WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume finite difference

  1. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  2. An overlapped grid method for multigrid, finite volume/difference flow solvers: MaGGiE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Oktay; Lessard, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to develop a domain decomposition method via overlapping/embedding the component grids, which is to be used by upwind, multi-grid, finite volume solution algorithms. A computer code, given the name MaGGiE (Multi-Geometry Grid Embedder) is developed to meet this objective. MaGGiE takes independently generated component grids as input, and automatically constructs the composite mesh and interpolation data, which can be used by the finite volume solution methods with or without multigrid convergence acceleration. Six demonstrative examples showing various aspects of the overlap technique are presented and discussed. These cases are used for developing the procedure for overlapping grids of different topologies, and to evaluate the grid connection and interpolation data for finite volume calculations on a composite mesh. Time fluxes are transferred between mesh interfaces using a trilinear interpolation procedure. Conservation losses are minimal at the interfaces using this method. The multi-grid solution algorithm, using the coaser grid connections, improves the convergence time history as compared to the solution on composite mesh without multi-gridding.

  3. A TVD-WAF-based hybrid finite volume and finite difference scheme for nonlinearly dispersive wave equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A total variation diminishing-weighted average flux (TVD-WAF-based hybrid numerical scheme for the enhanced version of nonlinearly dispersive Boussinesq-type equations was developed. The one-dimensional governing equations were rewritten in the conservative form and then discretized on a uniform grid. The finite volume method was used to discretize the flux term while the remaining terms were approximated with the finite difference method. The second-order TVD-WAF method was employed in conjunction with the Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL Riemann solver to calculate the numerical flux, and the variables at the cell interface for the local Riemann problem were reconstructed via the fourth-order monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL. The time marching scheme based on the third-order TVD Runge-Kutta method was used to obtain numerical solutions. The model was validated through a series of numerical tests, in which wave breaking and a moving shoreline were treated. The good agreement between the computed results, documented analytical solutions, and experimental data demonstrates the correct discretization of the governing equations and high accuracy of the proposed scheme, and also conforms the advantages of the proposed shock-capturing scheme for the enhanced version of the Boussinesq model, including the convenience in the treatment of wave breaking and moving shorelines and without the need for a numerical filter.

  4. Hybrid Spectral Difference/Embedded Finite Volume Method for Conservation Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Jung J

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid spectral difference/embedded finite volume method is introduced in order to apply a discontinuous high-order method for large scale engineering applications involving discontinuities in flows with complex geometries. In the proposed hybrid approach, structured finite volume (FV) cells are embedded in hexahedral SD elements containing discontinuities, and FV based high-order shock-capturing scheme is employed to overcome Gibbs phenomenon. Thus, discontinuities are captured at the resolution of embedded FV cells within an SD element. In smooth flow regions, the SD method is chosen for its low numerical dissipation and computational efficiency preserving spectral-like solutions. The coupling between the SD elements and the elements with embedded FV cells are achieved by the mortar method. In this paper, the 5th-order WENO scheme with characteristic decomposition is employed as the shock-capturing scheme in the embedded FV cells, and the 5th-order SD method is used in the smooth flow field. The ord...

  5. Finite-volume effects in the evaluation of the K_L - K_S mass difference

    CERN Document Server

    Christ, N H; Sachrajda, C T

    2014-01-01

    The RBC and UKQCD collaborations have recently proposed a procedure for computing the K_L-K_S mass difference. A necessary ingredient of this procedure is the calculation of the (non-exponential) finite-volume corrections relating the results obtained on a finite lattice to the physical values. This requires a significant extension of the techniques which were used to obtain the Lellouch-Luscher factor, which contains the finite-volume corrections in the evaluation of non-leptonic kaon decay amplitudes. We review the status of our study of this issue and, although a complete proof is still being developed, suggest the form of these corrections for general volumes and a strategy for taking the infinite-volume limit. The general result reduces to the known corrections in the special case when the volume is tuned so that there is a two-pion state degenerate with the kaon.

  6. Symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on a linear finite element space,two symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions are constructed and analyzed.Some relationships between the finite element method and the finite difference method are addressed,too.

  7. Symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xiaoying; YANG Zhang; ZHOU Aihui

    2008-01-01

    Based on a linear finite element space, two symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions are constructed and analyzed. Some relationships between the finite element method and the finite difference method are addressed, too.

  8. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  9. A Finite Volume Backward Euler Difference Method for Nonlinear Parabolic Integral-differential Equation%非线性抛物型积分-微分方程的向后Euler差分有限体积元方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王波; 王强

    2009-01-01

    The Finite volume backward Euler difference method is established to discuss two-dimensional parabolic integro-differential equations.These results are new for finite volume element methods for parabolic integro-differential equations.

  10. A control volume based finite difference method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Hansen, Preben

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a novel control volume based FD method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements, i.e. the generalized Navier equations. The method is based on the widely used cv-FDM solution of heat conduction and fluid flow problems involving a staggered grid formulati...

  11. A control volume based finite difference method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Hansen, Preben

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a novel control volume based FD method for solving the equilibrium equations in terms of displacements, i.e. the generalized Navier equations. The method is based on the widely used cv-FDM solution of heat conduction and fluid flow problems involving a staggered grid formulation...

  12. ASSESSMENT OF A CENTRAL DIFFERENCE FINITE VOLUME SCHEME FOR MODELING OF CAVITATING FLOWS USING PRECONDITIONED MULTIPHASE EULER EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEJRANFAR Kazem; FATTAH-HESARY Kasra

    2011-01-01

    A numerical treatment for the prediction of cavitating flows is presented and assessed.The algorithm uses the preconditioned multiphase Euler equations with appropriate mass transfer terms.A central difference finite volume scheme with suitable dissipation terms to account for density jumps across the cavity interface is shown to yield an effective method for solving the multiphase Euler equations.The Euler equations are utilized herein for the cavitation modeling, because some certain characteristics of cavitating flows can be obtained using the solution of this system of equations with relative low computational effort.In addition, the Euler equations are appropriate for the assessment of the numerical method used, because of the sensitivity of the solution to the numerical instabilities.For this reason, a sensitivity study is conducted to evaluate the effects of various parameters, such as numerical dissipation coefficients and grid size, on the accuracy and performance of the solution.The computations are performed for steady cavitating flows around the NACA 0012 and NACA 66 (MOD) hydrofoils and also an axisymmetric hemispherical fore-body under different conditions and the results are compared with the available numerical and experimental data.The solution procedure presented is shown to be accurate and efficient for predicting steady sheet- and super-cavitation for 2D/axisymmetric geometries.

  13. A dual coordinate system finite difference method for forward and inverse solutions of the volume conductor problem in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, S; Maynard, D E

    1997-03-01

    Finite difference methods for the volume conductor problem have used a single coordinate system for the mesh and made approximations of Laplace's equation. This method is simple but has two major problems. Firstly, to deal with boundary conditions properly, the normal potential gradient at the boundary must be known. However it is complicated to compute at a curved surface point. Secondly, for an inverse solution the equation on a curved boundary is difficult to reverse since more than one inner mesh node appears in the approximation equation for each surface point. The new method developed in this paper is a dual coordinate system. One system serves as a frame mesh, the other is a sub-coordinate system in which surface points become mesh points (regular nodes). The equation at each surface point is then directly reversible since only one inner point appears in the equation. The forward solution is applied to both centric and eccentric bone models and uses the conventional successive over-relaxation (SOR) method. Noise is added to this solution for input to the inverse procedure which is a direct step-in non-iterative method. Low pass filtering was effective in reducing the effects of noise. In the examples given, only one coordinate subsystem is used but, for complex shape boundaries, multiple subsystems would be necessary.

  14. Solving hyperbolic equations with finite volume methods

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez-Cendón, M Elena

    2015-01-01

    Finite volume methods are used in numerous applications and by a broad multidisciplinary scientific community. The book communicates this important tool to students, researchers in training and academics involved in the training of students in different science and technology fields. The selection of content is based on the author’s experience giving PhD and master courses in different universities. In the book the introduction of new concepts and numerical methods go together with simple exercises, examples and applications that contribute to reinforce them. In addition, some of them involve the execution of MATLAB codes. The author promotes an understanding of common terminology with a balance between mathematical rigor and physical intuition that characterizes the origin of the methods. This book aims to be a first contact with finite volume methods. Once readers have studied it, they will be able to follow more specific bibliographical references and use commercial programs or open source software withi...

  15. Comparative study on triangular and quadrilateral meshes by a finite-volume method with a central difference scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Guojun

    2012-10-01

    In this article, comparative studies on computational accuracies and convergence rates of triangular and quadrilateral meshes are carried out in the frame work of the finite-volume method. By theoretical analysis, we conclude that the number of triangular cells needs to be 4/3 times that of quadrilateral cells to obtain similar accuracy. The conclusion is verified by a number of numerical examples. In addition, the convergence rates of the triangular meshes are found to be slower than those of the quadrilateral meshes when the same accuracy is obtained with these two mesh types. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  17. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  18. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  19. Three particles in a finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Polejaeva, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Within the non-relativistic potential scattering theory, we derive a generalized version of the L\\"uscher formula, which includes three-particle inelastic channels. Faddeev equations in a finite volume are discussed in detail. It is proved that, even in the presence of the three-particle intermediate states, the discrete spectrum in a finite box is determined by the infinite-volume elements of the scattering S-matrix up to corrections, exponentially suppressed at large volumes.

  20. Finite volume form factors and correlation functions at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Pozsgay, Balázs

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate finite size effects in 1+1 dimensional integrable QFT. In particular we consider matrix elements of local operators (finite volume form factors) and vacuum expectation values and correlation functions at finite temperature. In the first part of the thesis we give a complete description of the finite volume form factors in terms of the infinite volume form factors (solutions of the bootstrap program) and the S-matrix of the theory. The calculations are correct to all orders in the inverse of the volume, only exponentially decaying (residual) finite size effects are neglected. We also consider matrix elements with disconnected pieces and determine the general rule for evaluating such contributions in a finite volume. The analytic results are tested against numerical data obtained by the truncated conformal space approach in the Lee-Yang model and the Ising model in a magnetic field. In a separate section we also evaluate the leading exponential correction (the $\\mu$-term) associate...

  1. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see...... in this presentation is focused on a prototype model for topology optimization of steady heat diffusion. This allows for a study of the basic ingredients in working with FVM methods when dealing with topology optimization problems. The FVM and FEM based formulations differ both in how one computes the design...... derivative of the system matrix K and in how one computes the discretized version of certain objective functions. Thus for a cost function for minimum dissipated energy (like minimum compliance for an elastic structure) one obtains an expression c = u^\\T \\tilde{K}u $, where \\tilde{K} is different from K...

  2. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see...... in this presentation is focused on a prototype model for topology optimization of steady heat diffusion. This allows for a study of the basic ingredients in working with FVM methods when dealing with topology optimization problems. The FVM and FEM based formulations differ both in how one computes the design...... $, where $\\tilde{\\mathbf K}$ is different from $\\mathbf K $; in a FEM scheme these matrices are equal following the principle of virtual work. Using a staggered mesh and averaging procedures consistent with the FVM the checkerboard problem is eliminated. Two averages are compared to FE solutions, being...

  3. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...

  4. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: bramiozo@gmail.com [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  5. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see......, e.g. [2]) in order to develop methods for topology design for applications where conservation laws are critical such that element--wise conservation in the discretized models has a high priority. This encompasses problems involving for example mass and heat transport. The work described...... in this presentation is focused on a prototype model for topology optimization of steady heat diffusion. This allows for a study of the basic ingredients in working with FVM methods when dealing with topology optimization problems. The FVM and FEM based formulations differ both in how one computes the design...

  6. Finite volume schemes for Boussinesq type equations

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    6 pages, 2 figures, 18 references. Published in proceedings of Colloque EDP-Normandie held at Caen (France), on 28 & 29 October 2010. Other author papers can be dowloaded at http://www.lama.univ-savoie.fr/~dutykh/; Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the m...

  7. Finite volume schemes for Boussinesq type equations

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the method to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given to important nonlinear phenomena such as solitary waves interactions.

  8. FINITE VOLUME METHOD OF MODELLING TRANSIENT GROUNDWATER FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Muyinda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of computational fluid dynamics, the finite volume method is dominant over other numerical techniques like the finite difference and finite element methods because the underlying physical quantities are conserved at the discrete level. In the present study, the finite volume method is used to solve an isotropic transient groundwater flow model to obtain hydraulic heads and flow through an aquifer. The objective is to discuss the theory of finite volume method and its applications in groundwater flow modelling. To achieve this, an orthogonal grid with quadrilateral control volumes has been used to simulate the model using mixed boundary conditions from Bwaise III, a Kampala Surburb. Results show that flow occurs from regions of high hydraulic head to regions of low hydraulic head until a steady head value is achieved.

  9. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  10. Resonance Extraction from the Finite Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Molina Peralta, Raquel [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The spectrum of excited hadrons becomes accessible in simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics on the lattice. Extensions of Lüscher's method allow to address multi-channel scattering problems using moving frames or modified boundary conditions to obtain more eigenvalues in finite volume. As these are at different energies, interpolations are needed to relate different eigenvalues and to help determine the amplitude. Expanding the T- or the K-matrix locally provides a controlled scheme by removing the known non-analyticities of thresholds. This can be stabilized by using Chiral Perturbation Theory. Different examples to determine resonance pole parameters and to disentangle resonances from thresholds are dis- cussed, like the scalar meson f0(980) and the excited baryons N(1535)1/2^- and Lambda(1405)1/2^-.

  11. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see...... the well known Reuss lower bound. [1] Bendsøe, M.P.; Sigmund, O. 2004: Topology Optimization - Theory, Methods, and Applications. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag [2] Versteeg, H. K.; W. Malalasekera 1995: An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics: the Finite Volume Method. London: Longman......, e.g. [2]) in order to develop methods for topology design for applications where conservation laws are critical such that element--wise conservation in the discretized models has a high priority. This encompasses problems involving for example mass and heat transport. The work described...

  12. Finite volume renormalization scheme for fermionic operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas [JLAB

    2013-11-01

    We propose a new finite volume renormalization scheme. Our scheme is based on the Gradient Flow applied to both fermion and gauge fields and, much like the Schr\\"odinger functional method, allows for a nonperturbative determination of the scale dependence of operators using a step-scaling approach. We give some preliminary results for the pseudo-scalar density in the quenched approximation.

  13. Hidden charm molecules in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Albaladejo, Miguel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper we address the interaction of pairs of charmed mesons with hidden charm in a finite box. We use the interaction from a recent model based on heavy quark spin symmetry that predicts molecules of hidden charm in the infinite volume. The energy levels in the box are generated within this model, and from them some synthetic data are generated. These data are then employed to study the inverse problem of getting the energies of the bound states and phase shifts for $D \\bar D$ or $D^* {\\bar D}^*$. Different strategies are investigated using the lowest two levels for different values of the box size, carrying a study of the errors produced. Starting from the upper level, fits to the synthetic data are carried out to determine the scattering length and effective range plus the binding energy of the ground state. A similar strategy using the effective range formula is considered with a simultaneous fit to the two levels, one above and the other one below threshold. This method turns out to be more...

  14. Chiral interpolation in a finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, H; Hashimoto, S; Kaneko, T; Matsufuru, H; Noaki, J; Onogi, T; Yamada, N

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of lattice QCD at (or even below) the physical pion mass is feasible on a small lattice size of \\sim 2 fm. The results are, however, subject to large finite volume effects. In order to precisely understand the chiral behavior in a finite volume, we develop a new computational scheme to interpolate the conventional epsilon and p regimes within chiral perturbation theory. In this new scheme, we calculate the two-point function in the pseudoscalar channel, which is described by a set of Bessel functions in an infra-red finite way as in the epsilon regime, while chiral logarithmic effects are kept manifest as in the p regime. The new ChPT formula is compared to our 2+1- flavor lattice QCD data near the physical up and down quark mass, mud \\sim 3 MeV on an L \\sim 1.8 fm lattice. We extract the pion mass = 99(4) MeV, from which we attempt a chiral "interpolation" of the observables to the physical point.

  15. Exponential reduction of finite volume effects with twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Cherman, Aleksey; Wagman, Michael L; Yaffe, Laurence G

    2016-01-01

    Flavor-twisted boundary conditions can be used for exponential reduction of finite volume artifacts in flavor-averaged observables in lattice QCD calculations with $SU(N_f)$ light quark flavor symmetry. Finite volume artifact reduction arises from destructive interference effects in a manner closely related to the phase averaging which leads to large $N_c$ volume independence. With a particular choice of flavor-twisted boundary conditions, finite volume artifacts for flavor-singlet observables in a hypercubic spacetime volume are reduced to the size of finite volume artifacts in a spacetime volume with periodic boundary conditions that is four times larger.

  16. Finite volume corrections to pi pi scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Ikuro; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2006-01-13

    Lattice QCD studies of hadron-hadron interactions are performed by computing the energy levels of the system in a finite box. The shifts in energy levels proportional to inverse powers of the volume are related to scattering parameters in a model independent way. In addition, there are non-universal exponentially suppressed corrections that distort this relation. These terms are proportional to e-m{sub pi} L and become relevant as the chiral limit is approached. In this paper we report on a one-loop chiral perturbation theory calculation of the leading exponential corrections in the case of I=2 pi pi scattering near threshold.

  17. MORTAR FINITE VOLUME METHOD WITH ADINI ELEMENT FOR BIHARMONIC PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-jia Bi; Li-kang Li

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we construct and analyse a mortar finite volume method for the dis-cretization for the biharmonic problem in R2. This method is based on the mortar-type Adini nonconforming finite element spaces. The optimal order H2-seminorm error estimate between the exact solution and the mortar Adini finite volume solution of the biharmonic equation is established.

  18. Extracting three-body observables from finite-volume quantities

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Maxwell T

    2015-01-01

    Scattering and transition amplitudes with three-hadron final states play an important role in nuclear and particle physics. However, predicting such quantities using numerical Lattice QCD is very difficult, in part because of the effects of Euclidean time and finite volume. In this review we highlight recent formal developments that work towards overcoming these issues. We organize the presentation into three parts: large volume expansions, non-relativistic nonperturbative analyses, and nonperturbative studies based in relativistic field theory. In the first part we discuss results for ground state energies and matrix elements given by expanding in inverse box length, $1/L$. We describe complications that arise at $\\mathcal O(1/L^6)$ and include a table summarizing the results of different calculations. In the second part we summarize three recent non-relativistic non-perturbative studies and highlight the main conclusions of these works. This includes demonstrating that the three-particle finite-volume spect...

  19. Simulations at fixed topology: fixed topology versus ordinary finite volume corrections

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Lattice QCD simulations tend to get stuck in a single topological sector at fine lattice spacing, or when using chirally symmetric quarks. In such cases computed observables differ from their full QCD counterparts by finite volume corrections, which need to be understood on a quantitative level. We extend a known relation from the literature between hadron masses at fixed and at unfixed topology by incorporating in addition to topological finite volume effects, also ordinary finite volume eff...

  20. MODFLOW–USG version 1: An unstructured grid version of MODFLOW for simulating groundwater flow and tightly coupled processes using a control volume finite-difference formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Ibaraki, Motomu; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    A new version of MODFLOW, called MODFLOW–USG (for UnStructured Grid), was developed to support a wide variety of structured and unstructured grid types, including nested grids and grids based on prismatic triangles, rectangles, hexagons, and other cell shapes. Flexibility in grid design can be used to focus resolution along rivers and around wells, for example, or to subdiscretize individual layers to better represent hydrostratigraphic units. MODFLOW–USG is based on an underlying control volume finite difference (CVFD) formulation in which a cell can be connected to an arbitrary number of adjacent cells. To improve accuracy of the CVFD formulation for irregular grid-cell geometries or nested grids, a generalized Ghost Node Correction (GNC) Package was developed, which uses interpolated heads in the flow calculation between adjacent connected cells. MODFLOW–USG includes a Groundwater Flow (GWF) Process, based on the GWF Process in MODFLOW–2005, as well as a new Connected Linear Network (CLN) Process to simulate the effects of multi-node wells, karst conduits, and tile drains, for example. The CLN Process is tightly coupled with the GWF Process in that the equations from both processes are formulated into one matrix equation and solved simultaneously. This robustness results from using an unstructured grid with unstructured matrix storage and solution schemes. MODFLOW–USG also contains an optional Newton-Raphson formulation, based on the formulation in MODFLOW–NWT, for improving solution convergence and avoiding problems with the drying and rewetting of cells. Because the existing MODFLOW solvers were developed for structured and symmetric matrices, they were replaced with a new Sparse Matrix Solver (SMS) Package developed specifically for MODFLOW–USG. The SMS Package provides several methods for resolving nonlinearities and multiple symmetric and asymmetric linear solution schemes to solve the matrix arising from the flow equations and the Newton

  1. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  2. Footbridge between finite volumes and finite elements with applications to CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Frédéric; Ghidaglia, Jean-Michel

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new algorithm for the discretization of second-order elliptic operators in the context of finite volume schemes on unstructured meshes. We are strongly motivated by partial differential equations (PDEs) arising in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), like the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Our technique consists of matching up a finite volume discretization based on a given mesh with a finite element representation on the same mesh. An inverse operator is also built, which has the desirable property that in the absence of diffusion, one recovers exactly the finite volume solution. Numerical results are also provided. Copyright

  3. 8th conference on Finite Volumes for Complex Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Omnes, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    This first volume of the proceedings of the 8th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Lille, June 2017) covers various topics including convergence and stability analysis, as well as investigations of these methods from the point of view of compatibility with physical principles. It collects together the focused invited papers comparing advanced numerical methods for Stokes and Navier–Stokes equations on a benchmark, as well as reviewed contributions from internationally leading researchers in the field of analysis of finite volume and related methods, offering a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in the field. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation, and recent decades have brought significant advances in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including m...

  4. A Finite Volume Scheme on the Cubed Sphere Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William M.; Lin, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a multidimensional finite-volume scheme for global atmospheric dynamics is evaluated on the cubed-sphere geometry. We will explore the properties of the finite volume scheme through traditional advection and shallow water test cases. Baroclinic evaluations performed via a recently developed deterministic initial value baroclinic test case from Jablonowski and Williamson that assesses the evolution of an idealized baroclinic wave in the Northern Hemisphere for a global 3-dimensional atmospheric dynamical core. Comparisons will be made when available to the traditional latitude longitude discretization of the finite-volume dynamical core, as well as other traditional gridpoint and spectral formulations for atmospheric dynamical cores.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of two neutrons in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Klos, P; Tews, I; Gandolfi, S; Gezerlis, A; Hammer, H -W; Hoferichter, M; Schwenk, A

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations provide direct access to the properties of pure neutron systems that are challenging to study experimentally. In addition to their importance for fundamental physics, their properties are required as input for effective field theories of the strong interaction. In this work, we perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the ground and first excited state of two neutrons in a finite box, considering a simple contact potential as well as chiral effective field theory interactions. We compare the results against exact diagonalizations and present a detailed analysis of the finite-volume effects, whose understanding is crucial for determining observables from the calculated energies. Using the L\\"uscher formula, we extract the low-energy S-wave scattering parameters from ground- and excited-state energies for different box sizes.

  6. Efficient discretization in finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Koussis, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) is a plausible and simple method for solving partial differential equations. The standard practice is to use an orthogonal discretization to form algebraic approximate formulations of the derivatives of the unknown function and a grid, much like raster maps, to represent the properties of the function domain. For example, for the solution of the groundwater flow equation, a raster map is required for the characterization of the discretization cells (flow cell, no-flow cell, boundary cell, etc.), and two raster maps are required for the hydraulic conductivity and the storage coefficient. Unfortunately, this simple approach to describe the topology comes along with the known disadvantages of the FDM (rough representation of the geometry of the boundaries, wasted computational resources in the unavoidable expansion of the grid refinement in all cells of the same column and row, etc.). To overcome these disadvantages, Hunt has suggested an alternative approach to describe the topology, the use of an array of neighbours. This limits the need for discretization nodes only for the representation of the boundary conditions and the flow domain. Furthermore, the geometry of the boundaries is described more accurately using a vector representation. Most importantly, graded meshes can be employed, which are capable of restricting grid refinement only in the areas of interest (e.g. regions where hydraulic head varies rapidly, locations of pumping wells, etc.). In this study, we test the Hunt approach against MODFLOW, a well established finite difference model, and the Finite Volume Method with Simplified Integration (FVMSI). The results of this comparison are examined and critically discussed.

  7. High resolution finite volume scheme for the quantum hydrodynamic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Tien; Yeh, Jia-Yi; Chen, Jiun-Yeu

    2009-03-01

    The theory of quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) helps nanotechnology engineers to understand the physical effect of quantum forces. Although the governing equations of quantum fluid dynamics and classical fluid mechanics have the same form, there are two numerical simulation problems must be solved in QFD. The first is that the quantum potential term becomes singular and causes a divergence in the numerical simulation when the probability density is very small and close to zero. The second is that the unitarity in the time evolution of the quantum wave packet is significant. Accurate numerical evaluations are critical to the simulations of the flow fields that are generated by various quantum fluid systems. A finite volume scheme is developed herein to solve the quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion, which significantly improve the accuracy and stability of this method. The QFD equation is numerically implemented within the Eulerian method. A third-order modified Osher-Chakravarthy (MOC) upwind-centered finite volume scheme was constructed for conservation law to evaluate the convective terms, and a second-order central finite volume scheme was used to map the quantum potential field. An explicit Runge-Kutta method is used to perform the time integration to achieve fast convergence of the proposed scheme. In order to meet the numerical result can conform to the physical phenomenon and avoid numerical divergence happening due to extremely low probability density, the minimum value setting of probability density must exceed zero and smaller than certain value. The optimal value was found in the proposed numerical approach to maintain a converging numerical simulation when the minimum probability density is 10 -5 to 10 -12. The normalization of the wave packet remains close to unity through a long numerical simulation and the deviations from 1.0 is about 10 -4. To check the QFD finite difference numerical computations, one- and two-dimensional particle motions were

  8. Finite volume schemes for dispersive wave propagation and runup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutykh, Denys; Katsaounis, Theodoros; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2011-04-01

    Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the method to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given to important nonlinear phenomena such as solitary waves interactions, dispersive shock wave formation and the runup of breaking and non-breaking long waves.

  9. Finite volume schemes for dispersive wave propagation and runup

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the method to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given to important nonlinear phenomena such as solitary waves interactions, dispersive shock wave formation and the runup of breaking and non-breaking long waves.

  10. Finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for hyperbolic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Morton, K.W.; Warnecke, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the derivation and analysis of new multidimensional, high-resolution, finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes for systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. Our approach couples a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of the multidimensional hyperbolic system, such that all of the infinitely many directions of wave propagation are taken into account. In particular, we p...

  11. A finite volume method for fluctuating hydrodynamics of simple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kiran; Samtaney, Ravi; Moran, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics accounts for stochastic effects that arise at mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. We present a finite volume method for numerical solutions of the fluctuating compressible Navier Stokes equations. Case studies for simple fluids are demonstrated via the use of two different equations of state (EOS) : a perfect gas EOS, and a Lennard-Jones EOS for liquid argon developed by Johnson et al. (Mol. Phys. 1993). We extend the fourth order conservative finite volume scheme originally developed by McCorquodale and Colella (Comm. in App. Math. & Comput. Sci. 2011), to evaluate the deterministic and stochastic fluxes. The expressions for the cell-centered discretizations of the stochastic shear stress and stochastic heat flux are adopted from Espanol, P (Physica A. 1998), where the discretizations were shown to satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. A third order Runge-Kutta scheme with weights proposed by Delong et al. (Phy. Rev. E. 2013) is used for the numerical time integration. Accuracy of the proposed scheme will be demonstrated. Comparisons of the numerical solution against theory for a perfect gas as well as liquid argon will be presented. Regularizations of the stochastic fluxes in the limit of zero mesh sizes will be discussed. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  12. Generalized rectangular finite difference beam propagation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujecki, Slawomir

    2008-08-10

    A method is proposed that allows for significant improvement of the numerical efficiency of the standard finite difference beam propagation algorithm. The advantages of the proposed method derive from the fact that it allows for an arbitrary selection of the preferred direction of propagation. It is demonstrated that such flexibility is particularly useful when studying the properties of obliquely propagating optical beams. The results obtained show that the proposed method achieves the same level of accuracy as the standard finite difference beam propagation method but with lower order Padé approximations and a coarser finite difference mesh.

  13. Prediction of Overpressure from Finite Volume Explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ramamurthi

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Tri-nitro toluene (TNT equivalence is not a good criterion for evaluating the practically encounted nonideal blast waves during ignition and in explosion-safety problems. A theoretical model which shows the trends related to the effects of source volume and energy time release on blast wave strength is discussed. A slower energy release and a larger source volume are shown to be necessary to reduce the blast effects.

  14. Analytic varieties with finite volume amoebas are algebraic

    CERN Document Server

    Madani, Farid

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the amoeba volume of a given $k-$dimensional generic analytic variety $V$ of the complex algebraic torus $(\\C^*)^n$. When $n\\geq 2k$, we show that $V$ is algebraic if and only if the volume of its amoeba is finite. In this precise case, we establish a comparison theorem for the volume of the amoeba and the coamoeba. Examples and applications to the $k-$linear spaces will be given.

  15. High-Resolution Finite Volume Modeling of Wave Propagation in Orthotropic Poroelastic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, Grady I; LeVeque, Randall J

    2012-01-01

    Poroelasticity theory models the dynamics of porous, fluid-saturated media. It was pioneered by Maurice Biot in the 1930s through 1960s, and has applications in several fields, including geophysics and modeling of in vivo bone. A wide variety of methods have been used to model poroelasticity, including finite difference, finite element, pseudospectral, and discontinuous Galerkin methods. In this work we use a Cartesian-grid high-resolution finite volume method to numerically solve Biot's equations in the time domain for orthotropic materials, with the stiff relaxation source term in the equations incorporated using operator splitting. This class of finite volume method has several useful properties, including the ability to use wave limiters to reduce numerical artifacts in the solution, ease of incorporating material inhomogeneities, low memory overhead, and an explicit time-stepping approach. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first use of high-resolution finite volume methods to model poroelasticity. T...

  16. Two-Nucleon Systems in a Finite Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul

    2014-11-01

    I present the formalism and methodology for determining the nucleon-nucleon scattering parameters from the finite volume spectra obtained from lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations. Using the recently derived energy quantization conditions and the experimentally determined scattering parameters, the bound state spectra for finite volume systems with overlap with the 3S1-3D3 channel are predicted for a range of volumes. It is shown that the extractions of the infinite-volume deuteron binding energy and the low-energy scattering parameters, including the S-D mixing angle, are possible from Lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems with boosts of |P| <= 2pi sqrt{3}/L in volumes with spatial extents L satisfying fm <~ L <~ 14 fm.

  17. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Lellouch, L; Portelli, A; Szabo, K K; Toth, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  18. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Hoelbling, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Katz, S.D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Lellouch, L., E-mail: lellouch@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [CNRS, Aix-Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, UMR 7332, F-13288, Marseille (France); Portelli, A. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Szabo, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Toth, B.C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-04-10

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  19. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fodor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  20. Large N Phase Transitions, Finite Volume, and Entanglement Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Clifford V

    2014-01-01

    Holographic studies of the entanglement entropy of field theories dual to charged and neutral black holes in asymptotically global AdS4 spacetimes are presented. The goal is to elucidate various properties of the quantity that are peculiar to working in finite volume, and to gain access to the behaviour of the entanglement entropy in the rich thermodynamic phase structure that is present at finite volume and large N. The entropy is followed through various first order phase transitions, and also a novel second order phase transition. Behaviour is found that contrasts interestingly with an earlier holographic study of a second order phase transition dual to an holographic superconductor.

  1. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  2. Lattice approach to finite volume form-factors of the Massive Thirring (Sine-Gordon) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Árpád

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, that the light-cone lattice approach for the Massive-Thirring (sine-Gordon) model, through the quantum inverse scattering method, admits an appropriate framework for computing the finite volume form-factors of local operators of the model. In this work we compute the finite volume diagonal matrix elements of the U(1) conserved current in the pure soliton sector of the theory. Based on the systematic large volume expansion of our results, we conjecture an exact expression for the finite volume expectation values of local operators in pure soliton states. At large volume in leading order these expectation values have the same form as in purely elastic scattering theories, but exponentially small corrections differ from previous Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz conjectures of purely elastic scattering theories.

  3. A finite volume method for numerical grid generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, S. B.

    1999-07-01

    A novel method to generate body-fitted grids based on the direct solution for three scalar functions is derived. The solution for scalar variables , and is obtained with a conventional finite volume method based on a physical space formulation. The grid is adapted or re-zoned to eliminate the residual error between the current solution and the desired solution, by means of an implicit grid-correction procedure. The scalar variables are re-mapped and the process is reiterated until convergence is obtained. Calculations are performed for a variety of problems by assuming combined Dirichlet-Neumann and pure Dirichlet boundary conditions involving the use of transcendental control functions, as well as functions designed to effect grid control automatically on the basis of boundary values. The use of dimensional analysis to build stable exponential functions and other control functions is demonstrated. Automatic procedures are implemented: one based on a finite difference approximation to the Cristoffel terms assuming local-boundary orthogonality, and another designed to procure boundary orthogonality. The performance of the new scheme is shown to be comparable with that of conventional inverse methods when calculations are performed on benchmark problems through the application of point-by-point and whole-field solution schemes. Advantages and disadvantages of the present method are critically appraised. Copyright

  4. Diagonal multi-soliton matrix elements in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Pálmai, T

    2012-01-01

    We consider diagonal matrix elements of local operators between multi-soliton states in finite volume in the sine-Gordon model, and formulate a conjecture regarding their finite size dependence which is valid up to corrections exponential in the volume. This conjecture extends the results of Pozsgay and Tak\\'acs which were only valid for diagonal scattering. In order to test the conjecture we implement a numerical renormalization group improved truncated conformal space approach. The numerical comparisons confirm the conjecture, which is expected to be valid for general integrable field theories. The conjectured formula can be used to evaluate finite temperature one-point and two-point functions using recently developed methods.

  5. Modeling of composite piezoelectric structures with the finite volume method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolborici, Valentin; Dawson, Francis P; Pugh, Mary C

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric devices, such as piezoelectric traveling- wave rotary ultrasonic motors, have composite piezoelectric structures. A composite piezoelectric structure consists of a combination of two or more bonded materials, at least one of which is a piezoelectric transducer. Piezoelectric structures have mainly been numerically modeled using the finite element method. An alternative approach based on the finite volume method offers the following advantages: 1) the ordinary differential equations resulting from the discretization process can be interpreted directly as corresponding circuits; and 2) phenomena occurring at boundaries can be treated exactly. This paper presents a method for implementing the boundary conditions between the bonded materials in composite piezoelectric structures modeled with the finite volume method. The paper concludes with a modeling example of a unimorph structure.

  6. High order finite volume methods for singular perturbation problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ZhongYing; HE ChongNan; WU Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we establish a high order finite volume method for the fourth order singular perturbation problems. In conjunction with the optimal meshes, the numerical solutions resulting from the method have optimal convergence order. Numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical estimates.

  7. A FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR THERMAL CONVECTION PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮洪兴

    2004-01-01

    Consider the finite volume element method for the thermal convection problem with the infinite Prandtl number. The author uses a conforming piecewise linear function on a fine triangulation for velocity and temperature, and a piecewise constant function on a coarse triangulation for pressure. For general triangulation the optimal order H1 norm error estimates are given.

  8. Finite Volume Multilevel Approximation of the Shallow Water Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arthur BOUSQUET; Martine MARION; Roger TEMAM

    2013-01-01

    The authors consider a simple transport equation in one-dimensional space and the linearized shallow water equations in two-dimensional space,and describe and implement a multilevel finite-volume discretization in the context of the utilization of the incremental unknowns.The numerical stability of the method is proved in both cases.

  9. Finite Volume Effect of Baryons in Strange Hadronic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao-Xi; LI Lei; NING Ping-Zhi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2001-01-01

    The finite volume effect of baryons in strange hadronic matter (SHM) is studied within the framework of relativistic mean-field theory. As this effect is concerned, the saturation density of SHM turns lower, and the binding energy per baryon decreases. Its influence to the compression modulus of SHM is also discussed.

  10. Coupled-channel systems in a finite volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Zohreh

    2012-10-01

    In this talk I will motivate studies of two-body coupled-channel systems in a finite volume in connection with the ultimate goal of studying nuclear reactions, as well as hadronic resonances, directly from lattice QCD. I will discuss how one can determine phase shifts and mixing parameters of coupled-channels such as that of pipi-KK isosinglet system from the energy spectrum in a finite volume with periodic boundary conditions. From the energy quantization condition, the volume dependence of electroweak matrix elements of two-hadron processes can also be extracted. This is necessary for studying weak processes that mix isosinglet-isotriplet two-nucleon states, e.g. proton-proton fusion. I will show how one can obtain such transition amplitudes from lattice QCD using the formalism developed.

  11. Finite difference order doubling in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Centre, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Jolicard, Georges [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut Utinam (UMR CNRS 6213), Observatoire de Besancon, 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP1615, 25010 Besancon cedex (France)

    2008-03-28

    An order doubling process previously used to obtain eighth-order eigenvalues from the fourth-order Numerov method is applied to the perturbed oscillator in two dimensions. A simple method of obtaining high order finite difference operators is reported and an odd parity boundary condition is found to be effective in facilitating the smooth operation of the order doubling process.

  12. Nonstandard finite difference schemes for differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdizadeh Khalsaraei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the reorganization of the denominator of the discrete derivative and nonlocal approximation of nonlinear terms are used in the design of nonstandard finite difference schemes (NSFDs. Numerical examples confirming then efficiency of schemes, for some differential equations are provided. In order to illustrate the accuracy of the new NSFDs, the numerical results are compared with standard methods.

  13. Multiphase control volume finite element simulations of fractured reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao

    With rapid evolution of hardware and software techniques in energy sector, reservoir simulation has become a powerful tool for field development planning and reservoir management. Many of the widely used commercial simulators were originally designed for structured grids and implemented with finite difference method (FDM). In recent years, technical advances in griding, fluid modeling, linear solver, reservoir and geological modeling, etc. have created new opportunities. At the same time, new reservoir simulation technology is required for solving large-scale heterogeneous problems. A three-dimensional, three-phase black-oil reservoir simulator has been developed using the control volume finite element (CVFE) formulation. Flux-based upstream weighting is employed to ensure flux continuity. The CVFE method is embedded in a fully-implicit formulation. State-of-the-art parallel, linear solvers are used. The implementation takes the advantages of object-oriented programming capabilities of C++ to provide maximum reuse and extensibility for future students. The results from the simulator have excellent agreement with those from commercial simulators. The convergence properties of the new simulator are verified using the method of manufactured solutions. The pressure and saturation solutions are verified to be first-order convergent as expected. The efficiency of the simulators and their capability to handle real large-scale field models are improved by implementing the models in parallel. Another aspect of the work dealt with multiphase flow of fractured reservoirs was performed. The discrete-fracture model is implemented in the simulator. Fractures and faults are represented by lines and planes in two- and three-dimensional spaces, respectively. The difficult task of generating an unstructured mesh for complex domains with fractures and faults is accomplished in this study. Applications of this model for two-phase and three-phase simulations in a variety of fractured

  14. Three-particle scattering amplitudes from a finite volume formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Briceno, Raul A

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantization condition for the spectrum of a system composed of three identical bosons in a finite volume with periodic boundary conditions. This condition gives a relation between the finite volume spectrum and infinite volume scattering amplitudes. The quantization condition presented is an integral equation that in general must be solved numerically. However, for systems with an attractive two-body force that supports a two-body bound-state, a diboson, and for energies below the diboson breakup, the quantization condition reduces to the well-known Luscher formula with exponential corrections in volume that scale with the diboson binding momentum. To accurately determine infinite volume phase shifts, it is necessary to extrapolate the phase shifts obtained from the Luscher formula for the boson-diboson system to the infinite volume limit. For energies above the breakup threshold, or for systems with no two-body bound-state (with only scattering states and resonances) the Luscher formula gets po...

  15. Finite element modeling for volume phantom in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Rybina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Using surface phantom, "shadows" of currents, which flow below and under surface tomographic lays, include on this lay, that is cause of adding errors in reconstruction image. For processing modeling in studied object volume isotropic finite elements should be used. Cube is chosen for finite element modeling in this work. Cube is modeled as sum of six rectangular (in the base pyramids, each pyramid consists of four triangular pyramids (with rectangular triangle in the base and hypotenuse, which is equal to cube rib to provide its uniformity and electrical definition. In the case of modeling on frequencies higher than 100 kHz biological tissue resistivities are complex. In this case weight coefficient k will be complex in received cube electrical model (inverse conductivity matrix of the cube finite element.

  16. An hybrid finite volume finite element method for variable density incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaro, Caterina; Creusé, Emmanuel; Goudon, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of variable density incompressible flows, modeled by the Navier-Stokes system. We introduce an hybrid scheme which combines a finite volume approach for treating the mass conservation equation and a finite element method to deal with the momentum equation and the divergence free constraint. The breakthrough relies on the definition of a suitable footbridge between the two methods, through the design of compatibility condition. In turn, the method is very flexible and allows to deal with unstructured meshes. Several numerical tests are performed to show the scheme capabilities. In particular, the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution is carefully investigated.

  17. Three-boson bound states in finite volume with EFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, S.; Hammer, H.-W.

    2010-04-01

    The universal properties of a three-boson system with large scattering length are well understood within the framework of Effective Field Theory. They include a geometric spectrum of shallow three-body bound states called “Efimov states” and log-periodic dependence of scattering observables on the scattering length. We investigate the modification of this spectrum in a finite cubic box using a partial wave expansion. The dependence of the binding energies on the box size is calculated for systems with positive and negative two-body scattering length. We compare the full results to results obtained using an expansion around the infinite volume binding energy. The renormalization of the Effective Field Theory in the finite volume is verified explicitly.

  18. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Patella, Agostino; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are massive, a mass-gap is generated and the theory is confined. IR-conformality is recovered in the chiral limit: masses of particles vanish in the chiral limit, while their ratios stay finite. In order to trust this analysis one has to relay on the infinite volume extrapolation. We will discuss the finite volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields.

  19. On the wavelet optimized finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Leland

    1994-01-01

    When one considers the effect in the physical space, Daubechies-based wavelet methods are equivalent to finite difference methods with grid refinement in regions of the domain where small scale structure exists. Adding a wavelet basis function at a given scale and location where one has a correspondingly large wavelet coefficient is, essentially, equivalent to adding a grid point, or two, at the same location and at a grid density which corresponds to the wavelet scale. This paper introduces a wavelet optimized finite difference method which is equivalent to a wavelet method in its multiresolution approach but which does not suffer from difficulties with nonlinear terms and boundary conditions, since all calculations are done in the physical space. With this method one can obtain an arbitrarily good approximation to a conservative difference method for solving nonlinear conservation laws.

  20. Infinite volume of noncommutative black hole wrapped by finite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; You, Li

    2017-02-01

    The volume of a black hole under noncommutative spacetime background is found to be infinite, in contradiction with the surface area of a black hole, or its Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy, which is well-known to be finite. Our result rules out the possibility of interpreting the entropy of a black hole by counting the number of modes wrapped inside its surface if the final evaporation stage can be properly treated. It implies the statistical interpretation for the BH entropy can be independent of the volume, provided spacetime is noncommutative. The effect of radiation back reaction is found to be small and doesn't influence the above conclusion.

  1. Finite Volume Evolution Galerkin Methods for Nonlinear Hyperbolic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, M.; Saibertová, J.; Warnecke, G.

    2002-12-01

    We present new truly multidimensional schemes of higher order within the frame- work of finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. These methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of the multidimensional hyperbolic system, such that all of the infinitely many directions of wave propagation are taken into account. Following our previous results for the wave equation system, we derive approximate evolution operators for the linearized Euler equations. The integrals along the Mach cone and along the cell interfaces are evaluated exactly, as well as by means of numerical quadratures. The influence of these numerical quadratures will be discussed. Second-order resolution is obtained using a conservative piecewise bilinear recovery and the midpoint rule approximation for time integration. We prove error estimates for the finite volume evolution Galerkin scheme for linear systems with constant coefficients. Several numerical experiments for the nonlinear. Euler equations, which confirm the accuracy and good multidimensional behavior of the FVEG schemes, are presented as well.

  2. Implicit finite difference methods on composite grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, C. Wayne

    1987-01-01

    Techniques for eliminating time lags in the implicit finite-difference solution of partial differential equations are investigated analytically, with a focus on transient fluid dynamics problems on overlapping multicomponent grids. The fundamental principles of the approach are explained, and the method is shown to be applicable to both rectangular and curvilinear grids. Numerical results for sample problems are compared with exact solutions in graphs, and good agreement is demonstrated.

