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Sample records for volume end-tidal co2

  1. Sleep Transcutaneous vs. End-Tidal CO2 Monitoring for Patients with Neuromuscular Disease.

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    Won, Yu Hui; Choi, Won Ah; Lee, Jang Woo; Bach, John Robert; Park, Jinyoung; Kang, Seong-Woong

    2016-02-01

    This study compared transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO2) and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2) monitoring during sleep for patients with neuromuscular disease. This is a retrospective study of patients whose PtcCO2 and PetCO2 were monitored before they began using noninvasive mechanical ventilation. The outcomes were divided into four groupings: group 1, both PtcCO2 and PetCO2 are greater than or equal to 49 mm Hg; group 2, PtcCO2 is greater than or equal to 49 mm Hg but PetCO2 is less than 49 mm Hg; group 3, PtcCO2 is less than 49 mm Hg but PetCO2 is greater than or equal to 49 mm Hg; and group 4, both PtcCO2 and PetCO2 are less than 49 mm Hg. A total of 39 subjects (mean [SD] age, 27.7 [19.3] yrs) were enrolled. PtcCO2 values were significantly higher than PetCO2 values (P < 0.001). The intraclass correlation coefficient between maximal and mean values of PtcCO2 and PetCO2 was 0.612 and 0.718, respectively. Bias and limits of agreement between PtcCO2 and PetCO2 were -7.5 mm Hg and -21.3 to 6.3 mm Hg for maximal values and -4.8 mm Hg and -14.8 to 5.3 mm Hg for mean values. Group 2 included 19 (48.7%) and group 3 included 3 (7.6%) patients who showed discrepancy of hypercapnia between two methods. Maximum PtcCO2 was significantly greater than maximum PetCO2 for both groups and, therefore, tends to be higher than PetCO2 in this population. This should be taken into consideration when assessing patients for sleep hypoventilation.

  2. End-tidal CO2 analysis in sleep apnea syndrome. Conditions for use.

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    Magnan, A; Philip-Joet, F; Rey, M; Reynaud, M; Porri, F; Arnaud, A

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) requires expensive and complex instrumentation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the value of end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) in screening for sleep apneas. Thirty-nine patients referred to our sleep laboratory because of suspected SAS and ten normal subjects were studied. The EtCO2 was measured using an infrared spectrometer (POET) designed for simultaneous measurement of CO2 and pulse oximetry. In 29 subjects, expired gas was sampled with a nasobuccal mask (Respiron) with lateral orifices. In the other 20 subjects, sampling was done with nasobuccal prongs (Criticare) comprising a four-channel plastic tube to the mouth and the nostrils. Data from an 8-h night were transferred the following day to a microcomputer (Apple Macintosh) for processing. Apnea was defined as an absence of detection of CO2 for more than 10 s. Conventional polysomnography was performed (Respisomnographe). The number of apneas in 8 h and the apnea index (number of apneas in 1 h) were calculated after visual analysis on the screen of the polysomnograph and also with EtCO2 analysis. For recordings made with a nasobuccal mask, the regression curve between the apnea indices computed with EtCO2 and polysomnography was an order 2 polynomial curve (r = 0.76; p < 0.001), with an inflection point at 39 apneas per hour. For recordings with nasobuccal prongs, the correlation was very significant (r = 0.95; p < 0.0001), and the regression curve was linear. The EtCO2 with nasobuccal prongs appears to be a simple and reliable method for screening for SAS.

  3. Predictive value of EndTidalCO2, lung mechanics and other standard parameters for weaning neurological patients from mechanical ventilation

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    Hala A. Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that measurements of RSBI, MIP (maximum inspiratory pressure, EndTidalCO2 and dynamic compliance were more accurate predictors of extubation failure in patients with neurological insults than other standard weaning parameters.

  4. End-tidal arterial CO2 partial pressure gradient in patients with severe hypercapnia undergoing noninvasive ventilation

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    Defilippis V

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vito Defilippis,1 Davide D’Antini,2 Gilda Cinnella,2 Michele Dambrosio,2 Fernando Schiraldi,3 Vito Procacci1 1Emergency Department, Riuniti Hospital, 2Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Foggia, Foggia, 3Emergency Department, San Paolo Hospital, Naples, Italy Background: Patients with severe hypercapnia represent a particularly serious condition in an emergency department (ED, requiring immediate attention. Noninvasive ventilation (NIV is an integral part of the treatment for acute respiratory failure. The present study aimed to validate the measurement of end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2 as a noninvasive technique to evaluate the effectiveness of NIV in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients admitted to the ED with severe dyspnea were enrolled in the study. NIV by means of bilevel positive airway pressure, was applied to the patients simultaneously with standard medical therapy and continued for 12 hours; the arterial blood gases and side-stream nasal/oral EtCO2 were measured at subsequent times: T0 (admission to the ED, T1h (after 1 hour, T6h (after 6 hours, and T12h (after 12 hours during NIV treatment. Results: The arterial CO2 partial pressure (PaCO2–EtCO2 gradient decreased progressively, reaching at T6h and T12h values lower than baseline (P < 0.001, while arterial pH increased during the observation period (P < 0.001. A positive correlation was found between EtCO2 and PaCO2 values (r = 0.89, P < 0.001 at the end of the observation period. Conclusion: In our hypercapnic patients, the effectiveness of the NIV was evidenced by the progressive reduction of the PaCO2–EtCO2 gradient. The measurement of the CO2 gradient could be a reliable method in monitoring the effectiveness of NIV in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the ED. Keywords: arterial end-tidal CO2 gradient, noninvasive ventilation, bilevel positive airway pressure, acute respiratory failure

  5. Superiority of transcutaneous CO2 over end-tidal CO2 measurement for monitoring respiratory failure in nonintubated patients: A pilot study.

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    Lermuzeaux, Mathilde; Meric, Henri; Sauneuf, Bertrand; Girard, Salomé; Normand, Hervé; Lofaso, Frédéric; Terzi, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Arterial blood gas measurement is frequently performed in critically ill patients to diagnose and monitor acute respiratory failure. At a given metabolic rate, carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) is entirely determined by CO2 elimination through ventilation. Transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PtcCO2) monitoring permits a noninvasive and continuous estimation of arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2). The accuracy of PtcCO2, however, has not been well studied. To assess the accuracy of different CO2 monitoring methods, we compared PtcCO2 and end-tidal CO2 concentration (EtCO2) to PaCO2 measurements in nonintubated intensive care unit (ICU) patients with acute respiratory failure. During a 2-month period, we conducted a prospective observational cohort study in 25 consecutive nonintubated and spontaneously breathing patients admitted to our ICU. Arterial blood gases were measured at study inclusion, 30, 60, and 120 minutes later. At each sampling time, EtCO2 was continuously monitored using a Philips Smart Capnoline Plus, and PtcCO2 was measured using was measured using SenTec device. The aim of the study was to assess agreement between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 and between EtCO2 and PaCO2 in nonintubated ICU patients with acute respiratory failure. Bland-Altman techniques and Pearson correlation coefficients were used. The differences over time (at 30, 60, and 120 minutes) between PaCO2 and EtCO2 and between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 were evaluated using 1-way analysis of variance. Transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide and PaCO2 were well correlated (R = 0.97), whereas the correlation between EtCO2 and PaCO2 was poor (R = 0.62) probably due to the presence of an alveolar dead space in a few patients, most notably in the group with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The difference over time remained stable for both PaCO2 vs EtCO2 (analysis of variance; P = .88) and PaCO2 vs PtcCO2 (P = .93). We found large differences between EtCO2 and Paco2 in spontaneously

  6. Anterior cerebral blood velocity and end-tidal CO2 responses to exercise differ in children and adults.

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    Ellis, Lindsay A; Ainslie, Philip N; Armstrong, Victoria A; Morris, Laura E; Simair, Ryan G; Sletten, Nathan R; Tallon, Christine M; McManus, Ali M

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the response of the cerebrovasculature to acute exercise in children and how these responses might differ with adults. Therefore, we compared changes in middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAVmean), end-tidal Pco2 ([Formula: see text]), blood pressure, and minute ventilation (V̇e) in response to incremental exercise between children and adults. Thirteen children [age: 9 ± 1 (SD) yr] and thirteen sex-matched adults (age: 25 ± 4 yr) completed a maximal exercise test, during which MCAVmean, [Formula: see text], and V̇e were measured continuously. These variables were measured at rest, at exercise intensities specific to individual ventilatory thresholds, and at maximum. Although MCAVmean was higher at rest in children compared with adults, there were smaller increases in children (1-12%) compared with adults (12-25%) at all exercise intensities. There were alterations in [Formula: see text] with exercise intensity in an age-dependent manner [F(2.5,54.5) = 7.983, P 0.05) until hyperventilation-induced reductions following the respiratory compensation point. In adults, [Formula: see text] increased with exercise intensity (36-45 mmHg, P adults showed a greater hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia than children. These findings show that the relative increase in MCAVmean during exercise was attenuated in children compared with adults. There was also a weaker relationship between MCAVmean and [Formula: see text] during exercise in children, suggesting that cerebral perfusion may be regulated by different mechanisms during exercise in the child.NEW & NOTEWORTHY These findings provide the first direct evidence that exercise increases cerebral blood flow in children to a lesser extent than in adults. Changes in end-tidal CO2 parallel changes in cerebral perfusion in adults but not in children, suggesting age-dependent regulatory mechanisms of cerebral blood flow during exercise. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Task-related BOLD responses and resting-state functional connectivity during physiological clamping of end-tidal CO(2).

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    Madjar, C; Gauthier, C J; Bellec, P; Birn, R M; Brooks, J C W; Hoge, R D

    2012-05-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)), a potent vasodilator, is known to have a significant impact on the blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. With the growing interest in studying synchronized BOLD fluctuations during the resting state, the extent to which the apparent synchrony is due to variations in the end-tidal pressure of CO(2) (PETCO(2)) is an important consideration. CO(2)-related fluctuations in BOLD signal may also represent a potential confound when studying task-related responses, especially if breathing depth and rate are affected by the task. While previous studies of the above issues have explored retrospective correction of BOLD fluctuations related to arterial PCO(2), here we demonstrate an alternative approach based on physiological clamping of the arterial CO(2) level to a near-constant value. We present data comparing resting-state functional connectivity within the default-mode-network (DMN), as well as task-related BOLD responses, acquired in two conditions in each subject: 1) while subject's PETCO(2) was allowed to vary spontaneously; and 2) while controlling subject's PETCO(2) within a narrow range. Strong task-related responses and areas of maximal signal correlation in the DMN were not significantly altered by suppressing fluctuations in PETCO(2). Controlling PETCO(2) did, however, improve the performance of retrospective physiological noise correction techniques, allowing detection of additional regions of task-related response and resting-state connectivity in highly vascularized regions such as occipital cortex. While these results serve to further rule out systemic physiological fluctuations as a significant source of apparent resting-state network connectivity, they also demonstrate that fluctuations in arterial CO(2) are one of the factors limiting sensitivity in task-based and resting-state fMRI, particularly in regions of high vascular density. This must be considered when comparing subject groups who might exhibit differences in

  8. Noninvasive monitoring of PaCO2 during one-lung ventilation and minimal access surgery in adults: End-tidal versus transcutaneous techniques

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    Cox, Paul; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that end-tidal CO2 (ET-CO2) may be inaccurate during one-lung ventilation (OLV). This study was performed to compare the accuracy of the noninvasive monitoring of PCO2 using transcutaneous CO2 (TC-CO2) with ET-CO2 in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) during OLV. Materials and Methods: In adult patients undergoing thoracoscopic surgical procedures, PCO2 was simultaneously measured with TC-CO2 and ET-CO2 devices and compa...

  9. End tidal CO2 level (PETCO2 during laparoscopic surgery: comparison between spinal anaesthesia and general anaesthesia

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    Rahul S. Jadhav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is a procedure which involves insufflations of the abdomen by a gas, so that endoscope can visualise intra abdominal content without being in direct contact with viscera or tissues. Its advantages are small incisions, less pain, less postoperative ileus, short hospital stay compared to traditional open method. Monitoring of end tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2 and hemodynamics is very necessary during Laparoscopy surgery. This study is conducted to find out effects of CO2 insufflation on parameters like PETCO2, Mean arterial pulse pressure, SPO2 under spinal anaesthesia and general anaesthesia in ASA I and ASA II patients. Methods: The present study was conducted in the department of anaesthesiology from December 2014 to September 2015.This study was a prospective, randomized controlled, single blind. Each group consisted of 30 patients having Group A and Group B as patient undergoing laparoscopic surgery under Spinal anaesthesia and General anaesthesia respectively. Preoperatively patients in Group A (Spinal anaesthesia given inj. Midazolam 0.3mg/kg IM 45 before surgery and Group B (General anaesthesia inj. pentazocin 0.3mg/kg, inj. promethazine 0.5mg/kg, inj. Glycopyrrolate 0.004 mg/kg IM 45 before surgery. In operation theatre, intra operative pulseoximetre, ECG, SPO2, Heart rate (HR, Mean arterial pulse pressure and PETCO2 monitoring done. Amount of CO2 insufflated noted. Results: It was found from present study that in both group there was significant progressive rise in PETCO2 after CO2 insufflation, with peak at 30 min and thereafter plateau till the end of procedure (avg. duration 45-60 min. In group A i.e. laparoscopic surgery under spinal anaesthesia with (spontaneous respiration the rise in PETCO2 was significant as compared to the group B i.e. laparoscopic surgery under general anaesthesia with controlled ventilation. The heart rate increased after CO2 insufflation in both the group, but it was significant in

  10. Noninvasive Measurement of Carbon Dioxide during One-Lung Ventilation with Low Tidal Volume for Two Hours: End-Tidal versus Transcutaneous Techniques.

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    Hong Zhang

    Full Text Available There may be significant difference between measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2 and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2 during one-lung ventilation with low tidal volume for thoracic surgeries. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO2 monitoring can be used continuously to evaluate PaCO2 in a noninvasive fashion. In this study, we compared the accuracy between PetCO2 and PtcCO2 in predicting PaCO2 during prolonged one-lung ventilation with low tidal volume for thoracic surgeries.Eighteen adult patients who underwent thoracic surgeries with one-lung ventilation longer than two hours were included in this study. Their PetCO2, PtcCO2, and PaCO2 values were collected at five time points before and during one-lung ventilation. Agreement among measures was evaluated by Bland-Altman analysis.Ninety sample sets were obtained. The bias and precision when PtcCO2 and PaCO2 were compared were 4.1 ± 6.5 mmHg during two-lung ventilation and 2.9 ± 6.1 mmHg during one-lung ventilation. Those when PetCO2 and PaCO2 were compared were -11.8 ± 6.4 mmHg during two-lung ventilation and -11.8 ± 4.9 mmHg during one-lung ventilation. The differences between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 were significantly lower than those between PetCO2 and PaCO2 at all five time-points (p < 0.05.PtcCO2 monitoring was more accurate for predicting PaCO2 levels during prolonged one-lung ventilation with low tidal volume for patients undergoing thoracic surgeries.

  11. Severe intraoperative hypercarbia undetected by continuous end-tidal CO2 monitoring in a chronic smoker undergoing one-lung ventilation

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    Shagun Bhatia Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One-lung ventilation is known to alter the physiology and result in a discrepancy between end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2 and arterial blood CO2partial pressure despite protective mechanisms like hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Shunts in an emphysematous patient, lateral positioning and capnothorax may aggravate the discrepancy. We present here an incredible discrepancy of 40 mmHg which led us to question the very utility of ETCO2monitoring in this subset of patients and consider alternative techniques.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: relation to end-tidal CO2 tension.

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    Sørensen, H; Nielsen, H B; Secher, N H

    2016-08-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We intend to adjust ventilation according end-tidal CO2 tension (EtCO2) and here evaluated to what extent that strategy maintains frontal lobe oxygenation (ScO2) as determined by near infrared spectroscopy. For 44 patients [5 women, aged 70 (48-83) years] ScO2, mean arterial pressure (MAP), EtCO2, and ventilation were obtained retrospectively from the anesthetic charts. By clamping the aorta, ScO2 and EtCO2 were kept stable by reducing ventilation (median, -0.8 l min(-1); interquartile range, -1.1 to -0.4; P body is reperfused.

  13. The correlation and level of agreement between end-tidal and blood gas pCO2 in children with respiratory distress: a retrospective analysis

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    Alexander Jamin L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the correlation and level of agreement between end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2 and blood gas pCO2 in non-intubated children with moderate to severe respiratory distress. Methods Retrospective study of patients admitted to an intermediate care unit (InCU at a tertiary care center over a 20-month period with moderate to severe respiratory distress secondary to asthma, bronchiolitis, or pneumonia. Patients with venous pCO2 (vpCO2 and EtCO2 measurements within 10 minutes of each other were eligible for inclusion. Patients with cardiac disease, chronic pulmonary disease, poor tissue perfusion, or metabolic abnormalities were excluded. Results Eighty EtCO2-vpCO2 paired values were available from 62 patients. The mean ± SD for EtCO2 and vpCO2 was 35.7 ± 10.1 mmHg and 39.4 ± 10.9 mmHg respectively. EtCO2 and vpCO2 values were highly correlated (r = 0.90, p SD between EtCO2 and vpCO2 was -3.68 ± 4.70 mmHg. The 95% level of agreement ranged from -12.88 to +5.53 mmHg. EtCO2 was found to be more accurate when vpCO2 was 35 mmHg or lower. Conclusion EtCO2 is correlated highly with vpCO2 in non-intubated pediatric patients with moderate to severe respiratory distress across respiratory illnesses. Although the level of agreement between the two methods precludes the overall replacement of blood gas evaluation, EtCO2 monitoring remains a useful, continuous, non-invasive measure in the management of non-intubated children with moderate to severe respiratory distress.

