003-04-01

    Volume is an important parameter of radiation therapy. Local control is inversely related to tumor size and the complication rate increases with the importance of the irradiated volume. Although the effect of irradiated volume has been widely reported since the beginning of radiotherapy, it has been less studied than other radiation parameters such as dose, fractionation, or treatment duration. One of the first organ system in which the adverse effect of increased volume was well defined is the skin. Over the last twenty years, numerous mathematical models have been developed for different organs. In this report we will discuss the relation between irradiated volume and tumor control. In a second article we will study the impact of irradiated volume on radiation adverse effects. (authors)

  16. MHD flow of dusty nanofluid over a stretching surface with volume fraction of dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Naramgari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed the momentum and heat transfer behavior of MHD nanofluid embedded with conducting dust particles past a stretching surface in the presence of volume fraction of dust particles. The governing equations of the flow and heat transfer are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and then solved numerically using Runge–Kutta based shooting technique. The effect of non-dimensional governing parameters on velocity and temperature profiles of the flow are discussed and presented through graphs. Additionally friction factor and the Nusselt number have also been computed. Under some special conditions, numerical results obtained by the present study were compared with the existed studies. The result of the present study proves to be highly satisfactory. The results indicate that an increase in the interaction between the fluid and particle phase enhances the heat transfer rate and reduces the friction factor.

  17. A Novel Semiautomated Fractional Limb Volume Tool for Rapid and Reproducible Fetal Soft Tissue Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Lauren M; Kim, Sung Yoon; Lee, Sungmin; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lee, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the reproducibility and efficiency of a semiautomated image analysis tool that rapidly provides fetal fractional limb volume measurements. Fifty pregnant women underwent 3-dimensional sonographic examinations for fractional arm and thigh volumes at a mean menstrual age of 31.3 weeks. Manual and semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements were calculated, with the semiautomated measurements calculated by novel software (5D Limb Vol; Samsung Medison, Seoul, Korea). The software applies an image transformation method based on the major axis length, minor axis length, and limb center coordinates. A transformed image is used to perform a global optimization technique for determination of an optimal limb soft tissue boundary. Bland-Altman analysis defined bias with 95% limits of agreement (LOA) between methods, and timing differences between manual versus automated methods were compared by a paired t test. Bland-Altman analysis indicated an acceptable bias with 95% LOA between the manual and semiautomated methods: mean arm volume ± SD, 1.7% ± 4.6% (95% LOA, -7.3% to 10.7%); and mean thigh volume, 0.0% ± 3.8% (95% LOA, -7.5% to 7.5%). The computer-assisted software completed measurements about 5 times faster compared to manual tracings. In conclusion, semiautomated fractional limb volume measurements are significantly faster to calculate when compared to a manual procedure. These results are reproducible and are likely to reduce operator dependency. The addition of computer-assisted fractional limb volume to standard biometry may improve the precision of estimated fetal weight by adding a soft tissue component to the weight estimation process.

  18. Analysis of the Microstructure and Permeability of the Laminates with Different Fiber Volume Fraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yue; LI Wei; LIANG Zi-qing

    2008-01-01

    Microstmctures of laminates produced by epoxy/ carbon fibers with different fiber volume fraction were studied by analyzing the composite cross-sections. The main result of the compaction of reinforcement is the flatting of bundle shape, the reducing of gap and the embedment of bundles among each layer. The void content outside the bundle decreased sharply during the compoction until it is less than that inside the bundle when the fiber volume fraction is over 60%. The resin flow velocity in the fiber tow is 102-104 times greater than the flow velocity out the fiber tow no matter the capillary pressure is taken into account or not.

  19. Vibrations of FGM thin cylindrical shells with exponential volume fraction law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul Ghafar Shah; Tahir Mahmood; Muhammad Nawaz Naeem

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the influence of an exponential volume fraction law on the vibration frequencies of thin functionally graded cylindrical shells is studied. Material properties in the shell thickness direction are graded in accordance with the exponential law. Expressions for the strain-displacement and curvature-displacement relationships are taken from Love's thin shell theory. The Rayleigh-Ritz approach is used to derive the shell eigenfrequency equation. Axial modal dependence is assumed in the characteristic beam functions. Natural frequencies of the shells are observed to be dependent on the constituent volume fractions. The results are compared with those available in the literature for the validity of the present methodology.

  20. Prediction of volume fractions in three-phase flows using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques Salgado, Cesar [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)], E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br; Brandao, Luis E.B. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil); Schirru, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE-DNC/EE-CT, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21941-972-Caixa Postal 68509 (Brazil); Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil); Silva, Ademir Xavier da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE-DNC/EE-CT, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21941-972-Caixa Postal 68509 (Brazil); Ramos, Robson [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    This work presents methodology based on nuclear technique and artificial neural network for volume fraction predictions in annular, stratified and homogeneous oil-water-gas regimes. Using principles of gamma-ray absorption and scattering together with an appropriate geometry, comprised of three detectors and a dual-energy gamma-ray source, it was possible to obtain data, which could be adequately correlated to the volume fractions of each phase by means of neural network. The MCNP-X code was used in order to provide the training data for the network.

  1. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Crabeck

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate 3-D images of air-volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4–22 cm sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air-volume fractions 5 mm. While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of air inclusions, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice microstructure (granular and columnar as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration and can help considerably improving parameterization of these processes in sea ice biogeochemical models.

  2. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabeck, Odile; Galley, Ryan; Delille, Bruno; Else, Brent; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Lemes, Marcos; Des Roches, Mathieu; Francus, Pierre; Tison, Jean-Louis; Rysgaard, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate images of air volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air volume fractions bubbles (Ø bubbles (1 mm bubbles (Ø > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of gas bubbles, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice texture (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration.

  3. Measurement of Soot Volume Fraction and Temperature for Oxygen-Enriched Ethylene Combustion Based on Flame Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Yan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for simultaneously visualizing the two-dimensional distributions of temperature and soot volume fraction in an ethylene flame was presented. A single-color charge-coupled device (CCD camera was used to capture the flame image in the visible spectrum considering the broad-response spectrum of the R and G bands of the camera. The directional emissive power of the R and G bands were calibrated and used for measurement. Slightly increased temperatures and reduced soot concentration were predicted in the central flame without self-absorption effects considered, an iterative algorithm was used for eliminating the effect of self-absorption. Nine different cases were presented in the experiment to demonstrate the effects of fuel mass flow rate and oxygen concentration on temperature and soot concentration in three different atmospheres. For ethylene combustion in pure-air atmosphere, as the fuel mass flow rate increased, the maximum temperature slightly decreased, and the maximum soot volume fraction slightly increased. For oxygen fractions of 30%, 40%, and 50% combustion in O2/N2 oxygen-enhanced atmospheres, the maximum flame temperatures were 2276, 2451, and 2678 K, whereas combustion in O2/CO2 atmospheres were 1916, 2322, and 2535 K. The maximum soot volume fractions were 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere and 13.6, 15.3, and 14.8 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/CO2 atmosphere. Compared with the O2/CO2 atmosphere, combustion in the oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere produced higher flame temperature and larger soot volume fraction. Preliminary results indicated that this technique is reliable and can be used for combustion diagnosis.

  4. Fractional Quantization of the Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-02-27

    The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect is caused by the condensation of a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field into a new type of macroscopic ground state, the elementary excitations of which are fermions of charge 1/m, where m is an odd integer. A mathematical description is presented.

  5. Influence of bress laminate volume fraction on electromechanical properties of externally laminated coated conductor tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bautista, Zhierwinjay M.; Shin, Hyung Seop [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Hun; Lee, Hun Ju; Moon, Seung Hyun [SuNAM Co Ltd., Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The enhancement of mechanical properties of coated conductor (CC) tapes in practical application are usually achieved by reinforcing through lamination or electroplating metal layers on either sides of the CC tape. Mechanical or electromechanical properties of the CC tapes have been largely affected by the lamination structure under various loading modes such as tension, bending or even cyclic. In this study, the influence of brass laminate volume fraction on electromechanical properties of RCE-DR processed Gadolinium-barium-copper-oxide (GdBCO) CC tapes was investigated. The samples used were composed of single-side and both-side laminate of brass layer to the Cu-stabilized CC tape and their Ic behaviors were compared to those of the Cu-stabilized CC tape without external lamination. The stress/strain dependences of Ic in laminated CC tapes under uniaxial tension were analyzed and the irreversible stress/strain limits were determined. As a result, the increase of brass laminate volume fraction initially increased the irreversible strain limit and became gradual. The corresponding irreversible stress limit, however, showed no difference even though the brass laminate volume fraction increased to 3.4. But the irreversible load limit linearly increased with the brass laminate volume fraction.

  6. Spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction partial-volume irradiation: a swine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medin, P.M.; Foster, R.D.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Sayre, J.W.; McBride, W.H.; Solberg, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation in swine. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A 5-cm-long cervical segment was irradiated in 38-47-week-old Yucatan minipigs using a dedicated, image-guided radiosurgery linear accelerator. The radiation was delivered

  7. Influence of bone volume fraction and architecture on computed large-deformation failure mechanisms in human trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevill, Grant; Eswaran, Senthil K; Gupta, Atul; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis; Keaveny, Tony M

    2006-12-01

    Large-deformation bending and buckling have long been proposed as failure mechanisms by which the strength of trabecular bone can be affected disproportionately to changes in bone density, and thus may represent an important aspect of bone quality. We sought here to quantify the contribution of large-deformation failure mechanisms on strength, to determine the dependence of these effects on bone volume fraction and architecture, and to confirm that the inclusion of large-deformation effects in high-resolution finite element models improves predictions of strength versus experiment. Micro-CT-based finite element models having uniform hard tissue material properties were created from 54 cores of human trabecular bone taken from four anatomic sites (age = 70+/-11; 24 male, 27 female donors), which were subsequently biomechanically tested to failure. Strength predictions were made from the models first including, then excluding, large-deformation failure mechanisms, both for compressive and tensile load cases. As expected, strength predictions versus experimental data for the large-deformation finite element models were significantly improved (p deformation models in both tension and compression. Below a volume fraction of about 0.20, large-deformation failure mechanisms decreased trabecular strength from 5-80% for compressive loading, while effects were negligible above this volume fraction. Step-wise nonlinear multiple regression revealed that structure model index (SMI) and volume fraction (BV/TV) were significant predictors of these reductions in strength (R2 = 0.83, p deformation failure mechanisms on trabecular bone strength is highly heterogeneous and is not well explained by standard architectural metrics.

  8. Determination of volume fractions of texture components with standard distributions in Euler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hyung; Rollett, A. D.; Oh, K. H.

    2004-03-01

    The intensities of texture components are modeled by Gaussian distribution functions in Euler space. The multiplicities depend on the relation between the texture component and the crystal and sample symmetry elements. Higher multiplicities are associated with higher maximum values in the orientation distribution function (ODF). The ODF generated by Gaussian function shows that the S component has a multiplicity of 1, the brass and copper components, 2, and the Goss and cube components, 4 in the cubic crystal and orthorhombic sample symmetry. Typical texture components were modeled using standard distributions in Euler space to calculate a discrete ODF, and their volume fractions were collected and verified against the volume used to generate the ODF. The volume fraction of a texture component that has a standard spherical distribution can be collected using the misorientation approach. The misorientation approach means integrating the volume-weighted intensity that is located within a specified cut-off misorientation angle from the ideal orientation. The volume fraction of a sharply peaked texture component can be collected exactly with a small cut-off value, but textures with broad distributions (large full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)) need a larger cut-off value. Larger cut-off values require Euler space to be partitioned between texture components in order to avoid overlapping regions. The misorientation approach can be used for texture's volume in Euler space in a general manner. Fiber texture is also modeled with Gaussian distribution, and it is produced by rotation of a crystal located at g 0, around a sample axis. The volume of fiber texture in wire drawing or extrusion also can be calculated easily in the unit triangle with the angle distance approach.

  9. Effect the addition of 10% (volume fraction) chromium on the mechanical properties of NiAlCr processed by powder metallurgy; Efecto de la adicion de un 10% en volumen de cromo en el comportamiento a traccion de aleaciones pulvimetalurgicas NiAlCr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Barriocanal, J.; Garces, G.; Perez, P.; Adeva, P.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical properties of Ni{sub 3}Al-Cr reinforced with 10% in volume fraction of chromium particles produced by powder metallurgy have been studied. For this purpose, milled powders with composition of Ni-20.9Al-8Cr-0.49B (% st.) with and without the addition of 10% in volume fraction of chromium particles have been produced. Both alloys were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). After HIP, heat treatment was applied to homogenize the microstructure. The chromium reinforcement has an important effect in the yield strength and ultimate strength increase. The reinforced alloy presents a yield strength of 1300 MPa at room temperature with respect to 800 MPa for the un-reinforced material. After heat treatment, the yield strength of both alloys does not change significantly. However, a decrease in ductility and ultimate tensile strength have been observed. (Author) 4 refs.

  10. Fractional Statistics and the Butterfly Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Yingfei

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we point out a connection between quantum chaos, known as the "butterfly effect", in (1+1)-dimensional rational conformal field theories and fractional statistics in (2+1)-dimensional topologically ordered states. This connection comes from the characteristics of the butterfly effect by the out-of-time-order-correlator proposed recently. We show that the late-time behavior of such correlators is determined by universal properties of the rational conformal field theory such as the modular S-matrix. Using the bulk-boundary correspondence between rational conformal field theories and (2+1)-dimensional topologically ordered states, we show that the late time behavior of out-of-time-order-correlators is intrinsically connected with fractional statistics in the topological order. We also propose a quantitative measure of chaos in a rational conformal field theory, which turns out to be determined by the topological entanglement entropy of the corresponding topological order.

  11. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Osterhoudt, Curtis F. [University of Alaska

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  12. Research on Cellular Instabilities of Lean Premixed Syngas Flames under Various Hydrogen Fractions Using a Constant Volume Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Meng Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the intrinsic instabilities of H2/CO lean (φ = 0.4 to φ = 1.0 premixed flames at different hydrogen fractions ranging from 0% to 100% at elevated pressure and room temperature was performed in a constant volume vessel using a Schlieren system. The unstretched laminar burning velocities were compared with data from the previous literature and simulated results. The results indicate that excellent agreements are obtained. The cellular instabilities of syngas-air flames were discussed and critical flame radii were measured. When hydrogen fractions are above 50%, the flame tends to be more stable as the equivalence ratio increases; however, the instability increases for flames of lower hydrogen fractions. For the premixed syngas flame with hydrogen fractions greater than 50%, the decline in cellular instabilities induced by the increase in equivalence ratio can be attributed to a reduction of diffusive-thermal instabilities rather than increased hydrodynamic instabilities. For premixed syngas flames with hydrogen fractions lower than 50%, as the equivalence ratio increases, the cellular instabilities become more evident because the enhanced hydrodynamic instabilities become the dominant effect. For premixed syngas flames, the enhancement of cellular instabilities induced by the increase in hydrogen fraction is the result of both increasing diffusive-thermal and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  13. Tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions in breast DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Jeong Seon; Park, Sang Joon; Jung, Yun Sub; Song, Jung Joo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to classify contrast enhancement curves using both three-time-points (3TP) method and clustering approach at full-time points, and to introduce a novel evaluation method using perfusion volume fractions for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. DCE-MRI was applied to 24 lesions (12 malignant, 12 benign). After region growing segmentation for each lesion, hole-filling and 3D morphological erosion and dilation were performed for extracting final lesion volume. 3TP method and k-means clustering at full-time points were applied for classifying kinetic curves into six classes. Intratumoral volume fraction for each class was calculated. ROC and linear discriminant analyses were performed with distributions of the volume fractions for each class, pairwise and whole classes, respectively. The best performance in each class showed accuracy (ACC), 84.7% (sensitivity (SE), 100%; specificity (SP), 66.7% to a single class) to 3TP method, whereas ACC, 73.6% (SE, 41.7%; SP, 100% to a single class) to k-means clustering. The best performance in pairwise classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7% to four class pairs and SE, 58.3%; SP, 91.7% to a single class pair) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 75%; SP, 75% to a single class pair and SE, 66.7%; SP, 83.3% to three class pairs) to k-means clustering. The performance in whole classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7%) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 91.7%; 58.3%) to k-means clustering. The results indicate that tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions is helpful in selecting meaningful kinetic patterns for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions, and that two different classification methods are complementary to each other.

  14. Fractional statistics and the butterfly effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yingfei; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Fractional statistics and quantum chaos are both phenomena associated with the non-local storage of quantum information. In this article, we point out a connection between the butterfly effect in (1+1)-dimensional rational conformal field theories and fractional statistics in (2+1)-dimensional topologically ordered states. This connection comes from the characterization of the butterfly effect by the out-of-time-order-correlator proposed recently. We show that the late-time behavior of such correlators is determined by universal properties of the rational conformal field theory such as the modular S-matrix and conformal spins. Using the bulk-boundary correspondence between rational conformal field theories and (2+1)-dimensional topologically ordered states, we show that the late time behavior of out-of-time-order-correlators is intrinsically connected with fractional statistics in the topological order. We also propose a quantitative measure of chaos in a rational conformal field theory, which turns out to be determined by the topological entanglement entropy of the corresponding topological order.

  15. Fractional statistics and the butterfly effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yingfei; Qi, Xiao-Liang [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-08-23

    Fractional statistics and quantum chaos are both phenomena associated with the non-local storage of quantum information. In this article, we point out a connection between the butterfly effect in (1+1)-dimensional rational conformal field theories and fractional statistics in (2+1)-dimensional topologically ordered states. This connection comes from the characterization of the butterfly effect by the out-of-time-order-correlator proposed recently. We show that the late-time behavior of such correlators is determined by universal properties of the rational conformal field theory such as the modular S-matrix and conformal spins. Using the bulk-boundary correspondence between rational conformal field theories and (2+1)-dimensional topologically ordered states, we show that the late time behavior of out-of-time-order-correlators is intrinsically connected with fractional statistics in the topological order. We also propose a quantitative measure of chaos in a rational conformal field theory, which turns out to be determined by the topological entanglement entropy of the corresponding topological order.

  16. Rheological Characterisation of the Flow Behaviour of Wood Plastic Composites in Consideration of Different Volume Fractions of Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, N.; Hansmann, H.; Koch, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the rheological properties of wood plastic composites (WPC) with different polymeric matrices (LDPE, low-density polyethylene and PP, polypropylene) and with different types of wood filler (hardwood flour and softwood flour) have been investigated by means of high pressure capillary rheometry. The volume fraction of wood was varied between 0 and 60 %. The shear thinning behaviour of the WPC melts can be well described by the Ostwald - de Waele power law relationship. The flow consistency index K of the power law shows a good correlation with the volume fraction of wood. Interparticular interaction effects of wood particles can be mathematically taken into account by implementation of an interaction exponent (defined as the ratio between flow exponent of WPC and flow exponent of polymeric matrix). The interaction exponent shows a good correlation with the flow consistency index. On the basis of these relationships the concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate has been modified. Thus, the flow behaviour of the investigated wood filled polymer melts could be well described mathematically by the modified concept of shear-stress-equivalent inner shear rate. On this basis, the shear thinning behaviour of WPC can now be estimated with good accuracy, taking into account the volume fraction of wood.

  17. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  18. Surface area and volume fraction of random open-pore systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, H.; Elsner, A.; Stoyan, D.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, explicit approximate formulas are presented for the volume fraction and specific surface area of random open-pore systems with poly-disperse pore size distributions. It is shown that the formulas are valid for broad classes of models for porous media characterized by tunable pore size distributions and a variable degree of inter-penetrability of pores. The formulas for the poly-disperse case are based on expressions derived previously for mono-disperse penetrable-sphere models. The results are obtained by analysis of a series of open-pore models, which are prepared by computer simulation of systems of randomly packed partially penetrable spheres with various poly-disperse size distributions such as gamma, lognormal, and Gaussian. The formulas are applied in a study of atomic layer deposition processes on open-pore systems, and the effective Young's modulus and the effective thermal conductivity of Al2O3 coated porous polypropylene electrodes for lithium ion batteries are predicted.

  19. Excitons in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-09-01

    Quasiparticles of charge 1/m in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect form excitons, which are collective excitations physically similar to the transverse magnetoplasma oscillations of a Wigner crystal. A variational exciton wavefunction which shows explicitly that the magnetic length is effectively longer for quasiparticles than for electrons is proposed. This wavefunction is used to estimate the dispersion relation of these excitons and the matrix elements to generate them optically out of the ground state. These quantities are then used to describe a type of nonlinear conductivity which may occur in these systems when they are relatively clean.

  20. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  1. Volume fraction prediction in biphasic flow using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Cesar M.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The volume fraction is one of the most important parameters used to characterize air-liquid two-phase flows. It is a physical value to determine other parameters, such as the phase's densities and to determine the flow rate of each phase. These parameters are important to predict the flow pattern and to determine a mathematical model for the system. To study, for example, heat transfer and pressure drop. This work presents a methodology for volume fractions prediction in water-gas stratified flow regime using the nuclear technique and artificial intelligence. The volume fractions calculate in biphasic flow systems is complex and the analysis by means of analytical equations becomes very difficult. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means of the artificial neural network. The detection system uses appropriate broad beam geometry, comprised of a ({sup 137}Cs) energy gamma-ray source and a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in order measure transmitted beam whose the counts rates are influenced by the phases composition. These distributions are directly used by the network without any parameterization of the measured signal. The ideal and static theoretical models for stratified regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the network. The detector also was modeled with this code and the results were compared to experimental photopeak efficiency measurements of radiation sources. The proposed network could obtain with satisfactory prediction of the volume fraction in water-gas system, demonstrating to be a promising approach for this purpose. (author)

  2. Effect of Methanol Volume Fractions in Gasoline on Anti-Swelling Property of Rubber Materials%甲醇体积分数不同的甲醇汽油对橡胶材料膨胀性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊娥; 闫锋; 张文鹏

    2013-01-01

    Because of inherent characters of rubber materials,there exists some differences on anti-swelling property of rubber materials in gasoline with different methanol volume fraction.Immersion tests in gasoline 93# or gasoline with different methanol proportions are conducted to show the anti-swelling property of 3 rubber materials commonly used in motor vehicles.The results show that silicone rubber has better anti-swelling property in gasoline with high methanol proportion; on the contrary,fluorine rubber has good resistance to swelling in low-proportion-methanol gasoline; Nitrile Rubber has good antiswelling property in all gasoline with different proportion of methanol.%由于橡胶材料自身的特性不同,对甲醇体积分数不同的甲醇汽油的抗膨胀性存在差异,采用汽车上常见的3种橡胶材料分别在93#汽油和不同甲醇体积分数的甲醇汽油中进行浸泡实验.试验结果表明,硅橡胶在高比例甲醇汽油中抗膨胀性较好,氟橡胶在低比例甲醇汽油中抗膨胀性较好,而丁腈类橡胶在不同比例甲醇汽油中均有很好的抗膨胀性.

  3. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  4. Salinity independent volume fraction prediction in water-gas-oil multiphase flows using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, C.M.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (DIRA/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radiofarmacos

    2011-07-01

    This work investigates the response of a volume fraction prediction system for water-gas-oil multiphase flows considering variations on water salinity. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means the artificial neural networks (ANNs). The detection system uses appropriate fan beam geometry, comprised of a dual-energy gamma-ray source and two NaI(Tl) detectors adequately positioned outside the pipe in order measure transmitted and scattered beams. An ideal and static theoretical model for annular flow regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the ANN. More than 500 simulations have been done, in which water salinity have been ranged from 0 to 16% in order to cover a most practical situations. Validation tests have included values of volume fractions and water salinity different from those used in ANN training phase. The results presented here show that the proposed approach may be successfully applied to material volume fraction prediction on watergas- oil multiphase flows considering practical (real) levels of variations in water salinity. (author)

  5. Stereological evaluation of the volume and volume fraction of newborns' brain compartment and brain in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisari, Mehtap; Ertekin, Tolga; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Cınar, Serife; Doğanay, Selim; Acer, Niyazi

    2012-11-01

    Brain development in early life is thought to be critical period in neurodevelopmental disorder. Knowledge relating to this period is currently quite limited. This study aimed to evaluate the volume relation of total brain (TB), cerebrum, cerebellum and bulbus+pons by the use of Archimedes' principle and stereological (point-counting) method and after that to compare these approaches with each other in newborns. This study was carried out on five newborn cadavers mean weighing 2.220 ± 1.056 g with no signs of neuropathology. The mean (±SD) age of the subjects was 39.7 (±1.5) weeks. The volume and volume fraction of the total brain, cerebrum, cerebellum and bulbus+pons were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images using the point-counting approach of stereological methods and by the use of fluid displacement technique. The mean (±SD) TB, cerebrum, cerebellum and bulbus+pons volumes by fluid displacement were 271.48 ± 78.3, 256.6 ± 71.8, 12.16 ± 6.1 and 2.72 ± 1.6 cm3, respectively. By the Cavalieri principle (point-counting) using sagittal MRIs, they were 262.01 ± 74.9, 248.11 ± 68.03, 11.68 ± 6.1 and 2.21 ± 1.13 cm3, respectively. The mean (± SD) volumes by point-counting technique using axial MR images were 288.06 ± 88.5, 275.2 ± 83.1, 19.75 ± 5.3 and 2.11 ± 0.7 cm3, respectively. There were no differences between the fluid displacement and point-counting (using axial and sagittal images) for all structures (p > 0.05). This study presents the basic data for studies relative to newborn's brain volume fractions according to two methods. Stereological (point-counting) estimation may be accepted a beneficial and new tool for neurological evaluation in vivo research of the brain. Based on these techniques we introduce here, the clinician may evaluate the growth of the brain in a more efficient and precise manner.

  6. Determination of respirable mass concentration using a high volume air sampler and a sedimentation method for fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.

    1995-12-31

    A preliminary study of a new method for determining respirable mass concentration is described. This method uses a high volume air sampler and subsequent fractionation of the collected mass using a particle sedimentation technique. Side-by-side comparisons of this method with cyclones were made in the field and in the laboratory. There was good agreement among the samplers in the laboratory, but poor agreement in the field. The effect of wind on the samplers` capture efficiencies is the primary hypothesized source of error among the field results. The field test took place at the construction site of a hazardous waste landfill located on the Hanford Reservation.

  7. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  8. A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, L.

    2014-01-10

    Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.

  9. Prediction of Shrinkage Pore Volume Fraction Using a Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to use a dimensionless form of the well-known Niyama criterion to directly predict the amount of shrinkage porosity that forms during solidification of metal alloy castings. The main advancement offered by this method is that it avoids the need to know the threshold Niyama value below which shrinkage porosity forms; such threshold values are generally unknown and alloy dependent. The dimensionless criterion accounts for both the local thermal conditions (as in the original Niyama criterion) and the properties and solidification characteristics of the alloy. Once a dimensionless Niyama criterion value is obtained from casting simulation results, the corresponding shrinkage pore volume fraction can be determined knowing only the solid fraction-temperature curve and the total solidification shrinkage of the alloy. Curves providing the shrinkage pore volume percentage as a function of the dimensionless Niyama criterion are given for WCB steel, aluminum alloy A356, and magnesium alloy AZ91D. The present method is used in a general-purpose casting simulation software package to predict shrinkage porosity in three-dimensional (3-D) castings. Comparisons between simulated and experimental shrinkage porosity results for a WCB steel plate casting demonstrate that this method can reasonably predict shrinkage. Additional simulations for magnesium alloy AZ91D illustrate that this method is applicable to a wide variety of alloys and casting conditions.

  10. Determination of the Surface and Volume Porosity, on the Basis of the Main Fraction of the Polifractional Matrix of Moulding and Core Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko R.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the hereby paper is to present the developed model of determining the volume and surface porosity based on the main fraction of polifractional materials, its experimental verification and utilisation for the interpretation of effects accompanying the formation of a moulding sand apparent density, porosity and permeability in the blowing processes of the core and moulds technology.

  11. Microchemostat array with small-volume fraction replenishment for steady-state microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaewon; Wu, Jianzhang; Polymenis, Michael; Han, Arum

    2013-11-07

    A chemostat is a bioreactor in which microorganisms can be cultured at steady-state by controlling the rate of culture medium inflow and waste outflow, thus maintaining media composition over time. Even though many microbial studies could greatly benefit from studying microbes in steady-state conditions, high instrument cost, complexity, and large reagent consumption hamper the routine use of chemostats. Microfluidic-based chemostats (i.e. microchemostats) can operate with significantly smaller reagent consumption while providing accurate chemostatic conditions at orders of magnitude lower cost compared to conventional chemostats. Also, microchemostats have the potential to significantly increase the throughput by integrating arrays of microchemostats. We present a microchemostat array with a unique two-depth culture chamber design that enables small-volume fraction replenishment of culture medium as low as 1% per replenishment cycle in a 250 nl volume. A system having an array of 8 microchemostats on a 40 × 60 mm(2) footprint could be automatically operated in parallel by a single controller unit as a demonstration for potential high throughput microbial studies. The model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, successfully reached a stable steady-state of different cell densities as a demonstration of the chemostatic functionality by programming the dilution rates. Chemostatic functionality of the system was further confirmed by quantifying the budding index as a function of dilution rate, a strong indicator of growth-dependent cell division. In addition, the small-volume fraction replenishment feature minimized the cell density fluctuation during the culture. The developed system provides a robust, low-cost, and higher throughput solution to furthering studies in microbial physiology.

  12. Fractions We Cannot Ignore: The Nonsymbolic Ratio Congruity Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Percival G; Lewis, Mark R

    2016-10-20

    Although many researchers theorize that primitive numerosity processing abilities may lay the foundation for whole number concepts, other classes of numbers, like fractions, are sometimes assumed to be inaccessible to primitive architectures. This research presents evidence that the automatic processing of nonsymbolic magnitudes affects processing of symbolic fractions. Participants completed modified Stroop tasks in which they selected the larger of two symbolic fractions while the ratios of the fonts in which the fractions were printed and the overall sizes of the compared fractions were manipulated as irrelevant dimensions. Participants were slower and less accurate when nonsymbolic dimensions of printed fractions were incongruent with the symbolic comparison decision. Results indicated a robust basic sensitivity to nonsymbolic ratios that exceeds prior conceptions about the accessibility of fraction values. Results also indicated a congruity effect for overall fraction size, contrary to findings of prior research. These findings have implications for extending theory about the nature of human number sense and mathematical cognition more generally.

  13. Si3N4颗粒体积分数对Si3N4/Al复合材料微观组织和力学性能的影响%Effect of volume fraction on microstructure and mechanical properties of Si3N4/Al composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修子扬; 陈国钦; 武高辉; 杨文澍; 刘艳梅

    2011-01-01

    采用压力浸渗法制备Si3N4体积分数分别为45%、50%和55%的颗粒增强铝基复合材料(Si3N4/Al).研究Si3N4体积分数和T6热处理对Si3N4/Al复合材料微观组织和力学性能的影响.结果表明:Si3N4颗粒分散均匀,Si3N4/Al复合材料浸渗良好,没有明显的孔洞和铸造缺陷;在Si3N4颗粒附近的铝基体中,可以观察到高密度位错;Si3N4/Al复合材料的弯曲强度随着Si3N4体积分数的增大而降低;T6热处理能提高复合材料的强度;复合材料的弹性模量随着Si3N4体积分数的增加而线性增加;在低Si3N4体积分数时,可以观察到更多的撕裂棱和韧窝;T6热处理对断口形貌的影响较小.%Si3N4 particles reinforced aluminium matrix composites (Si3N4/Al) with different particle volume fractions (45%,50%,and 55%) were fabricated by pressure infiltration method.The effects of Si3N4 volume fraction and T6 treatment on mierostructure and mechanical properties of Si3N4/Al composite were investigated.The results show that Si3N4/Al composites are well infiltrated with good particles dispersion and no apparent porosity or significant casting defects are observed.High density of dislocations in Al matrix around Si3N4 particles is observed.The bending strength of Si3N4/Al composites decreases with an increase in Si3N4 volume fraction,and can be greatly improved by T6 treatment.Elastic modulus of composites increases linearly with Si3N4 volume fraction.At a lower Si3N4 volume fraction,more tearing ridge and dimples with elongation are observed.T6 heat treatment shows minor effect on the fracture surface of composite.

  14. Volume fraction instability in an oscillating non-Brownian iso-dense suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roht, Y. L.; Gauthier, G.; Hulin, J. P.; Salin, D.; Chertcoff, R.; Auradou, H.; Ippolito, I.

    2017-06-01

    The instability of an iso-dense non-Brownian suspension of polystyrene beads of diameter 40 μm dispersed in a water-glycerol mixture submitted to a periodic square wave oscillating flow in a Hele-Shaw cell is studied experimentally. The instability gives rise to stationary bead concentration waves transverse to the flow. It has been observed for average particle volume fractions between 0.25 and 0.4, for periods of the square wave flow variation between 0.4 and 10 s and in finite intervals of the amplitude of the fluid displacement. The study shows that the wavelength λ increases roughly linearly with the amplitude of the oscillatory flow; on the other hand, λ is independent of the particle concentration and of the period of oscillation of the flow although the minimum threshold amplitude for observing the instability increases with the period.

  15. In situ synthesis of calcium phosphate-polycaprolactone nanocomposites with high ceramic volume fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, C; Gotman, I; Jiang, X; Fuchs, S; Kirkpatrick, C J; Gutmanas, E Y

    2010-06-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate-PCL nanocomposite powders with unusually high ceramic volume fractions (80-95%) and uniform PCL distribution were synthesized by a non-aqueous chemical reaction in the presence of the dissolved polymer. No visible polymer separation occurred during processing. Depending on the reagents combination, either dicalcium phosphate (DCP) or Ca-deficient HA (CDHA) was obtained. CDHA-PCL composite powders were high pressure consolidated at room temperature yielding dense materials with high compressive strengths. Such densification route provides the possibility of incorporating drug and proteins without damaging their biological activity. The CDHA-PCL composites were tested in osteoblastic and endothelial cell line cultures and were found to support the attachment and proliferation of both cell types.

  16. Mechanical behavior of LC4 alloy in semisolid state at high volume fractions of solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of LC4 alloy in the semisolid state at high volume fractions of solid has been studied through unconstrictive compressing test. The results show that peak stress mainly depends on grain boundary's cohesion and instantaneous strain rate sensitivity in the semisolid state, which is similar to that in the solid state. Analyses on microstructures and status of compressive stress of specimen demonstrate that segregation of liquid-solid phase is mainly affected by strain rate and deformation temperature. There are mainly two kinds of flow in liquid phase: either from the region with relatively large hydrostatic compressive stress to the region with relatively small hydrostatic compressive stress or from the grain boundaries perpendicular to the compression axis to the grain boundaries with a certain directional angle to the compression direction. Based on the above results, compressive deformation mechanism mainly depends on deformation temperature, strain rate and stress state.

  17. Diffusion characteristics and extracellular volume fraction during normoxia and hypoxia in slices of rat neostriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, M E; Nicholson, C

    1991-02-01

    1. Diffusion properties of submerged, superfused slices from the rat neostriatum were measured by quantitative analysis of concentration-time profiles of tetramethylammonium (TMA+) introduced by iontophoresis. TMA+ was sensed at an ion-selective microelectrode (ISM) positioned 100-150 microns from the source pipette. Slice viability was assessed from the extracellular field potentials evoked by intrastriatal electrical stimulation. 2. Under normoxic conditions the extracellular volume fraction (alpha) was 0.21 (range 0.18-0.24), and the tortuosity (lambda) was 1.54, in slices with good field potentials. In slices with poor field potentials, alpha was 0.09-0.16. Extraction of correct alpha and lambda in the slice required evaluation of nonspecific uptake, k', which was 1 x 10(-2) s-1. 3. Slices were made hypoxic by superfusing physiological saline equilibrated with 95% N2-5% CO2 for 10-30 min. Synaptic components of field potentials were inhibited after 3-4 min in hypoxic media. In some experiments extracellular K+ concentration [( K+]o) was monitored with ISMs. During hypoxia, [K+]o rose from an average baseline of 5.1 mM to 7-10 mM. After reoxygenation, [K+]o transiently fell below the original level. 4. The average value for alpha during hypoxia was 0.13 (a 38% decrease), which was significantly different from control (P less than 0.001) and increased progressively during hypoxic exposure. In contrast, tortuosity and k' were unchanged by this treatment. 5. These data represent the first characterization of the diffusion properties of the rat striatal slice and of changes in extracellular volume fraction during hypoxia in a brain slice preparation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. RESOLVE Survey Photometry and Volume-limited Calibration of the Photometric Gas Fractions Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, Kathleen D; Stark, David V; Moffett, Amanda J; Norris, Mark A; Snyder, Elaine M; Hoversten, Erik A

    2015-01-01

    We present custom-processed UV, optical, and near-IR photometry for the RESOLVE survey, a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass within two subvolumes of the nearby universe (RESOLVE-A and -B), complete down to baryonic mass ~10^9.1-9.3 Msun. In contrast to standard pipeline photometry (e.g., SDSS), our photometry uses optimal background subtraction, avoids suppressing color gradients, and includes systematic errors. With these improvements, we measure brighter magnitudes, larger radii, bluer colors, and a real increase in scatter around the red sequence. Combining stellar masses from our photometry with the RESOLVE-A HI mass census, we create volume-limited calibrations of the photometric gas fractions (PGF) technique, which predicts gas-to-stellar mass ratios (G/S) from galaxy colors and optional additional parameters. We analyze G/S-color residuals vs. potential third parameters, finding that axial ratio is the best independent and physically meaningful third parameter. We define a "modi...

  19. Three-dimensional simulations of microstructural evolution in polycrystalline dual-phase materials with constant volume fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Voorhees, P.W.; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal

    2013-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of a polycrystalline dual-phase material with a constant volume fraction of the phases was investigated using large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations. All materials parameters are taken to be isotropic, and microstructures with volume fractions of 50....../50 and 40/60 were examined. After an initial transient, the number of grains decrease from ∼2600 to ∼500. It was found that the mean grain size of grains of both phases obeyed a power law with an exponent of 3, and the microstructural evolution was found to be controlled by diffusion. Steady...... with the topology of single-phase grain structures as determined by experiment and simulation. The evolution of size and number of faces for the minority and majority phase grains in the 40/60 volume fraction simulation is presented and discussed. Non-constant curvature across some interphase boundaries...

  20. Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect: Conserving approximation for incompressible fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    2001-11-01

    A microscopic Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect developed by Shankar and the present author based on the fermionic Chern-Simons approach has recently been quite successful in calculating gaps and finite-tempertature properties in fractional quantum Hall states. Initially proposed as a small-q theory, it was subsequently extended by Shankar to form an algebraically consistent theory for all q in the lowest Landau level. Such a theory is amenable to a conserving approximation in which the constraints have vanishing correlators and decouple from physical response functions. Properties of the incompressible fractions are explored in this conserving approximation, including the magnetoexciton dispersions and the evolution of the small-q structure factor as ν-->12. Finally, a formalism capable of dealing with a nonuniform ground-state charge density is developed and used to show how the correct fractional value of the quasiparticle charge emerges from the theory.

  1. Destruction of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect by Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1985-07-01

    It is suggested that Hall steps in the fractional quantum Hall effect are physically similar to those in the ordinary quantum Hall effect. This proposition leads to a simple scaling diagram containing a new type of fixed point, which is identified with the destruction of the fractional states by disorder. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  2. A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    increasing the fiber-volume fraction by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) in order to produce composite structures with aerospace-grade...processed composites. Using a combination of viscosity control, ARL- based VARTM techniques, and a pressure control system, we increased the fiber-volume...content from 50% (ARL’s normal processing range for a particular material system and VARTM process) to over 60%. Future work will focus on

  3. Fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, D N; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Sun, Kai; Sheng, L

    2011-07-12

    It is well known that the topological phenomena with fractional excitations, the fractional quantum Hall effect, will emerge when electrons move in Landau levels. Here we show the theoretical discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels in an interacting fermion model. The non-interacting part of our Hamiltonian is the recently proposed topologically non-trivial flat-band model on a checkerboard lattice. In the presence of nearest-neighbouring repulsion, we find that at 1/3 filling, the Fermi-liquid state is unstable towards the fractional quantum Hall effect. At 1/5 filling, however, a next-nearest-neighbouring repulsion is needed for the occurrence of the 1/5 fractional quantum Hall effect when nearest-neighbouring repulsion is not too strong. We demonstrate the characteristic features of these novel states and determine the corresponding phase diagram.

  4. The effects of intracranial volume adjustment approaches on multiple regional MRI volumes in healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eVoevodskaya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In neurodegeneration research, normalization of regional volumes by intracranial volume (ICV is important to estimate the extent of disease-driven atrophy. There is little agreement as to whether raw volumes, volume-to-ICV fractions or regional volumes from which the ICV factor has been regressed out should be used for volumetric brain imaging studies. Using multiple regional cortical and subcortical volumetric measures generated by Freesurfer (51 in total, the main aim of this study was to elucidate the implications of these adjustment approaches. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data were analyzed from two large cohorts, the population-based PIVUS cohort (N=406, all subjects age 75 and the Alzheimer disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI cohort (N=724. Further, we studied whether the chosen ICV normalization approach influenced the relationship between hippocampus and cognition in the three diagnostic groups of the ADNI cohort (Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy individuals. The ability of raw vs adjusted hippocampal volumes to predict diagnostic status was also assessed. In both cohorts raw volumes correlate positively with ICV, but do not scale directly proportionally with it. The correlation direction is reversed for all volume-to-ICV fractions, except the lateral and third ventricles. Most grey matter fractions are larger in females, while lateral ventricle fractions are greater in males. Residual correction effectively eliminated the correlation between the regional volumes and ICV and removed gender differences. The association between hippocampal volumes and cognition was not altered by ICV normalization. Comparing prediction of diagnostic status using the different approaches, small but significant differences were found. The choice of normalization approach should be carefully considered when designing a volumetric brain imaging study.

  5. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  6. Mapping Bone Mineral Density Obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2017-01-01

    Methods for relating or mapping estimates of volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction (BVF) are outlined mathematically. The methods are based on definitions of bone properties, cited experimental studies and regression relations derived from them for trabecular bone in the proximal femur. Using an experimental range of values in the intertrochanteric region obtained from male and female human subjects, age 18 to 49, the BVF values calculated from four different methods were compared to the experimental average and numerical range. The BVF values computed from the conversion method used data from two sources. One source provided pre bed rest vBMD values in the intertrochanteric region from 24 bed rest subject who participated in a 70 day study. Another source contained preflight vBMD values from 18 astronauts who spent 4 to 6 months on the ISS. To aid the use of a mapping from BMD to BVF, the discussion includes how to formulate them for purpose of computational modeling. An application of the conversions would be used to aid in modeling of time varying changes in vBMD as it relates to changes in BVF via bone remodeling and/or modeling.

  7. Left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic volume in patients with diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovin, Ion S; Ebisu, Keita; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Finta, Laurie A; Oprea, Adriana D; Brandt, Cynthia A; Dziura, James; Wackers, Frans J

    2013-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction can be diagnosed on equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) by a low peak filling rate (PFR) in the setting of a normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The authors evaluated the relationship between diastolic dysfunction, LVEF, and end-diastolic volume (EDV). A total of 408 predominantly asymptomatic patients with an LVEF ≥50% by ERNA were studied. LVEF of patients with a low PFR was compared with the LVEF of patients with a normal PFR. Correlation analyses to evaluate the association between PFR and EDV were also performed. The LVEF of patients with a low PFR was lower than the LVEF of patients with normal PFR (59±7 vs 63%±7%; PPFR (r=-0.04; P=.32). The results did not change when the EDV indices were used. In patients who had repeat scans, there was no correlation between the change in EDV and the change in PFR (r=0.16; P=.2). In asymptomatic patients undergoing ERNA who have normal systolic function, a low PFR can be associated with a lower LVEF, but it is not associated with changes in EDV. This suggests that diastolic dysfunction is associated with mild systolic dysfunction.

  8. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low-dose cardiac CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Nacif, Marcelo S; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher; Summers, Ronald M; Bluemke, David A; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for the detection of focal myocardial scar using a delayed enhancement technique in this paper. CCT, however, has not been previously evaluated for quantification of diffuse myocardial fibrosis. In our investigation, we sought to evaluate the potential of low-dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. ECV is altered under conditions of increased myocardial fibrosis. A framework consisting of three main steps was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation. First, a shape-constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation on postcontrast image. Second, the symmetric demons deformable registration method was applied to register precontrast to postcontrast images. So the correspondences between the voxels from precontrast to postcontrast images were established. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 20 clinical low-dose CCT datasets with precontrast and postcontrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  9. Role of cardiac CTA in estimating left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robin; Man; Singh; Balkrishna; Man; Singh; Jawahar; Lal; Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction(LVEF)is an impor-tant predictor of cardiac outcome and helps in makingimportant diagnostic and therapeutic decisions suchas the treatment of different types of congestive heartfailure or implantation of devices like cardiac resynchro-nization therapy-defibrillator.LVEF can be measuredby various techniques such as transthoracic echo-cardiography,contrast ventriculography,radionuclidetechniques,cardiac magnetic resonance imaging andcardiac computed tomographic angiography(CTA).Thedevelopment of cardiac CTA using multi-detector rowCT(MDCT)has seen a very rapid improvement in thetechnology for identifying coronary artery stenosis andcoronary artery disease in the last decade.During theacquisition,processing and analysis of data to studycoronary anatomy,MDCT provides a unique opportunityto measure left ventricular volumes and LVEF simulta-neously with the same data set without the need foradditional contrast or radiation exposure.The develop-ment of semi-automated and automated software to measure LVEF has now added uniformity,efficiency and reproducibility of practical value in clinical practice rather than just being a research tool.This article will address the feasibility,the accuracy and the limitations of MDCT in measuring LVEF.

  10. Considerations regarding the volume fraction influence on the wear behavior of the fiber reinforced composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2017-08-01

    This paper contains an analysis of the factors that have an influence on the tribological characteristics of the composite material sintered with metal matrix reinforced with carbon fibers. These composites are used generally if it’s needed the wear resistant materials, whereas these composites have high specific strength in conjunction with a good corrosion resistance at low densities and some self-lubricating properties. Through the knowledge of the better tribological properties of the materials and their behavior to wear, can be generated by dry and the wet friction. Thus, where necessary the use of high temperature resistant material with low friction between the elements, carbon fiber composite materials are very suitable because they have: mechanical strength and good ductility, melting temperature on the higher values, higher electrical and thermal conductivity, lower wear speed and lower friction forces. For this purpose, this paper also contains an experimental program based on the evidence of formaldehyde resin made from fiber reinforced Cu-carbon with the aim to specifically determine the volume of fibers fraction for the consolidation of the composite material. In order to determine the friction coefficient and the wear rates of the various fiber reinforced polymer mixtures of carbon have been used special devices with needle-type with steel disc. These tests were conducted in the atmosphere at the room temperature without external lubrication study taking into consideration the sliding different speeds with constant loading task.