  3. Finite-volume cumulant expansion in QCD-colorless plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladrem, M. [Taibah University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Madinah, Al-Munawwarah (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Algiers (Algeria); ENS-Vieux Kouba (Bachir El-Ibrahimi), Laboratoire de Physique et de Mathematiques Appliquees (LPMA), Algiers (Algeria); Ahmed, M.A.A. [Taibah University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Madinah, Al-Munawwarah (Saudi Arabia); ENS-Vieux Kouba (Bachir El-Ibrahimi), Laboratoire de Physique et de Mathematiques Appliquees (LPMA), Algiers (Algeria); Taiz University in Turba, Physics Department, Taiz (Yemen); Alfull, Z.Z. [Taibah University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Madinah, Al-Munawwarah (Saudi Arabia); Cherif, S. [ENS-Vieux Kouba (Bachir El-Ibrahimi), Laboratoire de Physique et de Mathematiques Appliquees (LPMA), Algiers (Algeria); Ghardaia University, Sciences and Technologies Department, Ghardaia (Algeria)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the finite-size effects, the localization of the phase transition in finite systems and the determination of its order, become an extremely difficult task, even in the simplest known cases. In order to identify and locate the finite-volume transition point T{sub 0}(V) of the QCD deconfinement phase transition to a colorless QGP, we have developed a new approach using the finite-size cumulant expansion of the order parameter and the L{sub mn}-method. The first six cumulants C{sub 1,2,3,4,5,6} with the corresponding under-normalized ratios (skewness Σ, kurtosis κ, pentosis Π{sub ±}, and hexosis H{sub 1,2,3}) and three unnormalized combinations of them, (O = σ{sup 2}κΣ{sup -1},U = σ{sup -2}Σ{sup -1},N = σ{sup 2}κ) are calculated and studied as functions of (T, V). A new approach, unifying in a clear and consistent way the definitions of cumulant ratios, is proposed.Anumerical FSS analysis of the obtained results has allowed us to locate accurately the finite-volume transition point. The extracted transition temperature value T{sub 0}(V) agrees with that expected T{sub 0}{sup N}(V) from the order parameter and the thermal susceptibility χ{sub T} (T, V), according to the standard procedure of localization to within about 2%. In addition to this, a very good correlation factor is obtained proving the validity of our cumulants method. The agreement of our results with those obtained by means of other models is remarkable. (orig.)

  4. Nucleon resonance structure in the finite volume of lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Lee, T -S H; Leinweber, D B; Thomas, A W

    2016-01-01

    An approach for relating the nucleon resonances extracted from $\\pi N$ reaction data to lattice QCD calculations has been developed by using the finite-volume Hamiltonian method. Within models of $\\pi N$ reactions, bare states are introduced to parametrize the intrinsic excitations of the nucleon. We show that the resonance pole positions can be related to the probability $P_{N^*}(E)$ of finding the bare state, $N^*$, in the $\\pi N$ scattering states in infinite volume. We further demonstrate that the probability $P_{N^*}^V(E)$ of finding the same bare states in the eigenfunctions of the underlying Hamiltonian in finite volume approaches $P_{N^*}(E)$ as the volume increases. Our findings suggest that the comparison of $P_{N^*}(E)$ and $P_{N^*}^V(E)$ can be used to examine whether the nucleon resonances extracted from the $\\pi N$ reaction data within the dynamical models are consistent with lattice QCD calculation. We also discuss the measurement of $P_{N^*}^V(E)$ directly from lattice QCD. The practical diffe...

  5. Finite Volume Cumulant Expansion in QCD-Colorless Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ladrem, M; Al-Full, Z; Cherif, S

    2015-01-01

    Due to the finite size effects, the localisation of the phase transition in finite systems and the determination of its order, become an extremely difficult task, even in the simplest known cases. In order to identify and locate the finite volume transition point $T_{0}(V)$ of the QCD deconfinement phase transition to a Colorless QGP, we have developed a new approach using the finite size cumulant expansion of the order parameter and the $L_{mn}$-method. The first six cumulants $C_{1,2,3,4,5,6}$ with the corresponding under-normalized ratios(skewness $\\Sigma$, kurtosis $\\kappa$ ,pentosis $\\Pi_{\\pm}$ and hexosis $\\mathcal{H}_{1,2,3}$) and three unnormalized combinations of them ($\\mathcal{O}={\\mathcal{\\sigma }^{2} \\mathcal{\\kappa } }{\\mathbf{\\Sigma }^{-1} }$, $\\mathcal{U} ={\\mathcal{\\sigma }^{-2} \\mathbf{\\Sigma }^{-1} }$, $\\mathcal{N} = \\mathcal{\\sigma }^{2} \\mathcal{\\kappa }$) are calculated and studied as functions of $(T,V)$. A new approach, unifying in a clear and consistent way the definitions of cumulant...

  6. Mathematical model of diffusion-limited gas bubble dynamics in unstirred tissue with finite volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R Srini; Gerth, Wayne A; Powell, Michael R

    2002-02-01

    Models of gas bubble dynamics for studying decompression sickness have been developed by considering the bubble to be immersed in an extravascular tissue with diffusion-limited gas exchange between the bubble and the surrounding unstirred tissue. In previous versions of this two-region model, the tissue volume must be theoretically infinite, which renders the model inapplicable to analysis of bubble growth in a finite-sized tissue. We herein present a new two-region model that is applicable to problems involving finite tissue volumes. By introducing radial deviations to gas tension in the diffusion region surrounding the bubble, the concentration gradient can be zero at a finite distance from the bubble, thus limiting the tissue volume that participates in bubble-tissue gas exchange. It is shown that these deviations account for the effects of heterogeneous perfusion on gas bubble dynamics, and are required for the tissue volume to be finite. The bubble growth results from a difference between the bubble gas pressure and an average gas tension in the surrounding diffusion region that explicitly depends on gas uptake and release by the bubble. For any given decompression, the diffusion region volume must stay above a certain minimum in order to sustain bubble growth.

  7. Integral and finite difference inequalities and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pachpatte, B G

    2006-01-01

    The monograph is written with a view to provide basic tools for researchers working in Mathematical Analysis and Applications, concentrating on differential, integral and finite difference equations. It contains many inequalities which have only recently appeared in the literature and which can be used as powerful tools and will be a valuable source for a long time to come. It is self-contained and thus should be useful for those who are interested in learning or applying the inequalities with explicit estimates in their studies.- Contains a variety of inequalities discovered which find numero

  8. Application of vector finite volume method for electromagnetic flow simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, T.; Murashige, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Yamaguchi, A. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    A vector finite volume method (VFVM) has been developed for an electromagnetic flow analysis. In the VFVM, the governing equations of magnetic flux density and electric field intensity are solved separately so as to reduce the computational cost caused by an iterative procedure that is required to satisfy the solenoidal condition. In the present paper, a suppression of temperature fluctuation of liquid sodium after a T-junction has also been investigated with a simplified two dimensional numerical analysis by adding an obstacle (turbulence promoter) or a magnetic field after the junction. (author)

  9. Finite volume adaptive solutions using SIMPLE as smoother

    CERN Document Server

    Syrakos, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new multilevel procedure that can solve the discrete Navier-Stokes system arising from finite volume discretizations on composite grids, which may consist of more than one level. SIMPLE is used and tested as the smoother, but the multilevel procedure is such that it does not exclude the use of other smoothers. Local refinement is guided by a criterion based on an estimate of the truncation error. The numerical experiments presented test not only the behaviour of the multilevel algebraic solver, but also the efficiency of local refinement based on this particular criterion.

  10. Finite volume method for investigating anisotrooic conductivitv in EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel finite volume method is presented to investigate the effect of anisotropic conductivity on the potential distribution of the scalp. The second-order interpolation of the tetrahedral mesh is used to avoid employing the secondary element. The calculation precision is enhanced by using the Gaussian integration. To avoid the geometric singularity, the triangular prism is employed in place of the conventional hexahedron mesh. With the method, the spherical models as well as the realistic head models are simulated. The calculation results indicate that the anisotropic ratio and the position of dipole sources have great influence on the potential distribution in the electroencephalogram.

  11. On Third-Order Limiter Functions for Finite Volume Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidtmann, Birte; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose a finite volume limiter function for a reconstruction on the three-point stencil. Compared to classical limiter functions in the MUSCL framework, which yield $2^{\\text{nd}}$-order accuracy, the new limiter is $3^\\text{rd}$-order accurate for smooth solutions. In an earlier work, such a $3^\\text{rd}$-order limiter function was proposed and showed successful results [2]. However, it came with unspecified parameters. We close this gap by giving information on these parameters.

  12. An introduction to finite volumes for gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, François

    2011-01-01

    We propose an elementary introduction to the finite volume method in the context of gas dynamics conservation laws. Our approach is founded on the advection equation, the exact integration of the associated Cauchy problem, and the so-called upwind scheme in one space dimension. It is then extended in three directions: hyperbolic linear systems and particularily the system of acoustics, gas dynamics with the help of the Roe matrix and two space dimensions by following the approach proposed by Van Leer. A special emphasis on boundary conditions is proposed all along the text.

  13. The Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Rafael; Stich, Daniel; Morales, Jose

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method (CSFDM) as a generalization of the well-known Finite-Difference method (FDM) for solving the acoustic and elastic wave equations. We have found a direct relationship between modelling the second-order wave equation by the FDM and the first-order wave equation by the CSFDM in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D acoustic media. We present the numerical methodology in order to apply the introduced CSFDM and show an example for wave propagation in simple homogeneous and heterogeneous models. The CSFDM may be implemented as an extension into pre-existing numerical techniques in order to obtain fourth- or sixth-order accurate results with compact three time-level stencils. We compare advantages of imposing various types of initial motion conditions of the CSFDM and demonstrate its higher-order accuracy under the same computational cost and dispersion-dissipation properties. The introduced method can be naturally extended to solve different partial differential equations arising in other fields of science and engineering.

  14. A HIGH RESOLUTION FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR SOLVING SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution finite volume numerical method for solving the shallow water equations is developed in this paper. In order to extend finite difference TVD scheme to finite volume method, a new geometry and topology of control bodies is defined by considering the corresponding relationships between nodes and elements. This solver is implemented on arbitrary quadrilateral meshes and their satellite elements, and based on a second-order hybrid type of TVD scheme in space discretization and a two-step Runge-Kutta method in time discretization. Then it is used to deal with two typical dam-break problems and very satisfactory results are obtained comparied with other numerical solutions. It can be considered as an efficient implement for the computation of shallow water problems, especially concerning those having discontinuities, subcritical and supercritical flows and complex geometries.

  15. A Mixed Finite Volume Element Method for Flow Calculations in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jim E.

    1996-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of flow in porous media is the accurate determination of the velocities that drive the flow. The large scale irregularities of the geology, such as faults, fractures, and layers suggest the use of irregular grids in the simulation. Work has been done in applying the finite volume element (FVE) methodology as developed by McCormick in conjunction with mixed methods which were developed by Raviart and Thomas. The resulting mixed finite volume element discretization scheme has the potential to generate more accurate solutions than standard approaches. The focus of this paper is on a multilevel algorithm for solving the discrete mixed FVE equations. The algorithm uses a standard cell centered finite difference scheme as the 'coarse' level and the more accurate mixed FVE scheme as the 'fine' level. The algorithm appears to have potential as a fast solver for large size simulations of flow in porous media.

  16. Local tetrahedron modeling of microelectronics using the finite-volume hybrid-grid technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    The finite-volume hybrid-grid (FVHG) technique uses both structured and unstructured grid regions in obtaining a solution to the time-domain Maxwell`s equations. The method is based on explicit time differencing and utilizes rectilinear finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and nonorthogonal finite-volume time-domain (FVTD). The technique directly couples structured FDTD grids with unstructured FVTD grids without the need for spatial interpolation across grid interfaces. In this paper, the FVHG method is applied to simple planar microelectronic devices. Local tetrahedron grids are used to model portions of the device under study, with the remainder of the problem space being modeled with cubical hexahedral cells. The accuracy of propagating microstrip-guided waves from a low-density hexahedron region through a high-density tetrahedron grid is investigated.

  17. Finite volume treatment of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering in the $\\rho$ channel

    CERN Document Server

    Albaladejo, M; Oller, J A; Roca, L

    2013-01-01

    We make a theoretical study of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering with quantum numbers $J^{PC}=1^{--}$ in a finite box. To calculate physical observables for infinite volume from lattice QCD, the finite box dependence of the potentials is not usually considered. We quantify such effects by means of two different approaches for vector-isovector $\\pi\\pi$ scattering based on Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory results: the Inverse Amplitude Method and another one based on the $N/D$ method. We take into account finite box effects stemming from higher orders through loops in the crossed $t,u-$channels as well as from the renormalization of the coupling constants. The main conclusion is that for $\\pi\\pi$ phase shifts in the isovector channel one can safely apply L\\"uscher based methods for finite box sizes of $L$ greater than $2 m_\\pi^{-1}$.

  18. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  19. Multichannel 1 → 2 transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Hansen, Maxwell T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Walker-Loud, Andre [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    We perform a model-independent, non-perturbative investigation of two-point and three-point finite-volume correlation functions in the energy regime where two-particle states can go on-shell. We study three-point functions involving a single incoming particle and an outgoing two-particle state, relevant, for example, for studies of meson decays (e.g., B⁰ → K*l⁺l⁻) or meson photo production (e.g., πγ* → ππ). We observe that, while the spectrum solely depends upon the on-shell scattering amplitude, the correlation functions also depend upon off-shell amplitudes. The main result of this work is a non-perturbative generalization of the Lellouch-Luscher formula relating matrix elements of currents in finite and infinite spatial volumes. We extend that work by considering a theory with multiple, strongly-coupled channels and by accommodating external currents which inject arbitrary four-momentum as well as arbitrary angular-momentum. The result is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections governed by the pion mass times the box size. We also apply our master equation to various examples, including two processes mentioned above as well as examples where the final state is an admixture of two open channels.

  20. The Effect of a Finite Measurement Volume on Power Spectra from a Burst Type LDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika; K. George, William

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the effects of a finite size measurement volume on the power spectrum computed fromdata acquired with a burst-type laser Doppler anemometer. The finite measurement volume causes temporal distortions in acquisition of the data resulting in phenomena such as finite processing time and de...

  1. Abstract Level Parallelization of Finite Difference Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Vollebregt

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A formalism is proposed for describing finite difference calculations in an abstract way. The formalism consists of index sets and stencils, for characterizing the structure of sets of data items and interactions between data items (“neighbouring relations”. The formalism provides a means for lifting programming to a more abstract level. This simplifies the tasks of performance analysis and verification of correctness, and opens the way for automaticcode generation. The notation is particularly useful in parallelization, for the systematic construction of parallel programs in a process/channel programming paradigm (e.g., message passing. This is important because message passing, unfortunately, still is the only approach that leads to acceptable performance for many more unstructured or irregular problems on parallel computers that have non-uniform memory access times. It will be shown that the use of index sets and stencils greatly simplifies the determination of which data must be exchanged between different computing processes.

  2. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  3. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  4. Alternating Direction Finite Volume Element Methods for Three-Dimensional Parabolic Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongke

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents alternating direction finite volume element methods for three-dimensional parabolic partial differential equations and gives four computational schemes, one is analogous to Douglas finite difference scheme with second-order splitting error, the other two schemes have third-order splitting error, and the last one is an extended LOD scheme. The L2 norm and H1 semi-norm error estimates are obtained for the first scheme and second one, respectively. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the methods.

  5. The Yang-Mills gradient flow in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Zoltan; Kuti, Julius; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2012-01-01

    The Yang-Mills gradient flow is considered on the four dimensional torus T^4 for SU(N) gauge theory coupled to N_f flavors of massless fermions in arbitrary representations. The small volume dynamics is dominated by the constant gauge fields. The expectation value of the field strength tensor squared is calculated for positive flow time t by treating the non-zero gauge modes perturbatively and the zero modes exactly. The finite volume correction to the infinite volume result is found to contain both algebraic and exponential terms. The leading order result is then used to define a one parameter family of running coupling schemes in which the coupling runs with the linear size of the box. The new scheme is tested numerically in SU(3) gauge theory coupled to N_f = 4 flavors of massless fundamental fermions. The calculations are performed at several lattice spacings with a controlled continuum extrapolation. The continuum result agrees with the perturbative 2-loop prediction for small renormalized coupling as ex...

  6. Determination of finite-difference weights using scaled binomial windows

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-05-01

    The finite-difference method evaluates a derivative through a weighted summation of function values from neighboring grid nodes. Conventional finite-difference weights can be calculated either from Taylor series expansions or by Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The finite-difference method can be interpreted as a truncated convolutional counterpart of the pseudospectral method in the space domain. For this reason, we also can derive finite-difference operators by truncating the convolution series of the pseudospectral method. Various truncation windows can be employed for this purpose and they result in finite-difference operators with different dispersion properties. We found that there exists two families of scaled binomial windows that can be used to derive conventional finite-difference operators analytically. With a minor change, these scaled binomial windows can also be used to derive optimized finite-difference operators with enhanced dispersion properties. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Hidden sl$_{2}$-algebra of finite-difference equations

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Yu F; Smirnov, Yuri; Turbiner, Alexander

    1995-01-01

    The connection between polynomial solutions of finite-difference equations and finite-dimensional representations of the sl_2-algebra is established. (Talk presented at the Wigner Symposium, Guadalajara, Mexico, August 1995; to be published in Proceedings)

  8. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  9. SU(N) multi-Skyrmions at finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfora, Fabrizio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Casilla, Valdivia (Chile); Di Mauro, Marco; Naddeo, Adele [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E.R. Caianiello' ' , Fisciano, SA (Italy); Kurkov, Maxim A. [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Matematica e Applicazioni ' ' R. Caccioppoli' ' , Napoli (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    We study multi-soliton solutions of the fourdimensional SU(N) Skyrme model by combining the hedgehog ansatz for SU(N) based on the harmonic maps of S{sup 2} into CP{sup N-1} and a geometrical trick which allows to analyze explicitly finite-volume effects without breaking the relevant symmetries of the ansatz. The geometric set-up allows to introduce a parameter which is related to the ft Hooft coupling of a suitable large N limit, in which N → ∞ and the curvature of the background metric approaches zero, in such a way that their product is constant. The relevance of such a parameter to the physics of the system is pointed out. In particular, we discuss how the discrete symmetries of the configurations depend on it. (orig.)

  10. Reflection-free finite volume Maxwell's solver for adaptive grids

    CERN Document Server

    Elkina, Nina

    2015-01-01

    We present a non-staggered method for the Maxwell equations in adaptively refined grids. The code is based on finite volume central scheme that preserves in a discrete form both divergence-free property of magnetic field and the Gauss law. High spatial accuracy is achieved with help of non-oscillatory extrema preserving piece-wise or piece-wise-quadratic reconstructions. The semi-discrete equations are solved by implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta method. The new adaptive grid Maxwell's solver is examined based on several 1d examples, including the an propagation of a Gaussian pulse through vacuum and partially ionised gas. Two-dimensional extension is tested with a Gaussian pulse incident on dielectric disc. Additionally, we focus on testing computational accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Frost Formation: Optimizing solutions under a finite volume approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrons, E.; Perez-Segarra, C. D.; Oliet, C.

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional transient formulation of the frost formation process is developed by means of a finite volume approach. Emphasis is put on the frost surface boundary condition as well as the wide range of empirical correlations related to the thermophysical and transport properties of frost. A study of the numerical solution is made, establishing the parameters that ensure grid independence. Attention is given to the algorithm, the discretised equations and the code optimization through dynamic relaxation techniques. A critical analysis of four cases is carried out by comparing solutions of several empirical models against tested experiments. As a result, a discussion on the performance of such parameters is started and a proposal of the most suitable models is presented.

  12. Well-balanced finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for the shallow water equations

    OpenAIRE

    Medvidová, Maria Lukáčová -; Noelle, Sebastian; Kraft, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    We present a new well-balanced finite volume method within the framework of the finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. The methodology will be illustrated for the shallow water equations with source terms modelling the bottom topography and Coriolis forces. Results can be generalized to more complex systems of balance laws. The FVEG methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of multidimensio...

  13. Finite volume schemes for multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems based on the use of bicharacteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Saibertova, Jitka

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present recent results for the bicharacteristic based finite volume schemes, the so-called finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. These methods were proposed to solve multi-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws. They combine the usually conflicting design objectives of using the conservation form and following the characteristics, or bicharacteristics. This is realized by combining the finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators, which use bich...

  14. Finite volume schemes for multidimensional hyperbolic systems based on the use of bicharacteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria

    2003-01-01

    In this survey paper we present an overview on recent results for the bicharacteristics based finite volume schemes, the so-called finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. These methods were proposed to solve multidimensional hyperbolic conservation laws. They combine the usually conflicting design objectives of using the conservation form and following the characteritics, or bicharacteritics. This is realized by combining the finite volume formulation with approximate evolution opera...

  15. Well-balanced finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for the shallow water equations

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Kraft, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    We present a new well-balanced finite volume method within the framework of the finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. The methodology will be illustrated for the shallow water equations with source terms modelling the bottom topography and Coriolis forces. Results can be generalized to more complex systems of balance laws. The FVEG methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of the multidime...

  16. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  17. ON FINITE DIFFERENCES ON A STRING PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Mango

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an analysis of a one-Dimensional (1D time dependent wave equation from a vibrating guitar string. We consider the transverse displacement of a plucked guitar string and the subsequent vibration motion. Guitars are known for production of great sound in form of music. An ordinary string stretched between two points and then plucked does not produce quality sound like a guitar string. A guitar string produces loud and unique sound which can be organized by the player to produce music. Where is the origin of guitar sound? Can the contribution of each part of the guitar to quality sound be accounted for, by mathematically obtaining the numerical solution to wave equation describing the vibration of the guitar string? In the present sturdy, we have solved the wave equation for a vibrating string using the finite different method and analyzed the wave forms for different values of the string variables. The results show that the amplitude (pitch or quality of the guitar wave (sound vary greatly with tension in the string, length of the string, linear density of the string and also on the material of the sound board. The approximate solution is representative; if the step width; ∂x and ∂t are small, that is <0.5.

  18. A finite volume scheme for the transport of radionucleides in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Chénier, Eric; Eymard,, Robert; Nicolas, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The COUPLEX1 Test case (Bourgeat et al., 2003) is devoted to the comparison of numerical schemes on a convection-diffusion-reaction problem. We first show that the results of the simulation can be mainly predicted by a simple analysis of the data. A finite volume scheme, with three different treatments of the convective term, is then shown to deliver accurate and stable results under a low computational cost.

  19. Effective condition number for finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Cai; Chien, Cheng-Sheng; Huang, Hung-Tsai

    2007-01-01

    For solving the linear algebraic equations Ax=b with the symmetric and positive definite matrix A, from elliptic equations, the traditional condition number in the 2-norm is defined by Cond.=[lambda]1/[lambda]n, where [lambda]1 and [lambda]n are the maximal and minimal eigenvalues of the matrix A, respectively. The condition number is used to provide the bounds of the relative errors from the perturbation of both A and b. Such a Cond. can only be reached by the worst situation of all rounding errors and all b. For the given b, the true relative errors may be smaller, or even much smaller than the Cond., which is called the effective condition number in Chan and Foulser [Effectively well-conditioned linear systems, SIAM J. Sci. Statist. Comput. 9 (1988) 963-969] and Christiansen and Hansen [The effective condition number applied to error analysis of certain boundary collocation methods, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 54(1) (1994) 15-36]. In this paper, we propose the new computational formulas for effective condition number Cond_eff, and define the new simplified effective condition number Cond_E. For the latter, we only need the eigenvector corresponding to the minimal eigenvalue of A, which can be easily obtained by the inverse power method. In this paper, we also apply the effective condition number for the finite difference method for Poisson's equation. The difference grids are not supposed to be quasiuniform. Under a non-orthogonality assumption, the effective condition number is proven to be O(1) for the homogeneous boundary conditions. Such a result is extraordinary, compared with the traditional , where hmin is the minimal meshspacing of the difference grids used. For the non-homogeneous Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, the effective condition number is proven to be O(h-1/2) and , respectively, where h is the maximal meshspacing of the difference grids. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the analysis made.

  20. A finite-volume scheme for a kidney nephron model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seguin Nicolas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a finite volume type scheme to solve a transport nephron model. The model consists in a system of transport equations with specific boundary conditions. The transport velocity is driven by another equation that can undergo sign changes during the transient regime. This is the main difficulty for the numerical resolution. The scheme we propose is based on an explicit resolution and is stable under a CFL condition which does not depend on the stiffness of source terms. Nous présentons un schéma numérique de type volume fini que l’on applique à un modèle de transport dans le néphron. Ce modèle consiste en un système d’équations de transport, avec des conditions aux bords spécifiques. La vitesse du transport est la solution d’un autre système d’équation et peut changer de signe au cours du régime transitoire. Ceci constitue la principale difficulté pour la résolution numérique. Le schéma proposé, basé sur une résolution explicite, est stable sous une condition CFL non restrictive.

  1. PERTURBATION FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR CONVECTIVE-DIFFUSION INTEGRAL EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi; YANG Guowei

    2004-01-01

    A perturbation finite volume (PFV) method for the convective-diffusion integral equation is developed in this paper. The PFV scheme is an upwind and mixed scheme using any higher-order interpolation and second-order integration approximations, with the least nodes similar to the standard three-point schemes, that is, the number of the nodes needed is equal to unity plus the face-number of the control volume. For instance, in the two-dimensional (2-D) case, only four nodes for the triangle grids and five nodes for the Cartesian grids are utilized, respectively. The PFV scheme is applied on a number of 1-D linear and nonlinear problems, 2-D and 3-D flow model equations. Comparing with other standard three-point schemes, the PFV scheme has much smaller numerical diffusion than the first-order upwind scheme (UDS). Its numerical accuracies are also higher than the second-order central scheme (CDS), the power-law scheme (PLS) and QUICK scheme.

  2. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  3. Study of the $\\bar K N$ system and coupled channels in a finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, A Martínez; Jido, D; Oset, E

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the $\\bar KN$ and coupled channels system in a finite volume and study the properties of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance. We calculate the energy levels in a finite volume and solve the inverse problem of determining the resonance position in the infinite volume. We devise the best strategy of analysis to obtain the two poles of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ in the infinite volume case, with sufficient precision to distinguish them.

  4. Cell-Centred Finite Difference Methodology for Solving Partial Differential Equations on an Unstructured Mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, J. J.; Barron, R. M.; Higgins, M.

    2011-11-01

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) arise in connection with many physical phenomena involving two or more independent variables. Boundary conditions associated with the PDEs are either Dirichlet, Neumann or mixed conditions. Analytical solutions for most of these problems are not easy to obtain, and may not even be posssible. For such reasons, numerical methodologies for solving PDEs have been developed, such as finite element (FE), finite volume (FV) and finite difference (FD) methods. In the present paper, an innovative finite difference formulation, referred to as the cell-centred finite difference (CCFD) method, is proposed. Instead of applying finite difference approximations at the grid points as in the traditional finite difference method, the new methodology implements a finite difference scheme at each cell centroid in a predefined mesh topology. The prominent advantage of the proposed methodology is that it allows finite differencing to be applied on any arbitrary mesh topology, i.e. structured, unstructured or hybrid. The CCFD formulation is developed in this paper and implemented on a test problem to demonstrate its capabilities.

  5. Mortar Upwind Finite Volume Element Method with Crouzeix-Raviart Element for Parabolic Convection Diffusion Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element method with the Crouzeix-Raviart element for the parabolic convection diffusion problems.It is proved that the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element approximations derived are convergent in the H1- and L2-norms.

  6. A study of finite volume effect on the multiple-frequencies coherence of VHF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    1993-08-01

    In the past few years, the technique of frequency domain interferometry (FDI) has been developed on VHF radar. By using this technique, the characteristics of a very thin atmospheric lay structure, which is embedded in the radar volume and cannot be solved by conventional VHF radar with only one operational frequency, can be determined through the calculation of the coherence and the phase from the two echo signals with different operational frequencies. According to FDI theory, assuming that the range and antenna beam weighting effect can be ignored, the coherence will approach zero if the layer thickness is fairly greater than the radar volume. However, in this study, it will be shown that if a rectangular pulse is transmitted and the atmospheric refractivity irregularities are distributed uniformly in the radar volume, that is, there is no narrow layer structure existing in the scattering volume, the coherence of two signals with different operational frequencies is still high and its behavior can be described by the equation C is approximately equal to Sinc((Delta)k L)/(l + N/S), where C is the coherence, Delta K is the wavenumber difference between two carrier frequencies, L is the effective scale of scattering volume, and N/S is the noise-to-signal power ratio. This feature can be interpreted physically by the finite volume filtering effect on the turbulent wavenumber spectrum. This theoretical prediction has been compared with the FDI experiments carried out by the Chung-Li VHF radar, and the results are quite reasonable. Thus, it is suggested that when the FDI technique is applied to estimate the thickness and the position of a thin layer, the finite volume filtering effect should be taken into account.

  7. Finite-Volume QED Corrections to Decay Amplitudes in Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lubicz, V.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Sanfilippo, F.; Simula, S.; Tantalo, N.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that the leading and next-to-leading finite-volume effects in the evaluation of leptonic decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons at $O(\\alpha)$ are universal, i.e. they are independent of the structure of the meson. This is analogous to a similar result for the spectrum but with some fundamental differences, most notably the presence of infrared divergences in decay amplitudes. The leading non-universal, structure-dependent terms are of $O(1/L^2)$ (compared to the $O(1/L^3)$ leading non-universal corrections in the spectrum). We calculate the universal finite-volume effects, which requires an extension of previously developed techniques to include a dependence on an external three-momentum (in our case, the momentum of the final state lepton). The result can be included in the strategy proposed in Ref.\\,\\cite{Carrasco:2015xwa} for using lattice simulations to compute the decay widths at $O(\\alpha)$, with the remaining finite-volume effects starting at order $O(1/L^2)$. The methods developed in this...

  8. Finite-volume WENO scheme for viscous compressible multicomponent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We develop a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method that is suitable for the simulation of multicomponent flows governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method is high-order accurate in smooth regions of the flow, discretely conserves the mass of each component, as well as the total momentum and energy, and is oscillation-free, i.e. it does not introduce spurious oscillations at the locations of shockwaves and/or material interfaces. The method is of Godunov-type and utilizes a fifth-order, finite-volume, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the spatial reconstruction and a Harten-Lax-van Leer contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver to upwind the fluxes. A third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm is employed to march the solution in time. The derivation is generalized to three dimensions and nonuniform Cartesian grids. A two-point, fourth-order, Gaussian quadrature rule is utilized to build the spatial averages of the reconstructed variables inside the cells, as well as at cell boundaries. The algorithm is therefore fourth-order accurate in space and third-order accurate in time in smooth regions of the flow. We corroborate the properties of our numerical method by considering several challenging one-, two- and three-dimensional test cases, the most complex of which is the asymmetric collapse of an air bubble submerged in a cylindrical water cavity that is embedded in 10% gelatin. PMID:25110358

  9. Finite volume methods for submarine debris flows and generated waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihwan; Løvholt, Finn; Issler, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Submarine landslides can impose great danger to the underwater structures and generate destructive tsunamis. Submarine debris flows often behave like visco-plastic materials, and the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model is known to be appropriate for describing the motion. In this work, we develop numerical schemes for the visco-plastic debris flows using finite volume methods in Eulerian coordinates with two horizontal dimensions. We provide parameter sensitivity analysis and demonstrate how common ad-hoc assumptions such as including a minimum shear layer depth influence the modeling of the landslide dynamics. Hydrodynamic resistance forces, hydroplaning, and remolding are all crucial terms for underwater landslides, and are hence added into the numerical formulation. The landslide deformation is coupled to the water column and simulated in the Clawpack framework. For the propagation of the tsunamis, the shallow water equations and the Boussinesq-type equations are employed to observe how important the wave dispersion is. Finally, two cases in central Norway, i.e. the subaerial quick clay landslide at Byneset in 2012, and the submerged tsunamigenic Statland landslide in 2014, are both presented for validation. The research leading to these results has received funding from the Research Council of Norway under grant number 231252 (Project TsunamiLand) and the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement 603839 (Project ASTARTE).

  10. Finite volume simulation for convective heat transfer in wavy channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Erman; Taymaz, Imdat; Islamoglu, Yasar

    2016-03-01

    The convective heat transfer characteristics for a periodic wavy channel have been investigated experimentally and numerically. Finite volume method was used in numerical study. Experiment results are used for validation the numerical results. Studies were conducted for air flow conditions where contact angle is 30°, and uniform heat flux 616 W/m2 is applied as the thermal boundary conditions. Reynolds number ( Re) is varied from 2000 to 11,000 and Prandtl number ( Pr) is taken 0.7. Nusselt number ( Nu), Colburn factor ( j), friction factor ( f) and goodness factor ( j/ f) against Reynolds number have been studied. The effects of the wave geometry and minimum channel height have been discussed. Thus, the best performance of flow and heat transfer characterization was determined through wavy channels. Additionally, it was determined that the computed values of convective heat transfer coefficients are in good correlation with experimental results for the converging diverging channel. Therefore, numerical results can be used for these channel geometries instead of experimental results.

  11. A Comparison of Continuous Mass-lumped Finite Elements and Finite Differences for 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.; Kononov, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    The finite-difference method is widely used for time-domain modelling of the wave equation because of its ease of implementation of high-order spatial discretization schemes, parallelization and computational efficiency. However, finite elements on tetrahedral meshes are more accurate in complex geo

  12. Asymptotic Behavior of the Finite Difference and the Finite Element Methods for Parabolic Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; FENG Hui

    2005-01-01

    The asymptotic convergence of the solution of the parabolic equation is proved. By the eigenvalues estimation, we obtain that the approximate solutions by the finite difference method and the finite element method are asymptotically convergent. Both methods are considered in continuous time.

  13. A Comparison of Continuous Mass-lumped Finite Elements and Finite Differences for 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.; Kononov, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    The finite-difference method is widely used for time-domain modelling of the wave equation because of its ease of implementation of high-order spatial discretization schemes, parallelization and computational efficiency. However, finite elements on tetrahedral meshes are more accurate in complex

  14. Finite volume treatment of pi pi scattering and limits to phase shifts extraction from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Albaladejo, M; Oset, E; Rios, G; Roca, L

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the effects of finite volume for pipi scattering in order to extract physical observables for infinite volume from lattice QCD. We compare three different approaches for pipi scattering (lowest order Bethe-Salpeter approach, N/D and inverse amplitude methods) with the aim to study the effects of the finite size of the box in the potential of the different theories, specially the left-hand cut contribution through loops in the crossed t,u-channels. We quantify the error made by neglecting these effects in usual extractions of physical observables from lattice QCD spectra. We conclude that for pipi phase-shifts in the scalar-isoscalar channel up to 800 MeV this effect is negligible for box sizes bigger than 2.5m_pi^-1 and of the order of 5% at around 1.5-2m_pi^-1. For isospin 2 the finite size effects can reach up to 10% for that energy. We also quantify the error made when using the standard Luscher method to extract physical observables from lattice QCD, which is widely used in the lite...

  15. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, S; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Freeland, E; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Osborn, J; Sugar, R L; Torok, A; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  16. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Subhasish [Bhubaneswar, NISER; Bazavov, Alexei [Iowa U.; Bernard, Claude [Washington U., St. Louis; Detar, Carleton [Utah U.; Freeland, Elizabeth [Art Inst. of Chicago; Foley, Justin [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, Urs M. [APS, New York; Komijani, Javad [Washington U., St. Louis; Laiho, Jack [Syracuse U.; Levkova, Ludmila [Utah U.; Osborn, James [Argonne; Sugar, Robert [UC, Santa Barbara; Torok, Aaron [Indiana U.; Toussaint, Doug [Arizona U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab; Zhou, Ran [Fermilab

    2014-09-25

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  17. Finite-volume effects and the electromagnetic contributions to kaon and pion masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Subhasish [Bhubaneswar, NISER; Bazavov, Alexei [Iowa U.; Bernard, Claude [Washington U., St. Louis; Detar, Carleton [Utah U.; Freeland, Elizabeth [Art Inst. of Chicago; Foley, Justin [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, Urs M. [APS, New York; Komijani, Javad [Washington U., St. Louis; Laiho, Jack [Syracuse U.; Levkova, Ludmila [Utah U.; Osborn, James [Argonne; Sugar, Robert [UC, Santa Barbara; Torok, Aaron [Indiana U.; Toussaint, Doug [Arizona U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab; Zhou, Ran [Fermilab

    2014-09-25

    We report on the MILC Collaboration calculation of electromagnetic effects on light pseudoscalar mesons. The simulations employ asqtad staggered dynamical quarks in QCD plus quenched photons, with lattice spacings varying from 0.12 to 0.06 fm. Finite volume corrections for the MILC realization of lattice electrodynamics have been calculated in chiral perturbation theory and applied to the lattice data. These corrections differ from those calculated by Hayakawa and Uno because our treatment of zero modes differs from theirs. Updated results for the corrections to "Dashen's theorem" are presented.

  18. Adaptive boundaryless finite-difference method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Mago, Dorilian; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2013-02-01

    The boundaryless beam propagation method uses a mapping function to transform the infinite real space into a finite-size computational domain [Opt. Lett.21, 4 (1996)]. This leads to a bounded field that avoids the artificial reflections produced by the computational window. However, the method suffers from frequency aliasing problems, limiting the physical region to be sampled. We propose an adaptive boundaryless method that concentrates the higher density of sampling points in the region of interest. The method is implemented in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinate systems. It keeps the same advantages of the original method but increases accuracy and is not affected by frequency aliasing.

  19. HIGH ACCURACY FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM OF SECOND ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王同科

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy finite volume element method is presented for two-point boundary value problem of second order ordinary differential equation, which differs fromthe high order generalized difference methods. It is proved that the method has optimal order er-ror estimate O(h3) in H1 norm. Finally, two examples show that the method is effective.

  20. Combining ordinary and topological finite volume effects for fixed topology simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dromard, Arthur; Gerber, Urs; Mejía-Díaz, Héctor; Wagner, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In lattice quantum field theories with topological sectors, simulations at fine lattice spacings --- with typical algorithms --- tend to freeze topologically. In such cases, specific topological finite size effects have to be taken into account to obtain physical results, which correspond to infinite volume or unfixed topology. Moreover, when a theory like QCD is simulated in a moderate volume, one also has to overcome ordinary finite volume effects (not related to topology freezing). To extract physical results from simulations affected by both types of finite volume effects, we extend a known relation between hadron masses at fixed and unfixed topology by additionally incorporating ordinary finite volume effects. We present numerical results for SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

  1. The low-energy effective theory of QCD at small quark masses in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, Christoph

    2010-01-15

    At low energies the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can be described effectively in terms of the lightest particles of the theory, the pions. This approximation is valid for temperatures well below the mass difference of the pions to the next heavier particles. We study the low-energy effective theory at very small quark masses in a finite volume V. The corresponding perturbative expansion in 1/{radical}(V) is called {epsilon} expansion. At each order of this expansion a finite number of low-energy constants completely determine the effective theory. These low-energy constants are of great phenomenological importance. In the leading order of the {epsilon} expansion, called {epsilon} regime, the theory becomes zero-dimensional and is therefore described by random matrix theory (RMT). The dimensionless quantities of RMT are mapped to dimensionful quantities of the low-energy effective theory using the leading-order lowenergy constants {sigma} and F. In this way {sigma} and F can be obtained from lattice QCD simulations in the '' regime by a fit to RMT predictions. For typical volumes of state-of-the-art lattice QCD simulations, finite-volume corrections to the RMT prediction cannot be neglected. These corrections can be calculated in higher orders of the {epsilon} expansion. We calculate the finite-volume corrections to {sigma} and F at next-to-next-to-leading order in the {epsilon} expansion. We also discuss non-universal modifications of the theory due to the finite volume. These results are then applied to lattice QCD simulations, and we extract {sigma} and F from eigenvalue correlation functions of the Dirac operator. As a side result, we provide a proof of equivalence between the parametrization of the partially quenched low-energy effective theory without singlet particle and that of the super-Riemannian manifold used earlier in the literature. Furthermore, we calculate a special version of the massless sunset diagram at finite volume without

  2. A finite-volume module for simulating global all-scale atmospheric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Deconinck, Willem; Hamrud, Mats; Kühnlein, Christian; Mozdzynski, George; Szmelter, Joanna; Wedi, Nils P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper documents the development of a global nonhydrostatic finite-volume module designed to enhance an established spectral-transform based numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. The module adheres to NWP standards, with formulation of the governing equations based on the classical meteorological latitude-longitude spherical framework. In the horizontal, a bespoke unstructured mesh with finite-volumes built about the reduced Gaussian grid of the existing NWP model circumvents the notorious stiffness in the polar regions of the spherical framework. All dependent variables are co-located, accommodating both spectral-transform and grid-point solutions at the same physical locations. In the vertical, a uniform finite-difference discretisation facilitates the solution of intricate elliptic problems in thin spherical shells, while the pliancy of the physical vertical coordinate is delegated to generalised continuous transformations between computational and physical space. The newly developed module assumes the compressible Euler equations as default, but includes reduced soundproof PDEs as an option. Furthermore, it employs semi-implicit forward-in-time integrators of the governing PDE systems, akin to but more general than those used in the NWP model. The module shares the equal regions parallelisation scheme with the NWP model, with multiple layers of parallelism hybridising MPI tasks and OpenMP threads. The efficacy of the developed nonhydrostatic module is illustrated with benchmarks of idealised global weather.

  3. Chiral Perturbation Theory at Finite Volume and/or with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In this talk we discuss a number of ChPT calculations relevant for lattice QCD. These include the finite volume corrections at two-loop order for masses and decay constants. The second part is about hadronic vacuum polarization where we present the two-loop ChPT estimate for the disconnected and strange quark contributions. We also present the finite volume corrections at two-loop order. The final part is the one-loop finite volume with twisted boundary conditions contribution to $f_+(q^2)$ and the full $K_{\\ell3}$ amplitude

  4. Convergence Rates of Finite Difference Stochastic Approximation Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    examine the rates of convergence for the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm and the mirror descent algorithm , under various updating schemes using finite...dfferences as gradient approximations. It is shown that the convergence of these algorithms can be accelerated by controlling the implementation of the...Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm , mirror descent algorithm , finite-difference approximation, Monte Carlo methods REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR

  5. Finite difference solutions to shocked acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkington, N. J.; Eversman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MacCormack, Lambda and split flux finite differencing schemes are used to solve a one dimensional acoustics problem. Two duct configurations were considered, a uniform duct and a converging-diverging nozzle. Asymptotic solutions for these two ducts are compared with the numerical solutions. When the acoustic amplitude and frequency are sufficiently high the acoustic signal shocks. This condition leads to a deterioration of the numerical solutions since viscous terms may be required if the shock is to be resolved. A continuous uniform duct solution is considered to demonstrate how the viscous terms modify the solution. These results are then compared with a shocked solution with and without viscous terms. Generally it is found that the most accurate solutions are those obtained using the minimum possible viscosity coefficients. All of the schemes considered give results accurate enough for acoustic power calculations with no one scheme performing significantly better than the others.

  6. Finite volume element method for analysis of unsteady reaction-diffusion problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sutthisak Phongthanapanich; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2009-01-01

    A finite volume element method is developed for analyzing unsteady scalar reaction--diffusion problems in two dimensions. The method combines the concepts that are employed in the finite volume and the finite element method together. The finite volume method is used to discretize the unsteady reaction--diffusion equation, while the finite element method is applied to estimate the gradient quantities at cell faces. Robustness and efficiency of the combined method have been evaluated on uniform rectangular grids by using available numerical solutions of the two-dimensional reaction-diffusion problems. The numerical solutions demonstrate that the combined method is stable and can provide accurate solution without spurious oscillation along the highgradient boundary layers.

  7. Eigenvalues of singular differential operators by finite difference methods. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    Note is made of an earlier paper which defined finite difference operators for the Hilbert space L2(m), and gave the eigenvalues for these operators. The present work examines eigenvalues for higher order singular differential operators by using finite difference methods. The two self-adjoint operators investigated are defined by a particular value in the same Hilbert space, L2(m), and are strictly positive with compact inverses. A class of finite difference operators is considered, with the idea of application to the theory of Toeplitz matrices. The approximating operators consist of a good approximation plus a perturbing operator.

  8. Mesh locking effects in the finite volume solution of 2-D anisotropic diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Putti, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Strongly anisotropic diffusion equations require special techniques to overcome or reduce the mesh locking phenomenon. We present a finite volume scheme that tries to approximate with the best possible accuracy the quantities that are of importance in discretizing anisotropic fluxes. In particular, we discuss the crucial role of accurate evaluations of the tangential components of the gradient acting tangentially to the control volume boundaries, that are called into play by anisotropic diffusion tensors. To obtain the sought characteristics from the proposed finite volume method, we employ a second-order accurate reconstruction scheme which is used to evaluate both normal and tangential cell-interface gradients. The experimental results on a number of different meshes show that the scheme maintains optimal convergence rates in both L2 and H1 norms except for the benchmark test considering full Neumann boundary conditions on non-uniform grids. In such a case, a severe locking effect is experienced and documented. However, within the range of practical values of the anisotropy ratio, the scheme is robust and efficient. We postulate and verify experimentally the existence of a quadratic relationship between the anisotropy ratio and the mesh size parameter that guarantees optimal and sub-optimal convergence rates.

  9. Development of Generic Field Classes for Finite Element and Finite Difference Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane A. Verner

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the development of a reusable object-oriented array library, as well as the use of this library in the construction of finite difference and finite element codes. The classes in this array library are also generic enough to be used to construct other classes specific to finite difference and finite element methods. We demonstrate the usefulness of this library by inserting it into two existing object-oriented scientific codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories. One of these codes is based on finite difference methods, whereas the other is based on finite element methods. Previously, these codes were separately maintained across a variety of sequential and parallel computing platforms. The use of object-oriented programming allows both codes to make use of common base classes. This offers a number of advantages related to optimization and portability. Optimization efforts, particularly important in large scientific codes, can be focused on a single library. Furthermore, by encapsulating machine dependencies within this library, the optimization of both codes on different architec-tures will only involve modification to a single library.

  10. Two-Level Stabilized Finite Volume Methods for Stationary Navier-Stokes Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Rachid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose two algorithms of two-level methods for resolving the nonlinearity in the stabilized finite volume approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations describing the equilibrium flow of a viscous, incompressible fluid. A macroelement condition is introduced for constructing the local stabilized finite volume element formulation. Moreover the two-level methods consist of solving a small nonlinear system on the coarse mesh and then solving a linear system on the fine mesh. The error analysis shows that the two-level stabilized finite volume element method provides an approximate solution with the convergence rate of the same order as the usual stabilized finite volume element solution solving the Navier-Stokes equations on a fine mesh for a related choice of mesh widths.