  14. Measuring the human ventilatory and cerebral blood flow response to CO2: a technical consideration for the end-tidal-to-arterial gas gradient.

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    Tymko, Michael M; Hoiland, Ryan L; Kuca, Tomas; Boulet, Lindsey M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Pinske, Bryenna K; Williams, Alexandra M; Foster, Glen E

    2016-01-15

    Our aim was to quantify the end-tidal-to-arterial gas gradients for O2 (PET-PaO2) and CO2 (Pa-PETCO2) during a CO2 reactivity test to determine their influence on the cerebrovascular (CVR) and ventilatory (HCVR) response in subjects with (PFO+, n = 8) and without (PFO-, n = 7) a patent foramen ovale (PFO). We hypothesized that 1) the Pa-PETCO2 would be greater in hypoxia compared with normoxia, 2) the Pa-PETCO2 would be similar, whereas the PET-PaO2 gradient would be greater in those with a PFO, 3) the HCVR and CVR would be underestimated when plotted against PETCO2 compared with PaCO2, and 4) previously derived prediction algorithms will accurately target PaCO2. PETCO2 was controlled by dynamic end-tidal forcing in steady-state steps of -8, -4, 0, +4, and +8 mmHg from baseline in normoxia and hypoxia. Minute ventilation (V̇E), internal carotid artery blood flow (Q̇ICA), middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv), and temperature corrected end-tidal and arterial blood gases were measured throughout experimentation. HCVR and CVR were calculated using linear regression analysis by indexing V̇E and relative changes in Q̇ICA, and MCAv against PETCO2, predicted PaCO2, and measured PaCO2. The Pa-PETCO2 was similar between hypoxia and normoxia and PFO+ and PFO-. The PET-PaO2 was greater in PFO+ by 2.1 mmHg during normoxia (P = 0.003). HCVR and CVR plotted against PETCO2 underestimated HCVR and CVR indexed against PaCO2 in normoxia and hypoxia. Our PaCO2 prediction equation modestly improved estimates of HCVR and CVR. In summary, care must be taken when indexing reactivity measures to PETCO2 compared with PaCO2. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. System identification and closed-loop control of end-tidal CO2 in mechanically ventilated patients.

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    Hahn, Jin-Oh; Dumont, Guy A; Anersmino, J Mark

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to system identification and closed-loop control of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2) in mechanically ventilated patients. An empirical model consisting of a linear dynamic system followed by an affine transform is proposed to derive a low-order and high-fidelity representation that can reproduce the positive and inversely proportional dynamic input-output relationship between PETCO2 and minute ventilation (MV) in mechanically ventilated patients. The predictive capability of the empirical model was evaluated using experimental respiratory data collected from eighteen mechanically ventilated human subjects. The model predicted PETCO2 response accurately with a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 0.22+/-0.16 mmHg and a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.81+/-0.18 (mean+/-SD) when a second-order rational transfer function was used as its linear dynamic component. Using the proposed model, a closedloop control method for PETCO2 based on a proportionalintegral (PI) compensator was proposed by systematic analysis of the system root locus. For the eighteen mechanically ventilated patient models identified, the PI compensator exhibited acceptable closed-loop response with a settling time of 1.27+/- 0.20 min and a negligible overshoot (0.51+/-1.17%), in addition to zero steady-state PETCO2 set point tracking. The physiologic implication of the proposed empirical model was analyzed by comparing it with the traditional multi-compartmental model widely used in pharmacological modeling.

  16. Comparison of apnea identified by respiratory inductance plethysmography with that detected by end-tidal CO(2) or thermistor. The CHIME Study Group.

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    Weese-Mayer, D E; Corwin, M J; Peucker, M R; Di Fiore, J M; Hufford, D R; Tinsley, L R; Neuman, M R; Martin, R J; Brooks, L J; Davidson Ward, S L; Lister, G; Willinger, M

    2000-08-01

    As part of the Collaborative Home Infant Monitoring Evaluation (CHIME) we compared apnea identified by a customized home monitor using respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) with simultaneously recorded polysomnography-acquired nasal end-tidal CO(2) (PET(CO(2))) and nasal/oral thermistor in 422 infants during overnight laboratory recordings to determine concordance between techniques, sources of disagreement, and capacity of RIP to detect obstructed breaths within an apnea. Among 233 episodes of apnea identified by at least one method as >/= 16 s, 120 were observed by the CHIME monitor, 219 by PET(CO(2)), and 163 by thermistor. The positive predictive value of the CHIME-identified apnea was 89.2% (95% CI 83, 95) and 73% (95% CI 65, 81) for PET(CO(2)) and thermistor, respectively. However, the sensitivity of the CHIME monitor in identifying events detected by the other methods was only approximately 50%. Among 87 apnea events identified by all three techniques, no two methods showed high agreement in measurement of apnea duration: RIP and PET(CO(2)) (ICC = 0.54), RIP and thermistor (ICC = 0.13), PET(CO(2)) and nasal thermistor (ICC = 0.41). Among the 179 breaths identified by RIP as obstructed, 79.9% were judged to be obstructed on the PET(CO(2)) and 80.4% were judged to be obstructed on the thermistor channel. Among 238 breaths identified on PET(CO(2)) as obstructed, 54.2% were determined to be obstructed by RIP. Among 204 breaths identified on thermistor as obstructed, 55. 4% were determined to be obstructed by RIP. Reasons for discrepancies in apnea detection among channels included body movement, partial airway obstruction, and obstructed breaths. Despite these limitations the CHIME monitor provides an opportunity to record physiological data previously unavailable in the home.

  17. The Diagnostic Value of End-tidal Carbon Dioxide (EtCO2 and Alveolar Dead Space (AVDS in Patients with Suspected Pulmonary Thrombo-embolism (PTE

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    Reza Basiri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Capnography, is an easy, fast and practical method which its application in the diagnosis of Pulmonary Thromboendarterectomy (PTE has recently been studied. This study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2 and the alveolar dead space (AVDS in the diagnosis of patients suspected to PTE who have been referred to the emergency department. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during one year in the emergency department of Ghaem Hospital on patients with suspected PTE who scored less than 4 for the Wells’ criteria during the initial evaluation. After excluding other differential diagnoses, all patients underwent CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA to confirm PTE. Following that, arterial blood gas sampling, ETCO2 and AVDS were requested for all the patients based on capnography. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistical tests in SPSS software version 11.5. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of AVDS and ETCO2 were measured based on (CTPA results. Results: The study was performed on 78 patients (mean age of 47.08± 15.6 years, 43 males/35 females suspected to PTE. According to the results of CTPA, 37 patients did not develop PTE while 41 patients were with PTE. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age and gender (P=0.999, while a statistically significant difference was found between the mean values of ETCO2 and AVDS between the two groups (P

  18. Effects of inhalational anaesthesia with low tidal volume ventilation on end-tidal sevoflurane and carbon dioxide concentrations: prospective randomized study.

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    de la Matta-Martín, M; López-Herrera, D; Luis-Navarro, J C; López-Romero, J L

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how ventilation with low tidal volumes affects the pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake during the first minutes of inhaled anaesthesia. Forty-eight patients scheduled for lung resection were randomly assigned to three groups. Patients in group 1, 2 and 3 received 3% sevoflurane for 3 min via face mask and controlled ventilation with a tidal volume of 2.2, 8 and 12 ml kg(-1), respectively (Phase 1). After tracheal intubation (Phase 2), 3% sevoflurane was supplied for 2 min using a tidal volume of 8 ml kg(-1) (Phase 3). End-tidal sevoflurane concentrations were significantly higher in group 1 at the end of phase 1 and lower at the end of phase 2 than in the other groups as follows: median of 2.5%, 2.2% and 2.3% in phase 1 for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (P<0.001); and 1.7%, 2.1% and 2.0% in phase 2, respectively (P<0.001). End-tidal carbon dioxide values in group 1 were significantly lower at the end of phase 1 and higher at the end of phase 2 than in the other groups as follows: median of 16.5, 31 and 29.5 mm Hg in phase 1 for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (P<0.001); and 46.2, 36 and 33.5 mm Hg in phase 2, respectively (P<0.001). When sevoflurane is administered with tidal volume approximating the airway dead space volume, end-tidal sevoflurane and end-tidal carbon dioxide may not correctly reflect the concentration of these gases in the alveoli, leading to misinterpretation of expired gas data. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. End-Tidal CO2 Tension Is Predictive of Effective Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

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    Sugimura, Koichiro; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ogawa, Hiromasa; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is characterized by recurring cycles of crescendo-decrescendo ventilation during sleep, and enhances sympathetic nerve activity. Thus CSA has a prognostic impact in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Although nocturnal oxygen (O2) therapy decreases frequency of CSA and improves functional exercise capacity, it is also known that some non-responders to the therapy exist. We thus aimed to identify predictors of responders to nocturnal O2 therapy in CHF patients with CSA. In 12 CHF patients with CSA hospitalized at our department, sleep study was performed at 2 consecutive nights. Patients nasally inhaled O2 at either the first or second night in a randomized manner. To predict the percentage reduction in apnea-hypopnea index (%ΔAHI) in response to the nocturnal O2 therapy, we performed multiple regression analysis with a stepwise method with variables including age, brain-natriuretic peptide, circulation time, baseline AHI, hypercapnic ventilatory response and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2). Nocturnal O2 therapy significantly decreased AHI (from 32 ± 13 /h to 12 ± 10 /h, P 50% reduction of AHI), with 88.9% of sensitivity and 66.7% of specificity. In conclusion, PETCO2 is useful to predict the efficacy of O2 therapy in CHF patients with CSA, providing important information to the current nocturnal O2 therapy.

  20. Implementation of Fowler's method for end-tidal air sampling.

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    Di Francesco, F; Loccioni, C; Fioravanti, M; Russo, A; Pioggia, G; Ferro, M; Roehrer, I; Tabucchi, S; Onor, M

    2008-09-01

    The design, realization and testing of a CO(2)-triggered breath sampler, capable of a separate collection of dead space and end-tidal air on multiple breaths, is presented. This sampling procedure has advantages in terms of the sample volume, insights regarding the origin of compounds, increased reproducibility and higher concentrations of compounds. The high quality of design and the speed of the components ensure a breath-by-breath estimate of dead volume, as well as the comfort and safety of the subject under test. The system represents a valid tool to contribute to the development of a standardized sampling protocol needed to compare results obtained by the various groups in this field.

  1. Evaluation of a new side-stream, low dead space, end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring system in rats.

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    Beck, Christopher; Barthel, Franziska; Hahn, Anna-Maria; Vollmer, Christian; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a newly developed infrared side-stream capnograph with minimal sample volume for the continuous measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in small rodents. Thirty-four male Wistar rats (weight 345 ± 70 g) were treated in accordance with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines for animal care. All experiments were performed with approval of the local animal care and use committee. Sepsis was induced by implanting an 18 gauge stent into the colon 24 h prior to the experiments, allowing a constant fecal leakage into the peritoneal cavity (25 septic and nine control animals). Hemodynamic variables and end-tidal CO2 were recorded continuously and arterial blood (5 × 120 µL) was sampled periodically for arterial blood gas analysis. After baseline controlled mechanical ventilation was randomized and titrated to either normocapnia (35-45 mmHg) or hypercapnia (65-75 mmHg) with exogenous application of CO2. A total of 155 paired CO2 measurements comparing end-tidal and arterial partial pressure were conducted. Side-stream capnography underestimated the CO2 partial pressure with a bias of -6.1 mmHg and a 95% limit of agreement from 6.7 to -19.1 mmHg. Our results suggest that side-stream end-tidal CO2 monitoring with a low dead space could be utilized in rats as a surrogate for the arterial CO2 measurement over a wide range of partial pressures in normal and septic animals.

  2. End-inspiratory rebreathing reduces the end-tidal to arterial PCO2 gradient in mechanically ventilated pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fierstra, Jorn; Machina, Matthew; Battisti-Charbonney, Anne; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph Arnold; Minkovich, Leonid

    Noninvasive monitoring of the arterial partial pressures of CO2 (PaCO2) of critically ill patients by measuring their end-tidal partial pressures of CO2 (PetCO(2)) would be of great clinical value. However, the gradient between PetCO(2) and PaCO2 (Pet-aCO(2)) in such patients typically varies over a

  3. End-inspiratory rebreathing reduces the end-tidal to arterial PCO2 gradient in mechanically ventilated pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fierstra, Jorn; Machina, Matthew; Battisti-Charbonney, Anne; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph Arnold; Minkovich, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of the arterial partial pressures of CO2 (PaCO2) of critically ill patients by measuring their end-tidal partial pressures of CO2 (PetCO(2)) would be of great clinical value. However, the gradient between PetCO(2) and PaCO2 (Pet-aCO(2)) in such patients typically varies over a

  4. Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Ruddiman

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the major ice-sheet variations during the last 2.7 million years remains a mystery. Neither the dominant 41 000-year cycles in δ18O and ice-volume during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene nor the late-Pleistocene variations near 100 000 years is a linear (''Milankovitch'' response to summer insolation forcing. Both result from non-linear behavior within the climate system. Greenhouse gases (primarily CO2 are a plausible source of this non-linearity, but confusion has persisted over whether the gases force ice volume or are a positive feedback. During the last several hundred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine δ18O have varied in phase both at the 41 000-year obliquity cycle and within the ~100 000-year eccentricity band. This timing argues against greenhouse-gas forcing of a slow ice response and instead favors ice control of a fast CO2 response. Because the effect of CO2 on temperature is logarithmic, the temperature/CO2 feedback on ice volume is also logarithmic. In the schematic model proposed here, ice sheets were forced by insolation changes at the precession and obliquity cycles prior to 0.9 million years ago and responded in a linear way, but CO2 feedback amplified (roughly doubled the ice response at 41 000 years. After 0.9 million years ago, as polar climates continued to cool, ablation weakened. CO2 feedback continued to amplify ice-sheet growth at 41 000-year intervals, but weaker ablation permitted ice to survive subsequent insolation maxima of low intensity. These longer-lived ice sheets persisted until peaks in northern summer insolation paced abrupt deglaciations every 100 000±15 000 years. Most ice melting during deglaciations was achieved by the same CO2/temperature feedback that had built the ice sheets, but now acting in the opposite direction. Several processes have the northern geographic origin, as well as the requisite orbital tempo and phasing, to have been the mechanisms by which ice sheets

  5. Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Ruddiman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the major ice-sheet variations during the last 2.7 million years is a long-standing mystery. Neither the dominant 41 000-year cycles in δ18O/ice-volume during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene nor the late-Pleistocene oscillations near 100 000 years is a linear ('Milankovitch' response to summer insolation forcing. Both responses must result from non-linear behavior within the climate system. Greenhouse gases (primarily CO2 are a plausible source of the required non-linearity, but confusion has persisted over whether the gases force ice volume or are a positive feedback. During the last several hundred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine δ18O have varied in phase at the 41 000-year obliquity cycle and nearly in phase within the ~100 000-year band. This timing rules out greenhouse-gas forcing of a very slow ice response and instead favors ice control of a fast CO2 response. In the schematic model proposed here, ice sheets responded linearly to insolation forcing at the precession and obliquity cycles prior to 0.9 million years ago, but CO2 feedback amplified the ice response at the 41 000-year period by a factor of approximately two. After 0.9 million years ago, with slow polar cooling, ablation weakened. CO2 feedback continued to amplify ice-sheet growth every 41 000 years, but weaker ablation permitted some ice to survive insolation maxima of low intensity. Step-wise growth of these longer-lived ice sheets continued until peaks in northern summer insolation produced abrupt deglaciations every ~85 000 to ~115 000 years. Most of the deglacial ice melting resulted from the same CO2/temperature feedback that had built the ice sheets. Several processes have the northern geographic origin, as well as the requisite orbital tempo and phasing, to be candidate mechanisms for ice-sheet control of CO2 and their own feedback.

  6. Transient influence of end-tidal carbon dioxide tension on the postural restraint in cerebral perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R.V.; Truijen, J.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    In the upright position, cerebral blood flow is reduced, maybe because arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pa(CO(2))) decreases. We evaluated the time-dependent influence of a reduction in Pa(CO(2)), as indicated by the end-tidal Pco(2) tension (Pet(CO(2))), on cerebral perfusion during head......-up tilt. Mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)), and dynamic cerebral autoregulation at supine rest and 70 degrees head-up tilt were determined during free breathing and with Pet(CO(2)) clamped to the supine level. The postural changes in central...