  11. Non-monotonic dependence of Pickering emulsion gel rheology on particle volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganyuk, M; Mohraz, A

    2017-03-29

    The microstructure of Pickering emulsion gels features a tenuous network of faceted droplets, bridged together by shared monolayers of particles. In this investigation, we use standard oscillatory rheometry in conjunction with confocal microscopy to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the role particle bridged interfaces have on the rheology of Pickering emulsion gels. The zero-shear elastic modulus of Pickering emulsion gels shows a non-monotonic dependence on particle loading, with three separate regimes of power-law and linear gel strengthening, and subsequent gel weakening. The transition from power-law to linear scaling is found to coincide with a peak in the volume fraction of particles that participate in bridging, which we indirectly calculate using measureable quantities, and the transition to gel weakening is shown to result from a loss in network connectivity at high particle loadings. These observations are explained via a simple representation of how Pickering emulsion gels arise from an initial population of partially-covered droplets. Based on these considerations, we propose a combined variable related to the initial droplet coverage, to be used in reporting and rationalizing the rheology of Pickering emulsion gels. We demonstrate the applicability of this variable with Pickering emulsions prepared at variable fluid ratios and with different-sized colloidal particles. The results of our investigation have important implications for many technological applications that utilize solid stabilized multi-phase emulsions and require a priori knowledge or engineering of their flow characteristics.

  12. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low dose cardiac CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Songtao; Bluemke, David A.; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has been well validated and allows quantification of myocardial fibrosis in comparison to overall mass of the myocardium. Unfortunately, CMRI is relatively expensive and is contraindicated in patients with intracardiac devices. Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for detection of scar and myocardial stress/rest perfusion. In this paper, we sought to evaluate the potential of low dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. A novel framework was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation, which consists of three main steps. First, a shape constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation for post-contrast image. Second, the symmetric Demons deformable registrations method was applied to register pre-contrast to post-contrast images. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 7 clinical low dose CCT datasets with pre-contrast and post-contrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  13. Microscale reservoir effects on microbial sulfur isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Stilianos; Crowe, Sean A.

    2017-04-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction can impart strong sulfur isotope fractionation by preferentially using the lighter 32SO42- over the heavier 34SO42-. The magnitude of fractionation depends on a number of factors, including ambient concentrations of sulfate and electron donors. Sulfur isotope compositions in sedimentary rocks thus facilitate reconstruction of past environmental conditions, such as seawater sulfate concentrations, primary productivity, organic carbon burial, and sulfur fluxes into or out of the ocean. Knowing the processes that regulate the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation is necessary for the correct interpretation of the geological record, but so far theoretical work has focused mostly on internal cellular processes. In sulfate-limited environments, like low sulfate lakes and the Archean ocean, microbial sulfate reduction can lead to sulfate depletion in the water column and an enrichment in isotopically heavy sulfate. This reservoir effect in turn mutes the fractionation expressed in the water column and ultimately preserved in sediments relative to the biologically induced fractionation. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that similar reservoir effects can also appear at the microscale in close proximity to sulfate-reducing cells. These microscale reservoir effects have the potential to modulate sulfur isotope fractionation to a considerable degree, especially at low (micromolar) sulfate concentrations. As a result, background sulfate concentrations, sulfate reduction rates, and extracellular ion diffusion rates can influence the fractionation expressed even if the physiologically induced fractionation is constant. This has implications for the interpretation of biogenic sulfur isotope fractionations expressed in the geological record, because the correct estimation of the environmental conditions that would promote these fractionations requires consideration of microscale reservoir effects. We discuss these implications, and

  14. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  15. A systematic review: effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in patients with a myocardial infarction and in patients with left ventricular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Barlera, Simona; Latini, Roberto;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: To summarize and quantify results of echocardiographic studies examining the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on left ventricular remodelling in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction...

  16. Fractionation effects in particle radiotherapy: implications for hypo-fractionation regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carabe-Fernandez, A; Paganetti, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Dale, R G [Department of Radiation Physics and Radiobiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Hopewell, J W; Jones, B, E-mail: acarabe@partners.or [Particle Therapy Cancer Research Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-07

    The aim is to demonstrate the potential impact of changes in the value of the {beta} parameter in the linear quadratic (LQ) model on the calculation of clinical relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values used for high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy. The parameter RBE{sub min} is introduced into the LQ formulation to account for possible changes in the {beta} radiosensitivity coefficient with changing LET. The model is used to fit fractionated data under two conditions, where RBE{sub min} = 1 and RBE{sub min} {ne} 1. Nonlinear regression and analysis of variance are used to test the hypothesis that the inclusion of a non-unity value of RBE{sub min} better predicts the total iso-effective dose required at low number of fractions for fast neutrons, carbon ions, {pi}-meson and proton fractionation data obtained for various tissues from previous publications. For neutrons the assumption of RBE{sub min} {ne} 1 provided a better fit in 89% of the cases, whereas for carbon ions RBE{sub min} {ne} 1 provided a better fit only for normal tissue at the spread-out Bragg peak. The results provide evidence of the impact that variations in the {beta} parameter may have when calculating clinically relevant RBE values, especially when using high doses per fraction (i.e. hypofractionation) of high-LET radiations.

  17. Nanoparticle volume fraction with heat and mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow in a nanofluid in the presence of thermo-diffusion under convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, R.; Jeyabalan, C.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the influence of thermophoresis, Brownian motion of the nanoparticles with variable stream conditions in the presence of magnetic field on mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer region of a semi-infinite porous vertical plate in a nanofluid under the convective boundary conditions. The transformed boundary layer ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Maple 18 software with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Numerical results are presented both in tabular and graphical forms illustrating the effects of these parameters with magnetic field on momentum, thermal, nanoparticle volume fraction and solutal concentration boundary layers. The numerical results obtained for the velocity, temperature, volume fraction, and concentration profiles reveal interesting phenomenon, some of these qualitative results are presented through plots. It is interesting to note that the magnetic field plays a dominant role on nanofluid flow under the convective boundary conditions.

  18. Extracellular volume fraction mapping in the myocardium, part 2: initial clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellman Peter

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diffuse myocardial fibrosis, and to a lesser extent global myocardial edema, are important processes in heart disease which are difficult to assess or quantify with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR using conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE or T1-mapping. Measurement of the myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECV circumvents factors that confound T1-weighted images or T1-maps. We hypothesized that quantitative assessment of myocardial ECV would be clinically useful for detecting both focal and diffuse myocardial abnormalities in a variety of common and uncommon heart diseases. Methods A total of 156 subjects were imaged including 62 with normal findings, 33 patients with chronic myocardial infarction (MI, 33 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, 15 with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, 7 with acute myocarditis, 4 with cardiac amyloidosis, and 2 with systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS. Motion corrected ECV maps were generated automatically from T1-maps acquired pre- and post-contrast calibrated by blood hematocrit. Abnormally-elevated ECV was defined as >2SD from the mean ECV in individuals with normal findings. In HCM the size of regions of LGE was quantified as the region >2 SD from remote. Results Mean ECV of 62 normal individuals was 25.4 ± 2.5% (m ± SD, normal range 20.4%-30.4%. Mean ECV within the core of chronic myocardial infarctions (without MVO (N = 33 measured 68.5 ± 8.6% (p  Conclusions ECV mapping appears promising to complement LGE imaging in cases of more homogenously diffuse disease. The ability to display ECV maps in units that are physiologically intuitive and may be interpreted on an absolute scale offers the potential for detection of diffuse disease and measurement of the extent and severity of abnormal regions.

  19. PREDICTION OF CARBON CONCENTRATION AND FERRITE VOLUME FRACTION OF HOT-ROLLED STEEL STRIP DURING LAMINAR COOLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation model was presented for predicting the phase fraction transformed and the carbon concentration in austenite for austenite to ferrite transformation during laminar cooling on run-out table in hot rolling strip mill. In this model, the parameter k in Avrami equation was developed for carbon steels. The wide range of chemical composition, the primary austenite grain size, and the retained strain were taken into account. It can be used to predict the ferrite volume fraction and the carbon concentration in austenite of hot-rolled steel strip during laminar cooling on run-out table. The coiling temperature controlling model was also presented to calculate the temperature of steel strip. The transformation kinetics of austenite to ferrite and the evolution of carbon concentration in austenite at different temperatures during cooling were investigated in the hot rolled Q235B strip for thickness of 9.35, 6.4, and 3.2mm. The ferrite volume fraction along the length of the strip was also calculated. The calculated ferrite volume fraction was compared with the log data from hot strip mill and the calculated results were in agreement with the experimental ones. The present study is a part of the prediction of the mechanical properties of hot-rolled steel strip, and it has already been used on-line and off-line in the hot strip mill.

  20. Quantitative grain-scale ferroic domain volume fractions and domain switching strains from three-dimensional X-ray diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Majkut, Marta; Caosyd, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extension of the three-dimensional X-ray diffraction technique to allow the extraction of domain volume fractions in polycrystalline ferroic materials is presented. This method gives access to quantitative domain volume fractions of hundreds of independent embedded grains within...

  1. Validation of Interstitial Fractional Volume Quantification by Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maa, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the accuracy of fractional interstitial volume determination in low perfused and low vascularized tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The fractional interstitial volume (ve) was determined in the medial thigh muscle of 12 female pigs by using a 3-dimensional gradient echo sequence with k-space sharing and administering gadolinium-based contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine). Analysis was performed using 3 pharmacokinetic models: the simple Tofts model (TM), the extended TM (ETM), and the 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM). We investigated the effect of varying acquisition durations (ADs) on the model parameter estimates of the 3 models and compared the ve values with the results of histological examinations of muscle sections of the medial thigh muscle. Histological measurements yielded a median value (25%-75% quartile) of 4.8% (3.7%-6.2%) for ve. The interstitial fractional volume determined by DCE-MRI was comparable to the histological results but varied strongly with AD for the TM and ETM. For the TM and the ETM, the results were virtually the same. Choosing arterial hematocrit to Hcta = 0.4, the lowest median ve value determined by DCE-MRI was 5.2% (3.3%-6.1%) for the ETM at a 6-minute AD. The maximum ve value determined with the ETM at a 15-minute AD was 7.7% (4.5%-9.0%). The variation with AD of median ve values obtained with the 2CXM was much smaller: 6.2% (3.1%-9.2%) for the 6-minute AD and 6.3% (4.3%-9.8%) for the 15-minute AD. The best fit for the 2CXM was found at the 10-minute AD with ve values of 6.6% (3.7%-8.2%). No significant correlation between the histological and any DCE-MRI modeling results was found. Considering the expected accuracy of histological measurements, the medians of the MR modeling results were in good agreement with the histological prediction. A parameter determination uncertainty was identified with the use of the TMs. This is due to underfitting and

  2. 氧体积分数对木质和玉米秸秆燃烧特性的影响%Effect of volume fraction of oxygen on combustion characteristics of wood pellets and corn stalks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭好义; 姚昆; 蒋绍坚; 王育青; 彭福来

    2014-01-01

    采用TG-DTG-DSC联用技术对木质颗粒和玉米秸秆颗粒的燃烧特性进行了实验,考察了在不同含氧气氛中两种生物质的可燃特性、着火特性、燃烧稳定性、燃尽特性及综合燃烧特性的影响,计算了燃烧动力学参数。结果表明:随着氧体积分数的增大,两种生物质的着火温度和燃尽温度降低,燃烧稳定性判别指数、可燃性指数和综合燃烧特性指数增大;木质颗粒的着火温度和前期燃尽指数高于玉米秸秆,后期燃尽指数低于玉米秸秆,木质颗粒比玉米秸秆颗粒更难热分解,氧气体积分数对玉米秸秆颗粒燃烧特性影响要大于木质颗粒;生物质在低温阶段的活化能要大于高温阶段的活化能,两阶段的活化能随着氧气体积分数的增大而减小。%Thermo gravimetric experiments of corn stalks and wood pellets were performed by using TG-DTG-DSC thermal analysis technology. The effect of oxygen concentration on combustible characteristics,ignition characteristics,combustion stability characteristics,burn-out characteristics and synthetic combustion characteristics were discussed,and the combustion kinetics parameters were identified.Results show that with increase of oxygen concentration the ignition temperature,burn-out temperature decreased,the j udgement index of combustion stability,the combustible characteristics index and synthetic combustion characteristics index increased;the ignition temperature and the prophase burn-out characteristics index of wood pellets are higher than that of corn stalks,the later burn-out characteristics index is smaller than corn stalks,the wood pellets are more difficult to pyrolysis than corn stalks,the combustion characteristics of corn stalks is evidently affected by oxygen content.The corresponding reaction activation energy is larger at the low temperature phase than that at high temperature phase,the reaction activation energy of two stage decrease

  3. Shear thickening in non-Brownian suspensions: an excluded volume effect

    CERN Document Server

    Picano, Francesco; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Brandt, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Shear-thickening appears as an increase of the viscosity of a dense suspension with the shear rate, sometimes sudden and violent at high volume fraction. Its origin for non-colloidal suspension with non negligible inertial effects is still debated. Here we consider a simple shear flow and demonstrate that fluid inertia causes a strong microstructure anisotropy that results in the formation of a wake region with no relative flux of particles. We show that shear-thickening at finite inertia can be explained as an increase of the effective volume fraction when considering the dynamically excluded volume due to these wake regions.

  4. Theoretical and experimental analysis of a multiphase screw pump, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raebiger, K. [LEISTRITZ Pumpen GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany); Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales (United Kingdom); Maksoud, T.M.A.; Ward, J. [Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales (United Kingdom); Hausmann, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Building Services Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    In the investigation of the pumping behaviour of multiphase screw pumps, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions, theoretical and experimental analyses were performed. A new theoretical screw pump model was developed, which calculates the time-dependent conditions inside the several chambers of a screw pump as well as the exchange of mass and energy between these chambers. By means of the performed experimental analysis, the screw pump model was verified, especially at very high gas volume fractions from 90% to 99%. The experiments, which were conducted with the reference fluids water and air, can be divided mainly into the determination of the steady state pumping behaviour on the one hand and into the analysis of selected transient operating conditions on the other hand, whereas the visualisation of the leakage flows through the circumferential gaps was rounded off the experimental analysis. (author)

  5. Effect of reinforcement volume fraction on the density & elastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    صﺧﻟﻣ. ق. ﻲﻧدﻌﻣﻟا جﺎﺟزﻟا نﻣ سﮐﯾرﺗﺎﻣ وﻧ طﯾﻟﺧﻟﻟ ﺔﯾﻟوطﻟا ﺔﻧورﻣﻟا تﺑاوﺛ و ﺔﻓﺎﺛﮐﻟا ﯽﻟﻋ ﺔﯾوﻘﻣﻟا فﺎﯾﻟﻷا ﺔﺑﺳﻧ رﯾﻐﺗ رﯾﺛﺄﺗ ﺔﺳاردﺑ ﺎﻧﻣ. ) Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5. (. نﻣ فﺎﯾﻟﺄﺑ ﺔﻣﻋدﻣﻟا. : glass E. ,. Fe.

  6. Determination of the steam volume fraction in the event of loss of cooling of the spent fuel storage pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledkov, R. M.; Galkin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, O. E.; Strebnev, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    When one solves engineering problems related to the cooling of fuel assemblies (FAs) in a spent fuel storage pool (SFSP) and the assessment of nuclear safety of FA storage in an SFSP in the initial event of loss of SFSP cooling, it is essential to determine the coolant density and, consequently, steam volume fractions φ in bundles of fuel elements at a pressure of 0.1-0.5 MPa. Such formulas for calculating φ that remain valid in a wide range of operating parameters and geometric shapes of channels and take the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling into account are currently almost lacking. The results of systematization and analysis of the available formulas for φ are reported in the present study. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained in the process of simulating the conditions of FA cooling in an SFSP in the event of loss of its cooling. Six formulas for calculating the steam volume fraction, which were used in this comparison, were chosen from a total of 11 considered relations. As a result, the formulas producing the most accurate values of φ in the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling were selected. In addition, a relation that allows one to perform more accurate calculations of steam volume fractions in the conditions of loss of SFSP cooling was derived based on the Fedorov formula in the two-group approximation.

  7. Effects of grain size distribution on the packing fraction and shear strength of frictionless disk packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Using discrete element methods, the effects of the grain size distribution on the density and the shear strength of frictionless disk packings are analyzed. Specifically, two recent findings on the relationship between the system's grain size distribution and its rheology are revisited, and their validity is tested across a broader range of distributions than what has been used in previous studies. First, the effects of the distribution on the solid fraction are explored. It is found that the distribution that produces the densest packing is not the uniform distribution by volume fractions as suggested in a recent publication. In fact, the maximal packing fraction is obtained when the grading curve follows a power law with an exponent close to 0.5 as suggested by Fuller and Thompson in 1907 and 1919 [Trans Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 59, 1 (1907) and A Treatise on Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (1919), respectively] while studying mixtures of cement and stone aggregates. Second, the effects of the distribution on the shear strength are analyzed. It is confirmed that these systems exhibit a small shear strength, even if composed of frictionless particles as has been shown recently in several works. It is also found that this shear strength is independent of the grain size distribution. This counterintuitive result has previously been shown for the uniform distribution by volume fractions. In this paper, it is shown that this observation keeps true for different shapes of the grain size distribution.

  8. The flow past a circular patch of vegetation with a low submergence depth and low solid volume fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkil, Gokhan

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the Solid Volume Fraction (SVF) on the flow structure within and past a circular array of surface-mounted cylinders that extends over 75% of the water depth, h is investigated using Detached Eddy Simulation (DES). This set up mimics the case of a submerged patch of rigid vegetation in a channel. The diameter of the cylinders in the array is d = 0.02D, where D is the diameter of the circular array. The channel Reynolds number is close to 20,000 and the Reynolds number defined with D is around 24,000. DES is conducted for SVF = 10% and 25%. It is found that as the SVF increases, fairly strong horseshoe vortex system forms around the upstream face of the vegetation patch, the strength of the separated shear layers on the sides of the vegetation patch increases and the length of the recirculation region behind the patch decreases. While an increase of the SVF results in a large increase of the turbulent kinetic energy in the wake, the opposite is observed within the porous vegetation patch.

  9. Quasiparticle Tunneling in the Fractional Quantum Hall effect at filling fraction ν=5/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Iuliana P.

    2009-03-01

    In a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in the fractional quantum Hall regime, the quasiparticles are predicted to have fractional charge and statistics, as well as modified Coulomb interactions. The state at filling fraction ν=5/2 is predicted by some theories to have non-abelian statistics, a property that might be exploited for topological quantum computing. However, alternative models with abelian properties have been proposed as well. Weak quasiparticle tunneling between counter-propagating edges is one of the methods that can be used to learn about the properties of the state and potentially distinguish between models describing it. We employ an electrostatically defined quantum point contact (QPC) fabricated on a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEG to create a constriction where quasiparticles can tunnel between counter-propagating edges. We study the temperature and dc bias dependence of the tunneling conductance, while preserving the same filling fraction in the constriction and the bulk of the sample. The data show scaling of the bias-dependent tunneling over a range of temperatures, in agreement with the theory of weak quasiparticle tunneling, and we extract values for the effective charge and interaction parameter of the quasiparticles. The ranges of values obtained are consistent with those predicted by certain models describing the 5/2 state, indicating as more probable a non-abelian state. This work was done in collaboration with J. B. Miller, C. M. Marcus, M. A. Kastner, L. N. Pfeiffer and K. W. West. This work was supported in part by the Army Research Office (W911NF-05-1-0062), the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center program of NSF (PHY-0117795), NSF (DMR-0701386), the Center for Materials Science and Engineering program of NSF (DMR-0213282) at MIT, the Microsoft Corporation Project Q, and the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard University.

  10. [Automatic calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT--basic evaluation using phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Nanbu, I; Tohyama, J; Ooba, S

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated accuracy of Quantitative Gated SPECT Program that enabled calculation of the left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction by automatically tracing the contour of the cardiac surface. Cardiac phantoms filled with 99mTc-solution were used. Data acquisition was made by 180-degree projection in L type and 360-degree projection in opposed type. Automatic calculation could be done in all processes, which required 3-4 minutes. Reproducibility was sufficient. The adequate cut off value of a prefilter was 0.45. At this value LV volume was 93% of the actual volume in L type acquisition and 95.9% in opposed type acquisition. The LV volume obtained in L type was smaller than that obtained in opposed type (p defects was fair, on the cardiac phantoms with all of 90-degree defects and 180-degree defects of the septal and lateral wall. The LV volume was estimated to be larger on the phantom with 180-degree defect of the anterior wall, and to be smaller on the phantom of 180-degree defect of the inferoposterior wall. Because tracing was deviated anteriorly at the defects. In the patients with similar conditions to 180-degree defect of the anterior wall or inferoposterior wall, the LV volume should be carefully evaluated.

  11. Automatic calculation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Basic evaluation using phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Yoshimi; Nanbu, Ichirou [Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital (Japan); Tohyama, Junko; Ooba, Satoru

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated accuracy of Quantitative Gated SPECT Program that enabled calculation of the left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction by automatically tracing the contour of the cardiac surface. Cardiac phantoms filled with {sup 99m}Tc-solution were used. Data acquisition was made by 180-degree projection in L type and 360-degree projection in opposed type. Automatic calculation could be done in all processes, which required 3-4 minutes. Reproducibility was sufficient. The adequate cut off value of a prefilter was 0.45. At this value LV volume was 93% of the actual volume in L type acquisition and 95.9% in opposed type acquisition. The LV volume obtained in L type was smaller than that obtained in opposed type (p<0.05). The tracing of the defects was fair, on the cardiac phantoms with all of 90-degree defects and 180-degree defects of the septal and lateral wall. The LV volume was estimated to be larger on the phantom with 180-degree defect of the anterior wall, and to be smaller on the phantom of 180-degree defect of the inferoposterior wall. Because tracing was deviated anteriorly at the defects. In the patients with similar conditions to 180-degree defect of the anterior wall or inferoposterior wall, the LV volume should be carefully evaluated. (author)

  12. Correlation between Cohesive Energy Density, Fractional Free Volume, and Gas Transport Properties of Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kubica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport properties of the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA materials to He, N2, O2, and CO2 are correlated with two polymer molecular structure parameters, that is, cohesive energy density (CED and fractional free volume (FFV, determined by the group contribution method. In our preceding paper, the attempt was made to approximate EVA permeability using a linear function of 1/FFV as predicted by the free volume theory. However, the deviations from this relationship appeared to be significant. In this paper, it is shown that permeation of gas molecules is controlled not only by free volume but also by the polymer cohesive energy. Moreover, the behavior of CO2 was found to differ significantly from that of other gases. In this instance, the correlation is much better when diffusivity instead of permeability is taken into account in a modified transport model.

  13. Fractional Identification of Rotor Skin Effect in Induction Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Trigeassou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractional identification of rotor skin effect in induction machines is presented in this paper. Park transformation is used to obtain a system of differential equations which allows to include the skin effect in the rotor bars of asynchronous machines. A transfer function with a fractional derivative order has been selected to represent the admittance of the bar by the help of a non integer integrator which is approximated by a J+1 dimensional modal system. The machine parameters are estimated by an output-error technique using a non linear iterative optimization algorithm. Numerical simulations and experimental results show the performance of the modal approach for modeling and identification.

  14. A Novel Effective Approach for Solving Fractional Nonlinear PDEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminikhah, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Nasrin; Rezazadeh, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    The present work introduces an effective modification of homotopy perturbation method for the solution of nonlinear time-fractional biological population model and a system of three nonlinear time-fractional partial differential equations. In this approach, the solution is considered a series expansion that converges to the nonlinear problem. The new approximate analytical procedure depends only on two iteratives. The analytical approximations to the solution are reliable and confirm the ability of the new homotopy perturbation method as an easy device for computing the solution of nonlinear equations.

  15. Fractional watt Vuillemier cryogenic refrigerator program engineering notebook. Volume 1: Thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    The cryogenic refrigerator thermal design calculations establish design approach and basic sizing of the machine's elements. After the basic design is defined, effort concentrates on matching the thermodynamic design with that of the heat transfer devices (heat exchangers and regenerators). Typically, the heat transfer device configurations and volumes are adjusted to improve their heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. These adjustments imply that changes be made to the active displaced volumes, compensating for the influence of the heat transfer devices on the thermodynamic processes of the working fluid. Then, once the active volumes are changed, the heat transfer devices require adjustment to account for the variations in flows, pressure levels, and heat loads. This iterative process is continued until the thermodynamic cycle parameters match the design of the heat transfer devices. By examing several matched designs, a near-optimum refrigerator is selected.

  16. Transformation Volume Effects on Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kosogor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the martensitic transformations (MTs in the shape memory alloys (SMAs are mainly characterized by the shear deformation of the crystal lattice that arises in the course of MT, while a comparatively small volume change during MT is considered as the secondary effect, which can be disregarded when the basic characteristics of MTs and functional properties of SMAs are analyzed. This point of view is a subject to change nowadays due to the new experimental and theoretical findings. The present article elucidates (i the newly observed physical phenomena in different SMAs in their relation to the volume effect of MT; (ii the theoretical analysis of the aforementioned volume-related phenomena.

  17. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Aldershvile, J;

    2011-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) was determined by first passage radionuclide cardiography and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multigated radionuclide cardiography in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease. The results were evaluated against those obtained by the invasive dye dilution...... or thermodilution and left ventricular cardioangiographic techniques. In a paired comparison the mean difference between the invasive and radionuclide SV was -1 ml (SED 3.1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p less than 0.01). Radionuclide LVEF values also correlated well with cardioangiographic measurements...

  18. Fractionation of the Hypericum perforatum L. extract: PMF, and PDT effects of the fractions against HL-60 leukemic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsontou, M.; Dimitriou, H.; Filippidis, G.; Tsimaris, I.; Kalmanti, M.; Skalkos, D.

    2007-02-01

    In the last three years we have prepared and studied the polar methanolic extract PMF, of the herb Hypericum perforatum L, and studied as a new, alternative photosensitizing substance for PDT. Hypericum perforatum L., as well as PMF, contains a number of naphthodianthrone derivatives (hypericins), such as hypericin and pseudohypericin, as its main photosensitizing constituents. PMF has been tested as a PDT agent in vitro in bladder cancer cells, leukemia cells, and in vivo in rat tumor bearing urinary bladder. In order to evaluate the contribution of the hypericins in the overall PDT action, and prepare a better photosensitizing extract than PMF, we have separated the extract in four main fractions (1,2,3,4), and tested their PDT effects against the HL-60 leukemic cells. The concentration of hypericins in the extracts was found 0.08% for fraction 1, 0.09% for fraction 2, 0.8% for fraction 3, and 2,8% for fraction 4. The PDT activity observed among the fractions was proportional to their hypericins concentration, thus increasing in the order of increasing number: fraction 4 > fraction 3 > fraction 2 > fraction 1. Fraction 4 proved to be the most powerful fraction. However, despite its relatively high hypericins concentration (2.8%), compared with the total extract PMF (1.37%), fraction 4 proved to be less active in the cell line tested. This result indicates that there are other photosensitizing constituents within the PMF extract which contribute significantly in the overall PDT action, and therefore the extract should be used as it is for further PDT studies, without any further purification.

  19. Prediction of the Soil Water Characteristic from Soil Particle Volume Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Modelling water distribution and flow in partially saturated soils requires knowledge of the soil-water characteristic (SWC). However, measurement of the SWC is challenging and time-consuming, and in some cases not feasible. This study introduces two predictive models (Xw-model and Xw......*-model) for the SWC, derived from readily available soil properties such as texture and bulk density. A total of 46 soils from different horizons at 15 locations across Denmark were used for models evaluation. The Xw-model predicts the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric fines content (organic matter...... (organic matter, clay, silt, fine and coarse sand), variably included in the model depending on the pF value. The volumetric content of a particular soil particle size fraction was included in the model if it was assumed to contribute to the pore size fraction still occupied with water at the given p...

  20. Fractions as percepts? Exploring cross-format distance effects for fractional magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Percival G; Chesney, Dana L

    2015-05-01

    This study presents evidence that humans have intuitive, perceptually based access to the abstract fraction magnitudes instantiated by nonsymbolic ratio stimuli. Moreover, it shows these perceptually accessed magnitudes can be easily compared with symbolically represented fractions. In cross-format comparisons, participants picked the larger of two ratios. Ratios were presented either symbolically as fractions or nonsymbolically as paired dot arrays or as paired circles. Response patterns were consistent with participants comparing specific analog fractional magnitudes independently of the particular formats in which they were presented. These results pose a challenge to accounts that argue human cognitive architecture is ill-suited for processing fractions. Instead, it seems that humans can process nonsymbolic ratio magnitudes via perceptual routes and without recourse to conscious symbolic algorithms, analogous to the processing of whole number magnitudes. These findings have important implications for theories regarding the nature of human number sense - they imply that fractions may in some sense be natural numbers, too.

  1. Effect of Acute and Fractionated Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Kyu Kim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has become an inevitable health concern emanating from natural sources like space travel and from artificial sources like medical therapies. In general, exposure to ionizing radiation such as γ-rays is one of the methods currently used to stress specific model systems. In this study, we elucidated the long-term effect of acute and fractionated irradiation on DCX-positive cells in hippocampal neurogenesis. Groups of two-month-old C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at acute dose (5 Gy or fractional doses (1 Gy × 5 times and 0.5 Gy × 10 times. Six months after exposure to γ-irradiation, the hippocampus was analyzed. Doublecortin (DCX immunohistochemistry was used to measure changes of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. The number of DCX-positive cells was significantly decreased in all acute and fractionally irradiation groups. The long-term changes in DCX-positive cells triggered by radiation exposure showed a very different pattern to the short-term changes which tended to return to the control level in previous studies. Furthermore, the number of DCX-positive cells was relatively lower in the acute irradiation group than the fractional irradiation groups (approximately 3.6-fold, suggesting the biological change on hippocampal neurogenesis was more susceptible to being damaged by acute than fractional irradiation. These results suggest that the exposure to γ-irradiation as a long-term effect can trigger biological responses resulting in the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis.

  2. Volume-effect and radiotherapy [2]. Part 2: volume-effect and normal tissue; Effet volume en radiotherapie [2]. Deuxieme partie: volume et tolerance des tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Caudry, M.; Trouette, R.; Vendrely, V.; Causse, N.; Recaldini, L.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Atlan, D. [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    The first part of our work has focused on the relationship bet men tumor Volume and tumor control. Indeed, it is well known that the importance of irradiated volume could be a main parameter of radiation-induced complications. Numerous mathematical models have described the correlation between the irradiated volume and the risk of adverse effects. These models should predict the complication rate of each treatment planning. At the present time late effects have been the most studied. In this report we firstly propose a review of different mathematical models described for volume effect. Secondly, we will discuss whether these theoretical considerations can influence our view of radiation treatment planning optimization. (authors)

  3. Hydrophobic effects on partial molar volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-03-01

    The hydrophobic effects on partial molar volume (PMV) are investigated as a PMV change in the transfer of a benzenelike nonpolar solute from the nonpolar solvent to water, using an integral equation theory of liquids. The volume change is divided into two effects. One is the "packing" effect in the transfer from the nonpolar solvent to hypothetical "nonpolar water" without hydrogen bonding networks. The other is the "iceberg" effect in the transfer from nonpolar water to water. The results indicate that the packing effect is negative and a half compensated by the positive iceberg effect. The packing effect is explained by the difference in the solvent compressibility. Further investigation shows that the sign and magnitude of the volume change depend on the solute size and the solvent compressibility. The finding gives a significant implication that the exposure of a hydrophobic residue caused by protein denaturation can either increase or decrease the PMV of protein depending on the size of the residue and the fluctuation of its surroundings.

  4. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  5. Comparative study of bulk metallic glass composites with high-volume-fractioned dendritic and spherical b. c. c. phase precipitates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-yuan Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A dendritic β-phase reinforced bulk metallic glass (BMG composite named as D2 was prepared by rapid quenching of a homogenous Zr60Ti14.67Nb5.33Cu5.56Ni4.44Be10 melt, and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM observation and room-temperature compression test. The microstructure and mechanical properties were compared with those of the spherical β-phase reinforced composite named as composite S2. It was found that the composite D2 contains β-phase dendrites up to 56% in volume-fraction, and exhibits a ductile compressive behavior with plastic strain of 12.7%. As the high-volume-fractioned β-phase dendrites transferred to coarse spherical particles of about 20 μm in diameter in the composite S2, a much improved plastic strain up to 20.4% can be achieved. Micrographs of the fractured samples reveal different interaction modes of the propagating shear bands with the dendritic and spherical β phase inclusions, resulting in different shear strains in the composite samples. The matrix of composite S2 undergoes a significantly larger shear strain than that of the composite D2 before ultimate failure, which is thought to be mainly responsible for the greatly increased global plastic strain of the S2 relative to D2.

  6. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  7. Quantized Thermal Transport in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, C. L.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze thermal transport in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), employing a Luttinger liquid model of edge states. Impurity mediated inter-channel scattering events are incorporated in a hydrodynamic description of heat and charge transport. The thermal Hall conductance, $K_H$, is shown to provide a new and universal characterization of the FQHE state, and reveals non-trivial information about the edge structure. The Lorenz ratio between thermal and electrical Hall conductances {\\i...

  8. Quark confinement and the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-Jun; GENG Wen-Tong

    2008-01-01

    Working in the physics of Wilson factor and Aharonov-Bohm effect,we find in the fluxtubequark system the topology of a baryon consisting of three heavy flavor quarks resembles that of the fractional quantum Hall effect(FQHE)in condensed matter.This similarity yields the result that the constituent quarks of baryon have the"filling factor"1/3.thus the previous conjecture that quark confinement is a correlation effect is confirmed.Moreover,by deriving a Hamiltonian of the system analogous to that of FQHE,we predict an energy gap for the ground state of a heavy three-quark system.

  9. Generalized Pseudopotentials for the Anisotropic Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Lee, Ching Hua; Papić, Z.

    2017-04-01

    We generalize the notion of Haldane pseudopotentials to anisotropic fractional quantum Hall (FQH) systems that are physically realized, e.g., in tilted magnetic field experiments or anisotropic band structures. This formalism allows us to expand any translation-invariant interaction over a complete basis, and directly reveals the intrinsic metric of incompressible FQH fluids. We show that purely anisotropic pseudopotentials give rise to new types of bound states for small particle clusters in the infinite plane, and can be used as a diagnostic of FQH nematic order. We also demonstrate that generalized pseudopotentials quantify the anisotropic contribution to the effective interaction potential, which can be particularly large in models of fractional Chern insulators.

  10. Agreement of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes between adenosine stress TL-201 gated SPECT and echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, M. S. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Ewha, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, D. H.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, Y. J.; Kang, D. H. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated TI-201 SPECT measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) have shown high correlation with conventional methods. However, how much these parameters measured by TI-201 gated SPECT differ from those by echocardiography has not been assessed. Adenosine stress (Ad-G) and redistribution TI-201 gated SPECT (Re-G) and resting echocardiography were conducted in 337 patients (184 male, 153 female). EDV, ESV and LVEF measured by QGS software were compared with the results by echocardiography. Patients with arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation or frequent premature contractions) or evidence of fixed or reversible perfusion defects on TI-201 SPECT were excluded. EF, EDV and ESV measured by Ad-G (63.3{+-}9.8,73.8{+-}30.2,29.1{+-}20.1) and Re-G (65.2{+-}11.6,69.1{+-}30.1,26.5{+-}20.3) correlated well with those by Echo (61.4{+-}7.9,78.3{+-}2.7, 30.7{+-} 17.5 ; r of Ad-G=0.547, 0.850, 0.827, p<0.001 ; r of Re-G=0.585, 0.838, 0.819, p<0.001). However the difference (mean, SD, SEE of Echo - gated SPECT) was statistically significant (EF: Ad-G=1.71, 8.92, 0.48, Re-G=3.59, 10.39, 0.56, p<0.001 ; EDV: Ad-G=4.75, 16.21, 0.88, Re-G=9.53, 16.77, 0.91, p<0.001 ; ESV: Ad-G=1.75, 11.35, 0.61, p<0.05, Re-G=4.29, 11.7, 0.63, p<0.001). Bland-Altman plots showed that the difference of EDV and ESV did not vary in any systematic way over the range of measurement, whereas the difference of EF increased with increasing average EF by Echo and gated-SPECT. The difference of EF, EDV, and ESV between Ad-G and Echo was significantly smaller than those between Re-G and Echo (p<0.001). Gated TI-201 SPECT underestimates EDV and ESV over a wide range of volume. As a result, EF by gated TI-201 SPECT is overestimated especially in patients with small LV volume. Ad-G is preferable to Re-G in assessing left ventricular ejection fraction and volume in place of Echo because of smaller bias.

  11. Quantitative sodium MRI of the human brain at 9.4 T provides assessment of tissue sodium concentration and cell volume fraction during normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulborn, Keith; Lui, Elaine; Guntin, Jonathan; Jamil, Saad; Sun, Ziqi; Claiborne, Theodore C; Atkinson, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ion homeostasis is a fundamental property of viable tissue, allowing the tissue sodium concentration to be modeled as the tissue cell volume fraction. The modern neuropathology literature using ex vivo tissue from selected brain regions indicates that human brain cell density remains constant during normal aging and attributes the volume loss that occurs with advancing age to changes in neuronal size and dendritic arborization. Quantitative sodium MRI performed with the enhanced sensitivity of ultrahigh-field 9.4 T has been used to investigate tissue cell volume fraction during normal aging. This cross-sectional study (n = 49; 21-80 years) finds that the in vivo tissue cell volume fraction remains constant in all regions of the brain with advancing age in individuals who remain cognitively normal, extending the ex vivo literature reporting constant neuronal cell density across the normal adult age range. Cell volume fraction, as measured by quantitative sodium MRI, is decreased in diseases of cell loss, such as stroke, on a time scale of minutes to hours, and in response to treatment of brain tumors on a time scale of days to weeks. Neurodegenerative diseases often have prodromal periods of decades in which regional neuronal cell loss occurs prior to clinical presentation. If tissue cell volume fraction can detect such early pathology, this quantitative parameter may permit the objective measurement of preclinical disease progression. This current study in cognitively normal aging individuals provides the basis for the pursuance of investigations directed towards such neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Hydrophobic Volume Effects in Albumin Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrade, P.; Klein, H.; Egry, I.; Ademovic, Z.; Klee, D.

    2001-02-15

    Density measurements of aqueous albumin solutions as a function of concentration and temperature are reported. The solvents were H(2)O, D(2)O, and a physiological H(2)O-based buffer. An anomaly of the density at very small concentrations of albumin in D(2)O was found. Furthermore, the partial specific volume of albumin is remarkably different in D(2)O and H(2)O. We attribute both effects to structural differences of the solvents. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Effects of fractionation and combinatorial evaluation of Tamarindus indica fractions for antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Iroegbu, Christian U; Ngene, Augustine A; Chigor, Vincent N; Okoh, Anthony I

    2011-06-09

    Six fractions, named TiA - TiF, were obtained by fractionating the crude ethanol extract of the stem bark of Tamarindus indica using column chromatographic techniques. On TLC, fraction TiB showed five bands, TiC three bands, while TiD and TiE showed two bands each. TiC, TiD and TiE were re-eluted with different solvent systems to yield two fractions each, while TiB yielded four. These subfractions were designated B1-B4; C1-C2; D1-D2 and E1-E2, respectively. Tannins, flavonoids and alkaloids, among other components, were detected, albeit in different proportions with respect to fractions and subfractions and were compartmentalized with respect to the solvent systems used. The in vitro antibacterial activity of fractions and subfractions was tested separately and in combinations using the agar well diffusion technique. The susceptibly of test strains (expressed as %) were: 83.3% (TiA and TiB), 75.0% (crude extract and TiC), 66.7% (TiD), 50.0% (TiE) and 16.7% (TiF) when used singly, whereas in combination, the corresponding susceptibilities were 100% (CE), 83.3% (DE), 66.7% (AB, AF, BC, BD, DE and EF), 50% (AC and CD), 33.3% (BE and BF) and 16.7% (AD) against Gram negative bacteria strains and 100% (EF), 80% (DE), 60% (AB, BC and CE), 40% (AC, BD, BF, CF and DF) and 20% (AE, AF, BE and CD) against Gram positive strains. Percentage susceptibility with combinatorial use of re-fractions ranged from 85.7-57.1% and 60-40% against Gram negative and positive strains (TiB subfractions), respectively, 100-85.7% and 40-0% against Gram negative and positive strains (TiC, TiD and TiE sub-fractions).

  14. Effect of pericardiocentesis on right and left ventricular function and volumes in pericardial effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyari, D E; Kostuk, W J; Purves, P

    1983-07-01

    To assess the effects of pericardial effusion on ventricular performance and volumes, electrocardiographically gated blood pool cardiac scintigraphy was performed immediately before and after 14 pericardiocenteses in 10 patients, 7 men and 3 women, aged 28 to 73 years (mean 50). Cardiac tamponade was present in 5 patients. After removal of 140 to 1,100 ml of pericardial fluid (527 +/- 305 ml [mean +/- standard deviation]), left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction increased from 63 +/- 5 to 64 +/- 4% (p greater than 0.05) and right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction decreased from 47 +/- 4 to 46 +/- 2% (p greater than 0.05). LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes increased (p less than 0.01) by 28 and 33%, and RV volumes by 40 and 43%, respectively. There were 8 patients with normal LV function (ejection fraction greater than 60%) and 6 patients with subnormal LV function. Changes in ejection fraction were nonsignificant in the 4 subgroups. LV end-diastolic volume changes were more marked (p less than 0.01) in patients with cardiac tamponade (+ 56%) than in those without tamponade (+ 17%), and in those with normal LV function (+ 36%) than in those with subnormal LV function (+ 21%). RV end-diastolic volume increased more markedly (p less than 0.05) in patients with tamponade (+ 72%) than in those without tamponade (+ 23%), but were similar in patients with normal (+ 38%) and abnormal (+ 43%) LV function. After pericardiocentesis, RV volume increased more markedly than did LV volume. Thus, hemodynamic and clinical improvement after pericardiocentesis may be related only to an increase in stroke volume. RV and LV ejection fraction, a measure of myocardial contractility, was not affected significantly by the presence of pericardial effusion, even in those patients who had cardiac tamponade.

  15. 2D and 3D milled surface roughness of high volume fraction SiCp/Al composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on surface roughness generated by high speed milling of high volume fraction (65% silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminum matrix (SiCp/Al composites. Typical 2D (Ra and Rz and 3D (Sa and Sq surface roughness parameters were selected to evaluate the influence of the milling parameters on the surface quality in comparison with aluminum alloy. The 3D topography of the milled surface was studied as well. The results indicate that 3D parameters (Sa and Sq are more capable to describe the influence of the milling parameters on the surface quality, and among them Sq is preferable due to its good sensitivity. Sq decreases with milling speed and increases with feed rate. The influence of axial depth of cut (ADOC is negligible.

  16. Vortex equations governing the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Luciano, E-mail: lmedina@nyu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    An existence theory is established for a coupled non-linear elliptic system, known as “vortex equations,” describing the fractional quantum Hall effect in 2-dimensional double-layered electron systems. Via variational methods, we prove the existence and uniqueness of multiple vortices over a doubly periodic domain and the full plane. In the doubly periodic situation, explicit sufficient and necessary conditions are obtained that relate the size of the domain and the vortex numbers. For the full plane case, existence is established for all finite-energy solutions and exponential decay estimates are proved. Quantization phenomena of the magnetic flux are found in both cases.

  17. Review of experimental methods for evaluating effective delayed neutron fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Yoshihiro [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The International Effective Delayed Neutron Fraction ({beta}{sub eff}) Benchmark Experiments have been carried out at the Fast Critical Assembly of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute since 1995. Researchers from six countries, namely France, Italy, Russia, U.S.A., Korea, and Japan, participate in this FCA project. Each team makes use of each experimental method, such as Frequency Method, Rossi-{alpha} Method, Nelson Number Method, Cf Neutron Source Method, and Covariance Method. In this report these experimental methods are reviewed. (author)

  18. Measurements of γ/γ' Lattice Misfit and γ' Volume Fraction for a Ru-containing Nickel-based Single Crystal Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.P. Tan; J.L. Liu; X P Song; T. Jin; X.F. Sun; Z.Q. Hu

    2011-01-01

    A conventional X-ray difFractometer has been used to determine the -y/y' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction for a Ru-containing nickel-based single crystal superalloy at room temperature. The rocking curve was used to characterize the distribution of subgrains. The diffraction peaks obtained by w-20 scan were used to determine the γ/γ' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction. A three peaks fitting model was proposed. The peak fitting results are in good agreement with the model. The X-ray diffraction results indicate that the nickel-based single crystal superalloy was not a perfect monocrystalline material, which is comprised of many subgrains; and each subgrain also consists of large numbers of mosaic structures. In addition, two anomalous reflection phenomena were found during the experiment and discussed with respect to their occurrence and impact on the measurement. The experimental results show that the γ/γ' lattice misfit and ~/r volume fraction will be various at the different regions of its dendritic microstructure. The average γ/γ' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction of the experimental alloy are approximately-0.2% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, the γ' volume fraction calculated by atom microprobe (AP) data is also basically consistent with the experimental results.

  19. A Fractional Factorial Design to Study the Effect of Process Variables on the Preparation of Hyaluronidase Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was initiated to understand the effect of PLGA concentration, PVA concentration, internal-external phase ratio, homogenization speed, and homogenization time on mean particle size, zeta potential, and percentage drug encapsulation using fractional factorial design. Using PLGA (50-50 as the carrier, hyaluronidase loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared using double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The particle size was analyzed by dynamic light scattering technique and protein content by Lowry method. The study showed that homogenization speed as an independent variable had maximum effect on particle size and zeta potential. Internal-external phase volume ratio had maximum effect on drug encapsulation. Mean particle size also had high dependency on the combined effect of PVA concentration and phase volume ratio. Using fractional factorial design particle size of <400 nm, zeta potential of <−30 mV, and percentage encapsulation of 15–18% were achieved.

  20. Effects of Fractionation and Combinatorial Evaluation of Tamarindus indica Fractions for Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine A. Ngene

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Six fractions, named TiA – TiF, were obtained by fractionating the crude ethanol extract of the stem bark of Tamarindus indica using column chromatographic techniques. On TLC, fraction TiB showed five bands, TiC three bands, while TiD and TiE showed two bands each. TiC, TiD and TiE were re-eluted with different solvent systems to yield two fractions each, while TiB yielded four. These subfractions were designated B1-B4; C1-C2; D1-D2 and E1-E2, respectively. Tannins, flavonoids and alkaloids, among other components, were detected, albeit in different proportions with respect to fractions and subfractions and were compartmentalized with respect to the solvent systems used. The in vitro antibacterial activity of fractions and subfractions was tested separately and in combinations using the agar well diffusion technique. The susceptibly of test strains (expressed as % were: 83.3% (TiA and TiB, 75.0% (crude extract and TiC, 66.7% (TiD, 50.0% (TiE and 16.7% (TiF when used singly, whereas in combination, the corresponding susceptibilities were 100% (CE, 83.3% (DE, 66.7% (AB, AF, BC, BD, DE and EF, 50% (AC and CD, 33.3% (BE and BF and 16.7% (AD against Gram negative bacteria strains and 100% (EF, 80% (DE, 60% (AB, BC and CE, 40% (AC, BD, BF, CF and DF and 20% (AE, AF, BE and CD against Gram positive strains. Percentage susceptibility with combinatorial use of re-fractions ranged from 85.7–57.1% and 60–40% against Gram negative and positive strains (TiB subfractions, respectively, 100–85.7% and 40–0% against Gram negative and positive strains (TiC, TiD and TiE sub-fractions.