  11. Deconfinement phase transition in a finite volume in the presence of massive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait El Djoudi, A.; Ghenam, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure - Kouba, B.P. 92, 16050, Vieux Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    We study the QCD deconfinement phase transition from a hadronic gas to a Quark-Gluon Plasma, in the presence of massive particles. Especially, the influence of some parameters as the finite volume, finite mass, flavors number N{sub f} on the transition point and on the order of the transition is investigated.

  12. A combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme for compressible two phase flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2014-06-28

    We propose and analyze a combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme on general meshes to simulate the two compressible phase flow in porous media. The diffusion term, which can be anisotropic and heterogeneous, is discretized by piecewise linear nonconforming triangular finite elements. The other terms are discretized by means of a cell-centered finite volume scheme on a dual mesh, where the dual volumes are constructed around the sides of the original mesh. The relative permeability of each phase is decentred according the sign of the velocity at the dual interface. This technique also ensures the validity of the discrete maximum principle for the saturation under a non restrictive shape regularity of the space mesh and the positiveness of all transmissibilities. Next, a priori estimates on the pressures and a function of the saturation that denote capillary terms are established. These stabilities results lead to some compactness arguments based on the use of the Kolmogorov compactness theorem, and allow us to derive the convergence of a subsequence of the sequence of approximate solutions to a weak solution of the continuous equations, provided the mesh size tends to zero. The proof is given for the complete system when the density of the each phase depends on its own pressure. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  13. Design of Finite Element Tools for Coupled Surface and Volume Meshes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel K(o)ster; Oliver Kriessl; Kunibert G. Siebert

    2008-01-01

    Many problems with underlying variational structure involve a coupling of volume with surface effects. A straight-forward approach in a finite element discretization is to make use of the surface triangulation that is naturally induced by the volume triangulation. In an adaptive method one wants to facilitate "matching" local mesh modifications, i.e., local refinement and/or coarsening, of volume and surface mesh with standard tools such that the surface grid is always induced by the volume grid. We describe the concepts behind this approach for bisectional refinement and describe new tools incorporated in the finite element toolbox ALBERTA. We also present several important applications of the mesh coupling.

  14. Energy-preserving finite volume element method for the improved Boussinesq equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanxiang; Zhang, Zhiyue; Zhang, Xinhua; Zhu, Quanyong

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we design an energy-preserving finite volume element scheme for solving the initial boundary problems of the improved Boussinesq equation. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed numerical schemes can conserve the energy and mass. Numerical experiments are performed to illustrate the efficiency of the scheme and theoretical analysis. While the results demonstrate that the proposed finite volume element scheme is second-order accuracy in space and time. Moreover, the new scheme can conserve mass and energy.

  15. Design and Verification Methodology of Boundary Conditions for Finite Volume Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Finite Volume Schemes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Folkner, D., Katz , A and Sankaran...July 9-13, 2012 ICCFD7-2012-1001 Design and Verification Methodology of Boundary Conditions for Finite Volume Schemes D. Folkner∗, A. Katz ∗ and V...Office (ARO), under the supervision of Dr. Frederick Ferguson. The authors would like to thank Dr. Ferguson for his continuing support of this research

  16. Flux-splitting finite volume method for turbine flow and heat transfer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Amano, R. S.

    A novel numerical method was developed to deal with the flow and heat transfer in a turbine cascade at both design and off-design conditions. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized and integrated in a coupled manner. In the present method a time-marching scheme was employed along with the time-integration approach. The flux terms are discretized based on a cell finite volume formulation as well as a flux-difference splitting. The flux-difference splitting makes the scheme rapid convergence and the finite volume technique ensure the governing equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. A hybrid difference scheme for quasi-three-dimensional procedure based on the discretized and integrated Navier-Stokes equations was incorporated in the code. The numerical method possesses the positive features of the explicit and implicit algorithms which provide a rapid convergence process and have a less stability constraint. The computed results were compared with other numerical studies and experimental data. The comparisons showed fairly good agreement with experiments.

  17. Dual-mixed finite elements for the three-field Stokes model as a finite volume method on staggered grids

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-06-09

    In this paper, a new three-field weak formulation for Stokes problems is developed, and from this, a dual-mixed finite element method is proposed on a rectangular mesh. In the proposed mixed methods, the components of stress tensor are approximated by piecewise constant functions or Q1 functions, while the velocity and pressure are discretized by the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas element and the piecewise constant functions, respectively. Using quadrature rules, we demonstrate that this scheme can be reduced into a finite volume method on staggered grid, which is extensively used in computational fluid mechanics and engineering.

  18. Implicit finite-difference simulations of seismic wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-03-01

    We propose a new finite-difference modeling method, implicit both in space and in time, for the scalar wave equation. We use a three-level implicit splitting time integration method for the temporal derivative and implicit finite-difference operators of arbitrary order for the spatial derivatives. Both the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators require solving systems of linear equations. We show that it is possible to merge these two sets of linear systems, one from implicit temporal discretizations and the other from implicit spatial discretizations, to reduce the amount of computations to develop a highly efficient and accurate seismic modeling algorithm. We give the complete derivations of the implicit splitting time integration method and the implicit spatial finite-difference operators, and present the resulting discretized formulas for the scalar wave equation. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on grid dispersions of this new implicit modeling method. We show that implicit spatial finite-difference operators greatly improve the accuracy of the implicit splitting time integration simulation results with only a slight increase in computational time, compared with explicit spatial finite-difference operators. We further verify this conclusion by both 2D and 3D numerical examples. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. The mass of the {delta} resonance in a finite volume: fourth-order calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoja, Dominik; Rusetsky, Akaki [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Bernard, Veronique [Universite Louis Pasteur, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (Germany); Meissner, Ulf G. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik und Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The self-energy of the {delta} resonance in a finite volume is calculated by using chiral effective field theory with explicit spin-3/2 fields. The calculations are performed up-to-and-including fourth order in the small scale expansion and yield an explicit parameterization of the energy spectrum of the interacting {pi}N pair in a finite box in terms of both the quark mass and the box size L. We show that finite-volume corrections are sizable at small quark masses. The values of certain low-energy constants are extracted from fitting to the available data in lattice QCD.

  20. Scattering of unstable particles in a finite volume: the case of pi rho scattering and the a1(1260) resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Roca, L

    2012-01-01

    We present a way to evaluate the scattering of unstable particles quantized in a finite volume with the aim of extracting physical observables for infinite volume from lattice data. We illustrate the method with the $\\pi\\rho$ scattering which generates dynamically the axial-vector $a_1(1260)$ resonance. Energy levels in a finite box are evaluated both considering the $\\rho$ as a stable and unstable resonance and we find significant differences between both cases. We discuss how to solve the problem to get the physical scattering amplitudes in the infinite volume, and hence phase shifts, from possible lattice results on energy levels quantized inside a finite box.

  1. CASCADIC MULTIGRID FOR FINITE VOLUME METHODS FOR ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-ci Shi; Xue-jun Xu; Hong-ying Man

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, some effective cascadic multigrid methods are proposed for solving the large scale symmetric or nonsymmetric algebraic systems arising from the finite volumemethods for second order elliptic problems. Its is shown that these algorithms are optimal in both accuracy and computational complexity. Numerical expermients are repored to support out theory.

  2. One-point functions in finite volume/temperature: a case study

    CERN Document Server

    Szécsényi, I M; Watts, G M T

    2013-01-01

    We consider finite volume (or equivalently, finite temperature) expectation values of local operators in integrable quantum field theories using a combination of numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the truncated conformal space approach, when supplemented with a recently proposed renormalization group, can be sufficiently extended to the low-energy regime that it can be matched with high precision by the low-temperature expansion proposed by Leclair and Mussardo. Besides verifying the consistency of the two descriptions, their combination leads to an evaluation of expectation values which is valid to a very high precision for all volume/temperature scales. As a side result of the investigation, we also discuss some unexpected singularities in the framework recently proposed by Pozsgay and Tak\\'acs for the description of matrix elements of local operators in finite volume, and show that while some of these singularities are resolved by the inclusion of the class of exponential finite size cor...

  3. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 4; Numerical Simulation of the Nonlinear Acoustic Impedance of a Perforated Plate Single-Degree-of-Freedom Resonator Using a Time-Domain Finite Difference Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Single-degree-of-freedom resonators consisting of honeycomb cells covered by perforated facesheets are widely used as acoustic noise suppression liners in aircraft engine ducts. The acoustic resistance and mass reactance of such liners are known to vary with the intensity of the sound incident upon the panel. Since the pressure drop across a perforated liner facesheet increases quadratically with the flow velocity through the facesheet, this is known as the nonlinear resistance effect. In the past, two different empirical frequency domain models have been used to predict the Sound Pressure Level effect of the incident wave on the perforated liner impedance, one that uses the incident particle velocity in isolated narrowbands, and one that models the particle velocity as the overall velocity. In the absence of grazing flow, neither frequency domain model is entirely accurate in predicting the nonlinear effect that is measured for typical perforated sheets. The time domain model is developed in an attempt to understand and improve the model for the effect of spectral shape and amplitude of multi-frequency incident sound pressure on the liner impedance. A computer code for the time-domain finite difference model is developed and predictions using the models are compared to current frequency-domain models.

  4. Solving difference equations in finite terms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Singer, MF

    We define the notion of a Liouvillian sequence and show that the solution space of a difference equation with rational function coefficients has a basis of Liouvillian sequences iff the Galois group of the equation is solvable. Using this we give a procedure to determine the Liouvillian solutions of

  5. Solving difference equations in finite terms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Singer, MF

    1999-01-01

    We define the notion of a Liouvillian sequence and show that the solution space of a difference equation with rational function coefficients has a basis of Liouvillian sequences iff the Galois group of the equation is solvable. Using this we give a procedure to determine the Liouvillian solutions of

  6. Large parallel volumes of finite and compact sets in d-dimensional Euclidean space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Jürgen; Kiderlen, Markus

    The r-parallel volume V (Cr) of a compact subset C in d-dimensional Euclidean space is the volume of the set Cr of all points of Euclidean distance at most r > 0 from C. According to Steiner’s formula, V (Cr) is a polynomial in r when C is convex. For finite sets C satisfying a certain geometric ...

  7. Finite element procedure for stress amplification factor recovering in a representative volume of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar Plaisant Junior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Finite element models are proposed to the micromechanical analysis of a representative volume of composite materials. A detailed description of the meshes, boundary conditions, and loadings are presented. An illustrative application is given to evaluate stress amplification factors within a representative volume of the unidirectional carbon fiber composite plate. The results are discussed and compared to the numerical findings.

  8. Finite Volume Numerical Methods for Aeroheating Rate Calculations from Infrared Thermographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional finite volume heat conduction techniques for calculating aeroheating rates from measured global surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models was investigated. Both direct and inverse finite volume techniques were investigated and compared with the standard one-dimensional semi-infinite technique. Global transient surface temperatures were measured using an infrared thermographic technique on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air tunnel. In these tests the effectiveness of vortices generated via gas injection for initiating hypersonic transition on the Hyper-X forebody was investigated. An array of streamwise-orientated heating striations was generated and visualized downstream of the gas injection sites. In regions without significant spatial temperature gradients, one-dimensional techniques provided accurate aeroheating rates. In regions with sharp temperature gradients caused by striation patterns multi-dimensional heat transfer techniques were necessary to obtain more accurate heating rates. The use of the one-dimensional technique resulted in differences of 20% in the calculated heating rates compared to 2-D analysis because it did not account for lateral heat conduction in the model.

  9. Multiphase flow through porous media: an adaptive control volume finite element formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Tollit, B.; Gorman, G.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate modeling of multiphase flow in porous media is of great importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We have developed a numerical scheme which employs an implicit pressure explicit saturation (IMPES) algorithm for the temporal discretization of the governing equations. The saturation equation is spatially discretized using a node centered control volume method on an unstructured finite element mesh. The face values are determined through an upwind scheme. The pressure equation is spatially discretized using a continuous control volume finite element method (CV-FEM) to achieve consistency with the discrete saturation equation. The numerical simulation is implemented in Fluidity, an open source and general purpose fluid simulator capable of solving a number of different governing equations for fluid flow and accompanying field equations on arbitrary unstructured meshes. The model is verified against the Buckley-Leverett problem where a quasi-analytical solution is available. We discuss the accuracy and the order of convergence of the scheme. We demonstrate the scheme for modeling multiphase flow in a synthetic heterogeneous porous medium along with the use of anisotropic mesh adaptivity to control local solution errors and increase computational efficiency. The adaptive method is also used to simulate two-phase flow in heap leaching, an industrial mining process, where the flow of the leaching solution is gravitationally dominated. Finally we describe the extension of the developed numerical scheme for simulation of flow in multiscale fractured porous media and its capability to model the multiscale characterization of flow in full scale.

  10. Minimum divergence viscous flow simulation through finite difference and regularization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Rodolfo A.; Mirabolghasemi, Maryam; Bryant, Steven L.; Prodanović, Maša

    2016-09-01

    We develop a new algorithm to simulate single- and two-phase viscous flow through a three-dimensional Cartesian representation of the porous space, such as those available through X-ray microtomography. We use the finite difference method to discretize the governing equations and also propose a new method to enforce the incompressible flow constraint under zero Neumann boundary conditions for the velocity components. Finite difference formulation leads to fast parallel implementation through linear solvers for sparse matrices, allowing relatively fast simulations, while regularization techniques used on solving inverse problems lead to the desired incompressible fluid flow. Tests performed using benchmark samples show good agreement with experimental/theoretical values. Additional tests are run on Bentheimer and Buff Berea sandstone samples with available laboratory measurements. We compare the results from our new method, based on finite differences, with an open source finite volume implementation as well as experimental results, specifically to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of each method. Finally, we calculate relative permeability by using this modified finite difference technique together with a level set based algorithm for multi-phase fluid distribution in the pore space. To our knowledge this is the first time regularization techniques are used in combination with finite difference fluid flow simulations.

  11. Simulation of pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading using Finite Volume Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Tian; Hededal, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a finite volume implementation of a porous, nonlinear soil model capable of simulating pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading. The mathematical formulations are based on modified Biot’s coupled theory by substituting the original elastic constitutive model with an adv...... mapping algorithm is used to calculate the stress and strain relation in each control volume level. Test cases show very good performance of the model.......This paper presents a finite volume implementation of a porous, nonlinear soil model capable of simulating pore pressure accumulation under cyclic loading. The mathematical formulations are based on modified Biot’s coupled theory by substituting the original elastic constitutive model...... with an advanced elastoplastic model suitable for describing monotonic as well as cyclic loading conditions. The finite volume method is applied to discretize these formulations. The resulting set of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations are then solved by a ’segregated’ solution procedure. An efficient return...

  12. An assessment of unstructured grid finite volume schemes for cold gas hypersonic flow calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luiz F. Azevedo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of five different spatial discretization schemes is performed considering a typical high speed flow application. Flowfields are simulated using the 2-D Euler equations, discretized in a cell-centered finite volume procedure on unstructured triangular meshes. The algorithms studied include a central difference-type scheme, and 1st- and 2nd-order van Leer and Liou flux-vector splitting schemes. These methods are implemented in an efficient, edge-based, unstructured grid procedure which allows for adaptive mesh refinement based on flow property gradients. Details of the unstructured grid implementation of the methods are presented together with a discussion of the data structure and of the adaptive refinement strategy. The application of interest is the cold gas flow through a typical hypersonic inlet. Results for different entrance Mach numbers and mesh topologies are discussed in order to assess the comparative performance of the various spatial discretization schemes.

  13. Finite-difference schemes for anisotropic diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: es@cwi.nl [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    In fusion plasmas diffusion tensors are extremely anisotropic due to the high temperature and large magnetic field strength. This causes diffusion, heat conduction, and viscous momentum loss, to effectively be aligned with the magnetic field lines. This alignment leads to different values for the respective diffusive coefficients in the magnetic field direction and in the perpendicular direction, to the extent that heat diffusion coefficients can be up to 10{sup 12} times larger in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular direction. This anisotropy puts stringent requirements on the numerical methods used to approximate the MHD-equations since any misalignment of the grid may cause the perpendicular diffusion to be polluted by the numerical error in approximating the parallel diffusion. Currently the common approach is to apply magnetic field-aligned coordinates, an approach that automatically takes care of the directionality of the diffusive coefficients. This approach runs into problems at x-points and at points where there is magnetic re-connection, since this causes local non-alignment. It is therefore useful to consider numerical schemes that are tolerant to the misalignment of the grid with the magnetic field lines, both to improve existing methods and to help open the possibility of applying regular non-aligned grids. To investigate this, in this paper several discretization schemes are developed and applied to the anisotropic heat diffusion equation on a non-aligned grid.

  14. An implicit finite-difference operator for the Helmholtz equation

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-07-01

    We have developed an implicit finite-difference operator for the Laplacian and applied it to solving the Helmholtz equation for computing the seismic responses in the frequency domain. This implicit operator can greatly improve the accuracy of the simulation results without adding significant extra computational cost, compared with the corresponding conventional explicit finite-difference scheme. We achieved this by taking advantage of the inherently implicit nature of the Helmholtz equation and merging together the two linear systems: one from the implicit finite-difference discretization of the Laplacian and the other from the discretization of the Helmholtz equation itself. The end result of this simple yet important merging manipulation is a single linear system, similar to the one resulting from the conventional explicit finite-difference discretizations, without involving any differentiation matrix inversions. We analyzed grid dispersions of the discrete Helmholtz equation to show the accuracy of this implicit finite-difference operator and used two numerical examples to demonstrate its efficiency. Our method can be extended to solve other frequency domain wave simulation problems straightforwardly. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. FINITE DIFFERENCE SIMULATION OF LOW CARBON STEEL MANUAL ARC WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith S Al-Khafagy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the evaluation and simulation of angular distortion in welding joints, and the ways of controlling and treating them, while welding plates of (low carbon steel type (A-283-Gr-C through using shielded metal arc welding. The value of this distortion is measured experimentally and the results are compared with the suggested finite difference method computer program. Time dependent temperature distributions are obtained using finite difference method. This distribution is used to obtain the shrinkage that causes the distortions accompanied with structural forces that act to modify these distortions. Results are compared with simple empirical models and experimental results. Different thickness of plates and welding parameters is manifested to illustrate its effect on angular distortions. Results revealed the more accurate results of finite difference method that match experimental results in comparison with empirical formulas. Welding parameters include number of passes, current, electrode type and geometry of the welding process.

  16. A comparison of the finite difference and finite element methods for heat transfer calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, A. F.; Mortazavi, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The finite difference method and finite element method for heat transfer calculations are compared by describing their bases and their application to some common heat transfer problems. In general it is noted that neither method is clearly superior, and in many instances, the choice is quite arbitrary and depends more upon the codes available and upon the personal preference of the analyst than upon any well defined advantages of one method. Classes of problems for which one method or the other is better suited are defined.

  17. Finite volume evolution Galerkin method for hyperbolic conservation laws with spatially varying flux functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, K. R.; Kraft, M.; Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, M.; Prasad, Phoolan

    2009-02-01

    We present a generalization of the finite volume evolution Galerkin scheme [M. Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, J. Saibertov'a, G. Warnecke, Finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for nonlinear hyperbolic systems, J. Comp. Phys. (2002) 183 533- 562; M. Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, K.W. Morton, G. Warnecke, Finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for hyperbolic problems, SIAM J. Sci. Comput. (2004) 26 1-30] for hyperbolic systems with spatially varying flux functions. Our goal is to develop a genuinely multi-dimensional numerical scheme for wave propagation problems in a heterogeneous media. We illustrate our methodology for acoustic waves in a heterogeneous medium but the results can be generalized to more complex systems. The finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) method is a predictor-corrector method combining the finite volume corrector step with the evolutionary predictor step. In order to evolve fluxes along the cell interfaces we use multi-dimensional approximate evolution operator. The latter is constructed using the theory of bicharacteristics under the assumption of spatially dependent wave speeds. To approximate heterogeneous medium a staggered grid approach is used. Several numerical experiments for wave propagation with continuous as well as discontinuous wave speeds confirm the robustness and reliability of the new FVEG scheme.

  18. Spectral (Finite) Volume Method for One Dimensional Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Consider a mesh of unstructured triangular cells. Each cell is called a Spectral Volume (SV), denoted by Si, which is further partitioned into subcells named Control Volumes (CVs), indicated by C(sub i,j). To represent the solution as a polynomial of degree m in two dimensions (2D) we need N = (m+1)(m+2)/2 pieces of independent information, or degrees of freedom (DOFs). The DOFs in a SV method are the volume-averaged mean variables at the N CVs. For example, to build a quadratic reconstruction in 2D, we need at least (2+1)(3+1)/2 = 6 DOFs. There are numerous ways of partitioning a SV, and not every partition is admissible in the sense that the partition may not be capable of producing a degree m polynomial. Once N mean solutions in the CVs of a SV are given, a unique polynomial reconstruction can be obtained.

  19. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  20. Compact finite difference method for American option pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jichao; Davison, Matt; Corless, Robert M.

    2007-09-01

    A compact finite difference method is designed to obtain quick and accurate solutions to partial differential equation problems. The problem of pricing an American option can be cast as a partial differential equation. Using the compact finite difference method this problem can be recast as an ordinary differential equation initial value problem. The complicating factor for American options is the existence of an optimal exercise boundary which is jointly determined with the value of the option. In this article we develop three ways of combining compact finite difference methods for American option price on a single asset with methods for dealing with this optimal exercise boundary. Compact finite difference method one uses the implicit condition that solutions of the transformed partial differential equation be nonnegative to detect the optimal exercise value. This method is very fast and accurate even when the spatial step size h is large (h[greater-or-equal, slanted]0.1). Compact difference method two must solve an algebraic nonlinear equation obtained by Pantazopoulos (1998) at every time step. This method can obtain second order accuracy for space x and requires a moderate amount of time comparable with that required by the Crank Nicolson projected successive over relaxation method. Compact finite difference method three refines the free boundary value by a method developed by Barone-Adesi and Lugano [The saga of the American put, 2003], and this method can obtain high accuracy for space x. The last two of these three methods are convergent, moreover all the three methods work for both short term and long term options. Through comparison with existing popular methods by numerical experiments, our work shows that compact finite difference methods provide an exciting new tool for American option pricing.

  1. Nonstandard Finite Difference Method Applied to a Linear Pharmacokinetics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Egbelowo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the nonstandard finite difference method of solution to the study of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models. Pharmacokinetic (PK models are commonly used to predict drug concentrations that drive controlled intravenous (I.V. transfers (or infusion and oral transfers while pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD interaction models are used to provide predictions of drug concentrations affecting the response of these clinical drugs. We structure a nonstandard finite difference (NSFD scheme for the relevant system of equations which models this pharamcokinetic process. We compare the results obtained to standard methods. The scheme is dynamically consistent and reliable in replicating complex dynamic properties of the relevant continuous models for varying step sizes. This study provides assistance in understanding the long-term behavior of the drug in the system, and validation of the efficiency of the nonstandard finite difference scheme as the method of choice.

  2. A generalized finite difference method for modeling cardiac electrical activation on arbitrary, irregular computational meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trew, Mark L; Smaill, Bruce H; Bullivant, David P; Hunter, Peter J; Pullan, Andrew J

    2005-12-01

    A generalized finite difference (GFD) method is presented that can be used to solve the bi-domain equations modeling cardiac electrical activity. Classical finite difference methods have been applied by many researchers to the bi-domain equations. However, these methods suffer from the limitation of requiring computational meshes that are structured and orthogonal. Finite element or finite volume methods enable the bi-domain equations to be solved on unstructured meshes, although implementations of such methods do not always cater for meshes with varying element topology. The GFD method solves the bi-domain equations on arbitrary and irregular computational meshes without any need to specify element basis functions. The method is useful as it can be easily applied to activation problems using existing meshes that have originally been created for use by finite element or finite difference methods. In addition, the GFD method employs an innovative approach to enforcing nodal and non-nodal boundary conditions. The GFD method performs effectively for a range of two and three-dimensional test problems and when computing bi-domain electrical activation moving through a fully anisotropic three-dimensional model of canine ventricles.

  3. Determining matrix elements and resonance widths from finite volume: the dangerous mu-terms

    CERN Document Server

    Takacs, G

    2011-01-01

    The standard numerical approach to determining matrix elements of local operators and width of resonances uses the finite volume dependence of energy levels and matrix elements. Finite size corrections that decay exponentially in the volume are usually neglected or taken into account using perturbation expansion in effective field theory. Using two-dimensional sine-Gordon field theory as "toy model" it is shown that some exponential finite size effects could be much larger than previously thought, potentially spoiling the determination of matrix elements in frameworks such as lattice QCD. The particular class of finite size corrections considered here are mu-terms arising from bound state poles in the scattering amplitudes. In sine-Gordon model, these can be explicitly evaluated and shown to explain the observed discrepancies to high precision. It is argued that the effects observed are not special to the two-dimensional setting, but rather depend on general field theoretic features that are common with model...

  4. Space-time adaptive ADER discontinuous Galerkin finite element schemes with a posteriori sub-cell finite volume limiting

    CERN Document Server

    Zanotti, Olindo; Dumbser, Michael; Hidalgo, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel arbitrary high order accurate discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method on space-time adaptive Cartesian meshes (AMR) for hyperbolic conservation laws in multiple space dimensions, using a high order \\aposteriori sub-cell ADER-WENO finite volume \\emph{limiter}. Notoriously, the original DG method produces strong oscillations in the presence of discontinuous solutions and several types of limiters have been introduced over the years to cope with this problem. Following the innovative idea recently proposed in \\cite{Dumbser2014}, the discrete solution within the troubled cells is \\textit{recomputed} by scattering the DG polynomial at the previous time step onto a suitable number of sub-cells along each direction. Relying on the robustness of classical finite volume WENO schemes, the sub-cell averages are recomputed and then gathered back into the DG polynomials over the main grid. In this paper this approach is implemented for the first time within a space-time adaptive ...

  5. Finite difference computing with PDEs a modern software approach

    CERN Document Server

    Langtangen, Hans Petter

    2017-01-01

    This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This easy-to-read book introduces the basics of solving partial differential equations by means of finite difference methods. Unlike many of the traditional academic works on the topic, this book was written for practitioners. Accordingly, it especially addresses: the construction of finite difference schemes, formulation and implementation of algorithms, verification of implementations, analyses of physical behavior as implied by the numerical solutions, and how to apply the methods and software to solve problems in the fields of physics and biology.

  6. Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Method in Nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra

    is often indispensable. This thesis presents the development of rigorous finite-difference method, a very general tool to solve Maxwell’s equations in arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, with an emphasis on the frequency-domain formulation. Enhanced performance of the perfectly matched layers...... is obtained through free space squeezing technique, and nonuniform orthogonal grids are built to greatly improve the accuracy of simulations of highly heterogeneous nanostructures. Examples of the use of the finite-difference frequency-domain method in this thesis range from simulating localized modes...

  7. Higher order finite difference schemes for the magnetic induction equations

    CERN Document Server

    Koley, Ujjwal; Risebro, Nils Henrik; Svärd, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    We describe high order accurate and stable finite difference schemes for the initial-boundary value problem associated with the magnetic induction equations. These equations model the evolution of a magnetic field due to a given velocity field. The finite difference schemes are based on Summation by Parts (SBP) operators for spatial derivatives and a Simultaneous Approximation Term (SAT) technique for imposing boundary conditions. We present various numerical experiments that demonstrate both the stability as well as high order of accuracy of the schemes.

  8. Finite-Difference Algorithms For Computing Sound Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    Governing equations considered as matrix system. Method variant of method described in "Scheme for Finite-Difference Computations of Waves" (ARC-12970). Present method begins with matrix-vector formulation of fundamental equations, involving first-order partial derivatives of primitive variables with respect to space and time. Particular matrix formulation places time and spatial coordinates on equal footing, so governing equations considered as matrix system and treated as unit. Spatial and temporal discretizations not treated separately as in other finite-difference methods, instead treated together by linking spatial-grid interval and time step via common scale factor related to speed of sound.

  9. Convergence of a finite difference method for combustion model problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING; Long'an

    2004-01-01

    We study a finite difference scheme for a combustion model problem. A projection scheme near the combustion wave, and the standard upwind finite difference scheme away from the combustion wave are applied. Convergence to weak solutions with a combustion wave is proved under the normal Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Some conditions on the ignition temperature are given to guarantee the solution containing a strong detonation wave or a weak detonation wave. Convergence to strong detonation wave solutions for the random projection method is also proved.

  10. Finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for three-dimensional wave equation system

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Warnecke, Gerald; Zahaykah, Yousef

    2004-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the derivation of finite volume evolution Galerkin schemes for three-dimensional wave equation system. The aim is to construct methods which take into account all of the infinitely many directions of propagation of bicharacteristics. The idea is to evolve the initial function using the characteristic cone and then to project onto a finite element space. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and the multidimensional behaviour of the solutio...

  11. A finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wang

    2012-10-01

    A new finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution is proposed in this paper with detailed derivation. The calculation results of this new method are compared with the traditional second-order finite volume method. The newly proposed method is more accurate than conventional ones, even though the discretized expression of this proposed method is slightly more complex than the second-order central finite volume method, making it cost more calculation time on the same grids. Numerical result shows that the total CPU time of the new method is significantly less than conventional methods for achieving the same level of accuracy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The finite volume local evolution Galerkin method for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutao; Ren, Yu-Xin

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a finite volume local evolution Galerkin (FVLEG) scheme for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws. The FVLEG scheme is the simplification of the finite volume evolution Galerkin method (FVEG). In FVEG, a necessary step is to compute the dependent variables at cell interfaces at tn + τ (0 FVEG. The FVLEG scheme greatly simplifies the evaluation of the numerical fluxes. It is also well suited with the semi-discrete finite volume method, making the flux evaluation being decoupled with the reconstruction procedure while maintaining the genuine multi-dimensional nature of the FVEG methods. The derivation of the FVLEG scheme is presented in detail. The performance of the proposed scheme is studied by solving several test cases. It is shown that FVLEG scheme can obtain very satisfactory numerical results in terms of accuracy and resolution.

  13. Well-balanced finite volume evolution Galerkin methods for the shallow water equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, M.; Noelle, S.; Kraft, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new well-balanced finite volume method within the framework of the finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) schemes. The methodology will be illustrated for the shallow water equations with source terms modelling the bottom topography and Coriolis forces. Results can be generalized to more complex systems of balance laws. The FVEG methods couple a finite volume formulation with approximate evolution operators. The latter are constructed using the bicharacteristics of multidimensional hyperbolic systems, such that all of the infinitely many directions of wave propagation are taken into account explicitly. We derive a well-balanced approximation of the integral equations and prove that the FVEG scheme is well-balanced for the stationary steady states as well as for the steady jets in the rotational frame. Several numerical experiments for stationary and quasi-stationary states as well as for steady jets confirm the reliability of the well-balanced FVEG scheme.

  14. Electromagnetic corrections to leptonic decay rates of charged pseudoscalar mesons: finite-volume effects

    CERN Document Server

    Tantalo, N; Martinelli, G; Sachrajda, C T; Sanfilippo, F; Simula, S

    2016-01-01

    In Carrasco et al. we have recently proposed a method to calculate $O(e^2)$ electromagnetic corrections to leptonic decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons. The method is based on the observation that the infrared divergent contributions (that appear at intermediate stages of the calculation and that cancel in physical quantities thanks to the Bloch-Nordsieck mechanism) are universal, i.e. depend on the charge and the mass of the meson but not on its internal structure. In this talk we perform a detailed analysis of the finite-volume effects associated with our method. In particular we show that also the leading $1/L$ finite-volume effects are universal and perform an analytical calculation of the finite-volume leptonic decay rate for a point-like meson.

  15. A new finite element and finite difference hybrid method for computing electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2015-10-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) is one widely-used implicit solvent continuum model for calculating electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule. In this paper, a new finite element and finite difference hybrid method is presented to solve PBE efficiently based on a special seven-overlapped box partition with one central box containing the solute region and surrounded by six neighboring boxes. In particular, an efficient finite element solver is applied to the central box while a fast preconditioned conjugate gradient method using a multigrid V-cycle preconditioning is constructed for solving a system of finite difference equations defined on a uniform mesh of each neighboring box. Moreover, the PBE domain, the box partition, and an interface fitted tetrahedral mesh of the central box can be generated adaptively for a given PQR file of a biomolecule. This new hybrid PBE solver is programmed in C, Fortran, and Python as a software tool for predicting electrostatics of a biomolecule in a symmetric 1:1 ionic solvent. Numerical results on two test models with analytical solutions and 12 proteins validate this new software tool, and demonstrate its high performance in terms of CPU time and memory usage.

  16. Electric field distribution in a finite-volume head model of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Peadar F; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a whole-head finite element model of deep brain stimulation to examine the effect of electrical grounding, the finite conducting volume of the head, and scalp, skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers. The impedance between the stimulating and reference electrodes in the whole-head model was found to lie within clinically reported values when the reference electrode was incorporated on a localized surface in the model. Incorporation of the finite volume of the head and inclusion of surrounding outer tissue layers reduced the magnitude of the electric field and activating function by approximately 20% in the region surrounding the electrode. Localized distortions of the electric field were also observed when the electrode was placed close to the skull. Under bipolar conditions the effect of the finite conducting volume was shown to be negligible. The results indicate that, for monopolar stimulation, incorporation of the finite volume and outer tissue layers can alter the magnitude of the electric field and activating function when the electrode is deep within the brain, and may further affect the shape if the electrode is close to the skull.

  17. A MULTISTEP FINITE VOLUME METHOD WITH PENALTY FOR THERMAL CONVECTION PROBLEMS IN TWO OR THREE DIMENSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min YANG

    2008-01-01

    The author considers a thermal convection problem with infinite Prandtl number in two or three dimensions. The mathematical model of such problem is described as an initial boundary value problem made up of three partial differential equations. One equation of the convection-dominated diffusion type for the temperature, and another two of the Stokes type for the normalized velocity and pressure. The approximate solution is obtained by a penalty finite volume method for the Stokes equation and a multistep upwind finite volume method for the convection-diffusion equation. Under suitable smoothness of the exact solution, error estimates in some discrete norms are derived.

  18. Finite volume numerical solution to a blood flow problem in human artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti Budiawan, Inge; Mungkasi, Sudi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we solve a one dimensional blood flow model in human artery. This model is of a non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equation system which can generate either continuous or discontinuous solution. We use the Lax–Friedrichs finite volume method to solve this model. Particularly, we investigate how a pulse propagates in human artery. For this simulation, we give a single sine wave with a small time period as an impluse input on the left boundary. The finite volume method is successful in simulating how the pulse propagates in the artery. It detects the positions of the pulse for the whole time period.

  19. Adaptive Finite Volume Method for the Shallow Water Equations on Triangular Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudi Mungkasi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical entropy production (NEP scheme for two-dimensional shallow water equations on unstructured triangular grids. We implement NEP as the error indicator for adaptive mesh refinement or coarsening in solving the shallow water equations using a finite volume method. Numerical simulations show that NEP is successful to be a refinement/coarsening indicator in the adaptive mesh finite volume method, as the method refines the mesh or grids around nonsmooth regions and coarsens them around smooth regions.

  20. Hybrid Finite Element and Volume Integral Methods for Scattering Using Parametric Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volakis, John L.; Sertel, Kubilay; Jørgensen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    n this paper we address several topics relating to the development and implementation of volume integral and hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetic modeling. Comparisons of volume integral equation formulations with the finite element-boundary integral method are given in terms of accu...... of vanishing divergence within the element but non-zero curl. In addition, a new domain decomposition is introduced for solving array problems involving several million degrees of freedom. Three orders of magnitude CPU reduction is demonstrated for such applications....

  1. One spatial dimensional finite volume three-body interaction for a short-range potential

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use McGuire's model to describe scattering of three spinless identical particles in one spatial dimension, we first present analytic solutions of Faddeev's equation for scattering of three spinless particles in free space. The three particles interaction in finite volume is derived subsequently, and the quantization conditions by matching wave functions in free space and finite volume are presented in terms of two-body scattering phase shifts. The quantization conditions obtained in this work for short range interaction are L\\"uscher's formula like and consistent with Yang's results in \\cite{Yang:1967bm}.

  2. A lattice Boltzmann coupled to finite volumes method for solving phase change problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ganaoui Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical scheme coupling lattice Boltzmann and finite volumes approaches has been developed and qualified for test cases of phase change problems. In this work, the coupled partial differential equations of momentum conservation equations are solved with a non uniform lattice Boltzmann method. The energy equation is discretized by using a finite volume method. Simulations show the ability of this developed hybrid method to model the effects of convection, and to predict transfers. Benchmarking is operated both for conductive and convective situation dominating solid/liquid transition. Comparisons are achieved with respect to available analytical solutions and experimental results.

  3. Finite Volume Evolution Galerkin Methods for the Shallow Water Equations with Dry Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Bollermann, Andreas; Noelle, Sebastian; Medvidová, Maria Lukáčová -

    2015-01-01

    We present a new Finite Volume Evolution Galerkin (FVEG) scheme for the solution of the shallow water equations (SWE) with the bottom topography as a source term. Our new scheme will be based on the FVEG methods presented in (Luk\\'a\\v{c}ov\\'a, Noelle and Kraft, J. Comp. Phys. 221, 2007), but adds the possibility to handle dry boundaries. The most important aspect is to preserve the positivity of the water height. We present a general approach to ensure this for arbitrary finite volume schemes...

  4. A finite volume approach for the simulation of nonlinear dissipative acoustic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    A form of the conservation equations for fluid dynamics is presented, deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A CLAWPACK based, 2D finite volume method using the Roe linearization was implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. In order to validate the code, two different tests have been performed: one against a special Taylor shock-like analytic solution, the other against published results on a HIFU system, both with satisfactory results. The code is based on CLAWPACK and is written for parallel execution on a GPU, thus improving performance by a factor of over 60 when compared to the standard CLAWPACK code.

  5. Methods to Increase the Robustness of Finite-Volume Flow Models in Thermodynamic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Quoilin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issues linked to simulation failures during integration in finite-volume flow models, especially those involving a two-phase state. This kind of model is particularly useful when modeling 1D heat exchangers or piping, e.g., in thermodynamic cycles involving a phase change. Issues, such as chattering or stiff systems, can lead to low simulation speed, instabilities and simulation failures. In the particular case of two-phase flow models, they are usually linked to a discontinuity in the density derivative between the liquid and two-phase zones. In this work, several methods to tackle numerical problems are developed, described, implemented and compared. In addition, methods available in the literature are also implemented and compared to the proposed approaches. Results suggest that the robustness of the models can be significantly increased with these different methods, at the price of a small increase of the error in the mass and energy balances.

  6. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Mignone, A

    2014-01-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruct...

  7. A class of the fourth order finite volume Hermite weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we developed a class of the fourth order accurate finite volume Hermite weighted essentially non-oscillatory(HWENO)schemes based on the work(Computers&Fluids,34:642-663(2005))by Qiu and Shu,with Total Variation Diminishing Runge-Kutta time discretization method for the two-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws.The key idea of HWENO is to evolve both with the solution and its derivative,which allows for using Hermite interpolation in the reconstruction phase,resulting in a more compact stencil at the expense of the additional work.The main difference between this work and the formal one is the procedure to reconstruct the derivative terms.Comparing with the original HWENO schemes of Qiu and Shu,one major advantage of new HWENOschemes is its robust in computation of problem with strong shocks.Extensive numerical experiments are performed to illustrate the capability of the method.

  8. Different radiation impedance models for finite porous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolan, Melanie; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas;

    2015-01-01

    coupled to the transfer matrix method (TMM). These methods are found to yield comparable results when predicting the Sabine absorption coefficients of finite porous materials. Discrepancies with measurement results can essentially be explained by the unbalance between grazing and non-grazing sound field...... the infinite case. Thus, in order to predict the Sabine absorption coefficients of finite porous samples, one can incorporate models of the radiation impedance. In this study, different radiation impedance models are compared with two experimental examples. Thomasson’s model is compared to Rhazi’s method when...

  9. Chebyshev Finite Difference Method for Fractional Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boundary

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical method for fractional differential equations using Chebyshev finite difference method. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo sense. Numerical results show that this method is of high accuracy and is more convenient and efficient for solving boundary value problems involving fractional ordinary differential equations. AMS Subject Classification: 34A08 Keywords and Phrases: Chebyshev polynomials, Gauss-Lobatto points, fractional differential equation, finite difference 1. Introduction The idea of a derivative which interpolates between the familiar integer order derivatives was introduced many years ago and has gained increasing importance only in recent years due to the development of mathematical models of a certain situations in engineering, materials science, control theory, polymer modelling etc. For example see [20, 22, 25, 26]. Most fractional order differential equations describing real life situations, in general do not have exact analytical solutions. Several numerical and approximate analytical methods for ordinary differential equation Received: December 2014; Accepted: March 2015 57 Journal of Mathematical Extension Vol. 9, No. 3, (2015, 57-71 ISSN: 1735-8299 URL: http://www.ijmex.com Chebyshev Finite Difference Method for Fractional Boundary Value Problems H. Azizi Taft Branch, Islamic Azad University Abstract. This paper presents a numerical method for fractional differential equations using Chebyshev finite difference method. The fractional derivative

  10. Eigenvalues of singular differential operators by finite difference methods. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    Approximation of the eigenvalues of certain self-adjoint operators defined by a formal differential operator in a Hilbert space. In general, two problems are studied. The first is the problem of defining a suitable Hilbert space operator that has eigenvalues. The second problem concerns the finite difference operators to be used.

  11. Efficient interface conditions for the finite difference beam propagation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hugo; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Lambeck, Paul

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that by adapting the refractive indexes in the vicinity of interfaces, the 2-D beam propagation method based on the finite-difference (FDBPM) scheme can be made much more effective. This holds especially for TM modes propagating in structures with high-index contrasts, such as surface

  12. EXTERNAL BODY FORCE IN FINITE DIFFERENCE LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Sheng; LIU Zhao-hui; SHI Bao-chang; ZHENG Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    A new finite difference lattice Boltzmann scheme is developed. Because of analyzing the influence of external body force roundly, the correct Navier-Stokes equations with the external body force are recovered, without any additional unphysical terms. And some numerical results are presented. The result which close agreement with analytical data shows the good performance of the model.

  13. High-order finite-difference methods for Poisson's equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linde, Hendrik Jan

    1971-01-01

    In this thesis finite-difference approximations to the three boundary value problems for Poisson’s equation are given, with discretization errors of O(H^3) for the mixed boundary value problem, O(H^3 |ln(h)| for the Neumann problem and O(H^4)for the Dirichlet problem respectively . First an operator

  14. Finite Difference Solution for Biopotentials of Axially Symmetric Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Maurice; Plonsey, Robert

    1972-01-01

    The finite difference equations necessary for calculating the three-dimensional, time-varying biopotentials within and surrounding axially symmetric cells are presented. The method of sucessive overrelaxation is employed to solve these equations and is shown to be rapidly convergent and accurate for the exemplary problem of a spheroidal cell under uniform field stimulation. PMID:4655665

  15. Compact high order finite volume method on unstructured grids III: Variational reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Ren, Yu-Xin; Pan, Jianhua; Li, Wanai

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a variational reconstruction for the high order finite volume method in solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary unstructured grids. In the variational reconstruction, an interfacial jump integration is defined to measure the jumps of the reconstruction polynomial and its spatial derivatives on each cell interface. The system of linear equations to determine the reconstruction polynomials is derived by minimizing the total interfacial jump integration in the computational domain using the variational method. On each control volume, the derived equations are implicit relations between the coefficients of the reconstruction polynomials defined on a compact stencil involving only the current cell and its direct face-neighbors. The reconstruction and time integration coupled iteration method proposed in our previous paper is used to achieve high computational efficiency. A problem-independent shock detector and the WBAP limiter are used to suppress non-physical oscillations in the simulation of flow with discontinuities. The advantages of the finite volume method using the variational reconstruction over the compact least-squares finite volume method proposed in our previous papers are higher accuracy, higher computational efficiency, more flexible boundary treatment and non-singularity of the reconstruction matrix. A number of numerical test cases are solved to verify the accuracy, efficiency and shock-capturing capability of the finite volume method using the variational reconstruction.

  16. Time-dependent optimal heater control using finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen Zhe; Heo, Kwang Su; Choi, Jun Hoo; Seol, Seoung Yun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Thermoforming is one of the most versatile and economical process to produce polymer products. The drawback of thermoforming is difficult to control thickness of final products. Temperature distribution affects the thickness distribution of final products, but temperature difference between surface and center of sheet is difficult to decrease because of low thermal conductivity of ABS material. In order to decrease temperature difference between surface and center, heating profile must be expressed as exponential function form. In this study, Finite Difference Method was used to find out the coefficients of optimal heating profiles. Through investigation, the optimal results using Finite Difference Method show that temperature difference between surface and center of sheet can be remarkably minimized with satisfying temperature of forming window.

  17. L\\"uscher's finite volume test for two-baryon systems with attractive interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Sinya; Iritani, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    For the attractive interaction, the L\\"uscher's finite volume formula gives the phase shift at negative squared moment $k^2<0$ for the ground state in the finite volume, which corresponds to the analytic continuation of the phase shift at $k^2<0$ in the infinite volume. Using this fact, we reexamine behaviors of phase shifts at $k^2 <0$ obtained directly from plateaux of effective energy shifts in previous lattice studies for two nucleon systems on various volumes. We have found that data, based on which existences of the bound states are claimed, show singular behaviors of the phase shift at $k^2<0$, which seem incompatible with smooth behaviors predicted by the effective range expansion. This, together with the fake plateau problem for the determination of the energy shift, brings a serious doubt on existences of the $NN$ bound states claimed in previous lattice studies at pion masses heavier than 300 MeV.