  7. Correlation of end tidal and arterial carbon dioxide levels in critically Ill neonates and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Hiren; Kashyap, Rahul; Trivedi, Sangita

    2014-06-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) monitoring is considered to reflect real-time estimation of partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO2) noninvasively. However, knowledge about its relationship with PaCO2 in critically ill pediatric and neonatal patients is limited. The primary objective was to evaluate predictive capability of end tidal carbon dioxide monitoring and secondary objective was to determine the influence of severity of lung disease on EtCO2 and PaCO2 relationship. This was a prospective, nonrandomized, consecutive enrollment study carried out in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units of a tertiary care children hospital. It was conducted in 66 neonates and 35 children receiving mechanical ventilation. Severity of lung disease was estimated by ventilation index and PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio. Simultaneous recording of EtCO2 and PaCO2 levels was done and data were analyzed for correlation and agreement. In neonates, 150 EtCO2 and PaCO2 pairs were recorded. The mean weight ± SD of patients was 2.1 ± 0.63 kg. PaCO2 had a positive correlation with EtCO2 (r = 0.836, 95% CI = 0.78-0.88). P/F ratio <200 adversely affected relationship. In infants and children, 96 pairs were recorded. Mean age ± SD of patients was 4.20 ± 4.92 years and mean weight ± SD was 13.1 ± 9.49 kg. PaCO2 had an excellent correlation with EtCO2 (r = 0.914, 95% CI = 0.87 and 0.94). P/F ratio <200 adversely affected relationship. EtCO2 monitoring displayed a good validity to predict PaCO2. Correlation was affected by low P/F ratio (<200); hence, it is recommended that blood gases be measured in these patients until such time that a good relation can be established between end tidal and arterial CO2 values.

  8. Arterial and end-tidal carbon dioxide difference in pediatric intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulananda Dias Goonasekera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO 2 is considered the gold standard for scrupulous monitoring in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU, but it is invasive, laborious, expensive, and intermittent. The study aims to explore when we can use end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (P ET CO 2 as a reliable, continuous, and noninvasive monitor of arterial CO 2 Materials and Methods: Concurrent P ET CO 2 , fraction of inspired oxygen, PaCO 2 , and arterial oxygen tension values of clinically stable children on mechanical ventilation were recorded. Children with extra-pulmonary ventriculoatrial shunts were excluded. The P ET CO 2 and PaCO 2 difference and its variability and reproducibility were studied. Results: A total of 624 concurrent readings were obtained from 105 children (mean age [SD] 5.53 [5.43] years requiring invasive bi-level positive airway pressure ventilation in the PICU. All had continuous P ET CO 2 monitoring and an arterial line for blood gas measurement. The mean (SD number of concurrent readings obtained from each child, 4-6 h apart was 6.0 (4.05. The P ET CO 2 values were higher than PaCO 2 in 142 observations (22.7%. The PaCO 2 -P ET CO 2 difference was individual admission specific (ANOVA, P < 0.001. The PaCO 2 -P ET CO 2 difference correlated positively with the alveolar-arterial oxygen tension [P(A-aO 2 ] difference (ρ = 0.381 P < 0.0001. There was a fixed bias between the P ET CO 2 and PaCO 2 measuring methods, difference +0.66 KPa (95% confidence interval: +0.57 to +0.76. Conclusions: The PaCO 2 -P ET CO 2 difference was individual specific. It was not affected by the primary disorder leading to the ventilation.

  9. Arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide difference in children undergoing mechanical ventilation of the lungs during general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodi, C; Bühler, P K; Thomas, J; Schmitz, A; Weiss, M

    2017-07-11

    Capnography (ETCO2 ) is routinely used as a non-invasive estimate of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2 ) levels in order to modify ventilatory settings, whereby it is assumed that there is a positive gap between PaCO2 and ETCO2 of approximately 0.5 kPa. However, negative values (ETCO2 > PaCO2 ) can be observed. We retrospectively analysed arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide differences in 799 children undergoing general anaesthesia with mechanical ventilation of the lungs in order to elucidate predictors for a negative gap. A total of 2452 blood gas analysis readings with complete vital sign monitoring, anaesthesia gas analysis and spirometry data were analysed. Mean arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide difference was -0.18 kPa (limits of 95% agreement -1.10 to 0.74) and 71.2% of samples demonstrated negative values. The intercept model revealed PaCO2 to be the strongest predictor for a negative PaCO2 -ETCO2 difference. A decrease in PaCO2 by 1 kPa resulted in a decrease in the PaCO2 -ETCO2 difference by 0.23 kPa. This study demonstrates that ETCO2 monitoring in children whose lungs are mechanically ventilated may paradoxically lead to overestimation of ETCO2 (ETCO2 > PaCO2 ) with a subsequent risk of unrecognised hypocarbia. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Extensive CO2 Leakage From Extinct and Modern CO2 Reservoirs in New Mexico and Arizona: Evaluating the Role of Seal Bypass and Large-Volume Travertine Deposition With Implications For CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priewisch, A.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Mozley, P.

    2014-12-01

    Quaternary large-volume travertine deposits in New Mexico and Arizona occur along the Rio Grande rift and on the southeastern Colorado Plateau. Travertines are natural analogues for CO2 leakage along fault systems because they form due to the degassing of CO2 from carbonic groundwater that migrates up fault systems. Travertine volumes can be used to infer integrated CO2 leakage along faults, which includes: (1) CO2 that becomes fixed in CaCO3/travertine (tons of carbon converted into tons of carbonate), (2) the amount of CO2 that degassed into the atmosphere (twice the amount of (1), based on reaction stoichiometry), (3) dissolved CO2 that is carried away with the water discharging from a spring (based on modern spring discharge and dissolved carbon content), and (4) CO2 that escapes through the soil (based on modern soil flux measurements). The total CO2 leakage (1 and 2) calculated in this study is estimated as ~6 Gt (gigatons) whereas the integrated CO2 leakage (1-4) is estimated as ~128 Gt over ~450,000 years of travertine accumulation. U-series dating of the travertines shows that the deposits formed episodically which implies that CO2 leakage occurred episodically. Better understanding of integrated CO2 leakage along fault systems is needed to better constrain global estimates of natural CO2 fluxes, and to help in risk assessment of CO2 sequestration sites designed to effectively store anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface.

  11. [Transbronchoscopic end-tidal carbon dioxide detection for location of the leading bronchus in patients with pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yiming; Lin, Huihuang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) detection for location of the leading bronchus in patients with pneumothorax. Transbronchoscopic EtCO2 detection was performed in 4 patients with intractable pneumothorax in whom transbronchoscopic balloon detection failed to localize the leading bronchus. A specific bronchus was suspected to be the leading bronchus when its EtCO2 value was significantly lower than that of the main bronchus of the affected lung. After the pleural air leakage was successfully sealed by bronchial occlusion of the suspected bronchus, the EtCO2 was confirmed to indicate the leading bronchus. Transbronchoscopic EtCO2 detection successfully located the leading bronchus in all 4 patients. Transbronchoscopic EtCO2 detection is a new method of locating the leading bronchus in patients with intractable pneumothorax.

  12. Application of end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring via distal gas samples in ventilated neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ziying; Yang, Maoying; Lin, Ru; Huang, Wenfang; Wang, Jiangmei; Hu, Zhiyong; Shu, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Previous research has suggested correlations between the end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PETCO2) and the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) in mechanically ventilated patients, but both the relationship between PETCO2 and PaCO2 and whether PETCO2 accurately reflects PaCO2 in neonates and infants are still controversial. This study evaluated remote sampling of PETCO2 via an epidural catheter within an endotracheal tube to determine the procedure's clinical safety and efficacy in the perioperative management of neonates. Abdominal surgery was performed under general anesthesia in 86 full-term newborns (age 1-30 days, weight 2.55-4.0 kg, American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II). The infants were divided into 2 groups (n = 43 each), and carbon dioxide (CO2) gas samples were collected either from the conventional position (the proximal end) or a modified position (the distal end) of the epidural catheter. The PETCO2 measured with the new method was significantly higher than that measured with the traditional method, and the difference between PETCO2 and PaCO2 was also reduced. The accuracy of PETCO2 measured increased from 78.7% to 91.5% when the modified sampling method was used. The moderate correlation between PETCO2 and PaCO2 by traditional measurement was 0.596, which significantly increased to 0.960 in the modified sampling group. Thus, the PETCO2 value was closer to that of PaCO2. PETCO2 detected via modified carbon dioxide monitoring had a better accuracy and correlation with PaCO2 in neonates. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Disparity between mainstream and sidestream end-tidal carbon dioxide values and arterial carbon dioxide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdemir, Murat; Cinar, Orhan; Yilmaz, Serkan; Yaka, Elif; Yuksel, Melih

    2013-07-01

    Measuring and monitoring end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) is an important aspect of caring for critically ill patients. The 2 methods used for PETCO2 measurement are the mainstream and sidestream methods. To assess the agreement between PETCO2 measurements performed by mainstream and sidestream methods with the PaCO2 values. This was a prospective observational study. A total of 114 subjects were enrolled in the study. PETCO2 measurements using mainstream and sidestream methods were performed simultaneously with the arterial blood sampling in subjects who were observed in the emergency department and required arterial blood gas analysis. Agreement between the PETCO2 measurements and the PaCO2 values obtained from arterial blood gas analysis were evaluated using the Bland-Altman method. Sixty subjects (52.6%) were female, and the mean age was 60.9 years (95% CI 58.3-63.6). The mean PaCO2 was 35.16 mm Hg (95% CI 33.81-36.51), the mainstream PETCO2 was 22.11 (95% CI 21.05-23.18), and the sidestream PETCO2 was 25.48 (95% CI 24.22-26.75). Bland-Altman analysis showed an average difference between mainstream PETCO2 and PaCO2 values of 13 mm Hg (95% limits of agreement -0.6 to 25.5) and moderate correlation (r = 0.55, P < .001). The average difference between the sidestream PETCO2 and PaCO2 values was 9.7 mm Hg (95% limits of agreement -5.4 to 24.7) and poor correlation (r = 0.41, P < .001). PETCO2 values obtained by mainstream and sidestream methods were found to be significantly lower than the PaCO2 values. There was essentially no agreement between the measurements obtained by 2 different methods and the PaCO2 values.

  14. Implementation of a novel postoperative monitoring system using automated Modified Early Warning Scores (MEWS) incorporating end-tidal capnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankush, Joseph M; Freeman, Robbie; McIlvaine, Joy; Tran, Trung; Nassani, Stephen; Leitman, I Michael

    2016-10-20

    Modified Early Warning Scores (MEWS) provide real-time vital sign (VS) trending and reduce ICU admissions in post-operative patients. These early warning calculations classically incorporate oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, and temperature but have not previously included end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2), more recently identified as an independent predictor of critical illness. These systems may be subject to failure when physiologic data is incorrectly measured, leading to false alarms and increased workload. This study investigates whether the implementation of automated devices that utilize ongoing vital signs monitoring and MEWS calculations, inclusive of a score for end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2), can be feasibly implemented on the general care hospital floor and effectively identify derangements in a post-operative patient's condition while limiting the amount of false alarms that would serve to increase provider workload. From July to November 2014, post-operative patients meeting the inclusion criteria (BMI > 30 kg/m(2), history of obstructive sleep apnea, or the use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or epidural narcotics) were monitored using automated devices that record minute-by-minute VS included in classic MEWS calculations as well as EtCO2. Automated messages via pagers were sent to providers for instances when the device measured elevated MEWS, abnormal EtCO2, and oxygen desaturations below 85 %. Data, including alarm and message details from the first 133 patients, were recorded and analyzed. Overall, 3.3 alarms and pages sounded per hour of monitoring. Device-only alarms sounded 2.7 times per hour-21 % were technical alarms. The remaining device-only alarms for concerning VS sounded 2.0/h, 70 % for falsely recorded VS. Pages for abnormal EtCO2 sounded 0.4/h (82 % false recordings) while pages for low blood oxygen saturation sounded 0.1/h (55 % false alarms). 143 times (0.1 pages/h) the devices calculated a MEWS

  15. CO2 measurements during transcranial Doppler examinations in headache patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    -tidal pCO2 with a capnograph. When patients are nauseated and vomit, as in migraine, the mask or mouthpiece connected to the capnograph represents a problem. We therefore evaluated whether a transcutaneous pCO2 electrode was as useful as the capnograph for pCO2 measurements in TCD examinations. We...... conclude that this is not the case, and recommend capnographic end-tidal pCO2 measurements during TCD examinations. However, transcutaneous pCO2 measurements may represent a supplement to spot measurements of end-tidal pCO2 in stable conditions when long-term monitoring is needed, and the mask...

  16. Limitations of End-Tidal CO2 as an Early Indicator of Central Hypovolemia in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    undergoing infrarenal aortic abdom- inal aneurysm repair; when the aortic clamp was re- leased, systolic hypotension (> 20%) occurred in sub- jects who...composite technique for continuous, minimally invasive monitoring. J Pediatr Surg. 1984;19:758–763. 35. Yosefy C, Hay E, Nasri Y, Magen E, Reisin L. End

  17. End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during bag valve ventilation: the use of a new portable device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindström Veronica

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For healthcare providers in the prehospital setting, bag-valve mask (BVM ventilation could be as efficacious and safe as endotracheal intubation. To facilitate the evaluation of efficacious ventilation, capnographs have been further developed into small and convenient devices able to provide end- tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a new portable device (EMMA™ attached to a ventilation mask would provide ETCO2 values accurate enough to confirm proper BVM ventilation. Methods A prospective observational trial was conducted in a single level-2 centre. Twenty-two patients under general anaesthesia were manually ventilated. ETCO2 was measured every five minutes with the study device and venous PCO2 (PvCO2 was simultaneously measured for comparison. Bland- Altman plots were used to compare ETCO2, and PvCO2. Results The patients were all hemodynamically and respiratory stable during anaesthesia. End-tidal carbon dioxide values were corresponding to venous gases during BVM ventilation under optimal conditions. The bias, the mean of the differences between the two methods (device versus venous blood gases, for time points 1-4 ranges from -1.37 to -1.62. Conclusion The portable device, EMMA™ is suitable for determining carbon dioxide in expired air (kPa as compared to simultaneous samples of PvCO2. It could therefore, be a supportive tool to asses the BVM ventilation in the demanding prehospital and emergency setting.

  18. Evaluation of transcutaneous and end-tidal carbon dioxide levels during inhalation sedation in volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kenichi; Chikuda, Mami; Ohashi, Ayako; Kumagai, Miho; Kuji, Akiyoshi; Joh, Shigeharu

    2016-08-01

    Measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) is useful because of its noninvasiveness, continuity, and response time when sudden changes in ventilation occur during inhalation sedation. We compared the accuracy of PETCO2 using a nasal mask and nasal cannula with the accuracy of transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TC-CO2) and determined which method is more useful during inhalation sedation in volunteers. We used a modified nasal mask (MNM) and modified nasal cannula (MNC) for measurement of PETCO2. The capnometer measured PETCO2 in the gas expired from the nasal cavity by means of two devices. The volunteers received supplemental O2 by means of each device at a flow rate of 6 L/min. After the volunteers lay quietly for 5 min with a supply of 100 % O2, they received supplemental N2O by means of each device at concentrations of 10, 20, and 25 % for 5 min and 30 % for 25 min. The correlation coefficient was poorer in the MNM than in the MNC, and the mean difference between TC-CO2 and PETCO2 in the MNM was greater than that in the MNC. The difference between the TC-CO2 and PETCO2 ranged from 3 to 6 mmHg in the MNM and from 2 to 5 mmHg in the MNC. The difference between two variables against the TC-CO2 and the CO2 waveforms obtained by means of the two devices were within the clinically acceptable range. Our two devices can provide continuous monitoring of PETCO2 with a supply of N2O/O2 in patients undergoing inhalation sedation.

  19. Noninvasive monitoring of CO2 during polysomnography: a review of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdung, Christopher A; Adeleye, Adetayo; Kirk, Valerie G

    2016-11-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders are complex conditions that require the integration of clinical and sleep laboratory findings to support a diagnosis. Analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during sleep provides important additional information to the clinician that is not obtained from other polysomnographic indices, and that may have a direct impact on both diagnosis and patient mortality. Although arterial blood gas (ABG) is considered the gold standard for assessing PaCO2 levels, there are numerous drawbacks. Noninvasive methods for PaCO2 estimation include end-tidal and transcutaneous monitoring, which allow for continuous monitoring of trends. Review of the recent literature suggests that transcutaneous methods correlate strongly with PaCO2 levels and can provide an accurate surrogate in replacement of ABGs. End-tidal methods provide breath to breath information that can be used to assess hypoventilation; however, they have more variability, especially in patients with increased dead space and small tidal volumes. To date, however, there are limited studies investigating noninvasive CO2 monitoring during sleep. Given the benefits of CO2 monitoring and the importance of assessing for hypercapnia, noninvasive continuous CO2 monitoring should be considered for all patients undergoing polysomnography.