  1. Impact of epoetin alfa on left ventricular structure, function, and pressure volume relations as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance: the heart failure preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) anemia trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S

    2013-01-01

    Anemia, a common comorbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. The authors quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A prospective, randomized single-blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa vs placebo for 24 weeks in which a subgroup (n=22) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated. Patients (75±10 years, 64% women) with HFPEF (EF=63%±15%) with an average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dL were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose-adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared with placebo (PHFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR imaging.

  2. A fractional transient model for the viscoplastic response of polymers based on a micro-mechanism of free volume distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spathis, G.; Kontou, E.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, the nonlinear viscoelastic/viscoplastic response of polymeric materials is described by introducing essential modifications on a model developed in previous works. A constitutive equation of viscoelasticity, based on the transient network theory, is introduced in a more generalized form, which takes into account volume changes during deformation. This time-dependent equation accounts for the nonlinearity and viscoplasticity at small elastic and finite plastic strain regime. The present description was proved to be more flexible, given that it contains a relaxation function that has been derived by considering instead of first order kinetics a fractional derivative that controls the rate of molecular chain detachment from their junctions. Therefore, the new equation has a more global character, appropriate for cases where heavy tails are expected. On the basis of the distributed nature of free volume, a new functional form of the rate of plastic deformation is developed, which is combined with a proper kinematic formulation and leads to the separation of the total strain into the elastic and plastic part. A three-dimensional constitutive equation is then derived for an isotropic, compressible medium. This analysis was proved to be capable of capturing the main aspects of inelastic response as well as the instability stage taking place at the tertiary creep, related to the creep failure.

  3. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  4. Inhibitory effects of Zengshengping fractions on DMBA-induced buccal pouch carcinogenesis in hamsters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xiao-bing; SUN Zheng; CHEN Xiao-xin; WU Hong-ru; ZHANG Xin-yan

    2012-01-01

    Background Zengshengping (ZSP) tablets had inhibitory effects on oral precancerous lesions by reducing the incidence of oral cancer.However,the severe liver toxicity caused by systemic administration of ZSP limits the long-term use of this anti-cancer drug.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tumor inhibitory effects due to the topical application of extracts from ZSP,a Chinese herbal drug,on 7,12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced oral tumors in hamsters.The study also investigated the anti-cancer mechanisms of the ZSP extracts on oral carcinogenesis.Methods DMBA (0.5%) was applied topically to the buccal pouches of Syrian golden hamsters (6-8 weeks old) three times per week for six weeks in order to induce the development of oral tumors.Different fractions of ZSP were either applied topically to the oral tumor lesions or fed orally at varying dosages to animals with oral tumors for 18 weeks.Tumor volume was measured by histopathological examination.Tumor cell proliferation was evaluated by counting BrdU labeled cells and by Western blotting for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein levels.The protein levels of apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and regulator Bcl-2 protein were also measured by Western blotting.Results Topical application of DMBA to the left pouch of hamsters induced oral tumor formation.Animals treated with DMBA showed a loss in body weight while animals treated with ZSP maintained normal body weights.Both the ZSP n-butanol fraction and water fraction significantly reduced tumor volume by 32.6% (P <0.01) and 22.9% (P <0.01)respectively.Topical application of ZSP also markedly decreased the BrdU-positive cell numbers in oral tumor lesions and reduced the expression level of MAPK.In addition,ZSP promoted tumor cell apoptosis by increasing Caspase-3 expression but decreasing Bcl-2 protein production.Conclusion The n-butanol and water fractions of ZSP are effective at inhibiting tumor cell proliferation and stimulating

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume in peripheral arterial disease: initial findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten PAD patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the peripheral arteries, followed by one DCE MRI examination of the musculature of the calf. Healthy control subjects were examined twice on different days to determine normative values and the interreader and interscan reproducibility of the technique. The MRI protocol comprised dynamic imaging of contrast agent wash-in under reactive hyperemia conditions of the calf musculature. Using pharmacokinetic modeling the hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume (V(p, unit: % of the anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was calculated. RESULTS: V(p was significantly lower for all muscle groups in PAD patients (4.3±1.6%, 5.0±3.3% and 6.1±3.6% for anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, respectively compared to healthy control subjects (9.1±2.0%, 8.9±1.9% and 9.3±2.1%. Differences in V(p between muscle groups were not significant. The coefficient of variation of V(p varied from 10-14% and 11-16% at interscan and interreader level, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using DCE MRI after contrast-enhanced MR angiography with gadofosveset enables reproducible assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. V(p was lower in PAD patients than in healthy controls, which reflects a promising functional (hemodynamic biomarker for the

  6. Volume Effects in Discrete beta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuzhi; Zou, Haiyuan

    2011-01-01

    We calculate discrete beta functions corresponding to the two-lattice matching for the 2D O(N) models and Dyson's hierarchical model. We describe and explain finite-size effects such as the appearance of a nontrivial infrared fixed point that goes to infinity at infinite volume or the merging of an infrared and an ultraviolet fixed point. We present extensions of the RG flows to the complex coupling plane. We discuss the possibility of constructing a continuous beta function from the discrete one by using functional conjugation methods. We briefly discuss the relevance of these findings for the search of nontrivial fixed points in multiflavor lattice gauge theory models.

  7. Deformed Calogero-Sutherland model and fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atai, Farrokh; Langmann, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    The deformed Calogero-Sutherland (CS) model is a quantum integrable system with arbitrary numbers of two types of particles and reducing to the standard CS model in special cases. We show that a known collective field description of the CS model, which is based on conformal field theory (CFT), is actually a collective field description of the deformed CS model. This provides a natural application of the deformed CS model in Wen's effective field theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), with the two kinds of particles corresponding to electrons and quasi-hole excitations. In particular, we use known mathematical results about super-Jack polynomials to obtain simple explicit formulas for the orthonormal CFT basis proposed by van Elburg and Schoutens in the context of the FQHE.

  8. Exponential reduction of finite volume effects with twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Cherman, Aleksey; Wagman, Michael L; Yaffe, Laurence G

    2016-01-01

    Flavor-twisted boundary conditions can be used for exponential reduction of finite volume artifacts in flavor-averaged observables in lattice QCD calculations with $SU(N_f)$ light quark flavor symmetry. Finite volume artifact reduction arises from destructive interference effects in a manner closely related to the phase averaging which leads to large $N_c$ volume independence. With a particular choice of flavor-twisted boundary conditions, finite volume artifacts for flavor-singlet observables in a hypercubic spacetime volume are reduced to the size of finite volume artifacts in a spacetime volume with periodic boundary conditions that is four times larger.

  9. Research Update for: A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites (ARL-TR-6057)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    increasing the fiber-volume fraction by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) in order to produce composite structures with aerospace grade...processed composites. Using a combination of viscosity control, U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) based VARTM techniques, and a pressure control...system, we have shown an increase in fiber-volume content from 50% (ARL’s normal processing range for a particular material system and VARTM process) to

  10. Dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations on daily or alternate day schedule outside the linear quadratic model: Proof of concept and early results. A substitute to volume fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Kumar, Narendra; Tripathi, Manjul; Oinam, Arun S; Ahuja, Chirag K; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kaur, Rupinder; Bhatt, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery (DFGKRS) on a daily schedule beyond the linear quadratic (LQ) model, for large volume arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Between 2012-16, 14 patients of large AVMs (median volume 26.5 cc) unsuitable for surgery or embolization were treated in 2-3 of DFGKRS sessions. The Leksell G frame was kept in situ during the whole procedure. 86% (n = 12) patients had radiologic evidence of bleed, and 43% (n = 6) had presented with a history of seizures. 57% (n = 8) patients received a daily treatment for 3 days and 43% (n = 6) were on an alternate day (2 fractions) regimen. The marginal dose was split into 2 or 3 fractions of the ideal prescription dose of a single fraction of 23-25 Gy. The median follow up period was 35.6 months (8-57 months). In the three-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 8.9-11.5 Gy, while in the two-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 11.3-15 Gy at 50% per fraction. Headache (43%, n = 6) was the most common early postoperative complication, which was controlled with short course steroids. Follow up evaluation of at least three years was achieved in seven patients, who have shown complete nidus obliteration in 43% patients while the obliteration has been in the range of 50-99% in rest of the patients. Overall, there was a 67.8% reduction in the AVM volume at 3 years. Nidus obliteration at 3 years showed a significant rank order correlation with the cumulative prescription dose (p 0.95, P value 0.01), with attainment of near-total (more than 95%) obliteration rates beyond 29 Gy of the cumulative prescription dose. No patient receiving a cumulative prescription dose of less than 31 Gy had any severe adverse reaction. In co-variate adjusted ordinal regression, only the cumulative prescription dose had a significant correlation with common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) severity (P value 0.04), independent of age, AVM volume

  11. Imaging water velocity and volume fraction distributions in water continuous multiphase flows using inductive flow tomography and electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an inductive flow tomography (IFT) system, employing a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM) and novel reconstruction techniques, for measuring the local water velocity distribution in water continuous single and multiphase flows. A series of experiments were carried out in vertical-upward and upward-inclined single phase water flows and ‘water continuous’ gas-water and oil-gas-water flows in which the velocity profiles ranged from axisymmetric (single phase and vertical-upward multiphase flows) to highly asymmetric (upward-inclined multiphase flows). Using potential difference measurements obtained from the electrode array of the EMFM, local axial velocity distributions of the continuous water phase were reconstructed using two different IFT reconstruction algorithms denoted RT#1, which assumes that the overall water velocity profile comprises the sum of a series of polynomial velocity components, and RT#2, which is similar to RT#1 but which assumes that the zero’th order velocity component may be replaced by an axisymmetric ‘power law’ velocity distribution. During each experiment, measurement of the local water volume fraction distribution was also made using the well-established technique of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By integrating the product of the local axial water velocity and the local water volume fraction in the cross section an estimate of the water volumetric flow rate was made which was compared with a reference measurement of the water volumetric flow rate. In vertical upward flows RT#2 was found to give rise to water velocity profiles which are consistent with the previous literature although the profiles obtained in the multiphase flows had relatively higher central velocity peaks than was observed for the single phase profiles. This observation was almost certainly a result of the transfer of axial momentum from the less dense dispersed phases to the water

  12. Environmental Effects on Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Allergic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania La Grutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is a non-invasive marker of airway inflammation in asthma and respiratory allergy. Environmental factors, especially indoor and outdoor air quality, may play an important role in triggering acute exacerbations of respiratory symptoms. The authors have reviewed the literature reporting effects of outdoor and indoor pollutants on FeNO in children. Although the findings are not consistent, urban and industrial pollution—mainly particles (PM2.5 and PM10, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and sulfur dioxide (SO2—as well as formaldehyde and electric baseboard heating have been shown to increase FeNO, whilst ozone (O3 tends to decrease it. Among children exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS with a genetic polymorphisms in nitric oxide synthase genes (NOS, a higher nicotine exposure was associated with lower FeNO levels. Finally, although more studies are needed in order to better investigate the effect of gene and environment interactions which may affect the interpretation of FeNO values in the management of children with asthma, clinicians are recommended to consider environmental exposures when taking medical histories for asthma and respiratory allergy. Further research is also needed to assess the effects of remedial interventions aimed at reducing/abating environmental exposures in asthmatic/allergic patients.

  13. Anti-fertility effects of different fractions of Anethum graveolens l ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-fertility effects of different fractions of Anethum graveolens l. extracts on female rats. ... and ethanol extracts of Anethum graveolens L. (dill) on female infertility. ... that each fraction produced some changes such as hormonal level reduction ...

  14. DNS of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kidanemariam, Aman G; Doychev, Todor; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation of turbulent open channel flow over a smooth horizontal wall in the presence of finite-size, heavy particles. The spherical particles have a diameter of approximately 7 wall units, a density of 1.7 times the fluid density and a solid volume fraction of 0.0005. The value of the Galileo number is set to 16.5, while the Shields parameter measures approximately 0.2. Under these conditions, the particles are predominantly located in the vicinity of the bottom wall, where they exhibit strong preferential concentration which we quantify by means of Voronoi analysis and by computing the particle-conditioned concentration field. As observed in previous studies with similar parameter values, the mean streamwise particle velocity is smaller than that of the fluid. We propose a new definition of the fluid velocity "seen" by finite-size particles based on an average over a spherical surface segment, from which we deduce in the present case that the particles are instantaneousl...

  15. HOT ROLLING OF A FERRITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN A STECKEL MILL: THERMOMECHANICAL AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CARACTERIZATION AND MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF THE EVOLUTION OF RECRYSTALLIZED VOLUME FRACTION OF FERRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Schuwarten Júnior

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A thermomechanical and a microstructure caracterization and a mathematical model of the evolution of the recrystallized volume fraction of ferrite in hot rolling in a Steckel mill have been carried out here. The proposed model is able to reasonably predict the observed in hot rolling, that is, there is 100% recrystallization of ferrite after roughing and partial recrystallization only after finishing

  16. Pre-chemotherapy values for left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated tomographic radionuclide angiography using a cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarmark, Christian; Haase, Christine; Jensen, Maria Maj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using equilibrium radionuclide angiography is an established method for assessment of left ventricular function. The purpose of this study was to establish normative data on left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fractio...

  17. Impact of ribs on flow parameters and laminar heat transfer of water–aluminum oxide nanofluid with different nanoparticle volume fractions in a three-dimensional rectangular microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Ali Akbari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to study the impact of ribs on flow parameters and laminar heat transfer of water–aluminum oxide nanofluid with different nanoparticle volume fractions in a three-dimensional rectangular microchannel. To this aim, compulsory convection heat transfer of water–aluminum oxide nanofluid in a rib-roughened microchannel has been numerically studied. The results of this simulation for rib-roughened three-dimensional microchannel have been evaluated in contrast to the smooth (unribbed three-dimensional microchannel with identical geometrical and heat–fluid boundary conditions. Numerical simulation is performed for different nanoparticle volume fractions for Reynolds numbers of 10 and 100. Cold fluid entering the microchannel is heated in order to apply constant flux to external surface of the microchannel walls and then leaves it. Given the results, the fluid has a higher heat transfer with a hot wall in surfaces with ribs rather than in smooth ones. As Reynolds number, number of ribs, and nanoparticle volume fractions increase, more temperature increase happens in fluid in exit intersection of the microchannel. By investigating Nusselt number and friction factor, it is observed that increase in nanoparticle volume fractions causes nanofluid heat transfer properties to have a higher heat transfer and friction factor compared to the base fluid used in cooling due to an increase in viscosity.

  18. Measurement of oil volume fraction and velocity distributions in vertical oil-in-water flows using ERT and a local probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua; WANG Mi; WU Ying-xiang; MA Yi-xin; WILLIAMS Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a high performance dual-plane electrical resistance tomography (ERT) system and a local dual-sensor conductance probe to measure the vertical upward oil-in-water pipe flows in which the mean oil volume fraction is up to 23.1%.A sensitivity coefficient back-projection (SBP) algorithm was adopted to reconstruct the flow distributions and a cross correlation method was applied to obtain the oil velocity distributions. The oil volume fraction and velocity distributions obtained from both measurement techniques were compared and good agreement was found, which indicates that the ERT technique can be used to measure the low fraction oil-water flows. Finally, the factors affecting measurement precision were discussed.

  19. Altitude acclimatization and blood volume: effects of exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawka, M N; Young, Jette Feveile; Rock, P B;

    1996-01-01

    We studied sea-level residents during 13 days of altitude acclimatization to determine 1) altitude acclimatization effects on erythrocyte volume and plasma volume, 2) if exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion alters subsequent erythrocyte volume and plasma volume adaptations, 3) if an increased...... blood oxygen content alters erythropoietin responses during altitude acclimatization, and 4) mechanisms responsible for plasma loss at altitude. Sixteen healthy men had a series of hematologic measurements made at sea level, on the first and ninth days of altitude (4,300 m) residence, and after...... had no effect; in addition, initially at altitude, blood oxygen content was 8% higher in erythrocyte-infused than in saline-infused subjects. The new findings regarding altitude acclimatization are summarized as follows: 1) erythrocyte volume does not change during the first 13 days...

  20. Fractionated PDT with 5-aminolevulinic acid: effective, cost effective, and patient friendly

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vijlder, Hannah C.; Middelburg, Tom A.; de Bruijn, Henriette S.; Robinson, Dominic J.; Neumann, H. A. Martino; de Haas, Ellen R. M.

    2009-06-01

    PDT with ALA and MAL is established as a relatively effective treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer and premalignancies. PDT is often repeated, because a single treatment gives poor long term results. Preclinical studies showed that ALA-PDT applying a fractionated illumination scheme with a small first light fraction and a second larger light fraction separated by a dark interval of two hours resulted in a significant increase in efficacy. Whereas the efficacy was not enhanced by fractionating MAL-PDT, indicating that ALA-PDT mechanism is not the same as MAL-PDT mechanism. The increase in efficacy using fractionated PDT was confirmed clinically. A randomized comparative clinical study comparing fractionated ALA-PDT versus non-fractionated ALA-PDT in the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma showed a significant higher response rate in the lesions treated with fractionated ALA-PDT after a follow-up of one year ( pMAL-PDT treatments separated by one week), both reducing direct and indirect costs and the burden to the patient.

  1. Impact of the target volume (prostate alone vs. prostate with seminal vesicles) and fraction dose (1.8 Gy vs. 2.0 Gy) on quality of life changes after external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, Michael J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Fischedick, Karin; Holy, Richard; Klotz, Jens; Nussen, Sandra; Krenkel, Barbara

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the impact of the clinical target volume (CTV) and fraction dose on quality of life (QoL) after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: a group of 283 patients has been surveyed prospectively before, at the last day, at a median time of 2 months and 15 months after EBRT (70.2-72 Gy) using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). FBRT of prostate alone (P, n = 70) versus prostate with seminal vesicles (PS, n = 213) was compared. Differences of fraction doses (1.8 Gy, n = 80, vs. 2.0 Gy, n = 69) have been evaluated in the patient group receiving a total dose of 72 Gy. Results: significantly higher bladder and rectum volumes were found at all dose levels for the patients with PS versus P within the CTV (p < 0.001). Similar volumes resulted in the groups with different fraction doses. Paradoxically, bowel function scores decreased significantly less 2 and 15 months after EBRT of PS versus P. 2 months after EBRT, patients with a fraction dose of 2.0 Gy versus 1.8 Gy reported pain with urination ({>=} once a day in 12% vs. 3%; p = 0.04) and painful bowel movements ({>=} rarely in 46% vs. 29%; p = 0.05) more frequently. No long-term differences were found. Conclusion: the risk of adverse QoL changes after EBRT for prostate cancer cannot be derived from the dose-volume histogram alone. Seminal vesicles can be included in the CTV up to a moderate total dose without adverse effects on QoL. Apart from a longer recovery period, higher fraction doses were not associated with higher toxicity. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral white matter fractional anisotropy and tract volume as measured by MR imaging are associated with impaired cognitive and motor function in pediatric posterior fossa tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckriegel, Stefan M; Bruhn, Harald; Thomale, Ulrich W; Hernáiz Driever, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Disease and therapy cause brain damage and subsequent functional loss in pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors. Treatment-related toxicity factors are resection in patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and, additionally, cranio-spinal irradiation together with chemotherapy in patients with medulloblastoma (MB). We tested whether damage to white matter (WM) as revealed by diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) correlated with specific cognitive and motor impairments in survivors of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. Eighteen MB (mean age ± SD, 15.2 ± 4.9 y) and 14 PA (12.6 ± 5.0 y) survivors were investigated with DTI on a 3-Tesla-MR system. We identified fractional anisotropy (FA) of WM, the volume ratio of WM to gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid (WM/GM + CSF), and volume of specific frontocerebellar tracts. Ataxia was assessed using the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), while the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children determined full-scale intelligence quotients (FSIQ). Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (ANT) was used to assess processing speed. Handwriting automation was analyzed using a digitizing graphic tablet. The WM/GM + CSF ratio correlated significantly with cognitive measures (IQ, P = 0.002; ANT baseline speed, P = 0.04; ANT shifting attention, P = 0.004). FA of skeletonized tracts correlated significantly with FSIQ (P = 0.008), ANT baseline speed (P = 0.028) and ANT shifting attention (P = 0.045). Moreover, frontocerebellar tract volumes correlated with both the FSIQ (P = 0.011) and ICARS (P = 0.007). DTI provides a method for quantification of WM damage by tumor and by therapy-associated effects in survivors of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. DTI-derived WM integrity may be a representative marker for cognitive and motor deterioration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effectivity of Beta vulgaris L. Extract with various Solvent Fractions to Aedes aegypti Larval Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutiara Widawati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue vector control is mostly done by using plant-based insecticides. Insecticides from the vegetable and fruit extracts of the leaves of plants that contain compounds alkaloids, saponins, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids, and polyphenols can be used as an alternative to naturally control Ae. aegypti. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the B. vulgaris L. extract larvacide against larvae of Ae. aegypti. The materials that been used was B. vulgaris L. fruit parts which was milled and dried to become a powder form. 800 g of dry powder was extracted by 70% methanol by percolation method with occasional stirring for 3 days. The extract was concentrated using an evaporator. 60 g remaining residue was dissolved in distilled water and re-extracted with diethyl ether, chloroform, and ethyl acetate. Each fraction extract was dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate and the solvent was distilled. The extract was tested qualitatively to determine the content of secondary metabolites. Larvacide test performed by dissolving each extracts in dimetilsulphoxide (DMSO at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1%. The larvae used was larval of Ae. aegypti age of seven days. Death larvae counted every day for seven days to determine the effect of the contact. Tests carried out at a temperature of 27±1°C by immersing 25 larvae at each concentration of the extract with 50 mL volume and three replications was performed. The data obtained were analyzed further with different test. The results showed that fruit extract contains flavonoids, alkoloid, sterols, triterpenes, saponins and tannins. Highest mortality happened which was 82.5% and the lowest mortality happened with a concentration of 0.1% diethyl ether extract fraction. The extracts that are dissolved in various solvent fractions have not been effective as a larvacide until the highest concentration which was 1%. Methanol and polar solvent extracts of the fruit has a larvacide potency a bit

  4. Advanced fractional crystallisation and homogenization of large-volume rhyolite before the Oraefajokull 1362 AD plinian eruption, SE Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbekk, R. S.; Tronnes, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    In the 50 km wide Icelandic rift zones rhyolite magma is generated by partial melting of hydrated metabasaltic crust, subsiding under the weight of the growing volcanic pile. This mechanism of silicic melt formation is indicated by the basalt-rhyolite bimodality and rhyolite O-isotope composition. The low 18/16O-isotope ratios of rift zone rhyolites trace the high-latitude meteoric water component of the subsiding hydrated basalts [1]. The rhyolites of the volcanic flank zones (VFZ), however, have generally as heavy oxygen as the associated alkaline to transitional basalts and intermediate volcanics [2,3]. The minor volcanic loading of the older, thicker and stronger VFZ crust is insufficient for significant subsidence, and less pronounced basalt-rhyolite bimodality combined with other geochemical features support silicic melt generation by fractional crystallization. An extreme case in Icelandic, as well as global, perspective is the rhyolite magma of the plinian eruption from the large VFZ-volcano, Oraefajokull, in 1362 AD [4]. Glass, mineral and bulk tephra analyses show no chemical variation exceeding the analytical precision for the entire erupted volume of 2 km3 DRE. This applies even to the glass shards from distant locations in Greenland, Norway and Ireland. The total phenocryst content is 0.5-1 wt percent, with oligoclase (An14 Ab81 Or5.5), fayalite (Fa99.7 Fo0.3) and hedenbergite (Wo44.7 En2.6 Fs52.7) constituting 50- 80, 10-25 and 10-25 percent of the total phenocrysts, respectively. The extreme mineral compositions (especially pure fayalite and hedenbergite) resemble those of the granophyres in the Skaergaard and Bushveld complexes and differ from all other investigated rhyolites. The advanced fractionation and homogenisation to form the erupted 2 km3 DRE rhyolite is petrogenetically challenging, and a parental magma chamber of 20-40 km3 seems like a conservative estimate. The time-scale of the historic magma chamber evolution under Oraefajokull is

  5. Emergence and mechanism in the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    For some authors, an adequate notion of emergence must include an account of a mechanism by means of which emergent behavior is realized. This appeal to mechanism is problematic in the case of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). There is a consensus among physicists that the FQHE exhibits emergent phenomena, but there are at least four alternative explanations of the latter that, arguably, appeal to ontologically distinct mechanisms, both at the microphysics level and at the level of general organizing principles. In light of this underdetermination of mechanism, one is faced with the following options: (I) deny that emergence is present in the FQHE; (II) argue for the priority of one mechanistic explanation over the others; or (III) temper the desire for a mechanism-centric account of emergence. I will argue that there are good reasons to reject (I) and (II) and accept (III). In particular, I will suggest that a law-centric account of emergence does just fine in explaining the emergent phenomena associated with the FQHE.

  6. Effect of volume expansion on systemic hemodynamics and central and arterial blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1995-01-01

    and in controls. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with cirrhosis (12 patients with Child-Turcotte class A, 14 with class B, and 13 with class C) and 6 controls were studied. During hepatic vein catheterization, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, central and arterial blood volume, noncentral blood volume...... in patients with either class B or class C. Conversely, the noncentral blood volume increased in patients with class B and C. In both patients and controls, the cardiac output increased and the systemic vascular resistance decreased, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure did not change significantly......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Systemic vasodilatation in cirrhosis may lead to hemodynamic alterations with reduced effective blood volume and decreased arterial blood pressure. This study investigates the response of acute volume expansion on hemodynamics and regional blood volumes in patients with cirrhosis...

  7. Bone volume fraction and fabric anisotropy are better determinants of trabecular bone stiffness than other morphological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquer, Ghislain; Musy, Sarah N; Wandel, Jasmin; Gross, Thomas; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-06-01

    As our population ages, more individuals suffer from osteoporosis. This disease leads to impaired trabecular architecture and increased fracture risk. It is essential to understand how morphological and mechanical properties of the cancellous bone are related. Morphology-elasticity relationships based on bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric anisotropy explain up to 98% of the variation in elastic properties. Yet, other morphological variables such as individual trabeculae segmentation (ITS) and trabecular bone score (TBS) could improve the stiffness predictions. A total of 743 micro-computed tomography (μCT) reconstructions of cubic trabecular bone samples extracted from femur, radius, vertebrae, and iliac crest were analyzed. Their morphology was assessed via 25 variables and their stiffness tensor (CFE) was computed from six independent load cases using micro finite element (μFE) analyses. Variance inflation factors were calculated to evaluate collinearity between morphological variables and decide upon their inclusion in morphology-elasticity relationships. The statistically admissible morphological variables were included in a multiple linear regression model of the dependent variable CFE. The contribution of each independent variable was evaluated (ANOVA). Our results show that BV/TV is the best determinant of CFE(r(2) adj  = 0.889), especially in combination with fabric anisotropy (r(2) adj  = 0.968). Including the other independent predictors hardly affected the amount of variance explained by the model (r(2) adj  = 0.975). Across all anatomical sites, BV/TV explained 87% of the variance of the bone elastic properties. Fabric anisotropy further described 10% of the bone stiffness, but the improvement in variance explanation by adding other independent factors was marginal (variables do not bring any further contribution. These overall conclusions remain to be confirmed for specific bone diseases and postelastic properties.

  8. Bone volume fraction explains the variation in strength and stiffness of cancellous bone affected by metastatic cancer and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Ara; von Stechow, Dietrich; Zurakowski, David; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2008-12-01

    Preventing nontraumatic fractures in millions of patients with osteoporosis or metastatic cancer may significantly reduce the associated morbidity and reduce health-care expenditures incurred by these fractures. Predicting fracture occurrence requires an accurate understanding of the relationship between bone structure and the mechanical properties governing bone fracture that can be readily measured. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a single analytic relationship with either bone tissue mineral density or bone volume fraction (BV/TV) as independent variables could predict the strength and stiffness of normal and pathologic cancellous bone affected by osteoporosis or metastatic cancer. After obtaining institutional review board approval and informed consent, 15 patients underwent excisional biopsy of metastatic prostate, breast, lung, ovarian, or colon cancer from the spine and/or femur to obtain 41 metastatic cancer specimens. In addition, 96 noncancer specimens were excised from 43 age- and site-matched cadavers. All specimens were imaged using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and backscatter emission imaging and tested mechanically by uniaxial compression and nanoindentation. The minimum BV/TV, measured using quantitative micro-CT, accounted for 84% of the variation in bone stiffness and strength for all cancellous bone specimens. While relationships relating bone density to strength and stiffness have been derived empirically for normal and osteoporotic bone, these relationships have not been applied to skeletal metastases. This simple analytic relationship will facilitate large-scale screening and prediction of fracture risk for normal and pathologic cancellous bone using clinical CT systems to determine the load capacity of bones altered by metastatic cancer, osteoporosis, or both.

  9. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali

    2010-12-01

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (keff) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  10. Effect of tumor hypoxia on efficacy of tirapazamine combined with fractionated irradiation in mouse tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Han [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia can be overcome with hypoxic cytotoxin. In mouse tumor, tirapazamine's efficacy of the potentiating radiation effect was tested by the tumor oxygenation status combined with hyperfactionated radiotherapy. The control and hypoxic mouse tumors were established by inoculation of RIF-1 tumor cells into the normal or previously irradiated back and thigh of C3H mice. When the tumors reached a proper size, both the control and hypoxic tumors were given hyperfractionated treatments (8 fractions/4 days) with saline (0.02 ml/g), tirapazamin (0.08 mM/0.02 ml/kg), irradiation (2.5 Gy), irradiation combined with tirapazamine given 30 minutes prior to each irradiation. The response was evaluated by the growth delay assay by measuring tumor size from day 0 (12 hrs prior to the first fractionation) to the day when the volume had 4-fold increase or cross sectional area had 2-fold increase. Overall growth pattern showed that tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect in back and thigh tumors grew in the normal and preirradiated tumor bed. With growth delay assay using reference point of initial tumor volume or cross sectional area, tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect 1.9 times for the control and 2.4 times for the hypoxic tumors in back, and 1.85 times for the control and 1.6 times for the hypoxic tumors. With reference of 4-fold increase of the initial volume or 2-fold increase of the cross sectional area, tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect 1.48 times for the control and 2.02 times for the hypxic tumors in back, and 1.85 times for the control and 1.6 times for the hypoxic tumors. Present result indicated that radiation response of hypoxic tumors was potentiated by tirapazamine in the back or thigh tumors grew in the control or preirradiated tumor bed, and potentiation of the hypoxic tumors was equal to or greater than that of the control tumors in the back or thigh.

  11. The Effect of Cow Manure and Vermicompost Application on Fractionation and Availability of Zinc and Copper in wheat planting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Hosseinpur`

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of organic fertilizers in agricultural soils with low organic matter content is one of the best ways of nutrientsaddition to these soils. Different organic fertilizers have different effects on nutrient availability in soil. Moreover study of the distribution of nutrients in the soil allows investigating their mobility and bioavailability. The nutrients availability and kinetics of nutrients desorption into the soil solution is often closely related to the distribution of nutrients to different fractions in the soil. It has been assumed that the factors influencing metal fractionation and availability in soil include rate of amendment application, amount of nutrients in amendment, root-induced pH changes, metal binding by root exudates, root-induced changes of microbial activities, and metal depletion because of plant uptake. Materials and Methods: In this study, availability and fractionation of Zinc (Zn and Copper (Cu were compared in one calcareous soil amended with 0, 0.5, and 1% (w/w of cow manure and vermicompost in a completely randomized design. Also, wheat was planted in treated and untreated soils in greenhouse condition.Available Zn and Cu were determined using different methods (DTPA-TEA, AB-DTPA, and Mehlich 3. For Zn and Cu fractionation, the soil samples were sequentially extracted using an operationally defined sequential fractionation procedure, based on that employed by Tessier et al. (1979 in which increasingly strong extractants were used to release Zn and Cu associated with different soil fractions. Five Zn and Cu -fractions were extracted in the following sequence: Step 1: exchangeable fraction (a 8 ml volume of 1.0 MNaOAc (pH= 8.2 for 120 min. at room temperature., Step 2: carbonate-associated fraction (a 8 ml volume of 1.0 MNaOAc adjusted to pH 5.0 with acetic acid for 6 h at room temperature, Step 3: iron-manganese oxides-associated fraction (20 ml of 0.04 M NH2OH.HCl in 25% (v/v HOAc for 6 h at

  12. PRIMUS: Effect of Galaxy Environment on the Quiescent Fraction Evolution at z < 0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, ChangHoon; Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L; Cool, Richard J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Skibba, Ramin A; Wong, Kenneth C; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of galaxy environment on the evolution of the quiescent fraction ($f_\\mathrm{Q}$) from z =0.8 to 0.0 using spectroscopic redshifts and multi-wavelength imaging data from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and the Sloan Digitial Sky Survey (SDSS). Our stellar mass limited galaxy sample consists of ~14,000 PRIMUS galaxies within z = 0.2-0.8 and ~64,000 SDSS galaxies within z = 0.05-0.12. We classify the galaxies as quiescent or star-forming based on an evolving specific star formation cut, and as low or high density environments based on fixed cylindrical aperture environment measurements on a volume-limited environment defining population. For quiescent and star-forming galaxies in low or high density environments, we examine the evolution of their stellar mass function (SMF). Then using the SMFs we compute $f_\\mathrm{Q}(M_{*})$ and quantify its evolution within our redshift range. We find that the quiescent fraction is higher at higher masses and in denser environments. The quie...

  13. A Clinically Useful Tool to Determine an Effective Snellen Fraction: Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    A Clinically Useful Tool to Determine an Effective Snellen Fraction: Details by William A. Monaco, Joseph M. Heimerl, and Joel T. Kalb...ARL-TR-4756 March 2009 A Clinically Useful Tool to Determine an Effective Snellen Fraction: Details William A. Monaco, Joseph M...Effective Snellen Fraction: Details 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) William A. Monaco, Joseph M

  14. Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Michael; /MIT, LNS; Nayak, Chetan; /Station Q, UCSB; Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    We present a Landau-Ginzburg theory for a fractional quantized Hall nematic state and the transition to it from an isotropic fractional quantum Hall state. This justifies Lifshitz-Chern-Simons theory - which is shown to be its dual - on a more microscopic basis and enables us to compute a ground state wave function in the symmetry-broken phase. In such a state of matter, the Hall resistance remains quantized while the longitudinal DC resistivity due to thermally-excited quasiparticles is anisotropic. We interpret recent experiments at Landau level filling factor {nu} = 7/3 in terms of our theory.

  15. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  16. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the permanent dent depth and energy absorption of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  17. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the maximum deflection and impact load of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  18. Effects of fractionation on antibacterial activity of crude extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-18

    Oct 18, 2010 ... TiA showed activity against 100% of the test gram negative bacterial strains and 60% of the ... Key words: Fractionation, chromatography, plant extract, Tamarindus indica, antibacterial activity, .... The phytochemical analysis showed that TiA, .... Alleviating Soil Acidity through Plant Organic Compounds. Braz ...

  19. Analysis of Partial Volume Effects on Accurate Measurement of the Hippocampus Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Hajiesmaeili; Jamshid Dehmeshki; Tim Ellis

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal volume loss is an important biomarker in distinguishing subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and its measurement in magnetic resonance images (MRI) is influenced by partial volume effects (PVE). This paper describes a post-processing approach to quantify PVE for correction of the hippocampal volume by using a spatial fuzzyC-means (SFCM) method. The algorithm is evaluated on a dataset of 20 T1-weighted MRI scans sampled at two different resolutions. The corrected volumes for left and right hippocampus (HC) which are 23% and 18% for the low resolution and 6% and 5% for the high resolution datasets, respectively are lower than hippocampal volume results from manual segmentation. Results show the importance of applying this technique in AD detection with low resolution datasets.

  20. Therapeutic Effect of Saponin Rich Fraction of Achyranthes aspera Linn. on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj S. Kothavade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Achyranthes aspera Linn. (AA is used in folklore for the treatment of various inflammatory ailments and arthritis like conditions. Anti-inflammatory activity of saponin rich (SR fraction of AA has been previously reported. The objective of this study was to assess the antiarthritic effect of SR fraction of Achyranthes aspera in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Methods. Arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, paw volume, changes in tibiotarsal joint thickness, hyperalgesic parameters, and spleen and thymus index. Haematological, serum, biochemical, and inflammatory cytokine and in vivo antioxidant parameters were measured on the last day of the study. Results. SR fraction significantly suppressed paw swelling and arthritic score and improved the pain threshold in motility and stair climbing tests. There was a reversal in the levels of altered parameters, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and antioxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide. SR fraction significantly decreased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6. Moreover, histopathology revealed a significant reduction in synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, and bone destruction in the joints. Conclusion. These observations explain the therapeutic benefit of SR fraction of AA in suppressing the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

  1. Axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus measured by q-space imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Kamiya

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies suggest that compression and stretching of the corticospinal tract (CST potentially cause treatable gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. Measurement of axon diameter with diffusion MRI has recently been used to investigate microstructural alterations in neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated alterations in the axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction of the CST in iNPH by q-space imaging (QSI analysis. METHODS: Nineteen patients with iNPH and 10 age-matched controls were recruited. QSI data were obtained with a 3-T system by using a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence with the diffusion gradient applied parallel to the antero-posterior axis. By using a two-component low-q fit model, the root mean square displacements of intra-axonal space ( =  axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the CST were calculated at the levels of the internal capsule and body of the lateral ventricle, respectively. RESULTS: Wilcoxon's rank-sum test revealed a significant increase in CST intra-axonal volume fraction at the paraventricular level in patients (p<0.001, whereas no significant difference was observed in the axon diameter. At the level of the internal capsule, neither axon diameter nor intra-axonal volume fraction differed significantly between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that in patients with iNPH, the CST does not undergo irreversible axonal damage but is rather compressed and/or stretched owing to pressure from the enlarged ventricle. These analyses of axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction yield insights into microstructural alterations of the CST in iNPH.

  2. Fetal cardiac ventricular volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Neil; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S.; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Lee, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify fetal cardiovascular parameters with Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™) utilizing the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”. Study Design A cross-sectional study was designed consisting of patients with normal pregnancies between 19 and 40 weeks of gestation. After STIC datasets were acquired, analysis was performed offline (4DView) and the following cardiovascular parameters were evaluated: ventricular volume in end systole and end diastole, stroke volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction. To account for fetal size, cardiac output was also expressed as a function of head circumference, abdominal circumference, or femoral diaphysis length. Regression models were fitted for each cardiovascular parameter to assess the effect of gestational age and paired comparisons were made between the left and right ventricles. Results 1) Two hundred and seventeen patients were retrospectively identified, of whom 184 had adequate STIC datasets (85% acceptance); 2) ventricular volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and adjusted cardiac output increased with gestational age; whereas, the ejection fraction decreased as gestation advanced; 3) the right ventricle was larger than the left in both systole (Right: 0.50 ml, IQR: 0.2 – 0.9; vs. Left: 0.27 ml, IQR: 0.1 – 0.5; p<0.001) and diastole (Right: 1.20 ml, IQR: 0.7 – 2.2; vs. Left: 1.03 ml, IQR: 0.5 – 1.7; p<0.001); 4) there were no differences between the left and right ventricle with respect to stroke volume, cardiac output, or adjusted cardiac output; and 5) the left ventricular ejection fraction was greater than the right (Left: 72.2%, IQR: 64 – 78; vs. Right: 62.4%, IQR: 56 – 69; p<0.001). Conclusion Fetal echocardiography, utilizing STIC and VOCAL™ with the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”, allows assessment of fetal cardiovascular parameters. Normal fetal cardiovascular physiology is characterized by ventricular

  3. Horava-Lifshitz Gravity and Effective Theory of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chaolun

    2014-01-01

    We show that Horava-Lifshitz gravity theory can be employed as a covariant framework to build an effective field theory for the fractional quantum Hall effect that respects all the spacetime symmetries such as non-relativistic diffeomorphism invariance and anisotropic Weyl invariance as well as the gauge symmetry. The key to this formalism is a set of correspondence relations that maps all the field degrees of freedom in the Horava-Lifshitz gravity theory to external background (source) fields among others in the effective action of the quantum Hall effect, according to their symmetry transformation properties. We originally derive the map as a holographic dictionary, but its form is independent of the existence of holographic duality. This paves the way for the application of Horava-Lifshitz holography on fractional quantum Hall effect. Using the simplest holographic Chern-Simons model, we compute the low energy effective action at leading orders and show that it captures universal electromagnetic and geomet...

  4. 2016 Billion-Ton Report: Environmental Sustainability Effects of Select Scenarios from Volume 1 (Volume 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, R. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Langholtz, M. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, K. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stokes, B. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-13

    On behalf of all the authors and contributors, it is a great privilege to present the 2016 Billion-Ton Report (BT16), volume 2: Environmental Sustainability Effects of Select Scenarios from volume 1. This report represents the culmination of several years of collaborative effort among national laboratories, government agencies, academic institutions, and industry. BT16 was developed to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s efforts towards national goals of energy security and associated quality of life.

  5. Interference effects from coexisting fatty acids on elaidic acid separation by fractionating crystallization: A model study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jala, Ram Chandra Reddy; Guo, Zheng; Bjerring, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage temperature-programmed fractionating crystallization process was carried out to examine the effects of the presence of stearic acid (SA), oleic acid (OA), and linoleic acid (LA) on the separation of elaidic acid (EA). The results showed that the efficiency of fractionating crystalli......A multi-stage temperature-programmed fractionating crystallization process was carried out to examine the effects of the presence of stearic acid (SA), oleic acid (OA), and linoleic acid (LA) on the separation of elaidic acid (EA). The results showed that the efficiency of fractionating...

  6. Weapons Effects in Cities. Volume 2. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    Volume III. Moscow: Military Publishing House, 1961. 20. Korbonski, S. Fighting Warsaw. New York: Funk and Wagnalls , 1956. 21. Losch, A. The...Cowle’s Encyclopedia of Science, Industry, and Technology. New York: Cowles Publishing Co., 1967. H-2 13. Cralg, W. Enemy at the Gates; The...City in History; Its Origins. Its Transforma- tions, and Its Prospects. New York; Harcourt, Brace and World , Inc., 1961. 25. Patton, George S

  7. Effects of Wheat Gluten Hydrolysate and Its Ultrafiltration Fractions on Dough Properties and Bread Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouming Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two fractions (50-K and permeate from a proteolytic hydrolysate (degree of hydrolysis, DH=3.8 % of wheat gluten were separated using ultrafiltration (UF membrane with molecular mass cut-off of 50 kDa. The effects of the wheat gluten hydrolysate (WGH and its UF fractions on the mixing behaviour and viscoelastic properties of wheat dough were presented. The WGH and its UF fractions modified the mixing properties of dough. The addition of these fractions improved the viscoelastic characteristics of wheat dough. A significant (p<0.05 effect of 50-K fraction on these characteristics of wheat dough was observed. After adding these fractions, the bread was considered acceptable by the sensory panel. Also, 50-K fraction resulted in significant (p<0.05 increase in the crumb firmness, while the bread made with wheat flour with WGH and permeate (P fraction showed softer crumbs compared to that of wheat flour. Moreover, these fractions had anti-staling properties for bread during storage. Hence, the wheat gluten hydrolysate and its UF fractions are the products with promising potential in the baking products.

  8. Effects of headspace fraction and aqueous alkalinity on subcritical hydrothermal gasification of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Ryan; Yin, Sudong; Tan, Zhongchao [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Centre for Environmental Engineering Research and Education, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W. Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-15

    In order to better understand the pathways of hydrothermal gasification of cellulose, the effect of headspace fraction and alkalinity on the hydrothermal gasification of cellulose has been studied at 315 C in the presence of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as catalyst. It was found that regardless of alkalinity the headspace fraction had a large impact on gasification yield, with larger headspace fractions resulting in considerably more gas product. Without the addition of sodium carbonate, the effect of headspace fraction became more pronounced, with gas increasing by approximately a factor of forty from the lowest to highest headspace fraction. On the other hand, for the same residence time the addition of sodium carbonate co-catalyst dampened the magnitude of the effect, to a factor of 2.5 and 1.5, for 50 and 100 mM sodium carbonate solutions, respectively. These results indicated that the headspace fraction affected the phase behaviour, and that this altered the pathway of the cellulose decomposition. While furfural alcohol was the major product obtained with a 49% headspace fraction, it was effectively suppressed by using 78% or greater headspace fractions. Based on the effects of phase behaviour and previous literature, the reduced effect occurring upon the addition of sodium carbonate may relate to catalysis of the Lobry de-bruyn Van Eckenstein transform to produce lactic acid rather than intermediates proceeding through glycolaldehyde. (author)

  9. Microcomputed tomographic analysis of human condyles in unilateral condylar hyperplasia: increased cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume fraction with reduced mineralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karssemakers, L H E; Nolte, J W; Tuinzing, D B; Langenbach, G E J; Raijmakers, P G; Becking, A G

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral condylar hyperplasia or hyperactivity is a disorder of growth that affects the mandible, and our aim was to visualise the 3-dimensional bony microstructure of resected mandibular condyles of affected patients. We prospectively studied 17 patients with a clinical presentation of progressive mandibular asymmetry and an abnormal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scan. All patients were treated by condylectomy to arrest progression. The resected condyles were scanned with micro-CT (18 μm resolution). Rectangular volumes of interest were selected in 4 quadrants (lateromedial and superoinferior) of the trabecular bone of each condyle. Variables of bone architecture (volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and separation, degree of mineralisation, and degree of structural anisotrophy) were calculated with routine morphometric software. Eight of the 17 resected condyles showed clear destruction of the subchondral layer of cortical bone. There was a significant superoinferior gradient for all trabecular variables. Mean (SD) bone volume fraction (25.1 (6) %), trabecular number (1.69 (0.26) mm(-1)), trabecular thickness (0.17 (0.03) mm), and degree of mineralisation (695.39 (39.83) mg HA/cm(3)) were higher in the superior region. Trabecular separation (0.6 (0.16) mm) and structural anisotropy (1.84 (0.28)) were higher in the inferior region. The micro-CT analysis showed increased cortical porosity in many of the condyles studied. It also showed a higher bone volume fraction, greater trabecular thickness and trabecular separation, greater trabecular number, and less mineralisation in the condyles of the 17 patients compared with the known architecture of unaffected mandibular condyles.

  10. Effect of Jatropha curcas Peptide Fractions on the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira R. Segura-Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common worldwide diseases in humans. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and hypertension. An evaluation was done on the effect of Alcalase hydrolysis of defatted Jatropha curcas kernel meal on ACE inhibitory activity in the resulting hydrolysate and its purified fractions. Alcalase exhibited broad specificity and produced a protein hydrolysate with a 21.35% degree of hydrolysis and 34.87% ACE inhibition. Ultrafiltration of the hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with increased biological activity (24.46–61.41%. Hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to the peptides’ inhibitory potency. The 5–10 and <1 kDa fractions were selected for further fractionation by gel filtration chromatography. ACE inhibitory activity (% ranged from 22.66 to 45.96% with the 5–10 kDa ultrafiltered fraction and from 36.91 to 55.83% with the <1 kDa ultrafiltered fraction. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was observed in F2 ( μg/mL from the 5–10 kDa fraction and F1 ( μg/mL from the <1 kDa fraction. ACE inhibitory fractions from Jatropha kernel have potential applications in alternative hypertension therapies, adding a new application for the Jatropha plant protein fraction and improving the financial viability and sustainability of a Jatropha-based biodiesel industry.