  18. Finite volume corrections and low momentum cuts in the thermodynamics of quantum gases

    CERN Document Server

    Redlich, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The conjecture, that the finite volume corrections to the thermodynamic functions can be correctly reproduced by using the thermodynamic limit with low particle momenta cutoff is examined in a very transparent example of an ideal boson gas in one dimension. We show that this conjecture is always true in principle, and derive convenient relations for the momentum cutoff dependence on thermal parameters in the asymptotic limits of large and small volume.

  19. An element-based finite-volume method approach for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcondes, Francisco [Federal University of Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Material Science], e-mail: marcondes@ufc.br; Varavei, Abdoljalil; Sepehrnoori, Kamy [The University of Texas at Austin (United States). Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Dept.], e-mails: varavei@mail.utexas.edu, kamys@mail.utexas.edu

    2010-07-01

    An element-based finite-volume approach in conjunction with unstructured grids for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation is presented. In this approach, both the discrete fracture and the matrix mass balances are taken into account without any additional models to couple the matrix and discrete fractures. The mesh, for two dimensional domains, can be built of triangles, quadrilaterals, or a mix of these elements. However, due to the available mesh generator to handle both matrix and discrete fractures, only results using triangular elements will be presented. The discrete fractures are located along the edges of each element. To obtain the approximated matrix equation, each element is divided into three sub-elements and then the mass balance equations for each component are integrated along each interface of the sub-elements. The finite-volume conservation equations are assembled from the contribution of all the elements that share a vertex, creating a cell vertex approach. The discrete fracture equations are discretized only along the edges of each element and then summed up with the matrix equations in order to obtain a conservative equation for both matrix and discrete fractures. In order to mimic real field simulations, the capillary pressure is included in both matrix and discrete fracture media. In the implemented model, the saturation field in the matrix and discrete fractures can be different, but the potential of each phase in the matrix and discrete fracture interface needs to be the same. The results for several naturally fractured reservoirs are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. (author)

  20. An Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Impact Dynamics of a Thin Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weidong Chen; Yanchun Yu

    2012-01-01

    The examination of an unstructured finite volume method for structural dynamics is assessed for simulations of systematic impact dynamics.A robust display dual-time stepping method is utilized to obtain time accurate solutions.The study of impact dynamics is a complex problem that should consider strength models and state equations to describe the mechanical behavior of materials.The current method has several features.1) Discrete equations of unstructured finite volume method naturally follow the conservation law.2)Display dual-time stepping method is suitable for the analysis of impact dynamic problems of time accurate solutions.3) The method did not produce grid distortion when large deformation appeared.The method is validated by the problem of impact dynamics of an elastic plate with initial conditions and material properties.The results validate the finite element numerical data.

  1. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Topology optimization of heat conduction problems using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    This note addresses the use of the finite volume method (FVM) for topology optimization of a heat conduction problem. Issues pertaining to the proper choice of cost functions, sensitivity analysis and example test problems are used to illustrate the effect of applying the FVM as an analysis tool...... checkerboards do not form during the topology optimization process....

  3. P1-NONCONFORMING QUADRILATERAL FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD AND ITS CASCADIC MULTIGRID ALGORITHM FOR ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-ying Man; Zhong-ci Shi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the finite volume element method of P1-nonconforming quadrilateral element for elliptic problems and obtain optimal error estimates for general quadrilateral partition. An optimal cascadic multigrid algorithm is proposed to solve the nonsymmetric large-scale system resulting from such discretization. Numerical experiments are reported to support our theoretical results.

  4. Wind deficit model in a wind farm using finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimanzadeh, Maryam; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    A wind deficit model for wind farms is developed in this work using finite volume method. The main question addressed here is to calculate approximately the wind speed in the vicinity of each wind turbine of a farm. The procedure followed is to solve the governing equations of flow for the whole ...

  5. Nuclear equation of state and finite nucleon volumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rożynek, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    It is shown how the Equation of State (EoS) depends on nucleon properties inside Nuclear Matter (NM). We propose to benefit from the concept of enthalpy in order to include volume corrections to the nucleon rest energy, which are proportional to pressure and absent in a standard Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) with point-like nucleons. As a result, the nucleon mass can decrease inside NM, making the model nonlinear and the EoS softer. The course of the EoS in our RMF model agrees with a semi-empirical estimate and is close to the results obtained from extensive DBHF calculations with a Bonn A potential, which produce an EoS stiff enough to describe neutron star properties (mass--radius constraint), especially the masses of PSR J1614_2230 and PSR J0348_0432, known as the most massive ($\\sim 2 M_\\odot$) neutron stars. The presented model has proper saturation properties, including a good value of compressibility.

  6. Explicit finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method for curvilinear coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhaoli; Zhao, T S

    2003-06-01

    In this paper a finite-difference-based lattice Boltzmann method for curvilinear coordinates is proposed in order to improve the computational efficiency and numerical stability of a recent method [R. Mei and W. Shyy, J. Comput. Phys. 143, 426 (1998)] in which the collision term of the Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation for discrete velocities is treated implicitly. In the present method, the implicitness of the numerical scheme is removed by introducing a distribution function different from that being used currently. As a result, an explicit finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method for curvilinear coordinates is obtained. The scheme is applied to a two-dimensional Poiseuille flow, an unsteady Couette flow, a lid-driven cavity flow, and a steady flow around a circular cylinder. The numerical results are in good agreement with the results of previous studies. Extensions to other lattice Boltzmann models based on nonuniform meshes are also discussed.

  7. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  8. The Three-Dimensional Finite-Volume Non-Hydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. L.; MacDonald, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    A multi-scales Non-hydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM) has been developed at Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) to meet NOAA's future prediction mission ranging from mesoscale short-range, high-impact weather forecasts to longer-term intra-seasonal climate prediction. NIM formulates the latest numerical innovation of the three-dimensional finite-volume control volume on the quasi-uniform icosahedral grid suitable for ultra-high resolution simulations. NIM is designed to utilize the state-of-art computing architecture such as Graphic Processing Units (GPU) processors to run globally at kilometer scale resolution to explicitly resolve convective storms and complex terrains. The novel features of NIM numerical design include: 1.1. A local coordinate system upon which finite-volume integrations are undertaken. The use of a local Cartesian coordinate greatly simplifies the mathematic formulation of the finite-volume operators and leads to the finite-volume integration along straight lines on the plane, rather than along curved lines on the spherical surface. 1.2. A general indirect addressing scheme developed for modeling on irregular grid. It arranges the icosahedral grid with a one-dimensional vector loop structure, table specified memory order, and an indirect addressing scheme that yields very compact code despite the complexities of this grid. 1.3. Use of three-dimensional finite-volume integration over control volumes constructed on the height coordinates. Three-dimensional finite-volume integration accurately represents the Newton Third Law over terrain and improves pressure gradient force over complex terrain. 1.4. Use of the Runge-Kutta 4th order conservative and positive-definite transport scheme 1.5. NIM dynamical solver has been implemented on CPU as well as GPU. As one of the potential candidates for NWS next generation models, NIM dynamical core has been successfully verified with various benchmark test cases including those proposed by DCMIP

  9. Implications of Poincare symmetry for thermal field theories in finite-volume

    CERN Document Server

    Giusti, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The analytic continuation to an imaginary velocity $i\\xi$ of the canonical partition function of a thermal system expressed in a moving frame has a natural implementation in the Euclidean path-integral formulation in terms of shifted boundary conditions. Writing the Boltzmann factor as $\\exp[-L_0(H-i\\xi.P)]$, the Poincare invariance underlying a relativistic theory implies a dependence of the free-energy on $L_0$ and the shift $\\xi$ only through the combination $\\beta= L_0 \\sqrt{1+\\xi^2}$. This in turn implies a set of Ward identities, some of which were previously derived by us, among the correlators of the energy-momentum tensor. In the infinite-volume limit they lead to relations among the cumulants of the total energy distribution and those of the momentum, i.e. they connect the energy and the momentum distributions in the canonical ensemble. In finite volume the Poincare symmetry translates into exact relations among partition functions and correlation functions defined with different sets of (generalize...

  10. Simulation of Jetting in Injection Molding Using a Finite Volume Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaozhen Hua

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the jetting and the subsequent buckling flow more accurately, a three dimensional melt flow model was established on a viscous, incompressible, and non-isothermal fluid, and a control volume-based finite volume method was employed to discretize the governing equations. A two-fold iterative method was proposed to decouple the dependence among pressure, velocity, and temperature so as to reduce the computation and improve the numerical stability. Based on the proposed theoretical model and numerical method, a program code was developed to simulate melt front progress and flow fields. The numerical simulations for different injection speeds, melt temperatures, and gate locations were carried out to explore the jetting mechanism. The results indicate the filling pattern depends on the competition between inertial and viscous forces. When inertial force exceeds the viscous force jetting occurs, then it changes to a buckling flow as the viscous force competes over the inertial force. Once the melt contacts with the mold wall, the melt filling switches to conventional sequential filling mode. Numerical results also indicate jetting length increases with injection speed but changes little with melt temperature. The reasonable agreements between simulated and experimental jetting length and buckling frequency imply the proposed method is valid for jetting simulation.

  11. The Laguerre finite difference one-way equation solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, Andrew V.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a new finite difference algorithm for solving the 2D one-way wave equation with a preliminary approximation of a pseudo-differential operator by a system of partial differential equations. As opposed to the existing approaches, the integral Laguerre transform instead of Fourier transform is used. After carrying out the approximation of spatial variables it is possible to obtain systems of linear algebraic equations with better computing properties and to reduce computer costs for their solution. High accuracy of calculations is attained at the expense of employing finite difference approximations of higher accuracy order that are based on the dispersion-relationship-preserving method and the Richardson extrapolation in the downward continuation direction. The numerical experiments have verified that as compared to the spectral difference method based on Fourier transform, the new algorithm allows one to calculate wave fields with a higher degree of accuracy and a lower level of numerical noise and artifacts including those for non-smooth velocity models. In the context of solving the geophysical problem the post-stack migration for velocity models of the types Syncline and Sigsbee2A has been carried out. It is shown that the images obtained contain lesser noise and are considerably better focused as compared to those obtained by the known Fourier Finite Difference and Phase-Shift Plus Interpolation methods. There is an opinion that purely finite difference approaches do not allow carrying out the seismic migration procedure with sufficient accuracy, however the results obtained disprove this statement. For the supercomputer implementation it is proposed to use the parallel dichotomy algorithm when solving systems of linear algebraic equations with block-tridiagonal matrices.

  12. The mimetic finite difference method for elliptic problems

    CERN Document Server

    Veiga, Lourenço Beirão; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the theoretical and computational aspects of the mimetic finite difference method for a wide class of multidimensional elliptic problems, which includes diffusion, advection-diffusion, Stokes, elasticity, magnetostatics and plate bending problems. The modern mimetic discretization technology developed in part by the Authors allows one to solve these equations on unstructured polygonal, polyhedral and generalized polyhedral meshes. The book provides a practical guide for those scientists and engineers that are interested in the computational properties of the mimetic finite difference method such as the accuracy, stability, robustness, and efficiency. Many examples are provided to help the reader to understand and implement this method. This monograph also provides the essential background material and describes basic mathematical tools required to develop further the mimetic discretization technology and to extend it to various applications.

  13. MULTISTEP FINITE VOLUME APPROXIMATIONS TO THE TRANSIENT BEHAVIOR OF A SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE ON GENERAL 2D OR 3D MESHES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a hydrodynamic model of the semiconductor device. The approximate solutions are obtained by a mixed finite volume method for the potential equation and multistep upwind finite volume methods for the concentration equations.Error estimates in some discrete norms are derived under some regularity assumptions on the exact solutions.

  14. Pseudoscalar mesons in a finite cubic volume with twisted boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Vaghi, Alessio

    2016-07-01

    We study the effects of a finite cubic volume with twisted boundary conditions on pseudoscalar mesons. We first apply chiral perturbation theory in the p-regime and calculate the corrections for masses, decay constants, pseudoscalar coupling constants and form factors at next-to-leading order. We show that the Feynman-Hellmann theorem and the relevant Ward-Takahashi identity are satisfied. We then derive asymptotic formulae à la Lüscher for twisted boundary conditions. We show that chiral Ward identities for masses and decay constants are satisfied by the asymptotic formulae in finite volume as a consequence of infinite-volume Ward identities. Applying asymptotic formulae in combination with chiral perturbation theory we estimate corrections beyond next-to-leading order for twisted boundary conditions.

  15. Stability of Semi-implicit Finite Volume Scheme for Level Set Like Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim Kwang-il; Son Yong-chol

    2015-01-01

    We study numerical methods for level set like equations arising in im-age processing and curve evolution problems. Semi-implicit finite volume-element type schemes are constructed for the general level set like equation (image selective smoothing model) given by Alvarez et al. (Alvarez L, Lions P L, Morel J M. Image selective smoothing and edge detection by nonlinear diffusion II. SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 1992, 29: 845–866). Through the reasonable semi-implicit discretization in time and co-volume method for space approximation, we give finite volume schemes, unconditionally stable in L∞ and W 1,2 (W 1,1) sense in isotropic (anisotropic) diffu-sion domain.

  16. Pseudoscalar mesons in a finite cubic volume with twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Colangelo, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of a finite cubic volume with twisted boundary conditions on pseudoscalar mesons. We first apply chiral perturbation theory in the p-regime and calculate the corrections for masses, decay constants, pseudoscalar coupling constants and form factors at next-to-leading order. We show that the Feynman-Hellmann theorem and the relevant Ward-Takahashi identity are satisfied. We then derive asymptotic formulae a la Luscher for twisted boundary conditions. We show that chiral Ward identities for masses and decay constants are satisfied by the asymptotic formulae in finite volume as a consequence of infinite-volume Ward identities. Applying asymptotic formulae in combination with chiral perturbation theory we estimate corrections beyond next-to-leading order for twisted boundary conditions.

  17. High Order Finite Difference Methods for Multiscale Complex Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    The classical way of analyzing finite difference schemes for hyperbolic problems is to investigate as many as possible of the following points: (1) Linear stability for constant coefficients; (2) Linear stability for variable coefficients; (3) Non-linear stability; and (4) Stability at discontinuities. We will build a new numerical method, which satisfies all types of stability, by dealing with each of the points above step by step.

  18. Finite difference methods for the solution of unsteady potential flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradonna, F. X.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various problems which are confronted in the development of an unsteady finite difference potential code. This review is conducted mainly in the context of what is done for a typical small disturbance and full potential methods. The issues discussed include choice of equation, linearization and conservation, differencing schemes, and algorithm development. A number of applications including unsteady three-dimensional rotor calculation, are demonstrated.

  19. A finite difference method for free boundary problems

    KAUST Repository

    Fornberg, Bengt

    2010-04-01

    Fornberg and Meyer-Spasche proposed some time ago a simple strategy to correct finite difference schemes in the presence of a free boundary that cuts across a Cartesian grid. We show here how this procedure can be combined with a minimax-based optimization procedure to rapidly solve a wide range of elliptic-type free boundary value problems. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A 3-D Finite-Volume Non-hydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin

    2014-05-01

    The Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM) formulates the latest numerical innovation of the three-dimensional finite-volume control volume on the quasi-uniform icosahedral grid suitable for ultra-high resolution simulations. NIM's modeling goal is to improve numerical accuracy for weather and climate simulations as well as to utilize the state-of-art computing architecture such as massive parallel CPUs and GPUs to deliver routine high-resolution forecasts in timely manner. NIM dynamic corel innovations include: * A local coordinate system remapped spherical surface to plane for numerical accuracy (Lee and MacDonald, 2009), * Grid points in a table-driven horizontal loop that allow any horizontal point sequence (A.E. MacDonald, et al., 2010), * Flux-Corrected Transport formulated on finite-volume operators to maintain conservative positive definite transport (J.-L, Lee, ET. Al., 2010), *Icosahedral grid optimization (Wang and Lee, 2011), * All differentials evaluated as three-dimensional finite-volume integrals around the control volume. The three-dimensional finite-volume solver in NIM is designed to improve pressure gradient calculation and orographic precipitation over complex terrain. NIM dynamical core has been successfully verified with various non-hydrostatic benchmark test cases such as internal gravity wave, and mountain waves in Dynamical Cores Model Inter-comparisons Projects (DCMIP). Physical parameterizations suitable for NWP are incorporated into NIM dynamical core and successfully tested with multimonth aqua-planet simulations. Recently, NIM has started real data simulations using GFS initial conditions. Results from the idealized tests as well as real-data simulations will be shown in the conference.

  1. Biomechanical effects of bone cement volume on the endplates of augmented vertebral body: a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Liang; Chang Zhen; Xu Zhengwei; Liu Tuanjiang; He Baorong; Hao Dingjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that percutaneous vertebroplasty might alter vertebral stress transfer,leading to adjacent vertebral failure.However,no three-dimensional finite element study so far accounted for the stress distributions on different cement volumes.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress distributions on the endplate under different loading conditions after augmentation with various volumes of bone cement.Methods L2-L3 motion segment data were obtained from CT scans of the lumbar spine from a cadaver of a young man who had no abnormal findings on roentgenograms.Three-dimensional model of L2-L3 was established using Mimics software,and finite element model of L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) was established using Ansys10.0 software.For simulating percutaneous vertebral augmentation,polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was deposited into the bipedicle of the L2 vertebra.The percentage of PMMA volume varied between 15% and 30%.The stress distributions on the endplate of the augmented vertebral body were calculated under three different loading conditions.Results In general,the stress level monotonically increased with bone cement volume.Under each loading condition,the stress change on the L2 superior and inferior endplates in three kinds of finite element models shows monotonic increase.Compared with the stress-increasing region of the endplate,the central part of the L2 endplate was subject to the greatest stress under three kinds of loading conditions,especially on the superior endplate and under flexion.Conclusions The finite element models of FSU are useful to optimize the planning for vertebroplasty.The bone cement volume might have an influence on the endplate of the augmentation,especially the superior endplate.It should be noted that the optimization of bone cement volume is patient specific; the volume of the bone cement should be based on the size,body mineral density,and stiffness of the vertebrae of individual

  2. ON THE FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT VERSION OF RITZ-VOLTERRA PROJECTION AND APPLICATIONS TO RELATED EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie Zhang; Yan-ping Lin; Robert J.Tait

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general error analysis framework for the finite volume element (FVE) approximation to the Ritz-Volterra projection, the Sobolev equations and parabolic integro-differential equations. The main idea in our paper is to consider the FVE methods as perturbations of standard finite element methods which enables us to derive the optimal L2 and H1 norm error estimates, and the L∞ and W1∞ norm error estimates by means of the time dependent Green functions. Our disc ussions also include elliptic and parabolic problems as the special cases.

  3. Convergence of Cell Based Finite Volume Discretizations for Problems of Control in the Conduction Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evgrafov, Anton; Gregersen, Misha Marie; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2011-01-01

    design, in particular shape and topology optimization, and are most often solved numerically utilizing a finite element approach. Within the FV framework for control in the coefficients problems the main difficulty we face is the need to analyze the convergence of fluxes defined on the faces of cells......We present a convergence analysis of a cell-based finite volume (FV) discretization scheme applied to a problem of control in the coefficients of a generalized Laplace equation modelling, for example, a steady state heat conduction. Such problems arise in applications dealing with geometric optimal...

  4. Two-Particle Elastic Scattering in a Finite Volume Including QED

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Silas R

    2014-01-01

    The presence of long-range interactions violates a condition necessary to relate the energy of two particles in a finite volume to their S-matrix elements in the manner of Luscher. While in infinite volume, QED contributions to low-energy charged particle scattering must be resummed to all orders in perturbation theory (the Coulomb ladder diagrams), in a finite volume the momentum operator is gapped, allowing for a perturbative treatment. The leading QED corrections to the two-particle finite-volume energy quantization condition below the inelastic threshold, as well as approximate formulas for energy eigenvalues, are obtained. In particular, we focus on two spinless hadrons in the A1+ irreducible representation of the cubic group, and truncate the strong interactions to the s-wave. These results are necessary for the analysis of Lattice QCD+QED calculations of charged-hadron interactions, and can be straightforwardly generalized to other representations of the cubic group, to hadrons with spin, and to includ...

  5. Comparison of finite difference and finite element methods for simulating two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehner, Marcel; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Saenger, Erik H.; Steeb, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves in a medium containing a circular heterogeneity is investigated with an analytical solution and numerical wave propagation simulations. Different combinations of finite difference methods (FDM) and finite element methods (FEM) are used to numerically solve

  6. Comparison of finite difference and finite element methods for simulating two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehner, Marcel; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Saenger, Erik H.; Steeb, Holger Karl

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves in a medium containing a circular heterogeneity is investigated with an analytical solution and numerical wave propagation simulations. Different combinations of finite difference methods (FDM) and finite element methods (FEM) are used to numerically solve

  7. Simulation of 3D parachute fluid-structure interaction based on nonlinear finite element method and preconditioning finite volume method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yuxin; Xia Jian

    2014-01-01

    A fluid–structure interaction method combining a nonlinear finite element algorithm with a preconditioning finite volume method is proposed in this paper to simulate parachute tran-sient dynamics. This method uses a three-dimensional membrane–cable fabric model to represent a parachute system at a highly folded configuration. The large shape change during parachute infla-tion is computed by the nonlinear Newton–Raphson iteration and the linear system equation is solved by the generalized minimal residual (GMRES) method. A membrane wrinkling algorithm is also utilized to evaluate the special uniaxial tension state of membrane elements on the parachute canopy. In order to avoid large time expenses during structural nonlinear iteration, the implicit Hil-ber–Hughes–Taylor (HHT) time integration method is employed. For the fluid dynamic simula-tions, the Roe and HLLC (Harten–Lax–van Leer contact) scheme has been modified and extended to compute flow problems at all speeds. The lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS) approximate factorization is applied to accelerate the numerical convergence speed. Finally, the test model of a highly folded C-9 parachute is simulated at a prescribed speed and the results show similar characteristics compared with experimental results and previous literature.

  8. Simulation of 3D parachute fluid–structure interaction based on nonlinear finite element method and preconditioning finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuxin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluid–structure interaction method combining a nonlinear finite element algorithm with a preconditioning finite volume method is proposed in this paper to simulate parachute transient dynamics. This method uses a three-dimensional membrane–cable fabric model to represent a parachute system at a highly folded configuration. The large shape change during parachute inflation is computed by the nonlinear Newton–Raphson iteration and the linear system equation is solved by the generalized minimal residual (GMRES method. A membrane wrinkling algorithm is also utilized to evaluate the special uniaxial tension state of membrane elements on the parachute canopy. In order to avoid large time expenses during structural nonlinear iteration, the implicit Hilber–Hughes–Taylor (HHT time integration method is employed. For the fluid dynamic simulations, the Roe and HLLC (Harten–Lax–van Leer contact scheme has been modified and extended to compute flow problems at all speeds. The lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS approximate factorization is applied to accelerate the numerical convergence speed. Finally, the test model of a highly folded C-9 parachute is simulated at a prescribed speed and the results show similar characteristics compared with experimental results and previous literature.

  9. Explicit finite difference methods for the delay pseudoparabolic equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirali, I; Amiraliyev, G M; Cakir, M; Cimen, E

    2014-01-01

    Finite difference technique is applied to numerical solution of the initial-boundary value problem for the semilinear delay Sobolev or pseudoparabolic equation. By the method of integral identities two-level difference scheme is constructed. For the time integration the implicit rule is being used. Based on the method of energy estimates the fully discrete scheme is shown to be absolutely stable and convergent of order two in space and of order one in time. The error estimates are obtained in the discrete norm. Some numerical results confirming the expected behavior of the method are shown.

  10. Development op finite volume methods for fluid dynamics; Developpement de methodes de volumes finis pour la mecanique des fluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delcourte, S

    2007-09-15

    We aim to develop a finite volume method which applies to a greater class of meshes than other finite volume methods, restricted by orthogonality constraints. We build discrete differential operators over the three staggered tessellations needed for the construction of the method. These operators verify some analogous properties to those of the continuous operators. At first, the method is applied to the Div-Curl problem, which can be viewed as a building block of the Stokes problem. Then, the Stokes problem is dealt with with various boundary conditions. It is well known that when the computational domain is polygonal and non-convex, the order of convergence of numerical methods is deteriorated. Consequently, we have studied how an appropriate local refinement is able to restore the optimal order of convergence for the Laplacian problem. At last, we have discretized the non-linear Navier-Stokes problem, using the rotational formulation of the convection term, associated to the Bernoulli pressure. With an iterative algorithm, we are led to solve a saddle-point problem at each iteration. We give a particular interest to this linear problem by testing some pre-conditioners issued from finite elements, which we adapt to our method. Each problem is illustrated by numerical results on arbitrary meshes, such as strongly non-conforming meshes. (author)

  11. Thermal buckling comparative analysis using Different FE (Finite Element) tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banasiak, Waldemar; Labouriau, Pedro [INTECSEA do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Burnett, Christopher [INTECSEA UK, Surrey (United Kingdom); Falepin, Hendrik [Fugro Engineers SA/NV, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-12-19

    High operational temperature and pressure in offshore pipelines may lead to unexpected lateral movements, sometimes call lateral buckling, which can have serious consequences for the integrity of the pipeline. The phenomenon of lateral buckling in offshore pipelines needs to be analysed in the design phase using FEM. The analysis should take into account many parameters, including operational temperature and pressure, fluid characteristic, seabed profile, soil parameters, coatings of the pipe, free spans etc. The buckling initiation force is sensitive to small changes of any initial geometric out-of-straightness, thus the modeling of the as-laid state of the pipeline is an important part of the design process. Recently some dedicated finite elements programs have been created making modeling of the offshore environment more convenient that has been the case with the use of general purpose finite element software. The present paper aims to compare thermal buckling analysis of sub sea pipeline performed using different finite elements tools, i.e. general purpose programs (ANSYS, ABAQUS) and dedicated software (SAGE Profile 3D) for a single pipeline resting on an the seabed. The analyses considered the pipeline resting on a flat seabed with a small levels of out-of straightness initiating the lateral buckling. The results show the quite good agreement of results of buckling in elastic range and in the conclusions next comparative analyses with sensitivity cases are recommended. (author)

  12. PERTURBATIONAL FINITE DIFFERENCE SCHEME OF CONVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Perturbational Finite Difference (PFD) method is a kind of high-order-accurate compact difference method, But its idea is different from the normal compact method and the multi-nodes method. This method can get a Perturbational Exact Numerical Solution (PENS) scheme for locally linearlized Convection-Diffusion (CD) equation. The PENS scheme is similar to the Finite Analytical (FA) scheme and Exact Difference Solution (EDS) scheme, which are all exponential schemes, but PENS scheme is simpler and uses only 3, 5 and 7 nodes for 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional problems, respectively. The various approximate schemes of PENS scheme are also called Perturbational-High-order-accurate Difference (PHD) scheme. The PHD schemes can be got by expanding the exponential terms in the PENS scheme into power series of grid Renold number, and they are all upwind schemes and remain the concise structure form of first-order upwind scheme. For 1-dimensional (1-D) CD equation and 2-D incompressible Navier-Stokes equation, their PENS and PHD schemes were constituted in this paper, they all gave highly accurate results for the numerical examples of three 1-D CD equations and an incompressible 2-D flow in a square cavity.

  13. High-order accurate finite-volume formulations for the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models

    CERN Document Server

    Engwirda, Darren; Marshall, John

    2016-01-01

    The development of a set of high-order accurate finite-volume formulations for evaluation of the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models is described. A pair of new schemes are presented, both based on an integration of the contact pressure force about the perimeter of an associated momentum control-volume. The two proposed methods differ in their choice of control-volume geometries. High-order accurate numerical integration techniques are employed in both schemes to account for non-linearities in the underlying equation-of-state definitions and thermodynamic profiles, and details of an associated vertical interpolation and quadrature scheme are discussed in detail. Numerical experiments are used to confirm the consistency of the two formulations, and it is demonstrated that the new methods maintain hydrostatic and thermobaric equilibrium in the presence of strongly-sloping layer-wise geometry, non-linear equation-of-state definitions and non-uniform vertical stratification profiles. Additionally, one...

  14. A numerical study of 2D detonation waves with adaptive finite volume methods on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a framework of adaptive finite volume solutions for the reactive Euler equations on unstructured grids is proposed. The main ingredients of the algorithm include a second order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta method for temporal discretization, and the finite volume method with piecewise linear solution reconstruction of the conservative variables for the spatial discretization in which the least square method is employed for the reconstruction, and weighted essentially nonoscillatory strategy is used to restrain the potential numerical oscillation. To resolve the high demanding on the computational resources due to the stiffness of the system caused by the reaction term and the shock structure in the solutions, the h-adaptive method is introduced. OpenMP parallelization of the algorithm is also adopted to further improve the efficiency of the implementation. Several one and two dimensional benchmark tests on the ZND model are studied in detail, and numerical results successfully show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. A Finite Volume Method with Unstructured Triangular Grids for Numerical Modeling of Tidal Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hong-da; LIU zhen

    2005-01-01

    The finite volume method (FVM) has many advantages in 2-D shallow water numerical simulation. In this study, the finite volume method is used with unstructured triangular grids to simulate the tidal currents. The Roe scheme is applied in the calculation of the intercell numerical flux, and the MUSCL method is introduced to improve its accuracy. The time integral is a two-step scheme of forecast and revision. For the verification of the present method, the Stoker's problem is calculated and the result is compared with the mathematically analytic solutions. The comparison indicates that the method is feasible. A sea area of a port is used as an example to test the method established here. The result shows that the present computational method is satisfactory, and it could be applied to the engineering fields.

  16. Precise determination of universal finite volume observables in the Gross-Neveu model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzec, T.

    2007-01-26

    The Gross-Neveu model is a quantum field theory in two space time dimensions that shares many features with quantum chromo dynamics. In this thesis the continuum model and its discretized versions are reviewed and a finite volume renormalization scheme is introduced and tested. Calculations in the limit of infinitely many fermion flavors as well as perturbative computations are carried out. In extensive Monte-Carlo simulations of the one flavor and the four flavor lattice models with Wilson fermions a set of universal finite volume observables is calculated to a high precision. In the one flavor model which is equivalent to the massless Thirring model the continuum extrapolated Monte-Carlo results are confronted with an exact solution of the model. (orig.)

  17. On Finite Volume Corrections to the Electromagnetic Mass of Composite Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jong-Wan

    2015-01-01

    In standard lattice QCD + QED studies, the long-range nature of the electromagnetic interaction introduces power-law finite volume effects that must be quantitatively understood to extract the desired physics. Non-relativistic effective field theories have shown to be an efficient tool for the characterization of such effects, especially in the case of composite particles. Recently it was argued that contributions from antiparticles are required so that QED results for a point-like fermion can be reproduced in the effective field theory description. We further solidify this argument by considering the analogous case of a point-like scalar in QED. In this case, we find that contributions from antiparticles are also required, and these contributions, moreover, are independent of the treatment of photon zero modes. We extend these considerations to composite scalar and spinor particles, and determine the leading antiparticle contributions to their finite-volume electromagnetic masses. Such contributions are show...

  18. The Meshfree Finite Volume Method with application to multi-phase porous media models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Brody H.; Perré, Patrick; Turner, Ian

    2017-03-01

    Numerical methods form a cornerstone of the analysis and investigation of mathematical models for physical processes. Many classical numerical schemes rely on the application of strict meshing structures to generate accurate solutions, which in some applications are an infeasible constraint. Within this paper we outline a new meshfree numerical scheme, which we call the Meshfree Finite Volume Method (MFVM). The MFVM uses interpolants to approximate fluxes in a disjoint finite volume scheme, allowing for the accurate solution of strong-form PDEs. We present a derivation of the MFVM, and give error bounds on the spatial and temporal approximations used within the scheme. We present a wide variety of applications of the method, showing key features, and advantages over traditional meshed techniques. We close with an application of the method to a non-linear multi-phase wood drying model, showing the potential for solving numerically challenging problems.

  19. A New Class of Non-Linear, Finite-Volume Methods for Vlasov Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A

    2009-11-24

    Methods for the numerical discretization of the Vlasov equation should efficiently use the phase space discretization and should introduce only enough numerical dissipation to promote stability and control oscillations. A new high-order, non-linear, finite-volume algorithm for the Vlasov equation that discretely conserves particle number and controls oscillations is presented. The method is fourth-order in space and time in well-resolved regions, but smoothly reduces to a third-order upwind scheme as features become poorly resolved. The new scheme is applied to several standard problems for the Vlasov-Poisson system, and the results are compared with those from other finite-volume approaches, including an artificial viscosity scheme and the Piecewise Parabolic Method. It is shown that the new scheme is able to control oscillations while preserving a higher degree of fidelity of the solution than the other approaches.

  20. FINITE VOLUME NUMERICAL ANALYSIS FOR PARABOLIC EQUATION WITH ROBIN BOUNDARY CONDITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Cui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, finite volume method on unstructured meshes is studied for a parabolic convection-diffusion problem on an open bounded set of Rd (d = 2 or 3) with Robin boundary condition. Upwinding approximations are adapted to treat both the convection term and Robin boundary condition. By directly getting start from the formulation of the finite volume scheme, numerical analysis is done. By using several discrete functional analysis techniques such as summation by parts, discrete norm inequality, et al, the stability and error estimates on the approximate solution are established, existence and uniqueness of the approximate solution and the 1st order temporal norm and L2 and H1 spacial norm convergence properties are obtained.

  1. FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR SIMULATION OF VISCOELASTIC FLOW THROUGH A EXPANSION CHANNEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Chun-quan; JIANG Hai-mei; YIN Hong-jun; SU Yu-chi; ZENG Ye-ming

    2009-01-01

    A finite volume method for the numerical solution of viscoelastic flows is given. The flow of a differential Upper-Convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid through an abrupt expansion has been chosen as a prototype example. The conservation and constitutive equations are solved using the Finite Volume Method (FVM) in a staggered grid with an upwind scheme for the viscoelastic stresses and a hybrid scheme for the velocities. An enhanced-in-speed pressure-correction algorithm is used and a method for handling the source term in the momentum equations is employed. Improved accuracy is achieved by a special discretization of the boundary conditions. Stable solutions are obtained for higher Weissenberg number (We), further extending the range of simulations with the FVM. Numerical results show the viscoelasticity of polymer solutions is the main factor influencing the sweep efficiency.

  2. INTERVAL FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR UNCERTAINTY SIMULATION OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL RIVER WATER QUALITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Li; ZENG Guang-ming; HUANG Guo-he; LU Hong-wei

    2004-01-01

    Under the interval uncertainties, by incorporating the discretization form of finite volume method and interval algebra theory, an Interval Finite Volume Method (IFVM) was developed to solve water quality simulation issues for two-dimensional river when lacking effective data of flow velocity and flow quantity. The IFVM was practically applied to a segment of the Xiangjiang River because the Project of Hunan Inland Waterway Multipurpose must be started working after the environmental impact assessment for it. The simulation results suggest that there exist rather apparent pollution zones of BOD5 downstream the Dongqiaogang discharger and that of COD downstream Xiaoxiangjie discharger, but the pollution sources have no impact on the safety of the three water plants located in this river segment. Although the developed IFVM is to be perfected, it is still a powerful tool under interval uncertainties for water environmental impact assessment, risk analysis, and water quality planning, etc. besides water quality simulation studied in this paper.

  3. Finite volume effects in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rokash, Alexander; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2013-01-01

    We present a lattice calculation of neutron-deuteron scattering at very low energies and investigate in detail the impact of the topological finite-volume corrections. Our calculations are carried out in the framework of pionless effective field theory at leading order in the low-energy expansion. Using lattice sizes and a lattice spacing comparable to those employed in nuclear lattice simulations, we find that the topological volume corrections must be taken into account in order to obtain correct results for the neutron-proton S-wave scattering lengths.

  4. An extension to the Luscher's finite volume method above inelastic threashold (formalism)

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Luscher's finite volume method above inelastic thresholds is proposed. It is fulfilled by extendind the procedure recently proposed by HAL-QCD Collaboration for a single channel system. Focusing on the asymptotic behaviors of the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions (equal-time) near spatial infinity, a coupled channel extension of effective Schrodinger equation is constructed by introducing an energy-independent interaction kernel. Because the NBS wave functions contain the information of T-matrix at long distance, S-matrix can be obtained by solving the coupled channel effective Schrodinger equation in the infinite volume.

  5. Influence of finite volume and magnetic field effects on the QCD phase diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Magdy, Niseem; Lacey, Roy A

    2015-01-01

    The Polyakov linear sigma model (PLSM) is used to investigate the respective influence of a finite volume and a magnetic field on the quark-hadron phase boundary in the plane of baryon chemical potential ($\\mu_{B}$) vs. temperature ($T$) of the QCD phase diagram. The calculated results indicate sizable shifts of the quark-hadron phase boundary to lower values of $(\\mu_{B}~\\text{and}~T)$ for increasing magnetic field strength, and an opposite shift to higher values of $(\\mu_{B}~\\text{and}~T)$ for decreasing system volume. Such shifts could have important implications for extraction of the thermodynamic properties of the QCD phase diagram from heavy ion data.

  6. Seismic imaging using finite-differences and parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ober, C.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A key to reducing the risks and costs of associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Prestack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar wave equation using finite differences. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, a finite difference, 3-D prestack, depth migration code has been developed. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration. Several problems had to be addressed to get an efficient code for the Intel Paragon. These include efficient I/O, efficient parallel tridiagonal solves, and high single-node performance. Furthermore, to provide portable code the author has been restricted to the use of high-level programming languages (C and Fortran) and interprocessor communications using MPI. He has been using the SUNMOS operating system, which has affected many of his programming decisions. He will present images created from two verification datasets (the Marmousi Model and the SEG/EAEG 3D Salt Model). Also, he will show recent images from real datasets, and point out locations of improved imaging. Finally, he will discuss areas of current research which will hopefully improve the image quality and reduce computational costs.

  7. A posteriori error estimates for finite volume approximations of elliptic equations on general surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Lili; Tian, Li; Wang, Desheng

    2008-10-31

    In this paper, we present a residual-based a posteriori error estimate for the finite volume discretization of steady convection– diffusion–reaction equations defined on surfaces in R3, which are often implicitly represented as level sets of smooth functions. Reliability and efficiency of the proposed a posteriori error estimator are rigorously proved. Numerical experiments are also conducted to verify the theoretical results and demonstrate the robustness of the error estimator.

  8. Convergence of discrete duality finite volume schemes for the cardiac bidomain model

    CERN Document Server

    Andreianov, Boris; Karlsen, Kenneth H; Pierre, Charles

    2010-01-01

    We prove convergence of discrete duality finite volume (DDFV) schemes on distorted meshes for a class of simplified macroscopic bidomain models of the electrical activity in the heart. Both time-implicit and linearised time-implicit schemes are treated. A short description is given of the 3D DDFV meshes and of some of the associated discrete calculus tools. Several numerical tests are presented.

  9. TRIM: A finite-volume MHD algorithm for an unstructured adaptive mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, D.D.; Lottati, I.; Mikic, Z. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe TRIM, a MHD code which uses finite volume discretization of the MHD equations on an unstructured adaptive grid of triangles in the poloidal plane. They apply it to problems related to modeling tokamak toroidal plasmas. The toroidal direction is treated by a pseudospectral method. Care was taken to center variables appropriately on the mesh and to construct a self adjoint diffusion operator for cell centered variables.

  10. Triviality of $\\varphi^4$ theory in a finite volume scheme adapted to the broken phase

    CERN Document Server

    Siefert, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We study the standard one-component $\\varphi^4$-theory in four dimensions. A renormalized coupling is defined in a finite size renormalization scheme which becomes the standard scheme of the broken phase for large volumes. Numerical simulations are reported using the worm algorithm in the limit of infinite bare coupling. The cutoff dependence of the renormalized coupling closely follows the perturbative Callan Symanzik equation and the triviality scenario is hence further supported.

  11. Third order finite volume evolution Galerkin (FVEG) methods for two-dimensional wave equation system

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Warnecke, Gerald; Zahaykah, Yousef

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the derivation and analysis of third order finite volume evolution Galerkin schemes for the two-dimensional wave equation system. To achieve this the first order approximate evolution operator is considered. A recovery stage is carried out at each level to generate a piecewise polynomial approximation from the piecewise constants, to feed into the calculation of the fluxes. We estimate the truncation error and give numerical examples to demonstrate the higher order...

  12. Finite-volume method with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme for incompressible porous media flow at the representative-elementary-volume scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Based on the Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, a finite-volume computational model with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme is proposed for incompressible porous media flow in this paper. The fluxes across the cell interface are calculated by reconstructing the local solution of the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation for porous media flow. The time-scaled midpoint integration rule is adopted to discretize the governing equation, which makes the time step become limited by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewy condition. The force term which evaluates the effect of the porous medium is added to the discretized governing equation directly. The numerical simulations of the steady Poiseuille flow, the unsteady Womersley flow, the circular Couette flow, and the lid-driven flow are carried out to verify the present computational model. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical, finite-difference, and/or previously published solutions.

  13. Acoustic radiation force analysis using finite difference time domain method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, A; Wilcox, P D; Courtney, C R P; Drinkwater, B W

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force exerted by standing waves on particles is analyzed using a finite difference time domain Lagrangian method. This method allows the acoustic radiation force to be obtained directly from the solution of nonlinear fluid equations, without any assumptions on size or geometry of the particles, boundary conditions, or acoustic field amplitude. The model converges to analytical results in the limit of small particle radii and low field amplitudes, where assumptions within the analytical models apply. Good agreement with analytical and numerical models based on solutions of linear scattering problems is observed for compressible particles, whereas some disagreement is detected when the compressibility of the particles decreases.

  14. A review of current finite difference rotor flow methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1986-01-01

    Rotary-wing computational fluid dynamics is reaching a point where many three-dimensional, unsteady, finite-difference codes are becoming available. This paper gives a brief review of five such codes, which treat the small disturbance, conservative and nonconservative full-potential, and Euler flow models. A discussion of the methods of applying these codes to the rotor environment (including wake and trim considerations) is followed by a comparison with various available data. These data include tests of advancing lifting and nonlifting, and hovering model rotors with significant supercritical flow regions. The codes are also compared for computational efficiency.

  15. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  16. Treating network junctions in finite volume solution of transient gas flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Alfredo; López, Xián; Vázquez-Cendón, M. Elena

    2017-09-01

    A finite volume scheme for the numerical solution of a non-isothermal non-adiabatic compressible flow model for gas transportation networks on non-flat topography is introduced. Unlike standard Euler equations, the model takes into account wall friction, variable height and heat transfer between the pipe and the environment which are source terms. The case of one single pipe was considered in a previous reference by the authors, [8], where a finite volume method with upwind discretization of the flux and source terms has been proposed in order to get a well-balanced scheme. The main goal of the present paper is to go a step further by considering a network of pipes. The main issue is the treatment of junctions for which container-like 2D finite volumes are introduced. The couplings between pipes (1D) and containers (2D) are carefully described and the conservation properties are analyzed. Numerical tests including real gas networks are solved showing the performance of the proposed methodology.

  17. A spatial discretization of the MHD equations based on the finite volume - spectral method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Takahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2000-05-01

    Based on the finite volume - spectral method, we present new discretization formulae for the spatial differential operators in the full system of the compressible MHD equations. In this approach, the cell-centered finite volume method is adopted in a bounded plane (poloidal plane), while the spectral method is applied to the differential with respect to the periodic direction perpendicular to the poloidal plane (toroidal direction). Here, an unstructured grid system composed of the arbitrary triangular elements is utilized for constructing the cell-centered finite volume method. In order to maintain the divergence free constraint of the magnetic field numerically, only the poloidal component of the rotation is defined at three edges of the triangular element. This poloidal component is evaluated under the assumption that the toroidal component of the operated vector times the radius, RA{sub {phi}}, is linearly distributed in the element. The present method will be applied to the nonlinear MHD dynamics in an realistic torus geometry without the numerical singularities. (author)

  18. Performance and scalability of finite-difference and finite-element wave-propagation modeling on Intel's Xeon Phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.; Kononov, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid developments in parallel compute architectures, algorithms for seismic modeling and imaging need to be reconsidered in terms of parallelization. The aim of this paper is to compare scalability of seismic modeling algorithms: finite differences, continuous mass-lumped finite elements

  19. Performance and scalability of finite-difference and finite-element wave-propagation modeling on Intel's Xeon Phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.; Kononov, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid developments in parallel compute architectures, algorithms for seismic modeling and imaging need to be reconsidered in terms of parallelization. The aim of this paper is to compare scalability of seismic modeling algorithms: finite differences, continuous mass-lumped finite elements a

  20. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  1. Modeling of photon migration in the human lung using a finite volume solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Zbigniew; Furmanczyk, Michal; Przekwas, Andrzej J.

    2006-02-01

    The application of the frequency domain and steady-state diffusive optical spectroscopy (DOS) and steady-state near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to diagnosis of the human lung injury challenges many elements of these techniques. These include the DOS/NIRS instrument performance and accurate models of light transport in heterogeneous thorax tissue. The thorax tissue not only consists of different media (e.g. chest wall with ribs, lungs) but its optical properties also vary with time due to respiration and changes in thorax geometry with contusion (e.g. pneumothorax or hemothorax). This paper presents a finite volume solver developed to model photon migration in the diffusion approximation in heterogeneous complex 3D tissues. The code applies boundary conditions that account for Fresnel reflections. We propose an effective diffusion coefficient for the void volumes (pneumothorax) based on the assumption of the Lambertian diffusion of photons entering the pleural cavity and accounting for the local pleural cavity thickness. The code has been validated using the MCML Monte Carlo code as a benchmark. The code environment enables a semi-automatic preparation of 3D computational geometry from medical images and its rapid automatic meshing. We present the application of the code to analysis/optimization of the hybrid DOS/NIRS/ultrasound technique in which ultrasound provides data on the localization of thorax tissue boundaries. The code effectiveness (3D complex case computation takes 1 second) enables its use to quantitatively relate detected light signal to absorption and reduced scattering coefficients that are indicators of the pulmonary physiologic state (hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation).