  20. Carbon dioxide monitoring during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery in severely obese patients: transcutaneous versus end-tidal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Joanna M; McKee, Chris; Tobias, Joseph D; Herz, Daniel; Sohner, Paul; Teich, Steven; Michalsky, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Various factors including severe obesity or increases in intra-abdominal pressure during laparoscopy can lead to inaccuracies in end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) monitoring. The current study prospectively compares ET and transcutaneous (TC) CO2 monitoring in severely obese adolescents and young adults during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery. Carbon dioxide was measured with both ET and TC devices during insufflation and laparoscopic bariatric surgery. The differences between each measure (PETCO2 and TC-CO2) and the PaCO2 were compared using a non-paired t test, Fisher's exact test, and a Bland-Altman analysis. The study cohort included 25 adolescents with a mean body mass index of 50.2 kg/m2 undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. There was no difference in the absolute difference between the TC-CO2 and PaCO2 (3.2±3.0 mmHg) and the absolute difference between the PETCO2 and PaCO2 (3.7±2.5 mmHg). The bias and precision were 0.3 and 4.3 mmHg for TC monitoring versus PaCO2 and 3.2 and 3.2 mmHg for ET monitoring versus PaCO2. In the young severely obese population both TC and PETCO2 monitoring can be used to effectively estimate PaCO2. The correlation of PaCO2 to TC-CO2 is good, and similar to the correlation of PaCO2 to PETCO2. In this population, both of these non-invasive measures of PaCO2 can be used to monitor ventilation and minimize arterial blood gas sampling.

  1. Continuous non-invasive PCO2 monitoring in weaning patients: Transcutaneous is advantageous over end-tidal PCO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Sarah B; Windisch, Wolfram; Magnet, Friederike S; Schmoor, Claudia; Karagiannidis, Christian; Callegari, Jens; Huttmann, Sophie E; Storre, Jan H

    2017-06-14

    Continuous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2 ) assessment is essential for the success of mechanical ventilation (MV). Non-invasive end-tidal PCO2 (PetCO2 ) and transcutaneous PCO2 (PtcCO2 ) measurements serve as alternatives to the gold standard arterial PCO2 (PaCO2 ) method, but their eligibility in critical care is unclear. The present study therefore performed methodological comparisons of PaCO2 versus PetCO2 and PtcCO2 , respectively, in weaning patients receiving invasive MV via tracheal cannulas. PetCO2 and PtcCO2 were recorded continuously, while PaCO2 was analysed at baseline, and after 30 and 60 min. Using the Bland-Altman analysis, a clinically acceptable range was defined as a mean difference of ±4 mm Hg between PaCO2 and non-invasive strategies. A total of 60 patients (COPD (n = 30) and non-COPD (n = 30)) completed the protocol. Mean PCO2 values were 42.4 ± 8.6 mm Hg (PaCO2 ), 36.5 ± 7.5 mm Hg (PetCO2 ) and 41.7 ± 8.7 mm Hg (PtcCO2 ). Mean differences between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 were -0.7 ± 3.6 mm Hg (95% CI: -1.6/0.3 mm Hg; 95% limits of agreement: -7.8 to 6.4 mm Hg), and between PetCO2 and PaCO2 -5.9 ± 5.3 mm Hg (95% CI: -7.2/-4.5 mm Hg; 95% limits of agreement: -16.2 to 4.5 mm Hg). Underestimation of PaCO2 by PetCO2 was most pronounced in COPD patients. Our data therefore support PtcCO2 as a suitable means for monitoring PCO2 in patients undergoing invasive MV. This is in contrast to PetCO2 , which clearly underestimated PaCO2 , especially in patients with COPD. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Increased requirement for minute ventilation and negative arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide gradient may indicate malignant hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Tien Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic signs of malignant hyperthermia (MH include unexplained tachycardia, increased end-tidal carbon dioxide (Etco2 concentration, metabolic and respiratory acidosis, and an increase in body temperature above 38.8°C. We present the case of a patient with highly probable MH. In addition to sinus tachycardia and metabolic and respiratory acidosis, this patient also had a negative arterial to Etco2 gradient and an increased requirement for minute ventilation to maintain a normal Etco2 concentration, with signs of increased CO2 production. Despite these signs of MH, the patient's rectal temperature monitoring equipment did not show an increase in temperature, although the temperature measured in the mouth was increased. This case illustrates the unreliability of measuring rectal temperature as a means of reflecting body temperature during MH and the usefulness of increased CO2 production signs in helping to diagnose MH.

  3. Bymixer provides on-line calibration of measurement of CO2 volume exhaled per breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, P H; Serina, E R

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of CO2 volume exhaled per breath (VCO2.br) can be determined during anesthesia by the multiplication and integration of tidal flow (V) and PCO2. During side-stream capnometry, PCO2 must be advanced in time by transport delay (TD), the time to suction gas through the sampling tube. During ventilation, TD can vary due to sample line connection internal volume or flow rate changes. To determine correct TD and measure accurate VCO2.br during actual ventilation. TD can be iteratively adjusted (TDADJ) until VCO2-br/tidal volume equals PCO2 measured in a mixed expired gas collection (PECO2) (J Appl. Physiol. 72:2029-2035, 1992). However. PECO2 is difficult to measure during anesthesia because CO2 is absorbed in the circle circuit. Accordingly, we implemented a bypass flow-mixing chamber device (bymixer) that was interposed in the expiration limb of the circle circuit and accurately measured PECO2 over a wide range of conditions of ventilation of a test lung-metabolic chamber (regression slope = 1.01: R2 = 0.99). The bymixer response (time constant) varied from 18.1 +/- 0.03 sec (12.5 l/min ventilation) to 66.7 +/- 0.9 sec (2.5 l/min). Bymixer PECO2 was used to correctly determine TDADJ (without interrupting respiration) to enable accurate measurement of VCO2.br over widely changing expiratory flow patterns.

  4. Evaluation of an end-tidal portable ETCO2 colorimetric breath indicator (COLIBRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitsch, Werner; Nikolic, Ajsa; Schellongowski, Peter; Kofler, Julia; Kraft, Peter; Krenn, Claus G; Staudinger, Thomas; Locker, Gottfried J; Knöbl, Paul; Hofbauer, Roland; Frass, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of tube position is important after in-hospital and prehospital emergency intubation. Colorimetric breath indicators are devices for immediate control of tube positioning by showing a color change according to end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) concentrations. We hypothesized that colorimetric breath indicators can yield reliable results for confirmation of tube position. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a new colorimetric breath indicator (Colibri, ICOR AB, Bromma, Sweden) in 147 patients during general anesthesia, in critically ill patients, during transport to in-hospital interventions, and in a study design after insertion of a second tube into the esophagus in long-term ventilated patients. The Colibri was attached between the respective airway and ventilatory tubing. Seventy-three patients were investigated during general anesthesia, 39 patients were observed during long-term ventilation with an average duration of 33 hours, in 15 patients during transport to an intervention for up to 4 hours, and in 20 long-term ventilated patients at the medical intensive-care unit after insertion of a second tube intentionally into the esophagus with the help of a laryngoscope. The Colibri worked well in all groups investigated and showed no false results in the group with tubes inserted into the trachea and esophagus. Data suggest that the Colibri might serve as a valuable tool for evaluating and controlling tube position. This device is independent of power supply or electronic equipment, portable, small, and immediately ready for use.

  5. Effects of concurrent intravenous morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride on end-tidal carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goli Veeraindar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory depression, a potentially fatal side-effect of opioid-overdose, may be reversed by timely administration of an opioid antagonist, such as naloxone or naltrexone. Tampering with a formulation of morphine sulfate and sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride extended release capsules (MS-sNT releases both the opioid morphine and the antagonist naltrexone. A study in recreational opioid-users indicated that morphine and naltrexone injected in the 25:1 ratio (duplicating the ratio of the formulation found MS-sNT reduced morphine-induced euphoric effects vs intravenous (IV morphine alone. In the same study, the effects of morphine + naltrexone on end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2, a measure of respiratory-depression, were evaluated and these data are reported here. Methods Single-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. Non-dependent male opioid users were randomized to receive single IV doses of placebo, 30 mg morphine alone, and 30 mg morphine + 1.2 mg naltrexone. EtCO2 was measured by noninvasive capnography. Results Significant differences in EtCO2 least-squares means across all treatments for maximal effect (Emax and area under the effect curve (AUE0-2, AUE0-8, AUE0-24 were detected (all p ≤ 0.0011. EtCO2 Emax values for morphine + naltrexone were significantly reduced vs morphine alone (42.9 mm Hg vs 47.1 mm Hg, p max was delayed for morphine + naltrexone vs morphine alone (5.0 h vs 1.0 h. Conclusions Results provide preliminary evidence that the naltrexone:morphine ratio within MS-sNT is sufficient to significantly reduce EtCO2 when administered intravenously to non-dependent male recreational opioid-users. Further studies with multiple measures of respiratory-function are warranted to determine if risk of respiratory depression is also reduced by naltrexone in the tampered formulation.

  6. Using CO(2) to determine inhaled contaminant volumes and blower effectiveness in several types of respirators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Arthur T; Koh, Frank C; Scott, William H; Rehak, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine how much contaminant could be expected to be inhaled when overbreathing several different types of respirators. These included several tight-fitting and loose-fitting powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) and one air-purifying respirator (APR). CO(2) was used as a tracer gas in the ambient air, and several loose-and tight-fitting respirators were tested on the head form of a breathing machine. CO(2) concentration in the exhaled breath was monitored as well as CO(2) concentration in the ambient air. This concentration ratio was able to give a measurement of protection factor, not for the respirator necessarily, but for the wearer. Flow rates in the filter/blower inlet and breathing machine outlet were also monitored, so blower effectiveness (defined as the blower contribution to inhaled air) could also be determined. Wearer protection factors were found to range from 1.1 for the Racal AirMate loose-fitting PAPR to infinity for the 3M Hood, 3M Breath-Easy PAPR, and SE 400 breath-responsive PAPR. Inhaled contaminant volumes depended on tidal volume but ranged from 2.02  L to 0  L for the same respirators, respectively. Blower effectiveness was about 1.0 for tight-fitting APRs, 0.18 for the Racal, and greater than 1.0 for two of the loose-fitting PAPRs. With blower effectiveness greater than 1.0, some blower flow during the exhalation phase contributes to the subsequent inhalation. Results from this experiment point to different ways to measure respirator efficacy.

  7. Using CO2 to Determine Inhaled Contaminant Volumes and Blower Effectiveness in Several Types of Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Arthur T.; Koh, Frank C.; Scott, William H.; Rehak, Timothy E.

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine how much contaminant could be expected to be inhaled when overbreathing several different types of respirators. These included several tight-fitting and loose-fitting powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) and one air-purifying respirator (APR). CO2 was used as a tracer gas in the ambient air, and several loose-and tight-fitting respirators were tested on the head form of a breathing machine. CO2 concentration in the exhaled breath was monitored as well as CO2 concentration in the ambient air. This concentration ratio was able to give a measurement of protection factor, not for the respirator necessarily, but for the wearer. Flow rates in the filter/blower inlet and breathing machine outlet were also monitored, so blower effectiveness (defined as the blower contribution to inhaled air) could also be determined. Wearer protection factors were found to range from 1.1 for the Racal AirMate loose-fitting PAPR to infinity for the 3M Hood, 3M Breath-Easy PAPR, and SE 400 breath-responsive PAPR. Inhaled contaminant volumes depended on tidal volume but ranged from 2.02 L to 0 L for the same respirators, respectively. Blower effectiveness was about 1.0 for tight-fitting APRs, 0.18 for the Racal, and greater than 1.0 for two of the loose-fitting PAPRs. With blower effectiveness greater than 1.0, some blower flow during the exhalation phase contributes to the subsequent inhalation. Results from this experiment point to different ways to measure respirator efficacy. PMID:21792358

  8. CO2 column-averaged volume mixing ratio derived over Tsukuba from measurements by commercial airlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Matsueda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Column-averaged volume mixing ratios of carbon dioxide (XCO2 during the period from January 2007 to May 2008 over Tsukuba, Japan, were derived by using CO2 concentration data observed by Japan Airlines Corporation (JAL commercial airliners, based on the assumption that CO2 profiles over Tsukuba and Narita were the same. CO2 profile data for 493 flights on clear-sky days were analysed in order to calculate XCO2 with an ancillary dataset: Tsukuba observational data (by rawinsonde and a meteorological tower or global meteorological data (NCEP and CIRA-86. The amplitude of seasonal variation of XCO2 (Tsukuba observational from the Tsukuba observational data was determined by least-squares fit using a harmonic function to roughly evaluate the seasonal variation over Tsukuba. The highest and lowest values of the obtained fitted curve in 2007 for XCO2 (Tsukuba observational were 386.4 and 381.7 ppm in May and September, respectively. The dependence of XCO2 on the type of ancillary dataset was evaluated. The average difference between XCO2 (global from global climatological data and XCO2 (Tsukuba observational, i.e., the bias of XCO2 (global based on XCO2 (Tsukuba observational, was found to be -0.621 ppm with a standard deviation of 0.682 ppm. The uncertainty of XCO2 (global based on XCO2 (Tsukuba observational was estimated to be 0.922 ppm. This small uncertainty suggests that the present method of XCO2 calculation using data from airliners and global climatological data can be applied to the validation of GOSAT products for XCO2 over airports worldwide.

  9. Association between Prehospital CPR Quality and End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Levels in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Spaite, Daniel W; Hu, Chengcheng; McDannold, Robyn; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F

    2016-01-01

    International Guidelines recommend measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) to enhance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality and optimize blood flow during CPR. Numerous factors impact EtCO2 (e.g., ventilation, metabolism, cardiac output), yet few clinical studies have correlated CPR quality and EtCO2 during actual out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitations. The purpose of this study was to describe the association between EtCO2 and CPR quality variables during OHCA. This is an observational study of prospectively collected CPR quality and capnography data from two EMS agencies participating in a statewide resuscitation quality improvement program. CPR quality and capnography data from adult (≥18 years) cardiac resuscitation attempts (10/2008-06/2013) were collected and analyzed on a minute-by-minute basis using RescueNet™ Code Review. Linear mixed effect models were used to evaluate the association between (log-transformed) EtCO2 level and CPR variables: chest compression (CC) depth, CC rate, CC release velocity (CCRV), ventilation rate. Among the 1217 adult OHCA cases of presumed cardiac etiology, 925 (76.0%) had a monitor-defibrillator file with CPR quality data, of which 296 (32.0%) cases had >1 minute of capnography data during CPR. After capnography quality review, 66 of these cases (22.3%) were excluded due to uninterpretable capnography, resulting in a final study sample of 230 subjects (mean age 68 years; 69.1% male), with a total of 1581 minutes of data. After adjustment for other CPR variables, a 10 mm increase in CC depth was associated with a 4.0% increase in EtCO2 (p < 0.0001), a 10 compression/minute increase in CC rate with a 1.7% increase in EtCO2 (p = 0.02), a 10 mm/second increase in CCRV with a 2.8% increase in EtCO2 (p = 0.03), and a 10 breath/minute increase in ventilation rate with a 17.4% decrease in EtCO2 (p < 0.0001). When controlling for known CPR quality variables, increases in CC depth, CC rate and CCRV

  10. End tidal carbon dioxide levels during the resuscitation of prematurely born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vadivelam; O'Rourke-Potocki, Anthony; Dattani, Nikesh; Fox, Grenville F; Campbell, Morag E; Milner, Anthony D; Greenough, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Successful resuscitation of prematurely born infants is dependent on achieving adequate alveolar ventilation and vasodilation of the pulmonary vascular bed. Elevation of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2)) levels may indicate pulmonary vasodilation. This research aims to study the temporal changes in ETCO(2) levels and the infant's respiratory efforts during face mask resuscitation in the labour suite, and to determine if the infant's first inspiratory effort was associated with a rise in the ETCO(2) levels, suggesting pulmonary vasodilation had occurred. This study is an observational one. The subjects of the study are forty infants with a median gestational age of 30 weeks (range 23-34). Inflation pressures, expiratory tidal volumes and ETCO(2) levels were measured. The median expiratory tidal volume of inflations prior to the onset of the infant's respiratory efforts (passive inflations) was lower than that of the inflation associated with the first inspiratory effort (active inflation) (1.8 (range 0.1-7.3) versus 6.3 ml/kg (range 1.9-18.4), plevels (0.3 (range 0.1-2.1) versus 3.4 kPa (0.4-11.5), plevel (2.2 kPa (range 0.3-9.3)) of the two passive inflations following the first active inflation were also higher than the median expiratory tidal volume and ETCO(2) levels of the previous passive inflations (pcarbon dioxide elimination, likely due to pulmonary vasodilation, occurred with the onset of the infant's respiratory efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 关于CO2有机溶剂体系液相体积膨胀的研究%Study of the Liquid Phase Volume Expansion for CO2/Organic Solvent Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志义; 夏远景; 刘学武; 邓小亮; 胡大鹏

    2005-01-01

    The supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process has been developed in recent years for the formation of nanoand micro-particles. It is necessary to study the liquid phase volume expansion (LPVE) and find the relationships between the operating conditions and the LPVE in order to develop a practical method for determining the operation conditions and selecting an organic solvent for SAS process. The PR equation of state with vdW-1 mixing rule is used to calculate the LPVE for CO2/toluene, CO2/acetone and CO2/ethyl acetate systems, and the results show that the LPVE for each CO2/organic solvent system decreases as the temperature increases. The relationship between the LPVE and the solubility of CO2 in the liquid phase for CO2/organic solvent systems is investigated,and the results show that the LPVE is determined directly by the solubility of CO2 in the liquid phase, xCO2, and can be related to xCO2 independently. No matter what system of CO2/organic solvent is and how different the temperature is, the LPVEs have little difference as long as the solubility of CO2 in the liquid phase, xCO2, keeps constant. The lower temperature is always favorable to the SAS process. The higher the solubility of CO2 in an organic solvent under certain operation condition, the more suitable it is to the SAS process.