  11. Antibacterial, Antibiofilm Effect of Burdock (Arctium lappa L.) Leaf Fraction and Its Efficiency in Meat Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zaixiang; Li, Cheng; Kou, Xingran; Yu, Fuhao; Wang, Hongxin; Smith, Gary M; Zhu, Song

    2016-08-01

    First, the antibacterial, antibiofilm effect and chemical composition of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) leaf fractions were studied. Then, the efficiency of burdock leaf fractions in pork preservation was evaluated. The results showed that burdock leaf fraction significantly inhibited the growth and biofilm development of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. MICs of burdock leaf fractions on E. coli and Salmonella Typhimurium were both 2 mg/ml. At a concentration of 2.0 mg/ml, the inhibition rates of the fraction on growth and development of E. coli and Salmonella Typhimurium biofilms were 78.7 and 69.9%, respectively. During storage, the log CFU per gram of meat samples treated with burdock leaf fractions decreased 2.15, compared with the samples without treatment. The shelf life of pork treated with burdock leaf fractions was extended 6 days compared with the pork without treatment, and the sensory property was obviously improved. Compared with the control group, burdock leaf fraction treatment significantly decreased the total volatile basic nitrogen value and pH of the meat samples. Chemical composition analysis showed that the burdock leaf fraction consisted of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, cynarin, crocin, luteolin, arctiin, and quercetin. As a vegetable with an abundant source, burdock leaf is safe, affordable, and efficient in meat preservation, indicating that burdock leaf fraction is a promising natural preservative for pork.

  12. Fractional Effective Charges and Misner-Wheeler Charge without Charge Effect in Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Smolyaninov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transformation optics enables engineering of the effective topology and dimensionality of the optical space in metamaterials. Nonlinear optics of such metamaterials may mimic Kaluza-Klein theories having one or more kinds of effective charges. As a result, novel photon blockade devices may be realized. Here we demonstrate that an electromagnetic wormhole may be designed, which connects two points of such an optical space and changes its effective topological connectivity. Electromagnetic field configurations, which exhibit fractional effective charges, appear as a result of such topology change. Moreover, such effects as Misner-Wheeler “charge without charge” may be replicated.

  13. Effect of aqueous fraction of Rosa damascena on ileum contractile response of guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Dolati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The use of drugs with herbal origin is increasing for treatment of gastrointestinal (GI disorders. Rosa damascena (R. damascena is a well-known plant suggested to have beneficial effect on GI system. In this study, the effect of aqueous fraction of R. damascena on the contractionsofisolated guinea pig ileum was investigated. Materials and Methods: Aqueous fraction of plant was obtained from ethanolic extract after ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions were discarded. To evaluate effect of this fraction on ileum contraction, guinea pig ileum was removed and mounted on organ bath and its contraction was recorded. Effect of various concentrations (0.66, 0.83, and 1.3 mg/ml of aqueous fraction on ileum contraction in comparison with Ach in presence and absense of atropine, a muscarinic antagonist of cholinergic, was evaluated. The response of ileum to 1 µg/ml of acetylcholine was considered as 100% response. Results:Our results showed that aqueous fractions of R. damascena dose-dependently increased basal guinea pigs ileum contractions (pConclusion: It is concluded that aqueous fraction of R. damascena has mild excitatory effect on ileum contraction and this fraction may be beneficial as a mild laxative agent.

  14. Comparison of the effectiveness of nonablative fractional laser versus ablative fractional laser in thyroidectomy scar prevention: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hei Sung; Lee, Ji Hae; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jun Young

    2012-04-01

    A scar is a mark that remains after the healing of a wound or other morbid processes. In the past, treatment was mainly focused on severe scarring, such as the hypertrophic and burn scars. However, scars from relatively minor wounds can also be stressful. The site of an open thyroidectomy is the anterior neck, a prominently exposed part of the body, where postoperative scarring can cause patients distress. The cosmetic outcome of the scar after thyroidectomy is of particular importance to women, who constitute the majority of patients with thyroid disease. Active prevention is more likely to yield better cosmetic results and would require fewer treatment sessions and less expense than scar revision procedures. Many interventions have been proposed, but there is yet no universal consensus on optimal treatment. Recently, focus has been made on 'laser scar prevention', where various types of lasers have been used to improve the appearance of scars. The purpose of this study was to improve the appearance of scars, by laser intervention of the wound healing process. In this pilot study, we comparatively examined the effect of non-ablative 1550-nm fractional Er: glass laser and ablative 2940-nm fractional Er: YAG laser on fresh surgical scars of patients with Fitzpatrick skin type III-IV.

  15. 3D Higher spin gravity and the fractional quantum Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the talk "Fractional Spin Gravity" presented in the 31st International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics, Rio de Janeiro, 19-25th June 2016. There we emphasised an implication of the works [1,2] by N. Boulanger, P. Sundell and the author on fractional spin extensions of 2+1D higher spin gravity. This is that higher spin gravity may govern interactions of pseudo-particles excitations in the (fractional) quantum Hall effect. More generally, fractional spin currents in 2+1D source higher spin gravity curvatures.

  16. Hydrothermal fractionation of woody biomass: Lignin effect on sugars recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedro, Florencia M; Cantero, Danilo A; Pascual, Marcos; García-Serna, Juan; Cocero, M José

    2015-09-01

    Subcritical water was employed to fractionate woody biomass into carbohydrates and lignin. Nine urban trees species (hardwood and softwood) from Spain were studied. The experiments were carried out in a semi-continuous reactor at 250 °C for 64 min. The hemicellulose and cellulose recovery yields were between 30%wt. and 80%wt. while the lignin content in the solid product ranged between 32%wt. and 92%wt. It was observed that an increment of solubilized lignin disfavored the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses. It was determined that the maximum extraction of hemicellulose was achieved at 20 min of solid reaction time while the extraction of celluloses not exhibited a maximum value. The hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose would be governed by the hydrolysis kinetic and the polymers accessibility. In addition, the extraction of hemicellulose was negatively affected by the lignin content in the raw material while cellulose hydrolysis was not affected by this parameter.

  17. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk.

  18. Cardiotoxic effects of venom fractions from the Australian box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri on human myocardiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggiomo, Silvia L A; Seymour, Jamie E

    2012-09-01

    An investigation into the cardiotoxic effects in human cardiomyocytes of different fractions (as produced from an FPLC) of the venom from Chironex fleckeri showed that whole venom caused cardiac cell death in minutes, measured as cell detachment using xCELLigence technology. However, only one fraction of the venom was responsible for this effect. When all extracted venoms were recombined a similar result was seen for the toxic fraction, however these effects were slower than unfractionated venom alone even though the concentrations were similar. The difference in the results between fractioned and unfractionated venom may have been caused by compounds remaining in the FPLC column, which may interact with the toxic fraction to cause rapid cell detachment or death.

  19. Dosimetric effect of intra-fractional and inter-fractional target motion in lung cancer radiotherapy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerthraj Verma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of present study was to experimentally evaluate the dosimetric uncertainties in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT, dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT, step-shoot (SS-IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT treatment delivery techniques due to intra- and inter-fractional target motion. Methods: A previously treated lung patient was selected for this study and was replanned for 60 Gy in 30 fractions using four techniques (3DCRT, D-IMRT, SS-IMRT, and VMAT. These plans were delivered in a clinical linear accelerator equipped with HexaPOD™ evo RT System. The target dose of static QUASAR phantom was calculated that served as reference dose to the target. The QUASAR respiratory body phantom along with patients breathing wave form and HexaPOD™ evo RT System was used to simulate the intra-fraction and inter-fraction motions. Dose measurements were done by applying the intra-fractional and inter-fractional motions in all the four treatment delivery techniques.Results: The maximum percentage deviation in a single field was -4.3%, 10.4%, and -12.2% for 3DCRT, D-IMRT and SS-IMRT deliveries, respectively. Similarly, the deviation for a single fraction was -1.51%, -1.88%, -2.22%, and -3.03% for 3DCRT, D-IMRT, SS-IMRT and VMAT deliveries, respectively. Conclusion: The impact of inter-fractional and intra-fractional uncertainties calculated as deviation between dynamic and static condition dose was large in some fractions, however average deviation calculated for thirty fractions was well within 0.5% in all the four techniques. Therefore, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties could be concern in fewer fraction treatments such as stereotactic body radiation therapy, and should be used in conjunction with intra- and inter-fractional motion management techniques.

  20. Ultrasound emulsification: effect of ultrasonic and physicochemical properties on dispersed phase volume and droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Shashank G; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2008-04-01

    Ultrasonic emulsification of oil and water was carried out and the effect of irradiation time, irradiation power and physicochemical properties of oil on the dispersed phase volume and dispersed phase droplet size has been studied. The increase in the irradiation time increases the dispersed phase volume while decreases the dispersed phase droplets size. With an increase in the ultrasonic irradiation power, there is an increase in the fraction of volume of the dispersed phase while the droplet size of the dispersed phase decreases. The fractional volume of the dispersed phase increases for the case of groundnut oil-water system while it is low for paraffin (heavy) oil-water system. The droplet size of soyabean oil dispersed in water is found to be small while that of paraffin (heavy) oil is found to be large. These variations could be explained on the basis of varying physicochemical properties of the system, i.e., viscosity of oil and the interfacial tension. During the ultrasonic emulsification, coalescence phenomenon which is only marginal, has been observed, which can be attributed to the collision of small droplets when the droplet concentration increases beyond a certain number and the acoustic streaming strength increases.

  1. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  2. Generalized effective mode volume for leaky optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Van Vlack, C.; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    We show explicitly how the commonly adopted prescription for calculating effective mode volumes is wrong and leads to uncontrolled errors. Instead, we introduce a generalized mode volume that can be easily evaluated based on the mode calculation methods typically applied in the literature, and wh......, and which allows one to compute the Purcell effect and other interesting optical phenomena in a rigorous and unambiguous way....

  3. Effect of Various Sodium Chloride Mass Fractions on Wheat and Rye Bread Using Different Dough Preparation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tańska, Małgorzata; Rotkiewicz, Daniela; Piętak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Summary This study assessed the selected properties of bread with reduced amount of sodium chloride. The bread was made from white and wholemeal wheat flour and rye flour. The dough was prepared using three techniques: with yeast, natural sourdough or starter sourdough. Sodium chloride was added to the dough at 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of the flour mass. The following bread properties were examined in the study: yield and volume of the loaf, moisture content, crumb firmness and porosity, and organoleptic properties. Reducing the mass fraction of added sodium chloride was not found to have considerable effect on bread yield, whereas it had a significant and variable effect on the loaf volume, and crumb firmness and porosity. Organoleptic assessment showed diverse effects of sodium chloride addition on sensory properties of bread, depending on the type of bread and the dough preparation method. Reduced mass fractions of sodium chloride changed the organoleptic properties of bread made with yeast and with starter sourdough to a greater extent than of bread prepared with natural sourdough. PMID:27904407

  4. Effect of Various Sodium Chloride Mass Fractions on Wheat and Rye Bread Using Different Dough Preparation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Tańska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the selected properties of bread with reduced amount of sodium chloride. The bread was made from white and wholemeal wheat flour and rye flour. The dough was prepared using three techniques: with yeast, natural sourdough or starter sourdough. Sodium chloride was added to the dough at 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 % of the flour mass. The following bread properties were examined in the study: yield and volume of the loaf, moisture content, crumb firmness and porosity, and organoleptic properties. Reducing the mass fraction of added sodium chloride was not found to have considerable effect on bread yield, whereas it had a significant and variable effect on the loaf volume, and crumb firmness and porosity. Organoleptic assessment showed diverse effects of sodium chloride addition on sensory properties of bread, depending on the type of bread and the dough preparation method. Reduced mass fractions of sodium chloride changed the organoleptic properties of bread made with yeast and with starter sourdough to a greater extent than of bread prepared with natural sourdough.

  5. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  6. Identification of myocardial diffuse fibrosis by 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping: averaging to improve precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Vassilios S; Wassilew, Katharina; Cameron, Donnie; Heng, Ee Ling; Nyktari, Evangelia; Asimakopoulos, George; de Souza, Anthony; Giri, Shivraman; Pierce, Iain; Jabbour, Andrew; Firmin, David; Frenneaux, Michael; Gatehouse, Peter; Pennell, Dudley J; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2017-06-12

    Our objectives involved identifying whether repeated averaging in basal and mid left ventricular myocardial levels improves precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction for 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping versus assessment at a single ventricular level. For assessment of T 1 mapping precision, a cohort of 15 healthy volunteers underwent two CMR scans on separate days using an 11 heartbeat MOLLI with a 5(3)3 beat scheme to measure native T 1 and a 4(1)3(1)2 beat post-contrast scheme to measure post-contrast T 1, allowing calculation of partition coefficient and ECV. To assess correlation of T 1 mapping with collagen volume fraction, a separate cohort of ten aortic stenosis patients scheduled to undergo surgery underwent one CMR scan with this 11 heartbeat MOLLI scheme, followed by intraoperative tru-cut myocardial biopsy. Six models of myocardial diffuse fibrosis assessment were established with incremental inclusion of imaging by averaging of the basal and mid-myocardial left ventricular levels, and each model was assessed for precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction. A model using 11 heart beat MOLLI imaging of two basal and two mid ventricular level averaged T 1 maps provided improved precision (Intraclass correlation 0.93 vs 0.84) and correlation with histology (R (2) = 0.83 vs 0.36) for diffuse fibrosis compared to a single mid-ventricular level alone. ECV was more precise and correlated better than native T 1 mapping. T 1 mapping sequences with repeated averaging could be considered for applications of 11 heartbeat MOLLI, especially when small changes in native T 1/ECV might affect clinical management.

  7. Effective-field-theory model for the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. C.; Hansson, T. H.; Kivelson, S.

    1989-01-01

    Starting directly from the microscopic Hamiltonian, a field-theory model is derived for the fractional quantum Hall effect. By considering an approximate coarse-grained version of the same model, a Landau-Ginzburg theory similar to that of Girvin (1986) is constructed. The partition function of the model exhibits cusps as a function of density. It is shown that the collective density fluctuations are massive.

  8. Effects of Landau level mixing on the fractional quantum Hall effect in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael R; Nayak, Chetan

    2014-08-22

    We report results of exact diagonalization studies of the spin- and valley-polarized fractional quantum Hall effect in the N = 0 and N = 1 Landau levels in graphene. We use an effective model that incorporates Landau level mixing to lowest order in the parameter κ = ((e(2)/εℓ)/(ħv(F)/ℓ)) = (e(2)/εv(F)ħ), which is magnetic field independent and can only be varied through the choice of substrate. We find Landau level mixing effects are negligible in the N = 0 Landau level for κ ≲ 2. In fact, the lowest Landau level projected Coulomb Hamiltonian is a better approximation to the real Hamiltonian for graphene than it is for semiconductor based quantum wells. Consequently, the principal fractional quantum Hall states are expected in the N = 0 Landau level over this range of κ. In the N = 1 Landau level, fractional quantum Hall states are expected for a smaller range of κ and Landau level mixing strongly breaks particle-hole symmetry, producing qualitatively different results compared to the N = 0 Landau level. At half filling of the N = 1 Landau level, we predict the anti-Pfaffian state will occur for κ ∼ 0.25-0.75.

  9. Growth rate and size effect on carbon isotopic fractionation in diatom-bound organic matter in recent Southern Ocean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Abrevaya, Lorena; Anderson, Robert F.; Rigual-Hernández, Andrés S.; Gonzalez-Lemos, Saul

    2017-01-01

    Carbon isotopic fractionation during photosynthesis (εp) is used to reconstruct past CO2 and phytoplankton growth rates, typically by measuring the δ13C of biomarkers produced by coccolithophorids. However, organic molecules bound within diatom frustules represent another phase for measurement of δ13C and offer the opportunity to obtain εp for specific diatom sizes and geometries. Here, from core top sediments covering a strong productivity gradient in the Southern Ocean, we present determinations of δ13C and εp from frustule-bound organic matter from a fine opal fraction dominated by pennate diatoms and a coarse opal fraction dominated by larger centric diatoms. The δ13C of the pennate diatom fraction is typically 2.8‰ more positive than that of the centric fraction. Both fractions show a comparable range of 9-10‰ over the core top transect. εp is lowest (6.3‰ in pennate fraction) between the Polar Front (PF) and Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF) and increases both to the north and south, with maximum values at greatest distance from the PF (18‰ in the pennate fraction). These spatial changes in εp are too large to arise from the rather modest variation in dissolved CO2 in surface waters across the core top transect. We suggest instead that the maximum εp reflects higher diatom growth rates, and in the case of pennate diatom F. kerguelensis also an increase in the frustule width and volume to surface area ratio. Both processes may result from enhanced Fe supply due to upwelling of circumpolar deep water between the PF and SACCF. Farther south, diatom growth is strongly Fe-limited and farther north it is Fe and Si co-limited. The optima of growth rates between the PF and SACCF appears to be a general feature in all sectors of the Southern Ocean. Such growth rate-induced changes in diatom εp allow us to resolve a 5° northward displacement of the PF during glacial times compared to interglacial times. By estimating CO2 aq in

  10. Effect of size-fractionation dissolved organic matter on the mobility of prometryne in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Lin, Chao; Chen, Liang; Yang, Hong

    2010-05-01

    Import of organic materials in the form of compost, sludge or plant residues introduces large amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) into soils. DOM as a dynamic soil component affects the behaviors of organic pollutants. Different DOM constituents may affect herbicide action in a different way. However, the process of interaction between the distinct DOM-fractions and herbicides is largely unknown. In this study, DOM was separated by size-fractionation into three molecular size groups: MW14000 Da. Effects of DOM-fractions on prometryne sorption/desorption and mobility were analyzed using approaches of batch experiments, soil column and soil thin-layer chromatography. Application of varied DOM-fractions at 50mg DOCL(-1) to the soil reduced the sorption and increased desorption of prometryne. DOM-fraction with MW>14000 Da appeared most effective in prometryne mobilization in the soil than any other fractions. Finally, DOM-fractions were characterized by chemical analyses, fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) fluorescence spectroscopy. Our studies revealed that the high-molecular weight fraction contained more aromatic framework and unsaturated structure that was most likely the dominant factor modulating the behavior of prometryne in soils.

  11. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razam Ab Latip

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid and stearin (solid fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min, end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV, fatty acid composition (FAC, acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP, solid fat content (SFC, thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1 and palmitic (C16:0 respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of

  12. Cardiotoxic effects of the Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom fractions in the isolated perfused rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabuva, Svjetlana; Brizić, Ivica; Latinović, Zorica; Leonardi, Adrijana; Križaj, Igor; Lukšić, Boris

    2016-10-01

    The nose-horned viper (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes) is the most venomous European snake. Its venom is known as haematotoxic, myotoxic and neurotoxic but it exerts also cardiotoxic effects. To further explore the cardiotoxicity of the venom we separated it into four fractions by gel filtration chromatography. Three fractions that contain polypeptides (A, B, and C) were tested for their effects on isolated rat heart. Heart rate (HR), incidence of arrhythmias (atrioventricular (AV) blocks, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and asystolia), coronary flow (CF), systolic, developed and diastolic left ventricular pressure (LVP) were measured before, during, and after the application of venom fractions in three different concentrations. Fraction A, containing proteins of 60-100 kDa, displayed no effect on the rat heart. Fractions B and C disturbed heart functioning in similar way, but with different potency that was higher by the latter. This was manifested by significant decrease of HR and CF, the increase of diastolic, and the decrease of systolic and developed LVPs. All hearts treated with fraction C in the final CF concentrations 22.5 and 37.5 μg/mL suffered rapid and irreversible asystolia without AV blockade. They underwent also ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. Fraction B affected hearts only at the highest dose inducing asystolia in all hearts, ventricular fibrillation in 80% and ventricular tachycardia in 70% of the hearts. Venom fraction C induced 71% of all recorded heart rhythm disturbances, significantly more than fraction B, which induced 29%. Most abundant proteins in fraction C were secreted phospholipases A2 among which the venom component acting on the heart is most probably to be looked for. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ANALGESIC AND ANTIINFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF TOTAL EXTRACT, FLAVONOID FRACTION AND VOLATILE OIL OF SALVIA HYDRANGEA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    V.A HAJ HASHEMI; A GHANADI; D MOSAVI

    2000-01-01

    .... At first, total extract, flavonoid fraction and volatile oil was prepared. Analgesic effect was assessed using light tail flick and acetic acid writhing test. Male wistar rats (180-220g) and mice (25±2g...

  14. Probabilistic Characterization of Partial Volume Effects in Imaging of Rectangular Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskaya, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-06

    In imaging, a partial volume effect refers to the problem that arises when the system resolution is low relative to the size of the object being imaged [1, 2]. In this setting, it is likely that most voxels occupied by the object are only partially covered, and that the fraction covered in each voxel is low. This makes the problem of object detection and image segmentation very difficult because the algorithms designed for these purposes rely on pixel summary statistics. If the area covered by the object is very low in relatively many of the total number of the voxels the object occupies, these summary statistics may not reach the thresholds required to detect this object. It is thus important to understand the extent of partial volume effect for a given object size and resolution. This technical report focuses on rectangular objects and derives the probability distributions for three quantities for such objects: 1) the number of fully covered voxels, 2) the number of partially covered voxels, and 3) the fractions of the total volume covered in the partially covered voxels. The derivations are first shown for 2-D settings and are then extended to 3-D settings.

  15. The effect of particle size of wheat bran fractions on bread quality - Evidence for fibre-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, M.W.J.; Haaster, D. van; Hemery, Y.; Schols, H.A.; Hamer, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the adverse effects of wheat bran fractions on bread-making quality was studied. Two fractions of bran, representing different tissue layers and having different compositions, were used. The particle size of the bran fractions was varied by various milling techniques. All fractions wer

  16. Effect of Taxusbaccata leaves fractions on Trichomonasvaginalis growth in culture medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zarea

    2014-02-01

    .Results: The crude extract and fractions of 60% at different times at concentrations of 200, 300, 400 and 500 μg/ml showed higher anti-parasitic effects than 90% (p < 0.05. At concentration of 200 μg/ml of extract of 60% which causing 100% inhibition growth but the fraction of 90% showed 60% of inhibition growth. Conclusion: The effect of Taxusbaccata on Trichomonas may be a good alternative candidate for metronidazole. Key words: Taxusbaccata, Trichomonas vaginalis, Fracctions

  17. Robust fractional quantum Hall effect in the N=2 Landau level in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diankov, Georgi; Liang, Chi-Te; Amet, François; Gallagher, Patrick; Lee, Menyoung; Bestwick, Andrew J.; Tharratt, Kevin; Coniglio, William; Jaroszynski, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-12-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect is a canonical example of electron-electron interactions producing new ground states in many-body systems. Most fractional quantum Hall studies have focussed on the lowest Landau level, whose fractional states are successfully explained by the composite fermion model. In the widely studied GaAs-based system, the composite fermion picture is thought to become unstable for the N≥2 Landau level, where competing many-body phases have been observed. Here we report magneto-resistance measurements of fractional quantum Hall states in the N=2 Landau level (filling factors 4<|ν|<8) in bilayer graphene. In contrast with recent observations of particle-hole asymmetry in the N=0/N=1 Landau levels of bilayer graphene, the fractional quantum Hall states we observe in the N=2 Landau level obey particle-hole symmetry within the fully symmetry-broken Landau level. Possible alternative ground states other than the composite fermions are discussed.

  18. Robust fractional quantum Hall effect in the N=2 Landau level in bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diankov, Georgi; Liang, Chi-Te; Amet, François; Gallagher, Patrick; Lee, Menyoung; Bestwick, Andrew J; Tharratt, Kevin; Coniglio, William; Jaroszynski, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-12-21

    The fractional quantum Hall effect is a canonical example of electron-electron interactions producing new ground states in many-body systems. Most fractional quantum Hall studies have focussed on the lowest Landau level, whose fractional states are successfully explained by the composite fermion model. In the widely studied GaAs-based system, the composite fermion picture is thought to become unstable for the N≥2 Landau level, where competing many-body phases have been observed. Here we report magneto-resistance measurements of fractional quantum Hall states in the N=2 Landau level (filling factors 4Landau levels of bilayer graphene, the fractional quantum Hall states we observe in the N=2 Landau level obey particle-hole symmetry within the fully symmetry-broken Landau level. Possible alternative ground states other than the composite fermions are discussed.

  19. Opposing effects of different soil organic matter fractions on crop yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stephen A; Sokol, Noah; Bell, Colin W; Bradford, Mark A; Naeem, Shahid; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Palm, Cheryl A

    2016-10-01

    Soil organic matter is critical to sustainable agriculture because it provides nutrients to crops as it decomposes and increases nutrient- and water-holding capacity when built up. Fast- and slow-cycling fractions of soil organic matter can have different impacts on crop production because fast-cycling fractions rapidly release nutrients for short-term plant growth and slow-cycling fractions bind nutrients that mineralize slowly and build up water-holding capacity. We explored the controls on these fractions in a tropical agroecosystem and their relationship to crop yields. We performed physical fractionation of soil organic matter from 48 farms and plots in western Kenya. We found that fast-cycling, particulate organic matter was positively related to crop yields, but did not have a strong effect, while slower-cycling, mineral-associated organic matter was negatively related to yields. Our finding that slower-cycling organic matter was negatively related to yield points to a need to revise the view that stabilization of organic matter positively impacts food security. Our results support a new paradigm that different soil organic matter fractions are controlled by different mechanisms, potentially leading to different relationships with management outcomes, like crop yield. Effectively managing soils for sustainable agriculture requires quantifying the effects of specific organic matter fractions on these outcomes.

  20. Anti-fertility effects of different fractions of Anethum graveolens L. extracts on female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malihezaman, Monsefi; Mojaba, Masoudi; Elham, Hosseini; Farnaz, Gramifar; Ramin, Miri

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies showed the effects of aqueous and ethanol extracts of Anethum graveolens L. (dill) on female infertility. In the present study we investigated whether different fractions of this herb extract can cause infertility in rats. Female rats were divided into the control groups, the groups receiving either a low (0.5 g/kg)) or a high dose (5g/kg) of water, N-butanol, chloroform and ether fractions of the aqueous plant extract, and the groups receiving either a low (0.045 g/kg) or a high dose (0.45 g/kg) of the same fractions of ethanol extract. The mentioned doses were gavaged in 1mL for 10 days. Vaginal smears were prepared daily. Estradiol and progesterone levels were measured. The left oviduct and ovary were removed, their tissue subsequently being prepared in form of histology slides and stained using haematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome. Female rats assigned to each group were mated with males; after that, crown-rump lengths and weights of newborn rats were measured. Results showed that each fraction produced some changes such as hormonal level reduction (chloroform fraction), diestrus phase prolongation and infertility (water fraction), and increase in pregnancy duration (chloroform and ether fractions). We concluded that each fraction comprises only some of the mentioned components and therefore recommended the usage of crude extract, especially the aqueous one, in case infertility aims to be induced.

  1. Excluded-volume effects in the diffusion of hard spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-03

    Excluded-volume effects can play an important role in determining transport properties in diffusion of particles. Here, the diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in two or three dimensions is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle distribution function, with excluded-volume effects enhancing the overall collective diffusion rate. An expression for the effective (collective) diffusion coefficient is obtained. Stochastic simulations of the full particle system are shown to compare well with the solution of this equation for two examples. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  2. 3-D Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Complex Fiber Geometry RaFC Materials with High Volume Fraction and High Aspect Ratio based on ABAQUS PYTHON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, BoCheng

    2011-12-01

    Organic and inorganic fiber reinforced composites with innumerable fiber orientation distributions and fiber geometries are abundantly available in several natural and synthetic structures. Inorganic glass fiber composites have been introduced to numerous applications due to their economical fabrication and tailored structural properties. Numerical characterization of such composite material systems is necessitated due to their intrinsic statistical nature, which renders extensive experimentation prohibitively time consuming and costly. To predict various mechanical behavior and characterizations of Uni-Directional Fiber Composites (UDFC) and Random Fiber Composites (RaFC), we numerically developed Representative Volume Elements (RVE) with high accuracy and efficiency and with complex fiber geometric representations encountered in uni-directional and random fiber networks. In this thesis, the numerical simulations of unidirectional RaFC fiber strand RVE models (VF>70%) are first presented by programming in ABAQUS PYTHON. Secondly, when the cross sectional aspect ratios (AR) of the second phase fiber inclusions are not necessarily one, various types of RVE models with different cross sectional shape fibers are simulated and discussed. A modified random sequential absorption algorithm is applied to enhance the volume fraction number (VF) of the RVE, which the mechanical properties represents the composite material. Thirdly, based on a Spatial Segment Shortest Distance (SSSD) algorithm, a 3-Dimentional RaFC material RVE model is simulated in ABAQUS PYTHON with randomly oriented and distributed straight fibers of high fiber aspect ratio (AR=100:1) and volume fraction (VF=31.8%). Fourthly, the piecewise multi-segments fiber geometry is obtained in MATLAB environment by a modified SSSD algorithm. Finally, numerical methods including the polynomial curve fitting and piecewise quadratic and cubic B-spline interpolation are applied to optimize the RaFC fiber geometries

  3. Effective Student Learning of Fractions with an Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Moore, Emily B.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2015-01-01

    Computer technology, when coupled with reform-based teaching practices, has been shown to be an effective way to support student learning of mathematics. The quality of the technology itself, as well as how it is used, impacts how much students learn. Interactive simulations are dynamic virtual environments similar to virtual manipulatives that…

  4. Computerized MRS voxel registration and partial volume effects in single voxel 1H-MRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hedok; Caparelli, Elisabeth; Li, Haifang; Mandal, Amit; Smith, S David; Zhang, Shaonan; Bilfinger, Thomas V; Benveniste, Helene

    2013-09-01

    Partial volume effects in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the brain have been studied previously in terms of proper water concentration calculations, but there is a lack of disclosure in terms of voxel placement techniques that would affect the calculations. The purpose of this study is to facilitate a fully automated MRS voxel registration method which is time efficient, accurate, and can be extended to all imaging modalities. A total of thirteen healthy adults underwent single voxel 1H-MRS scans in 3.0T MRI scanners. Transposition of a MRS voxel onto an anatomical scan is derived along with a full calculation of water concentration with a correction term to account for the partial volume effects. Five metabolites (tNAA, Glx, tCr, mI, and tCho) known to yield high reliability are studied. Pearson's correlation analyses between tissue volume fractions and metabolite concentrations were statistically significant in parietal (tCr, Glx, and tNAA) lobe and occipital lobe (tNAA). MRS voxel overlaps quantified by dice metric over repeated visits yielded 60%~70% and coefficients of variance in metabolites concentration were 4%~10%. These findings reiterate an importance of considering the partial volume effects when tissue water is used as an internal concentration reference so as to avoid misinterpreting a morphometric difference as a metabolic difference.

  5. An effective analytic approach for solving nonlinear fractional partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junchi; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liang, Songxin

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear fractional differential equations are widely used for modelling problems in applied mathematics. A new analytic approach with two parameters c1 and c2 is first proposed for solving nonlinear fractional partial differential equations. These parameters are used to improve the accuracy of the resulting series approximations. It turns out that much more accurate series approximations are obtained by choosing proper values of c1 and c2. To demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the new method, two typical fractional partial differential equations, the nonlinear gas dynamics equation and the nonlinear KdV-Burgers equation, are solved.

  6. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@hotmail.com [Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A. [Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal’s method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth’s ionosphere.

  7. Improved correction for the tissue fraction effect in lung PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Millner, Lynn; Hutton, Brian F.; Maher, Toby M.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in imaging different pulmonary disorders using PET techniques. Previous work has shown, for static PET/CT, that air content in the lung influences reconstructed image values and that it is vital to correct for this ‘tissue fraction effect’ (TFE). In this paper, we extend this work to include the blood component and also investigate the TFE in dynamic imaging. CT imaging and PET kinetic modelling are used to determine fractional air and blood voxel volumes in six patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. These values are used to illustrate best and worst case scenarios when interpreting images without correcting for the TFE. In addition, the fractional volumes were used to determine correction factors for the SUV and the kinetic parameters. These were then applied to the patient images. The kinetic parameters K1 and Ki along with the static parameter SUV were all found to be affected by the TFE with both air and blood providing a significant contribution to the errors. Without corrections, errors range from 34-80% in the best case and 29-96% in the worst case. In the patient data, without correcting for the TFE, regions of high density (fibrosis) appeared to have a higher uptake than lower density (normal appearing tissue), however this was reversed after air and blood correction. The proposed correction methods are vital for quantitative and relative accuracy. Without these corrections, images may be misinterpreted.

  8. Finite Volume Effect of Baryons in Strange Hadronic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao-Xi; LI Lei; NING Ping-Zhi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2001-01-01

    The finite volume effect of baryons in strange hadronic matter (SHM) is studied within the framework of relativistic mean-field theory. As this effect is concerned, the saturation density of SHM turns lower, and the binding energy per baryon decreases. Its influence to the compression modulus of SHM is also discussed.

  9. Antioxidant and Antitumor Effect of Different Fractions of Ethyl Acetate Part from Elaeagnus angustifolia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine antitumor and antioxidant activities of the different fractions of ethyl acetate of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. extract, the MTT assay, the DPPH scavenging assay and the reducing power method were used. The results showed that as the concentration and the polarity were increasing, the antioxidant activity of the different fractions of ethyl acetate of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. extract was increased. The DPPH scavenging of the E and F fractions was 94.9%. The antitumor assay showed that the different fractions of ethyl acetate of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. exhibited the inhibition of the in vitro cultured Hela cell proliferation properties. During the first 48 h, there was a dependant relation of inhibition effect and the concentration and the polarity. The higher the concentration and the polarity, the stronger the inhibition effect was. The inhibition rate was 74.34% when the concentration of F faction was 2.5 mg/mL.

  10. The linear-quadratic model is inappropriate to model high dose per fraction effects in radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, John P; Meyer, Jeffrey J; Marks, Lawrence B

    2008-10-01

    The linear-quadratic (LQ) model is widely used to model the effect of total dose and dose per fraction in conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. Much of the data used to generate the model are obtained in vitro at doses well below those used in radiosurgery. Clinically, the LQ model often underestimates tumor control observed at radiosurgical doses. The underlying mechanisms implied by the LQ model do not reflect the vascular and stromal damage produced at the high doses per fraction encountered in radiosurgery and ignore the impact of radioresistant subpopulations of cells. The appropriate modeling of both tumor control and normal tissue toxicity in radiosurgery requires the application of emerging understanding of molecular-, cellular-, and tissue-level effects of high-dose/fraction-ionizing radiation and the role of cancer stem cells.

  11. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Lellouch, L; Portelli, A; Szabo, K K; Toth, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  12. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Hoelbling, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Katz, S.D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Lellouch, L., E-mail: lellouch@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [CNRS, Aix-Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, UMR 7332, F-13288, Marseille (France); Portelli, A. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Szabo, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Toth, B.C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-04-10

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  13. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fodor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  14. Fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume is reliably related to absolute depth during vertical displacements in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graham K; Holbrook, Robert Iain; de Perera, Theresa Burt

    2010-09-06

    Fish must orient in three dimensions as they navigate through space, but it is unknown whether they are assisted by a sense of depth. In principle, depth can be estimated directly from hydrostatic pressure, but although teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to changes in pressure, they appear unable to measure absolute pressure. Teleosts sense changes in pressure via changes in the volume of their gas-filled swim-bladder, but because the amount of gas it contains is varied to regulate buoyancy, this cannot act as a long-term steady reference for inferring absolute pressure. In consequence, it is generally thought that teleosts are unable to sense depth using hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overturn this received wisdom by showing from a theoretical physical perspective that absolute depth could be estimated during fast, steady vertical displacements by combining a measurement of vertical speed with a measurement of the fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume. This mechanism works even if the amount of gas in the swim-bladder varies, provided that this variation occurs over much longer time scales than changes in volume during displacements. There is therefore no a priori physical justification for assuming that teleost fish cannot sense absolute depth by using hydrostatic pressure cues.

  15. Effect of Genetic Database Comprehensiveness on Fractional Proteomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    EFFECT OF GENETIC DATABASE COMPREHENSIVENESS ON FRACTIONAL PROTEOMICS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 ECBC-TR-1154...Database Comprehensiveness on Fractional Proteomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...are characterizing the extracellular, fimbriae, and whole cell proteins produced by the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli

  16. Cost effective all-optical fractional OFDM receiver using an arrayed waveguide grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, T.; Cincotti, G.; Murakawa, T.; Shimizu, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Okuno, M.; Mino, S.; Himeno, A.; Wada, N.; Uenohara, H.; Konishi, T.

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a cost effective all-optical fractional orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (AO-FrOFDM) receiver using an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG). The all-optical fractional Fourier transform at the receiver is implemented by modifying the second slab coupler from a conventional all-optical discrete Fourier transform AWG. The open eye diagrams obtained from the experimental results indicate that 12 × 10 Gbit/s DBPSK AO-FrOFDM signals were successfully demultiplexed.

  17. Comparative technique in measurements of Ge detectors effective volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, E. V.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Vasenko, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and quick procedure was proposed for measurements of large coaxial Ge detectors effective volumes. It included a comparison of background spectra collected with several detectors without any shielding in an underground laboratory. Such measurements were performed in Homestake (USA) and Canfranc (Spain) laboratories with several 1 kg and 2 kg detectors. Monte-Carlo calculations confirmed that ratios of numbers of events in continua of the spectra should be either equal or very close to the ratios of the detectors effective volumes.

  18. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xin; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis E; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory S; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Anticancer Effects of Sterol Fraction from Red Algae Porphyra dentata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kazłowska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyra dentata, an edible red macroalgae, is used as a folk medicine in Asia. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo the protective effect of a sterol fraction from P. dentata against breast cancer linked to tumor-induced myeloid derived-suppressor cells (MDSCs. A sterol fraction containing cholesterol, β-sitosterol, and campesterol was prepared by solvent fractionation of methanol extract of P. dentata  in silica gel column chromatography. This sterol fraction in vitro significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in 4T1 cancer cells. Intraperitoneal injection of this sterol fraction at 10 and 25 mg/kg body weight into 4T1 cell-implanted tumor BALB/c mice significantly inhibited the growth of tumor nodules and increased the survival rate of mice. This sterol fraction significantly decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS and arginase activity of MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice. Therefore, the sterol fraction from P. dentata showed potential for protecting an organism from 4T1 cell-based tumor genesis.

  20. Effect of soil reclamation process on soil C fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, V; Vega, F A; Covelo, E F

    2014-01-01

    Mine soils are notable for their low organic matter content. Soils in the depleted copper mine in Touro (Galicia, Spain) were vegetated with trees (eucalyptuses and pines) and amended with wastes (sewage sludge and paper mill residues) to increase their carbon concentration. Two different zones at the mine (settling pond and mine tailing) and their respective treated areas (vegetated and/or amended) were sampled and analysed with the aim of evaluating in depth the effect of the reclamation treatments on both the concentration and quality of soil organic matter under field conditions. The results showed that the two treatments (tree vegetation and waste amendment) significantly increased the organic C in the mine soils from 1.4-6.6 to 10-112 g kg(-1). However, only the soil amended with wastes in the settling pond reached the usual values of undisturbed soils (92-126 g TOC kg(-1) soil). Amending with wastes was also the only treatment that increased the soil humified organic C concentration to proper values and therefore also the microbial biomass C. We recommend the use of organic wastes for amending soils poor in organic matter as well as the regular application of this treatment, as the nitrogen supply can be more limiting for plant growth than the organic C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Priming effects in aggregate size fractions induced by glucose addition and grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Pausch, Johanna; Kuzaykov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    It is widely recognized that soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization can be accelerated (positive priming) or retarded (negative priming) by addition of easily available substrates to soil. SOM is a heterogeneous mixture, which contains numerous compounds with different degradability and turnover rates times. Nevertheless, so far, there is still lack of knowledge on identifying single fractions of the SOM as the source of C and N released by priming effects. The aim of this study was to determine the priming effect as related to different aggregate fractions, aggregate disruption and the amounts of substrate. In a 49 days incubation experiment, the soil samples were separated into three aggregate fractions (>2 mm, 2-0.25 mm and 0.25 mm) than in the microaggregates (priming effect increased as added glucose increased in all intact aggregate size, and highest priming effect was observed in >2 mm fraction. However, the magnitude of priming effect response to glucose addition depended on the aggregate size after grinding. This study demonstrates that substrate amounts, aggregate fractionation and grinding can have obvious impacts on priming effect, indicating important implications for understanding SOM cycling and stability.

  2. Antioxidant effect of fractions from chicken breast and beef loin homogenates in phospholipid liposome systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byungrok; Cordray, Joseph C; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2011-09-15

    The antioxidant effects of meat fractions from chicken breast and beef loin were compared. Five meat fractions - homogenate (H), precipitate (P), supernatant (S), high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW) fractions - were prepared from chicken breast or beef loin. Each of the fractions were added to a phospholipid liposome model system containing catalysts (metmyoglobin, ferrous and ferric ion) or iron chelating agents to determine the effects of each fraction on the development of lipid oxidation during incubation at 37°C for 120min. All fractions from chicken breast showed stronger antioxidant effects against iron-catalyzed lipid oxidation than those from beef loin. Iron chelating capacity of water-soluble LMW and water-insoluble (P) fractions from both meats were responsible for their high antioxidant capacities. High concentration of myoglobin, which served as a source of various catalysts, was partially responsible for the high susceptibility of beef loin to lipid oxidation. Storage-stable ferric ion reducing capacity (FRC) was detected in all fractions from both meats, and was a rate-limiting factor for lipid oxidation in the presence of free ionic iron. Higher antioxidant capacity and lower myoglobin content in chicken breast were primarily responsible for its higher oxidative stability than beef loin. DTPA-unchelatable compounds, such as ferrylmyoglobin and/or hematin were the major catalysts for lipid oxidation in beef loin, but free ionic iron and storage-stable FRC also played important roles during prolonged storage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Fractional Regional Ventilation Using 4D-CT and Effects of Breathing Maneuvers on Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, Nilesh N., E-mail: nmistry@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Diwanji, Tejan; Shi, Xiutao [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pokharel, Sabin [Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Feigenberg, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Scharf, Steven M. [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); D' Souza, Warren D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Current implementations of methods based on Hounsfield units to evaluate regional lung ventilation do not directly incorporate tissue-based mass changes that occur over the respiratory cycle. To overcome this, we developed a 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based technique to evaluate fractional regional ventilation (FRV) that uses an individualized ratio of tidal volume to end-expiratory lung volume for each voxel. We further evaluated the effect of different breathing maneuvers on regional ventilation. The results from this work will help elucidate the relationship between global and regional lung function. Methods and Materials: Eight patients underwent 3 sets of 4D-CT scans during 1 session using free-breathing, audiovisual guidance, and active breathing control. FRV was estimated using a density-based algorithm with mass correction. Internal validation between global and regional ventilation was performed by use of the imaging data collected during the use of active breathing control. The impact of breathing maneuvers on FRV was evaluated comparing the tidal volume from 3 breathing methods. Results: Internal validation through comparison between the global and regional changes in ventilation revealed a strong linear correlation (slope of 1.01, R{sup 2} of 0.97) between the measured global lung volume and the regional lung volume calculated by use of the “mass corrected” FRV. A linear relationship was established between the tidal volume measured with the automated breathing control system and FRV based on 4D-CT imaging. Consistently larger breathing volumes were observed when coached breathing techniques were used. Conclusions: The technique presented improves density-based evaluation of lung ventilation and establishes a link between global and regional lung ventilation volumes. Furthermore, the results obtained are comparable with those of other techniques of functional evaluation such as spirometry and hyperpolarized-gas magnetic

  4. Dosimetric consequences of tumor volume changes after kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography for non-operative lung cancer during adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Hu; Ximing Xu; Guangjin Yuan; Wei Ge; Liming Xu; Aihua Zhang; Junjian Deng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate tumor volume changes with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and their dosimetric consequences for non-operative lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Eighteen patients with non-operative lung cancer who received IMRT consisting of 1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction and five fractions per week or stereotactic radiotherapy with 5-8 Gy/fraction and three fractions a week were studied. kV-CBCT was performed once per week during IMRT and at every fraction during stereotactic radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on the kV-CBCT images, and adaptive treatment plans were created using merged kV-CBCT and primary planning computed tomogra-phy image sets. Tumor volume changes and dosimetric parameters, including the minimum dose to 95%(D95) or 1% (D1) of the planning target volume (PTV), mean lung dose (MLD), and volume of lung tissue that received more than 5 (V5), 10 (V10), 20 (V20), and 30 (V30) Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The average maximum change in GTV observed during IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radio-therapy was -25.85% (range, -13.09% --56.76%). The D95 and D1 of PTV for the adaptive treatment plans in all patients were not significantly different from those for the initial or former adaptive treatment plans. In patients with tumor volume changes of >20% in the third or fourth week of treatment during IMRT, adap-tive treatment plans offered clinically meaningful decreases in MLD and V5, V10, V20, and V30; however, in patients with tumor volume changes of 20% in the third or fourth week of treatment.

  5. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 20 Appendix S - Historical Sea Ice Area Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  6. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 21 Appendix T - Forecast Sea Ice Area Fraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  7. Framing anomaly in the effective theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Andrey; Cho, Gil Young; You, Yizhi; Abanov, Alexander G; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2015-01-09

    We consider the geometric part of the effective action for the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). It is shown that accounting for the framing anomaly of the quantum Chern-Simons theory is essential to obtain the correct gravitational linear response functions. In the lowest order in gradients, the linear response generating functional includes Chern-Simons, Wen-Zee, and gravitational Chern-Simons terms. The latter term has a contribution from the framing anomaly which fixes the value of thermal Hall conductivity and contributes to the Hall viscosity of the FQH states on a sphere. We also discuss the effects of the framing anomaly on linear responses for non-Abelian FQH states.

  8. Ambient Occlusion Effects for Combined Volumes and Tubular Geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper details a method for interactive direct volume rendering that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube-shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The algorithm extends the recently presented the directional occlusion shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. Stream tube geometries are computed using an effective spline-based interpolation and approximation scheme that avoids self-intersection and maintains coherent orientation of the stream tube segments to avoid surface deforming twists. Furthermore, strategies to reduce the geometric and specular aliasing of the stream tubes are discussed.

  9. How do jet time, pressure and bone volume fraction influence the drilling depth when waterjet drilling in porcine bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Dunnen, Steven; Dankelman, Jenny; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M

    2016-09-01

    Using water jets for orthopedic procedures that require bone drilling can be beneficial due to the absence of thermal damage and the always sharp cut. Previously, the influence of the water jet diameter and bone architectural properties on the drilling depth have been determined. To develop water jet instruments that can safely drill in orthopedic surgery, the impact of the two remaining primary factors were determined: the jet time (tjet [s]) and pressure (P [MPa]). To this end, 84 holes were drilled in porcine tali and femora with water jets using Ø 0.4mm nozzle. tjet was varied between 1, 3 and 5s and P between 50 and 70MPa. Drilling depths Lhole (mm), diameters Dhole (mm) and the volume of mineralized bone per unit volume (BV/TV) were determined with microCT scans. A non-linear regression analysis resulted in the predictive equation: Lhole= 0.22 * tjet(0.18) * (1.2-BV/TV) * (P-29) (R(2)=0.904). The established relation between the machine settings and drilling depth allows surgeons to adjust jet time and pressure for the patient׳s BV/TV to drill holes at a predetermined depth. For developers, the relation allows design decisions to be made that influence the dimensions, flexibility and accuracy of water jet instruments. For a pressure of 50MPa, the potential hole depth spread indicated by the 95% confidence interval is drilling can be applied in orthopedic surgery to drill holes in bone with controlled depth.