  2. Impact erosion prediction using the finite volume particle method with improved constitutive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguizamón, Sebastián; Jahanbakhsh, Ebrahim; Maertens, Audrey; Vessaz, Christian; Alimirzazadeh, Siamak; Avellan, François

    2016-11-01

    Erosion damage in hydraulic turbines is a common problem caused by the high- velocity impact of small particles entrained in the fluid. In this investigation, the Finite Volume Particle Method is used to simulate the three-dimensional impact of rigid spherical particles on a metallic surface. Three different constitutive models are compared: the linear strainhardening (L-H), Cowper-Symonds (C-S) and Johnson-Cook (J-C) models. They are assessed in terms of the predicted erosion rate and its dependence on impact angle and velocity, as compared to experimental data. It has been shown that a model accounting for strain rate is necessary, since the response of the material is significantly tougher at the very high strain rate regime caused by impacts. High sensitivity to the friction coefficient, which models the cutting wear mechanism, has been noticed. The J-C damage model also shows a high sensitivity to the parameter related to triaxiality, whose calibration appears to be scale-dependent, not exclusively material-determined. After calibration, the J-C model is capable of capturing the material's erosion response to both impact velocity and angle, whereas both C-S and L-H fail.

  3. Numerical simulation of shallow-water flooding using a two-dimensional finite volume model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Bing; SUN Jian; YUAN De-kui; TAO Jian-hua

    2013-01-01

    A 2-D Finite Volume Model (FVM) is developed for shallow water flows over a complex topography with wetting and drying processes.The numerical fluxes are computed using the Harten,Lax,and van Leer (HLL) approximate Riemann solver.Second-order accuracy is achieved by employing the MUSCL reconstruction method with a slope limiter in space and an explicit two-stage Runge-Kutta method for time integration.A simple and efficient method is introduced to deal with the wetting and drying processes without any correction of the numerical flux term or the source term.In this new method,a switch of alternative schemes is used to compute the water depths at the cell interface to obtain the numerical flux.The model is verified against benchmark tests with analytical solutions and laboratory experimental data.The numerical results show that the model can simulate different types of flood waves from the ideal flood wave to cases over complex terrains.The satisfactory performance indicates an extensive application prospect of the present model in view of its simplicity and effectiveness.

  4. On finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, M F M; Kobdaj, C; Schwarz, K

    2014-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N^3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-N_c sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Precise values for all counter terms relevant at N^3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of (39 +- 1) MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of sigma_{sN} simeq (4 +- 1) MeV. The flavour SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with ( 802 +- 4 ) MeV and (1103 +- 6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  5. FINITE DIFFERENCE APPROXIMATION FOR PRICING THE AMERICAN LOOKBACK OPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie Zhang; Shuhua Zhang; Danmei Zhu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the pricing of lookback options with American type constrains. Based on the differential linear complementary formula associated with the pricing problem, an implicit difference scheme is constructed and analyzed. We show that there exists a unique difference solution which is unconditionally stable. Using the notion of viscosity solutions, we also prove that the finite difference solution converges uniformly to the viscosity solution of the continuous problem. Furthermore, by means of the variational inequality analysis method, the (O)(△t+△x2)-order error estimate is derived in the discrete L2-norm provided that the continuous problem is sufficiently regular. In addition, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the theoretical results.Mathematics subject classification: 65M12, 65M06, 91B28.

  6. Finite-difference calculation of traveltimes based on rectangular grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 刘玉莲; 张建磊; 马在田; 王华忠

    2004-01-01

    To the most of velocity fields, the traveltimes of the first break that seismic waves propagate along rays can be computed on a 2-D or 3-D numerical grid by finite-difference extrapolation. Under ensuring accuracy, to improve calculating efficiency and adaptability, the calculation method of first-arrival traveltime of finite-difference is derived based on any rectangular grid and a local plane wavefront approximation. In addition, head waves and scattering waves are properly treated and shadow and caustic zones cannot be encountered, which appear in traditional ray-tracing. The testes of two simple models and the complex Marmousi model show that the method has higher accuracy and adaptability to complex structure with strong vertical and lateral velocity variation, and Kirchhoff prestack depth migration based on this method can basically achieve the position imaging effects of wave equation prestack depth migration in major structures and targets. Because of not taking account of the later arrivals energy, the effect of its amplitude preservation is worse than that by wave equation method, but its computing efficiency is higher than that by total Green's function method and wave equation method.

  7. A parallel adaptive finite difference algorithm for petroleum reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Hai Minh

    2005-07-01

    Adaptive finite differential for problems arising in simulation of flow in porous medium applications are considered. Such methods have been proven useful for overcoming limitations of computational resources and improving the resolution of the numerical solutions to a wide range of problems. By local refinement of the computational mesh where it is needed to improve the accuracy of solutions, yields better solution resolution representing more efficient use of computational resources than is possible with traditional fixed-grid approaches. In this thesis, we propose a parallel adaptive cell-centered finite difference (PAFD) method for black-oil reservoir simulation models. This is an extension of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methodology first developed by Berger and Oliger (1984) for the hyperbolic problem. Our algorithm is fully adaptive in time and space through the use of subcycling, in which finer grids are advanced at smaller time steps than the coarser ones. When coarse and fine grids reach the same advanced time level, they are synchronized to ensure that the global solution is conservative and satisfy the divergence constraint across all levels of refinement. The material in this thesis is subdivided in to three overall parts. First we explain the methodology and intricacies of AFD scheme. Then we extend a finite differential cell-centered approximation discretization to a multilevel hierarchy of refined grids, and finally we are employing the algorithm on parallel computer. The results in this work show that the approach presented is robust, and stable, thus demonstrating the increased solution accuracy due to local refinement and reduced computing resource consumption. (Author)

  8. Viscoelastic Finite Difference Modeling Using Graphics Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabien-Ouellet, G.; Gloaguen, E.; Giroux, B.

    2014-12-01

    Full waveform seismic modeling requires a huge amount of computing power that still challenges today's technology. This limits the applicability of powerful processing approaches in seismic exploration like full-waveform inversion. This paper explores the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPU) to compute a time based finite-difference solution to the viscoelastic wave equation. The aim is to investigate whether the adoption of the GPU technology is susceptible to reduce significantly the computing time of simulations. The code presented herein is based on the freely accessible software of Bohlen (2002) in 2D provided under a General Public License (GNU) licence. This implementation is based on a second order centred differences scheme to approximate time differences and staggered grid schemes with centred difference of order 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 for spatial derivatives. The code is fully parallel and is written using the Message Passing Interface (MPI), and it thus supports simulations of vast seismic models on a cluster of CPUs. To port the code from Bohlen (2002) on GPUs, the OpenCl framework was chosen for its ability to work on both CPUs and GPUs and its adoption by most of GPU manufacturers. In our implementation, OpenCL works in conjunction with MPI, which allows computations on a cluster of GPU for large-scale model simulations. We tested our code for model sizes between 1002 and 60002 elements. Comparison shows a decrease in computation time of more than two orders of magnitude between the GPU implementation run on a AMD Radeon HD 7950 and the CPU implementation run on a 2.26 GHz Intel Xeon Quad-Core. The speed-up varies depending on the order of the finite difference approximation and generally increases for higher orders. Increasing speed-ups are also obtained for increasing model size, which can be explained by kernel overheads and delays introduced by memory transfers to and from the GPU through the PCI-E bus. Those tests indicate that the GPU memory size

  9. Comparison study of some finite volume and finite element methods for the shallow water equations with bottom topography and friction terms

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Teschke, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    We present a comparison of two discretization methods for the shallow water equations, namely the finite volume method and the finite element scheme. A reliable model for practical interests includes terms modelling the bottom topography as well as the friction effects. The resulting equations belong to the class of systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations of first order with zero order source terms, the so-called balance laws. In order to approximate correctly steady equilibrium ...

  10. An unstructured finite-volume method to analyze the impact of shape on natural convection and melting inside cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Omari, Kamal El; Guer, Yves Le

    2010-01-01

    The present paper numerically analyzes a passive cooling system using cavities with different geometries filled with thermal conductivity-enhanced phase change material (PCM). A numerical code is developed using an unstructured finite-volume method and an enthalpy-porosity technique to solve for natural convection coupled to a solid-liquid phase change. Five geometries containing the same volume of PCM are compared while cooling the same surface. The unsteady evolution of the melting front and the velocity and temperature fields is detailed. Other indicators of cooling efficiency are monitored, including the maximum temperature reached at the cooled surface. The computational results show the high impact of varying geometry: a maximum temperature difference as high as 40 degrees Celsius is observed between two of the cavities. The best efficiency is obtained for a cavity shifted vertically relative to the cooled surface. Other findings and recommendations are made for the design of PCM-filled cavities.

  11. Relationship between sample volumes and modulus of human vertebral trabecular bone in micro-finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin-Xin; Xu, Chao; Zong, Chun-Lin; Feng, Ya-Fei; Ma, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Fa-Qi; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Micro-finite element (μFE) models have been widely used to assess the biomechanical properties of trabecular bone. How to choose a proper sample volume of trabecular bone, which could predict the real bone biomechanical properties and reduce the calculation time, was an interesting problem. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between different sample volumes and apparent elastic modulus (E) calculated from μFE model. 5 Human lumbar vertebral bodies (L1-L5) were scanned by micro-CT. Cubic concentric samples of different lengths were constructed as the experimental groups and the largest possible volumes of interest (VOI) were constructed as the control group. A direct voxel-to-element approach was used to generate μFE models and steel layers were added to the superior and inferior surface to mimic axial compression tests. A 1% axial strain was prescribed to the top surface of the model to obtain the E values. ANOVA tests were performed to compare the E values from the different VOIs against that of the control group. Nonlinear function curve fitting was performed to study the relationship between volumes and E values. The larger cubic VOI included more nodes and elements, and more CPU times were needed for calculations. E values showed a descending tendency as the length of cubic VOI decreased. When the volume of VOI was smaller than (7.34mm(3)), E values were significantly different from the control group. The fit function showed that E values approached an asymptotic values with increasing length of VOI. Our study demonstrated that apparent elastic modulus calculated from μFE models were affected by the sample volumes. There was a descending tendency of E values as the length of cubic VOI decreased. Sample volume which was not smaller than (7.34mm(3)) was efficient enough and timesaving for the calculation of E.

  12. On the difference between permutation poynomials over finite fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Odzak, Almasa; Patel, Vandita

    2017-01-01

    The well-known Chowla and Zassenhaus conjecture, proven by Cohen in 1990, states that if p > (d 2 − 3d + 4)2 , then there is no complete mapping polynomial f in Fp[x] of degree d ≥ 2. For arbitrary finite fields Fq, a similar non-existence result is obtained recently by I¸sık, Topuzo˘glu and Wint......The well-known Chowla and Zassenhaus conjecture, proven by Cohen in 1990, states that if p > (d 2 − 3d + 4)2 , then there is no complete mapping polynomial f in Fp[x] of degree d ≥ 2. For arbitrary finite fields Fq, a similar non-existence result is obtained recently by I¸sık, Topuzo......˘glu and Winterhof in terms of the Carlitz rank of f. Cohen, Mullen and Shiue generalized the Chowla-Zassenhaus-Cohen Theorem significantly in 1995, by considering differences of permutation polynomials. More precisely, they showed that if f and f + g are both permutation polynomials of degree d ≥ 2 over Fp, with p...

  13. FINITE VOLUME METHODS AND ADAPTIVE REFINEMENT FOR GLOBAL TSUNAMI PROPAGATION AND LOCAL INUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. George

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The shallow water equations are a commonly accepted approximation governing tsunami propagation. Numerically capturing certain features of local tsunami inundation requires solving these equations in their physically relevant conservative form, as integral con- servation laws for depth and momentum. This form of the equations presents challenges when trying to numerically model global tsunami propagation, so often the best numerical methods for the local inundation regime are not suitable for the global propagation regime. The different regimes of tsunami flow belong to different spatial scales as well, and re- quire correspondingly different grid resolutions. The long wavelength of deep ocean tsunamis requires a large global scale computing domain, yet near the shore the propa- gating energy is compressed and focused by bathymetry in unpredictable ways. This can lead to large variations in energy and run-up even over small localized regions.We have developed a finite volume method to deal with the diverse flow regimes of tsunamis. These methods are well suited for the inundation regime—they are robust in the presence of bores and steep gradients, or drying regions, and can capture the inundating shoreline and run-up features. Additionally, these methods are well-balanced, meaning that they can appropriately model global propagation.To deal with the disparate spatial scales, we have used adaptive refinement algorithms originally developed for gas dynamics, where often steep variation is highly localized at a given time, but moves throughout the domain. These algorithms allow evolving Cartesian sub-grids that can move with the propagating waves and highly resolve local inundation of impacted areas in a single global scale computation. Because the dry regions are part of the computing domain, simple rectangular cartesian grids eliminate the need for complex shoreline-fitted mesh generation.

  14. Goldstone bosons in a finite volume the partition function to three loops

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, W

    1994-01-01

    A system of Goldstone bosons - stemming from a symmetry breaking $O(N) \\to O(N-1)$ - in a finite volume at finite temperature is considered. In the framework of dimensional regularization, the partition function is calculated to 3 loops for 3 and 4 dimensions, where Polyakov's measure for the functional integration is applied. Although the underlying theory is the non-linear $\\sigma $ model, the 3 loop result turns out to be renormalizable in the sense that all the singularities can be absorbed by the couplings occuring so far. In finite volume, this property is highly non trivial and confirms the method for the measure. We also show that the result coincides with the one obtained using the Faddeev- Popov measure. This is also true for the maximal generalization of Polyakov's measure: none of the additional invariant terms that can be added contributes to the dimensionally regularized system. Our phenomenological Lagrangian describes e.g. 2 flavor chiral QCD as well as the classical Heisenberg model, but ther...

  15. Different partial volume correction methods lead to different conclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Douglas N; Salat, David H; Bowen, Spencer L

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional group study of the effects of aging on brain metabolism as measured with (18)F-FDG-PET was performed using several different partial volume correction (PVC) methods: no correction (NoPVC), Meltzer (MZ), Müller-Gärtner (MG), and the symmetric geometric transfer matrix (SGTM) usin...

  16. Visualization of elastic wavefields computed with a finite difference code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Harris, D.

    1994-11-15

    The authors have developed a finite difference elastic propagation model to simulate seismic wave propagation through geophysically complex regions. To facilitate debugging and to assist seismologists in interpreting the seismograms generated by the code, they have developed an X Windows interface that permits viewing of successive temporal snapshots of the (2D) wavefield as they are calculated. The authors present a brief video displaying the generation of seismic waves by an explosive source on a continent, which propagate to the edge of the continent then convert to two types of acoustic waves. This sample calculation was part of an effort to study the potential of offshore hydroacoustic systems to monitor seismic events occurring onshore.

  17. Finite-difference modeling of commercial aircraft using TSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.

    1994-11-15

    Future aircraft may have systems controlled by fiber optic cables, to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. However, the digital systems associated with the fiber optic network could still experience upset due to powerful radio stations, radars, and other electromagnetic sources, with potentially serious consequences. We are modeling the electromagnetic behavior of commercial transport aircraft in support of the NASA Fly-by-Light/Power-by-Wire program, using the TSAR finite-difference time-domain code initially developed for the military. By comparing results obtained from TSAR with data taken on a Boeing 757 at the Air Force Phillips Lab., we hope to show that FDTD codes can serve as an important tool in the design and certification of U.S. commercial aircraft, helping American companies to produce safe, reliable air transportation.

  18. Computational electrodynamics the finite-difference time-domain method

    CERN Document Server

    Taflove, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This extensively revised and expanded third edition of the Artech House bestseller, Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method, offers engineers the most up-to-date and definitive resource on this critical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The method helps practitioners design antennas, wireless communications devices, high-speed digital and microwave circuits, and integrated optical devices with unsurpassed efficiency. There has been considerable advancement in FDTD computational technology over the past few years, and the third edition brings professionals the very latest details with entirely new chapters on important techniques, major updates on key topics, and new discussions on emerging areas such as nanophotonics. What's more, to supplement the third edition, the authors have created a Web site with solutions to problems, downloadable graphics and videos, and updates, making this new edition the ideal textbook on the subject as well.

  19. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  20. A finite-difference method for transonic airfoil design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, J. L.; Klineberg, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes an inverse method for designing transonic airfoil sections or for modifying existing profiles. Mixed finite-difference procedures are applied to the equations of transonic small disturbance theory to determine the airfoil shape corresponding to a given surface pressure distribution. The equations are solved for the velocity components in the physical domain and flows with embedded shock waves can be calculated. To facilitate airfoil design, the method allows alternating between inverse and direct calculations to obtain a profile shape that satisfies given geometric constraints. Examples are shown of the application of the technique to improve the performance of several lifting airfoil sections. The extension of the method to three dimensions for designing supercritical wings is also indicated.

  1. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisshelm, Julie M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed.

  2. Parallel finite-difference time-domain method

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wenhua

    2006-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FTDT) method has revolutionized antenna design and electromagnetics engineering. This book raises the FDTD method to the next level by empowering it with the vast capabilities of parallel computing. It shows engineers how to exploit the natural parallel properties of FDTD to improve the existing FDTD method and to efficiently solve more complex and large problem sets. Professionals learn how to apply open source software to develop parallel software and hardware to run FDTD in parallel for their projects. The book features hands-on examples that illustrate the power of parallel FDTD and presents practical strategies for carrying out parallel FDTD. This detailed resource provides instructions on downloading, installing, and setting up the required open source software on either Windows or Linux systems, and includes a handy tutorial on parallel programming.

  3. Application of a new finite difference algorithm for computational aeroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic problems have become extremely important in recent years because of research efforts such as the High Speed Civil Transport program. Computational aeroacoustics (CAA) requires a faithful representation of wave propagation over long distances, and needs algorithms that are accurate and boundary conditions that are unobtrusive. This paper applies a new finite difference method and boundary algorithm to the Linearized Euler Equations (LEE). The results demonstrate the ability of a new fourth order propagation algorithm to accurately simulate the genuinely multidimensional wave dynamics of acoustic propagation in two space dimensions with the LEE. The results also show the ability of a new outflow boundary condition and fourth order algorithm to pass the evolving solution from the computational domain with no perceptible degradation of the solution remaining within the domain.

  4. Finite difference methods for coupled flow interaction transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly McGee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding chemical transport in blood flow involves coupling the chemical transport process with flow equations describing the blood and plasma in the membrane wall. In this work, we consider a coupled two-dimensional model with transient Navier-Stokes equation to model the blood flow in the vessel and Darcy's flow to model the plasma flow through the vessel wall. The advection-diffusion equation is coupled with the velocities from the flows in the vessel and wall, respectively to model the transport of the chemical. The coupled chemical transport equations are discretized by the finite difference method and the resulting system is solved using the additive Schwarz method. Development of the model and related analytical and numerical results are presented in this work.

  5. Explicit and implicit finite difference schemes for fractional Cattaneo equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh, H. R.; Maerefat, M.; Azimi, A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, the numerical solution of fractional (non-integer)-order Cattaneo equation for describing anomalous diffusion has been investigated. Two finite difference schemes namely an explicit predictor-corrector and totally implicit schemes have been developed. In developing each scheme, a separate formulation approach for the governing equations has been considered. The explicit predictor-corrector scheme is the fractional generalization of well-known MacCormack scheme and has been called Generalized MacCormack scheme. This scheme solves two coupled low-order equations and simultaneously computes the flux term with the main variable. Fully implicit scheme however solves a single high-order undecomposed equation. For Generalized MacCormack scheme, stability analysis has been studied through Fourier method. Through a numerical test, the experimental order of convergency of both schemes has been found. Then, the domain of applicability and some numerical properties of each scheme have been discussed.

  6. Digital Waveguides versus Finite Difference Structures: Equivalence and Mixed Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karjalainen Matti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital waveguides and finite difference time domain schemes have been used in physical modeling of spatially distributed systems. Both of them are known to provide exact modeling of ideal one-dimensional (1D band-limited wave propagation, and both of them can be composed to approximate two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D mesh structures. Their equal capabilities in physical modeling have been shown for special cases and have been assumed to cover generalized cases as well. The ability to form mixed models by joining substructures of both classes through converter elements has been proposed recently. In this paper, we formulate a general digital signal processing (DSP-oriented framework where the functional equivalence of these two approaches is systematically elaborated and the conditions of building mixed models are studied. An example of mixed modeling of a 2D waveguide is presented.

  7. Applications of a finite-volume algorithm for incompressible MHD problems

    CERN Document Server

    Vantieghem, S; Jackson, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the theory, algorithms and implementation of a parallel finite-volume algorithm for the solution of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations using unstructured grids that are applicable for a wide variety of geometries. Our method implements a mixed Adams-Bashforth/Crank-Nicolson scheme for the nonlinear terms in the MHD equations and we prove that it is stable independent of the time step. To ensure that the solenoidal condition is met for the magnetic field, we use a method whereby a pseudo-pressure is introduced into the induction equation; since we are concerned with incompressible flows, the resulting Poisson equation for the pseudo-pressure is solved alongside the equivalent Poisson problem for the velocity field. We validate our code in a variety of geometries including periodic boxes, spheres, spherical shells, spheroids and ellipsoids; for the finite geometries we implement the so-called ferromagnetic or pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions appropriate for a surrounding medium w...

  8. Technical Report: Modeling of Composite Piezoelectric Structures with the Finite Volume Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bolborici, Valentin; Pugh, Mary C

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric devices, such as piezoelectric traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motors, have composite piezoelectric structures. A composite piezoelectric structure consists of a combination of two or more bonded materials, where at least one of them is a piezoelectric transducer. Numerical modeling of piezoelectric structures has been done in the past mainly with the finite element method. Alternatively, a finite volume based approach offers the following advantages: (a) the ordinary differential equations resulting from the discretization process can be interpreted directly as corresponding circuits and (b) phenomena occurring at boundaries can be treated exactly. This report extends the work of IEEE Transactions on UFFC 57(2010)7:1673-1691 by presenting a method for implementing the boundary conditions between the bonded materials in composite piezoelectric structures. The report concludes with one modeling example of a unimorph structure.

  9. Two-dimensional wood drying stress simulation using control-volume mixed finite element methods (CVFEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salinas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available  The work was aimed at simulating two-dimensional wood drying stress using the control-volume finite element method (CVFEM. Stress/strain was modeled by moisture content gradients regarding shrinkage and mechanical sorption in a cross-section of wood. CVFEM was implemented with triangular finite elements and lineal interpolation of the independent variable which were programmed in Fortran 90 language. The model was validated by contrasting results with similar ones available in the specialised literature. The present model’s results came from isothermal (20ºC drying of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides: two-dimensional distribution of stress/strain and water content, 40, 80, 130, 190 and 260 hour drying time and evolution of normal stress (2.5 <σ͓ ͓ < 1.2, MPa, from the interior to the exterior of wood. 

  10. A comparison of finite-difference and finite-element methods for calculating free edge stresses in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.; Tzeng, L.-S.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that edge delamination is a serious failure mechanism for laminated composite materials. Various numerical methods have been utilized in attempts to calculate the interlaminar stress components which precede delamination in a laminate. There are, however, discrepancies regarding the results provided by different methods, taking into account a finite-difference procedure, a perturbation procedure, and finite element approaches. The present investigation has the objective to assess the capacity of a finite difference method to predict the character and magnitude of the interlaminar stress distributions near an interface corner. A second purpose of the investigation is to determine if predictions by finite element method in-plane, interlaminar stress components near an interface corner represent actual laminate behavior.

  11. Development of the meshless finite volume particle method with exact and efficient calculation of interparticle area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Nathan J.; Lobovský, Libor; Nestor, Ruairi M.

    2014-06-01

    The Finite Volume Particle Method (FVPM) is a meshless method based on a definition of interparticle area which is closely analogous to cell face area in the classical finite volume method. In previous work, the interparticle area has been computed by numerical integration, which is a source of error and is extremely expensive. We show that if the particle weight or kernel function is defined as a discontinuous top-hat function, the particle interaction vectors may be evaluated exactly and efficiently. The new formulation reduces overall computational time by a factor between 6.4 and 8.2. In numerical experiments on a viscous flow with an analytical solution, the method converges under all conditions. Significantly, in contrast with standard FVPM and SPH, error depends on particle size but not on particle overlap (as long as the computational domain is completely covered by particles). The new method is shown to be superior to standard FVPM for shock tube flow and inviscid steady transonic flow. In benchmarking on a viscous multiphase flow application, FVPM with exact interparticle area is shown to be competitive with a mesh-based volume-of-fluid solver in terms of computational time required to resolve the structure of an interface.

  12. A multi-moment constrained finite volume method on arbitrary unstructured grids for incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Xiao, Feng

    2016-12-01

    We proposed a multi-moment constrained finite volume method which can simulate incompressible flows of high Reynolds number in complex geometries. Following the underlying idea of the volume-average/point-value multi-moment (VPM) method (Xie et al. (2014) [71]), this formulation is developed on arbitrary unstructured hybrid grids by employing the point values (PV) at both cell vertex and barycenter as the prognostic variables. The cell center value is updated via an evolution equation derived from a constraint condition of finite volume form, which ensures the rigorous numerical conservativeness. Novel numerical formulations based on the local PVs over compact stencil are proposed to enhance the accuracy, robustness and efficiency of computations on unstructured meshes of hybrid and arbitrary elements. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the present numerical model has nearly 3-order convergence rate with numerical errors much smaller than the VPM method. The numerical dissipation has been significantly suppressed, which facilitates numerical simulations of high Reynolds number flows in complex geometries.

  13. An upwind vertex centred Finite Volume solver for Lagrangian solid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Miquel; Gil, Antonio J.; Bonet, Javier; Lee, Chun Hean

    2015-11-01

    A vertex centred Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel (JST) finite volume algorithm was recently introduced by the authors (Aguirre et al., 2014 [1]) in the context of fast solid isothermal dynamics. The spatial discretisation scheme was constructed upon a Lagrangian two-field mixed (linear momentum and the deformation gradient) formulation presented as a system of conservation laws [2-4]. In this paper, the formulation is further enhanced by introducing a novel upwind vertex centred finite volume algorithm with three key novelties. First, a conservation law for the volume map is incorporated into the existing two-field system to extend the range of applications towards the incompressibility limit (Gil et al., 2014 [5]). Second, the use of a linearised Riemann solver and reconstruction limiters is derived for the stabilisation of the scheme together with an efficient edge-based implementation. Third, the treatment of thermo-mechanical processes through a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state is incorporated in the proposed formulation. For completeness, the study of the eigenvalue structure of the resulting system of conservation laws is carried out to demonstrate hyperbolicity and obtain the correct time step bounds for non-isothermal processes. A series of numerical examples are presented in order to assess the robustness of the proposed methodology. The overall scheme shows excellent behaviour in shock and bending dominated nearly incompressible scenarios without spurious pressure oscillations, yielding second order of convergence for both velocities and stresses.

  14. Finite-volume corrections to electromagnetic masses for larger-than-physical electric charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzelle, Matthew E.; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2017-05-01

    The numerical value of the fine-structure constant generally leads to small isospin-breaking effects due to electromagnetism in QCD. This smallness complicates determining isospin breaking from lattice QCD computations that include electromagnetism. One solution to this problem consists of performing computations using larger-than-physical values of the electric charge, and subsequently extrapolating (or interpolating) to the physical value of the fine-structure constant. Motivated by recent lattice QCD +QED computations of electromagnetic masses employing this setup, we consider finite-volume effects arising from the use of larger-than-physical electric charges. A modified power-counting scheme, which is based on treating the fine-structure constant as larger than its physical value, is explored. Results for perturbative QED corrections, however, are surprising. Within the framework of nonrelativistic QED, multiloop diagrams exhibit a momentum factorization property that produces exact cancellations. We determine that power-law finite-volume effects vanish at the leading two- and three-loop order, as well as the next-to-leading two-loop order. For larger-than-physical charges, we consequently expect no appreciable volume corrections beyond leading-order QED.

  15. Generalized Navier Boundary Condition for a Volume Of Fluid approach using a Finite-Volume method

    CERN Document Server

    Boelens, A M P

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an analytical Volume Of Fluid (VOF) implementation of the Generalized Navier Boundary Condition is presented based on the Brackbill surface tension model. The model is validated by simulations of droplets on a smooth surface in a planar geometry. Looking at the static behavior of the droplets, it is found that there is a good match between the droplet shape resolved in the simulations and the theoretically predicted shape for various values of the Young's angle. Evaluating the spreading of a droplet on a completely wetting surface, the Voinov-Tanner-Cox law ($\\theta \\propto \\text{Ca}^{1/3}$) can be observed. At later times scaling follows $r \\propto t^{1/2}$, suggesting spreading is limited by inertia. These observations are made without any fitting parameters except the slip length.

  16. Adaptive finite-volume WENO schemes on dynamically redistributed grids for compressible Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Harshavardhana S.; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2016-08-01

    A high-order adaptive finite-volume method is presented for simulating inviscid compressible flows on time-dependent redistributed grids. The method achieves dynamic adaptation through a combination of time-dependent mesh node clustering in regions characterized by strong solution gradients and an optimal selection of the order of accuracy and the associated reconstruction stencil in a conservative finite-volume framework. This combined approach maximizes spatial resolution in discontinuous regions that require low-order approximations for oscillation-free shock capturing. Over smooth regions, high-order discretization through finite-volume WENO schemes minimizes numerical dissipation and provides excellent resolution of intricate flow features. The method including the moving mesh equations and the compressible flow solver is formulated entirely on a transformed time-independent computational domain discretized using a simple uniform Cartesian mesh. Approximations for the metric terms that enforce discrete geometric conservation law while preserving the fourth-order accuracy of the two-point Gaussian quadrature rule are developed. Spurious Cartesian grid induced shock instabilities such as carbuncles that feature in a local one-dimensional contact capturing treatment along the cell face normals are effectively eliminated through upwind flux calculation using a rotated Hartex-Lax-van Leer contact resolving (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver for the Euler equations in generalized coordinates. Numerical experiments with the fifth and ninth-order WENO reconstructions at the two-point Gaussian quadrature nodes, over a range of challenging test cases, indicate that the redistributed mesh effectively adapts to the dynamic flow gradients thereby improving the solution accuracy substantially even when the initial starting mesh is non-adaptive. The high adaptivity combined with the fifth and especially the ninth-order WENO reconstruction allows remarkably sharp capture of

  17. Finite-volume Hamiltonian method for $\\pi\\pi$ scattering in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Leinweber, Derek B; Thomas, A W; Young, Ross D

    2015-01-01

    Within a formulation of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering, we investigate the use of the finite-volume Hamiltonian approach to resolving scattering observables from lattice QCD spectra. We consider spectra in the centre-of-mass and moving frames for both S- and P-wave cases. Furthermore, we investigate the multi-channel case. Here we study the use of the Hamiltonian framework as a parametrization that can be fit directly to lattice spectra. Through this method, the hadron properties, such as mass, width and coupling, can be directly extracted from the lattice spectra.

  18. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hookey, N.A. [Memorial Univ., Newfoundland (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  19. An enhanced finite volume method to model 2D linear elastic structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available a locking-free finite volume approx- imation to Mindlin-Reissner plates for both cell-centred and vertex-centred formulations. However, using solid elements, Wenke and Wheel [13] present results that do indicate shear locking with the displacement.... The governing equations for the solid undergoing linear elastic motion, in the absence of any body forces, may be written in strong form as follows: ∂σij ∂xj = ρai, (1) where σij is the stress tensor, ρ is the density and ai is the acceleration. 2...

  20. 3D Finite Volume Modeling of ENDE Using Electromagnetic T-Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method which can analyze the eddy current density in conductor materials using finite volume method is proposed on the basis of Maxwell equations and T-formulation. The algorithm is applied to solve 3D electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation (E’NDE benchmark problems. The computing code is applied to study an Inconel 600 work piece with holes or cracks. The impedance change due to the presence of the crack is evaluated and compared with the experimental data of benchmark problems No. 1 and No. 2. The results show a good agreement between both calculated and measured data.

  1. THE FINITE VOLUME PROJECTION METHOD WITH HYBRID UNSTRUCTURED TRIANGULAR COLLOCATED GRIDS FOR INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Wei; DUAN Ya-li; LIU Ru-xun

    2009-01-01

    In this article a finite volume method is proposed to solve viscous incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in two-dimensional regions with corners and curved boundaries. A hybrid collocated-grid variable arrangement is adopted, in which the velocity and pressure are stored at the centroid and the circumcenters of the triangular control cell, respectively. The cell flux is defined at the mid-point of the cell face. Second-order implicit time integration schemes are used for convection and diffusion terms. The second-order upwind scheme is used for convection fluxes. The present method is validated by results of several viscous flows.

  2. DIFFERENCE SCHEME AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION BASED ON MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR NATURAL CONVECTION PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗振东; 朱江; 谢正辉; 张桂芳

    2003-01-01

    The non-stationary natural convection problem is studied. A lowest order finite difference scheme based on mixed finite element method for non-stationary natural convection problem, by the spatial variations discreted with finite element method and time with finite difference scheme was derived, where the numerical solution of velocity, pressure, and temperature can be found together, and a numerical example to simulate the close square cavity is given, which is of practical importance.

  3. Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    We examine the accuracy of a modified finite volume method compared to analytical and Monte Carlo solutions for solving the radiative transfer equation. The model is used for predicting light propagation within a two-dimensional absorbing and highly forward-scattering medium such as biological tissue subjected to a collimated light beam. Numerical simulations for the spatially resolved reflectance and transmittance are presented considering refractive index mismatch with Fresnel reflection at the interface, homogeneous and two-layered media. Time-dependent as well as steady-state cases are considered. In the steady state, it is found that the modified finite volume method is in good agreement with the other two methods. The relative differences between the solutions are found to decrease with spatial mesh refinement applied for the modified finite volume method obtaining method is used for the time semi-discretization of the radiative transfer equation. An agreement among the modified finite volume method, Runge-Kutta method, and Monte Carlo solutions are shown, but with relative differences higher than in the steady state.

  4. Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian Discontinuous Galerkin schemes with a posteriori subcell finite volume limiting on moving unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscheri, Walter; Dumbser, Michael

    2017-10-01

    We present a new family of high order accurate fully discrete one-step Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element schemes on moving unstructured meshes for the solution of nonlinear hyperbolic PDE in multiple space dimensions, which may also include parabolic terms in order to model dissipative transport processes, like molecular viscosity or heat conduction. High order piecewise polynomials of degree N are adopted to represent the discrete solution at each time level and within each spatial control volume of the computational grid, while high order of accuracy in time is achieved by the ADER approach, making use of an element-local space-time Galerkin finite element predictor. A novel nodal solver algorithm based on the HLL flux is derived to compute the velocity for each nodal degree of freedom that describes the current mesh geometry. In our algorithm the spatial mesh configuration can be defined in two different ways: either by an isoparametric approach that generates curved control volumes, or by a piecewise linear decomposition of each spatial control volume into simplex sub-elements. Each technique generates a corresponding number of geometrical degrees of freedom needed to describe the current mesh configuration and which must be considered by the nodal solver for determining the grid velocity. The connection of the old mesh configuration at time tn with the new one at time t n + 1 provides the space-time control volumes on which the governing equations have to be integrated in order to obtain the time evolution of the discrete solution. Our numerical method belongs to the category of so-called direct Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) schemes, where a space-time conservation formulation of the governing PDE system is considered and which already takes into account the new grid geometry (including a possible rezoning step) directly during the computation of the numerical fluxes. We emphasize that our method is a moving mesh method, as opposed to total

  5. Influence of finite volume and magnetic field effects on the QCD phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdy, Niseem; Csanád, M.; Lacey, Roy A.

    2017-02-01

    The 2 + 1 SU(3) Polyakov linear sigma model is used to investigate the respective influence of a finite volume and a magnetic field on the quark-hadron phase boundary in the plane of baryon chemical potential ({μ }B) versus temperature (T) of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram. The calculated results indicate sizable shifts of the quark-hadron phase boundary to lower values of ({μ }B {and} T) for increasing magnetic field strength, and an opposite shift to higher values of ({μ }B {and} T) for decreasing system volume. Such shifts could have important implications for the extraction of the thermodynamic properties of the QCD phase diagram from heavy ion data.

  6. Perturbative results for two and three particle threshold energies in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Maxwell T

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the energy of the state closest to threshold for two and three identical, spinless particles confined to a cubic spatial volume with periodic boundary conditions and with zero total momentum in the finite-volume frame. The calculation is performed in relativistic quantum field theory with particles coupled via a $\\lambda \\phi^4$ interaction, and we work through order $\\lambda^3$. The energy shifts begin at ${\\cal O}(1/L^3)$, and we keep subleading terms proportional to $1/L^4$, $1/L^5$ and $1/L^6$. These terms allow a non-trivial check of the results obtained from quantization conditions that hold for arbitrary interactions, namely that of L\\"uscher for two particles and our recently developed formalism for three particles. We also compare to previously obtained results based on non-relativistic quantum mechanics.

  7. Finite-volume Hamiltonian method for coupled channel interactions in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Thomas, A W; Young, R D

    2014-01-01

    Within a multi-channel formulation of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering, we investigate the use of the finite-volume Hamiltonian approach to relate lattice QCD spectra to scattering observables. The equivalence of the Hamiltonian approach and the coupled-channel extension of the well-known L\\"uscher formalism is established. Unlike the single channel system, the spectra at a single lattice volume in the coupled channel case do not uniquely determine the scattering parameters. We investigate the use of the Hamiltonian framework as a method to directly fit the lattice spectra and thereby extract the scattering phase shifts and inelasticities. We find that with a modest amount of lattice data, the scattering parameters can be reproduced rather well, with only a minor degree of model dependence.

  8. High-order finite difference methods for earthquake rupture dynamics in complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, O.; Kozdon, J. E.; Dunham, E. M.; Nordström, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we continue our development of high-order summation-by-parts (SBP) finite difference methods for earthquake rupture dynamics. SBP methods use centered spatial differences in the interior and one-sided differences near the boundary. The transition to one-sided differences is done in a particular manner that permits one to provably maintain stability and accuracy. In many methods the boundary conditions are strongly enforced by modifying the difference operator at the boundary so that the solution there exactly satisfies the boundary condition. Though conceptually straightforward, this approach can introduce instabilities. In contrast, when boundary conditions are enforced weakly by adding a penalty term to the spatial discretization, it is possible to prove that the method is strictly stable, dissipating energy slightly faster than the continuous problem (with the additional dissipation vanishing under grid refinement). Another benefit of SBP operators is their built-in inner product which, if correctly constructed, can be interpreted as a quadrature operator. Thus, important integrated quantities such as the total mechanical energy in the system, the energy dissipation rate along faults, and the radiated energy flux through exterior boundaries can be rigorously calculated. These numerically integrated quantities converge to their true values with the same order of accuracy as the difference approximation. Though standard SBP methods are based on uniform Cartesian grids, it is possible to use the methods for problems with nonplanar faults, free surface topography, and branching faults through the use of coordinate transforms. Recently, it has also been shown how second-order SBP methods can be extended to unstructured grids. Due to the SBP character of both the finite difference and node-centered finite volume method they can be used together in a stable and accurate way. Inclusion of these techniques will be important for problems that have regions

  9. A finite difference model for free surface gravity drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couri, F.R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The unconfined gravity flow of liquid with a free surface into a well is a classical well test problem which has not been well understood by either hydrologists or petroleum engineers. Paradigms have led many authors to treat an incompressible flow as compressible flow to justify the delayed yield behavior of a time-drawdown test. A finite-difference model has been developed to simulate the free surface gravity flow of an unconfined single phase, infinitely large reservoir into a well. The model was verified with experimental results in sandbox models in the literature and with classical methods applied to observation wells in the Groundwater literature. The simulator response was also compared with analytical Theis (1935) and Ramey et al. (1989) approaches for wellbore pressure at late producing times. The seepage face in the sandface and the delayed yield behavior were reproduced by the model considering a small liquid compressibility and incompressible porous medium. The potential buildup (recovery) simulated by the model evidenced a different- phenomenon from the drawdown, contrary to statements found in the Groundwater literature. Graphs of buildup potential vs time, buildup seepage face length vs time, and free surface head and sand bottom head radial profiles evidenced that the liquid refills the desaturating cone as a flat moving surface. The late time pseudo radial behavior was only approached after exaggerated long times.

  10. SIMULATION OF POLLUTANTS IN RIVER SYSTEMS USING FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZAHEER Iqbal; CUI Guang Bai

    2002-01-01

    This paper using finite difference scheme for the numerical solution of advection-dispersion equation develops a one-dimensional water quality model. The model algorithm has some modification over other steady state models including QUAL2E, which have been used steady state implementation of implicit backward-difference numerical scheme. The computer program in the developed model contains a special unsteady state implementation of four point implicit upwind numerical schemes using double sweep method. The superiority of this method in the modeling procedure results the simulation efficacy under simplified conditions of effluent discharge from point and non-point sources. The model is helpful for eye view assessment of degree of interaction between model variables for strategic planning purposes. The model has been applied for the water quality simulation of the Hanjiang River basin using flow computation model. Model simulation results have shown the pollutants prediction, dispersion and impact on the existing water quality.Model test shows the model validity comparing with other sophisticated models. Sensitivity analysis was performed to overview the most sensitive parameters followed by calibration and verification process.

  11. A Three-Dimensional, Immersed Boundary, Finite Volume Method for the Simulation of Incompressible Heat Transfer Flows around Complex Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Badreddine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development and application of a new finite volume immersed boundary method (IBM to simulate three-dimensional fluid flows and heat transfer around complex geometries. First, the discretization of the governing equations based on the second-order finite volume method on Cartesian, structured, staggered grid is outlined, followed by the description of modifications which have to be applied to the discretized system once a body is immersed into the grid. To validate the new approach, the heat conduction equation with a source term is solved inside a cavity with an immersed body. The approach is then tested for a natural convection flow in a square cavity with and without circular cylinder for different Rayleigh numbers. The results computed with the present approach compare very well with the benchmark solutions. As a next step in the validation procedure, the method is tested for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS of a turbulent flow around a surface-mounted matrix of cubes. The results computed with the present method compare very well with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA measurements of the same case, showing that the method can be used for scale-resolving simulations of turbulence as well.

  12. Lattice QCD studies on baryon interactions from L\\"uscher's finite volume method and HAL QCD method

    CERN Document Server

    Iritani, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study between the L\\"uscher's finite volume method and the time-dependent HAL QCD method is given for the $\\Xi\\Xi$($^1\\mathrm{S}_0$) interaction as an illustrative example. By employing the smeared source and the wall source for the interpolating operators, we show that the effective energy shifts $\\Delta E_{\\rm eff} (t)$ in L\\"uscher's method do not agree between different sources, yet both exhibit fake plateaux. On the other hand, the interaction kernels $V(\\vec{r})$ obtained from the two sources in the HAL QCD method agree with each other already for modest values of $t$. We show that the energy eigenvalues $\\Delta E(L)$ in finite lattice volumes ($L^3$) calculated by $V(\\vec{r})$ indicate that there is no bound state in the $\\Xi\\Xi(^1\\mathrm{S}_0)$ channel at $m_{\\pi}=0.51$ GeV in 2+1 flavor QCD.

  13. Magnetic Helicity Estimations in Models and Observations of the Solar Magnetic Field. Part I: Finite Volume Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, Gherardo; Pariat, Etienne; Anfinogentov, Sergey; Chen, Feng; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Guo, Yang; Liu, Yang; Moraitis, Kostas; Thalmann, Julia K.; Yang, Shangbin

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity of ideal magneto-hydrodynamics characterized by an inverse turbulent cascade. Accordingly, it is often invoked as one of the basic physical quantities driving the generation and structuring of magnetic fields in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. We provide here the first systematic comparison of six existing methods for the estimation of the helicity of magnetic fields known in a finite volume. All such methods are reviewed, benchmarked, and compared with each other, and specifically tested for accuracy and sensitivity to errors. To that purpose, we consider four groups of numerical tests, ranging from solutions of the three-dimensional, force-free equilibrium, to magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations. Almost all methods are found to produce the same value of magnetic helicity within few percent in all tests. In the more solar-relevant and realistic of the tests employed here, the simulation of an eruptive flux rope, the spread in the computed values obtained by all but one method is only 3 %, indicating the reliability and mutual consistency of such methods in appropriate parameter ranges. However, methods show differences in the sensitivity to numerical resolution and to errors in the solenoidal property of the input fields. In addition to finite volume methods, we also briefly discuss a method that estimates helicity from the field lines' twist, and one that exploits the field's value at one boundary and a coronal minimal connectivity instead of a pre-defined three-dimensional magnetic-field solution.

  14. Modeling of electrical impedance tomography to detect breast cancer by finite volume methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, K.; Wibowo, R. A.; Soelistiono, S.

    2017-05-01

    The properties of the electrical impedance of tissue are an interesting study, because changes of the electrical impedance of organs are related to physiological and pathological. Both physiological and pathological properties are strongly associated with disease information. Several experiments shown that the breast cancer has a lower impedance than the normal breast tissue. Thus, the imaging based on impedance can be used as an alternative equipment to detect the breast cancer. This research carries out by modelling of Electrical Impedance Tomography to detect the breast cancer by finite volume methods. The research includes development of a mathematical model of the electric potential field by 2D Finite Volume Method, solving the forward problem and inverse problem by linear reconstruction method. The scanning is done by 16 channel electrode with neighbors method to collect data. The scanning is performed at a frequency of 10 kHz and 100 kHz with three objects numeric includes an anomaly at the surface, an anomaly at the depth and an anomaly at the surface and at depth. The simulation has been successfully to reconstruct image of functional anomalies of the breast cancer at the surface position, the depth position or a combination of surface and the depth.