  12. Anesthetic Overdose Leading to Cardiac Arrest Diagnosed by End-Tidal Inhalant Concentration Analysis in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hofmeister

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old male-castrated Cocker Spaniel presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Georgia for a total ear canal ablation. Premedication was with carprofen 2.2 mg/kg SQ, hydromorphone 0.1 mg/kg IM, diazepam 0.2 mg/kg IM, and glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg IM. The patient was induced with lidocaine 2 mg/kg IV and etomidate 1 mg/kg IV and maintained with sevoflurane and a constant rate infusion consisting of lidocaine 0.05 mg/kg/min. Before surgery start, the patient’s systolic arterial blood pressure was 110 mmHg, heart rate (HR was 85 beats/min, respiratory rate was 8 breaths/min, end-tidal sevoflurane concentration was 3.2%, and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2 was 23 mmHg. As a scrub was being performed, the patient’s HR abruptly dropped to 20 beats/min over the course of 2 minutes. His ETCO2 simultaneously decreased to 16 mmHg. At this time, cardiopulmonary arrest was diagnosed. After two minutes of resuscitation, a spontaneous heart beat was obtained and the patient was successfully recovered and discharged without further incident. The cardiac arrest in this case is most likely attributable to an overdose of inhalant anesthesia, which was diagnosed by an anesthetic inhalant concentration monitor. A gas analyzer may be a helpful contribution to the small animal practitioner, particularly those performing more lengthy or complex procedures.

  13. Functional Response of Tumor Vasculature to PaCO2: Determination of Total and Microvascular Blood Volume by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Packard

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify differences in functional activity, we compared the reactivity of glioma vasculature and the native cerebral vasculature to both dilate and constrict in response to altered PaCO2. Gliomas were generated by unilateral implantation of U87MGdEGFR human glioma tumor cells into the striatum of adult female athymic rats. Relative changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume were determined by steady state contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for transitions from normocarbia to hypercarbia and hypocarbia. Although hypercarbia induced a significant increase in both total and microvascular blood volume in normal brain and glioma, reactivity of glioma vasculature was significantly blunted in comparison to normal striatum; glioma total CBV increased by 0.6±0.1%/mm Hg CO2 whereas normal striatum increased by 1.5±0.2%/mm Hg CO2, (P < .0001, group t-test. Reactivity of microvascular blood volume was also significantly blunted. In contrast, hypocarbia decreased both total and microvascular blood volumes more in glioma than in normal striatum. These results indicate that cerebral blood vessels derived by tumor-directed angiogenesis do retain reactivity to CO2. Furthermore, reduced reactivity of tumor vessels to a single physiological perturbation, such as hypercarbia, should not be construed as a generalized reduction of functional activity of the tumor vascular bed.

  14. Transient influence of end-tidal carbon dioxide tension on the postural restraint in cerebral perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.V. Immink; J. Truijen; N.H. Secher; J.J. van Lieshout

    2009-01-01

    Immink RV, Truijen J, Secher NH, Van Lieshout JJ. Transient influence of end-tidal carbon dioxide tension on the postural restraint in cerebral perfusion. J Appl Physiol 107: 816-823, 2009. First published July 2, 2009; doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.91198.2008.-In the upright position, cerebral blood fl

  15. "EFFECTIVENESS OF ABDOMINAL WALL ELEVATOR IN REDUCING INTRA-ABDOMINAL PRESSURE AND CO2 VOLUME DURING LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yaghoobi Notash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Since CO2 pneumoperitoneum is the dominant method of laparoscopic exposure due to facility and good view, its physiologic effects are most relevant to the surgeons. CO2 pneumoperitoneum may affects hemodynamics by increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP and the physiologic effects of absorbed CO2. The adverse effects of both mechanisms relate directly to the duration of the pneumoperitoneum and the elevation of IAP. Gasless laparoscopy involves obtaining exposure for laparoscopy by placing an internal retracting device through a small incision and lifting the anterior abdominal wall. We designed and made a mechanical wall elevator and used it in 24 patients, compared with a control group (52 cases using a conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A prospective trial was undertaken in Sina Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1998 to 2000. The patients were assigned randomly to two groups. There was a significant decrease in IAP and CO2 consumption in the group using mechanical wall elevator as compared to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy, (mean IAP of 3.5 mmHg compared to 11.4 mmHg in the control group, mean CO2 volume 17 liters compared to 73 liters in the control group. We recommend this semigasless method in laparoscopy due to safety in performance and significant reduction in IAP through the surgery. This method provides a satisfactory view and easy performance without any increase in time or complications. The hospital stay and costs did not increase.

  16. Angiosperms evolved a higher mesophyll surface area per volume to maximize exchange surface under a low CO2 world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théroux-Rancourt, Guillaume; Mason Earles, J.; Gilbert, Matthew E.; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.; Boyce, C. Kevin; McElrone, Andrew; Brodersen, Craig

    2017-04-01

    Variation in leaf mesophyll structure strongly affects CO2 diffusion and photosynthetic rates. One key trait is the surface of mesophyll cells exposed to intercellular airspace (Sm) which increases mesophyll conductance. Consequently, Sm is a key control of CO2 diffusion among species and genotypes. Using Sm values from the literature (> 200 species with 500 data points) and from our high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (μCT) dataset (currently 117 species), Sm shows little variation from pteridophytes to early angiosperms, while eudicots show the greatest structural diversity. However, Sm increases with total thickness of the mesophyll. By considering the exposed surface of the mesophyll to the intercellular air space (IAS) on a leaf or mesophyll volume (Ames/V mes) rather than leaf area basis (Sm), we demonstrate that angiosperms, and most specifically commelinids and non-basal eudicots, have constructed leaves with more surface per volume, while gymnosperms keep a constant Ames/V mes ratio. Thus, this strong phylogenetic signal suggests that angiosperms have developed IAS properties favoring leaves with higher surface to volume ratio, trait that allowed for the potential of high productivity even as atmospheric CO2 declined over the Cenozoic.

  17. Glacial – interglacial atmospheric CO2 change: a possible "standing volume" effect on deep-ocean carbon sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Skinner

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available So far, the exploration of possible mechanisms for glacial atmospheric CO2 draw-down and marine carbon sequestration has focussed almost exclusively on dynamic or kinetic processes (i.e. variable mixing-, equilibration- or export rates. Here an attempt is made to underline instead the possible importance of changes in the standing volumes of intra-oceanic carbon reservoirs (i.e. different water-masses in setting the total marine carbon inventory. By way of illustration, a simple mechanism is proposed for enhancing the carbon storage capacity of the deep sea, which operates via an increase in the volume of relatively carbon-enriched AABW-like deep-water filling the ocean basins. Given the hypsometry of the ocean floor and an active biological pump, the water-mass that fills more than the bottom 3 km of the ocean will essentially determine the carbon content of the marine reservoir. A set of simple box-model experiments confirm the expectation that a deep sea dominated by AABW-like deep-water holds more CO2, prior to any additional changes in ocean overturning rate, biological export or ocean-atmosphere exchange. The magnitude of this "standing volume effect" might be as large as the contributions that have been attributed to carbonate compensation, the thermodynamic solubility pump or the biological pump for example. If incorporated into the list of factors that have contributed to marine carbon sequestration during past glaciations, this standing volume mechanism may help to reduce the amount of glacial – interglacial CO2 change that remains to be explained by other mechanisms that are difficult to assess in the geological archive, such as reduced mass transport or mixing rates in particular. This in turn could help narrow the search for forcing conditions capable of pushing the global carbon cycle between glacial and interglacial modes.

  18. A study of partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide and end-tidal carbon dioxide correlation in intraoperative and postoperative period in neurosurgical patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Pallavi; Harde, Minal; Gujjar, Pinakin; Deosarkar, Devanand; Bhadade, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: Monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) is of utmost importance in neurosurgical patients. It is measured by partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2) and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2). We aimed to study the correlation between PaCO2 and ETCO2 in neurosurgical patients in the intraoperative and postoperative period on mechanical ventilation in Postanesthesia Care Unit (PACU). Methodology: This was prospective observational study done at tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 1 year. We studied 30 patients undergoing elective craniotomy intraoperatively and in the postoperative period on mechanical ventilation for 24 h. Serial measurement of ETCO2 and PaCO2 at baseline, hourly intraoperatively and every 6 hourly in the PACU were studied. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 20. Results: The mean PaCO2–ETCO2 gradient intraoperatively over 4 h is 3.331 ± 2.856 and postoperatively over 24 h is 2.779 ± 2.932 and lies in 95% confidence interval. There was statistically significant correlation between PaCO2 and ETCO2 intraoperatively baseline, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, and 4 h with Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.799, 0.522, 0582, 0.439, and 0.547, respectively (P < 0.05). In PACU at baseline, 6 h, 12 h, 18 h, and 24 h Pearson's correlation coefficients were. 534, −0.032, 0.522, 0.242, 0.592, and 0.547, respectively, which are highly significant at three instances (P < 0.01). Conclusion: ETCO2 correlates PaCO2 with acceptable accuracy in neurosurgical patients in the intraoperative and postoperative period on mechanical ventilation in Intensive Care Unit. Thus, continuous and noninvasive ETCO2 can be used as a reliable guide to estimate arterial PCO2 during neurosurgical procedures and in PACU. PMID:28761526

  19. Role of CO2 in the cerebral hyperemic response to incremental normoxic and hyperoxic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K J; Wildfong, K W; Hoiland, R L; Harper, M; Lewis, N C; Pool, A; Smith, S L; Kuca, T; Foster, G E; Ainslie, P N

    2016-04-15

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is temporally related to exercise-induced changes in partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2 ); hyperoxia is known to enhance this relationship. We examined the hypothesis that preventing PetCO2 from rising (isocapnia) during submaximal exercise with and without hyperoxia [end-tidal Po2(PetO2 ) = 300 mmHg] would attenuate the increases in CBF. Additionally, we aimed to identify the magnitude that breathing, per se, influences the CBF response to normoxic and hyperoxic exercise. In 14 participants, CBF (intra- and extracranial) measurements were measured during exercise [20, 40, 60, and 80% of maximum workload (Wmax)] and during rest while ventilation (V̇e) was volitionally increased to mimic volumes achieved during exercise (isocapnic hyperpnea). While V̇ewas uncontrolled during poikilocapnic exercise, during isocapnic exercise and isocapnic hyperpnea, V̇ewas increased to prevent PetCO2 from rising above resting values (∼40 mmHg). Although PetCO2 differed by 2 ± 3 mmHg during normoxic poikilocapnic and isocapnic exercise, except for a greater poikilocapnic compared with isocapnic increase in blood velocity in the posterior cerebral artery at 60% Wmax, the between condition increases in intracranial (∼12-15%) and extracranial (15-20%) blood flow were similar at each workload. The poikilocapnic hyperoxic increases in both intra- and extracranial blood-flow (∼17-29%) were greater compared with poikilocapnic normoxia (∼8-20%) at intensities >40% Wmax(Pexercise influenced by the prevailing PetO2.

  20. A CO2 laser based two-volume collective scattering instrument for spatially localized turbulence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Zoletnik, S.; Basse, Nils Plesner

    2001-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a two-volume collective scattering system for localized measurements of plasma turbulence. The finite crossfield correlation length of plasma turbulence combined with spatial variations in the magnetic field direction are used to obtain spatially localized turbulence...

  1. Evaluation of a transportable capnometer for monitoring end-tidal carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, T; Tobiasen, Malene Espelund; Olsen, K S

    2010-01-01

    We compared a small and transportable Capnometer (EMMA™) with a reference capnometer, the Siesta i TS Anaesthesia. During air-breathing through a facemask, both the EMMA (nine modules) and reference capnometer sampled expired gas simultaneously. A wide range of end-tidal carbon dioxide values were...... obtained during inhalation of carbon dioxide and voluntary hyperventilation. The median IQR [range] difference between all sets of carbon dioxide values (EMMA - reference) was -0.3 (-0.6 to 0.0 [-1.7 to 1.6] kPa; n = 297) using new batteries, which was statistically significant (p = 0.04) and located...... to two of the nine EMMAs tested. Using batteries with reduced voltage did not influence the measurements. The 95% CI of the medians of the differences were -0.4 to -0.2. We conclude that the EMMA can slightly under-read the end-tidal carbon dioxide but is generally comparable with a free-standing monitor...

  2. Evaluation of a transportable capnometer for monitoring end-tidal carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, T; Tobiasen, Malene Espelund; Olsen, K S

    2010-01-01

    We compared a small and transportable Capnometer (EMMA™) with a reference capnometer, the Siesta i TS Anaesthesia. During air-breathing through a facemask, both the EMMA (nine modules) and reference capnometer sampled expired gas simultaneously. A wide range of end-tidal carbon dioxide values were...... obtained during inhalation of carbon dioxide and voluntary hyperventilation. The median IQR [range] difference between all sets of carbon dioxide values (EMMA - reference) was -0.3 (-0.6 to 0.0 [-1.7 to 1.6] kPa; n = 297) using new batteries, which was statistically significant (p = 0.04) and located...... to two of the nine EMMAs tested. Using batteries with reduced voltage did not influence the measurements. The 95% CI of the medians of the differences were -0.4 to -0.2. We conclude that the EMMA can slightly under-read the end-tidal carbon dioxide but is generally comparable with a free-standing monitor...

  3. Geochronology, geochemistry, and tectonic characterization of Quaternary large-volume travertine deposits in the southwestern United States and their implications for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priewisch, Alexandra

    Travertines are freshwater carbonates that precipitate from carbonic groundwater due to the degassing of CO2. Travertine deposits are often situated along faults that serve as conduits for CO2-charged groundwater and their geochemistry often records mixing of deeply-derived fluids and volatiles with shallow meteoric water. Travertines are surface expressions of dynamic mantle processes related to the tectonic setting. This dissertation includes four chapters that focus on different aspects of travertine formation and their scientific value. They are excellent, although underestimated, diagnostic tools for climatology, hydrology, tectonics, geochemistry, geomicrobiology, and they can inform carbon sequestration models. Quaternary large-volume travertine deposits in New Mexico and Arizona occur in an extensional tectonic stress regime on the southeastern Colorado Plateau and along the Rio Grande rift. They accumulated above fault systems during episodes of high hydraulic head in confined aquifers, increased regional volcanic activity, and high input of mantle-derived volatiles such as CO 2 and He. Stable isotope and trace element geochemistry of travertines is controlled by groundwater geochemistry as well as the degassing of CO 2. The geochemical composition allows for distinguishing different travertine facies and evaluating past groundwater flow. The travertine deposits in New Mexico are interpreted to be extinct CO2 fields due to the large volumes that accumulated and in analogy to the travertine deposits in Arizona that are associated with an active CO2-gas field. Travertines are natural analogues for CO2 leakage along fault systems that bypassed regional cap rocks and they provide important insight into the migration of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface. The volume of travertine can be used to infer the integrated CO2 leakage along a fault system over geologic time. This leakage is estimated as: (1) CO2 that becomes fixed in CaCO3/travertine (tons of carbon

  4. Evaluation of Low versus High Volume per Minute Displacement CO2 Methods of Euthanasia in the Induction and Duration of Panic-Associated Behavior and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra L. Hickman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Current recommendations for the use of CO 2 as a euthanasia agent for rats require the use of gradual fill protocols (such as 10% to 30% volume displacement per minute in order to render the animal insensible prior to exposure to levels of CO 2 that are associated with pain. However, exposing rats to CO 2 , concentrations as low as 7% CO 2 are reported to cause distress and 10%–20% CO 2 induces panic-associated behavior and physiology, but loss of consciousness does not occur until CO 2 concentrations are at least 40%. This suggests that the use of the currently recommended low flow volume per minute displacement rates create a situation where rats are exposed to concentrations of CO 2 that induce anxiety, panic, and distress for prolonged periods of time. This study first characterized the response of male rats exposed to normoxic 20% CO 2 for a prolonged period of time as compared to room air controls. It demonstrated that rats exposed to this experimental condition displayed clinical signs consistent with significantly increased panic-associated behavior and physiology during CO 2 exposure. When atmospheric air was then again delivered, there was a robust increase in respiration rate that coincided with rats moving to the air intake. The rats exposed to CO 2 also displayed behaviors consistent with increased anxiety in the behavioral testing that followed the exposure. Next, this study assessed the behavioral and physiologic responses of rats that were euthanized with 100% CO 2 infused at 10%, 30%, or 100% volume per minute displacement rates. Analysis of the concentrations of CO 2 and oxygen in the euthanasia chamber and the behavioral responses of the rats suggest that the use of the very low flow volume per minute displacement rate (10% may prolong the duration of panicogenic ranges of ambient CO 2 , while the use of the higher flow volume per minute displacement rate (100% increases agitation. Therefore, of the volume displacement per

  5. Improved method to determine the molar volume and compositions of the NaCl-H2O-CO2 system inclusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of Parry’s method (1986), an improved method was established to determine the molar volume (Vm) and compositions (X) of the NaCl-H2O-CO2 (NHC) system inclusion. To use this method, the determination of Vm-X only requires three microthermometric data of a NHC inclusion: partial homog-enization temperature (Th ,CO2), salinity (S) and total homogenization temperature (Th). Theoretically, four associated equations are needed containing four unknown parameters: X CO2, XNaCl, Vm and F (volume fraction of CO2 phase in total inclusion when occurring partial homogenization). When they are released, the Vm-X are determined. The former three equations, only correlated with Th ,CO2, S and F, have simplified expressions:XCO2=f1(Th,CO2,S,F),XNaCl=f2(Th,CO2,S,F),Vm=f3(Th,CO2,S,F). The last one is the thermodynamic relationship of X CO2, XNaCl, Vm and Th:f4(XCO2,XNaCl,Vm,Th)=0.Since the above four associated equations are complicated, it is necessary to adopt iterative technique to release them. The technique can be described by:(i) Freely input a F value (0≤F≤1),with Th ,CO2 and S, into the former three equations. As a result,X CO 2,XNaCl and the molar volume value recorded as Vm1 are derived. (ii) Input the X CO2 and XNaCl gotten in the step above into the last equation, and another molar volume value recorded as Vm2 is determined. (iii) If Vm1 is unequal to Vm2, the calculation will be restarted from “(i)”. The iteration is completed until Vm1 is equal to Vm2, which means that the four associated equations are released. Compared to Parry’s (1986) solution method, the improved method is more convenient to use, as well as more accurate to determine X CO 2. It is available for a NHC inlusion whose partial homogenization temperature is higher than clatherate melting temperature and there are no solid salt crystals in the inclusion at parital homogenization.