  10. Partial volume effects in dynamic contrast magnetic resonance renal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, D. Rodriguez, E-mail: drodriguez@biotronics3d.co [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Wells, K., E-mail: k.wells@surrey.ac.u [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Diaz Montesdeoca, O., E-mail: o.diaz.montesdeoca@gmail.co [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Moran Santana, A. [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Mendichovszky, I.A., E-mail: iosifm@hotmail.co [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom); Gordon, I., E-mail: i.gordon@ich.ucl.ac.u [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This is the first study of partial volume effect in quantifying renal function on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic image data were acquired for a cohort of 10 healthy volunteers. Following respiratory motion correction, each voxel location was assigned a mixing vector representing the 'overspilling' contributions of each tissue due to the convolution action of the imaging system's point spread function. This was used to recover the true intensities associated with each constituent tissue. Thus, non-renal contributions from liver, spleen and other surrounding tissues could be eliminated from the observed time-intensity curves derived from a typical renal cortical region of interest. This analysis produced a change in the early slope of the renal curve, which subsequently resulted in an enhanced glomerular filtration rate estimate. This effect was consistently observed in a Rutland-Patlak analysis of the time-intensity data: the volunteer cohort produced a partial volume effect corrected mean enhancement of 36% in relative glomerular filtration rate with a mean improvement of 7% in r{sup 2} fitting of the Rutland-Patlak model compared to the same analysis undertaken without partial volume effect correction. This analysis strongly supports the notion that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys is substantially affected by the partial volume effect, and that this is a significant obfuscating factor in subsequent glomerular filtration rate estimation.

  11. Effect of Potent Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Stereospermum suaveolens Extract in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of ethyl acetate fraction of ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens in streptozotocin-(STZ- induced diabetic rats by acute and subacute models. In this paper, various fractions of ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens were prepared and their effects on blood glucose levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats were studied after a single oral administration (200?mg/kg. Administration of the ethyl acetate fraction at 200?mg/kg once daily for 14 days to STZ-induced diabetic rats was also carried out. The parameters such as the fasting blood glucose, hepatic glycogen content, and pancreatic antioxidant levels were monitored. In the acute study, the ethyl acetate fraction is the most potent in reducing the fasting serum glucose levels of the STZ-induced diabetic rats. The 14-day repeated oral administration of the ethyl acetate fraction significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose and pancreatic TBARS level and significantly increased the liver glycogen, pancreatic superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities as well as reduced glutathione levels. The histopathological studies during the subacute treatment have been shown to ameliorate the STZ-induced histological damage of pancreas. This paper concludes that the ethyl acetate fraction from ethanol extract of Stereospermum suaveolens possesses potent antihyperglycemic and antioxidant properties, thereby substantiating the use of plant in the indigenous system of medicine.

  12. Effects of cooling and star formation on the baryon fractions in clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kravtsov, A V; Vikhlinin, A A; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.

    2005-01-01

    We study the effects of dissipation on the baryon fractions in clusters using high-resolution cosmological simulations of nine clusters that resolve formation of cluster galaxies. The simulations of each cluster are performed with the shock-capturing eulerian adaptive mesh refinement N-body+gasdynamics ART code with and without radiative cooling. We show that dissipation and associated galaxy formation increase the total baryon fractions within radii as large as the virial radius. The effect is the strongest within cluster cores, where the simulations with cooling have baryon fractions larger than the universal value, while the fraction of baryons in adiabatic simulations are smaller than universal. At larger radii (r >~ r_500) the cumulative baryon fractions in simulations with cooling are close to, while those in the adiabatic runs remain below than, the universal value. The gas fractions in simulations with dissipation are reduced by ~20-40% at r0.2, but differ systematically by up to 10% at small radii.

  13. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  14. In vitro antiproliferative effect of fractions from the caribbean marine sponge Myrmekioderma gyroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Márquez Fernández

    Full Text Available Introduction: studies performed to Myrmekioderma genus sponges show phospholipid fatty acids, volatile compounds, sterols, bioactive cyclic diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, lineal diterpenes and glycolipid ethers. Objetive: to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of seven fractions (F1-F7 obtained by flash column chromatography from the most bioactive extract of the sponge Myrmekioderma gyroderma, and to analyze the chemical composition of the most active fraction. Methods: samples of dried sponge were extracted with two different solvents: CH2Cl2 (2 x 50 mL, and CH3OH (2 x 50 mL. Each fraction was evaluated on tumor cell derived cell lines; and the cell growth, and viability were determined by a colorimeter assay using sulforhodamine B. Fatty acids structure of the most active fraction was possible by GC-MS analysis of the methyl ester, and pyrrolidine derivatives. Results: the fraction with higher activity on the assessed tumor cell lines is F4 due to it totally inhibited MDA-MB-231, and HT29 cell line growth to 5, and 25 µg/mL concentration (IC50< 1 µg/mL. Fatty acids identified in bioactive F4 fraction of the M. gyroderma sponge can be classified on the following groups: lineal chain saturated, branched-saturated, unsaturated, and a 3-hydroxy acid. Conclusions: 43 fatty acids among saturated, branched-saturated, and unsaturated were identified out of the F4 fraction with activity on the cell lines derived of breast cancer MDA-MB-231, colon carcinoma HT29, and lung carcinoma cells A-549. These results show the growth inhibitory effect shown by the fractions, on the tumor cell lines, depends on the dose.

  15. Anticonvulsant Effects of Fractions Isolated from Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempt Ant Venom (Formicidae: Ponerinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Aline Morais Ferreira Nôga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural products, sources of new pharmacological substances, have large chemical diversity and architectural complexity. In this context, some toxins obtained from invertebrate venoms have anticonvulsant effects. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects about 65 million people worldwide, and approximately 30% of cases are resistant to pharmacological treatment. Previous studies from our group show that the denatured venom of the ant Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempt protects mice against bicuculline (BIC-induced seizures and death. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticonvulsant activity of compounds isolated from D. quadriceps venom against seizures induced by BIC in mice. Crude venom was fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC resulting in six fractions referred to as DqTx1–DqTx6. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis revealed a major 431 Da compound in fractions DqTx1 and DqTx2. Fractions DqTx3 and DqTx4 showed a compound of 2451 Da and DqTx5 revealed a 2436 Da compound. Furthermore, the DqTx6 fraction exhibited a major component with a molecular weight of 13,196 Da. Each fraction (1 mg/mL was microinjected into the lateral ventricle of mice, and the animals were observed in an open field. We did not observe behavioral alterations when the fractions were given alone. Conversely, when the fractions were microinjected 20 min prior to the administration of BIC (21.6 nM, DqTx1, DqTx4, and DqTx6 fractions increased the latency for onset of tonic-clonic seizures. Moreover, all fractions, except DqTx5, increased latency to death. The more relevant result was obtained with the DqTx6 fraction, which protected 62.5% of the animals against tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, this fraction protected 100% of the animals from seizure episodes followed by death. Taken together, these findings indicate that compounds from ant venom might be a potential source of new anticonvulsants molecules.

  16. Anticonvulsant Effects of Fractions Isolated from Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempt) Ant Venom (Formicidae: Ponerinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nôga, Diana Aline Morais Ferreira; Brandão, Luiz Eduardo Mateus; Cagni, Fernanda Carvalho; Silva, Delano; de Azevedo, Dina Lilia Oliveira; Araújo, Arrilton; Dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira; Miranda, Antonio; da Silva, Regina Helena; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi

    2016-12-23

    Natural products, sources of new pharmacological substances, have large chemical diversity and architectural complexity. In this context, some toxins obtained from invertebrate venoms have anticonvulsant effects. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects about 65 million people worldwide, and approximately 30% of cases are resistant to pharmacological treatment. Previous studies from our group show that the denatured venom of the ant Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempt) protects mice against bicuculline (BIC)-induced seizures and death. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticonvulsant activity of compounds isolated from D. quadriceps venom against seizures induced by BIC in mice. Crude venom was fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) resulting in six fractions referred to as DqTx1-DqTx6. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis revealed a major 431 Da compound in fractions DqTx1 and DqTx2. Fractions DqTx3 and DqTx4 showed a compound of 2451 Da and DqTx5 revealed a 2436 Da compound. Furthermore, the DqTx6 fraction exhibited a major component with a molecular weight of 13,196 Da. Each fraction (1 mg/mL) was microinjected into the lateral ventricle of mice, and the animals were observed in an open field. We did not observe behavioral alterations when the fractions were given alone. Conversely, when the fractions were microinjected 20 min prior to the administration of BIC (21.6 nM), DqTx1, DqTx4, and DqTx6 fractions increased the latency for onset of tonic-clonic seizures. Moreover, all fractions, except DqTx5, increased latency to death. The more relevant result was obtained with the DqTx6 fraction, which protected 62.5% of the animals against tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, this fraction protected 100% of the animals from seizure episodes followed by death. Taken together, these findings indicate that compounds from ant venom might be a potential source of new anticonvulsants molecules.

  17. Volume of the effect compartment in simulations of neuromuscular block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigrovic, Vladimir; Proost, Johannes H.; Amann, Anton; Bhatt, Shashi B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The study examines the role of the volume of the effect compartment in simulations of neuromuscular block (NMB) produced by nondepolarizing muscle relaxants. Methods: The molar amount of the postsynaptic receptors at the motor end plates in muscle was assumed constant; the apparent recep

  18. Inhibitory effects of active fraction and its main components of Shaofu Zhuyu decoction on uterus contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shulan; Hua, Yongqing; Duan, Jin-Ao; Zhou, Wei; Shang, Erxin; Tang, Yuping

    2010-01-01

    Shaofu Zhuyu decoction is a famous formula for treating primary dysmenorrhea in China since the Qing dynasty. In this paper, the inhibitory effects of active-guided fraction and its main bioactive components of Shaofu Zhuyu decoction on a model of non-pregnant mice uterine contraction induced by oxytocin in vitro were investigated. Qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses were used to correlate the chemical composition of active fraction with the spasmolytic effects. Seven ingredients in the active fraction were identified and quantified by HPLC-DAD. Three ingredients, ferulic acid, vanillic acid, and typhaneoside, were evaluated for their effects on mice isolated uterine contraction induced by oxytocin in vitro. The ED(50) of them were 63.0 microg/ml, 57.6 microg/ml, 109.7 microg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of the combination of these three compounds was prior to the fraction and seven compounds group. The ED(50) was 65.5 microg/ml. The data stated that ferulic acid, vanillic acid, and typhaneoside were possibly the main active components in the bioactive fraction of Shaofu Zhuyu decoction. The study also implied that Shaofu Zhuyu decoction may have direct inhibitory effects on the contractility of the mice uterus and justified the traditional use of the prescription for treating the uterine cramping associated dysmenorrhea.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of high volume fraction Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite powders by high-energy milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, B. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Suryanarayana, C. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States)]. E-mail: csuryana@mail.ucf.edu; An, L. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2455 (United States); Vaidyanathan, R. [Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450 (United States); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2455 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal matrix composite (MMC) powders with volume fractions of 20, 30, and 50% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were synthesized by high-energy milling of the blended component powders. The particle sizes of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} studied were 50 nm, 150 nm, and 5 {mu}m. A uniform distribution of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforcement in the Al matrix was successfully obtained after milling the powders for a period of 20 h at a ball-to-powder ratio of 10:1 in a SPEX mill. The uniform distribution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the Al matrix was confirmed by characterizing these nanocomposite powders by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray mapping, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques.

  20. Temperature dependence of pin solar cell parameters with intrinsic layers made of pm-Si:H and low crystalline volume fraction {mu}c-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadeh, H. [AECS, Physics Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syria)

    2010-07-15

    A comparison of the temperature dependence of the IV characteristics parameters of hydrogenated silicon pin solar cells with intrinsic layers made of polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) and of {mu}c-Si:H with low crystalline volume fraction has been performed. When using pm-Si:H, higher efficiency and higher filling factors are achieved over a wide temperature range. Diode quality factors of both types of cells show similar temperature dependence. Recombination processes over the whole intrinsic layer dominates the forward current. A change of the cell parameters under illumination is also observed. The transport mechanism of both cells is similar in the temperature range that is important for most applications. Due to its optical and transport properties, pm-Si:H poses a very interesting alternative to {mu}c-Si:H and a-Si:H in the temperature range of normal terrestrial applications. (author)

  1. Temperature, Oxygen, and Soot-Volume-Fraction Measurements in a Turbulent C2H4-Fueled Jet Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearney, Sean P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Winters, Caroline [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farias, Paul Abraham [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grasser, Thomas W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hewson, John C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed set of measurements from a piloted, sooting, turbulent C 2 H 4 - fueled diffusion flame. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to monitor temperature and oxygen, while laser-induced incandescence (LII) is applied for imaging of the soot volume fraction in the challenging jet-flame environment at Reynolds number, Re = 20,000. Single-laser shot results are used to map the mean and rms statistics, as well as probability densities. LII data from the soot-growth region of the flame are used to benchmark the soot source term for one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) modeling of this turbulent flame. The ODT code is then used to predict temperature and oxygen fluctuations higher in the soot oxidation region higher in the flame.

  2. Revisiting the Lick Observatory Supernova Search Volume-Limited Sample: Updated Classifications and Revised Stripped-envelope Supernova Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Shivvers, Isaac; Zheng, Weikang; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Liu, Yuqian; Matheson, Thomas; Pastorello, Andrea; Graur, Or; Foley, Ryan J; Chornock, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Leaman, Jesse; Benetti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volumetric sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classifications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volumetric sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify...

  3. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  4. Does Working Memory Moderate the Effects of Fraction Intervention? An Aptitude-Treatment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Schumacher, Robin F.; Sterba, Sonya K.; Long, Jessica; Namkung, Jessica; Malone, Amelia; Hamlett, Carol L.; Jordan, Nancy C.; Gersten, Russell; Siegler, Robert S.; Changas, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether individual differences in working memory (WM) moderate effects of 2 variations of intervention designed to improve at-risk 4th graders' fraction knowledge. We also examined the effects of each intervention condition against a business-as-usual control group and assessed whether children's measurement interpretation…

  5. Fractional motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo I., E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il [Holon Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Shlesinger, Michael F., E-mail: mike.shlesinger@navy.mil [Office of Naval Research, Code 30, 875 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Brownian motion is the archetypal model for random transport processes in science and engineering. Brownian motion displays neither wild fluctuations (the “Noah effect”), nor long-range correlations (the “Joseph effect”). The quintessential model for processes displaying the Noah effect is Lévy motion, the quintessential model for processes displaying the Joseph effect is fractional Brownian motion, and the prototypical model for processes displaying both the Noah and Joseph effects is fractional Lévy motion. In this paper we review these four random-motion models–henceforth termed “fractional motions” –via a unified physical setting that is based on Langevin’s equation, the Einstein–Smoluchowski paradigm, and stochastic scaling limits. The unified setting explains the universal macroscopic emergence of fractional motions, and predicts–according to microscopic-level details–which of the four fractional motions will emerge on the macroscopic level. The statistical properties of fractional motions are classified and parametrized by two exponents—a “Noah exponent” governing their fluctuations, and a “Joseph exponent” governing their dispersions and correlations. This self-contained review provides a concise and cohesive introduction to fractional motions.

  6. PLASMA VOLUME EXPANSION 24-HOURS POST-EXERCISE: EFFECT OF DOUBLING THE VOLUME OF REPLACEMENT FLUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomew Kay

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of two volumes (1.5 L or 3.0 L of commercially available electrolyte beverage (1.44 mM·L-1 Na+ taken during a 24-hour recovery period post-exercise, on plasma volume (PV expansion 24-hours post-exercise were assessed. A simple random-order crossover research design was used. Subjects (n = 9 males: age 21 ± 4 years, body mass 80.0 ± 9.0 kg, peak incremental 60-second cycling power output 297 ± 45 W [means ± SD] completed an identical exercise protocol conducted in hot ambient conditions (35oC, 50% relative humidity on two occasions; separated by 7-days. On each occasion, subjects received a different volume of 24-hour fluid intake (commercial beverage in random order. In each case, the fluid was taken in five equal aliquots over 24-hours. PV expansions 24-hours post-exercise were estimated from changes in haemoglobin and haematocrit. Dependent t-testing revealed no significant differences in PV expansions between trials, however a significant expansion with respect to zero was identified in the 3.0 L trial only. Specifically, PV expansions (% were; 1.5 L trial: (mean ± SE 2.3 ± 2.0 (not significant with respect to zero, 3.0 L trial: 5.0 ± 2.0 (p < 0.05, with respect to zero. Under the conditions imposed in the current study, ingesting the greater volume of the beverage lead to larger mean PV expansion

  7. In vitro anti-inflammatory effects of different solution fractions of ethanol extract from Melilotus suaveolens Ledeb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-yu; TAO Jun-yan; ZHAO Lei; HUANG Zhi-jun; XIONG Fu-liang; ZHANG Shu-ling; LI Chong-ming; XIAO Fei

    2007-01-01

    Background Melilotus suaveolens Ledeb (M. suaveolens Ledeb) has long been used as a folk medicine in inflammation-related therapy. This study was undertaken to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of the plant.Methods Petroleum ether fraction, ethyl acetate fraction, n-butanol fraction, aqueous fraction were obtained from ethanol extract of M. suaveolens Ledeb and evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). While dexamethasone (DM) was used as a positive control, the effects of different solution fractions of ethanol extract on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) mRNA, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA, COX-2 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) of LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7cells were studied by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemical assay, respectively.Results Coumarin was one of the main ingredients in different solution fractions of ethanol extract except the aqueous fraction with no inflammatory effect. The petroleum ether fraction, ethyl acetate fraction and n-butanol fraction of ethanol extract could inhibit the production of TNF-α mRNA, COX-2 mRNA and NF-κB to some extent.Conclusions Different solution fractions of ethanol extract from M. suaveolens Ledeb had similar anti-inflammatory effect as did dexamethasone except the aqueous fraction. Coumarin was likely to be essential to the anti-inflammatory effect, and other ingredients might attribute to their different anti-inflammatory effects from the HPLC fingerprint.

  8. Variation in oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis: intramolecular and biosynthetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Leonel; Pinzon, Maria Camila; Anderson, William T; Jahren, A Hope

    2006-10-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of plant cellulose is commonly used for the interpretations of climate, ecophysiology and dendrochronology in both modern and palaeoenvironments. Further applications of this analytical tool depends on our in-depth knowledge of the isotopic fractionations associated with the biochemical pathways leading to cellulose. Here, we test two important assumptions regarding isotopic effects resulting from the location of oxygen in the carbohydrate moiety and the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose synthesis. We show that the oxygen isotopic fractionation of the oxygen attached to carbon 2 of the glucose moieties differs from the average fractionation of the oxygens attached to carbons 3-6 from cellulose by at least 9%, for cellulose synthesized within seedlings of two different species (Triticum aestivum L. and Ricinus communis L.). The fractionation for a given oxygen in cellulose synthesized by the Triticum seedlings, which have starch as their primary carbon source, is different than the corresponding fractionation in Ricinus seedlings, within which lipids are the primary carbon source. This observation shows that the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose affects oxygen isotope partitioning, a fact heretofore undemonstrated. Our findings may explain the species-dependent variability in the overall oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis, and may provide much-needed insight for palaeoclimate reconstruction using fossil cellulose.

  9. Effects of crystallization fractions on mechanical properties of Zr-based metallic glass matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (at.%) bulk metallic glass composites with various crystallization fractions were prepared by pretreating the bulk metallic glassy samples with pulsing current, and then by isothermal annealing at near initial crystallization temperature for different periods of time. The precipitations and crystallization fractions were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and their effects on mechanical properties of the composite were studied by microhardness, uniaxial compression test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results show that the primary precipitate is quasicrystalline phase and other metastable phases including Be2Zr, Zr2Cu and FCC would precipitate subsequently. In the initial crystallization process, in which the crystallization fraction increases from 0 to 8.2%, both fracture strength and plastic strain increase, with the maximum plastic strain up to 6.4%. When the crystallization fraction is larger than 8.2%, the fracture strength and the plastic strain decrease sharply. Furthermore, the alloy with low crystallization fraction is fractured by shearing, while for high crystallization fraction it is fractured by splitting and cleavage. The results show that the mechanical properties of the glassy alloy could be optimized by controlling the processing parameters.

  10. Effect of the fractions of Coccinia grandis on Ethanol-Induced cerebral oxidative stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Umamaheswari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of the various fractions of hydromethanol extract of the leaves of Coccinia grandis (Cucurbitaceae against ethanol-induced cerebral oxidative stress in rats. The leaves of this species is used in traditional medicine for treating jaundice, bronchitis, skin eruptions, burns, rheumatism, syphilis, gonorrhoea, etc. Cerebral oxidative stress was induced in rats by the administration of 20% ethanol (5 ml/100 g b.w. for 28 days. The pet-ether (PEF, chloroform (CF, ethylacetate (EAF and residual (RF fractions at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. were simultaneously administered with ethanol orally for 28 days. Vitamin E at a dose of 100 mg/kg orally was used as the standard. Administration of ethanol resulted in a significant increase in the activities of serum transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, uric acid and lipid levels. In addition, there was a significant elevation in the levels of malondialdehyde and lipid hydroperoxides and a reduction in the activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in the brain. Simultaneous administration of the fractions prevented the enzymatic leakage and the rise in uric acid and lipid levels. All the fractions (except the residual fraction prevented the peroxidative damage caused by ethanol, which is evidenced from the improved antioxidant potential. Further, histopathological examination of the brain tissue revealed that the fractions offered significant protection against ethanol toxicity. Among the fractions tested, the chloroform fraction exhibited appreciable antioxidant property, which was almost comparable with the standard Vitamin E. These results suggest that the leaves of Coccinia grandis exhibit significant antioxidant activity in ethanol-treated rats.

  11. World-volume Effective Actions of Exotic Five-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Yata, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    We construct world-volume effective actions of exotic $5^2_2$-branes in type IIA and IIB string theories. The effective actions are given in fully space-time covariant forms with two Killing vectors associated with background isometries. The effective theories are governed by the six-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=(2,0)$ tensor multiplet and $\\mathcal{N}=(1,1)$ vector multiplet, respectively. Performing the S-duality transformation to the $5^2_2$-brane effective action in type IIB string theory, we also work out the world-volume action of the $5^2_3$-brane. We discuss some additional issues relevant to the exotic five-branes in type I and heterotic string theories.

  12. [Ecological effect of No.0 diesel water accommodated fraction on marine algae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke-Qiang; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Zhu, Chen-Jian; Shi, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Hai-Yan; Li, Rui-Xiang; Sun, Sheng-Yu

    2007-02-01

    With batch culture experiments in field and laboratory, the ecological effect of No. 0 diesel water accommodated fraction on marine algae was studied. A growth model of marine algae under grazing pressure and a model of growth effect on marine algae with different doses No.0 diesel water accommodated fraction were proposed. Based on the model and experiments, the growth effect of No.0 diesel water accommodated fraction on marine algae was studied. The results show that, the growth model of marine algae under grazing pressure is more suited for the marine ecological system than Logistic model. And the final biomass (B(f)) of marine algae with different doses No.0 diesel water accommodated fraction was calculated by the model with none-linear fitting software. The results also show that, under the field and laboratory conditions, lower doses No.0 diesel water accommodated fraction promotes the growth of marine algae, and the most promoting ratio are 180% and 120% respectively, however, higher doses hardly promotes but bates the growth of marine algae.

  13. Beneficial Effects of Fractions of Nardostachys jatamansi on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi-Sang Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously shown that Nardostachys jatamansi (NJ exhibits anti-inflammatory properties against lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenges. However, the potency of NJ constituents against LPS-induced inflammatory responses has not been examined. In this present study, we determined which NJ extract fractions exhibit inhibitory effects against LPS-induced inflammatory responses. Among the NJ fractions, NJ-1, NJ-3, NJ-4, and NJ-6 inhibited LPS-induced production of NO. The NJ-3, NJ-4, and NJ-6 fractions also inhibited the production of cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. However, NJ-1, NJ-3, NJ-4, and NJ-6 showed differential inhibitory mechanisms against LPS-induced inflammatory responses. NJ-1, NJ-3, and NJ-4 inhibited LPS-induced activation of c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 but did not affect activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK or NF-κB. On the other hand, NJ-6 inhibited activation of MAPKs and NF-κB. In addition, in vivo experiments revealed that administration of NJ-1, NJ-3, NJ-4, and NJ-6 reduced LPS-induced endotoxin shock, with NJ-6 especially showing a marked protective effect. Taken together, these results provide the evidence for the potential of selective NJ fractions against LPS-induced inflammation. Thus, it will be advantageous to further isolate and determine single effective compounds from these potent fractions.

  14. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  15. Magnetic field effect on blood flow of Casson fluid in axisymmetric cylindrical tube: A fractional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farhad; Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmad; Khan, Ilyas; Saqib, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    The effects of magnetohydrodynamics on the blood flow when blood is represented as a Casson fluid, along with magnetic particles in a horizontal cylinder is studied. The flow is due to an oscillating pressure gradient. The Laplace and finite Hankel transforms are used to obtain the closed form solutions of the fractional partial differential equations. Effects of various parameters on the flow of both blood and magnetic particles are shown graphically. The analysis shows that, the model with fractional order derivatives bring a remarkable changes as compared to the ordinary model. The study highlights that applied magnetic field reduces the velocities of both the blood and magnetic particles.

  16. The enigma of the ν =2 +3 /8 fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutasoit, Jimmy A.; Balram, Ajit C.; Mukherjee, Sutirtha; Wu, Ying-Hai; Mandal, Sudhansu S.; Wójs, A.; Cheianov, Vadim; Jain, J. K.

    2017-03-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect at ν =2 +3 /8 , which has been definitively observed, is one of the last fractions for which no viable explanation has so far been demonstrated. Our detailed study suggests that it belongs to a new class of exotic states described by the Bonderson-Slingerland wave function. Its excitations are non-Abelian anyons similar to those of the well studied Pfaffian state at 5/2, but its wave function has a more complex structure. Using the effective edge theory, we make predictions for various measurable quantities that should enable a confirmation of the underlying topological order of this state.

  17. Analytic calculations of trial wave functions of the fractional quantum Hall effect on the sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Batista, C.L. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Dingping Li [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1996-07-01

    We present a framework for the analytic calculations of the hierarchical wave functions and the composite fermion wave functions in the fractional quantum Hall effect on the sphere by using projective coordinates. Then we calculate the overlaps between these two wave functions at various fillings and small numbers of electrons. We find that the overlaps are most equal to one. This gives a further evidence that two theories of the fractional quantum Hall effect, the hierarchical theory, are physically equivalent. (author). 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. The Fractional Statistics of Generalized Haldane Wave Function in 4D Quantum Hall Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGKe-Lin; WANShao-Long; CHENQing; XUFei

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a generalization of Laughlin's wave function expressed in Haldane's spherical geometry is con-structed in 4D quantum Hall effect. In fact, it is a membrane wave function in CP3 space. In this article, we use non-Abelian Berry phase to anaJyze the statistics of this membrane wave function. Our results show that the membrane wave function obeys fractional statistics. It is the rare example to realize fractional statistics in higher-dimensiona space than 2D. And, it will help to make clear the unresolved problems in 4D quantum Hall effect.

  19. The Fractional Statistics of Generalized Haldane Wave Function in 4D Quantum Hall Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fei; WANG Ke-Lin; WAN Shao-Long; CHEN Qing

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a generalization of Laughlin's wave function expressed in Haldane's spherical geometry is con-structed in 4D quantum Hall effect. In fact, it is a membrane wave function in CP3 space. In this article, we usenon-Abelian Berry phase to analyze the statistics of this membrane wave function. Our results show that the membranewave function obeys fractional statistics. It is the rare example to realize fractional statistics in higher-dimensional spacethan 2D. And, it will help to make clear the unresolved problems in 4D quantum Hall effect.

  20. Antidiabetic effect of an active fraction extracted from dragon's blood (Dracaena Cochinchinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hui-Juan; Lv, Jing-Ci; Yong, Ke-Lan; Chen, Xu; Liu, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Xia-Bing

    2009-02-01

    The active fraction extracted from dragon's blood displayed an inhibitory effect on alpha-glucosidase activity with an IC50 of 0.152 microg/mL, which is nearly half of the crude material. Its inhibition on alpha-glucosidase was noncompetitive. In addition, when this fraction was orally administered to mice dosed with Acarbose (20 mg/kg), the active fraction (100, 300, 500 mg/kg) significantly suppressed increase of blood glucose levels after sucrose loading in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that this extract from dragon's blood exerts an anti-diabetic effect by suppressing intestinal carbohydrate absorption and thereby reducing the postprandial increase of blood glucose.

  1. Antitumor effect of seaweeds. II. Fractionation and partial characterization of the polysaccharide with antitumor activity from Sargassum fulvellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, I; Nagumo, T; Fujihara, M; Takahashi, M; Ando, Y

    1977-06-01

    An almost purified antitumor polysaccharide fraction (SFPP) was obtained by fractional precipitation with ethanol from hot-water extract of Sargassum fulvellum. The fraction showed remarkable tumor-inhibiting effect against sarcoma-180 implanted subcutaneously in mice. The results of chemical and physical analyses suggested that the active substance may be either a sulphated peptidoglycuronoglycan or a sulphated glycuronoglycan.

  2. Effects of Acmella oleracea methanolic extract and fractions on the tyrosinase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Barbosa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of Acmella oleracea (L. R.K. Jansen, Asteraceae, methanolic extract, hexane (84.28% spilanthol and dichloromethane (approximately 100% spilanthol fractions on the tyrosinase enzyme. The dehydrated jambu extract was obtained through maceration using methanol. The extract residue was solubilized in MeOH/H2O (8:2 and subjected to liq.–liq. partition in organic solvents. Both the extraction and the partition procedures were conducted with three replicates. The analyses were performed using GC–MS, 1H and 13C NMR. The hexane fraction provided samples containing 84.28, 82.91 and 62.83% spilanthol in repetitions 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The dichloromethane fraction showed 88.55% spilanthol in repetition 1, and approximately 100% spilanthol in repetitions 2 and 3. The jambu extract as well as the hexane fraction (84.28% spilanthol were able to activate the oxidizing activity of the tyrosinase enzyme for L-DOPA. The dichloromethane fraction (approximately 100% spilanthol showed stronger inhibition effect on the tyrosinase enzyme in the first 10 min. The results raise the interest in study in spilanthol formulations for topical use, since it may prevent and/or slow skin hyperpigmentation or depigmentation processes. Furthermore, spilanthol may be used to control the enzymatic browning in fruits and vegetables.

  3. Effect of fractionation and pyrolysis on fuel properties of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kaushlendra; Risse, L Mark; Das, K C; Worley, John; Thompson, Sidney

    2010-07-01

    Raw poultry litter has certain drawbacks for energy production such as high ash and moisture content, a corrosive nature, and low heating values. A combined solution to utilization of raw poultry litter may involve fractionation and pyrolysis. Fractionation divides poultry litter into a fine, nutrient-rich fraction and a coarse, carbon-dense fraction. Pyrolysis of the coarse fraction would remove the corrosive volatiles as bio-oil, leaving clean char. This paper presents the effect of fractionation and pyrolysis process parameters on the calorific value of char and on the characterization of bio-oil. Poultry litter samples collected from three commercial poultry farms were divided into 10 treatments that included 2 controls (raw poultry litter and its coarse fraction having particle size greater than 0.85 mm) and 8 other treatments that were combinations of three factors: type (raw poultry litter or its coarse fraction), heating rate (30 or 10 degrees C/min), and pyrolysis temperature (300 or 500 degrees C). After the screening process, the poultry litter samples were dried and pyrolyzed in a batch reactor under nitrogen atmosphere and char and condensate yields were recorded. The condensate was separated into three fractions on the basis of their density: heavy, medium, and light phase. Calorific value and proximate and nutrient analysis were performed for char, condensate, and feedstock. Results show that the char with the highest calorific value (17.39 +/- 1.37 MJ/kg) was made from the coarse fraction at 300 degrees C, which captured 68.71 +/- 9.37% of the feedstock energy. The char produced at 300 degrees C had 42 +/- 11 mg/kg arsenic content but no mercury. Almost all of the Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and P remained in the char. The pyrolysis process reduced ammoniacal-nitrogen (NH4-N) in char by 99.14 +/- 0.47% and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) by 95.79 +/- 5.45% at 500 degrees C.

  4. Antihyperglycemic Effect of Orthosiphon Stamineus Benth Leaves Extract and Its Bioassay-Guided Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsnoussi Ali Hussin Mohamed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary investigations were carried out to evaluate the antidiabetic effects of the leaves of O. stamineus extracted serially with solvents of increasing polarity (petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and water; bioassay-guided purification of plant extracts using the subcutaneous glucose tolerance test (SbGTT was also carried out. Only the chloroform extract, given at 1 g/kg body weight (b.w., significantly reduced (P < 0.05 the blood glucose level of rats loaded subcutaneously with 150 mg/kg (b.w. glucose. The active chloroform extract of O. stamineus was separated into five fractions using a dry flash column chromatography method. Out of the five fractions tested, only chloroform fraction 2 (Cƒ2, at the dose of 1 g/kg (b.w. significantly inhibited (P < 0.05 blood glucose levels in SbGTT. Active Cƒ2 was split into two sub-fractions Cƒ2-A and Cƒ2-B, using a dry flash column chromatography method. The activities Cƒ2-A and Cƒ2-B were investigated using SbGTT, and the active sub-fraction was then further studied for anti-diabetic effects in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model. The results clearly indicate that Cƒ2-B fraction exhibited a blood glucose lowering effect in fasted treated normal rats after glucose-loading of 150 mg/kg (b.w.. In the acute streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, Cƒ2-B did not exhibit a hypoglycemic effect on blood glucose levels up to 7 hours after treatment. Thus, it appears that Cƒ2-B functions similarly to metformin, which has no hypoglycemic effect but demonstrates an antihyperglycemic effect only in normogycemic models. The effect of Cƒ2-B may have no direct stimulatory effects on insulin secretion or on blood glucose levels in diabetic animal models. Verification of the active compound(s within the active fraction (Cƒ2-B indicated the presence of terpenoids and, flavonoids, including sinensitin.

  5. Influence of volume and method of administration of colostrum on total protein and eletrophoretic serum fractions in Holstein calves

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Alexandre Secorun [UNESP; Feitosa, Francisco Leydson Formiga [UNESP; F.J. Benesi; E.H. Birgel; Mendes, L. C. N. [UNESP

    2001-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of the amount of colostrum (two and four liters) and methods of colostrum feeding (direct suckling from the cow, feeding colostrum using nipple bottle, and no feeding colostrum) on different blood traits. Thirty two Holstein calves (four groups of eight animals each) were randomly allotted to four treatments: treatment 1 - calves were hand fed four liters of colostrum; treatment 2 - calves were hand fed two liters of colostrum; treatment 3 - c...

  6. Realizing Tao-Thouless-like state in fractional quantum spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Rong; Guo, Yao-Wu; Li, Zhuo-Jun; Li, Wei; Chen, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The quest for exotic quantum states of matter has become one of the most challenging tasks in modern condensed matter communications. Interplay between topology and strong electron-electron interactions leads to lots of fascinating effects since the discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect. Here, we theoretically study the Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling effect on a fractional quantum spin Hall system by means of finite size exact diagonalization. Numerical evidences from the ground degeneracies, states evolutions, entanglement spectra, and static structure factor calculations demonstrate that non-trivial fractional topological Tao-Thouless-like quantum state can be realized in the fractional quantum spin Hall effect in a thin torus geometric structure by tuning the strength of spin-orbit coupling. Furthermore, the experimental realization of the Tao-Thouless-like state as well as its evolution in optical lattices are also proposed. The importance of this prediction provides significant insight into the realization of exotic topological quantum states in optical lattice, and also opens a route for exploring the exotic quantum states in condensed matters in future.

  7. Realizing Tao-Thouless-like state in fractional quantum spin Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Rong; Guo, Yao-Wu; Li, Zhuo-Jun; Li, Wei; Chen, Yan

    2016-09-21

    The quest for exotic quantum states of matter has become one of the most challenging tasks in modern condensed matter communications. Interplay between topology and strong electron-electron interactions leads to lots of fascinating effects since the discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect. Here, we theoretically study the Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling effect on a fractional quantum spin Hall system by means of finite size exact diagonalization. Numerical evidences from the ground degeneracies, states evolutions, entanglement spectra, and static structure factor calculations demonstrate that non-trivial fractional topological Tao-Thouless-like quantum state can be realized in the fractional quantum spin Hall effect in a thin torus geometric structure by tuning the strength of spin-orbit coupling. Furthermore, the experimental realization of the Tao-Thouless-like state as well as its evolution in optical lattices are also proposed. The importance of this prediction provides significant insight into the realization of exotic topological quantum states in optical lattice, and also opens a route for exploring the exotic quantum states in condensed matters in future.

  8. The Effects of Explicit Instruction with Manipulatives on the Fraction Skills of Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Jugnu

    2013-01-01

    This single-subject multiple-baseline across participants study was designed to investigate the effects of explicit instruction with manipulatives on the conceptual and procedural knowledge of addition and subtraction of like and unlike fractions of elementary school students with autism. This study included six 8- to 12-year-old students with…

  9. Effect of Cuisenaire Rods' Approach on Some Nigeria Primary Pupils' Achievement in Decimal Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumeh, M. S. C.; Achor, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    This study determined the effect of Cuisenaire Rods' approach on some Nigeria primary pupils' achievement in decimal fractions. Three hypotheses guided the study. A total of 200 Primary six pupils (that is, 6th grade) from randomly selected schools in Makurdi metropolis of Benue State of Nigeria served as the sample for the study. A Mathematics…

  10. Observation of even denominator fractional quantum Hall effect in suspended bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Dong-Keun; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Abanin, Dmitry A; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2014-01-01

    We investigate low-temperature magneto-transport in recently developed, high-quality multiterminal suspended bilayer graphene devices, enabling the independent measurement of the longitudinal and transverse resistance. We observe clear signatures of the fractional quantum Hall effect with different states that are either fully developed, and exhibit a clear plateau in the transverse resistance with a concomitant dip in longitudinal resistance or incipient, and exhibit only a longitudinal resistance minimum. All observed states scale as a function of filling factor ν, as expected. An unprecedented even-denominator fractional state is observed at ν = -1/2 on the hole side, exhibiting a clear plateau in Rxy quantized at the expected value of 2h/e(2) with a precision of ∼0.5%. Many of our observations, together with a recent electronic compressibility measurement performed in graphene bilayers on hexagonal boron-nitride (hBN) substrates, are consistent with a recent theory that accounts for the effect of the degeneracy between the N = 0 and N = 1 Landau levels in the fractional quantum Hall effect and predicts the occurrence of a Moore-Read type ν = -1/2 state. Owing to the experimental flexibility of bilayer graphene, which has a gate-dependent band structure, can be easily accessed by scanning probes, and can be contacted with materials such as superconductors, our findings offer new possibilities to explore the microscopic nature of even-denominator fractional quantum Hall effect.

  11. The Effects of Explicit Instruction with Manipulatives on the Fraction Skills of Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Jugnu

    2013-01-01

    This single-subject multiple-baseline across participants study was designed to investigate the effects of explicit instruction with manipulatives on the conceptual and procedural knowledge of addition and subtraction of like and unlike fractions of elementary school students with autism. This study included six 8- to 12-year-old students with…

  12. Effect of Training in Math Metacognitive Strategy on Fractional Achievement of Nigerian Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, V. C.; Eskay, M.; Igbo, J. N.; Obiyo, N.; Agbo, O.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of training in math metacognition on fractional mathematics among primary school pupils, with a quasi-experimental design, specifically a post-test only control group design. Two intact classes were randomly selected and assigned to treatment and control conditions. Sixty primary six pupils constituted the sample…

  13. Estimation of Fractionally Integrated Panels with Fixed Effects and Cross-Section Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre; Velasco, Carlos

    We consider large N, T panel data models with fixed effects, common factors allowing cross-section dependence, and persistent data and shocks, which are assumed fractionally integrated. In a basic setup, the main interest is on the fractional parameter of the idiosyncratic component, which...... is estimated in first differences after factor removal by projection on the cross-section average. The pooled conditional-sum-of-squares estimate is root-NT consistent but the normal asymptotic distribution might not be centered, requiring the time series dimension to grow faster than the cross-section size...

  14. Correcting the relationship between PRI and shadow fraction for the blue sky effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mõttus, Matti

    2016-04-01

    The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) is defined as the normalized difference ratio of leaf reflectance at two specific wavelengths in the green spectral region. Its value depends on the status of leaf carotenoid content, and especially that of the xanthophyll cycle pigments. Due to the dependence on the xanthophyll cycle, when the photosynthetic apparatus of green leaves is close to the saturation limit, their PRI becomes dependent on light conditions. Therefore, by measuring the PRI of leaves in the same canopy under different local irradiance conditions on a sunny day, it should be possible to determine the saturation level of the leaves. In turn, this gives information on the light use efficiency (LUE) of the vegetation canopy. The average light conditions of visible foliage elements are often quantified with the shadow fraction -- the fraction of visible foliage not lit by direct sunlight. The dependence of PRI on the shadow fraction has been used to remotely measure canopy LUE on clear days. Variations in shadow fraction have been achieved with multiangular measurement. However, besides photosynthetic downregulation, the dependence of canopy PRI on shadow fraction is affected by the blue sky radiation caused by scattering in the atmosphere. To quantify this effect on remotely sensed PRI, we present the underlying definitions relating leaf and canopy PRI and perform the required calculations for typical midsummer conditions in Central Finland. We demonstrate that the effect of blue sky radiation on the variation of PRI with canopy shadow fraction is similar in shape and magnitude to that of LUE variations reported in literature. Next, we propose a new method to assess these PRI variations in structured vegetation. We investiagate this blue sky effect on the PRI -- shadow fraction relationship with high spatial (60 cm) and spectral (9.8 nm) resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy data from Hyytiälä, Finland. We evaluate the spectral irradiance in

  15. An Effective Numerical Method and Its Utilization to Solution of Fractional Models Used in Bioengineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petráš Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the fractional-order linear and nonlinear models used in bioengineering applications and an effective method for their numerical solution. The proposed method is based on the power series expansion of a generating function. Numerical solution is in the form of the difference equation, which can be simply applied in the Matlab/Simulink to simulate the dynamics of system. Several illustrative examples are presented, which can be widely used in bioengineering as well as in the other disciplines, where the fractional calculus is often used.

  16. Stability and Convergence of an Effective Finite Element Method for Multiterm Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjun Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element method (FEM for multiterm fractional partial differential equations (MT-FPDEs is studied for obtaining a numerical solution effectively. The weak formulation for MT-FPDEs and the existence and uniqueness of the weak solutions are obtained by the well-known Lax-Milgram theorem. The Diethelm fractional backward difference method (DFBDM, based on quadrature for the time discretization, and FEM for the spatial discretization have been applied to MT-FPDEs. The stability and convergence for numerical methods are discussed. The numerical examples are given to match well with the main conclusions.

  17. Temperature effects on the fractionation of multiple sulfur isotopes by Thermodesulfobacterium and Desulfovibrio strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Sun, C.; Ono, S.; Lin, L.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction is one of the major mechanisms driving anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in global ocean. While sulfate-reducing prokaryotes are well known to fractionate sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction, unraveling the isotopic compositions of sulfur-bearing minerals preserved in sedimentary records could provide invaluable constraints on the evolution of seawater chemistry and metabolic pathways. Variations in the sulfur isotope fractionations are partly due to inherent differences among species and also affected by environmental conditions. The isotope fractionations caused by microbial sulfate reduction have been interpreted to be a sequence of enzyme-catalyzed isotope fractionation steps. Therefore, the fractionation factor depends on (1) the sulfate flux into and out of the cell, and (2) the flux of sulfur transformation between the internal pools. Whether the multiple sulfur isotope effect could be quantitatively predicted using such a metabolic flux model would provide insights into the cellular machinery catalyzing with sulfate reduction. This study examined the multiple sulfur isotope fractionation patterns associated with a thermophilic Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain and a mesophilic Desulfovibrio gigas over a wide temperature range. The Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain grew between 34 and 79°C with an optimal temperature at 72°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 77°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 8.2 and 31.6‰ with a maximum at 68°C. The D. gigas grew between 10 and 45 °C with an optimal temperature at 30°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 41°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 10.3 and 29.7‰ with higher magnitude at both lower and higher temperatures. The results of multiple sulfur isotope measurements expand the previously reported range and cannot be described by a solution field of the metabolic flux model, which calculates

  18. Spatial distribution of soluble insulin in pig subcutaneous tissue: Effect of needle length, injection speed and injected volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Maria; Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Refsgaard, Hanne H F; Pedersen, Karen-Margrethe; Kirk, Rikke K; Poulsen, Mette; Feidenhans'l, Robert

    2015-11-15

    The spatial distribution of a soluble insulin formulation was visualized and quantified in 3-dimensions using X-ray computed tomography. The drug distribution was visualized for ex vivo injections in pig subcutaneous tissue. Pig subcutaneous tissue has very distinct layers, which could be separated in the tomographic reconstructions and the amount of drug in each tissue class was quantified. With a scan time of about 45min per sample, and a robust segmentation it was possible to analyze differences in the spatial drug distribution between several similar injections. It was studied how the drug distribution was effected by needle length, injection speed and injected volume. For an injected volume of 0.1ml and injection depth of 8mm about 50% of the injections were partly intramuscular. Using a 5mm needle resulted in purely subcutaneous injections with minor differences in the spatial drug distribution between injections. Increasing the injected volume from 0.1ml to 1ml did not increase the intramuscular volume fraction, but gave a significantly higher volume fraction placed in the fascia separating the deep and superficial subcutaneous fat layers. Varying the injection speed from 25l/s up to 300l/s gave no changes in the drug concentration distribution. The method presented gives novel insight into subcutaneous injections of soluble insulin drugs and can be used to optimize the injection technique for subcutaneous drug administration in preclinical studies of rodents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of volume conductor and source configuration on simulated magnetogastrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komuro, Rie; Qiao Wenlian; Pullan, Andrew J; Cheng, Leo K, E-mail: l.cheng@auckland.ac.n [Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2010-11-21

    Recordings of the magnetic fields (MFs) arising from gastric electrical activity (GEA) have been shown to be able to distinguish between normal and certain abnormal GEA. Mathematical models provide a powerful tool for revealing the relationship between the underlying GEA and the resultant magnetogastrograms (MGGs). However, it remains uncertain the relative contributions that different volume conductor and dipole source models have on the resultant MFs. In this study, four volume conductor models (free space, sphere, half space and an anatomically realistic torso) and two dipole source configurations (containing 320 moving dipole sources and a single equivalent moving dipole source) were used to simulate the external MFs. The effects of different volume conductor models and dipole source configurations on the MF simulations were examined. The half space model provided the best approximation of the MFs produced by the torso model in the direction normal to the coronal plane. This was despite the fact that the half space model does not produce secondary sources, which have been shown to contribute up to 50% of the total MFs when an anatomically realistic torso model was used. We conclude that a realistic representation of the volume conductor and a detailed dipole source model are likely to be necessary when using a model-based approach for interpreting MGGs.