  15. Asymptotic preserving IMEX finite volume schemes for low Mach number Euler equations with gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bispen, Georgij; Lukáčová-Medvid'ová, Mária; Yelash, Leonid

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we will present and analyze a new class of the IMEX finite volume schemes for the Euler equations with a gravity source term. We will in particular concentrate on a singular limit of weakly compressible flows when the Mach number M ≪ 1. In order to efficiently resolve slow dynamics we split the whole nonlinear system in a stiff linear part governing the acoustic and gravity waves and a non-stiff nonlinear part that models nonlinear advection effects. For time discretization we use a special class of the so-called globally stiffly accurate IMEX schemes and approximate the stiff linear operator implicitly and the non-stiff nonlinear operator explicitly. For spatial discretization the finite volume approximation is used with the central and Rusanov/Lax-Friedrichs numerical fluxes for the linear and nonlinear subsystem, respectively. In the case of a constant background potential temperature we prove theoretically that the method is asymptotically consistent and asymptotically stable uniformly with respect to small Mach number. We also analyze experimentally convergence rates in the singular limit when the Mach number tends to zero.

  16. Finite volume effects in pion-kaon scattering and reconstruction of the kappa(800) resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, M

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the kappa(800) on the lattice is a challenging task that starts to become feasible due to the rapid progress in recent-years lattice QCD calculations. As the resonance is broad, special attention to finite-volume effects has to be paid, because no sharp resonance signal as from avoided level crossing can be expected. In the present article, we investigate the finite volume effects in the framework of unitarized chiral perturbation theory using next-to-leading order terms. After a fit to meson-meson partial wave data, lattice levels for piK scattering are predicted. In addition, levels are shown for the quantum numbers in which the sigma(600), f_0(980), a_0(980), phi(1020), K*(892), and rho(770) appear, as well as the repulsive channels. Methods to extract the kappa(800) signal from the lattice spectrum are presented. Using pseudo-data, we estimate the precision that lattice data should have to allow for a clear-cut extraction of this resonance. To put the results into context, in particular the req...

  17. ComPASS : a tool for distributed parallel finite volume discretizations on general unstructured polyhedral meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalissier E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the ComPASS project is to develop a parallel multiphase Darcy flow simulator adapted to general unstructured polyhedral meshes (in a general sense with possibly non planar faces and to the parallelization of advanced finite volume discretizations with various choices of the degrees of freedom such as cell centres, vertices, or face centres. The main targeted applications are the simulation of CO2 geological storage, nuclear waste repository and reservoir simulations. The CEMRACS 2012 summer school devoted to high performance computing has been an ideal framework to start this collaborative project. This paper describes what has been achieved during the four weeks of the CEMRACS project which has been focusing on the implementation of basic features of the code such as the distributed unstructured polyhedral mesh, the synchronization of the degrees of freedom, and the connection to scientific libraries including the partitioner METIS, the visualization tool PARAVIEW, and the parallel linear solver library PETSc. The parallel efficiency of this first version of the ComPASS code has been validated on a toy parabolic problem using the Vertex Approximate Gradient finite volume spatial discretization with both cell and vertex degrees of freedom, combined with an Euler implicit time integration.

  18. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  19. A fast and automatic full-potential finite volume solver on Cartesian grids for unconventional configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanxi LYU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To meet the requirements of fast and automatic computation of subsonic and transonic aerodynamics in aircraft conceptual design, a novel finite volume solver for full potential flows on adaptive Cartesian grids is developed in this paper. Cartesian grids with geometric adaptation are firstly generated automatically with boundary cells processed by cell-cutting and cell-merging algorithms. The nonlinear full potential equation is discretized by a finite volume scheme on these Cartesian grids and iteratively solved in an implicit fashion with a generalized minimum residual (GMRES algorithm. During computation, solution-based mesh adaptation is also applied so as to capture flow features more accurately. An improved ghost-cell method is proposed to implement the non-penetration wall boundary condition where the velocity-potential of a ghost cell is modified by an analytic method instead. According to the characteristics of the Cartesian grids, the Kutta condition is applied by specially computing the gradients on Kutta-faces without directly assigning the potential jump to cells adjacent wake faces, which can significantly improve the solution converging speed. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method are validated by several typical cases of sub/transonic flows around an ONERA M6 wing, a DLR-F4 wing-body, and an unconventional figuration of a blended wing body (BWB. The validation cases demonstrate a fast convergence with fully automatic grid treatment and computation, and the results suggest its capacity in application for aircraft conceptual design.

  20. Generalized source Finite Volume Method for radiative transfer equation in participating media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Xu, Chuan-Long; Wang, Shi-Min

    2017-03-01

    Temperature monitoring is very important in a combustion system. In recent years, non-intrusive temperature reconstruction has been explored intensively on the basis of calculating arbitrary directional radiative intensities. In this paper, a new method named Generalized Source Finite Volume Method (GSFVM) was proposed. It was based on radiative transfer equation and Finite Volume Method (FVM). This method can be used to calculate arbitrary directional radiative intensities and is proven to be accurate and efficient. To verify the performance of this method, six test cases of 1D, 2D, and 3D radiative transfer problems were investigated. The numerical results show that the efficiency of this method is close to the radial basis function interpolation method, but the accuracy and stability is higher than that of the interpolation method. The accuracy of the GSFVM is similar to that of the Backward Monte Carlo (BMC) algorithm, while the time required by the GSFVM is much shorter than that of the BMC algorithm. Therefore, the GSFVM can be used in temperature reconstruction and improvement on the accuracy of the FVM.

  1. Charged hadrons in local finite-volume QED+QCD with C* boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lucini, Biagio; Ramos, Alberto; Tantalo, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate QED corrections to hadronic physical quantities by means of lattice simulations, a coherent description of electrically-charged states in finite volume is needed. In the usual periodic setup, Gauss's law and large gauge transformations forbid the propagation of electrically-charged states. A possible solution to this problem, which does not violate the axioms of local quantum field theory, has been proposed by Wiese and Polley, and is based on the use of C* boundary conditions. We present a thorough analysis of the properties and symmetries of QED in isolation and QED coupled to QCD, with C* boundary conditions. In particular we learn that a certain class of electrically-charged states can be constructed in this setup in a fully consistent fashion, without relying on gauge fixing. We argue that this class of states covers most of the interesting phenomenological applications in the framework of numerical simulations. We also calculate finite-volume corrections to the mass of stable charg...

  2. Multichannel one-to-two transition form factors in a finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A; Walker-Loud, André

    2014-01-01

    We perform a model-independent, non-perturbative investigation of two-point and three-point finite-volume correlation functions in the energy regime where two-particle states can go on-shell. We study three-point functions involving a single incoming particle and an outgoing two-particle state, relevant, for example, for studies of meson decays (e.g., B-to-pi Kll) or meson photo production (e.g., pi gamma-to-pi pi). We observe that, while the spectrum solely depends upon the on-shell scattering amplitude, the correlation functions also depend upon off-shell amplitudes. The main result of this work is a non-perturbative generalization of the Lellouch-Luscher formula relating matrix elements of currents in finite and infinite spatial volumes. We extend that work by considering a theory with multiple, strongly-coupled channels and by accommodating external currents which inject arbitrary four-momentum as well as arbitrary angular-momentum. The result is exact up to exponential corrections governed by mpi L. We p...

  3. Benchmarking of a New Finite Volume Shallow Water Code for Accurate Tsunami Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Claudia; Clain, Stephane; Figueiredo, Jorge; Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Finite volume methods used to solve the shallow-water equation with source terms receive great attention on the two last decades due to its fundamental properties: the built-in conservation property, the capacity to treat correctly discontinuities and the ability to handle complex bathymetry configurations preserving the some steady-state configuration (well-balanced scheme). Nevertheless, it is still a challenge to build an efficient numerical scheme, with very few numerical artifacts (e.g. numerical diffusion) which can be used in an operational environment, and are able to better capture the dynamics of the wet-dry interface and the physical phenomenon that occur in the inundation area. We present here a new finite volume code and benchmark it against analytical and experimental results, and we test the performance of the code in the complex topographic of the Tagus Estuary, close to Lisbon, Portugal. This work is funded by the Portugal-France research agreement, through the research project FCT-ANR/MAT-NAN/0122/2012.

  4. The element-based finite volume method applied to petroleum reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordazzo, Jonas; Maliska, Clovis R.; Silva, Antonio F.C. da; Hurtado, Fernando S.V. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2004-07-01

    In this work a numerical model for simulating petroleum reservoirs using the Element-based Finite Volume Method (EbFVM) is presented. The method employs unstructured grids using triangular and/or quadrilateral elements, such that complex reservoir geometries can be easily represented. Due to the control-volume approach, local mass conservation is enforced, permitting a direct physical interpretation of the resulting discrete equations. It is demonstrated that this method can deal with the permeability maps without averaging procedures, since this scheme assumes uniform properties inside elements, instead inside of control volumes, avoiding the need of weighting the permeability values at the control volumes interfaces. Moreover, it is easy to include the full permeability tensor in this method, which is an important issue in simulating heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs. Finally, a comparison among the results obtained using the scheme proposed in this work in the EbFVM framework with those obtained employing the scheme commonly used in petroleum reservoir simulation is presented. It is also shown that the scheme proposed is less susceptible to the grid orientation effect with the increasing of the mobility ratio. (author)

  5. Domain of composition and finite volume schemes on non-matching grids; Decomposition de domaine et schemas volumes finis sur maillages non-conformes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saas, L.

    2004-05-01

    This Thesis deals with sedimentary basin modeling whose goal is the prediction through geological times of the localizations and appraisal of hydrocarbons quantities present in the ground. Due to the natural and evolutionary decomposition of the sedimentary basin in blocks and stratigraphic layers, domain decomposition methods are requested to simulate flows of waters and of hydrocarbons in the ground. Conservations laws are used to model the flows in the ground and form coupled partial differential equations which must be discretized by finite volume method. In this report we carry out a study on finite volume methods on non-matching grids solved by domain decomposition methods. We describe a family of finite volume schemes on non-matching grids and we prove that the associated global discretized problem is well posed. Then we give an error estimate. We give two examples of finite volume schemes on non matching grids and the corresponding theoretical results (Constant scheme and Linear scheme). Then we present the resolution of the global discretized problem by a domain decomposition method using arbitrary interface conditions (for example Robin conditions). Finally we give numerical results which validate the theoretical results and study the use of finite volume methods on non-matching grids for basin modeling. (author)

  6. QED multi-dimensional vacuum polarization finite-difference solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Grismayer, Thomas; Silva, Luís; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is expected to deliver peak intensities of 1023 - 1024 W/cm2 allowing to probe nonlinear Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) phenomena in an unprecedented regime. Within the framework of QED, the second order process of photon-photon scattering leads to a set of extended Maxwell's equations [W. Heisenberg and H. Euler, Z. Physik 98, 714] effectively creating nonlinear polarization and magnetization terms that account for the nonlinear response of the vacuum. To model this in a self-consistent way, we present a multi dimensional generalized Maxwell equation finite difference solver with significantly enhanced dispersive properties, which was implemented in the OSIRIS particle-in-cell code [R.A. Fonseca et al. LNCS 2331, pp. 342-351, 2002]. We present a detailed numerical analysis of this electromagnetic solver. As an illustration of the properties of the solver, we explore several examples in extreme conditions. We confirm the theoretical prediction of vacuum birefringence of a pulse propagating in the presence of an intense static background field [arXiv:1301.4918 [quant-ph

  7. Contraction preconditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective preconditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modeling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analog of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new preconditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulas for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations preconditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that for high contrasts, the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new preconditioner is advantageous over using the 1D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2 to 2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1D Green's function as a preconditioner.

  8. Contraction pre-conditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective pre-conditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modelling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analogue of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new pre-conditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1-D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulae for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations pre-conditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new pre-conditioner is advantageous over using the 1-D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2-2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1-D Green's function as a pre-conditioner.

  9. Solution strategies for finite elements and finite volumes methods applied to flow and heat transfer problem in U-shaped geothermal exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Nadaniela; Giacomini, Josephin; Maponi, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Matter of this paper is the study of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer in a U-shaped heat exchanger. We propose a mathematical model that is formulated as a forced convection problem for incompressible and Newtonian fluids and results in the unsteady Navier-Stokes problem. In order to get a solution, we discretise the equations with both the Finite Elements Method and the Finite Volumes Method. These procedures give rise to a non-symmetric indefinite quadratic system of equations. Thus, three regularisation techniques are proposed to make approximations effective and ideas to compare their results are provided.

  10. Overlapping Domain Decomp osition Finite Difference Algorithm for Compact Difference Scheme of the Heat Conduction Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-mei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a modified additive Schwarz finite difference algorithm is applied in the heat conduction equation of the compact difference scheme. The algorithm is on the basis of domain decomposition and the subspace correction. The basic train of thought is the introduction of the units function decomposition and reasonable distribution of the overlap of correction. The residual correction is conducted on each subspace while the computation is completely parallel. The theoretical analysis shows that this method is completely characterized by parallel.

  11. The Numerical Solution of Underwater Acoustic Propagation Problems Using Finite Difference and Finite Element Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-09

    State and /IP Code i Arlington, VA 22217 10. SOURCE OF FUNDING NOS. PROGRAM E LEMENT NO. 61153N 11 TITLE ilnclude SeGur \\ly Classificationi... CYBER 205. We observe in this connection that the finite-element algorithm, we described previously is, for the most part, vectorizable. The main...words. We understand that it is scheduled to be available before the end of 1985. We also understand that CDC is planning a successor to the CYBER 205

  12. An adaptive control volume finite element method for simulation of multi-scale flow in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G.; Jackson, M.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase flow in porous media is of importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We present a novel control volume finite element method (CVFEM) to solve for multi-scale flow in heterogeneous geological formations. It employs a node centred control volume approach to discretize the saturation equation, while a control volume finite element method is applied for the pressure equation. We embed the discrete continuity equation into the pressure equation and assure that the continuity is exactly enforced. Anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to accurately model the fine grained features of multiphase flow. The adaptive algorithm uses a metric tensor field based on solution error estimates to locally control the size and shape of elements in the metric. Moreover, it uses metric advection between adaptive meshes in order to predict the future required density of mesh thereby reducing numerical dispersion at the saturation front. The scheme is capable of capturing multi-scale heterogeneity such as those in fractured porous media through the use of several constraints on the element size in different regions of porous media. We show the application of our method for simulation of flow in some challenging benchmark problems. For flow in fractured reservoirs, the scheme adapts the mesh as the flow penetrates through the fracture and the matrix. The constraints for the element size within the fracture are smaller by several orders of magnitude than the generated mesh within the matrix. We show that the scheme captures the key multi-scale features of flow while preserving the geometry. We demonstrate that mesh adaptation can be used to accurately simulate flow in heterogeneous porous media at low computational cost.

  13. A well-balanced finite volume scheme for 1D hemodynamic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delestre, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    We are interested in simulating blood flow in arteries with variable elasticity with a one dimensional model. We present a well-balanced finite volume scheme based on the recent developments in shallow water equations context. We thus get a mass conservative scheme which also preserves equilibria of Q=0. This numerical method is tested on analytical tests. Nous nous int\\'eressons \\`a la simulation d'\\'ecoulements sanguins dans des art\\`eres dont les parois sont \\`a \\'elasticit\\'e variable. Ceci est mod\\'elis\\'e \\`a l'aide d'un mod\\`ele unidimensionnel. Nous pr\\'esentons un sch\\'ema "volume fini \\'equilibr\\'e" bas\\'e sur les d\\'eveloppements r\\'ecents effectu\\'es pour la r\\'esolution du syst\\`eme de Saint-Venant. Ainsi, nous obtenons un sch\\'ema qui pr\\'eserve le volume de fluide ainsi que les \\'equilibres au repos: Q=0. Le sch\\'ema introduit est test\\'e sur des solutions analytiques.

  14. A well-balanced finite volume scheme for 1D hemodynamic simulations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagrée Pierre-Yves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We are interested in simulating blood flow in arteries with variable elasticity with a one dimensional model. We present a well-balanced finite volume scheme based on the recent developments in shallow water equations context. We thus get a mass conservative scheme which also preserves equilibria of Q = 0. This numerical method is tested on analytical tests. Nous nous intéressons à la simulation d’écoulements sanguins dans des artères dont les parois sont à élasticité variable. Ceci est modélisé à l’aide d’un modèle unidimensionnel. Nous présentons un schéma ”volume fini équilibré” basé sur les développements récents effectués pour la résolution du système de Saint-Venant. Ainsi, nous obtenons un schéma qui préserve le volume de fluide ainsi que les équilibres au repos : Q = 0. Le schéma introduit est testé sur des solutions analytiques.

  15. 3D Finite Difference Modelling of Basaltic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engell-Sørensen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of the work was to generate realistic data to be applied for testing of processing and migration tools for basaltic regions. The project is based on the three - dimensional finite difference code (FD), TIGER, made by Sintef. The FD code was optimized (parallelized) by the author, to run on parallel computers. The parallel code enables us to model large-scale realistic geological models and to apply traditional seismic and micro seismic sources. The parallel code uses multiple processors in order to manipulate subsets of large amounts of data simultaneously. The general anisotropic code uses 21 elastic coefficients. Eight independent coefficients are needed as input parameters for the general TI medium. In the FD code, the elastic wave field computation is implemented by a higher order FD solution to the elastic wave equation and the wave fields are computed on a staggered grid, shifted half a node in one or two directions. The geological model is a gridded basalt model, which covers from 24 km to 37 km of a real shot line in horizontal direction and from the water surface to the depth of 3.5 km. The 2frac {1}{2}D model has been constructed using the compound modeling software from Norsk Hydro. The vertical parameter distribution is obtained from observations in two wells. At The depth of between 1100 m to 1500 m, a basalt horizon covers the whole sub surface layers. We have shown that it is possible to simulate a line survey in realistic (3D) geological models in reasonable time by using high performance computers. The author would like to thank Norsk Hydro, Statoil, GEUS, and SINTEF for very helpful discussions and Parallab for being helpful with the new IBM, p690 Regatta system.

  16. PCS: an Euler--Lagrange method for treating convection in pulsating stars using finite difference techniques in two spatial dimensions. [Finite difference method, time dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deupree, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Finite difference techniques were used to examine the coupling of radial pulsation and convection in stellar models having comparable time scales. Numerical procedures are emphasized, including diagnostics to help determine the range of free parameters.

  17. Accurate finite difference beam propagation method for complex integrated optical structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1993-01-01

    A simple and effective finite-difference beam propagation method in a z-varying nonuniform mesh is developed. The accuracy and computation time for this method are compared with a standard finite-difference method for both the 3-D and 2-D versions......A simple and effective finite-difference beam propagation method in a z-varying nonuniform mesh is developed. The accuracy and computation time for this method are compared with a standard finite-difference method for both the 3-D and 2-D versions...

  18. Study of the deconfinement phase transition in a finite volume with massive particles: Hydrodynamics of the system near the transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghenam, L.; Djoudi, A. Ait El [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules et Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure - Kouba, B.P. 92, 16050, Vieux Kouba, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    We study the finite size and finite mass effects for the thermal deconfinement phase transition in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), using a simple model of coexistence of hadronic (H) gas and quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phases in a finite volume. We consider the equations of state of the two phases with the QGP containing two massless u and d quarks and massive s quarks, and a hadronic gas of massive pions, and we probe the system near the transition. For this, we examine the behavior of the most important hydrodynamical quantities describing the system, at a vanishing chemical potential ({mu}= 0), with temperature and energy density.

  19. An explicit finite volume element method for solving characteristic level set equation on triangular grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sutthisak Phongthanapanich; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2011-01-01

    Level set methods are widely used for predicting evolutions of complex free surface topologies,such as the crystal and crack growth,bubbles and droplets deformation,spilling and breaking waves,and two-phase flow phenomena.This paper presents a characteristic level set equation which is derived from the two-dimensional level set equation by using the characteristic-based scheme.An explicit finite volume element method is developed to discretize the equation on triangular grids.Several examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method for calculating interface evolutions in time.The proposed level set method is also coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase immiscible incompressible flow analysis with surface tension.The Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem is used to test and evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  20. Finite volume - space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of compressible turbulent flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Česenek Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we deal with numerical simulation of the non-stationary compressible turbulent flow. Compressible turbulent flow is described by the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations. This RANS system is equipped with two-equation k-omega turbulence model. These two systems of equations are solved separately. Discretization of the RANS system is carried out by the space-time discontinuous Galerkin method which is based on piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximation of the sought solution in space and in time. Discretization of the two-equation k-omega turbulence model is carried out by the implicit finite volume method, which is based on piecewise constant approximation of the sought solution. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  1. A finite-volume numerical method to calculate fluid forces and rotordynamic coefficients in seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method to calculate rotordynamic coefficients of seals is presented. The flow in a seal is solved by using a finite-volume formulation of the full Navier-Stokes equations with appropriate turbulence models. The seal rotor is perturbed along a diameter such that the position of the rotor is a sinusoidal function of time. The resulting flow domain changes with time, and the time-dependent flow in the seal is solved using a space conserving moving grid formulation. The time-varying fluid pressure reaction forces are then linked with the rotor center displacement, velocity and acceleration to yield the rotordynamic coefficients. Results for an annular seal are presented, and compared with experimental data and other more simplified numerical methods.

  2. Coupling of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with Finite Volume method for free-surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrone, S.; Di Mascio, A.; Le Touzé, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for the solution of free surface flows with large front deformation and fragmentation is presented. The algorithm is obtained by coupling a classical Finite Volume (FV) approach, that discretizes the Navier-Stokes equations on a block structured Eulerian grid, with an approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, implemented in a Lagrangian framework. The coupling procedure is formulated in such a way that each solver is applied in the region where its intrinsic characteristics can be exploited in the most efficient and accurate way: the FV solver is used to resolve the bulk flow and the wall regions, whereas the SPH solver is implemented in the free surface region to capture details of the front evolution. The reported results clearly prove that the combined use of the two solvers is convenient from the point of view of both accuracy and computing time.

  3. Mimetic Theory for Cell-Centered Lagrangian Finite Volume Formulation on General Unstructured Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burton, Donald E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christon, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-19

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving large deformation problems is constructed based on the hypo-elastic model and using the mimetic theory. Rigorous analysis in the context of gas and solid dynamics, and arbitrary polygonal meshes, is presented to demonstrate the ability of cell-centered schemes in mimicking the continuum properties and principles at the discrete level. A new mimetic formulation based gradient evaluation technique and physics-based, frame independent and symmetry preserving slope limiters are proposed. Furthermore, a physically consistent dissipation model is employed which is both robust and inexpensive to implement. The cell-centered scheme along with these additional new features are applied to solve solids undergoing elasto-plastic deformation.

  4. Modelling the Hydraulic Behaviour of Growing Media with the Explicit Finite Volume Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carbone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing imperviousness of urban areas reduces the infiltration and evapotranspiration capacity of urban catchments and results in increased runoff. In the last few decades, several solutions and techniques have been proposed to prevent such impacts by restoring the hydrological cycle. A limiting factor in spreading the use of such systems is the lack of proper modelling tools for design, especially for the infiltration processes in a growing medium. In this research, a physically-based model, employing the explicit Finite Volume Method (FVM, is proposed for modelling infiltration into growing media. The model solves a modified version of the Richards equation using a formulation which takes into account the main characteristics of green infrastructure substrates. The proposed model was verified against the HYDRUS-1D software and the comparison of results confirmed the suitability of the proposed model for correctly describing the hydraulic behaviour of soil substrates.

  5. Finite volume methods for submarine debris flow with Herschel-Bulkley rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihwan; Issler, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    Submarine landslides can impose great danger to the underwater structures and generate destructive waves. The Herschel-Bulkley rheological model is known to be appropriate for describing the nonlinear viscoplastic behavior of the debris flow. The numerical implementation of the depth-averaged Herschel-Bulkley models such as BING has so-far been limited to the 1-dimensional Lagrangian coordinate system. In this work, we develop numerical schemes with the finite volume methods in the Eulerian coordinates. We provide parameter sensitivity analysis and demonstrate how common ad-hoc assumptions such as including a minimum shear layer depth influence the modeling of the landslide dynamics. The possibility of adding hydrodynamic resistance forces, hydroplaning, and remolding into this Eulerian framework is also discussed. Finally, the possible extension to a two-dimensional operational model for coupling towards operational tsunami models is discussed.

  6. A solution of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flow using the finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naceur Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the two dimensional numerical modeling of the coupling electromagnetic-hydrodynamic phenomena in a conduction MHD pump using the Finite volume Method. Magnetohydrodynamic problems are, thus, interdisciplinary and coupled, since the effect of the velocity field appears in the magnetic transport equations, and the interaction between the electric current and the magnetic field appears in the momentum transport equations. The resolution of the Maxwell's and Navier Stokes equations is obtained by introducing the magnetic vector potential A, the vorticity z and the stream function y. The flux density, the electromagnetic force, and the velocity are graphically presented. Also, the simulation results agree with those obtained by Ansys Workbench Fluent software.

  7. A High-Order Finite-Volume Algorithm for Fokker-Planck Collisions in Magnetized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Z; Cohen, R H; Rognlien, T D; Xu, X Q

    2007-04-18

    A high-order finite volume algorithm is developed for the Fokker-Planck Operator (FPO) describing Coulomb collisions in strongly magnetized plasmas. The algorithm is based on a general fourth-order reconstruction scheme for an unstructured grid in the velocity space spanned by parallel velocity and magnetic moment. The method provides density conservation and high-order-accurate evaluation of the FPO independent of the choice of the velocity coordinates. As an example, a linearized FPO in constant-of-motion coordinates, i.e. the total energy and the magnetic moment, is developed using the present algorithm combined with a cut-cell merging procedure. Numerical tests include the Spitzer thermalization problem and the return to isotropy for distributions initialized with velocity space loss cones. Utilization of the method for a nonlinear FPO is straightforward but requires evaluation of the Rosenbluth potentials.

  8. Control theory based airfoil design for potential flow and a finite volume discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, J.; Jameson, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for two-dimensional profiles in which the shape is determined by a conformal transformation from a unit circle, and the control is the mapping function. The goal of our present work is to develop a method which does not depend on conformal mapping, so that it can be extended to treat three-dimensional problems. Therefore, we have developed a method which can address arbitrary geometric shapes through the use of a finite volume method to discretize the potential flow equation. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented, where both target speed distributions and minimum drag are used as objective functions.

  9. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell modelling using finite volumes and adaptive mesh refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Wettervik, Benjamin Svedung; Siminos, Evangelos; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasmas can be modelled by the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. An Eulerian approach is needed to accurately describe processes that are governed by high energy tails in the distribution function, but is of limited efficiency for high dimensional problems. The use of an adaptive mesh can reduce the scaling of the computational cost with the dimension of the problem. Here, we present a relativistic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell solver with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement in one spatial and one momentum dimension. The discretization of the Vlasov equation is based on a high-order finite volume method. A flux corrected transport algorithm is applied to limit spurious oscillations and ensure the physical character of the distribution function. We demonstrate a speed-up by a factor of five, because of the use of an adaptive mesh, in a typical scenario involving laser-plasma interaction in the self-induced transparency regime.

  10. An Accurate Multimoment Constrained Finite Volume Transport Model on Yin-Yang Grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingliang; SHEN Xueshun; PENG Xindong; XIAO Feng; ZHUANG Zhaorong; CHEN Chungang

    2013-01-01

    A global transport model is proposed in which a multimoment constrained finite volume (MCV) scheme is applied to a Yin-Yang overset grid.The MCV scheme defines 16 degrees of freedom (DOFs) within each element to build a 2D cubic reconstruction polynomial.The time evolution equations for DOFs are derived from constraint conditions on moments of line-integrated averages (LIA),point values (PV),and values of first-order derivatives (DV).The Yin-Yang grid eliminates polar singularities and results in a quasi-uniform mesh.A limiting projection is designed to remove nonphysical oscillations around discontinuities.Our model was tested against widely used benchmarks; the competitive results reveal that the model is accurate and promising for developing general circulation models.

  11. Second-order accurate finite volume method for well-driven flows

    CERN Document Server

    Dotlić, Milan; Pokorni, Boris; Pušić, Milenko; Dimkić, Milan

    2013-01-01

    We consider a finite volume method for a well-driven fluid flow in a porous medium. Due to the singularity of the well, modeling in the near-well region with standard numerical schemes results in a completely wrong total well flux and an inaccurate hydraulic head. Local grid refinement can help, but it comes at computational cost. In this article we propose two methods to address well singularity. In the first method the flux through well faces is corrected using a logarithmic function, in a way related to the Peaceman correction. Coupling this correction with a second-order accurate two-point scheme gives a greatly improved total well flux, but the resulting scheme is still not even first order accurate on coarse grids. In the second method fluxes in the near-well region are corrected by representing the hydraulic head as a sum of a logarithmic and a linear function. This scheme is second-order accurate.

  12. A GPU-enabled Finite Volume solver for global magnetospheric simulations on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, Andrea; Yalim, Mehmet Sarp; Poedts, Stefaan

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes an ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver for global magnetospheric simulations based on a B1 +B0 splitting approach, which has been implemented within the COOLFluiD platform and adapted to run on modern heterogeneous architectures featuring General Purpose Graphical Processing Units (GPGPUs). The code is based on a state-of-the-art Finite Volume discretization for unstructured grids and either explicit or implicit time integration, suitable for both steady and time accurate problems. Innovative object-oriented design and coding techniques mixing C++ and CUDA are discussed. Performance results of the modified code on single and multiple processors are presented and compared with those provided by the original solver.

  13. AN UNSTRUCTURED FINITE-VOLUME ALGORITHM FOR NONLINEAR TWO-DIMENSIOAL SHALLOW WATER EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-li; GENG Yan-fen; JIN Sheng

    2005-01-01

    An unstructured finite-volume numerical algorithm was presented for solution of the two-dimensional shallow water equations, based on triangular or arbitrary quadrilateral meshes. The Roe type approximate Riemann solver was used to the system. A second-order TVD scheme with the van Leer limiter was used in the space discretization and a two-step Runge-Kutta approach was used in the time discretization. An upwind, as opposed to a pointwise, treatment of the slope source terms was adopted and the semi-implicit treatment was used for the friction source terms. Verification for two-dimension dam-break problems are carried out by comparing the present results with others and very good agreement is shown.

  14. Hybrid, explicit-implicit, finite-volume schemes on unstructured grids for unsteady compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Evgeny; Norouzi, Farhang

    2016-06-01

    The motivation for using hybrid, explicit-implicit, schemes rather than fully implicit or explicit methods for some unsteady high-speed compressible flows with shocks is firstly discussed. A number of such schemes proposed in the past are briefly overviewed. A recently proposed hybridization approach is then introduced and used for the development of a hybrid, explicit-implicit, TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) scheme of the second order in space and time on smooth solutions in both, explicit and implicit, modes for the linear advection equation. Further generalizations of this finite-volume method for the Burgers, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations discretized on unstructured grids are mentioned in the concluding remarks.

  15. Unstructured finite volume method for water impact on a rigid body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yan; MING Ping-jian; DUAN Wen-yang

    2014-01-01

    A new method is presented for the water impact simulation, in which the air-water two phase flow is solved using the pressure-based computational fluid dynamics method. Theoretically, the air effects can be taken into account in the water structure interaction. The key point of this method is the air-water interface capture, which is treated as a physical discontinuity and can be captured by a well-designed high order scheme. According to a normalized variable diagram, a high order discrete scheme on unstructured grids is realised, so a numerical method for the free surface flow on a fixed grid can be established. This method is implemented using an in-house code, the General Transport Equation Analyzer, which is an unstructured grid finite volume solver. The method is verified with the wedge water and structure interaction problem.

  16. 3D Finite Volume Simulation of Accretion Discs with Spiral Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Makita, M; Makita, Makoto; Matsuda, Takuya

    1998-01-01

    We perform 2D and 3D numerical simulations of an accretion disc in a close binary system using the Simplified Flux vector Splitting (SFS) finite volume method. In our calculations, gas is assumed to be the ideal one, and we calculate the cases with gamma=1.01, 1.05, 1.1 and 1.2. The mass ratio of the mass losing star to the mass accreting star is unity. Our results show that spiral shocks are formed on the accretion disc in all cases. In 2D calculations we find that the smaller gamma is, the more tightly the spiral winds. We observe this trend in 3D calculations as well in somewhat weaker sense.

  17. A finite volume alternate direction implicit approach to modeling selective laser melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Mohanty, Sankhya

    2013-01-01

    is proposed for modeling single-layer and few-layers selective laser melting processes. The ADI technique is implemented and applied for two cases involving constant material properties and non-linear material behavior. The ADI FV method consume less time while having comparable accuracy with respect to 3D...... to accurately simulate the process, are constrained by either the size or scale of the model domain. A second challenging aspect involves the inclusion of non-linear material behavior into the 3D implicit FE models. An alternating direction implicit (ADI) method based on a finite volume (FV) formulation......Over the last decade, several studies have attempted to develop thermal models for analyzing the selective laser melting process with a vision to predict thermal stresses, microstructures and resulting mechanical properties of manufactured products. While a holistic model addressing all involved...

  18. Numerical modeling of turbulence mixed convection heat transfer in air filled enclosures by finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Safaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, first the turbulent natural convection and then laminar mixed convection of air flow was solved in a room and the calculated outcomes are compared with results of other scientists and after showing validation of calculations, aforementioned flow is solved as a turbulent mixed convection flow, using the valid turbulence models Standard k-ε, RNG k-ε and RSM. To solve governing differential equations for this flow, finite volume method was used. This method is a specific case of residual weighting method. The results show that at high Richardson Numbers, the flow is rather stationary at the center of the enclosure. Moreover, it is distinguished that when Richardson Number increases the maximum of local Nusselt decreases. Therefore, it can be said that less number of Richardson Number, more rate of heat transfer.

  19. High-order accurate finite-volume formulations for the pressure gradient force in layered ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwirda, Darren; Kelley, Maxwell; Marshall, John

    2017-08-01

    Discretisation of the horizontal pressure gradient force in layered ocean models is a challenging task, with non-trivial interactions between the thermodynamics of the fluid and the geometry of the layers often leading to numerical difficulties. We present two new finite-volume schemes for the pressure gradient operator designed to address these issues. In each case, the horizontal acceleration is computed as an integration of the contact pressure force that acts along the perimeter of an associated momentum control-volume. A pair of new schemes are developed by exploring different control-volume geometries. Non-linearities in the underlying equation-of-state definitions and thermodynamic profiles are treated using a high-order accurate numerical integration framework, designed to preserve hydrostatic balance in a non-linear manner. Numerical experiments show that the new methods achieve high levels of consistency, maintaining hydrostatic and thermobaric equilibrium in the presence of strongly-sloping layer geometries, non-linear equations-of-state and non-uniform vertical stratification profiles. These results suggest that the new pressure gradient formulations may be appropriate for general circulation models that employ hybrid vertical coordinates and/or terrain-following representations.

  20. Test functions for three-dimensional control-volume mixed finite-element methods on irregular grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    2000-01-01

    Numerical methods based on unstructured grids, with irregular cells, usually require discrete shape functions to approximate the distribution of quantities across cells. For control-volume mixed finite-element methods, vector shape functions are used to approximate the distribution of velocities across cells and vector test functions are used to minimize the error associated with the numerical approximation scheme. For a logically cubic mesh, the lowest-order shape functions are chosen in a natural way to conserve intercell fluxes that vary linearly in logical space. Vector test functions, while somewhat restricted by the mapping into the logical reference cube, admit a wider class of possibilities. Ideally, an error minimization procedure to select the test function from an acceptable class of candidates would be the best procedure. Lacking such a procedure, we first investigate the effect of possible test functions on the pressure distribution over the control volume; specifically, we look for test functions that allow for the elimination of intermediate pressures on cell faces. From these results, we select three forms for the test function for use in a control-volume mixed method code and subject them to an error analysis for different forms of grid irregularity; errors are reported in terms of the discrete L2 norm of the velocity error. Of these three forms, one appears to produce optimal results for most forms of grid irregularity.

  1. Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srbislav S. Pajic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anatomy of frontal sinuses varies individually, from differences in volume and shape to a rare case when the sinuses are absent. However, there are scarce data related to influence of these variations on impact generated fracture pattern. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of frontal sinus volume on the stress distribution and fracture pattern in the frontal region. The study included four representative Finite Element models of the skull. Reference model was built on the basis of computed tomography scans of a human head with normally developed frontal sinuses. By modifying the reference model, three additional models were generated: a model without sinuses, with hypoplasic, and with hyperplasic sinuses. A 7.7 kN force was applied perpendicularly to the forehead of each model, in order to simulate a frontal impact. The results demonstrated that the distribution of impact stress in frontal region depends on the frontal sinus volume. The anterior sinus wall showed the highest fragility in case with hyperplasic sinuses, whereas posterior wall/inner plate showed more fragility in cases with hypoplasic and undeveloped sinuses. Well-developed frontal sinuses might, through absorption of the impact energy by anterior wall, protect the posterior wall and intracranial contents.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY PROBLEM AND STUDY OF APPROACH BASED ON FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Sherina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been aimed to carry out a study of peculiarities that arise in a numerical simulation of the electrical impedance tomography (EIT problem. Static EIT image reconstruction is sensitive to a measurement noise and approximation error. A special consideration has been given to reducing of the approximation error, which originates from numerical implementation drawbacks. This paper presents in detail two numerical approaches for solving EIT forward problem. The finite volume method (FVM on unstructured triangular mesh is introduced. In order to compare this approach, the finite element (FEM based forward solver was implemented, which has gained the most popularity among researchers. The calculated potential distribution with the assumed initial conductivity distribution has been compared to the analytical solution of a test Neumann boundary problem and to the results of problem simulation by means of ANSYS FLUENT commercial software. Two approaches to linearized EIT image reconstruction are discussed. Reconstruction of the conductivity distribution is an ill-posed problem, typically requiring a large amount of computation and resolved by minimization techniques. The objective function to be minimized is constructed of measured voltage and calculated boundary voltage on the electrodes. A classical modified Newton type iterative method and the stochastic differential evolution method are employed. A software package has been developed for the problem under investigation. Numerical tests were conducted on simulated data. The obtained results could be helpful to researches tackling the hardware and software issues for medical applications of EIT.

  3. Discontinuous finite volume element discretization for coupled flow-transport problems arising in models of sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Raimund; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    The sedimentation-consolidation and flow processes of a mixture of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers can be described by a nonlinear transport equation for the solids concentration coupled with the Stokes problem written in terms of the mixture flow velocity and the pressure field. Here both the viscosity and the forcing term depend on the local solids concentration. A semi-discrete discontinuous finite volume element (DFVE) scheme is proposed for this model. The numerical method is constructed on a baseline finite element family of linear discontinuous elements for the approximation of velocity components and concentration field, whereas the pressure is approximated by piecewise constant elements. The unique solvability of both the nonlinear continuous problem and the semi-discrete DFVE scheme is discussed, and optimal convergence estimates in several spatial norms are derived. Properties of the model and the predicted space accuracy of the proposed formulation are illustrated by detailed numerical examples, including flows under gravity with changing direction, a secondary settling tank in an axisymmetric setting, and batch sedimentation in a tilted cylindrical vessel.

  4. IMPROVED LOCALLY CONFORMAL FINITE-DIFFERENCE TIME-DOMAIN METHOD FOR EDGE INCLINED SLOTS IN A FINITE WALL THICKNESS WAVEGUIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Long; Zhang Yu; Liang Changhong

    2004-01-01

    An Improved Locally Conformal Finite-Difference Time-Domain (ILC-FDTD) method is presented in this paper, which is used to analyze the edge inclined slots penetrating adjacent broadwalls of a finite wall thickness waveguide. ILC-FDTD not only removes the instability of the original locally conformal FDTD algorithm, but also improves the computational accuracy by locally modifying magnetic field update equations and the virtual iterative electric fields according to the complexity of the slot fringe fields. The mutual coupling between two edge inclined slots can also be analyzed by ILC-FDTD effectively.

  5. Analysis of regular and chaotic dynamics of the Euler-Bernoulli beams using finite difference and finite element methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Awrejcewicz; A.V. Krysko; J. Mrozowski; O.A. Saltykova; M.V. Zhigalov

    2011-01-01

    Chaotic vibrations of flexible non-linear EulerBernoulli beams subjected to harmonic load and with various boundary conditions (symmetric and non-symmetric) are studied in this work. Reliability of the obtained results is verified by the finite difference method (FDM) and the finite element method (FEM) with the Bubnov-Galerkin approximation for various boundary conditions and various dynamic regimes (regular and non-regular). The influence of boundary conditions on the Euler-Bernoulli beams dynamics is studied mainly, dynamic behavior vs. control parameters {ωp, q0} is reported, and scenarios of the system transition into chaos are illustrated.

  6. A Multifunctional Interface Method for Coupling Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods: Two-Dimensional Scalar-Field Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.

    2002-01-01

    A multifunctional interface method with capabilities for variable-fidelity modeling and multiple method analysis is presented. The methodology provides an effective capability by which domains with diverse idealizations can be modeled independently to exploit the advantages of one approach over another. The multifunctional method is used to couple independently discretized subdomains, and it is used to couple the finite element and the finite difference methods. The method is based on a weighted residual variational method and is presented for two-dimensional scalar-field problems. A verification test problem and a benchmark application are presented, and the computational implications are discussed.

  7. DNS of Sheared Particulate Flows with a 3D Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Andrew; Hu, Howard

    2007-11-01

    A 3D explicit finite-difference code for direct simulation of the motion of solid particulates in fluids has been developed, and a periodic boundary condition implemented to study the effective viscosity of suspensions in shear. The code enforces the no-slip condition on the surface of spherical particles in a uniform Cartesian grid with a special particle boundary condition based on matching the Stokes flow solutions next to the particle surface with a numerical solution away from it. The method proceeds by approximating the flow next to the particle surface as a Stokes flow in the particle's local coordinates, which is then matched to the finite difference update in the bulk fluid on a ``cage'' of grid points near the particle surface. (The boundary condition is related to the PHYSALIS method (2003), but modified for explicit schemes and with an iterative process removed.) Advantages of the method include superior accuracy of the scheme on a relatively coarse grid for intermediate particle Reynolds numbers, ease of implementation, and the elimination of the need to track the particle surface. For the sheared suspension, the effects of fluid and solid inertia and solid volume fraction on effective viscosity at moderate particle Reynolds numbers and concentrated suspensions will be discussed.

  8. Rasterizing geological models for parallel finite difference simulation using seismic simulation as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehner, Björn; Hellwig, Olaf; Linke, Maik; Görz, Ines; Buske, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    3D geological underground models are often presented by vector data, such as triangulated networks representing boundaries of geological bodies and geological structures. Since models are to be used for numerical simulations based on the finite difference method, they have to be converted into a representation discretizing the full volume of the model into hexahedral cells. Often the simulations require a high grid resolution and are done using parallel computing. The storage of such a high-resolution raster model would require a large amount of storage space and it is difficult to create such a model using the standard geomodelling packages. Since the raster representation is only required for the calculation, but not for the geometry description, we present an algorithm and concept for rasterizing geological models on the fly for the use in finite difference codes that are parallelized by domain decomposition. As a proof of concept we implemented a rasterizer library and integrated it into seismic simulation software that is run as parallel code on a UNIX cluster using the Message Passing Interface. We can thus run the simulation with realistic and complicated surface-based geological models that are created using 3D geomodelling software, instead of using a simplified representation of the geological subsurface using mathematical functions or geometric primitives. We tested this set-up using an example model that we provide along with the implemented library.

  9. A 2D finite volume model for bebris flow and its application to events occurred in the Eastern Pyrenees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.MEDINA; A.BATEMAN; M.H(U)RLIMANN

    2008-01-01

    FLATModel is a 2D finite volume code that contains several original approaches to improve debris-flow simulation.Firstly,FLATModel incorporates a "stop-and-go" technique in each cell to allow continuous collapses and remobilizations of the debris-flow mass.Secondly,flow velocity and consequently yield stress is directly associated with the type of rheology to improve boundary accuracy.Thirdly,a simple approach for entrainment is also included in the model to analyse the effect of basal erosion of debris flows.FLATMODEL was tested at several events that occurred in the Eastern Pyrenees and simulation results indicated that the model can represent rather well the different characteristics observed in the field.

  10. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants with cylindrical symmetry: 1. Properly working devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnorr Jörg

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active Magnetic Resonance Imaging implants are constructed as resonators tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system with a specific field strength. The resonating circuit may be embedded into or added to the normal metallic implant structure. The resonators build inductively coupled wireless transmit and receive coils and can amplify the signal, normally decreased by eddy currents, inside metallic structures without affecting the rest of the spin ensemble. During magnetic resonance imaging the resonators generate heat, which is additional to the usual one described by the specific absorption rate. This induces temperature increases of the tissue around the circuit paths and inside the lumen of an active implant and may negatively influence patient safety. Methods This investigation provides an overview of the supplementary power absorbed by active implants with a cylindrical geometry, corresponding to vessel implants such as stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters. The knowledge of the overall absorbed power is used in a finite volume analysis to estimate temperature maps around different implant structures inside homogeneous tissue under worst-case assumptions. The "worst-case scenario" assumes thermal heat conduction without blood perfusion inside the tissue around the implant and mostly without any cooling due to blood flow inside vessels. Results The additional power loss of a resonator is proportional to the volume and the quality factor, as well as the field strength of the MRI system and the specific absorption rate of the applied sequence. For properly working devices the finite volume analysis showed only tolerable heating during MRI investigations in most cases. Only resonators transforming a few hundred mW into heat may reach temperature increases over 5 K. This requires resonators with volumes of several ten cubic centimeters, short inductor circuit paths with only a few 10 cm and a quality

  11. A finite difference, multipoint flux numerical approach to flow in porous media: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Hossam Omar

    2012-06-17

    It is clear that none of the current available numerical schemes which may be adopted to solve transport phenomena in porous media fulfill all the required robustness conditions. That is while the finite difference methods are the simplest of all, they face several difficulties in complex geometries and anisotropic media. On the other hand, while finite element methods are well suited to complex geometries and can deal with anisotropic media, they are more involved in coding and usually require more execution time. Therefore, in this work we try to combine some features of the finite element technique, namely its ability to work with anisotropic media with the finite difference approach. We reduce the multipoint flux, mixed finite element technique through some quadrature rules to an equivalent cell-centered finite difference approximation. We show examples on using this technique to single-phase flow in anisotropic porous media.