  6. Volume dependence of the exchange interaction and Curie temperature in Co2MGa (M = Ti and Fe): A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. B.; Altounian, Z.

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic moment, exchange interaction and Curie temperature (TC) have been calculated for Co2TiGa and Co2FeGa by a first-principles density functional calculation combined with a linear response method. The exchange interaction is dominated by Co-Co pairs in Co2TiGa while that of Co2FeGa is mainly contributed by Fe-Co pairs. Based on the mean field multiple-sublattices model, the estimated TC is about 114 K for M = Ti and 1270 K for M = Fe, calculated with the experimental lattice constant, in good agreement with the experimental values (128 K and 1093 K for M = Ti and Fe, respectively). With increasing lattice constant, a, from 95% to 105% of the experimental value (aexp .), the moment per formula unit mf.u. changes from 0.43 μB to 1.0 μB and TC increases from 27 K to 142 K in Co2TiGa. However, mf.u. increases slightly from 4.98 μB to 5.40 μB while TC decreases from 1330 K to 1190 K with increasing a from 95% to 105% of aexp . in Co2FeGa. These different volume dependences of TC are ascribed to the weak ferromagnetism in Co2TiGa and the strong ferromagnetism in Co2FeGa.

  7. Intraoperative end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in cats undergoing ovariectomy that received tramadol, buprenorphine or a combination of both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Luca; Mollo, Antonio; Contiero, Barbara; Busetto, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the end-tidal concentration of isoflurane required to maintain heart and respiratory rate within ± 20% of basal measurement in cats undergoing ovariectomy that received buprenorphine, tramadol or a combination of both. Methods Thirty cats, divided into three groups, were enrolled in a simple operator-blinded, randomised study. Cats received acepromazine (0.03 mg/kg) and one of the following treatments: buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg), tramadol (2 mg/kg) or a combination of both. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane titrated in order to maintain heart and respiratory rate within the target values recorded before premedication. Results Groups were similar for age, weight, dose of propofol administered, sedation and recovery scores. Cats receiving tramadol with buprenorphine were extubated earlier after isoflurane discontinuation. No statistical differences were detected in end-tidal fraction of isoflurane between buprenorphine alone or with tramadol. In cats that received tramadol or buprenorphine alone, ovarian pedicle traction caused a statistical increase in end-tidal isoflurane concentration compared with that measured during incision and suture of the skin. In cats that received the combination of tramadol plus buprenorphine no differences among surgical time points were observed. Conclusions and relevance Tramadol added to buprenorphine did not provide any advantage in decreasing the end-tidal fraction of isoflurane compared with buprenorphine alone, although it is speculated there may be an infra-additive interaction between tramadol and buprenorphine in cats.

  8. Effectiveness of CO2-insufflated endoscopic submucosal dissection with the duodenal balloon occlusion method for early esophageal or gastric cancer: a randomized case control prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori Hirohito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD has typically been performed using air insufflation. Recently, however, insufflation of CO2 has been increasingly used to avoid complications. This prospective study was designed to compare the CO2 concentration, intestinal volume, and acid–base balance using the duodenal balloon procedure. Methods From June 2010 to February 2011, we enrolled 44 patients with esophageal or gastric cancer and randomly allocated them into two groups. We compared 22 patients undergoing CO2-insufflated ESD with a balloon placed into the duodenal bulb (duodenal balloon group and 22 patients undergoing regular CO2-insufflated ESD (regular group. Three-dimensional computed tomography was performed before and after the procedure to measure intestinal volume. CO2 concentrations were measured every 10 minutes. The visual analogue system (VAS scores for postoperative symptoms were recorded, and pH was measured immediately after the procedure. This was a prospective case control study randomized by the sealed envelope method. Results Intestinal CO2 gas volume before and after ESD was lower in the duodenal balloon group than in the regular group (P = 0.00027. The end-tidal CO2 level was significantly lower in the duodenal balloon group than in the regular group (P = 0.0001. No significant differences in blood ΔpH were found between the two groups. The VAS score for the occurrence of nausea due to abdominal distension after ESD indicated a significant difference (P = 0.031. Conclusions ESD using the duodenal balloon occlusion method is effective for reduction of post-ESD intestinal CO2 gas volume, resulting in a lower total amount of CO2 insufflation during ESD and reducing harmful influences on the human body to some extent.

  9. Effects of CO2 pneumoperitoneum on blood flow vol-ume of abdominal organs of rabbits with controlled hem-orrhagic shock and liver impact injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian-yang; ZHAO Song; LI Yong; MA Xiao-lin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of CO2 pneumo-peritoneum on blood flow volume of abdominal organs of rabbits with controlled hemorrhagic shock model and liver impact injuries.Methods: After controlled hemorrhagic shock and liver impact injuries, the rabbit model was established. Eighteen rabbits subjected to hemorrhagic shock and liver impact inju-ries were divided into 3 groups randomly according to the volume of lost blood: light hemorrhagic shock (blood loss volume was 10%, 6 ml/kg), moderate hemorrhagic shock (20%, 12 ml/kg) and severe hemorrhagic shock (40%, 22 ml/kg). Intraabdominal pressures of CO2 pneumoperitoneum was 10 mmHg. Color-labeled microspheres were used to mea-sure the blood flow volume of the liver, kidney and stomach before pneumoperitoneum at 30 minutes and 2 hours after pneumoperitoneum and 30 minutes after deflation. And the mortality and hepatic traumatic condition of rabbits were recorded.Results: Of the 18 rabbits, there were 9 with liver impact injuries at Grade Ⅰ, 8 at Grade Ⅱ and Ⅰ at Grade Ⅲ (according to AIS-2005). The mortality rate in light hemorrhagic shock group was 33.33%, and that in moderate or severe hemor-rhagic shock group was 100% within 30 minutes and 2 hours after pneumoperitoneum, respectively. The blood flow vol-ume in the organs detected decreased at 30 minutes under pneumoperitoneum in light and moderate hemorrhagic shock groups. At the same time, the blood flow volume of the liver in moderate hemorrhagic shock group decreased more sig-nificantly than that in light hemorrhagic shock group.Conclusions: The blood flow volume of abdominal organs in rabbits is decreased obviously under CO2 pneumoperitoneum, with fairly high mortality rate. It is be-lieved that CO2 pneumoperitoneum should cautiously be used in abdominal injury accompanied with hemorrhagic shock, especially under non-resuscitation conditions.

  10. Validation of the MIPAS CO2 volume mixing ratio in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere and comparison with WACCM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, B.; Jurado-Navarro, Á. A.; García-Comas, M.; Gardini, A.; Boone, C. D.; Rezac, L.; Garcia, R. R.

    2017-08-01

    We present the validation of Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) CO2 daytime concentration in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere by comparing with Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Fourier transform spectrometer and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) data. MIPAS shows a very good agreement with ACE below 100 km with differences of ˜5%. Above 100 km, MIPAS CO2 is generally lower than ACE with differences growing from ˜5% at 100 km to 20-40% near 110-120 km. Part of this disagreement can be explained by the lack of a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium correction in ACE. MIPAS also agrees very well (˜5%) with SABER below 100 km. At 90-105 km, MIPAS is generally smaller than SABER by 10-30% in the polar summers. At 100-120 km, MIPAS and SABER CO2 agree within ˜10% during equinox but, for solstice, MIPAS is larger by 10-25%, except near the polar summer. Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) CO2 shows the major MIPAS features. At 75-100 km, the agreement is very good (˜5%), with maximum differences of ˜10%. At 95-115 km MIPAS CO2 is larger than WACCM by 20-30% in the winter hemisphere but smaller (20-40%) in the summer. Above 95-100 km WACCM generally overestimates MIPAS CO2 by about 20-80% except in the polar summer where underestimates it by 20-40%. MIPAS CO2 favors a large eddy diffusion below 100 km and suggests that the meridional circulation of the lower thermosphere is stronger than in WACCM. The three instruments and WACCM show a clear increase of CO2 with time, more markedly at 90-100 km.

  11. Comparison of end-tidal carbon dioxide and arterial blood bicarbonate levels in patients with metabolic acidosis referred to emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadieh, Ali; Pouraghaei, Mahboub; Moharamzadeh, Payman; Ala, Alireza; Rahmani, Farzad; Basiri Sofiani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The routine and gold standard method to diagnose of acid - base disturbance is arterial blood gas (ABG) sampling. Capnography could be used to measure the end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels and ETco2 has a close correlation with the PaCo2. The aim of this study was comparison the ETco2 and arterial blood bicarbonate levels in patients with metabolic acidosis. Methods: In a descriptive-analytical study that performed in Emergency Department of Emam Reza Medical Research and Training Hospital of Tabriz on patients with metabolic acidosis, ETco2 level and blood bicarbonate levels in 262 patients were evaluated. Results: Mean of ETco2 and Hco3 levels in patients with metabolic acidosis were 22.29 ± 4.15 and 12.78 ± 3.83, respectively. In all patients, the significant direct linear relationship was found between ETco2 with Hco3 (r = 0.553, P level of arterial blood in patients with renal failure (P < 0.001 and r = 0.551), sepsis (P < 0.001 and r = 0.431), drug toxicity (P < 0.001 and r = 0.856), and ketoacidosis (DKA) (P < 0.001 and r = 0.559). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, capnography can be used for primary diagnosis of metabolic acidosis in spontaneously breathing patients who referred to the emergency wards, however, the ABG must be considered as the gold standard tool for diagnosis and guiding the treatment.

  12. A Cross-Correlational Analysis between Electroencephalographic and End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Signals: Methodological Issues in the Presence of Missing Data and Real Data Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sole Morelli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalographic (EEG irreducible artifacts are common and the removal of corrupted segments from the analysis may be required. The present study aims at exploring the effects of different EEG Missing Data Segment (MDS distributions on cross-correlation analysis, involving EEG and physiological signals. The reliability of cross-correlation analysis both at single subject and at group level as a function of missing data statistics was evaluated using dedicated simulations. Moreover, a Bayesian-based approach for combining the single subject results at group level by considering each subject’s reliability was introduced. Starting from the above considerations, the cross-correlation function between EEG Global Field Power (GFP in delta band and end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2 during rest and voluntary breath-hold was evaluated in six healthy subjects. The analysis of simulated data results at single subject level revealed a worsening of precision and accuracy in the cross-correlation analysis in the presence of MDS. At the group level, a large improvement in the results’ reliability with respect to single subject analysis was observed. The proposed Bayesian approach showed a slight improvement with respect to simple average results. Real data results were discussed in light of the simulated data tests and of the current physiological findings.

  13. Global distributions of CO2 volume mixing ratio in the middle and upper atmosphere from daytime MIPAS high-resolution spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aythami Jurado-Navarro, Á.; López-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, Bernd; García-Comas, Maya; Gardini, Angela; González-Galindo, Francisco; Stiller, Gabriele P.; von Clarmann, Thomas; Grabowski, Udo; Linden, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Global distributions of the CO2 vmr (volume mixing ratio) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (from 70 up to ˜ 140 km) have been derived from high-resolution limb emission daytime MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) spectra in the 4.3 µm region. This is the first time that the CO2 vmr has been retrieved in the 120-140 km range. The data set spans from January 2005 to March 2012. The retrieval of CO2 has been performed jointly with the elevation pointing of the line of sight (LOS) by using a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) retrieval scheme. The non-LTE model incorporates the new vibrational-vibrational and vibrational-translational collisional rates recently derived from the MIPAS spectra by [Jurado-Navarro et al.(2015)]. It also takes advantage of simultaneous MIPAS measurements of other atmospheric parameters (retrieved in previous steps), such as the kinetic temperature (derived up to ˜ 100 km from the CO2 15 µm region of MIPAS spectra and from 100 up to 170 km from the NO 5.3 µm emission of the same MIPAS spectra) and the O3 measurements (up to ˜ 100 km). The latter is very important for calculations of the non-LTE populations because it strongly constrains the O(3P) and O(1D) concentrations below ˜ 100 km. The estimated precision of the retrieved CO2 vmr profiles varies with altitude ranging from ˜ 1 % below 90 km to 5 % around 120 km and larger than 10 % above 130 km. There are some latitudinal and seasonal variations of the precision, which are mainly driven by the solar illumination conditions. The retrieved CO2 profiles have a vertical resolution of about 5-7 km below 120 km and between 10 and 20 km at 120-140 km. We have shown that the inclusion of the LOS as joint fit parameter improves the retrieval of CO2, allowing for a clear discrimination between the information on CO2 concentration and the LOS and also leading to significantly smaller systematic errors. The retrieved CO2 has an improved

  14. Entropy-guided end-tidal desflurane concentration during living donor liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf S Hasanin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The three phases of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT represent different liver conditions. The aim is to study the required end-tidal desflurane concentration (ET-Des guided with entropy monitoring for the depth of anesthesia. Methods: After the Ethics and Research Committee approval, 40 patients were included in this prospective study. Anesthesia was maintained with Desflurane-O2-air. State entropy (SE and Response entropy (RE were kept between 40 and 60. Results: Age and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD score were 45±10 years and 15.43±3.92, respectively. ET-Des were significantly lower in the anhepatic phase (2.8±0.4% than in the pre-anhepatic and neohepatic phases (3.3±0.3%, 3.47±0.3%, respectively, P 0.05. Total operative time was 651±88 minutes, and for each phase it was 276±11, 195±55, and 191±24 minutes, respectively. Significant changes were found in hemoglobin g/dl and hematocrit % between the three phases (10.28±1.5, 30.48±4.3, (9.45±1.34, 28.36±4.1, and (8.88±1.1, 26.63±3.5, P<0.05. The heart rate and mean blood pressures were stable despite the cardiac index demonstrated a significant reduction during the anhepatic phase (2.99±0.22 when compared to the pre-anhepatic and neohepatic phases (3.60±0.29 and (4.72±0.32, respectively, ( P<0.05. There was a significant correlation between CI and ET-Des% (r=0.604, P<0.05. Conclusion: Inhalational anesthetic requirements differed from one phase to another during LDLT, with requirements being the least during the anhepatic phase. Monitoring of the anesthesia depth was required, to avoid excess administration, which could compromise the hemodynamics before the critical time of reperfusion.