  20. Diffusion of multiple species with excluded-volume effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic models of diffusion with excluded-volume effects are used to model many biological and physical systems at a discrete level. The average properties of the population may be described by a continuum model based on partial differential equations. In this paper we consider multiple interacting subpopulations/species and study how the inter-species competition emerges at the population level. Each individual is described as a finite-size hard core interacting particle undergoing Brownian motion. The link between the discrete stochastic equations of motion and the continuum model is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The system for two species leads to a nonlinear cross-diffusion system for each subpopulation, which captures the enhancement of the effective diffusion rate due to excluded-volume interactions between particles of the same species, and the diminishment due to particles of the other species. This model can explain two alternative notions of the diff...

  1. Effects of Nidus Vespae extract and chemical fractions on the growth and acidogenicity of oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jin; Liu, Yuan; Zuo, Yu Ling; Li, Ji Yao; Ye, Ling; Zhou, Xue Dong

    2006-09-01

    Nidus Vespae is the honeycomb of Polistes Olivaceous (De Geer), P. Japonicus Saussure, and Parapolybiavaria Fabricius. It is known to have a number of pharmacological effects, including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-virus, anti-tumor and anesthetic properties. The present study evaluated the antimicrobial activity and acid inhibition properties of extracts and chemical fractions of Nidus Vespae. The raw material was first extracted using 95% ethanol/water. Subsequent fractions were prepared from this extract using cyclohexane/ethyl acetate, petroleum ether/ethyl acetate, and chloroform/methanol. For the antimicrobial activity assays, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined using the microdilution method. The chloroform/methanol (Chl/MeOH) fraction showed the highest antibacterial activities with a MIC of 8-16mg/ml and an MBC of 16-32mg/ml. In addition, the extract and chemical fractions of Nidus Vespae showed a remarkable capacity for inhibiting the acid production of common oral bacteria at sub-MIC concentrations. Sub-MIC levels of the petroleum ether/ethyl acetate fraction significantly inhibited acid production by Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175. The significant antiacidogenic activity demonstrated by Nidus Vespae shows it to be a promising source of novel anticariogenic agents.

  2. Evidence for a fractional fractal quantum Hall effect in graphene superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Yuanda; Wen, Bo; Han, Zheng; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Koshino, Mikito; Hone, James; Dean, Cory R.

    2015-12-01

    The Hofstadter energy spectrum provides a uniquely tunable system to study emergent topological order in the regime of strong interactions. Previous experiments, however, have been limited to low Bloch band fillings where only the Landau level index plays a role. We report measurements of high-mobility graphene superlattices where the complete unit cell of the Hofstadter spectrum is accessible. We observed coexistence of conventional fractional quantum Hall effect (QHE) states together with the integer QHE states associated with the fractal Hofstadter spectrum. At large magnetic field, we observed signatures of another series of states, which appeared at fractional Bloch filling index. These fractional Bloch band QHE states are not anticipated by existing theoretical pictures and point toward a distinct type of many-body state.

  3. Antiulcer Effect of Extract/Fractions of Eruca sativa : Attenuation of Urease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Khan, Murad Ali

    2014-07-01

    Eruca sativa (Rocket salad) is known for its antiulcer properties in the traditional system of treatment. The present study was, therefore, designed to scrutinize its effect on urease activity in vitro. The results demonstrated marked attenuation of urease by the crude extract of various test concentrations with IC50 value of 7.77 mg/mL. On fractionation, marked change in inhibitory profile was observed. The ethyl acetate fraction was the most potent urease inhibitor with IC50 value of 4.17 mg/mL followed by the aqueous fraction with an IC50 value of 5.83 mg/mL. However, hexane did not show significant urease inhibition. In conclusion, the present study illustrated strong antagonism of urease activity and thus validated scientifically the traditional use of the plant in the treatment of ulcers.

  4. Non-saponifiable fraction of cocoa shell butter: effect on rat and human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warocquier-Clerout, R; Sigot, M; Ouraghi, M; Chaveron, H

    1992-02-01

    Synopsis Non-saponifiable lipid fraction (ICSB) extracted from cocoa shell butter was solubilized in dimethylformamide (DMF) and analysed for its biological activity on growth of rat and human fibroblasts. Non-saponifiables (10 mug ml(-1)) partially protected cells from toxicity of DMF (1%) and allowed the growth of fibroblasts cultivated in optimal conditions (10% fetal calf serum-FCS, 37 degrees C) or improved the survival of cells maintained in altered conditions (2.5% FCS, 35 degrees C). At higher concentration (ICSB 50 mug ml(-1), DMF 1%), the protective effect was suppressed. ICSB was fractionated by chromatography into four compounds: sterols, terpenic alcohols, tocopherols and hydrocarbons +/- carotenoids. We found that biological activity of ICSB was mostly due to the major fraction containing sterols.

  5. The effects of high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction for adult surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Meyhoff, Christian S; Jørgensen, Lars N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Available evidence on the effects of a high fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) of 60% to 90% compared with a routine fraction of inspired oxygen of 30% to 40%, during anaesthesia and surgery, on mortality and surgical site infection has been inconclusive. Previous trials and meta......-analyses have led to different conclusions on whether a high fraction of supplemental inspired oxygen during anaesthesia may decrease or increase mortality and surgical site infections in surgical patients. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of an FIO2 equal to or greater than 60% compared...... with a control FIO2 at or below 40% in the perioperative setting in terms of mortality, surgical site infection, respiratory insufficiency, serious adverse events and length of stay during the index admission for adult surgical patients.We looked at various outcomes, conducted subgroup and sensitivity analyses...

  6. Differential effects of Mycobacterium bovis - derived polar and apolar lipid fractions on bovine innate immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirson Chris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mycobacterial lipids have long been known to modulate the function of a variety of cells of the innate immune system. Here, we report the extraction and characterisation of polar and apolar free lipids from Mycobacterium bovis AF 2122/97 and identify the major lipids present in these fractions. Lipids found included trehalose dimycolate (TDM and trehalose monomycolate (TMM, the apolar phthiocerol dimycocersates (PDIMs, triacyl glycerol (TAG, pentacyl trehalose (PAT, phenolic glycolipid (PGL, and mono-mycolyl glycerol (MMG. Polar lipids identified included glucose monomycolate (GMM, diphosphatidyl glycerol (DPG, phenylethanolamine (PE and a range of mono- and di-acylated phosphatidyl inositol mannosides (PIMs. These lipid fractions are capable of altering the cytokine profile produced by fresh and cultured bovine monocytes as well as monocyte derived dendritic cells. Significant increases in the production of IL-10, IL-12, MIP-1β, TNFα and IL-6 were seen after exposure of antigen presenting cells to the polar lipid fraction. Phenotypic characterisation of the cells was performed by flow cytometry and significant decreases in the expression of MHCII, CD86 and CD1b were found after exposure to the polar lipid fraction. Polar lipids also significantly increased the levels of CD40 expressed by monocytes and cultured monocytes but no effect was seen on the constitutively high expression of CD40 on MDDC or on the levels of CD80 expressed by any of the cells. Finally, the capacity of polar fraction treated cells to stimulate alloreactive lymphocytes was assessed. Significant reduction in proliferative activity was seen after stimulation of PBMC by polar fraction treated cultured monocytes whilst no effect was seen after lipid treatment of MDDC. These data demonstrate that pathogenic mycobacterial polar lipids may significantly hamper the ability of the host APCs to induce an appropriate immune response to an invading pathogen.

  7. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  8. Effect of intra-fraction motion on the accumulated dose for free-breathing MR-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy of renal-cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Glitzner, Markus; Kontaxis, Charis; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Prins, Fieke M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has shown great promise in increasing local control rates for renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). Characterized by steep dose gradients and high fraction doses, these hypo-fractionated treatments are, however, prone to dosimetric errors as a result of variations in intra-fraction respiratory-induced motion, such as drifts and amplitude alterations. This may lead to significant variations in the deposited dose. This study aims to develop a method for calculating the accumulated dose for MRI-guided SBRT of RCC in the presence of intra-fraction respiratory variations and determine the effect of such variations on the deposited dose. For this, RCC SBRT treatments were simulated while the underlying anatomy was moving, based on motion information from three motion models with increasing complexity: (1) STATIC, in which static anatomy was assumed, (2) AVG-RESP, in which 4D-MRI phase-volumes were time-weighted, and (3) PCA, a method that generates 3D volumes with sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to capture respiration and intra-fraction variations. Five RCC patients and two volunteers were included and treatments delivery was simulated, using motion derived from subject-specific MR imaging. Motion was most accurately estimated using the PCA method with root-mean-squared errors of 2.7, 2.4, 1.0 mm for STATIC, AVG-RESP and PCA, respectively. The heterogeneous patient group demonstrated relatively large dosimetric differences between the STATIC and AVG-RESP, and the PCA reconstructed dose maps, with hotspots up to 40% of the D99 and an underdosed GTV in three out of the five patients. This shows the potential importance of including intra-fraction motion variations in dose calculations.

  9. Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-04

    Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal → uraninite → metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume

  10. Potent anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of methanol fraction of Otostegia persica extract and its components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tofighi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Otostegia persica (Labiatae is an endemic plant of Iran and is used for its anti-inflammatory properties in folk medicine of Sistan and Baluchestan province. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of O. Persica different fractions and identification of the natural compounds from the most active fraction. Methods: Total extract of O. Persica was fractionated with petroleum ether (PE, chloroform (CL, ethyl acetate (EA, n-butanol (BU and methanol (ME. The analgesic activities of different fractions were determined by formalin test. Then, activity of effective fractions was investigated on carrageenan-induced paw edema assay. Finally, the compounds of effective fraction were isolated and their structures were elucidated. Results: Anti-nociceptive activity of EA and BU fractions (100 mg/kg and ME fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg demonstrated significant difference with normal saline during the second phase of the formalin test. ME fraction showed higher analgesic effects in comparison to indomethacin (p0.05. Vicenin-2 and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside were elucidated from ME as the effective anti-inflammatory fraction. Conclusion: It was concluded that the existence of flavonoids in O. persica extract could play an important role for its anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects similar to various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS and inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS.

  11. T2’-Imaging to Assess Cerebral Oxygen Extraction Fraction in Carotid Occlusive Disease: Influence of Cerebral Autoregulation and Cerebral Blood Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichmann, Ralf; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Hattingen, Elke; Singer, Oliver C.; Wagner, Marlies

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative T2'-mapping detects regional changes of the relation of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) by using their different magnetic properties in gradient echo imaging and might therefore be a surrogate marker of increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in cerebral hypoperfusion. Since elevations of cerebral blood volume (CBV) with consecutive accumulation of Hb might also increase the fraction of deoxygenated Hb and, through this, decrease the T2’-values in these patients we evaluated the relationship between T2’-values and CBV in patients with unilateral high-grade large-artery stenosis. Materials and Methods Data from 16 patients (13 male, 3 female; mean age 53 years) with unilateral symptomatic or asymptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis/occlusion were analyzed. MRI included perfusion-weighted imaging and high-resolution T2’-mapping. Representative relative (r)CBV-values were analyzed in areas of decreased T2’ with different degrees of perfusion delay and compared to corresponding contralateral areas. Results No significant elevations in cerebral rCBV were detected within areas with significantly decreased T2’-values. In contrast, rCBV was significantly decreased (pperfusion delay and decreased T2’. Furthermore, no significant correlation between T2’- and rCBV-values was found. Conclusions rCBV is not significantly increased in areas of decreased T2’ and in areas of restricted perfusion in patients with unilateral high-grade stenosis. Therefore, T2’ should only be influenced by changes of oxygen metabolism, regarding our patient collective especially by an increase of the OEF. T2’-mapping is suitable to detect altered oxygen consumption in chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:27560515

  12. Contacts and Edge State Equilibration in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, C. L.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    1995-01-01

    We develop a simple kinetic equation description of edge state dynamics in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), which allows us to examine in detail equilibration processes between multiple edge modes. As in the integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE), inter-mode equilibration is a prerequisite for quantization of the Hall conductance. Two sources for such equilibration are considered: Edge impurity scattering and equilibration by the electrical contacts. Several specific models for electric...

  13. Volume Displacement Effects in Bubble-laden Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihonski, Andrew; Finn, Justin; Apte, Sourabh

    2012-11-01

    When a few bubbles are entrained in a traveling vortex ring, it has been shown that even at extremely low volume loadings, their presence can significantly affect the structure of the vortex core (Sridhar & Katz 1999). A typical Euler-Lagrange point-particle model with two-way coupling for this dilute system, wherein the bubbles are assumed subgrid and momentum point-sources are used to model their effect on the flow, is shown to be unable to accurately capture the experimental trends of bubble settling location and vortex distortion for a range of bubble parameters and vortex strengths. The bubbles experience a significant amount of drag, lift, added mass, pressure, and gravity forces. However, these forces are in balance of each other, as the bubbles reach a mean settling location away from the vortex core. Accounting for fluid volume displacement due to bubble motion, using a model termed as volumetric coupling, experimental trends on vortex distortion and bubble settling location are well captured. The fluid displacement effects are studied by introducing a notion of a volumetric coupling force, the net force on the fluid due to volumetric coupling, which is found to be dominant even at the low volume loadings investigated here.

  14. Retrieval of Gap Fraction and Effective Plant Area Index from Phase-Shift Terrestrial Laser Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyare Pueschel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of canopy structure is crucial for modeling eco-physiological processes. Two commonly used metrics for characterizing canopy structure are the gap fraction and the effective Plant Area Index (PAIe. Both have been successfully retrieved with terrestrial laser scanning. However, a systematic assessment of the influence of the laser scan properties on the retrieval of these metrics is still lacking. This study investigated the effects of resolution, measurement speed, and noise compression on the retrieval of gap fraction and PAIe from phase-shift FARO Photon 120 laser scans. We demonstrate that FARO’s noise compression yields gap fractions and PAIe that deviate significantly from those based on scans without noise compression and strongly overestimate Leaf Area Index (LAI estimates based on litter trap measurements. Scan resolution and measurement speed were also shown to impact gap fraction and PAIe, but this depended on leaf development phase, stand structure, and LAI calculation method. Nevertheless, PAIe estimates based on various scan parameter combinations without noise compression proved to be quite stable.

  15. Fractionation and anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenol-enriched extracts from apple pomace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianli Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive polyphenols are the predominant ingredients in apple pomace, an agro-industrial byproduct in apple juice processing. The present work focused on fractionation of ethanol extract of apple pomace using macroporous absorbent resin chromatography and HPLC analysis of all fractions recovered from polyphenol-enriched extract and their inhibitory effects on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression in lipo-polysaccharides (LPS -induced mouse RAW 264.7 cell line. Six fractions API-VI were achieved through fractionation eluting with aqueous alcohol. HPLC analysis indicated that APIII eluted by 40% ethanol had the highest content of total phenolics, which was 148.1 ± 3.11 mg gallic acid equivalents per 100 g of dry apple pomace. Anti-inflammatory assays showed that APIII had the strongest activity against COX-2 expression at 5 ?g mL-1 and procyanidin B2 and quercetin exhibited positive correlation with their anti-inflammatory effects. Our data suggested that phenolics could be prepared from apple pomace and applied in the management of inflammatory diseases.

  16. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Patella, Agostino; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are massive, a mass-gap is generated and the theory is confined. IR-conformality is recovered in the chiral limit: masses of particles vanish in the chiral limit, while their ratios stay finite. In order to trust this analysis one has to relay on the infinite volume extrapolation. We will discuss the finite volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields.

  17. Results of volume-staged fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery for large complex arteriovenous malformations: obliteration rates and clinical outcomes of an evolving treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzin, Alberto; Panni, Pietro; Spatola, Giorgio; Vecchio, Antonella Del; Gallotti, Alberto L; Gigliotti, Carmen R; Cavalli, Andrea; Donofrio, Carmine A; Mortini, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    .024). CONCLUSIONS According to the results of this study, volume-staged GKRS is an effective and safe treatment strategy for large, complex, cerebral AVMs for which microsurgery or endovascular approaches could carry substantially higher risks to the patient. Radiation doses up to 20 Gy can be safely administered. The time interval between stages should be shorter than 11.7 months to increase the chance of obliteration. High nidal flow and a patient age younger than 44 years were factors associated with nidus obliteration and significant nidus reduction, respectively.

  18. Pediatric cardiac MRI: automated left-ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of manual adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Dankerl, Peter; Kammerer, Ferdinand J.; Uder, Michael; Rompel, Oliver [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Gloeckler, Martin; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac MRI is an accurate and reproducible technique for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and function. The accuracy of automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments have not been determined in children. To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments for left ventricular parameter quantification in pediatric cardiac MR images. Left ventricular parameters were evaluated in 45 children with suspected myocarditis (age 13.4 ± 3.5 years, range 4-17 years) who underwent cardiac MRI. Dedicated software was used to automatically segment and adjust the parameters. Results of end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, myocardial mass, and ejection fraction were documented before and after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment. The software successfully detected the left ventricle in 42 of 45 (93.3%) children; failures occurred in the smallest and youngest children. Of those 42 children, automatically segmented end-diastolic volume (EDV) was 151 ± 47 ml, and after apex/base adjustment it was 146 ± 45 ml, after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment 146 ± 45 ml. The corresponding results for end-systolic volume (ESV) were 66 ± 32 ml, 63 ± 29 ml and 64 ± 28 ml; for stroke volume (SV) they were 85 ± 25 ml, 83 ± 23 ml and 83 ± 23 ml; for ejection fracture (EF) they were 57 ± 10%, 58 ± 9% and 58 ± 9%, and for myocardial mass (MM) they were 104 ± 31 g, 95 ± 31 g and 94 ± 30 g. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the EDV/ESV/MM results, the EF results after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment and the SV results (except for comparing the SVs after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment). Automated segmentation for the evaluation of left ventricular parameters in pediatric MR images proved to be feasible. Automated segmentation + apex/base adjustment provided clinically

  19. A newly developed snack effective for enhancing bone volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Hidetaka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of primary osteoporosis is higher in Japan than in USA and European countries. Recently, the importance of preventive medicine has been gradually recognized in the field of orthopaedic surgery with a concept that peak bone mass should be increased in childhood as much as possible for the prevention of osteoporosis. Under such background, we have developed a new bean snack with an aim to improve bone volume loss. In this study, we examined the effects of a newly developed snack on bone volume and density in osteoporosis model mice. Methods Orchiectomy (ORX and ovariectomy (OVX were performed for C57BL/6J mice of twelve-week-old (Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbar, ME, USA were used in this experiment. We prepared and given three types of powder diet e.g.: normal calcium diet (NCD, Ca: 0.9%, Clea Japan Co., Tokyo, Japan, low calcium diet (LCD, Ca: 0.63%, Clea Japan Co., and special diet (SCD, Ca: 0.9%. Eighteen weeks after surgery, all the animals were sacrified and prepared for histomorphometric analysis to quantify bone density and bone mineral content. Results As a result of histomorphometric examination, SCD was revealed to enhance bone volume irrespective of age and sex. The bone density was increased significantly in osteoporosis model mice fed the newly developmental snack as compared with the control mice. The bone mineral content was also enhanced significantly. These phenomena were revealed in both sexes. Conclusion It is shown that the newly developed bean snack is highly effective for the improvement of bone volume loss irrespective of sex. We demonstrated that newly developmental snack supplements may be a useful preventive measure for Japanese whose bone mineral density values are less than the ideal condition.

  20. Effects of dietary fiber and feeding frequency on ruminal fermentation, digesta water-holding capacity, and fractional turnover of contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froetschel, M A; Amos, H E

    1991-03-01

    To determine the effects of different sources of fiber and feeding frequency on digesta water-holding capacity (WHC; g H2O/g DM) and ruminal liquid contents, four ruminally fistulated Jersey steers were fed a 60:40 roughage-concentrate diet at 1.5 times NEm. Diets contained either sorghum silage (SS) or a 67:33 mixture of SS and soyhulls (SH) as roughage and were fed either once or 12 times daily, in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment with 15-d periods. Ruminal fluid was sampled at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after a dose of Co-EDTA on d 10 and analyzed for Co, VFA, ammonia, buffering capacity, and osmolality. Ruminal WHC, NDF, ADF, lignin, and starch were measured in samples obtained by ruminal evacuation at 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after feeding on d 11, 12, 14, and 15, respectively. Substitution of SH for SS decreased ruminal pH .32 units and dilution rate by 26.8% but increased total VFA by 10.9%, osmolality by 13.6%, and the fractional turnover rate (FTR) of ADF by 22.5% (P less than .05). Frequent feeding resulted in 4.7, 21.9, and 74.4% increases in total VFA and FTR of ruminal DM and starch (P less than .05), respectively. Interactions (P less than .05) were observed between dietary fiber source and feeding frequency for ruminal fluid molar percentage acetate to propionate ratio (A/P), liquid volume (evacuated), and WHC (kilograms). Substituting SH for SS decreased ruminal WHC (kilograms), liquid volume, and A/P only in steers fed once daily. Ruminal WHC (kilograms) was correlated positively with ruminal liquid volume but negatively with DM FTR. The dynamics of digesta WHC (kilograms) associated with dietary fiber source and feeding frequency suggest that it may influence the contribution of water and salivary secretions to ruminal liquid contents.

  1. Assessment of the Reliability ofFractionator Column of the Kaduna Refinery using Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available —The reliability of a process equipment is the probability that an item will perform a required function under stated condition(s. It is an important issue in any process industry. Failure to assess the reliability of most process equipment had led to huge financial losses. As a result, this research aims at assessing the reliability of the Fractionator column of the Kaduna Refining and Petrochemicals (KRPC, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU, using the Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA. The failure mode effects analysis (FMEA was firstused to identify failure modes, mechanisms, cause, effects severity of the fractionator column through its fourteen (14 sub-units(fractionator primary condenser, bottoms product cooler, debutanizer oil condenser, main fractionator, main fractionator oil drum, main fractionator reflux drum, heavy naphtha exchanger, heavy cycle oil exchanger, bottoms exchanger, BFW heater, steam generator, stripper reboiler, debutanizer reboiler, top reflux pumps. Both quantitative and qualitative criticality analyses (CA were used to determine the effectiveness and reliability of the unit (Fractionator column. For the qualitative analysis, items risk priority number (RPN were computed and it was found that, six (6 of the sub-units (feed/ main fractionator bottoms exchanger, main fractionator reflux drum, main fractionator bottoms pumps, feed/ heavy naphtha exchanger, main fractionator, and main fractionator bottoms/BFW heater had their RPN>300, with feed/ main fractionator bottoms exchanger having the highest RPN of 460. For the quantitative analysis, items criticality number (Cr were computed and it was found that most of the sub-units had their Cr>0.002. In addition, the results of the criticality matrix showed that, fifteen (15 out of the twenty nine (29 failure modes identifiedwere above or closely below the criticality line. Therefore, the effectiveness and reliability of the unit is low. As such, sub

  2. Native T1 Relaxation Time and Extracellular Volume Fraction as Accurate Markers of Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in Heart Valve Disease - Comparison With Targeted Left Ventricular Myocardial Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockova, Radka; Kacer, Petr; Pirk, Jan; Maly, Jiri; Sukupova, Lucie; Sikula, Viktor; Kotrc, Martin; Barciakova, Lucia; Honsova, Eva; Maly, Marek; Kautzner, Josef; Sedmera, David; Penicka, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between the cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived native T1 relaxation time and myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) fraction and the extent of diffuse myocardial fibrosis (DMF) on targeted myocardial left ventricular (LV) biopsy. The study population consisted of 40 patients (age 63±8 years, 65% male) undergoing valve and/or ascending aorta surgery for severe aortic stenosis (77.5%), root dilatation (7.5%) or valve regurgitation (15%). The T1 relaxation time was assessed in the basal interventricular septum pre- and 10-min post-contrast administration using the modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery sequence prior to surgery. LV myocardial biopsy specimen was obtained during surgery from the basal interventricular septal segment matched with the T1 mapping assessment. The percentage of myocardial collagen was quantified using picrosirius red staining. The average percentage of myocardial collagen was 22.0±14.8%. Both native T1 relaxation time with cutoff value ≥1,010 ms (sensitivity=90%, specificity=73%, area under the curve=0.82) and ECV with cutoff value ≥0.32 (sensitivity=80%, specificity=90%, area under the curve=0.85) showed high accuracy to identify severe (>30%) DMF. The native T1 relaxation time showed significant correlation with LV mass (P<0.01). Native T1 relaxation time and ECV at 10 min after contrast administration are accurate markers of DMF. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1202-1209).

  3. The Debye temperature of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-. delta. and its dependence on the volume fraction of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Phillips, N.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Gordon, J.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Amherst Coll., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    Specific-heat measurements, on polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, YBCO, have shown sample-to-sample variations in the volume fraction of superconductivity, f{sub s}, which is correlated with the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments in the YBCO lattice. At low temperatures the lattice specific heat also varies with f{sub s}, but these variations do not persist above {approximately}20K. The low-temperature data show that {Theta}{sub 0}{sup {minus}3} varies linearly with f{sub 3}, and give values of 520 and 390K for {Theta}{sub o} for fully-superconducting and fully-normal'' YBCO, respectively. These results suggest that the long wavelength phonon modes are altered when Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments are present in the lattice. The fact that different samples have the same lattice specific heat at {approximately}20K and above T{sub c} indicates that the higher energy phonon modes are insensitive to these Cu{sup 2+} moments.

  4. The Debye temperature of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and its dependence on the volume fraction of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Phillips, N.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Gordon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Amherst Coll., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1991-12-01

    Specific-heat measurements, on polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, YBCO, have shown sample-to-sample variations in the volume fraction of superconductivity, f{sub s}, which is correlated with the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments in the YBCO lattice. At low temperatures the lattice specific heat also varies with f{sub s}, but these variations do not persist above {approximately}20K. The low-temperature data show that {Theta}{sub 0}{sup {minus}3} varies linearly with f{sub 3}, and give values of 520 and 390K for {Theta}{sub o} for fully-superconducting and ``fully-normal`` YBCO, respectively. These results suggest that the long wavelength phonon modes are altered when Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments are present in the lattice. The fact that different samples have the same lattice specific heat at {approximately}20K and above T{sub c} indicates that the higher energy phonon modes are insensitive to these Cu{sup 2+} moments.

  5. Large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations for phase coarsening at ultrahigh volume fraction on high-performance architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Wang, K. G.; Jones, Jim E.

    2016-06-01

    A parallel algorithm for large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations of phase coarsening is developed and implemented on high-performance architectures. From the large-scale simulations, a new kinetics in phase coarsening in the region of ultrahigh volume fraction is found. The parallel implementation is capable of harnessing the greater computer power available from high-performance architectures. The parallelized code enables increase in three-dimensional simulation system size up to a 5123 grid cube. Through the parallelized code, practical runtime can be achieved for three-dimensional large-scale simulations, and the statistical significance of the results from these high resolution parallel simulations are greatly improved over those obtainable from serial simulations. A detailed performance analysis on speed-up and scalability is presented, showing good scalability which improves with increasing problem size. In addition, a model for prediction of runtime is developed, which shows a good agreement with actual run time from numerical tests.

  6. Understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional quantum hall effect state.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Crawford, Matthew; Tallakulam, Madhu; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2010-10-01

    We wish to present in this report experimental results from a one-year Senior Council Tier-1 LDRD project that focused on understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall effect state. We first give a general introduction to the quantum Hall effect, and then present the experimental results on the edge-state transport in a special fractional quantum Hall effect state at Landau level filling {nu} = 5/2 - a possible non-Abelian quantum Hall state. This state has been at the center of current basic research due to its potential applications in fault-resistant topological quantum computation. We will also describe the semiconductor 'Hall-bar' devices we used in this project. Electron physics in low dimensional systems has been one of the most exciting fields in condensed matter physics for many years. This is especially true of quantum Hall effect (QHE) physics, which has seen its intellectual wealth applied in and has influenced many seemingly unrelated fields, such as the black hole physics, where a fractional QHE-like phase has been identified. Two Nobel prizes have been awarded for discoveries of quantum Hall effects: in 1985 to von Klitzing for the discovery of integer QHE, and in 1998 to Tsui, Stormer, and Laughlin for the discovery of fractional QHE. Today, QH physics remains one of the most vibrant research fields, and many unexpected novel quantum states continue to be discovered and to surprise us, such as utilizing an exotic, non-Abelian FQHE state at {nu} = 5/2 for fault resistant topological computation. Below we give a briefly introduction of the quantum Hall physics.

  7. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, [Formula: see text], where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians

  8. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, π(d2)2, where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians (interquartile range

  9. Growth-promoting effects of different fractions of extra-embryonic coelomic fluid on embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, A K; Layfield, R; Pratten, M K

    2000-08-01

    In the early stages of embryonic development, many growth-promoting molecules must be provided by the maternal system. These factors may be supplied locally to the embryo, by the decidua, the placenta, or the yolk sac. In this study the growth-promoting potential of extra-embryonic coelomic fluid (EECF) and its fractions was investigated. The embryonic requirement of growth-promoting molecules may be studied by reducing the growth-supporting capacity of serum. Thus, ultrafiltration of rat serum was carried out for 8 h using Millipore filters with a molecular weight exclusion of 30 kDa. Rat embryos at 9.5 days of age were cultured for 8 days for anembryonic yolk sacs, and then EECF was collected and divided into three different molecular weight fractions by ultrafiltration. Rat embryos were cultured for 48 h in whole rat serum and the serum retenate (which has low growth-supporting capacity) in the presence and absence of EECF, its fractions, or in EECF only. Embryos grown in retenate showed severe growth retardation, and the addition of EECF significantly improved embryonic growth. The fraction which contained the molecules with molecular weight between 10 and 30 kDa had significantly more effect on embryonic development than the other fractions. This fraction of EECF was analysed by gel electrophoresis. Three of the four protein bands observed in this fraction were identified by amino-terminal sequencing as alpha-fetoprotein precursor (22 kDa), apolipoprotein A1 precursor (24 kDa) and fetal haemoglobin Y2 chain (14 kDa), none of which are likely to be responsible for the growth-promoting activity. To further investigate growth-promoting proteins, EECF was Western-blotted to nitrocellulose membranes and probed with antisera against rat prolactin, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factors I and II and human placental lactogen. No immunoreactive bands were detected in the EECF, suggesting that either these proteins are not present or are present at levels

  10. Effect of initial fraction of cooperators on cooperative behavior in evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo Shigaki

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of initial fraction of cooperators on the evolution of cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma games. Compared with the results of heterogeneous networks, we find that there is a relatively low initial fraction of cooperators to guarantee higher equilibrium cooperative level. While this interesting phenomenon is contrary to the commonly shared knowledge that higher initial fraction of cooperators can provide better environment for the evolution of cooperation. To support our outcome, we explore the time courses of cooperation and find that the whole course can be divided into two sequent stages: enduring (END and expanding (EXP periods. At the end of END period, thought there is a limited number of cooperator clusters left for the case of low initial setup, these clusters can smoothly expand to hold the whole system in the EXP period. However, for high initial fraction of cooperators, superfluous cooperator clusters hinder their effective expansion, which induces many remaining defectors surrounding the cooperator clusters. Moreover, through intensive analysis, we also demonstrate that when the tendency of three cooperation cluster characteristics (cluster size, cluster number and cluster shape are consistent within END and EXP periods, the state that maximizes cooperation can be favored.

  11. Effect of initial fraction of cooperators on cooperative behavior in evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Keizo; Wang, Zhen; Tanimoto, Jun; Fukuda, Eriko

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the influence of initial fraction of cooperators on the evolution of cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma games. Compared with the results of heterogeneous networks, we find that there is a relatively low initial fraction of cooperators to guarantee higher equilibrium cooperative level. While this interesting phenomenon is contrary to the commonly shared knowledge that higher initial fraction of cooperators can provide better environment for the evolution of cooperation. To support our outcome, we explore the time courses of cooperation and find that the whole course can be divided into two sequent stages: enduring (END) and expanding (EXP) periods. At the end of END period, thought there is a limited number of cooperator clusters left for the case of low initial setup, these clusters can smoothly expand to hold the whole system in the EXP period. However, for high initial fraction of cooperators, superfluous cooperator clusters hinder their effective expansion, which induces many remaining defectors surrounding the cooperator clusters. Moreover, through intensive analysis, we also demonstrate that when the tendency of three cooperation cluster characteristics (cluster size, cluster number and cluster shape) are consistent within END and EXP periods, the state that maximizes cooperation can be favored.

  12. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Samer George, E-mail: samer.hakim@mkg-chir.mu-luebeck.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Benedek, Geza Attila [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Su Yuxiong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guanghua (China); Jacobsen, Hans Christian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Klinger, Matthias [Institute of Anatomy, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Dendorfer, Andreas [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Hemmelmann, Claudia [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Meller, Birgit [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Sieg, Peter [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  13. Effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons or photons on the canine brain: evaluation by computerized tomography and evoked response recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.W.; Davis, D.O.; Gaskill, J.W.; Deye, J.A.; Fisher, M.P.; Sloan, G.E.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-12-01

    The use of fast neutrons in the treatment of cancer necessitates a knowledge of the normal tissue responses. This study was designed to compare the late effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons with fractionated doses of photons on canine brains by evoked response recording and viewing computerized tomograms (CT). A relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 4 was obtained for normal brain tissue assessed by mortality and onset of neurologic symptoms. Every three months post-irradiation, visual and sensory evoked responses were recorded. Changes over time appeared to be minimal; however, computerized tomographs showed marked brain shrinkage. A method of quantitating cerebrospinal fluid and parenchymal volumes from scans is described and future use of these CT ratios to generate dose response curves and RBE values is postulated.

  14. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation: Effect of temperature and added salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpabooth, K.; Osuwan, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Petroleum and Petrochemical Coll.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Harwell, J.H. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Applied Surfactant Research

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant present at low concentrations in aqueous streams. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used, and three surfactants were chosen for this study: sodium dodecyl sulfate, cetylpyridinium chloride, and sodium n-hexadecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate. In a previous study the effects of surfactant concentration, air flow rate, liquid- and vapor-phase heights, and sparger type were investigated for these surfactants. Here, the effects of temperature and added salt are studied. It is found that the foam flow rate and enrichment ratio increase whereas the foam wetness and the rate of surfactant recovery decrease with increasing temperature. Increasing the concentration of added salt decreases the CMC of the surfactants. The foam flow rate, foam wetness, and the rate of surfactant recovery increase, while the enrichment ratio decreases with increasing concentration of salt.

  15. Olive oil and health effects: from epidemiological studies to the molecular mechanisms of phenolic fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiot Marie Josèphe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil is a key component of the Mediterranean diet which is recognized to contribute to its health benefits. Recent prospective studies point towards a protective effect from an olive oil-rich diet in relation to the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and an improvement of cardiometabolic markers such as blood pressure, glycaemia and dyslipidemia, notably by reducing LDL cholesterol and LDL oxidation. The role of minor phenolic fraction was evidenced in intervention trials where lipid profiles showed greater improvement in participants receiving olive oil with higher phenolic content. The phenolic fraction of olive oil is composed of simple phenols (hydroxytyrosol, phenolic secoiridoids (oleuropein aglycone, lignans (pinoresinol, flavonoids and hydroxyisochromans. All these compounds have diverse biological activities that are described in the present review, supporting the protective effects of olive oil against degenerative diseases found in large cohorts monitored in Southern European countries.

  16. The effect of Toxoplasma cell fractions and mycobacterial immunostimulants against virulent Toxoplasma gondii in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masihi, K N; Brehmer, W; Werner, H

    1979-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites were disrupted in a Ribi cell fractionator and separated into cell walls and protoplasm by differential centrifugation. These products were used alone or combined with a mycobacterial glycolipid (P3) and injected either as oil-in-water emulsions or incorporated in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Mice were vaccinated by intravenous or intradermal routes and challenged intraperitoneally with a highly virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii. A local granuloma formation was induced after i.d. inoculation of Toxoplasma vaccines containing P3 as this glycolipid enabled an adherence of the antigens on the mineral oil droplets. The adjuvant effect of P3 on antibody formation was also observed. Most of the fractions showed a low, but statistically significant prolongation of survival time. Vaccination by the i.v. route with homologous or heterologous antigens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, were not significantly effective, with the exception of a high dose of Toxoplasma protoplasm associated with P3.

  17. Multiple satellite estimates of urban fractions and climate effects at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, G.; Xu, R.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Regional climate is controlled by large scale forcing at lateral boundary and physical processes within the region. Landuse in East Asia has been changed substantially in the last three decades, featured with expansion of urban built-up at unprecedented scale and speed. The fast expansion of urban areas could contribute to local even regional climate change. However, current spatial datasets of urban fractions do not well represent extend and expansion of urban areas in the regions, and the best available satellite data and remote sensing techniques have not been well applied to serve regional modeling of urbanization impacts on near surface temperature and other climate variables. Better estimates of localized urban fractions and urban climate effects are badly needed. Here we use high and mid resolution satellite data to estimate urban fractions and to assess effects of urban heat islands at local and regional scales. With our fractional cover, data fusion, and differentiated threshold approaches, estimated urban extent was greater than previously reported in many global datasets. Many city clusters were merging into each other, with gradual blurring boundaries and disappearing of gaps among member cities. Cities and towns were more connected with roads and commercial corridors, while wildland and urban greens became more isolated as patches among built-up areas. Those new estimates are expected to effectively improve climate simulation at local and regional scales in East Asia. There were significant positive relations between urban fraction and urban heat island effects as demonstrated by VNIR and TIR data from multiple satellites. Stronger warming was detected at the meteorological stations that experienced greater urbanization, i.e., those with a higher urbanization rate. While the total urban area affects the absolute temperature values, the change of the urban area (urbanization rate) likely affects the temperature trend. Increases of approximately 10% in

  18. Correction to "What is a fractional derivative?" by Ortigueira and Machado [Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 293, 15 July 2015, Pages 4-13. Special issue on Fractional PDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katugampola, Udita N.

    2016-09-01

    There is a debate among contemporary mathematicians about what it really means by a fractional derivative. The question arose as a consequence of introducing a 'new' definition of a fractional derivative in [1]. In a reply, Ortigueira and Machado [2] came up with several very important criteria to determine whether a given derivative is a fractional derivative. According to their criterion, the new fractional derivative, called conformable fractional derivative, introduced by Khalil et al. [1] turns out not to be a fractional derivative, but rather a controlled or conformable derivative. In proving the claim the authors in [2] use an example [2, p. 6]. It turns out that the explanation given there needs some corrections and it is the sole purpose of this note.

  19. Specific heat in the second Landau level fractional quantum Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, B. A.; Bennaceur, K.; Gaucher, S.; Gervais, G.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Specific heat has had an important role in the study of superfluidity and superconductivity, and could provide important information on the fractional quantum Hall effect as well. However, tra- ditional measurements of the specific heat of a two-dimensional electron gas are difficult due to the large background contribution of the phonon bath, even at very low temperatures. Here, we report measurements of the specific heat per electron of a single two-dimensional electron gas with no contribu...

  20. Non relativistic diffeomorphism and the geometry of the fractional quantum Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Rabin

    2015-01-01

    We show that our recently proposed method\\cite{BMM1,BMM2,BMM3,BM4} of constructing nonrelativistic diffeomorphism invariant field theories by gauging the Galilean symmetry provides a natural connection with the geometry of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). Specifically, the covariant derivative that appears on gauging, exactly reproduces the form that yields the Hall viscosity and Wen-Zee shift \\cite{CYF}.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Agrimoniin-Enriched Fractions of Potentilla erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hoffmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Potentilla erecta (PE is a small herbaceous plant with four yellow petals belonging to the Rosaceae family. The rhizome of PE has traditionally been used as an antidiarrheal, hemostatic and antihemorrhoidal remedy. PE contains up to 20% tannins and 5% ellagitannins, mainly agrimoniin. Agrimoniin is a hydrolyzable tannin that is a potent radical scavenger. In this study we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of four PE fractions with increasing amounts of agrimoniin obtained by Sephadex column separation. First, we analyzed in HaCaT keratinocytes the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 induced by ultraviolet-B (UVB irradiation. As COX-2 catalyzes the metabolism of arachidonic acid to prostanoids such as PGE2, we also measured the PGE2 concentration in cell culture supernatants. PE inhibited UVB-induced COX-2 expression in HaCaT cells and dose-dependently reduced PGE2. The PE fraction with the highest agrimoniin amount (PE4 was the most effective in this experiment, whereas fraction PE1 containing mainly sugars had no effect. PE4 also dose dependently inhibited the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR which plays a crucial role in UVB-mediated COX-2 upregulation. A placebo-controlled UV-erythema study with increasing concentrations of PE4 demonstrated a dose dependent inhibition of UVB-induced inflammation in vivo. Similarly, PE4 significantly reduced UVB-induced PGE2 production in suction blister fluid in vivo. In summary, PE fractions with a high agrimoniin content display anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo in models of UVB-induced inflammation.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Agrimoniin-Enriched Fractions of Potentilla erecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Julia; Casetti, Federica; Bullerkotte, Ute; Haarhaus, Birgit; Vagedes, Jan; Schempp, Christoph M; Wölfle, Ute

    2016-06-18

    Potentilla erecta (PE) is a small herbaceous plant with four yellow petals belonging to the Rosaceae family. The rhizome of PE has traditionally been used as an antidiarrheal, hemostatic and antihemorrhoidal remedy. PE contains up to 20% tannins and 5% ellagitannins, mainly agrimoniin. Agrimoniin is a hydrolyzable tannin that is a potent radical scavenger. In this study we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of four PE fractions with increasing amounts of agrimoniin obtained by Sephadex column separation. First, we analyzed in HaCaT keratinocytes the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation. As COX-2 catalyzes the metabolism of arachidonic acid to prostanoids such as PGE₂, we also measured the PGE₂ concentration in cell culture supernatants. PE inhibited UVB-induced COX-2 expression in HaCaT cells and dose-dependently reduced PGE₂. The PE fraction with the highest agrimoniin amount (PE4) was the most effective in this experiment, whereas fraction PE1 containing mainly sugars had no effect. PE4 also dose dependently inhibited the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) which plays a crucial role in UVB-mediated COX-2 upregulation. A placebo-controlled UV-erythema study with increasing concentrations of PE4 demonstrated a dose dependent inhibition of UVB-induced inflammation in vivo. Similarly, PE4 significantly reduced UVB-induced PGE₂ production in suction blister fluid in vivo. In summary, PE fractions with a high agrimoniin content display anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo in models of UVB-induced inflammation.

  3. Effect of volume expansion on systemic hemodynamics and central and arterial blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    and in controls. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with cirrhosis (12 patients with Child-Turcotte class A, 14 with class B, and 13 with class C) and 6 controls were studied. During hepatic vein catheterization, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, central and arterial blood volume, noncentral blood volume...

  4. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  5. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  6. Antimicrobial effects of Piper hispidum extract, fractions and chalcones against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G M; Endo, E H; Cortez, D A G; Nakamura, T U; Nakamura, C V; Dias Filho, B P

    2016-09-01

    Three chalcones, 2'-hydroxy-4,4',6'-trimethoxychalcone, 2'-hydroxy-4,4',6'-tetramethoxychalcone, and 3,2'-dihydroxy-4,4',6'-trimethoxychalcone, were isolated from the leaves of Piper hispidum in a bioguided fractionation of crude extract. The antimicrobial activity of crude extract of P. hispidum leaves was determined against bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and yeasts Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. Fractions and chalcones were tested against C. albicans and S. aureus. The checkerboard assay was performed to assess synergic interactions between extract and antifungal drugs, and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay was used to evaluate anti-biofilm effects of extract. The extract was active against yeasts, S. aureus and B. subtilis with MIC values between 15.6 and 62.5μg/mL. Synergistic effects of extract associated with fluconazole and nystatin were observed against C. albicans, with fractional inhibitory concentration indices of 0.37 and 0.24, respectively. The extract was also effective against C. albicans and S. aureus biofilm cells at concentrations of 62.5 and 200μg/mL, respectively. Thus, P. hispidum may be a possible source of bioactive substances with antimicrobial properties.

  7. Extraction, identification, fractionation and isolation of phenolic compounds in plants with hepatoprotective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-03-15

    The liver is one of the most important organs of human body, being involved in several vital functions and regulation of physiological processes. Given its pivotal role in the excretion of waste metabolites and drugs detoxification, the liver is often subjected to oxidative stress that leads to lipid peroxidation and severe cellular damage. The conventional treatments of liver diseases such as cirrhosis, fatty liver and chronic hepatitis are frequently inadequate due to side effects caused by hepatotoxic chemical drugs. To overcome this problematic paradox, medicinal plants, owing to their natural richness in phenolic compounds, have been intensively exploited concerning their extracts and fraction composition in order to find bioactive compounds that could be isolated and applied in the treatment of liver ailments. The present review aimed to collect the main results of recent studies carried out in this field and systematize the information for a better understanding of the hepatoprotective capacity of medicinal plants in in vitro and in vivo systems. Generally, the assessed plant extracts revealed good hepatoprotective properties, justifying the fractionation and further isolation of phenolic compounds from different parts of the plant. Twenty-five phenolic compounds, including flavonoids, lignan compounds, phenolic acids and other phenolic compounds, have been isolated and identified, and proved to be effective in the prevention and/or treatment of chemically induced liver damage. In this perspective, the use of medicinal plant extracts, fractions and phenolic compounds seems to be a promising strategy to avoid side effects caused by hepatotoxic chemicals.

  8. Effect of Drying on Heavy Metal Fraction Distribution in Rice Paddy Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yanbing; Huang, Biao; Darilek, Jeremy Landon

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how redox conditions affect soil heavy metal fractions in rice paddies is important due to its implications for heavy metal mobility and plant uptake. Rice paddy soil samples routinely undergo oxidation prior to heavy metal analysis. Fraction distribution of Cu, Pb, Ni, and Cd from paddy soil with a wide pH range was investigated. Samples were both dried according to standard protocols and also preserved under anaerobic conditions through the sampling and analysis process and heavy metals were then sequentially extracted for the exchangeable and carbonate bound fraction (acid soluble fraction), iron and manganese oxide bound fraction (reducible fraction), organic bound fraction (oxidizable fraction), and residual fraction. Fractions were affected by redox conditions across all pH ranges. Drying decreased reducible fraction of all heavy metals. Curesidual fraction, Pboxidizable fraction, Cdresidual fraction, and Niresidual fraction increased by 25%, 33%, 35%, and >60%, respectively. Pbresidual fraction, Niacid soluble fraction, and Cdoxidizable fraction decreased 33%, 25%, and 15%, respectively. Drying paddy soil prior to heavy metal analysis overestimated Pb and underestimated Cu, Ni, and Cd. In future studies, samples should be stored after injecting N2 gas to maintain the redox potential of soil prior to heavy metal analysis, and investigate the correlation between heavy metal fraction distribution under field conditions and air-dried samples. PMID:24823670

  9. Assessment of anxiolytic and panicolytic effects of dichloromethane fraction from stems of Kielmeyera coriacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesdorf, C; Cortez, D A G; Audi, E A

    2012-02-15

    Kielmeyera coriacea Mart. (Calophyllaceae) is known popularly as "Pau Santo". The hydroethanolic extract (HE) of Kielmeyera coriacea stems and its semi-pure dichloromethane (DCM) constituent produced an antidepressant-like effect in rats. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of repeated administration (21 days) by gavage of the DCM fraction (5, 10 or 15mg/kg) in rats submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM), a model of generalized anxiety and panic disorders. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (15mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Rat locomotion was assessed using the open field test (OFT) following each drug treatment. The 2-hydroxy-1-methoxyxanthone (1), aucuparin (2), swertinin (3), 1,3,7-trihydroxy-2-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-xanthone (4) and 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-xanthone (5) were identified in DCM fraction, and suggest that the xanthone (4) is related with the antidepressant-like profile of this plant. Pharmacological evaluation showed that DCM fraction (10 and 15 mg/kg) decreased the inhibitory avoidance latency from the closed arm and increased the one-way escape latency from the open arm in the ETM, which is indicative of anxiolytic and panicolytic effects, respectively, as occurs with the positive control, imipramine (15 mg/kg), when compared to their control group (vehicle). Locomotor activity was not significantly altered by the different treatments. This study suggests that the DCM fraction from stems of Kielmeyera coriacea can be an important therapeutic alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, such as generalized anxiety and panic disorders.