  12. A Finite Difference-Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-21

    model using a blending function in 1D, though again, the focus is on preset, unchang- ing local/ nonlocal regions. In contrast, this work will focus on...Fracture. 2014; 190:39-52. 14. ABSTRACT A method is presented for the modeling of brittle elastic fracture which combines peridynamics and a finite...propagation modeling , while peridynamics is automatically inserted in high strain areas to model crack initiation and growth. The dispersion

  13. A SECOND ORDER CONTROL-VOLUME FINITE-ELEMENT LEAST-SQUARES STRATEGY FOR SIMULATING DIFFUSION IN STRONGLY ANISOTROPIC MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jayantha Pasdunkorale A.; Ian W. Turner

    2005-01-01

    An unstructured mesh finite volume discretisation method for simulating diffusion in anisotropic media in two-dimensional space is discussed. This technique is considered as an extension of the fully implicit hybrid control-volume finite-element method and it retains the local continuity of the flux at the control volume faces. A least squares function reconstruction technique together with a new flux decomposition strategy is used to obtain an accurate flux approximation at the control volume face, ensuring that the overall accuracy of the spatial discretisation maintains second order. This paper highlights that the new technique coincides with the traditional shape function technique when the correction term is neglected and that it significantly increases the accuracy of the previous linear scheme on coarse meshes when applied to media that exhibit very strong to extreme anisotropy ratios. It is concluded that the method can be used on both regular and irregular meshes,and appears independent of the mesh quality.

  14. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  15. Comparison of Moving Boundary and Finite-Volume Heat Exchanger Models in the Modelica Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Desideri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When modeling low capacity energy systems, such as a small size (5–150 kWel organic Rankine cycle unit, the governing dynamics are mainly concentrated in the heat exchangers. As a consequence, the accuracy and simulation speed of the higher level system model mainly depend on the heat exchanger model formulation. In particular, the modeling of thermo-flow systems characterized by evaporation or condensation requires heat exchanger models capable of handling phase transitions. To this aim, the finite volume (FV and the moving boundary (MB approaches are the most widely used. The two models are developed and included in the open-source ThermoCycle Modelica library. In this contribution, a comparison between the two approaches is presented. An integrity and accuracy test is designed to evaluate the performance of the FV and MB models during transient conditions. In order to analyze how the two modeling approaches perform when integrated at a system level, two organic Rankine cycle (ORC system models are built using the FV and the MB evaporator model, and their responses are compared against experimental data collected on an 11 kWel ORC power unit. Additionally, the effect of the void fraction value in the MB evaporator model and of the number of control volumes (CVs in the FV one is investigated. The results allow drawing general guidelines for the development of heat exchanger dynamic models involving two-phase flows.

  16. Multi-channel 1-to-2 transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul [JLAB; Hansen, Maxwell [Helmholtz Institute Mainz; Walker-Loud, Andre P [W& M. JLAB

    2015-04-01

    We derive a model-independent expression for finite-volume matrix elements. Specifically, we present a relativistic, non-perturbative analysis of the matrix element of an external current between a one-scalar in-state and a two-scalar out-state. Our result, which is valid for energies below higher-particle inelastic thresholds, generalizes the Lellouch-Luscher formula in two ways: we allow the external current to inject arbitrary momentum into the system and we allow for the final state to be composed an arbitrary number of strongly coupled two-particle states with arbitrary partial waves (including partial-wave mixing induced by the volume). We also illustrate how our general result can be applied to some key examples, such as heavy meson decays and meson photo production. Finally, we point out complications that arise involving unstable resonance states, such as B to K*+l+l when staggered or mixed-action/partially-quenched calculations are performed.

  17. Multichannel one-to-two transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A; Walker-Loud, André

    2015-01-01

    We derive a model-independent expression for finite-volume matrix elements. Specifically, we present a relativistic, non-perturbative analysis of the matrix element of an external current between a one-scalar in-state and a two-scalar out-state. Our result, which is valid for energies below higher-particle inelastic thresholds, generalizes the Lellouch-Luscher formula in two ways: we allow the external current to inject arbitrary momentum into the system and we allow for the final state to be composed an arbitrary number of strongly coupled two-particle states with arbitrary partial waves (including partial-wave mixing induced by the volume). We also illustrate how our general result can be applied to some key examples, such as heavy meson decays and meson photo production. Finally, we point out complications that arise involving unstable resonance states, such as $B\\rightarrow K^*\\ell^+\\ell^-$ when staggered or mixed-action/partially-quenched calculations are performed.

  18. An implicit control-volume finite element method for well-reservoir modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Salinas, Pablo; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Here a novel implicit approach (embodied within the IC-Ferst) is presented for modelling wells with potentially a large number of laterals within reservoirs. IC-Ferst is a conservative and consistent, control-volume finite element method (CV-FEM) model and fully unstructured/geology conforming meshes with anisotropic mesh adaptivity. As far as the wells are concerned, a multi-phase/multi-well approach, where well systems are represented as phases, is taken here. Phase volume fraction conservation equations are solved for in both the reservoir and the wells, in addition, the field within wells is also solved for. A second novel aspect of the work is the combination of modelling and resolving of the motherbore and laterals. In this case wells do not have to be explicitly discretised in space. This combination proves to be accurate (in many situations) as well as computationally efficient. The method is applied to a number of multi-phase reservoir problems in order to gain an insight into the effectiveness, in terms of production rate, of perforated laterals. Model results are compared with semi-analytical solutions for simple cases and industry-standard codes for more complicated cases. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  19. The role of computational fluid dynamics in aeronautical engineering (5). Improvements and applications of implicit TVD finite volume code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Eiji; Yoshida, Kenji; Amano, Kanichi

    1987-11-01

    An automatic grid generator for multiple element airfoils was developed and the existing implicit Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) finite volume code was improved in both accuracy and efficiency, in order to make the Navier-Stokes solver a practical design tool for high lift devices. Utilizing these codes, Navier-Stokes analysis of the single slotted flap was carried out. The automatic grid generator utilizes the elliptic equation solver using the finite difference method combined with the panel method. The flow field is divided into subregions by the dividing stream lines which are calculated by the panel method and the computational grid in each subregion is generated by solving the elliptic equations (Thompson's method). Since the panel method can solve the potential flow around any number of arbitrary shaped bodies, this grid generator can generate a H-type computational grid around such bodies automatically. To obtain a high accuracy on a rapidly stretching grid, the flow solver uses the TVD formulation containing an explicit treatment of nonuniform grid spacing. Converging rate and numerical stability of the flow solver is augmented by the relaxation approach using Symmetric Point Gauss Seidel method in matrix inversion process which is necessary for an implicit scheme.

  20. A Study of the Transient Response of Duct Junctions: Measurements and Gas-Dynamic Modeling with a Staggered Mesh Finite Volume Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J. Torregrosa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Duct junctions play a major role in the operation and design of most piping systems. The objective of this paper is to establish the potential of a staggered mesh finite volume model as a way to improve the description of the effect of simple duct junctions on an otherwise one-dimensional flow system, such as the intake or exhaust of an internal combustion engine. Specific experiments have been performed in which different junctions have been characterized as a multi-port, and that have provided precise and reliable results on the propagation of pressure pulses across junctions. The results obtained have been compared to simulations performed with a staggered mesh finite volume method with different flux limiters and different meshes and, as a reference, have also been compared with the results of a more conventional pressure loss-based model. The results indicate that the staggered mesh finite volume model provides a closer description of wave dynamics, even if further work is needed to establish the optimal calculation settings.

  1. Finite-difference modeling of Bragg fibers with ultrathin cladding layers via adaptive coordinate transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shyroki, Dzmitry; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    As an alternative to the finite-element analysis or subgridding, coordinate transformation is used to “stretch” the fine-structured cladding of a Bragg fiber, and then the fullvector, equidistant-grid finite-difference computations of the modal structure are performed.......As an alternative to the finite-element analysis or subgridding, coordinate transformation is used to “stretch” the fine-structured cladding of a Bragg fiber, and then the fullvector, equidistant-grid finite-difference computations of the modal structure are performed....

  2. Finite-difference modeling of Bragg fibers with ultrathin cladding layers via adaptive coordinate transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shyroki, Dzmitry; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole;

    As an alternative to the finite-element analysis or subgridding, coordinate transformation is used to “stretch” the fine-structured cladding of a Bragg fiber, and then the fullvector, equidistant-grid finite-difference computations of the modal structure are performed.......As an alternative to the finite-element analysis or subgridding, coordinate transformation is used to “stretch” the fine-structured cladding of a Bragg fiber, and then the fullvector, equidistant-grid finite-difference computations of the modal structure are performed....

  3. On the accuracy and efficiency of finite difference solutions for nonlinear waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Harry B.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the relative accuracy and efficiency of low- and high-order finite difference discretizations of the exact potential flow problem for nonlinear water waves. The continuous differential operators are replaced by arbitrary order finite difference schemes on a structured but non...

  4. Implementation of Generalized Modes in a 3D Finite Difference Based Seakeeping Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Matilde H.; Amini Afshar, Mostafa; Bingham, Harry B.

    This work is an extension of the finite difference potential flow solver OceanWave3D-Seakeepingdeveloped by Afshar (2014) to include generalized modes. The continuity equation is solvedusing a fourth-order centered finite difference scheme which requires that the entire fluid domainis discretized...

  5. Multiphase flow modelling using non orthogonal collocated finite volumes : application to fluid catalytical cracking and large scale geophysical flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. M.; Nicolas, A. N.

    2003-04-01

    A modeling approach of gas solid flow, taking into account different physical phenomena such as gas turbulence and inter-particle interactions is presented. Moment transport equations are derived for the second order fluctuating velocity tensor which allow to involve practical closures based on single phase turbulence modeling on one hand and kinetic theory of granular media on the other hand. The model is applied to fluid catalytic cracking processes and explosive volcanism. In the industry as well as in the geophysical community, multiphase flows are modeled using a finite volume approach and a multicorrector algorithm in time in order to determine implicitly the pressures, velocities and volume fractions for each phase. Pressures, and velocities are generally determined at mid-half mesh step from each other following the staggered grid approach. This ensures stability and prevents oscillations in pressure. It allows to treat almost all the Reynolds number ranges for all speeds and viscosities. The disadvantages appear when we want to treat more complex geometries or if a generalized curvilinear formulation of the conservation equations is considered. Too many interpolations have to be done and accuracy is then lost. In order to overcome these problems, we use here a similar algorithm in time and a Rhie and Chow interpolation (1983) of the collocated variables and essentially the velocities at the interface. The Rhie and Chow interpolation of the velocities at the finite volume interfaces allows to have no oscillations of the pressure without checkerboard effects and to stabilize all the algorithm. In a first predictor step, fluxes at the interfaces of the finite volumes are then computed using 2nd and 3rd order shock capturing schemes of MUSCL/TVD or Van Leer type, and the orthogonal stress components are treated implicitly while cross viscous/diffusion terms are treated explicitly. Pentadiagonal linear systems are solved in each geometrical direction (the so

  6. The Dirac Equation in the algebraic approximation. VII. A comparison of molecular finite difference and finite basis set calculations using distributed Gaussian basis sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiney, H. M.; Glushkov, V. N.; Wilson, S.; Sabin,; Brandas, E

    2001-01-01

    A comparison is made of the accuracy achieved in finite difference and finite basis set approximations to the Dirac equation for the ground state of the hydrogen molecular ion. The finite basis set calculations are carried out using a distributed basis set of Gaussian functions the exponents and pos

  7. The Dirac Equation in the algebraic approximation. VII. A comparison of molecular finite difference and finite basis set calculations using distributed Gaussian basis sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiney, H. M.; Glushkov, V. N.; Wilson, S.; Sabin,; Brandas, E

    2001-01-01

    A comparison is made of the accuracy achieved in finite difference and finite basis set approximations to the Dirac equation for the ground state of the hydrogen molecular ion. The finite basis set calculations are carried out using a distributed basis set of Gaussian functions the exponents and

  8. An investigation of the accuracy of finite difference methods in the solution of linear elasticity problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The accuracy of the finite difference method in the solution of linear elasticity problems that involve either a stress discontinuity or a stress singularity is considered. Solutions to three elasticity problems are discussed in detail: a semi-infinite plane subjected to a uniform load over a portion of its boundary; a bimetallic plate under uniform tensile stress; and a long, midplane symmetric, fiber reinforced laminate subjected to uniform axial strain. Finite difference solutions to the three problems are compared with finite element solutions to corresponding problems. For the first problem a comparison with the exact solution is also made. The finite difference formulations for the three problems are based on second order finite difference formulas that provide for variable spacings in two perpendicular directions. Forward and backward difference formulas are used near boundaries where their use eliminates the need for fictitious grid points.

  9. Finite difference modeling of sinking stage curved beam based on revised Vlasov equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 朱真才; 沈刚; 曹国华

    2015-01-01

    For the static analysis of the sinking stage curved beam, a finite difference model was presented based on the proposed revised Vlasov equations. First, revised Vlasov equations for thin-walled curved beams with closed sections were deduced considering the shear strain on the mid-surface of the cross-section. Then, the finite difference formulation of revised Vlasov equations was implemented with the parabolic interpolation based on Taylor series. At last, the finite difference model was built by substituting geometry and boundary conditions of the sinking stage curved beam into the finite difference formulation. The validity of present work is confirmed by the published literature and ANSYS simulation results. It can be concluded that revised Vlasov equations are more accurate than the original one in the analysis of thin-walled beams with closed sections, and that present finite difference model is applicable in the evaluation of the sinking stage curved beam.

  10. High order sub-cell finite volume schemes for solving hyperbolic conservation laws I: basic formulation and one-dimensional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, JianHua; Ren, YuXin

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a family of sub-cell finite volume schemes for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws is proposed and analyzed in one-dimensional cases. The basic idea of this method is to subdivide a control volume (main cell) into several sub-cells and the finite volume discretization is applied to each of the sub-cells. The averaged values on the sub-cells of current and face neighboring main cells are used to reconstruct the polynomial distributions of the dependent variables. This method can achieve arbitrarily high order of accuracy using a compact stencil. It is similar to the spectral volume method incorporating with PNPM technique but with fundamental differences. An elaborate utilization of these differences overcomes some shortcomings of the spectral volume method and results in a family of accurate and robust schemes for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws. In this paper, the basic formulation of the proposed method is presented. The Fourier analysis is performed to study the properties of the one-dimensional schemes. A WENO limiter based on the secondary reconstruction is constructed.

  11. A study on the optimization of finite volume effects of B K in lattice QCD by using the CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangho; Cho, Kihyeon

    2015-07-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the non-perturbative implementation of field theory to solve the QCD theory of quarks and gluons by using the Feynman path integral approach. We calculate the kaon CP (charge-parity) violation parameter B K generally arising in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. Because lattice simulations are performed on finite volume lattices, the finite volume effects must be considered to exactly estimate the systematic error. The computational cost of numerical simulations may increase dramatically as the lattice spacing is decreased. Therefore, lattice QCD calculations must be optimized to account for the finite volume effects. The methodology used in this study was to develop an algorithm to parallelize the code by using a graphic processing unit (GPU) and to optimize the code to achieve as close to the theoretical peak performance as possible. The results revealed that the calculation speed of the newly-developed algorithm is significantly improved compared with that of the current algorithm for the finite volume effects.

  12. 3D highly heterogeneous thermal model of pineal gland in-vitro study for electromagnetic exposure using finite volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Wei; Hoppe, Ralph; Lu, Rongbo; Cai, Zhaoquan; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the relationship between electromagnetic power absorption and temperature distributions inside highly heterogeneous biological samples was accurately determinated using finite volume method. An in-vitro study on pineal gland that is responsible for physiological activities was for the first time simulated to illustrate effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Applications of a finite-volume algorithm for incompressible MHD problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantieghem, S.; Sheyko, A.; Jackson, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the theory, algorithms and implementation of a parallel finite-volume algorithm for the solution of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations using unstructured grids that are applicable for a wide variety of geometries. Our method implements a mixed Adams-Bashforth/Crank-Nicolson scheme for the nonlinear terms in the MHD equations and we prove that it is stable independent of the time step. To ensure that the solenoidal condition is met for the magnetic field, we use a method whereby a pseudo-pressure is introduced into the induction equation; since we are concerned with incompressible flows, the resulting Poisson equation for the pseudo-pressure is solved alongside the equivalent Poisson problem for the velocity field. We validate our code in a variety of geometries including periodic boxes, spheres, spherical shells, spheroids and ellipsoids; for the finite geometries we implement the so-called ferromagnetic or pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions appropriate for a surrounding medium with infinite magnetic permeability. This implies that the magnetic field must be purely perpendicular to the boundary. We present a number of comparisons against previous results and against analytical solutions, which verify the code's accuracy. This documents the code's reliability as a prelude to its use in more difficult problems. We finally present a new simple drifting solution for thermal convection in a spherical shell that successfully sustains a magnetic field of simple geometry. By dint of its rapid stabilization from the given initial conditions, we deem it suitable as a benchmark against which other self-consistent dynamo codes can be tested.

  14. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  15. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  16. LONG-TIME BEHAVIOR OF FINITE DIFFERENCE SOLUTIONS OF A NONLINEAR SCHRODINGER EQUATION WITH WEAKLY DAMPED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-yong Zhang; Shu-juan Lu

    2001-01-01

    A weakly demped Schrodinger equation possessing a global attractor are considered.The dynamical properties of a class of finite difference scheme are analysed. The exsitence of global attractor is proved for the discrete system. The stability of the difference scheme and the error estimate of the difference solution are obtained in the autonomous system case. Finally, long-time stability and convergence of the class of finite difference scheme also are analysed in the nonautonomous system case.

  17. A Hybrid Solver of Size Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Equation by Domain Decomposition, Finite Element, and Finite Difference

    CERN Document Server

    Ying, Jinyong

    2016-01-01

    The size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE) is one important variant of the popular dielectric model, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE), to reflect ionic size effects in the prediction of electrostatics for a biomolecule in an ionic solvent. In this paper, a new SMPBE hybrid solver is developed using a solution decomposition, the Schwartz's overlapped domain decomposition, finite element, and finite difference. It is then programmed as a software package in C, Fortran, and Python based on the state-of-the-art finite element library DOLFIN from the FEniCS project. This software package is well validated on a Born ball model with analytical solution and a dipole model with a known physical properties. Numerical results on six proteins with different net charges demonstrate its high performance. Finally, this new SMPBE hybrid solver is shown to be numerically stable and convergent in the calculation of electrostatic solvation free energy for 216 biomolecules and binding free energy for a DNA-drug com...

  18. Numerical modeling of wave equation by a truncated high-order finite-difference method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liu; Mrinal K. Sen

    2009-01-01

    Finite-difference methods with high-order accuracy have been utilized to improve the precision of numerical solution for partial differential equations. However, the computation cost generally increases linearly with increased order of accuracy. Upon examination of the finite-difference formulas for the first-order and second-order derivatives, and the staggered finite-difference formulas for the first-order derivative, we examine the variation of finite-difference coefficients with accuracy order and note that there exist some very small coefficients. With the order increasing, the number of these small coefficients increases, however, the values decrease sharply. An error analysis demonstrates that omitting these small coefficients not only maintain approximately the same level of accuracy of finite difference but also reduce computational cost significantly. Moreover, it is easier to truncate for the high-order finite-difference formulas than for the pseudospectral formulas. Thus this study proposes a truncated high-order finite-difference method, and then demonstrates the efficiency and applicability of the method with some numerical examples.

  19. Cell-centered nonlinear finite-volume methods for the heterogeneous anisotropic diffusion problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, Kirill M.; Mallison, Bradley T.; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-02-01

    We present two new cell-centered nonlinear finite-volume methods for the heterogeneous, anisotropic diffusion problem. The schemes split the interfacial flux into harmonic and transversal components. Specifically, linear combinations of the transversal vector and the co-normal are used that lead to significant improvements in terms of the mesh-locking effects. The harmonic component of the flux is represented using a conventional monotone two-point flux approximation; the component along the parameterized direction is treated nonlinearly to satisfy either positivity of the solution as in [29], or the discrete maximum principle as in [9]. In order to make the method purely cell-centered, we derive a homogenization function that allows for seamless interpolation in the presence of heterogeneity following a strategy similar to [46]. The performance of the new schemes is compared with existing multi-point flux approximation methods [3,5]. The robustness of the scheme with respect to the mesh-locking problem is demonstrated using several challenging test cases.

  20. Finite Element Surface Registration Incorporating Curvature, Volume Preservation, and Statistical Model Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models.

  1. Finite volume simulation of 2-D steady square lid driven cavity flow at high reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yapici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, computer simulation results of steady incompressible flow in a 2-D square lid-driven cavity up to Reynolds number (Re 65000 are presented and compared with those of earlier studies. The governing flow equations are solved by using the finite volume approach. Quadratic upstream interpolation for convective kinematics (QUICK is used for the approximation of the convective terms in the flow equations. In the implementation of QUICK, the deferred correction technique is adopted. A non-uniform staggered grid arrangement of 768x768 is employed to discretize the flow geometry. Algebraic forms of the coupled flow equations are then solved through the iterative SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equation algorithm. The outlined computational methodology allows one to meet the main objective of this work, which is to address the computational convergence and wiggled flow problems encountered at high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe numbers. Furthermore, after Re > 25000 additional vortexes appear at the bottom left and right corners that have not been observed in earlier studies.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of scalar transport using unstructured finite-volume schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Riccardo

    2009-03-01

    An unstructured finite-volume method for direct and large-eddy simulations of scalar transport in complex geometries is presented and investigated. The numerical technique is based on a three-level fully implicit time advancement scheme and central spatial interpolation operators. The scalar variable at cell faces is obtained by a symmetric central interpolation scheme, which is formally first-order accurate, or by further employing a high-order correction term which leads to formal second-order accuracy irrespective of the underlying grid. In this framework, deferred-correction and slope-limiter techniques are introduced in order to avoid numerical instabilities in the resulting algebraic transport equation. The accuracy and robustness of the code are initially evaluated by means of basic numerical experiments where the flow field is assigned a priori. A direct numerical simulation of turbulent scalar transport in a channel flow is finally performed to validate the numerical technique against a numerical dataset established by a spectral method. In spite of the linear character of the scalar transport equation, the computed statistics and spectra of the scalar field are found to be significantly affected by the spectral-properties of interpolation schemes. Although the results show an improved spectral-resolution and greater spatial-accuracy for the high-order operator in the analysis of basic scalar transport problems, the low-order central scheme is found superior for high-fidelity simulations of turbulent scalar transport.

  3. Numerical treatment of wave breaking on unstructured finite volume approximations for extended Boussinesq-type equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazolea, M.; Delis, A. I.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2014-08-01

    A new methodology is presented to handle wave breaking over complex bathymetries in extended two-dimensional Boussinesq-type (BT) models which are solved by an unstructured well-balanced finite volume (FV) scheme. The numerical model solves the 2D extended BT equations proposed by Nwogu (1993), recast in conservation law form with a hyperbolic flux identical to that of the Non-linear Shallow Water (NSW) equations. Certain criteria, along with their proper implementation, are established to characterize breaking waves. Once breaking waves are recognized, we switch locally in the computational domain from the BT to NSW equations by suppressing the dispersive terms in the vicinity of the wave fronts. Thus, the shock-capturing features of the FV scheme enable an intrinsic representation of the breaking waves, which are handled as shocks by the NSW equations. An additional methodology is presented on how to perform a stable switching between the BT and NSW equations within the unstructured FV framework. Extensive validations are presented, demonstrating the performance of the proposed wave breaking treatment, along with some comparisons with other well-established wave breaking mechanisms that have been proposed for BT models.

  4. ADER-WENO finite volume schemes with space-time adaptive mesh refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbser, Michael; Zanotti, Olindo; Hidalgo, Arturo; Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2013-09-01

    We present the first high order one-step ADER-WENO finite volume scheme with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in multiple space dimensions. High order spatial accuracy is obtained through a WENO reconstruction, while a high order one-step time discretization is achieved using a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method. Due to the one-step nature of the underlying scheme, the resulting algorithm is particularly well suited for an AMR strategy on space-time adaptive meshes, i.e. with time-accurate local time stepping. The AMR property has been implemented 'cell-by-cell', with a standard tree-type algorithm, while the scheme has been parallelized via the message passing interface (MPI) paradigm. The new scheme has been tested over a wide range of examples for nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws, including the classical Euler equations of compressible gas dynamics and the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). High order in space and time have been confirmed via a numerical convergence study and a detailed analysis of the computational speed-up with respect to highly refined uniform meshes is also presented. We also show test problems where the presented high order AMR scheme behaves clearly better than traditional second order AMR methods. The proposed scheme that combines for the first time high order ADER methods with space-time adaptive grids in two and three space dimensions is likely to become a useful tool in several fields of computational physics, applied mathematics and mechanics.

  5. ADER-WENO Finite Volume Schemes with Space-Time Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Dumbser, Michael; Hidalgo, Arturo; Balsara, Dinshaw S

    2012-01-01

    We present the first high order one-step ADER-WENO finite volume scheme with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in multiple space dimensions. High order spatial accuracy is obtained through a WENO reconstruction, while a high order one-step time discretization is achieved using a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method. Due to the one-step nature of the underlying scheme, the resulting algorithm is particularly well suited for an AMR strategy on space-time adaptive meshes, i.e.with time-accurate local time stepping. The AMR property has been implemented 'cell-by-cell', with a standard tree-type algorithm, while the scheme has been parallelized via the Message Passing Interface (MPI) paradigm. The new scheme has been tested over a wide range of examples for nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws, including the classical Euler equations of compressible gas dynamics and the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). High order in space and time have been confirmed via a numerical convergenc...

  6. Latest Developments With the Cubed-Sphere Finite-Volume Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, W. M.; Lin, S.

    2008-12-01

    The hydrostatic finite-volume (FV) dycore [Lin (2004)] has been implemented on the cubed-sphere geometry [Putman and Lin (2007)]. This implementation was intended to address the scalability limitations of the original FV dycore developed for the latitude-longitude grid. The improved parallelism of the cubed-sphere dynamical core has poised the FV dycore to efficiently address high-resolution climate, weather and data- assimilation problems on today's emerging peta-scale computing platforms. In addition, the FV dycore has been extended to the fully compressible non-hydrostatic flow (essentially the un-approximated Euler equations on the sphere) [Lin (2008)]. We will provide an overview of the current state of development, and implementation within parent models at NOAA/GFDL and NASA/GMAO, including shared use of modeling frameworks including the Flexible Modeling System (FMS) at NOAA and the Earth System Modeling Framework at NASA. Further science enhancements to the FV dycore will be discussed, including high-order scale selective explicit diffusion options and vertical remapping options from the floating Lagrangian to Eulerian reference coordinates. Results will be based on idealized baroclinic tests, aqua-planet and AMIP simulations.

  7. Finite-Volume Partially-Quenched Two-Pion Amplitudes in the I=0 Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, C J D; Pallante, E; Sachrajda, Christopher T C; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the finite-volume two-pion matrix elements and correlation functions of the I=0 scalar operator, in full and partially quenched QCD, at one-loop order in chiral perturbation theory. In partially quenched QCD, when the sea and valence light quark masses are not equal, the lack of unitarity leads to the same inconsistencies as in quenched QCD and the matrix elements cannot be determined. It is possible, however, to overcome this problem by requiring the masses of the valence and sea quarks to be equal for the u and d quarks while keeping the strange quark (s) quenched (or partially quenched), but only in the kinematic region where the two-pion energy is below the two-kaon threshold. Although our results are obtained at NLO in chiral perturbation theory, they are more general and are also valid for non-leptonic kaon decays (we also study the matrix elements of (8,1) operators, such as the QCD penguin operator Q6). We point out that even in full QCD, where any problems caused by the lack of ...

  8. Correlators of left charges and weak operators in finite volume chiral perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Pilar; Laine, Mikko

    2003-01-01

    We compute the two-point correlator between left-handed flavour charges, and the three-point correlator between two left-handed charges and one strangeness violating DeltaI = 3/2 weak operator, at next-to-leading order in finite volume SU(3)L × SU(3)R chiral perturbation theory, in the so-called epsilon-regime. Matching these results with the corresponding lattice measurements would in principle allow to extract the pion decay constant F, and the effective chiral theory parameter g27, which determines the Delta I = 3/2 amplitude of the weak decays K to pipi as well as the kaon mixing parameter BK in the chiral limit. We repeat the calculations in the replica formulation of quenched chiral perturbation theory, finding only mild modifications. In particular, a properly chosen ratio of the three-point and two-point functions is shown to be identical in the full and quenched theories at this order.

  9. Adjoint complement to viscous finite-volume pressure-correction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stück, Arthur; Rung, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    A hybrid-adjoint Navier-Stokes method for the pressure-based computation of hydrodynamic objective functional derivatives with respect to the shape is systematically derived in three steps: The underlying adjoint partial differential equations and boundary conditions for the frozen-turbulence Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are considered in the first step. In step two, the adjoint discretisation is developed from the primal, unstructured finite-volume discretisation, such that adjoint-consistent approximations to the adjoint partial differential equations are obtained following a so-called hybrid-adjoint approach. A unified, discrete boundary description is outlined that supports high- and low-Reynolds number turbulent wall-boundary treatments for both the adjoint boundary condition and the boundary-based gradient formula. The third component focused in the development of the industrial adjoint CFD method is the adjoint counterpart to the primal pressure-correction algorithm. The approach is verified against the direct-differentiation method and an application to internal flow problems is presented.

  10. Modified electrochemical parameter estimation of NCR18650BD battery using implicit finite volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, T. R.; McGordon, A.; Widanage, W. D.; Jennings, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    The Pseudo Two Dimensional (P2D) porous electrode model is less preferred for real time calculations due to the high computational expense and complexity in obtaining the wide range of electro-chemical parameters despite of its superior accuracy. This paper presents a finite volume based method for re-parametrising the P2D model for any cell chemistry with uncertainty in determining precise electrochemical parameters. The re-parametrisation is achieved by solving a quadratic form of the Butler-Volmer equation and modifying the anode open circuit voltage based on experimental values. Thus the only experimental result, needed to re-parametrise the cell, reduces to the measurement of discharge voltage for any C-rate. The proposed method is validated against the 1C discharge data and an actual drive cycle of a NCR18650BD battery with NCA chemistry when driving in an urban environment with frequent accelerations and regenerative braking events. The error limit of the present model is compared with the electro-chemical prediction of LiyCoO2 battery and found to be superior to the accuracy of the model presented in the literature.

  11. Analysis of triangular C-grid finite volume scheme for shallow water flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhani, Hamidreza; Mohammadian, Abdolmajid; Seidou, Ousmane; Qiblawey, Hazim

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a dispersion relation analysis is employed to investigate the finite volume triangular C-grid formulation for two-dimensional shallow-water equations. In addition, two proposed combinations of time-stepping methods with the C-grid spatial discretization are investigated. In the first part of this study, the C-grid spatial discretization scheme is assessed, and in the second part, fully discrete schemes are analyzed. Analysis of the semi-discretized scheme (i.e. only spatial discretization) shows that there is no damping associated with the spatial C-grid scheme, and its phase speed behavior is also acceptable for long and intermediate waves. The analytical dispersion analysis after considering the effect of time discretization shows that the Leap-Frog time stepping technique can improve the phase speed behavior of the numerical method; however it could not damp the shorter decelerated waves. The Adams-Bashforth technique leads to slower propagation of short and intermediate waves and it damps those waves with a slower propagating speed. The numerical solutions of various test problems also conform and are in good agreement with the analytical dispersion analysis. They also indicate that the Adams-Bashforth scheme exhibits faster convergence and more accurate results, respectively, when the spatial and temporal step size decreases. However, the Leap-Frog scheme is more stable with higher CFL numbers.

  12. Finite volume method in 3-D curvilinear coordinates with multiblocking procedure for radiative transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, P.; Steven, M.; Issendorff, F.V.; Trimis, D. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics (LSTM), University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstrasse 4, D 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    The finite volume method of radiation is implemented for complex 3-D problems in order to use it for combined heat transfer problems in connection with CFD codes. The method is applied for a 3-D block structured grid in a radiatively participating medium. The method is implemented in non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates so that it can handle irregular structure with a body-fitted structured grid. The multiblocking is performed with overlapping blocks to exchange the information between the blocks. Five test problems are considered in this work. In the first problem, present work is validated with the results of the literature. To check the accuracy of multiblocking, a single block is divided into four blocks and results are validated against the results of the single block simulated alone in the second problem. Complicated geometries are considered to show the applicability of the present procedure in the last three problems. Both radiative and non-radiative equilibrium situations are considered along with an absorbing, emitting and scattering medium. (author)

  13. Aerodynamic Noise Propagation Simulation using Immersed Boundary Method and Finite Volume Optimized Prefactored Compact Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LIU; Keqi WU

    2008-01-01

    Based on the immersed boundary method (IBM) and the finite volume optimized pre-factored compact (FVOPC) scheme, a numerical simulation of noise propagation inside and outside the casing of a cross flow fan is estab-lished. The unsteady linearized Euler equations are solved to directly simulate the aero-acoustic field. In order to validate the FVOPC scheme, a simulation case: one dimensional linear wave propagation problem is carried out using FVOPC scheme, DRP scheme and HOC scheme. The result of FVOPC is in good agreement with the ana-lytic solution and it is better than the results of DRP and HOC schemes, the FVOPC is less dispersion and dissi-pation than DRP and HOC schemes. Then, numerical simulation of noise propagation problems is performed. The noise field of 36 compact rotating noise sources is obtained with the rotating velocity of 1000r/min. The PML absorbing boundary condition is applied to the sound far field boundary condition for depressing the numerical reflection. Wall boundary condition is applied to the casing. The results show that there are reflections on the casing wall and sound wave interference in the field. The FVOPC with the IBM is suitable for noise propagation problems under the complex geometries for depressing the dispersion and dissipation, and also keeping the high order precision.

  14. Study on fluid-structure interaction in liquid oxygen feeding pipe systems using finite volume method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Wei; Bing Sun

    2011-01-01

    The fluid-structure interaction may occur in space launch vehicles,which would lead to bad performance of vehicles,damage equipments on vehicles,or even affect astronauts' health.In this paper,analysis on dynamic behavior of liquid oxygen (LOX) feeding pipe system in a large scale launch vehicle is performed,with the effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) taken into consideration.The pipe system is simplified as a planar FSI model with Poisson coupling and junction coupling.Numerical tests on pipes between the tank and the pump are solved by the finite volume method.Results show that restrictions weaken the interaction between axial and lateral vibrations.The reasonable results regarding frequencies and modes indicate that the FSI affects substantially the dynamic analysis,and thus highlight the usefulness of the proposed model.This study would provide a reference to the pipe test,as well as facilitate further studies on oscillation suppression.

  15. NUMERICAL RESEARCH ON WATER GUIDE BEARING OF HYDRO-GENERATOR UNIT USING FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the consideration of the geometry of tilting pad journal bearing, a new form of the Reynolds equation was derived in this article. The film thickness, the squeeze motion of the journal and the rotation motion of the pad were explicitly contained in the equation. Based on this equation, together with the equilibrium equation of pad pivot, the water guide bearing used in the Gezhouba 10 F hydro-generator unit was numerically researched. The new Reynolds equation for the lubricating film was solved using Finite Volume (FV) discretization, Successive Over-Relaxation (SOR) iteration method and C++ code are included. According to the numerical solution, and the stability of the film and the influences of the film thickness, the journal squeeze effect and the pad rotation effect on film force were discussed. The results indicate that the squeeze effect can not be neglected, although the rotation effect is negligible for both low-speed and high-speed bearings, so the computing time could be greatly reduced.

  16. Blast load estimation using Finite Volume Method and linear heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidner Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view of people and building security one of the main destroying factor is the blast load. Rational estimating of its results should be preceded with knowledge of complex wave field distribution in time and space. As a result one can estimate the blast load distribution in time. In considered conditions, the values of blast load are estimating using the empirical functions of overpressure distribution in time (Δp(t. The Δp(t functions are monotonic and are the approximation of reality. The distributions of these functions are often linearized due to simplifying of estimating the blast reaction of elements. The article presents a method of numerical analysis of the phenomenon of the air shock wave propagation. The main scope of this paper is getting the ability to make more realistic the Δp(t functions. An explicit own solution using Finite Volume Method was used. This method considers changes in energy due to heat transfer with conservation of linear heat transfer. For validation, the results of numerical analysis were compared with the literature reports. Values of impulse, pressure, and its duration were studied.

  17. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of a fuel rod by finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Rhayanne Y.N.; Silva, Mario A.B. da; Lira, Carlos A.B. de O., E-mail: ryncosta@gmail.com, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamaento de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In a nuclear reactor, the amount of power generation is limited by thermal and physic limitations rather than by nuclear parameters. The operation of a reactor core, considering the best heat removal system, must take into account the fact that the temperatures of fuel and cladding shall not exceed safety limits anywhere in the core. If such considerations are not considered, damages in the fuel element may release huge quantities of radioactive materials in the coolant or even core meltdown. Thermal analyses for fuel rods are often accomplished by considering one-dimensional heat diffusion equation. The aim of this study is to develop the first paper to verify the temperature distribution for a two-dimensional heat transfer problem in an advanced reactor. The methodology is based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM), which considers a balance for the property of interest. The validation for such methodology is made by comparing numerical and analytical solutions. For the two-dimensional analysis, the results indicate that the temperature profile agree with expected physical considerations, providing quantitative information for the development of advanced reactors. (author)

  18. Development of a finite element firn densification model for converting volume changes to mass changes

    CERN Document Server

    Cummings, Evan; Brinkerhoff, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In regions where ice sheets are increasing in mass, there is a 50-200 m layer of old snow called firn which does not melt in the summer months. The density of firn tracks the transformation of snow into glacial ice at approximately 917 kg m^-3. The process of firn densification is important in at least two ways: 1) it can be a dominant component in the observed rate of change of the surface elevation, and 2) storage of liquid water in the lower density firn layer is now considered a critical component in the mass balance of ice sheets. If the rate of change of surface elevation can be equated with the rate of change in the mass of the ice sheet, we would have an excellent means of monitoring ice sheet mass balance. However, knowledge of firn densification rates is needed to make the inference of mass rate of change from volume rate of change. Several firn models have been created for areas without melt. We have reformulated these models with the finite-element software package FEniCS and integrated them with ...

  19. A New Efficient Finite Volume Modeling of Small Amplitude Free Surface Flows with Unstructured Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Biao

    2013-01-01

    A staggered finite-volume technique for non-hydrostatic,small amplitude free surface flow governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented there is a proper balance between accuracy and computing time.The advection and horizontal diffusion terms in the momentum equation are discretized by an integral interpolation method on the orthogonal unstructured staggered mesh and,while it has the attractive property of being conservative.The pressure-correction algorithm is employed for the non-hydrostatic pressure in order to achieve second-order temporal accuracy.A conservative scalar transport algorithm is also applied to discretize k-ε equations in this model.The eddy viscosity is calculated from the k-ε turbulent model.The resulting model is mass and momentum conservative.The model is verified by two examples to simulate unsteady small amplitude free surface flows where non-hydrostatic pressures have a considerable effect on the velocity field,and then applied to simulate the tidal flow in the Bohai Sea.

  20. A hybrid vertex-centered finite volume/element method for viscous incompressible flows on non-staggered unstructured meshes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gao; Ru-Xun Liu; Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid vertex-centered finite volume/finite element method for sol ution of the two dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids.An incremental pressure fractional step method is adopted to handle the velocity-pressure coupling.The velocity and the pressure are collocated at the node of the vertex-centered control volume which is formed by joining the centroid of cells sharing the common vertex.For the temporal integration of the momentum equations,an implicit second-order scheme is utilized to enhance the computational stability and eliminate the time step limit due to the diffusion term.The momentum equations are discretized by the vertex-centered finite volume method (FVM) and the pressure Poisson equation is solved by the Galerkin finite element method (FEM).The momentum interpolation is used to damp out the spurious pressure wiggles.The test case with analytical solutions demonstrates second-order accuracy of the current hybrid scheme in time and space for both velocity and pressure.The classic test cases,the lid-driven cavity flow,the skew cavity flow and the backward-facing step flow,show that numerical results are in good agreement with the published benchmark solutions.

  1. Hybrid finite volume scheme for a two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenner Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a finite volume method on general meshes for the numerical simulation of an incompressible and immiscible two-phase flow in porous media. We consider the case that can be written as a coupled system involving a degenerate parabolic convection-diffusion equation for the saturation together with a uniformly elliptic equation for the global pressure. The numerical scheme, which is implicit in time, allows computations in the case of a heterogeneous and anisotropic permeability tensor. The convective fluxes, which are non monotone with respect to the unknown saturation and discontinuous with respect to the space variables, are discretized by means of a special Godunov scheme. We prove the existence of a discrete solution which converges, along a subsequence, to a solution of the continuous problem. We present a number of numerical results in space dimension two, which confirm the efficiency of the numerical method. Nous proposons un schéma de volumes finis hybrides pour la discrétisation d’un problème d’écoulement diphasique incompressible et immiscible en milieu poreux. On suppose que ce problème a la forme d’une équation parabolique dégénérée de convection-diffusion en saturation couplée à une équation uniformément elliptique en pression. On considère un schéma implicite en temps, où les flux diffusifs sont discrétisés par la méthode des volumes finis hybride, ce qui permet de pouvoir traiter le cas d’un tenseur de perméabilité anisotrope et hétérogène sur un maillage très général, et l’on s’appuie sur un schéma de Godunov pour la discrétisation des flux convectifs, qui peuvent être non monotones et discontinus par rapport aux variables spatiales. On démontre l’existence d’une solution discrète, dont une sous-suite converge vers une solution faible du problème continu. On présente finalement des cas test bidimensionnels.

  2. The $KD$, $\\eta D_s$ interaction in finite volume and the $D_{s^* 0}(2317)$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, A Martínez; Koren, C; Jido, D; Oset, E

    2011-01-01

    An SU(4) extrapolation of the chiral unitary theory in coupled channels done to study the scalar mesons in the charm sector is extended to produce results in finite volume. The theory in the infinite volume produces dynamically the $D_{s^*0}(2317)$ resonance by means of the coupled channels $KD$, $\\eta D_s$. Energy levels in the finite box are evaluated and, assuming that they would correspond to lattice results, the inverse problem of determining the bound states and phase shifts in the infinite volume from the lattice data is solved. We observe that it is possible to obtain accurate $KD$ phase shifts and the position of the $D_{s^*0}(2317)$ state, but it requires the explicit consideration of the two coupled channels in the analysis if one goes close to the $\\eta D_s$ threshold. We also show that a careful analysis of the finite volume data can shed some light on the nature of the $D_{s^*0}(2317)$ resonance as a $KD$ molecule or otherwise.

  3. a Finite Difference Numerical Model for the Propagation of Finite Amplitude Acoustical Blast Waves Outdoors Over Hard and Porous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Victor Ward

    1990-01-01

    This study has concerned the propagation of finite amplitude, i.e. weakly non-linear, acoustical blast waves from explosions over hard and porous media models of outdoor ground surfaces. The nonlinear acoustic propagation effects require a numerical solution in the time domain. To model a porous ground surface, which in the frequency domain exhibits a finite impedance, the linear phenomenological porous model of Morse and Ingard was used. The phenomenological equations are solved in the time domain for coupling with the time domain propagation solution in the air. The numerical solution is found through the method of finite differences. The second-order in time and fourth -order in space MacCormack method was used in the air, and the second-order in time and space MacCormack method was used in the porous medium modeling the ground. Two kinds of numerical absorbing boundary conditions were developed for the air propagation equations to truncate the physical domain for solution on a computer. Radiation conditions first were used on those sides of the domain where there were outgoing waves. Characteristic boundary conditions secondly are employed near the acoustic source. The numerical model agreed well with the Pestorius algorithm for the propagation of electric spark pulses in the free field, and with a result of Pfriem for normal plane reflection off a hard surface. In addition, curves of pressure amplification versus incident angle for waves obliquely incident on the hard and porous surfaces were produced which are similar to those in the literature. The model predicted that near grazing finite amplitude acoustic blast waves decay with distance over hard surfaces as r to the power -1.2. This result is consistent with the work of Reed. For propagation over the porous ground surface, the model predicted that this surface decreased the decay rate with distance for the larger blasts compared to the rate expected in the linear acoustics limit.

  4. Vibration analysis of rotating turbomachinery blades by an improved finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of calculating the natural frequencies and mode shapes of rotating blades is solved by an improved finite difference procedure based on second-order central differences. Lead-lag, flapping and coupled bending-torsional vibration cases of untwisted blades are considered. Results obtained by using the present improved theory have been observed to be close lower bound solutions. The convergence has been found to be rapid in comparison with the classical first-order finite difference method. While the computational space and time required by the present approach is observed to be almost the same as that required by the first-order theory for a given mesh size, accuracies of practical interest can be obtained by using the improved finite difference procedure with a relatively smaller matrix size, in contrast to the classical finite difference procedure which requires either a larger matrix or an extrapolation procedure for improvement in accuracy.