  15. Monitoring a large volume CO2 injection: Year two results from SECARB project at Denbury’s Cranfield, Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovorka, Susan D.; Meckel, Timothy A.; Trevino, Ramon H.; Lu, Jiemin; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Choi, Jong-Won; Freeman, David; Cook, Paul; Daley, Thomas M.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Freifeild, Barry M.; Doughty, Christine; Carrigan, Charles R.; La Brecque, Doug; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Thordsen, James J.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Yang, Changbing; Romanak, Katherine D.; Zhang, Tongwei; Holt, Robert M.; Lindler, Jeffery S.; Butsch, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) early project in western Mississippi has been testing monitoring tools and approaches to document storage efficiency and storage permanence under conditions of CO2 EOR as well as downdip injection into brine. Denbury Onshore LLC is host for the study and has brought a depleted oil and gas reservoir, Cranfield Field, under CO2 flood. Injection was started in July 2008 and has now achieved injection rates greater than 1.2 million tons/year though 23 wells, with cumulative mass injected as of August, 2010 of 2.2 million metric tons. Injection is into coarse grained fluvial deposits of the Cretaceous lower Tuscaloosa Formation in a gentle anticline at depths of 3300 m. A team of researchers from 10 institutions has collected data from five study areas, each with a different goal and different spatial and temporal scale.

  16. Conversion of a Continuous Flow Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to Measure 13C in CO2 Using Static Analyses of Small Volume Grab Samples (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, T.; Jordanova, K.; Berryman, E.; van Pelt, A. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Laser-based analyses of concentration and isotopic content allow unprecedented temporal resolution for a number of important atmospheric constituents. Perhaps overlooked is the potential for these tools to also provide analyses in a more traditional "mass spectrometric" mode that is readily deployable in a field setting. Certain sampling regimes (e.g. soil profiles) are not appropriate for continuous sampling due to their slow change and disturbance of gradients caused by frequent/continuous sampling. We have modified the inlet and plumbing system of a commercial continuous flow cavity ring-down spectrometer in a manner that allows for 13C analyses of CO2 from syringe samples at volumes as small as 25 ml of air with ambient concentrations of CO2. The method employs an external high vacuum pump and a series of programmable micro-valves that allow for evacuation of the long-pass ring-down cell followed by controlled filling, via syringe, of the cavity to optimal sampling pressure and subsequent static analysis of CO2 concentration and 13C /13C ratios. The set-up is field deployable with modest power requirements and allows for near real time analysis in a variety of sampling environments and on-the-fly determination of sampling protocol. In its current configuration, the system provides precision of 1% for CO2 concentration and 0.3 permil for δ13C in replicate analyses of reference air. We have deployed the system to a field laboratory in central New Mexico near a controlled tree mortality research site where post-mortality ecosystem CO2 evolution is being studied. Results from the first field season will be presented and discussed.

  17. The postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is not explained by PaCO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Secher, N H; Roos, C M

    2006-01-01

    Vmean and the end-tidal carbon-dioxide tension (PETCO2) decrease, suggesting that PaCO2 contributes to the reduction in MCA Vmean. In a fixed body position, PETCO2 tracks changes in the PaCO2 but when assuming the upright position, cardiac output (Q) decreases and its distribution over the lung changes......, while ventilation (VE) increases suggesting that PETCO2 decreases more than PaCO2. This study evaluated whether the postural reduction in PaCO2 accounts for the postural decline in MCA Vmean). From the supine to the upright position, VE, Q, PETCO2, PaCO2, MCA Vmean, and the near...

  18. Comparison of end-tidal carbon dioxide and arterial blood bicarbonate levels in patients with metabolic acidosis referred to emergency medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadieh, Ali; Pouraghaei, Mahboub; Moharamzadeh, Payman; Ala, Alireza; Rahmani, Farzad; Basiri Sofiani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The routine and gold standard method to diagnose of acid – base disturbance is arterial blood gas (ABG) sampling. Capnography could be used to measure the end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels and ETco2 has a close correlation with the PaCo2. The aim of this study was comparison the ETco2 and arterial blood bicarbonate levels in patients with metabolic acidosis. Methods: In a descriptive-analytical study that performed in Emergency Department of Emam Reza Medical Research and Training Hospital of Tabriz on patients with metabolic acidosis, ETco2 level and blood bicarbonate levels in 262 patients were evaluated. Results: Mean of ETco2 and Hco3 levels in patients with metabolic acidosis were 22.29 ± 4.15 and 12.78 ± 3.83, respectively. In all patients, the significant direct linear relationship was found between ETco2 with Hco3 (r = 0.553, P < 0.001). We had 4 groups of patients with metabolic acidosis, also there is a significant direct linear relationship between the ETCo2 and the Hco3 level of arterial blood in patients with renal failure (P < 0.001 and r = 0.551), sepsis (P < 0.001 and r = 0.431), drug toxicity (P < 0.001 and r = 0.856), and ketoacidosis (DKA) (P < 0.001 and r = 0.559). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, capnography can be used for primary diagnosis of metabolic acidosis in spontaneously breathing patients who referred to the emergency wards, however, the ABG must be considered as the gold standard tool for diagnosis and guiding the treatment. PMID:27777693

  19. 小儿先心患者呼气末与动脉血二氧化碳分压的相关性及其影响因素%Correlation and influencing factors between end-tidal carbon dioxide and arterial carbon dioxide tension in children with congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪萍; 王英伟

    2009-01-01

    小儿先天性心脏病通常可分为发绀型与非发绀型.由于不同程度的左向右或右向左分流造成的血流动力学的改变.使呼气末与动脉血二氧化碳分压差[P(a-et)CO2]增大,给临床上通过呼气末二氧化碳分压(PETCO2)推测动脉血二氧化碳分压(PaCO2)带来困难.因此,如何正确地评估和预测PaCO2,避免过多地进行动脉血气分析是十分必要的.此文参考近年来的研究,对可能影响P(a-et)CO2值的各种因素作一综述.%The pediatric congenital heart diseases are usually divided into cyanotic and non-cyanotic heart diseases. Due to the hemodynamic change caused by either left-right or right-left shunt, the value of arterial-to-end-tidal carbon dioxiede tension dif-ference (P(a- et)CO2) increases, which makes it difficult using pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) to predict pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). Therefore, in order to avoid excessive artery blood gas analysis, it is important to estimate and pre-dict PaCO2 exactly, especially in pediatric patients. The present review gathers various factors that probably influence P(a-et)CO2 and try to make a simple conclusion, based on published data recently.

  20. Oxygenation and Blood Volume Periodic Waveforms in the Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Gersten, Alexander; Raz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Results of an experiment are presented whose aim is to explore the relationship between respiration and cerebral oxygenation. Measurements of end tidal CO2 (EtCO2) were taken simultaneously with cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) using the INVOS Cerebral Oximeter of Somanetics. Due to the device limitations we could explore only subjects who could perform with a breathing rate of around 2/min or less. Six subjects were used who were experienced in yoga breathing techniques. They performed an identical periodic breathing exercise including periodicity of about 2/min. The results of all six subjects clearly show a periodic change of cerebral oxygenation with the same period as the breathing exercises. Similar periodic changes in blood volume index were observed as well.

  1. End-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) can replace methods for measuring partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2017-01-01

    We compared end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) with partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in domestic pigs anesthetized for neuroscience. There was good agreement between ETCO2 and PCO2 under both hypocapnia, normocapnia, and hypercapnia conditions. ETCO2 saves time by continually providing...

  2. 定容衰竭气藏CO2储集能力预测方法%A Simple Prediction Method of CO2 Storing Capacity for Constant-Volume Depleted Gas Reservoir after Being Rebuilt into a CO2 Gas Storage Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷勇; 郭平; 戴岑璞

    2006-01-01

    利用衰竭气藏储集CO2可有效解决CO2释放问题并同时提高气藏采收率.根据气藏物质平衡原理,通过类比构建与烃类气藏相似的CO2气藏,提出了一种预测定容衰竭气藏CO2储集能力的简单方法.

  3. Noninvasive end-tidal carbon dioxide measurements in children with acute asthma%无创性呼气末二氧化碳监测在急性哮喘儿童中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶斯清; 吕回; 邓爱芬; 蔺增榕

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical significance of noninvasive detection of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2) in the management of children with acute asthma, and to evaluate the association between PetCO2 and artery blood gas carbon dioxide partial pressure ( PaCO2 ). Methods This was a prospective,double blinded study of children aged 5 ~ 14 years old treated for acute asthma in a pediatric emergency department. PetCO2 and PaCO2 measurements were taken before therapy and after each nebulization treatment ( maximum of three). Various clinical parametesr were recorded. Patients with PaCO2 and PetCO2 measurements within 8 minutes of each other were eligible for inclusion. Patients with cardiac disease,chronic pulmonary disease, poor tissue perfusion, or metabolic abnormalities were excluded. Results Sixty five children were enrolled. The initial PetCO2 value was (34. 8 ±8. 6) mm Hg (95% confidence interval =34. 0 to 36. 1). The PetCO2 value of post-treatment was (33.2 ±8.2) mm Hg (95% confidence interval =32. 5 to 34. 4) ,which was decreased significantly than that before treatment(P < 0. 01 ). Fifty seven PetCO2-PaCO2 paired values were available from 57 patients. The values of PetCO2 and PaCO2 were ( 34. 8 ±7. 6) mm Hg and (40. 6 ± 8. 3 ) mm Hg, respectively. PetCO2 and PaCO2 values were highly positively correlated ( r = 0. 92,P < 0. 000 1 ). Conclusion Noninvasive bedside measurement of PetCO2 in children with acute asthma in emergency department is feasible. Continuous PetCO2 monitoring can provide a reliable assessment of pulmonary status. PetCO2 can serve as an important adjunct index in the clinical management of pediatric patients with acute asthma.%目的 评价在急性哮喘患儿中监测呼气末二氧化碳分压(PetCO2)的临床意义,探讨PetCO2与动脉血二氧化碳分压(PaCO2)的相关性.方法 采用前瞻性、双盲的方法.我院儿科急诊收治的急性哮喘患儿65例,年龄5~14岁.在开始治疗前

  4. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  5. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  6. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  7. Volume dependence of magnetic properties in Co2Cr1-xYx Ga (Y=Ti-Ni) Heusler alloys: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J. N.; Fortunato, N. M.; Amaral, J. S.; Amaral, V. S.

    2017-04-01

    The magnetic properties tuning and volume dependence in the series of quaternary full Heusler alloys with formula Co2Cr1-xYx Ga (Y=Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) were studied with a detailed first-principles exploration. We employ the density functional KKR method with the coherent potential approximation, estimating effective Heisenberg exchange constants via the magnetic force theorem together with mean-field Curie temperature (TC) and magnetic moment for compositions in the whole concentration range. The volumetric dependency of these magnetic properties is studied, particularly the pressure derivatives of TC at equilibrium. Our ternary alloy calculations show good agreement with local-density and generalized gradient approximations in the literature. The quaternary alloys show a wide range of tunable magnetic properties, where magnetic moments range from 0.8 to 4.9 μB, TC from 130 K to 1250 K, and dTC / dV values range from -7 to + 6.3 KÅ-3 .

  8. Monitoring the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane for preventing awareness during anesthesia (MEETS-PANDA): A prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiebo; Zhang, Liangcheng; Huang, Qijian; Wu, Guohua; Weng, Xianfeng; Lai, Zhongmeng; Lin, Pengtao

    2017-05-01

    It was hypothesized that monitoring end-tidal sevoflurane (ETS) during endoscopic surgery could reduce the incidence of intraoperative awareness in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Herein, the incidence of intraoperative awareness and other correlative factors was recorded and compared. Two thousand five hundred ASA I-III patients aged 18-80 years who underwent general anesthesia were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 1250): routine care group (R) and ETS concentration group (E). ETS concentration was monitored in group E and maintained at a sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of 0.7-1.3; group R was monitored using routine care, and the sevoflurane was maintained. Patients were assessed for intraoperative awareness with a questionnaire on their explicit memory 24-48 h after surgery. A total of 2532 patients were selected, and 86 patients were excluded. As for the groups, 1219 patients were assigned to group E, and 1227 patients were assigned to group R. As for intraoperative awareness, group E had 2 patients, and group R had 14. Compared with group R, the incidence of intraoperative awareness in group E was significantly lower (p = 0.003); the time-averaged ETS concentration and sevoflurane dosage were lower in group E (p  0.05). The incidence of intraoperative awareness was higher in women than men in group R (p < 0.05). Using ETS-guided anesthesia and maintaining the sevoflurane concentration (0.7-1.3 MAC) can decrease the incidence of patient awareness during endoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. End tidal carbon dioxide as a predictor of the arterial PCO2 in the emergency department setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosefy, C; Hay, E; Nasri, Y; Magen, E; Reisin, L

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Patients arriving in the emergency department (ED) need rapid and reliable evaluation of their respiratory status. Mainstream end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) is one of the methods used for this purpose during general anaesthesia of intubated patients in the operating theatre. Sidestream ETCO2 (SSETCO2) might be a non-invasive, rapid, and reliable predictor of arterial PCO2 in non-intubated patients in respiratory distress. The aim of this study was to verify whether SSETCO2 can accurately predict the arterial PCO2 and to detect variables that may affect this correlation. Methods: A prospective semi-blind study. The participants were 73 patients (47 men, 26 women) referred to the ED for respiratory distress. Arterial blood gas pressures and SSETCO2 measurements were performed and recorded for all patients. Other parameters recorded were: age; body temperature; respiratory rate; blood pressure; pulse rate; and medical diagnosis. Results: A significant correlation was found between SSETCO2 and arterial PCO2 (r = 0.792). Compared with the correlation curve of the whole group, age under 50 years deflected the correlation curve to the left, while temperature above 37.6°C deflected it to the right. The rest of the parameters had no clear influence on the SSETCO2/PCO2 correlation curve. Conclusions: There is a good correlation between SSETCO2 and arterial PCO2 in the ED setting. Young age may increase the arterial PCO2/SSETCO2 gradient while raised temperature may decrease this gradient. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in the normal healthy population. PMID:15333528

  10. Continuous Vocalization during Kendo Exercises Suppresses Expiration of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, H; Terada, T; Takahashi, T; Kizaki, K; Imai, H; Era, S

    2015-06-01

    One distinctive trait of kendo, the Japanese martial art of fencing, is the execution of sustained, high-effort vocalizations during actions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of these vocalizations on respiratory functions. First, the intensity of 3 kendo exercises was quantified by measuring oxygen uptake (V̇O2) and comparing it with V̇O2max measured during treadmill tests of 8 university kendo athletes. Respiratory variables of these 8 athletes were then analyzed using a portable breath gas analyzer during the most intensive kendo exercise, kakari-keiko, with and without vocalization. Breathing frequency (fB) increased regardless of vocalization, but in trials with vocalization, fB and ventilation were significantly lower, and expiration time was significantly longer. Components of expired gases were also affected by vocalization. Although there was no significant difference in oxygen uptake, vocalization yielded a reduction in carbon dioxide output (V̇CO2) and an increase in fraction of end-tidal carbon dioxide (FetCO2). We thus conclude that these vocalizations greatly affect expiration breathing patterns in kendo. Moreover, repetition of kakari-keiko caused a reduction in V̇CO2 and an increase in FetCO2 and CO2 storage. We consider the possibility that the sustained high-effort vocalizations of kendo also increase cerebral blood flow.

  11. CO2 -Responsive polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaojian; Theato, Patrick

    2013-07-25

    This Review focuses on the recent progress in the area of CO2 -responsive polymers and provides detailed descriptions of these existing examples. CO2 -responsive polymers can be categorized into three types based on their CO2 -responsive groups: amidine, amine, and carboxyl groups. Compared with traditional temperature, pH, or light stimuli-responsive polymers, CO2 -responsive polymers provide the advantage to use CO2 as a "green" trigger as well as to capture CO2 directly from air. In addition, the current challenges of CO2 -responsive polymers are discussed and the different solution methods are compared. Noteworthy, CO2 -responsive polymers are considered to have a prosperous future in various scientific areas.

  12. CO2 laser modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  13. Abnormal end-tidal carbon dioxide levels on emergency department arrival in adult and pediatric intubated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James; Peng, James; Bair, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The utility of prehospital intubation is controversial, as uncontrolled studies in trauma patients suggest adverse outcomes with prehospital intubation, perhaps secondary to inappropriate ventilation once intubation is accomplished. The objectives were 1) to establish, immediately upon arrival to the emergency department (ED), the prevalence of abnormal end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2)) levels in patients with prehospital intubation and 2) to describe the relationship between abnormal ETCO(2) levels on ED arrival and mortality. This was a prospective, observational cohort study of patients with prehospital intubation. Patients were excluded if they underwent prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). On ED arrival, the initial ETCO(2) measurement from the patient's endotracheal tube was immediately obtained prior to purposeful intervention in the patient's ventilation by using an Oridion Surestream Sure VentLine H Set with a Welch Allyn Propaq CS monitor. For each patient, the treating physician documented the ETCO(2) measurement, patient demographics, and details of the transport. The primary outcome was an abnormal ETCO(2) value (45 mmHg). The secondary outcome was mortality. One hundred eligible patients were enrolled, with a median age of 30 years (interquartile range [IQR] 15, 48 years). Esophageal intubations were identified in four cases, and those cases were excluded from further analysis. Mechanisms included trauma, 74; medical, 12; and burn, 10. The median ETCO(2) value was 32 mmHg (IQR 27, 38 mmHg), range 18-80 mmHg. Forty-six of 96 (48%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 38%, 58%) patients had abnormal ETCO(2) values, including 37 (39%, 95% CI 29%, 49%) with low ETCO(2) levels and nine (9%, 95% CI 4%, 17%) with high ETCO(2) levels. Death was higher in those trauma patients with abnormal ETCO(2) levels (10/33, 30%, 95% CI 16%, 49%) than in those with normal ETCO(2) levels (2/41, 5%, 95% CI 0.6%, 17%), relative risk = 6.2 (95% CI 1.5, 26.4), p = 0

  14. CO2NNIE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a system for calculating the personalized annual fuel consumption and CO2 emissions from transportation. The system, named CO2NNIE, estimates the fuel consumption on the fastest route between the frequent destinations of the user. The travel time and fuel consumption estimated are based......% of the actual fuel consumption (4.6% deviation on average). We conclude, that the system provides new detailed information on CO2 emissions and fuel consumption for any make and model....