  10. Efficient and Effective Volume Visualization with Enhanced Isosurface Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fei; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Compared with full volume rendering, isosurface rendering has several well recognized advantages in efficiency and accuracy. However, standard isosurface rendering has some limitations in effectiveness. First, it uses a monotone colored approach and can only visualize the geometry features of an isosurface. The lack of the capability to illustrate the material property and the internal structures behind an isosurface has been a big limitation of this method in applications. Another limitation of isosurface rendering is the difficulty to reveal physically meaningful structures, which are hidden in one or multiple isosurfaces. As such, the application requirements of extract and recombine structures of interest can not be implemented effectively with isosurface rendering. In this work, we develop an enhanced isosurface rendering technique to improve the effectiveness while maintaining the performance efficiency of the standard isosurface rendering. First, an isosurface color enhancement method is proposed to il...

  11. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  12. [Effect of Nano Zeolite on Chemical Fractions of Cd in Soil and Its Uptake by Cabbage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shi-juan; Xu, Wei-hong; Xie, Wen-wen; Chen, Rong; Chen, Yong-qin; Chi, Sun-lin; Chen, Xu- gen; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Xiong, Zhi-ting; Wang, Zheng-yin; Xie, De-ti

    2015-12-01

    Incubation experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different nano zeolite (NZ) and ordinary zeolite (OZ) levels(0, 5, 10 and 20 g · kg⁻¹) on the change trends in fraction distribution coefficient (FDC) of Cd when exposed to different Cadmium (Cd) levels (1, 5, 10 and 15 mg · kg⁻¹), and pot experiments were carried out to investigate their influence on soil Cd fraction and Cd uptake by cabbage. The results in incubation experiments showed that the application of nano zeolite as well as ordinary zeolite effectively decreased the FDC of exchangeable Cd and increased the FDC of Fe-Mn oxide fraction. The FDC of soil Cd from 0 d to 28 d was deceased at first, then increased and tended to be stable, and finally increased. At the end of incubation, the FDC of soil exchangeable Cd decreased from 72.0%-88.0% to 30.0%-66.4%. Exchangeable fraction Cd was the most dominant Cd fraction in soil during the whole incubation. The results in pot experiment indicated that the application of nano zeolite and ordinary zeolite decreased the concentration and FDC of soil exchangeable Cd, and concurrently the concentration and FDC of Cd in carbonate, Fe-Mn oxide, organic matter and residual fraction were increased. The lowest EX-Cd was observed in the treatment with high dose of nano zeolite (20 g · kg⁻¹). The FDC of exchangeable Cd showed significant negative relationship with the soil pH (P zeolite when exposed to 5 mg · kg⁻¹ 1 and Cd, respectively; FDC of exchangeable Cd decreased by 16.3%-47.7% and 16.2%-46.7%; Cd concentration in each tissues of cabbage decreased by 1.0%-75.0% and 3.8%-53.2%, respectively. Moreover, the reduction effect of nano zeolite on soil and plant Cd was better than that of ordinary zeolite. The growth of cabbage was stimulated by low and medium zeolite doses (≤ 10 g · kg⁻¹), while inhibited by high zeolite doses (20 g · kg⁻¹). Compared to ordinary zeolite, the biomass of Chinese cabbage was significantly increased

  13. Role of galloylation and polymerization in cytoprotective effects of polyphenolic fractions against hydrogen peroxide insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitjans, Montserrat; Ugartondo, Vanessa; Martínez, Verónica; Touriño, Sonia; Torres, Josep L; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2011-03-09

    Byproducts and wastes generated by agricultural, food, and forestry industries contain large amounts of polyphenols, which can be potentially used as sources of natural or semisynthetic antioxidants. This study examined and compared the protection against peroxidative damage induced in erythrocytes and 3T3 cell line of polyphenolic fractions from white grape pomace, pine bark, and witch hazel bark. The work pays special attention to the different degrees of polymerization and galloylation of the extracts to contribute to the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Fractions demonstrated different protections against erythrocyte lipid peroxidation, hemolysis, and 3T3 cytotoxicity caused by H(2)O(2). Galloylation is claimed to be related to antioxidant protective capacity, and it is also responsible for the pro-oxidant effect observed at high doses. The results show that not only the percentage of galloylation but also the degree of polymerization are important modulators of their antioxidant capacity. In this sense, it is crucial that novel polyphenolic fractions were prepared attending a value of 3 for the mean degree of polymerization and did not exceed a 30% of galloylation to reach the highest antioxidant capacity with the lowest cytotoxic effects. For this reason, the grape extracts appear to be the best strategy to fight against hydrogen peroxide cell damage.

  14. Radiation effects of UHMW-PE fibre on gel fraction and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yanning [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Jilin 136000 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Mouhua [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); Tang Zhongfeng [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu Guozhong, E-mail: wuguozhong@sinap.ac.c [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The effect of gamma ray irradiation on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) fibre was investigated for the change of gel fraction, mechanical properties, and morphology of crystallites. In the case of irradiation in air, the oxidation was limited to the fibre surface where the gel fraction decreased by chain scission, and the depth of the oxidation area from the surface was estimated to be 2 {mu}m. Tensile tests showed similar stress-strain curves for irradiation in vacuum or in air, but the elongation at break decreased more obviously for irradiation in air. The oxidation products, such as carboxylic acids, were detected by FTIR measurement. However, the DSC and XRD analyses indicated little change of crystallinity on irradiation in vacuum or in air. The oxidation was limited to a thin surface area on irradiation in air due to a low migration rate of the radicals trapped in the crystallite in the UHMW-PE fibre.

  15. Diffusion of multiple species with excluded-volume effects

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic models of diffusion with excluded-volume effects are used to model many biological and physical systems at a discrete level. The average properties of the population may be described by a continuum model based on partial differential equations. In this paper we consider multiple interacting subpopulations/species and study how the inter-species competition emerges at the population level. Each individual is described as a finite-size hard core interacting particle undergoing Brownian motion. The link between the discrete stochastic equations of motion and the continuum model is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The system for two species leads to a nonlinear cross-diffusion system for each subpopulation, which captures the enhancement of the effective diffusion rate due to excluded-volume interactions between particles of the same species, and the diminishment due to particles of the other species. This model can explain two alternative notions of the diffusion coefficient that are often confounded, namely collective diffusion and self-diffusion. Simulations of the discrete system show good agreement with the analytic results. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Assessment of changes in vascularity and blood volume in canine sarcomas and squamous cell carcinomas during fractionated radiation therapy using quantified contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bley, Carla Rohrer; Laluhová, Dagmar; Roos, Malgorzata; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    Radiation therapy does not only target tumour cells but also affects tumour vascularity. In the present study, changes in tumour vascularity and blood volume were investigated in five grade 1 oral fibrosarcomas, eight other sarcomas (non-oral soft tissue and bone sarcomas) and 12 squamous cell carcinomas in dogs during fractionated radiation therapy (total dose, 45-56 Gy). Contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound was performed before fraction 1, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 15 or 16 (sarcomas) or 17 (squamous cell carcinomas). Prior to treatment, median vascularity and blood volume were significantly higher in squamous cell carcinomas (P=0.0005 and 0.001), whereas measurements did not differ between oral fibrosarcomas and other sarcomas (P=0.88 and 0.999). During the course of radiation therapy, only small, non-significant changes in vascularity and blood volume were observed in all three tumour histology groups (P=0.08 and P=0.213), whereas median tumour volume significantly decreased until the end of treatment (P=0.04 for fibrosarcomas and other sarcomas, P=0.008 for squamous cell carcinomas). It appeared that there was a proportional decrease in tumour volume, vascularity and blood volume. Doppler measurements did not predict progression free interval or survival in any of the three tumour groups (P=0.06-0.86). However, the number of tumours investigated was small and therefore, the results can only be considered preliminary.

  17. Effect of weight loss on magnetic resonance imaging estimation of liver fat and volume in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Niraj S; Doycheva, Iliana; Peterson, Michael R; Hooker, Jonathan; Kisselva, Tatiana; Schnabl, Bernd; Seki, Ekihiro; Sirlin, Claude B; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about how weight loss affects magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liver fat and volume or liver histology in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We measured changes in liver fat and liver volume associated with weight loss by using an advanced MRI method. We analyzed data collected from a previous randomized controlled trial in which 43 adult patients with biopsy-proven NASH underwent clinical evaluation, biochemical tests, and MRI and liver biopsy analyses at the start of the study and after 24 weeks. We compared data between patients who did and did not have at least 5% decrease in body mass index (BMI) during the study period. Ten of 43 patients had at least a 5% decrease in BMI during the study period. These patients had a significant decrease in liver fat, which was based on MRI proton density fat fraction estimates (18.3% ± 7.6% to 13.6% ± 13.6%, P = .03), a relative 25.5% reduction. They also had a significant decrease in liver volume (5.3%). However, no significant changes in levels of alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase were observed with weight loss. Thirty-three patients without at least 5% decrease in BMI had insignificant increases in estimated liver fat fraction and liver volume. A reduction in BMI of at least 5% is associated with significant decrease in liver fat and volume in patients with biopsy-proven NASH. These data should be considered in assessing effect size in studies of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or obesity that use MRI-estimated liver fat and volume as end points. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physics Nobel Prize Goes to Tsui, Stormer and Laughlin for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzschild, Bertram

    1998-12-15

    This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is shared by Robert Laughlin (Stanford), Horst Stormer (Columbia University and Bell Laboratories) and Daniel Tsui (Princeton), for their roles in the discovery and explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. In 1982, when Stormer and Tsui were experimenters at Bell Labs, they and their colleague Arthur Gossard discovered this totally unexpected quantum effect in the transport properties of two‐dimensional electron gases at low temperature in strong magnetic fields.’ (See PHYSICS TODAY, July 1983, page 19.)

  19. Kinetics of hydrodesulfurization of dimethyldibenzothiophenes in a gas oil narrow-cut fraction and solvent effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laredo, Georgina C.; Cortes, Carlos M. [Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central LazaroCardenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, D.F. 07730 Mexico City (Mexico)

    2003-10-15

    The hydrodesulfurization kinetics of the dimethyldibenzothiophenes lump (DMDBTs) presented in a narrow-cut gas oil fraction at conditions commonly used in the hydrotreating of diesel feedstocks, has been experimentally determined. In order to obtain experimental data at different DMDBTs concentrations, octadecane was used as a solvent. During the mathematical treatment of the data, an inhibiting matrix effect due to the sulfur compounds themselves and octadecane was observed. These inhibitory effects were quantitatively represented by introducing the apparent adsorption constants K{sub D}[D] and K{sub sol}[S]{sup 2} into the denominator of a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood type rate equation.

  20. Volumizing effects of a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid volumizing filler: prospective European study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facial volume loss contributes significantly to facial aging. The 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid (HA formulation used in this study is a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, fully reversible, volumizing filler indicated to restore facial volume. This first prospective study evaluated use in current aesthetic clinical practice. Methods A pan-European evaluation conducted under guidelines of the World Association of Opinion and Marketing Research, the trial comprised a baseline visit (visit 1 and a follow-up (visit 2 at 14 ± 7 days posttreatment. Physicians photographed patients at each visit. Each patient was treated with the 20-mg/mL HA volumizing filler as supplied in standard packaging. Procedural details, aesthetic outcomes, safety, and physician and patient ratings of their experience were recorded. Results Fifteen physicians and 70 patients (91% female; mean age: 50 years participated. Mean volume loss at baseline was 3.7 (moderate on the Facial Volume Loss Scale. Local anesthesia was used in 64.3% of cases. Most injections (85% were administered with needles rather than cannulas. Of the 208 injections, 59% were in the malar region, primarily above the periosteum. Subcutaneous injections were most common for other sites. The mean total injection volume per patient was 4.6 mL. The mean volume loss score declined significantly (P Conclusion The 20-mg/mL smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, volumizing HA filler was effective, well tolerated, and easy to use in current clinical practice. Participants were very likely to recommend this product to colleagues and friends, and patients would be very or quite likely to request this product for future treatments.

  1. Incorporating the effect of fractionation in the evaluation of proton plan robustness to setup errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Matthew; Albertini, Francesca; Aitkenhead, Adam; Lomax, Antony J.; MacKay, Ranald I.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure the safe delivery of proton therapy treatments it is important to evaluate the effect of potential uncertainties, such as patient mispositioning, on the intended dose distribution. However, it can be expected that the uncertainty resulting from patient positioning is reduced in a fractionated treatment due to the convergence of random variables with the delivery of repeated treatments. This is neglected by current approaches to robustness analysis resulting in an overly conservative assessment of the robustness which can lead to sub-optimal plans. Here, a fast method of accounting for this reduced uncertainty is presented. An estimated bound to the error in the dose distribution resulting from setup uncertainty over a specified number of fractions is calculated by considering the distribution of values for each voxel across 14 initial error scenarios. The bound on the error in a given voxel is estimated using a 99.9% confidence limit assuming a convergence towards a normal distribution in line with the central limit theorem, and a correction of 1/\\sqrt{n} accounting for the reduction in the standard deviation over n fractions. The proposed method was validated in 5 patients by comparison to Monte Carlo simulations of 300 treatment courses. A voxelwise and volumetric analysis of the estimated and simulated bounds to the uncertainty in the dose distribution demonstrate that the proposed technique can be used to assess proton plan robustness more accurately allowing for less conservative treatment plans.

  2. Metoprolol does not effect myocardial fractional flow reserve in patients with intermediate coronary stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Yazici, Guliz Erdem; Turkoglu, Sedat; Timurkaynak, Timur; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-07-01

    Myocardial fractional flow reserve (FFR) is utilized to determine the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenoses. We sought to determine the effect, if any, of metoprolol on FFR in patients with coronary stenoses of intermediate severity. Eighteen patients (10 males, mean age, 59.4 +/- 7.7 years) with isolated, intermediate (30% to 70% narrowing on coronary angiogram) lesions on the proximal LAD and a preserved ejection fraction, underwent FFR measurement using a 0.014 inch pressurewire and intracoronary adenosine injection before and after intravenous metoprolol at a dose that achieved at least a 10% decrease in the heart rate. Heart rate dropped significantly with metoprolol. At the premetoprolol measurement, aortic pressure (Pa) remained essentially the same (105.7 +/- 11.5 versus 105.6 +/- 11.6 mmHg, P > 0.05) and distal coronary pressure (Pd) dropped significantly by 9% from 96.3 +/- 12.7 to 87.4 +/- 13.4 mmHg (P 0.05). In this study, FFR was found not to be influenced by metoprolol treatment in patients with intermediate coronary stenoses and a preserved ejection fraction.

  3. Dose-independent effect of misonidazole in fractionated irradiations of hypoxic Vicia faba bean roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khokhar, M.T. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK). Dept. of Medical Physics)

    1984-04-01

    The radiosensitization of 5 mM misonidazole (Miso) was measured in Vicia faba bean roots with regimens of single, three, six and twelve fractions of 250 kVp X-rays. To inhibit cell division, the beans were kept at a constant temperature of 3.5/sup 0/C during irradiation and between fractions that were spaced 24 hours apart. The doses in various regimens were graded such that they ranged between 27 and 350, and 42 and 513 cGy per fraction in Miso-treated and non-treated regimens, respectively, under hypoxia. The sensitivity enhancement ratio (s.e.r.) was constant throughout the dose range employed with an average value of 1.62. The s.e.r. increased to 2.3 when measured with single doses at 19/sup 0/C. It is concluded that the s.e.r. is dose-independent and that temperature enhances the effectiveness of the drug.

  4. The effect of homogenization and milk fat fractions on the functionality of Mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowney, M K; Hickey, M W; Roupas, P; Everett, D W

    2003-03-01

    Mozzarella cheese was manufactured from milk containing either a low (olein) or a high (stearin) melting point fraction of milk fat or anhydrous milk fat. The fat was dispersed into skim milk by homogenization at 2.6 MPa before being manufactured into cheese. The melting point of the milk fat did not affect the size or shape of the fat globules, nor was there any effect of homogenization on the polymorphic state of the milk fat. There were no changes in milk fat globule size and shape concomitant with the amount of free oil formed. The polymorphic state of the milk fat did affect the amount of free oil formed and the apparent viscosity of the cheese. The lower melting point fraction yielded a larger amount of free oil. The higher melting point fraction yielded a higher viscosity of melted cheese at 60 degrees C. Mozzarella cheese was also manufactured from homogenized milk, nonhomogenized milk, and a 1:1 ratio of the two, without altering the milk fat composition. Increasing the proportion of homogenized milk yielded a lower free oil content and higher viscosity of the cheese.

  5. Effects of the Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Alchornea triplinervia on Healing Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia A. Hiruma-Lima

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alchornea triplinervia (Spreng. Muell. Arg (Euphorbiaceae is a medicinal plant commonly used by people living in the Cerrado region of Brazil to treat gastrointestinal ulcers. We previously described the gastroprotective action of methanolic extract (ME of Alchornea triplinervia and the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF in increasing of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 gastric levels in the mucosa. In this work we evaluated the effect of EAF in promoting the healing process in rats with acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers. In addition, toxicity was investigated during treatment with EAF. After 14 days of treatment with EAF, the potent stimulator of gastric cell proliferation contributed to the acceleration of gastric ulcer healing. Upon immunohistochemical analysis, we observed a pronounced expression of COX-2, mainly in the submucosal layer. The 14-day EAF treatment also significantly increased the number of neutrophils in the gastric mucosa regeneration area. The EAF induced angiogenesis on gastric mucosa, observed as an increase of the number of blood vessels supplying the stomach in rats treated with EAF. Oral administration for 14 days of the ethyl acetate fraction from Alchornea triplinervia accelerated the healing of gastric ulcers in rats by promoting epithelial cell proliferation, increasing the number of neutrophils and stimulation of mucus production. This fraction, which contained mainly phenolic compounds, contributed to gastric mucosa healing.

  6. Effects of liquid immiscibility on trace element fractionation in magmatic iron meteorites: A case study of group IIIAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulff-Moeller, Finn

    1998-03-01

    Magmatic iron meteorites are generally agreed to represent metal that crystallized in asteroidal cores from a large pool of liquid. Estimates suggest that the metallic liquid contained significant amounts of S and P, both of which are incompatible and exert a strong effect on trace-element partitioning. In tandem, S and P are also prone to cause immiscibility between sulfide liquid and P-rich metal liquid. The liquid immiscibility field occupies about 70% of the portion of the Fe-Ni-S-P system in which iron is the first phase to crystallize. In spite of this, previous fractional crystallization models have taken into account only one liquid phase and have encountered significant discrepancies between the meteorite data and model values for the key elements Ni, Ir, Ga, Ge and Au at even moderate degrees of fractionation. For the first time, a model for trace-element partitioning between immiscible liquids in the Fe-Ni-S-P system is presented in order to assess the effects on fractionation in magmatic iron meteorite groups. The onset of liquid immiscibility causes a significant change in the enrichment patterns of S and P in both liquids, so elements with contrasting partitioning behavior will show trends deviating clearly from one-liquid trends. A trend recorded in the solid metal will either be a smooth curve as long as equilibrium is maintained between the two liquids or the trend may diverge into a field limited by two extreme curves depending on the degree of disequilibrium. Bulk initial liquids for most magmatic groups have S/P (wt%) ratios well below 25. In these cases, and due to the constitution of the Fe-Ni-S-P system, most of the metal will crystallize from the rapidly decreasing volume of metal liquid and only a subordinate amount from the sulfide liquid. Because of the strong extraction of P into the metal liquid, P will have a much larger influence on trace-element partitioning than a low initial P content might suggest. My model calculations suggest

  7. Effect of Airflows on Repetitive Nanosecond Volume Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jingfeng; Wei, Liqiu; Huo, Yuxin; Song, Jian; Yu, Daren; Zhang, Chaohai

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharges excited by repetitive nanosecond pulses have attracted significant attention for various applications. In this paper, a plate-plate discharge with airflows is excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse generator. Under different experiment conditions, the applied voltages, discharge currents, and discharge images are recorded. The plasma images presented here indicate that the volume discharge modes vary with airflow speeds, and a diffuse and homogeneous volume discharge occurs at the speed of more than 35 m/s. The role of airflows provides different effects on the 2-stage pulse discharges. The 1st pulse currents nearly maintain consistency for different airflow speeds. However, the 2nd pulse current has a change trend of first decreasing and then rapidly increasing, and the value difference for 2nd pulse currents is about 20 A under different airflows. In addition, the experimental results are discussed according to the electrical parameters and discharge images. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51006027, 51437002, and 51477035)

  8. Cosmeceutical Effects of Galactomannan Fraction from Arenga pinnata Fruits In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanti; Madriena; Ali, Soegianto

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cosmeceuticals refer to natural cosmetics with medical-like benefits due to their bioactive contents. Sugar palm fruit (Arenga pinnata) extract has been claimed for its anti-aging effect in vitro. However, its active compounds for cosmeceuticals is still unclear. Objective: This study was aimed to extract galactomannan from A. pinnata fruits and test its efficacy for tyrosinase inhibition, antioxidant, and anti-photoaging activities in vitro. Materials and Methods: Galactomannan from A. pinnata fruits was extracted by freeze drying and identified for its chemical compounds by using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS). Galactomannan was tested for its tyrosinase inhibition in both cell-based (melanocytes) and enzymatic assays, antioxidant activity using ferrous ion chelating assay (FCA) assay, and anti-photoaging activity for inhibiting the gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and MMP-13 in macrophages using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. Results: Identification of galactomannan fraction from A. pinnata fruits by py-GC/MS mainly consisted of oxonium ion and glucosides. For cellular assay, galactomannan at 5 μg/mL inhibited >50% of tyrosinase activity in melanocytes induced by phorbol myristate acetate. At the enzymatic level, galactomannan at similar concentration showed less tyrosinase activity inhibition (~20%). FCA results showed that galactomannan at 10 μg/mL exerted >50% of antioxidant activity. The qRT-PCR data indicated that galactomannan at 5 μg/mL inhibited >50% of MMP-1 and MMP-13 gene expressions in ultraviolet B-treated macrophages. Conclusion: Galactomannan fraction from A. pinnata fruits has efficacy for enlightening effect, antioxidant, and anti-photoaging activity in the dose-independent pattern, indicating its cosmeceutical effects for skin healthcare. SUMMARY A. pinnata fruit containing galactomannan has cosmeceutical potentials through enlightening effect

  9. Effects of two sludge application on fractionation and phytotoxicity of zinc and copper in the soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The potential harm of heavy metals is a primary concern in application of sludge to the agricultural land. A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of two sludges on fractionation of Zn and Cu in soil and their phytotoxicity to pakchoi. The loamy soil was mixed with 0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% (by weight) of digested sewage sludge (SS) and composted sludge (SC). The additions of both sludges caused a significant raise in all fractions, resulting in that exchangeable (EXCH) and organic bound (OM) became predominance of Zn and organic bound Cu occupied the largest portion. There was more available amount of Zn and Cu in SS treatments than SC treatments. During the pot experiment, the concentration of Zn in EXCH, carbonate (CAR) and OM and Cu in EXCH and OM fractions decreased in all treatments, so their bioavailability reduced. Germination rate and plant biomass decreased when the addition rate was high and the best yield appeared in 20% mixtures at the harvest of pakchoi. The two sludges increased tissue contents of Zn and Cu especially in the SS treatments. Zn in pakchoi was not only in relationship to ΔEXCH and ΔCAR forms but also in ΔOM forms in the sludge-soil mixtures. Tissue content of Cu in pakchoi grown on SC-soils could not be predicted by ΔEXCH. These correlation rates between Zn and Cu accumulation in pakchoi and variation of different fractions increased with time, which might indicate that sludges represented stronger impacts on the plant in long-term land application.

  10. Effects of Intervention to Improve At-Risk Fourth Graders' Understanding, Calculations, and Word Problems with Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Schumacher, Robin F.; Long, Jessica; Namkung, Jessica; Malone, Amelia S.; Wang, Amber; Hamlett, Carol L.; Jordan, Nancy C.; Siegler, Robert S.; Changas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the efficacy of a core fraction intervention program on understanding and calculation skill and (b) isolate the effects of different forms of fraction word-problem (WP) intervention delivered as part of the larger program. At-risk 4th graders (n = 213) were randomly assigned at the individual…

  11. Correlated Electrons in Two Dimensions: The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, James

    2014-03-01

    A collection of electrons confined to move on a plane surface is surely one of the simplest many-body systems imaginable. But in spite of this apparent simplicity, a strong magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane opens a door to a complex and beautiful world filled with many-body exotica. The magnetic field quenches the kinetic energy, leaving Coulomb interactions in control of the physics. The result has been a revolution in many-body physics comparable to that created by the discovery of superconductivity. Incompressible liquid ground states with fractionally charged quasiparticle excitations exhibit the quantized Hall effect at numerous discrete partial fillings of the lowest and first excited Landau level. The first examples of topological condensed matter, these many-body bulk insulators possess complex families of both conducting and neutral edge states at their boundaries. Highly correlated compressible phases of composite fermions also exist and may be viewed as progenitors of the various families of incompressible states. Multi-component two-dimensional systems with active discrete internal degrees of freedom (spin, layer, valley, etc.) display a wide array of broken symmetry states including ferromagnetism and exciton condensation. Now thirty years old, the field generically dubbed ``the fractional quantum Hall effect,'' remains extraordinarily vibrant. Once confined largely to GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, the fractional quantum Hall effect and its many relatives and offspring are now pursued in graphene, various oxide interfaces, and other materials. Some of the most fundamental aspects, including the exotic non-abelian quasiparticle statistics expected of some of the more subtle phases, have hardly been touched experimentally even as their potential for applications to quantum computation is alluring. In this talk, I will try to give a flavor of this enormous field, emphasizing current topics and possible future directions.

  12. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  14. Monte Carlo and deterministic computational methods for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng; Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2013-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction β plays an important role in kinetics and static analysis of the reactor physics experiments. It is used as reactivity unit referred to as "dollar". Usually, it is obtained by computer simulation due to the difficulty in measuring it experimentally. In 1965, Keepin proposed a method, widely used in the literature, for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction β. This method requires calculation of the adjoint neutron flux as a weighting function of the phase space inner products and is easy to implement by deterministic codes. With Monte Carlo codes, the solution of the adjoint neutron transport equation is much more difficult because of the continuous-energy treatment of nuclear data. Consequently, alternative methods, which do not require the explicit calculation of the adjoint neutron flux, have been proposed. In 1997, Bretscher introduced the k-ratio method for calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction; this method is based on calculating the multiplication factor of a nuclear reactor core with and without the contribution of delayed neutrons. The multiplication factor set by the delayed neutrons (the delayed multiplication factor) is obtained as the difference between the total and the prompt multiplication factors. Using Monte Carlo calculation Bretscher evaluated the β as the ratio between the delayed and total multiplication factors (therefore the method is often referred to as the k-ratio method). In the present work, the k-ratio method is applied by Monte Carlo (MCNPX) and deterministic (PARTISN) codes. In the latter case, the ENDF/B nuclear data library of the fuel isotopes (235U and 238U) has been processed by the NJOY code with and without the delayed neutron data to prepare multi-group WIMSD neutron libraries for the lattice physics code DRAGON, which was used to generate the PARTISN macroscopic cross sections. In recent years Meulekamp and van der Marck in 2006 and Nauchi and Kameyama

  15. Role of Exciton Screening in the 7/3 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wu, Ying-Hai; Sreejith, G. J.; Wójs, Arkadiusz; Jain, Jainendra K.

    2013-05-01

    The excitations of the 7/3 fractional Hall state, one of the most prominent states in the second Landau level, are not understood. We study the effect of screening by composite fermion excitons and find that it causes a strong renormalization at 7/3, thanks to a relatively small exciton gap and a relatively large residual interaction between composite fermions. The excitations of the 7/3 state are to be viewed as composite fermions dressed by a large exciton cloud. Their wide extent has implications for experiments as well as for analysis of finite system exact diagonalization studies.

  16. EFFECT OF IRRADIATION TEMPERATURE ON GENERAL EQUATION OF SOL FRACTION-DOSE RELATIONSHIP FOR FLUOROPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wanxi; XU Jun

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of irradiation temperature on sol fraction-dose relationship of fluoropolymers was studied. It was found that the increasing of irradiation temperature can result in the decreasing of β value of fluoropolymer , which increases the crosslinking probability of fluoropolymer. The relationship between crosslinking parameter β and irradiation temperature (Ti)of fluoropolymer is established as follows:β=2.2 × 10-3Tg +4×10-4 (Tg-Ti )+0.206.β values of some fluoropolymers calculated from the above expression are in agreement with the experimental values.

  17. The Branch Process of Skyrmions in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi-Shi; ZHANG Xiu-Ming; TIAN Miao

    2005-01-01

    @@ The branch process of the skyrmions in the fractional quantum Hall effect is studied from the φ-mapping topo logical current. It is shown that there exists a field ζ whose Hopf indices and Brouwer degrees characterize thetopological structure of the skyrmions. Based on the bifurcation theory of the φ-mapping theory, it is found that the skyrmions can be generated or annihilated at the limit points and they encounter, split or merge at the bifurcation points of the new field ζ.

  18. Lightsticks content toxicity: effects of the water soluble fraction on the oyster embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Menezes Filho, Adalberto; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; Pereira, Pedro Afonso P

    2015-11-01

    Lightsticks are artifacts used as attractors in a type of commercial fishery, known as surface longline gear. Despite the excessive use, the contamination risks of these devices have not yet been properly investigated. This research aimed to fill up this gap by determining the chemical composition and the toxicity of lightsticks recently activated, compared to those one year after activation and to the ones collected on the beaches. The analyzes were carried out by Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Additionally, the variations in composition and the toxicity of their sea Water Soluble Fractions (WSF) were evaluated based on the WSF-effects of Crassostrea rhizophorae embryonic development. The GC-MS analysis made possible the identification of nineteen substances in the water soluble fraction of the lightsticks, such as dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and dimethyl phthalate (DMP). The value of the WSF-effective concentration (EC50) was in an average of 0.35%. After one year of the lightsticks activation, the toxicity was even higher (0.65%). Furthermore, other substances, also present in the lightsticks-WSF caused persistent toxicity even more dangerous to the environment than DBP and DMP. This essay discusses their toxicity effects and possible environment damages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effects of Radiation and Dose-Fractionation on Cancer and Non-Tumor Disease Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle E. Woloschak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Janus series of radiation experiments, conducted from 1970 to 1992, explored the effects of gamma and neutron radiation on animal lifespan and disease development. Data from these experiments presents an opportunity to conduct a large scale analysis of both tumor and non-tumor disease development. This work was focused on a subset of animals from the Janus series of experiments, comparing acute or fractionated exposures of gamma or neutron radiation on the hazards associated with the development of tumor and non-tumor diseases of the liver, lung, kidney or vascular system. This study also examines how the co-occurrence of non-tumor diseases may affect tumor-associated hazards. While exposure to radiation increases the hazard of dying with tumor and non-tumor diseases, dose fractionation modulates these hazards, which varies across different organ systems. Finally, the effect that concurrent non-cancer diseases have on the hazard of dying with a tumor also differs by organ system. These results highlight the complexity in the effects of radiation on the liver, lung, kidney and vascular system.

  20. Neuroendocrine and renal effects of intravascular volume expansion in compensated heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, A; Bie, P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    2001-01-01

    To examine if the neuroendocrine link between volume sensing and renal function is preserved in compensated chronic heart failure [HF, ejection fraction 0.29 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- SE)] we tested the hypothesis that intravascular and central blood volume expansion by 3 h of water immersion (WI) elicits...... sustained angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy, n = 9) absolute and fractional sodium excretion increased (P Renal free water clearance increased during WI in control subjects but not in HF......, albeit plasma vasopressin concentrations were similar in the two groups. In conclusion, the neuroendocrine link between volume sensing and renal sodium excretion is preserved in compensated HF. The natriuresis of WI is, however, modulated by the prevailing ANG II and Aldo concentrations. In contrast...

  1. Determination of volume fraction in biphasic flows oil-gas and water-gas using artificial neural network and gamma densitometry; Determinacao de fracoes de volume em fluxos bifasicos oleo-gas e agua-gas utilizando redes neurais artificiais e densitometria gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Philippe Netto Belache

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a methodology based on the principles of gamma ray attenuation to identify volume fractions in biphasic systems composed of oil-gas-water and gas which are found in the offshore oil industry. This methodology is based on the acknowledgment counts per second on the photopeak energy using a detection system composed of a NaI (Tl) detector, a source of {sup 137}Cs without collimation positioned at 180 ° relative to the detector on a smooth stratified flow regime. The mathematical modeling for computational simulation using the code MCNP-X was performed using the experimental measurements of the detector characteristics (energy resolution and efficiency), characteristics of the material water and oil (density and coefficient attenuation) and measurement of the volume fractions. To predict these fractions were used artificial neural networks (ANNs), and to obtain an adequate training the ANNs for the prediction of volume fractions were simulated a larger number of volume fractions in MCNP-X. The experimental data were used in the set data necessary for validation of ANNs and the data generated using the computer code MCNP-X were used in training and test sets of the ANNs. Were used ANNs of type feed-forward Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and analyzed two functions of training, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) and gradient descent with momentum (GDM), both using the Backpropagation training algorithm. The ANNs identified correctly the volume fractions of the multiphase system with mean relative errors lower than 1.21 %, enabling the application of this methodology for this purpose. (author)

  2. Antidepressant-like effects of fractions, essential oil, carnosol and betulinic acid isolated from Rosmarinus officinalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daniele G; Cunha, Mauricio P; Neis, Vivian B; Balen, Grasiela O; Colla, André; Bettio, Luis E B; Oliveira, Agatha; Pazini, Francis Leonardo; Dalmarco, Juliana B; Simionatto, Edésio Luiz; Pizzolatti, Moacir G; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effect of fractions from Rosmarinus officinalis L.: ethyl acetate 1 and 2 (AcOEt1 and 2), hexane (HEX), ethanolic (ET), and essential oil-free (EOF) fractions, as well as essential oil, the isolated compounds carnosol and betulinic acid in the tail suspension test, a predictive test of antidepressant activity. Swiss mice were acutely administered by oral route (p.o.) with fractions, essential oil or isolated compounds, 60 min before the tail suspension test or open-field test. All of them produced a significant antidepressant-like effect: AcOEt1, ET, EOF fractions and essential oil (0.1-100mg/kg, p.o); HEX (0.1-10mg/kg, p.o) and AcOEt2 fraction (0.1-1mg/kg, p.o), carnosol (0.01-0.1mg/kg, p.o.) isolated from the HEX fraction and betulinic acid (10mg/kg, p.o.), isolated from the AcOEt1 and AcOEt2 fractions. No psychostimulant effect was shown in the open-field test, indicating that the effects in the tail suspension test are specific. This study suggests that carnosol and betulinic acid could be responsible for the anti-immobility effect of extracts from R. officinalis.

  3. Effect of Weight Fractions of Jute Fiber on Tensile Strength and Deflection Temperature of Jute Fiber/Polypropylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, S.; Juwono, A. L.; Roseno, S.

    2017-05-01

    Jute is one of eco-friendly natural fiber with relatively low cost and high volume production. This study aimed to determine the effect of weight fractions of jute fiber as a reinforcement in polypropylene (PP) to obtain an optimum properties of PP/jute fiber composites. Jute fiber was pre-treated through alkalization. The PP was initially produced by extrusion process, followed by fabricated the composites by compiling the PP matrix and jute fibers into lamina using a hot-press method. The results of tensile test and heat deflection temperature test showed that the addition of 40wt% jute fiber to the PP increased the tensile strength about 19.7 % up to (38.2±4.9)MPa, the Young modulus about 79.8 % up to (3.20±0.26)GPa, and the heat deflection temperature about 143% up to (143.3±1.14)°C compared to pristine PP. Based on Scanning Electron Microscopy observation on the fracture surfaces, it was shown that the mode of failure on the composites failure surfaces was “fiber pull-out”, which due to the poor interface bond between the fiber and the matrix.

  4. Effects of nonsaponin fraction of red ginseng on learning deficits in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Hiroaki; Nishijo, Hisao; Uwano, Teruko; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Kawanishi, Kazuko; Ono, Taketoshi

    2004-09-15

    Previously we reported that oral application of red ginseng significantly ameliorated learning deficits in aged rats and young rats with hippocampal lesions. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the nonsaponin fraction of red ginseng on learning deficits in aged rats in behavioral studies and those on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA3 subfield in young rats in electrophysiological studies. In the behavioral studies, three groups of rats [aged rats with and without oral administration of the nonsaponin fraction of red ginseng and young rats] were tested with the three types of spatial-learning task [distance movement task (DMT), random-reward place search task (RRPST), and place-learning task (PLT)] in a circular open field. The results in the DMT and RRPST indicated that motivational and motor activity was not significantly different among the three groups of rats. However, performance of the aged rats without nonsaponin was significantly impaired in the PLT when compared with the young rats. Treatment with nonsaponin significantly ameliorated deficits in place-navigation learning in the aged rats in the PLT. In the electrophysiological studies, effects of nonsaponin on the LTP in the CA3 subfield of the hippocampal slices were investigated in vitro. Pretreatment with nonsaponin significantly augmented the increase in population spike amplitudes in the CA3 subfield after LTP induction. These results suggest that the nonsaponin fraction of red ginseng contains important substances to improve learning and memory in aged rats and that this amelioration by nonsaponin might be attributed partly to augmentation of LTP in the CA3 subfield.

  5. Measuring of Volume Fraction for SiC Particles in SiCP/Al Composite%SiC颗粒增强铝基复合材料中SiC颗粒体积分数的测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    木二珍; 李强

    2013-01-01

    利用金相法和XRD定量分析法对SiC颗粒增强铝基复合材料的SiC颗粒体积分数进行测定.用定量金相法测得SiC增强铝基复合材料SiC颗粒的体积分数为58.6%,用XRD定量分析法测得的体积分数为62.7%.%The volume fraction for SiC particle was measured by metallographic method and XRD quantitative analysis.The volume fraction for SiC particles is 56.1% for metallographic method and 62.7% for XRD quantitative analysis.

  6. Effects of smoking on cerebral and ventricular volumes in healthy males

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-Jun Kim; Jae-Hoon Jun; Gye-Rae Tack; Soon-Cheol Chung; Mi-Hyun Choi; Beob-Yi Lee; Su-Jeong Lee; Jae-Woong Yang; Ji-Hye Kim; Jin-Seung Choi; Dong-Won Kang; Jang-Yeon Park

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have reported decreased cerebral volume as a result of smoking.However,little is known about accompanying changes in ventricular volume for healthy subjects who smoke,although ventricular volume is increased in patients with multiple sclerosis who smoke.The present study analyzed whether cerebral volume decreased with smoking through the use of magnetic resonance imaging.In addition,accompanying changes in ventricular volume that resulted from decreased cerebral volume and smoking were analyzed in healthy subjects.When multivariate lysis of covariance was performed by integrating the 2 age groups,aged 20-28 years and 40-49 years,with statistical significance,results showed that cerebral volume of smokers was smaller and ventricular volume was greater compared with the non-smokers.These findings suggest that ventricular volume changes could be utilized to characterize the effects of smoking.

  7. Space Weathering in the Fine Size Fractions of Lunar Soils: Soil Maturity Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Taylor, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Morris, R. V.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of space weathering on the optical properties of lunar materials have been well documented. These effects include a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. However, the regolith processes that cause these effects are not well known, nor is the petrographic setting of the products of these processes fully understood. A Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium has been formed with the purpose of systematically integrating chemical and mineralogical data with the optical properties of lunar soils. Understanding space-weathering effects is critical in order to fully integrate the lunar sample collection with remotely-sensed data from recent robotic missions (e.g., Lunar Prospector, Clementine, and Galileo) We have shown that depositional processes (condensation of impact-derived vapors, sputter deposits, accreted impact material, e.g., splash glass, spherules, etc.) are a major factor in the modification of the optical surfaces of lunar regolith materials. In mature soils, it is the size and distribution of the nanophase metal in the soil grains that has the major effect on optical properties. In this report, we compare and contrast the space-weathering effects in an immature and a mature soil with similar elemental compositions. For this study, we analyzed effects). The nanophase Fe in these rims probably accounts for a significant fraction of the increase in Is/FeO measured in these size fractions. In addition to the rims, the majority of particles also show abundant accreted material in the form of glass splashes and spherules that also contain nanophase Fe. In stark contrast, the surfaces of the mineral grains in the 71061 sample are relatively prisitine, as only about 14% of the mineral grains in the sample exhibited amorphous rims. Furthermore, the mineral particles are more angular and show greater surface

  8. Working without accumulation membrane in flow field-flow fractionation. Effect of sample loading on retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Dora; Zattoni, Andrea; Casolari, Sonia; Reggiani, Matteo; Sanz, Ramses; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Torsi, Giancarlo

    2004-03-01

    Membraneless hyperlayer flow field-flow fractionation (Hyp FIFFF) has shown improved performance with respect to Hyp FIFFF with membrane. The conditions for high recovery and recovery independent of sample loading in membraneless Hyp FIFFF have been previously determined. The effect of sample loading should be also investigated in order to optimize the form of the peaks for real samples. The effect of sample loading on peak retention parameters is of prime importance in applications such as the conversion of peaks into particle size distributions. In this paper, a systematic experimental work is performed in order to study the effect of sample loading on retention parameters. A procedure to regenerate the frit operating as accumulation wall is described. High reproducibility is obtained with low system conditioning time.

  9. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  10. Spleen volume on CT and the effect of abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Romero, Cinthia; Agarwal, Sheela; Abujudeh, Hani H; Thrall, James; Hahn, Peter F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the magnitude of change in spleen volume on CT in subjects sustaining blunt abdominal trauma without hemorrhage relative to patients without disease and how the spleen volumes are distributed. Sixty-seven subjects with blunt abdominal trauma and 101 control subjects were included in this retrospective single-center, IRB-approved, and HIPAA-compliant study. Patients with an injured spleen were excluded. Using a semiautomatic segmentation program, two readers computed spleen volumes from CT. Spleen volume distribution in male and female trauma and control cohorts were compared nonparametrically. Spleen volume plotted against height, weight, and age were analyzed by linear regression. The number of females and males are, respectively, 35 and 32 in trauma subjects and 69 and 32 among controls. Female trauma patients (49.6 years) were older than males (39.8 years) (p = 0.02). Distributions of spleen volume were not normal, skewed above their means, requiring a nonparametric comparison. Spleen volumes in trauma patients were smaller than those in controls with medians of 230 vs 294 mL in males(p volume correlated positively with weight in females and with height in male controls, and negatively with age in male controls (p volume in controls was 245 mL, the largest ever reported. Spleen volume decreases in response to blunt abdominal trauma. Spleen volumes are not normally distributed. Our population has the largest spleen volume reported in the literature, perhaps a consequence of the obesity epidemic.

  11. Cylindrical Field Effect Transistor: A Full Volume Inversion Device

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for high performance as well as low standby power devices has been the main reason for the aggressive scaling of conventional CMOS transistors. Current devices are at the 32nm technology node. However, due to physical limitations as well as increase in short-channel effects, leakage, power dissipation, this scaling trend cannot continue and will eventually hit a barrier. In order to overcome this, alternate device topologies have to be considered altogether. Extensive research on ultra thin body double gate FETs and gate all around nanowire FETs has shown a lot of promise. Under strong inversion, these devices have demonstrated increased performance over their bulk counterparts. This is mainly attributed to full carrier inversion in the body. However, these devices are still limited by lithographic and processing challenges making them unsuitable for commercial production. This thesis explores a unique device structure called the CFET (Cylindrical Field Effect Transistors) which also like the above, relies on complete inversion of carriers in the body/bulk. Using dual gates; an outer and an inner gate, full-volume inversion is possible with benefits such as enhanced drive currents, high Ion/Ioff ratios and reduced short channel effects.

  12. Effective delayed neutron fraction measurement in the critical VENUS-F reactor using noise techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doligez, X. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, CNRS-IN2P3/Univ. Paris Sud (France); Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Chevret, T.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecouey, J.L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie-Nourry, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN/Univ. de Caen/CNRS-IN2P3 (France); Fourmentel, D.; Mellier, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, DEN/DER/SPEX (France); Krasa, A.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J. [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    This paper present the measurements of VENUS-F kinetic parameters using the Rossi-Alpha methods. The VENUS-F reactor is a zero-power reactor based in Mol, Belgium at SCK-CEN where the fuel is made of metallic enriched uranium with pure lead in order to simulate the behavior of lead fast reactor. The reactor can be operated under critical when it is coupled with GENEPI-3C. At the beginning of 2014, a measurement campaign was performed in order to estimate the kinetics parameters. In this paper, two measurements are analyzed at two different powers (approximately 2 W and 30 W) with 7 different fission chambers (with a 235-U deposit that varies from 1 g to 10 mg). All the correlation functions needed for the Rossi-Alpha method have been built for each possible set of two detectors in each configuration and values obtained from those functions for the effective delayed neutron fraction are then compared. The absolute necessity to operate at very low power is presented. The final value for the effective delayed neutron fraction is finally estimated to be 730 pcm ± 11 pcm and the prompt neutron generation time is estimated to be equal to 0,041 μseconds ± 0.04 μsec. (authors)

  13. Captopril-induced reduction of regurgitation fraction in aortic insufficiency: Acute and long-term effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropp, J.; Heck, I.; Reske, S.N.; Biersack, H.J.; Mattern, H.; Winkler, C.; Polikl, M.

    1985-05-01

    In aortic insufficiency (AI) the inhibition of the stimulated Renin-Angiotensin-System (RAS) by Captopril (C) reduced afterload and leads consequently to a diminished regurgitation fraction (RF). In 17 patients (pts) with pure severe AI RF, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEFE) and heart rate were determined before (1) and 1 hr after (2) administration of 25 mg of C.Long term dosis was 3 x 25 mg of C and follow up time was 3-11 months (medium:6). The values were determined by gated radionuclide ventriculography using red blood cells labeled in vivo with 15 mCi Tc-99mROI's were selected over both ventricles in enddiastolic and endsystolic frames. Ventricular boundaries were defined by a fourier phase image overlay. RF was calculated by the background corrected count rate ratio of left and right ventricular ROI. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BPs,BPd), plasma levels of angiotensin I,II(A1,A2) and the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were determined before and 1 hr after C administration. After C there is a decrease in RF which persists in the long term follow period in up to to now 8 pts. The authors conclude: inhibition of ACE reduces significantly aortic regurgitation in patients with AI and has thus a beneficial effect on left ventricular performance. This effect persists in long term treatment and therefore seems beneficial to delay the point of operation.