  5. Finite-number-of-periods holographic gratings with finite-width incident beams: analysis using the finite-difference frequency-domain method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shun-Der; Glytsis, Elias N.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of finite number of periods (FNP) and finite incident beams on the diffraction efficiencies of holographic gratings are investigated by the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method. Gratings comprising 20, 15, 10, 5, and 3 periods illuminated by TE and TM incident light with various beam sizes are analyzed with the FDFD method and compared with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Both unslanted and slanted gratings are treated in transmission as well as in reflection configurations. In general, the effect of the FNP is a decrease in the diffraction efficiency with a decrease in the number of periods of the grating. Similarly, a decrease in incident-beam width causes a decrease in the diffraction efficiency. Exceptions appear in off-Bragg incidence in which a smaller beam width could result in higher diffraction efficiency. For beam widths greater than 10 grating periods and for gratings with more than 20 periods in width, the diffraction efficiencies slowly converge to the values predicted by the RCWA (infinite incident beam and infinite-number-of-periods grating) for both TE and TM polarizations. Furthermore, the effects of FNP holographic gratings on their diffraction performance are found to be comparable to their counterparts of FNP surface-relief gratings. 2002 Optical Society of America

  6. Application of a novel finite difference method to dynamic crack problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. M.; Wilkins, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A versatile finite difference method (HEMP and HEMP 3D computer programs) was developed originally for solving dynamic problems in continuum mechanics. It was extended to analyze the stress field around cracks in a solid with finite geometry subjected to dynamic loads and to simulate numerically the dynamic fracture phenomena with success. This method is an explicit finite difference method applied to the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of continuum mechanics in two and three space dimensions and time. The calculational grid moves with the material and in this way it gives a more detailed description of the physics of the problem than the Eulerian formulation.

  7. Construction of stable explicit finite-difference schemes for Schroedinger type differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    A family of conditionally stable, forward Euler finite difference equations can be constructed for the simplest equation of Schroedinger type, namely u sub t - iu sub xx. Generalization of this result to physically realistic Schroedinger type equations is presented.

  8. Finite-difference scheme for the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Ramadhani, Issa

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for numerical integration of the Schroedinger equation is constructed. Asymptotically (r goes to infinity), the method gives the exact solution correct to terms of order r exp -2.

  9. AN ACCURATE SOLUTION OF THE POISSON EQUATION BY THE FINITE DIFFERENCE-CHEBYSHEV-TAU METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hani I. Siyyam

    2001-01-01

    A new finite difference-Chebyshev-Tau method for the solution of the twodimensional Poisson equation is presented. Some of the numerical results are also presented which indicate that the method is satisfactory and compatible to other methods.

  10. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svyatskiy, Daniil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bertolazzi, Enrico [Univ. of Trento (Italy); Frego, Marco [Univ. of Trento (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  11. A FINITE DIFFERENCE SCHEME FOR THE GENERALIZED NONLINEAR SCHRODINGER EQUATION WITH VARIABLE COEFFICIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-zhong Dai; Raja Nassar

    2000-01-01

    A finite difference scheme for the generalized nonlinear Schrodinger equation with variable coefficients is developed. The scheme is shown to satisfy two conser vation laws. Numerical results show that the scheme is accurate and efficient.

  12. Finite difference methods for option pricing under Lévy processes: Wiener-Hopf factorization approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kudryavtsev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the problem of pricing options in wide classes of Lévy processes. We propose a general approach to the numerical methods based on a finite difference approximation for the generalized Black-Scholes equation...

  13. Combination of the discontinuous Galerkin method with finite differences for simulation of seismic wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisitsa, Vadim, E-mail: lisitsavv@ipgg.sbras.ru [Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tcheverda, Vladimir [Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kazakh–British Technical University, Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan); Botter, Charlotte [University of Stavanger (Norway)

    2016-04-15

    We present an algorithm for the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation in models with a complex near surface part and free surface topography. The approach is based on the combination of finite differences with the discontinuous Galerkin method. The discontinuous Galerkin method can be used on polyhedral meshes; thus, it is easy to handle the complex surfaces in the models. However, this approach is computationally intense in comparison with finite differences. Finite differences are computationally efficient, but in general, they require rectangular grids, leading to the stair-step approximation of the interfaces, which causes strong diffraction of the wavefield. In this research we present a hybrid algorithm where the discontinuous Galerkin method is used in a relatively small upper part of the model and finite differences are applied to the main part of the model.

  14. Implicit Finite Volume and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Multicomponent Flow in Unstructured 3D Fractured Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat, Joachim; Soltanian, Mohamad Reza

    2016-01-01

    We present a new implicit higher-order finite element (FE) approach to efficiently model compressible multicomponent fluid flow on unstructured grids and in fractured porous subsurface formations. The scheme is sequential implicit: pressures and fluxes are updated with an implicit Mixed Hybrid Finite Element (MHFE) method, and the transport of each species is approximated with an implicit second-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) FE method. Discrete fractures are incorporated with a cross-flow equilibrium approach. This is the first investigation of all-implicit higher-order MHFE-DG for unstructured triangular, quadrilateral (2D), and hexahedral (3D) grids and discrete fractures. A lowest-order implicit finite volume (FV) transport update is also developed for the same grid types. The implicit methods are compared to an Implicit-Pressure-Explicit-Composition (IMPEC) scheme. For fractured domains, the unconditionally stable implicit transport update is shown to increase computational efficiency by orders of mag...

  15. ONE-DIMENSIONAL GAS DYNAMICS PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTION BASED ON HIGH-RESOLUTION FINITE DIFFERENCE SCHEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional unsteady gas dynamics problems are revealing tests for the accuracy estimation of numerical solution with respect to simulation of supersonic flows of inviscid compressible gas. Numerical solution of Euler equations describing flows of inviscid compressible gas and conceding continuous and discontinuous solutions is considered. Discretization of Euler equations is based on finite volume method and WENO finite difference schemes. The numerical solutions computed are compared with the exact solution of Riemann problem. Monotonic correction of derivatives makes possible avoiding new extremes and ensures monotonicity of the numerical solution near the discontinuity, but it leads to the smoothness of the existing minimums and maximums and to the accuracy loss. Calculations with the use of WENO schemes give the possibility for obtaining accurate and monotonic solution with the presence of weak and strong gas dynamical discontinuities.

  16. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menart, James A. [Wright State University

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ?Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.? The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump

  17. Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A Menart, Professor

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems. The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The

  18. SH-wave propagation in the whole mantle using high-order finite differences

    OpenAIRE

    H. Igel; Michael Weber;  

    1995-01-01

    Finite-difference approximations to the wave equation in spherical coordinates are used to calculate synthetic seismograms for global Earth models. High-order finite-difference (FD) schemes were employed to obtain accurate waveforms and arrival times. Application to SH-wave propagation in the mantle shows that multiple reflections from the core-mantle boundary (CMB), with travel times of about one hour, can be modeled successfully. FD techniques, which are applicable in generally heterogeneou...

  19. Semi-discrete finite difference multiscale scheme for a concrete corrosion model: approximation estimates and convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Chalupecký, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    We propose a semi-discrete finite difference multiscale scheme for a concrete corrosion model consisting of a system of two-scale reaction-diffusion equations coupled with an ode. We prove energy and regularity estimates and use them to get the necessary compactness of the approximation estimates. Finally, we illustrate numerically the behavior of the two-scale finite difference approximation of the weak solution.

  20. Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Method for Advection-Diffusion Equations Subject to Heterogeneous Reactive Boundary Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-10-13

    We present a hybrid scheme for the coupling of macro and microscale continuum models for reactive contaminant transport in fractured and porous media. The transport model considered is the advection-dispersion equation, subject to linear heterogeneous reactive boundary conditions. The Multiscale Finite Volume method (MsFV) is employed to define an approximation to the microscale concentration field defined in terms of macroscopic or \\emph{global} degrees of freedom, together with local interpolator and corrector functions capturing microscopic spatial variability. The macroscopic mass balance relations for the MsFV global degrees of freedom are coupled with the macroscopic model, resulting in a global problem for the simultaneous time-stepping of all macroscopic degrees of freedom throughout the domain. In order to perform the hybrid coupling, the micro and macroscale models are applied over overlapping subdomains of the simulation domain, with the overlap denoted as the handshake subdomain $\\Omega^{hs}$, over which continuity of concentration and transport fluxes between models is enforced. Continuity of concentration is enforced by posing a restriction relation between models over $\\Omega^{hs}$. Continuity of fluxes is enforced by prolongating the macroscopic model fluxes across the boundary of $\\Omega^{hs}$ to microscopic resolution. The microscopic interpolator and corrector functions are solutions to local microscopic advection-diffusion problems decoupled from the global degrees of freedom and from each other by virtue of the MsFV decoupling ansatz. The error introduced by the decoupling ansatz is reduced iteratively by the preconditioned GMRES algorithm, with the hybrid MsFV operator serving as the preconditioner.

  1. Hybrid finite-volume/transported PDF method for the simulation of turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Venkatramanan

    A novel computational scheme is formulated for simulating turbulent reactive flows in complex geometries with detailed chemical kinetics. A Probability Density Function (PDF) based method that handles the scalar transport equation is coupled with an existing Finite Volume (FV) Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver. The PDF formulation leads to closed chemical source terms and facilitates the use of detailed chemical mechanisms without approximations. The particle-based PDF scheme is modified to handle complex geometries and grid structures. Grid-independent particle evolution schemes that scale linearly with the problem size are implemented in the Monte-Carlo PDF solver. A novel algorithm, in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) is employed to ensure tractability of complex chemistry involving a multitude of species. Several non-reacting test cases are performed to ascertain the efficiency and accuracy of the method. Simulation results from a turbulent jet-diffusion flame case are compared against experimental data. The effect of micromixing model, turbulence model and reaction scheme on flame predictions are discussed extensively. Finally, the method is used to analyze the Dow Chlorination Reactor. Detailed kinetics involving 37 species and 158 reactions as well as a reduced form with 16 species and 21 reactions are used. The effect of inlet configuration on reactor behavior and product distribution is analyzed. Plant-scale reactors exhibit quenching phenomena that cannot be reproduced by conventional simulation methods. The FV-PDF method predicts quenching accurately and provides insight into the dynamics of the reactor near extinction. The accuracy of the fractional time-stepping technique in discussed in the context of apparent multiple-steady states observed in a non-premixed feed configuration of the chlorination reactor.

  2. A finite-volume HLLC-based scheme for compressible interfacial flows with surface tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, Daniel P. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Owkes, Mark [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States); Regele, Jonathan D., E-mail: jregele@iastate.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Shock waves are often used in experiments to create a shear flow across liquid droplets to study secondary atomization. Similar behavior occurs inside of supersonic combustors (scramjets) under startup conditions, but it is challenging to study these conditions experimentally. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, a numerical approach is developed to simulate compressible multiphase flows under the effects of surface tension forces. The flow field is solved via the compressible multicomponent Euler equations (i.e., the five equation model) discretized with the finite volume method on a uniform Cartesian grid. The solver utilizes a total variation diminishing (TVD) third-order Runge–Kutta method for time-marching and second order TVD spatial reconstruction. Surface tension is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model. Fluxes are upwinded with a modified Harten–Lax–van Leer Contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver. An interface compression scheme is employed to counter numerical diffusion of the interface. The present work includes modifications to both the HLLC solver and the interface compression scheme to account for capillary force terms and the associated pressure jump across the gas–liquid interface. A simple method for numerically computing the interface curvature is developed and an acoustic scaling of the surface tension coefficient is proposed for the non-dimensionalization of the model. The model captures the surface tension induced pressure jump exactly if the exact curvature is known and is further verified with an oscillating elliptical droplet and Mach 1.47 and 3 shock-droplet interaction problems. The general characteristics of secondary atomization at a range of Weber numbers are also captured in a series of simulations.

  3. Two-dimensional finite volume method for dam-break flow simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.ALIPARAST

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model based upon a second-order upwind cell-center finite volume method on unstructured triangular grids is developed for solving shallow water equations.The assumption of a small depth downstream instead of a dry bed situation changes the wave structure and the propagation speed of the front which leads to incorrect results.The use of Harten-Lax-vau Leer (HLL) allows handling of wet/dry treatment.By usage of the HLL approximate Riemann solver,also it make possible to handle discontinuous solutions.As the assumption of a very small depth downstream of the dam can change the nature of the dam break flow problem which leads to incorrect results,the HLL approximate Riemann solver is used for the computation of inviscid flux functions,which makes it possible to handle discontinuous solutions.A multidimensional slope-limiting technique is applied to achieve second-order spatial accuracy and to prevent spurious oscillations.To alleviate the problems associated with numerical instabilities due to small water depths near a wet/dry boundary,the friction source terms are treated in a fully implicit way.A third-order Runge-Kutta method is used for the time integration of semi-discrete equations.The developed numerical model has been applied to several test cases as well as to real flows.The tests are tested in two cases:oblique hydraulic jump and experimental dam break in converging-diverging flume.Numerical tests proved the robustness and accuracy of the model.The model has been applied for simulation of dam break analysis of Torogh in Irun.And finally the results have been used in preparing EAP (Emergency Action Plan).

  4. A finite-volume HLLC-based scheme for compressible interfacial flows with surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Daniel P.; Owkes, Mark; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2017-06-01

    Shock waves are often used in experiments to create a shear flow across liquid droplets to study secondary atomization. Similar behavior occurs inside of supersonic combustors (scramjets) under startup conditions, but it is challenging to study these conditions experimentally. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, a numerical approach is developed to simulate compressible multiphase flows under the effects of surface tension forces. The flow field is solved via the compressible multicomponent Euler equations (i.e., the five equation model) discretized with the finite volume method on a uniform Cartesian grid. The solver utilizes a total variation diminishing (TVD) third-order Runge-Kutta method for time-marching and second order TVD spatial reconstruction. Surface tension is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model. Fluxes are upwinded with a modified Harten-Lax-van Leer Contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver. An interface compression scheme is employed to counter numerical diffusion of the interface. The present work includes modifications to both the HLLC solver and the interface compression scheme to account for capillary force terms and the associated pressure jump across the gas-liquid interface. A simple method for numerically computing the interface curvature is developed and an acoustic scaling of the surface tension coefficient is proposed for the non-dimensionalization of the model. The model captures the surface tension induced pressure jump exactly if the exact curvature is known and is further verified with an oscillating elliptical droplet and Mach 1.47 and 3 shock-droplet interaction problems. The general characteristics of secondary atomization at a range of Weber numbers are also captured in a series of simulations.

  5. Estimate of the truncation error of a finite volume discretisation of the Navier-Stokes equations on colocated grids

    CERN Document Server

    Syrakos, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    A methodology is proposed for the calculation of the truncation error of finite volume discretisations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on colocated grids. The truncation error is estimated by restricting the solution obtained on a given grid to a coarser grid and calculating the image of the discrete Navier-Stokes operator of the coarse grid on the restricted velocity and pressure field. The proposed methodology is not a new concept but its application to colocated finite volume discretisations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is made possible by the introduction of a variant of the momentum interpolation technique for mass fluxes where the pressure-part of the mass fluxes is not dependent on the coefficients of the linearised momentum equations. The theory presented is supported by a number of numerical experiments. The methodology is developed for two-dimensional flows, but extension to three-dimensional cases should not pose problems.

  6. 1D and 2D Numerical Modeling for Solving Dam-Break Flow Problems Using Finite Volume Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Hsien Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to model the flow movement in an idealized dam-break configuration. One-dimensional and two-dimensional motion of a shallow flow over a rigid inclined bed is considered. The resulting shallow water equations are solved by finite volumes using the Roe and HLL schemes. At first, the one-dimensional model is considered in the development process. With conservative finite volume method, splitting is applied to manage the combination of hyperbolic term and source term of the shallow water equation and then to promote 1D to 2D. The simulations are validated by the comparison with flume experiments. Unsteady dam-break flow movement is found to be reasonably well captured by the model. The proposed concept could be further developed to the numerical calculation of non-Newtonian fluid or multilayers fluid flow.

  7. Solution of the square lid-driven cavity flow of a Bingham plastic using the finite volume method

    CERN Document Server

    Syrakos, Alexandros; Alexandrou, Andreas N

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the performance of the finite volume method in solving viscoplastic flows. The creeping square lid-driven cavity flow of a Bingham plastic is chosen as the test case and the constitutive equation is regularised as proposed by Papanastasiou [J. Rheol. 31 (1987) 385-404]. It is shown that the convergence rate of the standard SIMPLE pressure-correction algorithm, which is used to solve the algebraic equation system that is produced by the finite volume discretisation, severely deteriorates as the Bingham number increases, with a corresponding increase in the non-linearity of the equations. It is shown that using the SIMPLE algorithm in a multigrid context dramatically improves convergence, although the multigrid convergence rates are much worse than for Newtonian flows. The numerical results obtained for Bingham numbers as high as 1000 compare favourably with reported results of other methods.

  8. The $DN$, $\\pi \\Sigma_c$ interaction in finite volume and the $\\Lambda_c(2595)$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Ju-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work the interaction of the coupled channels $DN$ and $\\pi \\Sigma_c$ in an SU(4) extrapolation of the chiral unitary theory, where the $\\Lambda_c(2595)$ resonance appears as dynamically generated from that interaction, is extended to produce results in finite volume. Energy levels in the finite box are evaluated and, assuming that they would correspond to lattice results, the inverse problem of determining the phase shifts in the infinite volume from the lattice results is solved. We observe that it is possible to obtain accurate $\\pi \\Sigma_c$ phase shifts and the position of the $\\Lambda_c(2595)$ resonance, but it requires the explicit consideration of the two coupled channels. We also observe that some of the energy levels in the box are attached to the closed $DN$ channel, such that their use to induce the $\\pi \\Sigma_c$ phase shifts via L\\"uscher's formula leads to incorrect results.

  9. A conservative finite volume method for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined nested Cartesian grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifounakis, Adamandios; Lee, Sangseung; You, Donghyun

    2016-12-01

    A second-order-accurate finite-volume method is developed for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined nested Cartesian grids. Numerical accuracy and stability on locally refined nested Cartesian grids are achieved using a finite-volume discretization of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations based on higher-order conservation principles - i.e., in addition to mass and momentum conservation, kinetic energy conservation in the inviscid limit is used to guide the selection of the discrete operators and solution algorithms. Hanging nodes at the interface are virtually slanted to improve the pressure-velocity projection, while the other parts of the grid maintain an orthogonal Cartesian grid topology. The present method is straight-forward to implement and shows superior conservation of mass, momentum, and kinetic energy compared to the conventional methods employing interpolation at the interface between coarse and fine grids.

  10. Nucleon Finite Volume Effect and Nuclear Matter Properties in a Relativistic Mean-Field Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Costa; A.J. Santiago; H. Rodrigues; J. Sa Borges

    2006-01-01

    Effects of excluded volume of nucleons on nuclear matter are studied, and the nuclear properties that follow from different relativistic mean-field model parametrizations are compared. We show that, for all tested parametrizations,the resulting volume energy a1 and the symmetry energy J are around the acceptable values of 16 MeV and 30 MeV,and the density symmetry L is around 100 Me V. On the other hand, models that consider only linear terms lead to incompressibility K0 much higher than expected. For most parameter sets there exists a critical point (ρc,δc), where the minimum and the maximum of the equation of state are coincident and the incompressibility equals zero. This critical point depends on the excluded volume parameter r. If this parameter is larger than 0.5 fm, there is no critical point and the pure neutron matter is predicted to be bound. The maximum value for neutron star mass is 1.85M⊙, which is in agreement with the mass of the heaviest observed neutron star 4U0900-40 and corresponds to r = 0.72 fm. We also show that the light neutron star mass (1.2M⊙) is obtained for r (≌) 0.9 fm.

  11. Performance of the finite volume method in solving regularised Bingham flows: inertia effects in the lid-driven cavity flow

    CERN Document Server

    Syrakos, Alexandros; Alexandrou, Andreas N

    2016-01-01

    We extend our recent work on the creeping flow of a Bingham fluid in a lid-driven cavity, to the study of inertial effects, using a finite volume method and the Papanastasiou regularisation of the Bingham constitutive model [J. Rheology 31 (1987) 385-404]. The finite volume method used belongs to a very popular class of methods for solving Newtonian flow problems, which use the SIMPLE algorithm to solve the discretised set of equations, and have matured over the years. By regularising the Bingham constitutive equation it is easy to extend such a solver to Bingham flows since all that this requires is to modify the viscosity function. This is a tempting approach, since it requires minimum programming effort and makes available all the existing features of the mature finite volume solver. On the other hand, regularisation introduces a parameter which controls the error in addition to the grid spacing, and makes it difficult to locate the yield surfaces. Furthermore, the equations become stiffer and more difficu...

  12. A σ-coordinate model for 3D free-surface flows using an unstructured finite-volume technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uh Zapata, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a numerical solution of three-dimensional free-surface flows using a σ-coordinate model, a projection method and an unstructured finite-volume technique. The coordinate transformation is used in order to overcome difficulties arising from free surface elevation and irregular geometry. The projection method consists to combine the momentum and continuity equations in order to establish a Poisson-type equation for the non-hydrostatic pressure. A cell-centered finite volume method with a triangular mesh in the horizontal direction is used to simulate the flows with free-surfaces, in which the average values of conserved variables are stored at the centre of each element. A parallel algorithm is also presented for the finite volume discretization of the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The proposed parallel method is formulated by using a multi-color SOR method, a block domain decomposition and interprocessor data communication techniques with Message Passing Interface. The model has been validated by several benchmarks which numerical simulations are in good agreement with the corresponding analytical and existing experimental results.

  13. An implicit finite volume scheme for a scalar hyperbolic problem with measure data related to piecewise deterministic Markov processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymard, Robert; Mercier, Sophie; Prignet, Alain

    2008-12-01

    We are interested here in the numerical approximation of a family of probability measures, solution of the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation associated to some non-diffusion Markov process with uncountable state space. Such an equation contains a transport term and another term, which implies redistribution of the probability mass on the whole space. An implicit finite volume scheme is proposed, which is intermediate between an upstream weighting scheme and a modified Lax-Friedrichs one. Due to the seemingly unusual probability framework, a new weak bounded variation inequality had to be developed, in order to prove the convergence of the discretised transport term. Such an inequality may be used in other contexts, such as for the study of finite volume approximations of scalar linear or nonlinear hyperbolic equations with initial data in L1. Also, due to the redistribution term, the tightness of the family of approximate probability measures had to be proven. Numerical examples are provided, showing the efficiency of the implicit finite volume scheme and its potentiality to be helpful in an industrial reliability context.

  14. On the monotonicity of multidimensional finite difference schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovyrkina, O.; Ostapenko, V.

    2016-10-01

    The classical concept of monotonicity, introduced by Godunov for linear one-dimensional difference schemes, is extended to multidimensional case. Necessary and sufficient conditions of monotonicity are obtained for linear multidimensional difference schemes of first order. The constraints on the numerical viscosity are given that ensure the monotonicity of a difference scheme in the multidimensional case. It is proposed a modification of the second order multidimensional CABARET scheme that preserves the monotonicity of one-dimensional discrete solutions and, as a result, ensures higher smoothness in the computation of multidimensional discontinuous solutions. The results of two-dimensional test computations illustrating the advantages of the modified CABARET scheme are presented.

  15. Finite-time stochastic outer synchronization between two complex dynamical networks with different topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongzheng; Li, Wang; Zhao, Donghua

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the finite-time stochastic outer synchronization between two different complex dynamical networks with noise perturbation is investigated. By using suitable controllers, sufficient conditions for finite-time stochastic outer synchronization are derived based on the finite-time stability theory of stochastic differential equations. It is noticed that the coupling configuration matrix is not necessary to be symmetric or irreducible, and the inner coupling matrix need not be symmetric. Finally, numerical examples are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the analytical results. The effect of control parameters on the settling time is also numerically demonstrated.

  16. Finite element analysis of thermal stress distribution in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cavity was restored with three different materials (Group I: Resin composite, Group II: ... Introduction. In restorative dentistry, the preferred method of treatment for cervical ... cold liquids. The cavity environment can be exposed to thermal.

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Fitted-Stable Finite Difference Method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gemechis

    A fitted-stable central difference method is presented for solving singularly perturbed two point ... with exact solutions. The error bound and convergence of the proposed method has also ... explicit method involving the reduction of order for ...

  18. Simulation of dissolution in porous media in three dimensions with lattice Boltzmann, finite-volume, and surface-rescaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, F.; Cen, J.; Boek, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a pore-scale dissolution model for the simulation of reactive transport in complex porous media such as those encountered in carbon-storage injection processes. We couple a lattice Boltzmann model for flow calculation with a finite-volume method for solving chemical transport equations, and allow the computational grid to change as mineral surfaces are dissolved according to first-order reaction kinetics. We appraise this scheme for use with high Péclet number flows in three-dimensional geometries and show how the popular first-order convection scheme is affected by severe numerical diffusion when grid Péclet numbers exceed unity, and confirm that this can be overcome relatively easily by using a second-order method in conjunction with a flux-limiter function. We then propose a surface rescaling method which uses parabolic elements to counteract errors in surface area exposed by the Cartesian grid and avoid the use of more complex embedded surface methods when surface reaction kinetics are incorporated. Finally, we compute dissolution in an image of a real porous limestone rock sample injected with HCl for different Péclet numbers and obtain dissolution patterns in concordance with theory and experimental observation. A low injection flow rate was shown to lead to erosion of the pore space concentrated at the face of the rock, whereas a high flow rate leads to wormhole formation.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Finite Deformation of Overbroken Rock Mass in Gob Area Based on Euler Model of Control Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei-qun; MIAO Xie-xing

    2006-01-01

    The overbroken rock mass of gob areas is made up of broken and accumulated rock blocks compressed to some extent by the overlying strata. The bearing pressure of the gob can directly affect the safety of mining fields, formation of road retained along the next goaf and seepage of water and methane through the gob. In this paper, the software RFPA'2000 is used to construct numerical models. Especially the Euler method of control volume is proposed to solve the simulation difficulty arising from plastically finite deformations. The results show that three characteristic regions occurred in the gob area: (1) a naturally accumulated region, 0-10 m away from unbroken surrounding rock walls, where the bearing pressure is nearly zero; (2) an overcompacted region, 10-20 m away from unbroken walls, where the bearing pressure results in the maximum value of the gob area; (3) a stable compaction region, more than 20 m away from unbroken walls and occupying absolutely most of the gob area, where the bearing pressures show basically no differences. Such a characteristic can explain the easy-seepaged "O"-ring phenomena around mining fields very well.

  20. A Second Order Thermal and Momentum Immersed Boundary Method for Conjugate Heat Transfer in a Cartesian Finite Volume Solver

    CERN Document Server

    Crocker, Ryan; Desjardins, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer (CHT) immersed boundary (IB and CHTIB) method is developed for use with laminar and turbulent flows with low to moderate Reynolds numbers. The method is validated with the canonical flow of two co-annular rotating cylinders at $Re=50$ which shows second order accuracy of the $L_{2}$ and $L_{\\infty}$ error norms of the temperature field over a wide rage of solid to fluid thermal conductivities, $\\kappa_{s}/\\kappa_{f} = \\left(9-100\\right)$. To evaluate the CHTIBM with turbulent flow a fully developed, heated, turbulent channel $\\left(Re_{u_{\\tau}}=150\\text{ and } \\kappa_{s}/\\kappa_{f}=4 \\right)$ is used which shows near perfect correlation to previous direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. The CHTIB method is paired with a momentum IB method (IBM), both of which use a level set field to define the wetted boundaries of the fluid/solid interfaces and are applied to the flow solver implicitly with rescaling of the difference operators of the finite volume (FV) method (FVM).

  1. Exploring the Effectiveness of Different Approaches to Teaching Finite Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeal, Mary; Walker, Sandra; Carter, Jamye; Simmons-Johnson, Carolyn; Balam, Esenc

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, mathematics has been taught using a very direct approach which the teacher explains the procedure to solve a problem and the students use pencil and paper to solve the problem. However, a variety of alternative approaches to mathematics have surfaced from a number of different directions. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  2. Finite difference time domain modeling of steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Langdon, H. Scott; Beggs, John H.; Steich, David J.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1992-01-01

    The approach chosen to model steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades is based upon the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method is a numerical electromagnetic program based upon the direct solution in the time domain of Maxwell's time dependent curl equations throughout a volume. One of the strengths of this method is the ability to model objects with complicated shape and/or material composition. General time domain functions may be used as source excitations. For example, a plane wave excitation may be specified as a pulse containing many frequencies and at any incidence angle to the scatterer. A best fit to the scatterer is accomplished using cubical cells in the standard cartesian implementation of the FDTD method. The material composition of the scatterer is determined by specifying its electrical properties at each cell on the scatterer. Thus, the FDTD method is a suitable choice for problems with complex geometries evaluated at multiple frequencies. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the FDTD method.

  3. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High-Order Finite-Volume Schemes in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Alan Michael

    For computational fluid dynamics, the governing equations are solved on a discretized domain of nodes, faces, and cells. The quality of the grid or mesh can be a driving source for error in the results. While refinement studies can help guide the creation of a mesh, grid quality is largely determined by user expertise and understanding of the flow physics. Adaptive mesh refinement is a technique for enriching the mesh during a simulation based on metrics for error, impact on important parameters, or location of important flow features. This can offload from the user some of the difficult and ambiguous decisions necessary when discretizing the domain. This work explores the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement in an implicit, unstructured, finite-volume solver. Consideration is made for applying modern computational techniques in the presence of hanging nodes and refined cells. The approach is developed to be independent of the flow solver in order to provide a path for augmenting existing codes. It is designed to be applicable for unsteady simulations and refinement and coarsening of the grid does not impact the conservatism of the underlying numerics. The effect on high-order numerical fluxes of fourth- and sixth-order are explored. Provided the criteria for refinement is appropriately selected, solutions obtained using adapted meshes have no additional error when compared to results obtained on traditional, unadapted meshes. In order to leverage large-scale computational resources common today, the methods are parallelized using MPI. Parallel performance is considered for several test problems in order to assess scalability of both adapted and unadapted grids. Dynamic repartitioning of the mesh during refinement is crucial for load balancing an evolving grid. Development of the methods outlined here depend on a dual-memory approach that is described in detail. Validation of the solver developed here against a number of motivating problems shows favorable

  4. Extending geometric conservation law to cell-centered finite difference methods on moving and deforming grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fei; Ye, Zhengyin

    2015-12-01

    Despite significant progress in recent computational techniques, the accurate numerical simulations, such as direct-numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation, are still challenging. For accurate calculations, the high-order finite difference method (FDM) is usually adopted with coordinate transformation from body-fitted grid to Cartesian grid. But this transformation might lead to failure in freestream preservation with the geometric conservation law (GCL) violated, particularly in high-order computations. GCL identities, including surface conservation law (SCL) and volume conservation law (VCL), are very important in discretization of high-order FDM. To satisfy GCL, various efforts have been made. An early and successful approach was developed by Thomas and Lombard [6] who used the conservative form of metrics to cancel out metric terms to further satisfy SCL. Visbal and Gaitonde [7] adopted this conservative form of metrics for SCL identities and satisfied VCL identity through invoking VCL equation to acquire the derivative of Jacobian in computation on moving and deforming grids with central compact schemes derived by Lele [5]. Later, using the metric technique from Visbal and Gaitonde [7], Nonomura et al. [8] investigated the freestream and vortex preservation properties of high-order WENO and WCNS on stationary curvilinear grids. A conservative metric method (CMM) was further developed by Deng et al. [9] with stationary grids, and detailed discussion about the innermost difference operator of CMM was shown with proof and corresponding numerical test cases. Noticing that metrics of CMM is asymmetrical without coordinate-invariant property, Deng et al. proposed a symmetrical CMM (SCMM) [12] by using the symmetric forms of metrics derived by Vinokur and Yee [10] to further eliminate asymmetric metric errors with stationary grids considered only. The research from Abe et al. [11] presented new asymmetric and symmetric conservative forms of time metrics and

  5. A toxin-mediated size-structured population model: Finite difference approximation and well-posedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qihua; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The question of the effects of environmental toxins on ecological communities is of great interest from both environmental and conservational points of view. Mathematical models have been applied increasingly to predict the effects of toxins on a variety of ecological processes. Motivated by the fact that individuals with different sizes may have different sensitivities to toxins, we develop a toxin-mediated size-structured model which is given by a system of first order fully nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). It is very possible that this work represents the first derivation of a PDE model in the area of ecotoxicology. To solve the model, an explicit finite difference approximation to this PDE system is developed. Existence-uniqueness of the weak solution to the model is established and convergence of the finite difference approximation to this unique solution is proved. Numerical examples are provided by numerically solving the PDE model using the finite difference scheme.

  6. Optimization of finite difference forward modeling for elastic waves based on optimum combined window functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wang; Xiaohong, Meng; Hong, Liu; Wanqiu, Zheng; Yaning, Liu; Sheng, Gui; Zhiyang, Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full waveform inversion and reverse time migration are active research areas for seismic exploration. Forward modeling in the time domain determines the precision of the results, and numerical solutions of finite difference have been widely adopted as an important mathematical tool for forward modeling. In this article, the optimum combined of window functions was designed based on the finite difference operator using a truncated approximation of the spatial convolution series in pseudo-spectrum space, to normalize the outcomes of existing window functions for different orders. The proposed combined window functions not only inherit the characteristics of the various window functions, to provide better truncation results, but also control the truncation error of the finite difference operator manually and visually by adjusting the combinations and analyzing the characteristics of the main and side lobes of the amplitude response. Error level and elastic forward modeling under the proposed combined system were compared with outcomes from conventional window functions and modified binomial windows. Numerical dispersion is significantly suppressed, which is compared with modified binomial window function finite-difference and conventional finite-difference. Numerical simulation verifies the reliability of the proposed method.

  7. THE UPWIND OPERATOR SPLITTING FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD FOR COMPRESSIBLE TWO-PHASE DISPLACEMENT PROBLEM AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁益让

    2002-01-01

    For compressible two-phase displacement problem, a kind of upwind operator splitting finite difference schemes is put forward and make use of operator splitting, of calculus of variations, multiplicative commutation rule of difference operators, decomposition of high order difference operators and prior estimates are adopted. Optimal order estinates in L2 norm are derived to determine the error in the approximate solution.

  8. Lie group invariant finite difference schemes for the neutron diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaegers, P.J.

    1994-06-01

    Finite difference techniques are used to solve a variety of differential equations. For the neutron diffusion equation, the typical local truncation error for standard finite difference approximation is on the order of the mesh spacing squared. To improve the accuracy of the finite difference approximation of the diffusion equation, the invariance properties of the original differential equation have been incorporated into the finite difference equations. Using the concept of an invariant difference operator, the invariant difference approximations of the multi-group neutron diffusion equation were determined in one-dimensional slab and two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates, for multiple region problems. These invariant difference equations were defined to lie upon a cell edged mesh as opposed to the standard difference equations, which lie upon a cell centered mesh. Results for a variety of source approximations showed that the invariant difference equations were able to determine the eigenvalue with greater accuracy, for a given mesh spacing, than the standard difference approximation. The local truncation errors for these invariant difference schemes were found to be highly dependent upon the source approximation used, and the type of source distribution played a greater role in determining the accuracy of the invariant difference scheme than the local truncation error.

  9. Comparison between staggered grid finite-volume and edge-based finite-element modelling of geophysical electromagnetic data on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandari, Hormoz; Ansari, SeyedMasoud; Farquharson, Colin G.

    2017-03-01

    This study compares two finite-element (FE) and three finite-volume (FV) schemes which use unstructured tetrahedral grids for the modelling of electromagnetic (EM) data. All these schemes belong to a group of differential methods where the electric field is defined along the edges of the elements. The FE and FV schemes are based on both the EM-field and the potential formulations of Maxwell's equations. The EM-field FE scheme uses edge-based (vector) basis functions while the potential FE scheme uses vector and scalar basis functions. All the FV schemes use staggered tetrahedral-Voronoï grids. Three examples are used for comparisons in terms of accuracy and in terms of the computation resources required by generic iterative and direct solvers for solving the problems. Two of these examples represent survey scenarios with electric and magnetic sources and the results are compared with those from the literature while the third example is a comparison against analytical solutions for an electric dipole source. Exactly the same mesh is used for all examples to allow for direct comparison of the various schemes. The results show that while the FE and FV schemes are comparable in terms of accuracy and computation resources, the FE schemes are slightly more accurate but also more expensive than the FV schemes.

  10. SOME NEW FINITE DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR HELMHOLTZ EQUATIONS ON IRREGULAR DOMAINS OR WITH INTERFACES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaohai; Li, Zhilin

    2012-06-01

    Solving a Helmholtz equation Δu + λu = f efficiently is a challenge for many applications. For example, the core part of many efficient solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is to solve one or several Helmholtz equations. In this paper, two new finite difference methods are proposed for solving Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, or with interfaces. For Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, the accuracy of the numerical solution obtained using the existing augmented immersed interface method (AIIM) may deteriorate when the magnitude of λ is large. In our new method, we use a level set function to extend the source term and the PDE to a larger domain before we apply the AIIM. For Helmholtz equations with interfaces, a new maximum principle preserving finite difference method is developed. The new method still uses the standard five-point stencil with modifications of the finite difference scheme at irregular grid points. The resulting coefficient matrix of the linear system of finite difference equations satisfies the sign property of the discrete maximum principle and can be solved efficiently using a multigrid solver. The finite difference method is also extended to handle temporal discretized equations where the solution coefficient λ is inversely proportional to the mesh size.

  11. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for a Finite Volume Method for Flow and Transport of Radionuclides in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaziane Brahim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider adaptive numerical simulation of miscible displacement problems in porous media, which are modeled by single phase flow equations. A vertex-centred finite volume method is employed to discretize the coupled system: the Darcy flow equation and the diffusion-convection concentration equation. The convection term is approximated with a Godunov scheme over the dual finite volume mesh, whereas the diffusion-dispersion term is discretized by piecewise linear conforming finite elements. We introduce two kinds of indicators, both of them of residual type. The first one is related to time discretization and is local with respect to the time discretization: thus, at each time, it provides an appropriate information for the choice of the next time step. The second is related to space discretization and is local with respect to both the time and space variable and the idea is that at each time it is an efficient tool for mesh adaptivity. An error estimation procedure evaluates where additional refinement is needed and grid generation procedures dynamically create or remove fine-grid patches as resolution requirements change. The method was implemented in the software MELODIE, developed by the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire. The algorithm is then used to simulate the evolution of radionuclide migration from the waste packages through a heterogeneous disposal, demonstrating its capability to capture complex behavior of the resulting flow.

  12. Performance prediction of finite-difference solvers for different computer architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, Mathias; Lange, Michael; Herrmann, Felix J.; Kukreja, Navjot; Gorman, Gerard

    2017-08-01

    The life-cycle of a partial differential equation (PDE) solver is often characterized by three development phases: the development of a stable numerical discretization; development of a correct (verified) implementation; and the optimization of the implementation for different computer architectures. Often it is only after significant time and effort has been invested that the performance bottlenecks of a PDE solver are fully understood, and the precise details varies between different computer architectures. One way to mitigate this issue is to establish a reliable performance model that allows a numerical analyst to make reliable predictions of how well a numerical method would perform on a given computer architecture, before embarking upon potentially long and expensive implementation and optimization phases. The availability of a reliable performance model also saves developer effort as it both informs the developer on what kind of optimisations are beneficial, and when the maximum expected performance has been reached and optimisation work should stop. We show how discretization of a wave-equation can be theoretically studied to understand the performance limitations of the method on modern computer architectures. We focus on the roofline model, now broadly used in the high-performance computing community, which considers the achievable performance in terms of the peak memory bandwidth and peak floating point performance of a computer with respect to algorithmic choices. A first principles analysis of operational intensity for key time-stepping finite-difference algorithms is presented. With this information available at the time of algorithm design, the expected performance on target computer systems can be used as a driver for algorithm design.

  13. FINITE DIFFERENCE FRACTIONAL STEP METHODS FOR THE TRANSIENT BEHAVIOR OF A SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yirang

    2005-01-01

    Characteristic finite difference fractional step schemes are put forward. The electric Potential equation is described by a seven-point finite difference scheme, and the electron and hole concentration equations are treated by a kind of characteristic finite difference fractional step methods. The temperature equation is described by a fractional step method. Thick and thin grids are made use of to form a complete set. Piecewise threefold quadratic interpolation, symmetrical extension, calculus of variations, commutativity of operator product, decomposition of high order difference operators and prior estimates are also made use of. Optimal order estimates in l2 norm are derived to determine the error of the approximate solution. The well-known problem is thorongley and completely solred.

  14. Radiation boundary condition and anisotropy correction for finite difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Webb, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper finite-difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation in an open domain are considered. By using a second-order central difference scheme and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition, reasonably accurate solutions can be obtained when the number of grid points per acoustic wavelength used is large. However, when a smaller number of grid points per wavelength is used excessive reflections occur which tend to overwhelm the computed solutions. Excessive reflections are due to the incompability between the governing finite difference equation and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition. The Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition was developed from the asymptotic solution of the partial differential equation. To obtain compatibility, the radiation boundary condition should be constructed from the asymptotic solution of the finite difference equation instead. Examples are provided using the improved radiation boundary condition based on the asymptotic solution of the governing finite difference equation. The computed results are free of reflections even when only five grid points per wavelength are used. The improved radiation boundary condition has also been tested for problems with complex acoustic sources and sources embedded in a uniform mean flow. The present method of developing a radiation boundary condition is also applicable to higher order finite difference schemes. In all these cases no reflected waves could be detected. The use of finite difference approximation inevita bly introduces anisotropy into the governing field equation. The effect of anisotropy is to distort the directional distribution of the amplitude and phase of the computed solution. It can be quite large when the number of grid points per wavelength used in the computation is small. A way to correct this effect is proposed. The correction factor developed from the asymptotic solutions is source independent and, hence, can be determined once and for all. The

  15. New finite volume methods for approximating partial differential equations on arbitrary meshes; Nouvelles methodes de volumes finis pour approcher des equations aux derivees partielles sur des maillages quelconques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermeline, F

    2008-12-15

    This dissertation presents some new methods of finite volume type for approximating partial differential equations on arbitrary meshes. The main idea lies in solving twice the problem to be dealt with. One addresses the elliptic equations with variable (anisotropic, antisymmetric, discontinuous) coefficients, the parabolic linear or non linear equations (heat equation, radiative diffusion, magnetic diffusion with Hall effect), the wave type equations (Maxwell, acoustics), the elasticity and Stokes'equations. Numerous numerical experiments show the good behaviour of this type of method. (author)

  16. Explicit finite-difference time domain for nonlinear analysis of waveguide modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, N. M.; Shabat, M. M.; El-Azab, S.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2003-07-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain Technique is at present the most widely used tool employed in the study of light propagation in various photonic waveguide structure. In this paper we derived an explicit finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for solving the wave equation in a four optical waveguiding rectangular structure. We derive the stability condition to achieve the stability in nonlinear media region, we also check that the wave equation used is consistence and convergent with the approximate finite difference equation. Our method is tested against some previous problems and we find a high degree of accuracy, moreover it is easy for programming. Numerical results are illustrated for a rectangular waveguide with four layers, where one of these layers is a nonlinear medium.

  17. A quasi-positive family of continuous Darcy-flux finite-volume schemes with full pressure support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael G.; Zheng, Hongwen

    2008-11-01

    A new family of flux-continuous, locally conservative, finite-volume schemes is presented for solving the general tensor pressure equation of subsurface flow in porous media. The new schemes have full pressure continuity imposed across control-volume faces. Previous families of flux-continuous schemes are point-wise continuous in pressure and flux. When applying the earlier point-wise flux-continuous schemes to strongly anisotropic full-tensor fields their failure to satisfy a maximum principle (as with other FEM and finite-volume methods) can result in loss of local stability for high anisotropy ratios which can cause strong spurious oscillations in the numerical pressure solution. An M-matrix analysis reveals the upper limits for guaranteeing a maximum principle for general 9-point schemes and aids in the design of schemes that minimize the occurrence of spurious oscillations in the discrete pressure field. The full pressure continuity schemes are shown to possess a larger range of flux-continuous schemes, than the previous point-wise counter parts. For strongly anisotropic full-tensor cases it is shown that the full quadrature range possessed by the new schemes permits these schemes to exploit quadrature points (previously out of range) that are shown to minimize spurious oscillations in discrete pressure solutions. The new formulation leads to a more robust quasi-positive family of flux-continuous schemes applicable to general discontinuous full-tensor fields.

  18. Multichannel 0-to-2 and 1-to-2 transition amplitudes for arbitrary spin particles in a finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A

    2015-01-01

    We present a model-independent, non-perturbative relation between finite-volume matrix elements and infinite-volume $\\textbf{0}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ and $\\textbf{1}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ transition amplitudes. Our result accommodates theories in which the final two-particle state is coupled to any number of other two-body channels, with all angular momentum states included. The derivation uses generic, fully relativistic field theory, and is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections in the lightest particle mass times the box size. This work distinguishes itself from previous studies by accommodating particles with any intrinsic spin. To illustrate the utility of our general result, we discuss how it can be implemented for studies of $N+\\mathcal{J}~\\rightarrow~(N\\pi,N\\eta,N\\eta',\\Sigma K,\\Lambda K)$ transitions, where $\\mathcal{J}$ is a generic external current. The reduction of rotational symmetry, due to the cubic finite volume, manifests in this example through the mixing of S- and P-waves when the...

  19. Finite difference method for the reverse parabolic problem with Neumann condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashyralyyev, Charyyar; Dural, Ayfer; Sozen, Yasar

    2012-08-01

    A finite difference method for the approximate solution of the reverse multidimensional parabolic differential equation with a multipoint boundary condition and Neumann condition is applied. Stability, almost coercive stability, and coercive stability estimates for the solution of the first and second orders of accuracy difference schemes are obtained. The theoretical statements are supported by the numerical example.

  20. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…