  14. Sonication effect on cellular material in sedimentation and gravitational field flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, R; Battu, S; Puignou, L; Galceran, M T; Cardot, Ph J P

    2003-06-20

    Sonication procedures are generally used prior to field flow fractionation (FFF) separation in order to produce suspensions without aggregates. Yeast cells manufactured in active dry wine yeast (ADWY) were placed in an ultrasound water bath in order to disrupt possible clumps and to obtain a single-cell suspension to be used in optimal conditions during fermentation processes. In order to determine whether this sample preparation procedure meets absolute needs, different yeast samples before and after sonication were analysed by two field flow fractionation techniques. It is shown that 2 min of sonication in the sample preparation process is sufficient to obtain an optimal dispersion of the yeast cells, that is, without critical percentage of aggregates. To demonstrate this effect, photographs of the yeast cell suspensions were performed with non-sonicated and sonicated yeast sample dispersion. The resulting data are compared with the elution profiles obtained from the two different FFF techniques. It is demonstrated that fractogram profiles prove the effectiveness of sonication methodologies.

  15. Effect of different doses of un-fractionated green and black tea extracts on thyroid physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Amar K; De, Neela; Choudhury, Shyamosree Roy

    2011-08-01

    Tea is a rich source of polyphenolic flavonoids including catechins, which are thought to contribute to the health benefits of it. Flavonoids have been reported to have antithyroid and goitrogenic effect. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether high doses of green and black tea have a harmful effect on thyroid physiology. Un-fractionated green and black tea extracts were administered orally to male rats for 30 days at doses of 1.25 g%, 2.5 g% and 5.0 g%. The results showed that green tea extract at 2.5 g% and 5.0 g% doses and black tea extract only at 5.0 g% dose have the potential to alter the thyroid gland physiology and architecture, that is, enlargement of thyroid gland as well as hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia of the thyroid follicles and inhibition of the activity of thyroid peroxidase and 5(')-deiodinase I with elevated thyroidal Na+, K+-ATPase activity along with significant decrease in serum T3 and T4, and a parallel increase in serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This study concludes that goitrogenic/antithyroidal potential of un-fractionated green tea extract is much more than black tea extract because of the differences in catechin contents in the tea extracts.

  16. Long-term tillage effects on the distribution of P fractions of German loess soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegholdt, C.; Geisseler, D.; Koch, H.-J.; Ludwig, B.

    2012-04-01

    Different tillage systems may affect P dynamics in soils due to differently distributed plant residues, different aggregate dynamics and erosion losses. Objectives were to investigate the effect of tillage on the availability of P in a long-term field trial initiated from 1990 to 1997. Four research sites located in eastern and southern Germany were established with a crop rotation consisting of two times winter wheat followed by sugar beet. The two treatments were no-till (NT), i.e. without cultivation, and conventional tillage (CT) down to 25-30 cm on loess soils. Soil P was divided into pools of different stabilities by a sequential extraction method and total P (Pt) was extracted by digesting the extracts of the fractionation to calculate organic P (Po). The Pt content (792 mg kg-1 soil) in the topsoil of the plots with NT was 15% higher than the content of Pt in the CT plots, while with increasing depth the Pt concentration decreased more under NT than under CT. This was also true for the other P fractions. The higher P contents in the topsoil of NT resulted presumably from the shallower incorporation of harvest residues compared to CT, whereas estimated soil losses and thus also P losses due to water erosion were only small for all four sites and treatments. Contents of oxalate extractable iron and organic carbon were positively related to the labile inorganic P (Pi) fractions, while there was a high correlation of the stable fractions with the clay contents and pH. Overall, the regression analyses indicated that labile P contents were controlled by the contents of organic C, while stable P contents depended on the contents of clay, oxalate-extractable Fe and Al, which suggested that the mineralization of organic matter provided available P. Overall, the tillage treatments had only little (and generally insignificant) effect on the total P content with a slightly increased soil P content under NT compared to CT mainly due to an increase in the content of

  17. Effect of Bombay high crude oil and its water-soluble fraction on growth and metabolism of diatom Thalassiosira sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parab, S.R.; Pandit, R.A.; Kadam, A.N.; Indap, M.M.

    Effect of Bombay high crude oil (BHC) and its water-soluble fraction (WSF) on growth and metabolism of the phytoplankton, Thalassiosira sp. was assessed. The study revealed the signs of acute toxicity at higher concentrations of crude oil (0...

  18. Small-volume effect enables the spine robust, sensitive and efficient information transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Masashi; Karasawa, Yasuaki; Hikichi, Minori; Kuroda, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Why is the spine of a neuron so small that only small numbers of molecules can exist and reactions inevitably become stochastic? Despite such noisy conditions, we previously showed that the spine exhibits robust, sensitive and efficient features of information transfer using probability of Ca$^{2+}$ increase; however, their mechanisms remains unknown. Here we show that the small-volume effect enables robust, sensitive and efficient information transfer in the spine volume, but not in the cell volume. In the spine volume, intrinsic noise in reactions becomes larger than extrinsic noise of input, making robust information transfer against input fluctuation. Stochastic facilitation of Ca$^{2+}$ increase occurs in the spine volume, making higher sensitivity to lower intensity of input. Volume-dependency of information transfer enables efficient information transfer per input in the spine volume. Thus, we propose that the small-volume effect is the functional reasons why the spine has to be so small.

  19. Effect of solvents on the fractionation of high oleic-high stearic sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootello, Miguel A; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2015-04-01

    Solvent fractionation of high oleic-high stearic (HOHS) sunflower oil was studied to determine the best solvent to use (hexane or acetone) in terms of the operational parameters and properties of the final stearins. Acetone fractionation on two types of HOHS sunflower oils (N17 and N20) was carried out at temperatures from 5 to 10 °C using micelles with different oil/solvent ratios. Acetone was more suitable than hexane as a solvent for HSHO sunflower oil fractionation because it allowed the oil to be fractionated at higher temperatures and at lower supercooling degrees. Likewise, a sunflower soft stearin obtained by dry fractionation of HOHS sunflower oil was also used to produce high-melting point stearins by acetone or hexane fractionation. The fractionation of these stearins could be performed at higher temperatures and gave higher yields. The combination of dry and solvent fractionation to obtain tailor-made stearins is discussed.

  20. Influence of T-semi attached rib on turbulent flow and heat transfer parameters of a silver-water nanofluid with different volume fractions in a three-dimensional trapezoidal microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Habibollah; Karimipour, Arash; Safaei, Mohammad Reza; Semiromi, Davood Toghraie; Akbari, Omid Ali

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at exploring influence of T-semi attached rib on the turbulent flow and heat transfer parameters of a silver-water nanofluid with different volume fractions in a three-dimensional trapezoidal microchannel. For this purpose, convection heat transfer of the silver-water nanofluid in a ribbed microchannel was numerically studied under a constant heat flux on upper and lower walls as well as isolated side walls. Calculations were done for a range of Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 16,000, and in four different sorts of serrations with proportion of rib width to hole of serration width (R/W). The results of this research are presented as the coefficient of friction, Nusselt number, heat transfer coefficient and thermal efficiency, four different R/W microchannels. The results of numerical modeling showed that the fluid's convection heat transfer coefficient is increased as the Reynolds number and volume fraction of solid nanoparticle are increased. For R/W=0.5, it was also maximum for all the volume fractions of nanoparticle and different Reynolds numbers in comparison to other similar R/W situations. That's while friction coefficient, pressure drop and pumping power is maximum for serration with R/W=0 compared to other serration ratios which lead to decreased fluid-heat transfer performance.

  1. The long-term effect of 1550 nm erbium:glass fractional laser in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yale; Zeng, Weihui; Hu, Die; Jha, Smita; Ge, Qin; Geng, Songmei; Xiao, Shengxiang; Hu, Guanglei; Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the short-term and long-term effects of the 1550 nm erbium:glass (Er:glass) fractional laser in the treatment of facial acne vulgaris. Forty-five (9 male and 36 female) acne patients were treated 4 times at 4-week intervals with the following parameters: 169 spot density and 15-30 mJ/cm(2) fluence. There was no control group. The laser spots were adjustable (maximum overlap: 20%) according to the treatment area, and delivered in rows in order to cover all the face. Clinical photographs were taken. The IGA scores and lesion counts were performed for each treatment. Their current state was obtained by phone call follow-up to determine the long-term effect and photographs were offered by themselves or taken in hospital. After four treatments, all patients had an obvious reduction of lesion counts and IGA score and the peak lesion counts decreased to 67.7% after the initial four treatment sessions. For long-term effect, 8 patients lost follow-up, hence 37 patients were followed-up. 8 patients were 2-year follow up, 27 at the 1-year follow-up, and all patients at the half-year follow-up. The mean percent reduction was 72% at the half-year follow-up, 79 at the 1-year follow-up and 75% at the 2-year follow-up. Side effects and complications were limited to transient erythema and edema, and few patients suffered from transient acne flare-ups and sensitivity. All patients responded that their skin was less prone to oiliness. In conclusion, acne can be successfully treated by 1550 nm Er:glass fractional laser, with few side effects and prolonged acne clearing.

  2. Which fraction of soil organic matter is more vulnerable to rhizosphere priming effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B.; Cheng, W.

    2016-12-01

    Rhizosphere priming effect (RPE) is defined as the stimulation or suppression of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition by living roots. It remains unclear which fraction of SOM is more vulnerable to rhizosphere priming. We conducted two experiments in continuous 13CO2 labeling growth chamber to compare the intensity of RPE for the active (or labile) vs. slow (or recalcitrant) SOM. A sandy loam (Alfisol) was incubated at 20oC and 80% water holding capacity for different periods, which created a gradient in the relative proportion of active vs. slow SOM in the remaining soils. We then grew sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and soybean (Glycine max) in these remaining soils for 50 days under the same environmental conditions to compare the RPE of these two plant species on the decomposition of soils that varied in the lability of SOM. In both experiments, as the incubation proceeded from 1 to 8 to 14 months (in experiment 1) and the soil changed from freshly-sampled soil to two-year-incubated soil (in experiment 2), the intensity of RPE increased significantly even after accounting for the changes in root biomass or root-derived CO2. This result suggests that the slow (or recalcitrant) fraction of SOM is likely more vulnerable to rhizosphere priming compared to the active (or labile) fraction of SOM. Although the underlying mechanisms of this finding await further investigation, our study clearly shows that the main component of SOM (slow or recalcitrant SOM, decadal turnover) is vulnerable to rhizosphere priming. Therefore, the RPE has the potential to substantially regulate both short-term and long-term soil carbon dynamics.

  3. The Effect of Ginkgo Biloba Extract on Hypoxic Fraction of C3H Mouse Fibrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Yi, Chun Ja; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : To investigate the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on hypoxic cell fraction and metabolic status in fibrosarcoma (FSa II) of C3H mouse. Materials and Methods : Fibrosarcoma (Fsa II), 6mm in diameter, growing in the right hind leg muscle of C3H mouse was used for estimation of hypoxic cell fraction using comparison of TCD{sub 50}. Radiation was given one hour after administration of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) with or without priming dose of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) given 24 hours earlier. Radiation was also given under air breathing condition or clamp hypoxia without GBE as controls. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy was performed before and one hour after administration of GBE with or without priming dose of GBE. Results : TCD{sub 50/120's} were 81.7(77.7-86.0) Gy when irradiated under clamped hypoxia, 69.6 (66.8-72.5) Gy under air breathing condition,67.5(64.1-71.1) Gy with a single dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) given one hour before irradiation, and 62.2(59.1-65.5) Gy with two doses of GBE given at 25 hours and one hour before irradiation. The hypoxic cell fractions, estimated from TCD50/120's were 1.6% under air breathing condition, 7.2% after single dose of GBE, and 2.7% after two doses of GBE. Metabolic status of tumor, probably by increasing the blood flow and delivery of oxygen and nutrients, resulting in increased radiosensitivity of tumor.

  4. Effect Of Gossypol, Apogossypol And Gossypolone On Fatty Acids Pattern Of Lipid Fractions In Rat Serum And Seminal Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    El sharaky, A. S. [احمد صبحي الشراكي; Sewedy, S. M.; El-Sayed, M. M.; El-Shahawy, I. N.

    1994-01-01

    he fatty acids pattern of the total lipid fractions of male rat serum and seminal fluids were studied under the effect of gossypol and some of its metabolites (Apogossypol and gossypolone). The applied dose of gossypol and its derivatives exhibits some metabolic effects such as significant decrease of the saturated fatty acids and a significant increase of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the serum, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) in sterylester fraction was significantly increased under the eff...

  5. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bruce S. [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [Earth Sciences Department, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B1 (Canada); Passeport, Elodie [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E5 (Canada); Sleep, Brent E., E-mail: sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining “observable” DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C{sub 0}), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (D{sub mech}/D{sub eff}). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C{sub 0}/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C{sub 0}/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1 m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (< 100 years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with “typical” well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where D{sub mech}/D{sub eff} is

  6. Rotation Effects on the Target-Volume Margin Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chan, M; Song, Y; Burman, C

    2014-01-01

    Rotational setup errors are usually neglected in most clinical centers. An analytical formula is developed to determine the extra margin between clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) to account for setup errors. The proposed formula corrects for both translational and rotational setup errors and then incorporated into margin determination for PTV.

  7. The Aharonov-Bohm effect and fractional statistics of distinguishable particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashkevich, Stefan, E-mail: mash@mashke.or [Schroedinger, 120 W 45th St., New York, NY 10036 (United States); Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev 03143 (Ukraine)

    2010-09-03

    In two-dimensional space, the topological coupling arising between charged particles with attached magnetic fluxes, via the Aharonov-Bohm effect, causes distinguishable particles to effectively acquire quantum statistics: a nontrivial quantum phase is generated when a particle of one species encircles one of a different species. We discuss a number of exact and numerical results concerning distinguishable particles with fractional statistics. Just like for anyons, the spectrum of such particles confined to the lowest Landau level of a strong magnetic field can be found exactly. Then a system of particles in the presence of static magnetic fluxes (equivalent to particles with infinite mass) is considered, and the low-lying states of one particle in the presence of two fluxes and two particles in the presence of one flux are analyzed.

  8. Effect of high pressure high temperature processing on the volatile fraction of differently coloured carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Palmers, Stijn; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Carle, Reinhold; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2014-06-15

    To get deeper insight into the effect of high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing on the volatile fraction of carrots, differently coloured cultivars exhibiting orange, purple, red and yellow hues were investigated. The impact of HPHT sterilisation was compared with thermal sterilisation based on equivalent microbiological inactivation. The results of this study demonstrated HPHT sterilisation to exert a distinct effect on important chemical reactions in comparison to thermal sterilisation. A comprehensive integration of MS-based metabolomic fingerprinting (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and chemometric tools has been implemented as an untargeted multivariate screening tool to identify differences. In all carrot cultivars, two dominant discriminative quality-related reactions were found: oxidative degradation and the Maillard reaction. Regarding the first reaction, oxidative terpenes, free fatty acids and carotenoids degradation products were detected at higher levels after HPHT sterilisation. Regarding the latter reaction, HPHT sterilisation appeared to suppress the formation of Maillard and Strecker degradation products.

  9. M-Theory Brane as Giant Graviton and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Huo, R

    2006-01-01

    A small number of M-theory branes as giant gravitons in the M-theory sector of LLM geometry is studied as a probe. The abelian way shows that the low energy effective action for M-theory brane is exactly the 2d electron subject to a vertical magnetic field. We also briefly discuss the microscopic description of M2-brane giant graviton in this geometry, in the language of a combination of D0-branes as fuzzy 2-spheres. Then we go to the well-established Noncommutative Chern-Simons theory description. After quantization, well behaved Fractional Quantum Hall Effect is demonstrated. This goes beyond the original LLM description and should be some indication of novel geometry.

  10. Diminishing the impact of the partial volume effect in cardiac SPECT perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, P Hendrik; King, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) significantly restricts the absolute quantification of regional myocardial uptake and thereby limits the accuracy of absolute measurement of blood flow and coronary flow reserve by SPECT. The template-projection-reconstruction method has been previously developed for PVE compensation. This method assumes the availability of coregistered high-spatial resolution anatomical information as is now becoming available with commercial dual-modality imaging systems such as SPECT/CTs. The objective of this investigation was to determine the extent to which the impact of the PVE on cardiac perfusion SPECT imaging can be diminished if coregistered high-spatial resolution anatomical information is available. For this investigation the authors introduced an additional parameter into the template-projection-reconstruction compensation equation called the voxel filling fraction (F). This parameter specifies the extent to which structure edge voxels in the emission reconstruction are filled by the structure in question as determined by the higher spatial-resolution imaging modality and the fractional presence of the structure at different states of physiological motion as in combining phases of cardiac motion. During correction the removal of spillover to the cardiac region from the surrounding structures is performed first by using reconstructed templates of neighboring structures (liver, blood pool, lungs) to calculate spillover fractions. This is followed by determining recovery coefficients for all voxels within the heart wall from the reconstruction of the template projections of the left and right ventricles (LV and RV). The emission data are subsequently divided by these recovery coefficients taking into account the filling fraction F. The mathematical cardiac torso phantom was used for investigation correction of PVE for a normal LV distribution, a defect in the inferior wall, and a defect in the anterior wall. PVE correction resulted in a

  11. Strategies for reducing intra-fraction motion induced dosimetric effects in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li

    Intra-fraction respiration motion during radiation delivery presents a major challenge to radiation therapy. There has been a growing effort to characterize and manage internal organ motion in radiation therapy, however very few studies focus on tackling this issue in proton therapy. Current practice for treating lung tumors in proton therapy is still to apply population-based margins to account for internal tumor motion, which can lead to target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. This thesis explores the intra-fraction motion induced dosimetric effects from both computational treatment planning and experimental studies. Four-dimensional CT scans are used to analyze the patient-specific tumor motion characteristics. A feasible method to design the range compensator by using the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images is proposed. Results demonstrate that this MIP approach ensures adequate tumor coverage throughout the entire respiratory cycle whilst maintaining normal tissue dose under clinical constraints. Based on 4D-CT scans, dose convolution is used for assessing the accuracy of Gaussian probability density function for modeling the patient-specific respiratory motion on dose distribution. Non-negligible dose discrepancy is observed in comparisons of convolved dose distributions, and patient-specific respiration PDF is advocated. In addition, an experimental phantom study primarily focusing on the interplay effect between target motion and the scanning beam motion is implemented in two proton beam delivery systems: double scattering and uniform scanning. Measurement results suggest that dose blurring effect is dominant, and interplay effect is trivial in the uniform scanning system due to dose repainting.

  12. The Effect of Magnetic Field and Initial Stress on Fractional Order Generalized Thermoelastic Half-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Deswal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study magneto-thermoelastic interactions in an initially stressed isotropic homogeneous half-space in the context of fractional order theory of generalized thermoelasticity. State space formulation with the Laplace transform technique is used to obtain the general solution, and the resulting formulation is applied to the ramp type increase in thermal load and zero stress. Solutions of the problem in the physical domain are obtained by using a numerical method of the Laplace inverse transform based on the Fourier expansion technique, and the expressions for the displacement, temperature, and stress inside the half-space are obtained. Numerical computations are carried out for a particular material for illustrating the results. Results obtained for the field variables are displayed graphically. Some comparisons have been shown in figures to present the effect of fractional parameter, ramp parameter, magnetic field, and initial stress on the field variables. Some particular cases of special interest have been deduced from the present investigation.

  13. Emergent chiral spin liquid: fractional quantum Hall effect in a kagome Heisenberg model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shou-Shu; Zhu, Wei; Sheng, D N

    2014-09-10

    The fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) realized in two-dimensional electron systems under a magnetic field is one of the most remarkable discoveries in condensed matter physics. Interestingly, it has been proposed that FQHE can also emerge in time-reversal invariant spin systems, known as the chiral spin liquid (CSL) characterized by the topological order and the emerging of the fractionalized quasiparticles. A CSL can naturally lead to the exotic superconductivity originating from the condense of anyonic quasiparticles. Although CSL was highly sought after for more than twenty years, it had never been found in a spin isotropic Heisenberg model or related materials. By developing a density-matrix renormalization group based method for adiabatically inserting flux, we discover a FQHE in a spin-½ isotropic kagome Heisenberg model. We identify this FQHE state as the long-sought CSL with a uniform chiral order spontaneously breaking time reversal symmetry, which is uniquely characterized by the half-integer quantized topological Chern number protected by a robust excitation gap. The CSL is found to be at the neighbor of the previously identified Z2 spin liquid, which may lead to an exotic quantum phase transition between two gapped topological spin liquids.

  14. Structure of Ground state Wave Functions for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: A Variational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sutirtha; Mandal, Sudhansu

    The internal structure and topology of the ground states for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) are determined by the relative angular momenta between all the possible pairs of electrons. Laughlin wave function is the only known microscopic wave function for which these relative angular momenta are homogeneous (same) for any pair of electrons and depend solely on the filling factor. Without invoking any microscopic theory, considering only the relationship between number of flux quanta and particles in spherical geometry, and allowing the possibility of inhomogeneous (different) relative angular momenta between any two electrons, we develop a general method for determining a closed-form ground state wave function for any incompressible FQHE state. Our procedure provides variationally obtained very accurate wave functions, yet having simpler structure compared to any other known complex microscopic wave functions for the FQHE states. This method, thus, has potential in predicting a very accurate ground state wave function for the puzzling states such as the state at filling fraction 5/2. We acknowledge support from Department of Science and Technology, India.

  15. Dimensionality effect on two-electron energy spectrum: A fractional-dimension-based formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, R.; Gutiérrez, W.; Mikhailov, I. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Fulla, M.R. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia); Marín, J.H., E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.co [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-07-17

    We analyze the spectrum of two-electron quantum dot with anisotropic parabolic confinement by using the fractional-dimension formulation which allows us to reduce the two-particle problem to two equations for independent particles in an effective space with variable dimension, ranging between two and three for ellipsoidal-shaped quantum dots and between one and two for elliptical-shaped quantum disks. The dependencies of energy levels on the heterostructure sizes for quantum dots, disks and wires are presented. - Highlights: • We report the two-electron eigenenergies in a quantum dot with anisotropic parabolic confinement. • Our model is versatile enough to consider changes in the dimension space from 3 to 2 and 2 to 1. • The two-electron structure is calculated in integer and fractional dimensional spaces. • The two-electron energy structure is sensitive to the quantum dot size and morphology changes. • The electron–electron Coulomb interaction is strongly dependent on the space dimensionality.

  16. Effects of high and low volume of strength training on muscle strength, muscle volume and lipid profile in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Silva Correa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in lipid profile are considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, especially in postmenopausal woman who have been associated with age-related loss of muscle mass. The beneficial role of aerobic exercise in the prevention of CVD has been well documented. However, the effect of strength training has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of lipoprotein levels after 12 weeks of different volumes of strength training and its correlation with strength and muscle volume in postmenopausal women. The participants were randomized into three groups: low volume (LVST; n = 12, 1 set and high volume of strength training (HVST; n = 11, 3 sets, or control group (n = 12. Training groups performed 12 weeks of supervised strength exercises, 15 maximum repetitions, five times a week, 20 minutes for LVST and 40 minutes for HVST for each training session. Measurements included body composition, strength and muscle volume, as well as blood analysis (glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein pre- and post-training. The HVST and LVST improved the one-repetition maximum knee extension strength (p < 0.001, maximal dynamic strength (p < 0.001, and muscle volume (p = 0.048. Post-training triglyceride was lower in HVST when compared to LVST and the control group (p = 0.047. Even though they present the same neuromuscular and morphological adaptations in postmenopausal women, the HVST is more effective than LVST in improving the lipid profile of postmenopausal woman, and can be considered as an ideal program of intervention to reverse changes in lipid metabolism commonly found in this group.

  17. Decoupling crystalline volume fraction and V{sub OC} in microcrystalline silicon pin solar cells by using a {mu}c-Si:F:H intrinsic layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Johnson, E.V.; Djeridane, Y.; Abramov, A.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2008-08-15

    Microcrystalline silicon thin film pin solar cells with a highly crystallized intrinsic {mu}c-Si:F:H absorber were prepared by RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition using SiF{sub 4} as the gas precursor. The cells were produced with a vacuum break between the doped layer and intrinsic layer depositions, and the effect of different subsequent interface treatment processes was studied. The use of an intrinsic {mu}c-Si:H p/i buffer layer before the first air break increased the short circuit current density from 22.3 mA/cm{sup 2} to 24.7 mA/cm{sup 2}. However, the use of a hydrogen-plasma treatment after both air breaks without an interface buffer layer improved both the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. Although the material used for the absorber layer showed a very high crystalline fraction and thus an increased spectral response at long wavelengths, an open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.523 V was nevertheless observed. Such a value of V{sub OC} is higher than is typically obtained in devices that employ a highly crystallized absorber as reported in the literature (see abstract figure). Using a hydrogen-plasma treatment, a single junction {mu}c-Si:F:H pin solar cell with an efficiency of 8.3% was achieved. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. The componential processing of fractions in adults and children: effects of stimuli variability and contextual interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Fang, Qiaochu; Gabriel, Florence C; Szücs, Dénes

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that people have a strong tendency to compare fractions based on constituent numerators or denominators. This is called componential processing. This study explored whether componential processing was preferred in tasks involving high stimuli variability and high contextual interference, when fractions could be compared based either on the holistic values of fractions or on their denominators. Here, stimuli variability referred to the fact that fractions were not monotonous but diversiform. Contextual interference referred to the fact that the processing of fractions was interfered by other stimuli. To our ends, three tasks were used. In Task 1, participants compared a standard fraction 1/5 to unit fractions. This task was used as a low stimuli variability and low contextual interference task. In Task 2 stimuli variability was increased by mixing unit and non-unit fractions. In Task 3, high contextual interference was created by incorporating decimals into fractions. The RT results showed that the processing patterns of fractions were very similar for adults and children. In task 1 and task 3, only componential processing was utilzied. In contrast, both holistic processing and componential processing were utilized in task 2. These results suggest that, if individuals are presented with the opportunity to perform componential processing, both adults and children will tend to do so, even if they are faced with high variability of fractions or high contextual interference.

  19. A Fractional Creep Constitutive Model for Frozen Soil in Consideration of the Strengthening and Weakening Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The triaxial creep tests of frozen silty clay mixed with sands were performed under different pressures, and the test results demonstrated that, under the low confining pressure, when the shear stress is lower than the long-term strength, the test specimen exhibits an attenuation creep because the strengthening effect is greater than the weakening effect. When the shear stress is higher than the long-term strength, the test specimen exhibits a nonattenuation creep due to the level of the strengthening and weakening effects change in different stages. As the confining pressure increases, the test specimens only exhibit an attenuation creep because of the enhancing strengthening effect. Both the hardening parameter and the damage variable were introduced to describe the strengthening and weakening effects, respectively, and a new creep constitutive model for frozen soil considering these effects was put forward based on the theory of elastoviscoplastic and the fractional derivative. Finally, the model parameters were analyzed and their determination method was also provided to reveal the trend of parameters according to the triaxial test results. The calculated results of the constitutive model show that the proposed model can describe the whole creep process of frozen soil well.

  20. Antioxidative activities of white rose flower extract and pharmaceutical advantages of its hexane fraction via free radical scavenging effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dongsun; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Kwon, Sang-Chul; Shin, Sunhee; Jang, Ja Young; Jeong, Heon Sang; Lee, Do Ik; Kim, Yun-Bae; Joo, Seong Soo

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we determined the antioxidant activities of two different solvent fractions(butanol and hexane) obtained from white Rosa rugosa flowers by employing various assays such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity, and nitric oxide (NO) scavenging and inhibition activity in S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) in the RAW264.7 model. In addition, more advanced antioxidant assays were conducted, including lipid peroxidation, hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation, DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cell growth. The results revealed that the hexane fraction, which contained a significant amount of polyphenols and volatile components, had excellent antioxidant potency and could scavenge free radicals of DPPH and ABTS. Interestingly, the hexane fraction inhibited lipid peroxidation to almost the same degree as a chemical antioxidant. In the NO assay, the hexane fraction effectively scavenged free radicals at all dose ranges and is expected to inhibit NO production in mammalian cells. The hexane fraction effectively prevented oxidative damage, which was induced by Cu2+/H2O2, to target proteins at lower concentrations (>1 microg x mL(-1)). The DNA fragmentation and the cell-level assays suggest that the hexane fraction may play a crucial role in inhibiting peroxynitrite and H2O2 attack. Based on the findings described in this study, the hexane fraction holds promise for use as a novel pharmaceutical antioxidant.

  1. The effect of burdock leaf fraction on adhesion, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Z; Wang, H; Tang, Y; Chen, X

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a fraction of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) leaf on the initial adhesion, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibiofilm activity of the burdock leaf fraction was studied by the method of crystal violet staining. When the concentration of the burdock leaf fraction was 2·0 mg ml(-1) , the inhibition rates on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa were 100%. The burdock leaf fraction was found to inhibit the formation of biofilm by reducing bacterial surface hydrophobicity, decreasing bacterial aggregation ability and inhibiting swarming motility. Interestingly, the burdock leaf fraction inhibited the secretion of quorum-sensing (QS) signalling molecule 3-oxo-C12-HSL and interfered quorum sensing. Moreover, the QS-regulated pyocyanin and elastase were also inhibited. Chemical composition analysis by UPLC-MS showed 11 active compounds in the burdock leaf fraction. The burdock leaf fraction significantly inhibited the formation of biofilm and quorum sensing, as well as significantly decreased the content of virulence factors. This study introduces a natural and effective bacterial biofilm inhibitor, which could also significantly decrease the content of virulence factors and the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Connectivity and Excluded Volume Effects in Polymeric Complex Coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Charles; Radhakrishna, Mithun

    Oppositely-charged polyelectrolytes in salt solutions can undergo phase separation to form complex coacervates. This charge-driven phase behavior is the basis for emerging motifs in self-assembly. Traditional uses for coacervates are in food and personal care products, while applications in technologies for drug delivery and sensory materials are being developed. One of the primary theories driving understanding of complex coacervates is the Voorn-Overbeek (V-O) theory, which is a precursor to more sophisticated field theories. We present both theory and simulation that provides an alternate picture of coacervates, specifically addressing the limitations of V-O. Our theoretical approach is based on PRISM, which is a liquid-state theory that specifically accounts for connectivity. This is compared with Monte Carlo-based simulations, which likewise provide a molecular picture of coacervation. We demonstrate that a combination of connectivity-based correlations and excluded volume has a profound effect on coacervation phase behavior, suggesting that favorable comparison of V-O to experiment benefits from a cancellation of errors. The influence of connectivity on coacervate phase behavior hints at new opportunities for molecular-based design in electrostatically-driven self-assembly.

  3. Antidiabetic and Synergistic Effects of Anthocyanin Fraction from Berberis integerrima Fruit on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a complex endocrine disorder. There is a serious attempt to identify antidiabetic compounds from natural sources to use with other drugs for reduction of diabetes complications. Present study is based on the investigation of antihyperglycemic effect of anthocyanin fraction of Berberis integerrima Bunge (AFBI fruits on some physiological parameters (glucose level, glycogen content, and body weight in normal and streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced diabetic rats and evaluation of synergic effect of this fraction with metformin and glibenclamide. Male Sprague dawley rats were divided into nine groups: healthy control group, diabetic control group, diabetic groups treated with anthocyanin fraction (200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively; diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide and metformin separately, diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg, metformin + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg. Treatment of diabetic rats with AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly decreased blood glucose as compared with control. Moreover, AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly increased liver glycogen and body weight compared to control. Nevertheless, there were no synergistic effects between anthocyanin fraction and metformin or glibenclamide on blood glucose, liver glycogen, and body weight. The results of this study indicate that AFBI possesses hypoglycemic effects and may be considered for evaluation in future diabetes clinical studies.

  4. Fenitrothion Alters Sperm Characteristics in Rats: Ameliorating Effects of Palm Oil Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, Izatus Shima; Budin, Siti Balkis; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi; Jayusman,, Putri Ayu; Mohamed, Jamaludin

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to organophosphate insecticides such as fenitrothion (FNT) in agriculture and public health has been reported to affect sperm quality. Antioxidants may have a potential to reduce spermatotoxic effects induced by organophosphate. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effects of palm oil tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) in reducing the detrimental effects occurring in spermatozoa of FNT-treated rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four equal groups: a control group and groups of rats treated orally with palm oil TRF (200 mg/kg), FNT (20 mg/kg) and palm oil TRF (200 mg/kg) combined with FNT (20 mg/kg). The sperm characteristics, DNA damage, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PC) were evaluated. Supplementation with TRF attenuated the detrimental effects of FNT by significantly increasing the sperm counts, motility, and viability and decreased the abnormal sperm morphology. The SOD activity and GSH level were significantly increased, whereas the MDA and PC levels were significantly decreased in the TRF+FNT group compared with the rats receiving FNT alone. TRF significantly decreased the DNA damage in the sperm of FNT-treated rats. A significant correlation between abnormal sperm morphology and DNA damage was found in all groups. TRF showed the potential to reduce the detrimental effects occurring in spermatozoa of FNT-treated rats. PMID:25030881

  5. Effect of Y (Yttrium) Filling Fraction on Thermoelectric Properties of p-type Yy Fex Co4-x Sb12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xinfeng; SONG Bo; ZHANG Qingjie

    2006-01-01

    Yttrium-filled skutterndites YyFex Co4-x Sb12 ( y= 0-0.40) were syrthesized. The effect of Y filling fraction on thermoelectric properties of YyFexCo4-xSb12 was investigated. All samples showed p-type conduct. The electrical conductivity decreased with increasing filling fraction y . The Seebeck coefficient increased with increasing temperature. The lattice thermal conductivity decreased with increasing filling fraction y and showed the minimum value at a certain filling fraction y = 0.3. The effect of different filling atoms M( M: Ba, Ce, Y) on the lattice thermal conductivity of MyFex Co4- x Sb12 was discussed. The maximum ZT value of 0.7 was obtained for Y0.08 Fe0.7 Co3.3 Sb12 at 750 K.

  6. Effects of Propranolol on the Left Ventricular Volume of Normal Subjects During CT Coronary Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Yuan Heng; Jaw, Fu Shan [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yung Cheng; Jeng, Chin Ming [Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Peng, Shinn Forng [National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (CN)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of propranolol on the left ventricular (LV) volume during CT coronary angiography. The LV volume of 252 normal Chinese subjects (126 subjects with propranolol medication and 126 age- and gender-matched Chinese subjects without medication) was estimated using 64 slices multi-detector CT (MDCT). The heart rate difference was analyzed by the logistic linear regression model with variables that included gender, age, body height, body weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the dosage of propranolol. The following global LV functional parameters were calculated: the real-end diastolic volume (EDV), the real-end systolic volume (ESV) and the real-ejection fraction (EF). The female subjects had a greater decrease of heart rate after taking propranolol. The difference of heart rate was negatively correlated with the dosage of propranolol. The real-EDV, the real-ESV and the real-EF ranged from 48.1 to 109 mL/m2, 6.1 to 57.1 mL/m2 and 41% to 88%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the SBP and DBP between the groups without and with propranolol medication (123 {+-} 17 and 80 {+-} 10 mmHg; 120 {+-} 14 and 80 {+-} 11 mmHg, respectively). The real-EDV showed no significant difference between these two groups, but the real-ESV and real-EF showed significant differences between these two groups (69.4 {+-} 9.3 and 70.6 {+-} 8.9 mL/m2; 23.5 {+-} 5.7 and 25.6 {+-} 3.7 mL/m2, 66.5 {+-} 5.1% and 63.5 {+-} 4.6%, respectively). The difference of heart rate is significantly influenced by gender and the dosage of propranolol. Propranolol will also increase the ESV, which contributes to a decreased EF, while the SBP, DBP and EDV are not statistically changed.

  7. Effect of grain moisture content during milling on pasting profile and functional properties of amaranth fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Vishnuswamy Preetham; Dharmaraj, Usha; Sakhare, Suresh D; Inamdar, Aashitosh A

    2016-05-01

    Evaluation of functional properties of milled fractions of grain amaranth may be useful to decide the end uses of the grain. Hence, pasting profiles of amaranth fractions obtained by milling the grains at different moisture contents were studied in relation with their starch profile and also with their swelling power and solubility indices. It was observed that, for flour fraction, the viscosity parameters were lowest at 14-16 % moisture content. Swelling power and solubility indices of the samples varied as a function of grain moisture content. The middling fraction also showed similar pasting pattern with the variation of grain moisture content. The seed coat fractions showed higher gelatinization temperature compared to that of fine flour and middling fractions. However, starch content of the fine seed coat fraction was comparable with that of the flour and middling fractions. The coarse seed coat fraction showed lower viscosity parameters than the other samples. Viscosity parameters correlated well among themselves while, they did not show significant correlation with the starch content. However, the viscosity parameters showed negative correlation with the soluble amylose content. The study revealed that, the fractions obtained by milling the grains at different moisture content show differential pasting profiles and functional properties.

  8. Slip effects on a generalized Burgers’ fluid flow between two side walls with fractional derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihao Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research for the 3D flow of a generalized Burgers’ fluid between two side walls generated by an exponential accelerating plate and a constant pressure gradient, where the no-slip assumption between the exponential accelerating plate and the Burgers’ fluid is no longer valid. The governing equations of the generalized Burgers’ fluid flow are established by using the fractional calculus approach. Exact analytic solutions for the 3D flow are established by employing the Laplace transform and the finite Fourier sine transform. Furthermore, some 3D and 2D figures for the fluid velocity and shear stress are plotted to analyze and discuss the effects of various parameters.

  9. Devil's Staircase Phase Diagram of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in the Thin-Torus Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, Pietro; Molinari, Luca Guido; Ratti, Piergiorgio; Gherardi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    After more than three decades, the fractional quantum Hall effect still poses challenges to contemporary physics. Recent experiments point toward a fractal scenario for the Hall resistivity as a function of the magnetic field. Here, we consider the so-called thin-torus limit of the Hamiltonian describing interacting electrons in a strong magnetic field, restricted to the lowest Landau level, and we show that it can be mapped onto a one-dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interactions, with the magnetic field playing the role of the chemical potential. The statistical mechanics of such models leads us to interpret the sequence of Hall plateaux as a fractal phase diagram whose landscape shows a qualitative agreement with experiments.

  10. Antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) leaves on Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboro, Akeem; Bin Mohamed, Kamaruzaman; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Yekeen, Taofeek A

    2014-01-01

    Natural plant extracts offer a promising hope in the prevention/treatment of cancer arising from genetic mutations. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (AFMF) leaves on TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus (Male Swiss albino mice), respectively. The antioxidant activity of AFMF against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined, followed by its phytochemical elucidation using the Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography technique (UPLC). The mutagenicity of AFMF at 4, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 µg/well was Rutin was elucidated by the UPLC technique, and thereby suspected to be the phytochemical responsible for the observed antimutagenic activity. Thus far, AFMF seems to contain a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention of genetic damage that is crucial for cancer development.

  11. Fungicides and the effects of mycotoxins on milling fractions of irrigated rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dors, Giniani Carla; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Hackbart, Helen Cristina dos Santos; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; Fagundes, Carlos Alberto Alves; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2013-02-27

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of fungicides on rice cultivation, regarding the occurrence and the distribution of mycotoxins in fractions of the processed grain, by a validated chromatographic method. A method based on extraction with acetonitrile:water, determination by HPLC-DAD, and confirmation by LC-MS was validated before the mycotoxin evaluation. Control samples and samples to which triazole fungicides had been applied were collected from experimental fields for four years. Results showed that 87% of the samples were contaminated with deoxynivalenol or zearalenone, and that all samples treated with fungicide were contaminated with some of these mycotoxins. Aflatoxin B(1) and ochratoxin A were found in 37% of the samples; half of them had been treated with fungicide. Therefore, fungicides tend to be stressors for toxigenic fungi found in the fields.

  12. The neuroprotective effects of tocotrienol rich fraction and alpha tocopherol against glutamate injury in astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilaga Rati Selvaraju

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF is an extract of palm oil, which consists of 25% alpha tocopherol (α-TCP and 75% tocotrienols. TRF has been shown to possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, neuroprotection, and cholesterol lowering activities. Glutamate is the main excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of mammalian, which can be excitotoxic, and it has been suggested to play a key role in neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this present study, the effects of vitamin E (TRF and α-TCP in protecting astrocytes against glutamate injury were elucidated. Astrocytes induced with 180 mM of glutamate lead to significant cell death. However, glutamate mediated cytotoxicity was diminished via pre and post supplementation of TRF and α-TCP. Hence, vitamin E acted as a potent antioxidant agent in recovering mitochondrial injury due to elevated oxidative stress, and enhanced better survivability upon glutamate toxicity.  

  13. Microwave spectroscopic observation of a Wigner solid within the ν =1 /2 fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatke, A. T.; Liu, Yang; Engel, L. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the microwave spectra of a wide quantum well for Landau level fillings, ν , just below 1/2, under conditions where the ν =1 /2 fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is present. One resonance in the spectra exhibits intensity variations with ν in striking agreement with that expected for a pinning mode of a Wigner solid of quasiholes of this FQHE state. This resonance is also quite sensitive to asymmetrization of the growth-direction charge distribution in the quantum well by gate bias. Another resonance in the spectra is associated with a different bilayer Wigner solid that also exists at much lower ν than the 1/2 FQHE, and that appears to coexist with the 1/2 quasihole solid.

  14. Method of computation of energies in the fractional quantum Hall effect regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ammar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work, we reported exact results of energies of the ground state in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE regime for systems with up to N_{e}=6 electrons at the filling factor ν=1/3 by using the method of complex polar coordinates. In this work, we display interesting computational details of the previous calculation and extend the calculation to N_{e}=7 electrons at ν=1/3. Moreover, similar exact results are derived at the filling ν=1/5 for systems with up to N_{e}=6 electrons. The results that we obtained by analytical calculation are in good agreement with their analogues ones derived by the method of Monte Carlo in a precedent work.

  15. Possible hypoglycemic effect of Aloe vera L. high molecular weight fractions on type 2 diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Akira; Hegazy, Sahar; Kabbash, Amal; Wahab, Engy Abd-El

    2009-01-01

    Aloe vera L. high molecular weight fractions (AHM) containing less than 10 ppm of barbaloin and polysaccharide (MW: 1000 kDa) with glycoprotein, verectin (MW: 29 kDa), were prepared by patented hyper-dry system in combination of freeze–dry technique with microwave and far infrared radiation. AHM produced significant decrease in blood glucose level sustained for 6 weeks of the start of the study. Significant decrease in triglycerides was only observed 4 weeks after treatment and continued thereafter. No deterious effects on kidney and liver functions were apparent. Treatment of diabetic patients with AHM may relief vascular complications probably via activation of immunosystem. PMID:23964163

  16. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect via Holography Chern-Simons, Edge States, and Hierarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi; Ryu, Shinsei; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    We present three holographic constructions of fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) via string theory. The first model studies edge states in FQHE using supersymmetric domain walls in N=6 Chern-Simons theory. We show that D4-branes wrapped on CP^1 or D8-branes wrapped on CP^3 create edge states that shift the rank or the level of the gauge group, respectively. These holographic edge states correctly reproduce the Hall conductivity. The second model presents a holographic dual to the pure U(N)_k (Yang-Mills-)Chern-Simons theory based on a D3-D7 system. Its holography is equivalent to the level-rank duality, which enables us to compute the Hall conductivity and the topological entanglement entropy. The third model introduces the first string theory embedding of hierarchical FQHEs, using IIA string on C^2/Z_n.

  17. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com; Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  18. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: animal tissue evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Robert Y; McDonald, Nancy; Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν¯fat) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν¯fat in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μs of the remaining fatless tissue. The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, νfat for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν¯fat were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10(-5) sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μs was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μs of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μs of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. For chicken and beef composites, ν¯fat=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μs for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μs of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the differences did not vary from zero in a statistically significant way thereby validating the methods. The methodology to

  19. On the Effective Description of Large Volume Compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Gallego, Diego

    2011-01-01

    We study the reliability of the Two-Step moduli stabilization in the type-IIB Large Volume Scenarios with matter and gauge interactions. The general analysis is based on a family of N=1 Supergravity models with a factorizable invariant Kaehler function, where the decoupling between two sets of fields without a mass hierarchy is easily understood. For the Large Volume Scenario particular analyses are performed for explicit models, one of such developed for the first time here, finding that the simplified version, where the Dilaton and Complex structure moduli are regarded as frozen by a previous stabilization, is a reliable supersymmetric description whenever the neglected fields stand at their leading F-flatness conditions and be neutral. The terms missed by the simplified approach are either suppressed by powers of the Calabi-Yau volume, or are higher order operators in the matter fields, and then irrelevant for the moduli stabilization rocedure. Although the power of the volume suppressing such corrections ...

  20. Effect of catecholamines and insulin on plasma volume and intravascular mass of albumin in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J; Larsen, S

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of intravenous catecholamine infusions and of intravenous insulin on plasma volume and intravascular mass of albumin was investigated in healthy males. 2. Physiological doses of adrenaline (0.5 microgram/min and 3 microgram/min) increased peripheral venous packed cell volume...... significantly; intravenous noradrenaline at 0.5 microgram/min had no effect on packed cell volume, whereas packed cell volume increased significantly at 3 micrograms of noradrenaline/min. No significant change in packed cell volume was found during saline infusion. 3. During adrenaline infusion at 6 micrograms...... in packed cell volume, plasma volume, intravascular mass of albumin and transcapillary escape rate of albumin during hypoglycaemia may be explained by the combined actions of adrenaline and insulin....

  1. Effect of pulmonary hyperinflation on central blood volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijacika, Tanja; Kyhl, Kasper; Frestad, Daria

    2017-01-01

    (11±7%) above the total lung capacity. All cardiac chambers decreased in volume and despite a heart rate increase of 24±29 bpm (39±50%), pulmonary blood flow decreased by 2783±1820mL (43±20%). The pulmonary transit time remained unchanged at 7.5±2.2s and pulmonary blood volume decreased by 354±176m...

  2. Pig slurry and mineral fertilization strategies' effects on soil quality: macroaggregate stability and organic matter fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, María R; Bosch-Serra, Àngela D; Antúnez, Montserrat; Boixadera, Jaume

    2012-11-01

    Applying pig slurry to the land as fertilizer at appropriate agronomic rates is important to close nutrient cycles and optimize the value of organic matter. However a long-term discussion has taken place about its effects on soil quality. In the north-east of Spain, eight fertilization strategies were evaluated on the soil quality parameters' aggregate stability, soil organic matter (SOM) physical fractions and soil microbial biomass (SMB). Six strategies used different pig slurries (PS) which provided organic matter from 1.7 to 2.6 t ha(-1)yr(-1), the rest (mineral N fertilization and a control) did not. Pig slurries were applied at sowing and/or at cereal tillering, as sidedressing. Field experiments were maintained for an 8-year period, in a silty loam soil devoted to a rainfed winter cereal. Soil samples were taken once, before the last sidedressing in 2011. Aggregate stability was quantified using the standard water-stable aggregate method but including a modification which meant that pre-wetting was avoided (WSA(MOD)). When using the WSA(MOD) method, we found a tendency for the percentage of water-stable aggregates to increase due to PS application (differences of up to 74% in the increment) and it was more marked the nearer they were measured to the application time (3 months vs. 12 months). The strategies which include PS show a positive effect on the SOM amount, mainly in the 0.05-0.2 mm light fraction, which increased by up to 34% with every 10 t ha(-1) organic C applied, and on SMB (up to 53% increment). There is a positive and significant linear relationship (p fertilization strategies improves soil quality