  15. Wearable CO2 sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Radu, Tanja; Fay, Cormac; Lau, King-Tong; Waite, Rhys; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    High concentrations of CO2 may develop particularly in the closed spaces during fires and can endanger the health of emergency personnel by causing serious physiological effects. The proposed prototype provides real-time continuous monitoring of CO2 in a wearable configuration sensing platform. A commercially available electrochemical CO2 sensor was selected due to its selectivity, sensitivity and low power demand. This was integrated onto an electronics platform that performed signal capture...

  16. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  17. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  18. The postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is not explained by PaCO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Secher, N H; Roos, C M

    2006-01-01

    In the normocapnic range, middle cerebral artery mean velocity (MCA Vmean) changes approximately 3.5% per mmHg carbon-dioxide tension in arterial blood (PaCO2) and a decrease in PaCO2 will reduce the cerebral blood flow by vasoconstriction (the CO2 reactivity of the brain). When standing up MCA...... Vmean and the end-tidal carbon-dioxide tension (PETCO2) decrease, suggesting that PaCO2 contributes to the reduction in MCA Vmean. In a fixed body position, PETCO2 tracks changes in the PaCO2 but when assuming the upright position, cardiac output (Q) decreases and its distribution over the lung changes...

  19. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  20. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  1. CO2-strategier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    I 2007 henvendte Lyngby-Taarbæk kommunens Agenda 21 koordinator sig til Videnskabsbutikken og spurgte om der var interesse for at samarbejde om CO2-strategier. Da Videnskabsbutikken DTU er en åben dør til DTU for borgerne og deres organisationer, foreslog Videnskabsbutikken DTU at Danmarks...... Naturfredningsforening’s lokalkomité for Lyngby blev en del af samarbejdet for at få borgerne i kommunen involveret i arbejdet med at udvikle strategier for reduktion af CO2. Siden sommeren 2007 har Videnskabsbutikken DTU, Lyngby-Taarbæk kommune og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening i Lyngby-Taarbæk samarbejdet om analyse...... og innovation i forhold til CO2-strategier....

  2. The accuracy of mainstream end-tidal carbon dioxide levels to predict the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations presented to the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Şener, Alp; Günaydın, Gül Pamukçu; İçme, Ferhat; Çelik, Gülhan Kurtoğlu; Kavaklı, Havva Şahin; Temrel, Tuğba Atmaca

    2014-05-01

    The end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) measurement was considered as an essential tool for the assessment of several conditions in emergency medicine. However, the diagnostic role of capnography in dyspneic patients still remains unclear. We aimed to analyze the alteration of the ETCO2 levels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations and its role in the decision-making process. All the individuals who were presented to the emergency department (ED) after COPD exacerbations were prospectively enrolled in the study. The patients were excluded if they refused to give informed consent, intubated after initial assessment, and had uncertain COPD diagnosis. The ETCO2 measurement using a mainstream capnometer was undertaken in the pretreatment and post-treatment period of COPD exacerbations. A total of 102 patients were enrolled in the study. Pre-ETCO2 and post-ETCO2 levels were positively correlated with arterial partial carbon dioxide pressure levels (r=0.756, Plevel was 32.0 (30.5-40.5) in discharged patients and 39.0 (31.0-53.5) in admitted patients. After the initial therapy in the ED was completed, the median post-ETCO2 level was found to be 32.0 (28.0-37.5) in discharged patients and 36.0 (32.0-52.0) in admitted patients. Although a statistically significant difference was observed in the pretreatment period (P=.043), no difference was observed in post-treatment period between ETCO2 levels (P=.107). End-tidal carbon dioxide levels were higher in admitted patients when compared with discharged patients on arrival to the ED. ETCO2 measurement has very little contributions while evaluating patients with COPD exacerbation in the ED. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Values Associated With Return of Spontaneous Circulation During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Silvia M; Farris, Reid W D; Di Gennaro, Jane L; Roberts, Joan S

    2015-10-01

    End-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2)) measurements during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) reflect variable cardiac output over time, and low values have been associated with decreased survival. The goals of this review are to confirm and quantify this relationship and to determine the mean ETCO(2) value among patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) as an initial step toward determining an appropriate target for intervention during resuscitation in the absence of prospective data. The PubMed database was searched for the key words "end-tidal carbon dioxide" or "capnometry" or "capnography" and "resuscitation" or "return of spontaneous circulation." Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, or case-control studies that reported ETCO(2) values for participants with and without ROSC were included. Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria for qualitative synthesis. Twenty studies were included in determination of average ETCO(2) values. The mean ETCO(2) in participants with ROSC was 25.8 ± 9.8 mm Hg versus 13.1 ± 8.2 mm Hg (P = .001) in those without ROSC. Nineteen studies were included in a meta-analysis. The mean difference in ETCO(2) was 12.7 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: 10.3-15.1) between participants with and without ROSC (P levels of ETCO(2). The average ETCO(2) level of 25 mm Hg in participants with ROSC is notably higher than the threshold of 10 to 20 mm Hg to improve delivery of chest compressions. The ETCO(2) goals during resuscitation may be higher than previously suggested and further investigation into appropriate targets during resuscitation is needed to diminish morbidity and mortality after cardiorespiratory arrest. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  5. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  6. Increased apparatus dead space and tidal volume increase blood concentrations of oxygen and sevoflurane in overweight patients: a randomised controlled clinical study.

    OpenAIRE

    Enekvist, Bruno; Bodelsson, Mikael; Johansson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    General anaesthesia impairs respiratory function in overweight patients. We wanted to determine whether increased tidal volume (VT), with unchanged end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2), affects blood concentrations of oxygen and sevoflurane in overweight patients.

  7. CO2驱油与埋存研究进展%Advances in CO2 Displacing Oil and CO2 Sequestrated Researches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欢庆; 胡永乐; 田昌炳

    2012-01-01

    The current situation of CO2 displacing oil and CO2 sequestrated researches was reviewed. Nowadays, CO2 displacing oil had got good economic benefits outside and was carried out oil field experiment inside. And CO2 sequestrated researches were in exploring stage all over the world. The key problems in CO2 displacing oil and CO2 sequestrated researches contained five parts, such as enlarging sweep volume of EOR, carrier and medium choice of CO2 sequestrated, the formation damage in the process of CO2 displacing oil, air source, industrial coordination and overall planning. Finally, several development directions of CO2 displacing oil and CO2 sequestrated researches were proposed.%详细介绍了CO2驱油与埋存研究的现状。目前CO2驱油在国外已取得较好的经济效益,在国内正在进行矿场先导试验。而CO2埋存在国内外均处于探索阶段。CO2驱油与埋存研究中存在的问题主要包括提高采收率方面的扩大波及体积等关键问题、CO2埋存介质和方法的选择、CO2驱油对地层的伤害、CO2驱油与埋存的气源问题、CO2驱油与埋存产业协调和整体规划5大方面。指出了该项研究的发展趋势。图2表2参38

  8. Relevance and influence factors of arterial blood carbon dioxide tension and end tidal carbon dioxide tension%动脉血二氧化碳分压与呼气末二氧化碳分压的相关性及影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王赟; 黄施伟; 陈莲华; 李士通

    2015-01-01

    Background End tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2) monitoring has a lot of advantages like noninvasive,convenient,fast and intuitive,and it is widely used for monitoring the ventilation function.At the same time,PETCO2 is also associated with pulmonary perfusion well,so it can be used as a monitoring and evaluation index of heart function and circulation dynamics indirectly.That has been a good correlation between PETCO2 and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2).Objective To summarize the factors may influence the correlation between PETCO2 and PaCO2,and to explore the pathophysiological mechanism may exist.Content We performed a review of the factors that affect the relativity between PETCO2 and PaCO2 from the operation's type,the basic condition of the patients and the aspect of anesthesia.Trend In general,there is a good correlation between PETCO2 and PaCO2 in normal condition,which has also been proved in corresponding physiological mechanism.However,the correlation between them still needs further research and exploration in a mixed more complex condition.%背景 呼气末二氧化碳分压(end tidal carbon dioxide tension,PETCO2)监测具有无创、简便、快捷、直观等优点,被广泛用于监测通气功能.同时PETCO2与肺血流灌注状况有密切关联,间接地同心排血量相关,故其还可作为心功能和循环动力的监测及评估指标.一直以来认为PETCO2与动脉血二氧化碳分压(arterial carbon dioxide tension,PaCO2)之间有很好的相关性.目的 总结可能影响PETCO2与PaCO2相关性的有关因素,探讨可能存在的病理生理机制.内容 结合近年来的相关文献,通过手术、患者基本情况及麻醉等三方面,就对PETCO2与PaCO2相关性产生影响的有关因素作一总结和回顾.趋向 PETCO2与PaCO2在一般情况下相关性良好,也有相应的生理机制证明.但存在混杂较为复杂的因素时,两者的相关性还需要深入研究和不断探索.

  9. CO2 laser preionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  10. Extraction of lipids from microalgae using CO2-expanded methanol and liquid CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Ashok; Jessop, Michael J; Stubbins, Spencer H; Champagne, Pascale; Jessop, Philip G

    2015-05-01

    The use of CO2-expanded methanol (cxMeOH) and liquid carbon dioxide (lCO2) is proposed to extract lipids from Botryococcus braunii. When compressed CO2 dissolves in methanol, the solvent expands in volume, decreases in polarity and so increases in its selectivity for biodiesel desirable lipids. Solid phase extraction of the algal extract showed that the cxMeOH extracted 21 mg of biodiesel desirable lipids per mL of organic solvent compared to 3mg/mL using either neat methanol or chloroform/methanol mixture. The non-polar lCO2 showed a high affinity for non-polar lipids. Using lCO2, it is possible to extract up to 10% neutral lipids relative to the mass of dry algae. Unlike extractions using conventional solvents, these new methods require little to no volatile, flammable, or chlorinated organic solvents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The relationship between arterial carbon dioxide tension and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension in intubated adults with traumatic brain injuries who required emergency craniotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Brett A; White, William A; Lee, Doohee; Elkins, Laurie; Slayton, Donna J

    2013-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients who have suffered traumatic brain injuries can be challenging. We investigated the relationship between arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure gradients (Pa-etCO₂) and 3 predictor variables: (1) injury severity score, (2) use of positive end-expiratory pressure, and (3) presence of rib fractures. Using a convenient sampling method, we sampled 56 patients who arrived to the operating room intubated after traumatic brain injuries between 2005 and 2011. Two groups were compared retrospectively: those with Pa-etCO₂ greater than 10 mm Hg (case group) (n = 37) and those with Pa-etCO₂ gradients of 10 mm Hg or less (control group) (n = 19). Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed to identify any differences between the groups. Stepwise regression was also performed. Cross tabulation analysis revealed that injury severity score of 30 or more was a predictor of Pa-etCO₂ gradient. Stepwise regression analysis revealed the presence of rib fracture and body mass index to be significant predictors of Pa-etCO₂ gradient (P arterial blood gas analysis to determine optimal ventilation status of these patients.

  12. The mechanical impact of CO2 injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Schroot, B.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical impact of CO2 injection into a depleted hydrocarbon field or aquifer is caused by changes in the stress field, resulting from changes in the pore pressure and volume of the rock. Mechanical processes can lead to the loss of reservoir and caprock integrity, and the reactivation of exis

  13. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  14. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  15. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agustí-Panareda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate – Interim Implementation (MACC-II service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they

  16. CO2-helium and CO2-neon mixtures at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, B; Ninet, S; Le Marchand, G; Munsch, P; Datchi, F

    2013-01-28

    The properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with helium or neon have been investigated as a function of CO(2) concentration and pressure up to 30 GPa at room temperature. The binary phase diagrams of these mixtures are determined over the full range of CO(2) concentrations using visual observations and Raman scattering measurements. Both diagrams are of eutectic type, with a fluid-fluid miscibility gap for CO(2) concentrations in the range [5, 75] mol. % for He and [8, 55] mol. % for Ne, and a complete separation between the two components in the solid phase. The absence of alloys or stoichiometric compounds for these two binary systems is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules of hard sphere mixtures. The Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns of solid CO(2) embedded in He or Ne for various initial concentrations have been measured up to 30 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively. The frequencies of the Raman modes and the volume of solid phase I are identical, within error bars, to those reported for 100% CO(2) samples, thus confirming the total immiscibility of CO(2) with He and Ne in the solid phase. These results demonstrate the possibility to perform high-pressure experiments on solid CO(2) under (quasi-)hydrostatic conditions using He or Ne as pressure transmitting medium.

  17. The application of transcutaneous CO2 pressure monitoring in the anesthesia of obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijiang Liu

    Full Text Available To investigate the correlation and accuracy of transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PTCCO2 with regard to arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2 in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Twenty-one patients with BMI>35 kg/m(2 were enrolled in our study. Their PaCO2, end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2, as well as PTCCO2 values were measured at before pneumoperitoneum and 30 min, 60 min, 120 min after pneumoperitoneum respectively. Then the differences between each pair of values (PetCO2-PaCO2 and. (PTCCO2-PaCO2 were calculated. Bland-Altman method, correlation and regression analysis, as well as exact probability method and two way contingency table were employed for the data analysis. 21 adults (aged 19-54 yr, mean 29, SD 9 yr; weight 86-160 kg, mean 119.3, SD 22.1 kg; BMI 35.3-51.1 kg/m(2, mean 42.1,SD 5.4 kg/m(2 were finally included in this study. One patient was eliminated due to the use of vaso-excitor material phenylephrine during anesthesia induction. Eighty-four sample sets were obtained. The average PaCO2-PTCCO2 difference was 0.9 ± 1.3 mmHg (mean ± SD. And the average PaCO2-PetCO2 difference was 10.3 ± 2.3 mmHg (mean ± SD. The linear regression equation of PaCO2-PetCO2 is PetCO2 = 11.58+0.57 × PaCO2 (r(2 = 0.64, P<0.01, whereas the one of PaCO2-PTCCO2 is PTCCO2 = 0.60 + 0.97 × PaCO2 (r(2 = 0.89. The LOA (limits of agreement of 95% average PaCO2-PetCO2 difference is 10.3 ± 4.6 mmHg (mean ± 1.96 SD, while the LOA of 95% average PaCO2-PTCCO2 difference is 0.9 ± 2.6 mmHg (mean ± 1.96 SD. In conclusion, transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring provides a better estimate of PaCO2 than PetCO2 in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

  18. India Co2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, S.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    created a balance in between the “developed” and developing countries. If India was producing the same amounts of emissions per capita as the it would have a total of 20 billion metric tons of CO2 emissions annually.

  19. CO2 as a refrigerant

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    A first edition, the IIR guide “CO2 as a Refrigerant” highlights the application of carbon dioxide in supermarkets, industrial freezers, refrigerated transport, and cold stores as well as ice rinks, chillers, air conditioning systems, data centers and heat pumps. This guide is for design and development engineers needing instruction and inspiration as well as non-technical experts seeking background information on a specific topic. Written by Dr A.B. Pearson, a well-known expert in the field who has considerable experience in the use of CO2 as a refrigerant. Main topics: Thermophysical properties of CO2 – Exposure to CO2, safety precautions – CO2 Plant Design – CO2 applications – Future prospects – Standards and regulations – Bibliography.

  20. 早产儿机械通气状态下呼气末二氧化碳分压的目标调节范围%The target adjustment of the end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure in preterm infants under mechanical ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武荣; 胡金绘; 查丽; 朱红利; 赵玉祥; 丁素芳; 封志纯

    2015-01-01

    Objective To reduce the incidence of the hypocapnia,the cutoff value of the end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure[Pet(CO2)] for predicting the hypocapnia so as to understand the suitable adjustment target and target range of the Pet(CO2) in preterm infants under mechanical ventilation.Methods From Jan.2012 to Oct.2013,96 cases of the preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome(RDS) who needed mechanical support were selected from the Huaian Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital.Pet(CO2) value of each time point(1 h,24 h,48 h and 72 h after mechanical ventilation) were recorded,while radial artery blood was collected for blood gas analysis.The level of pa (CO2) < 35 mmHg(1 mmHg =0.133 kPa) diagnosed hypocapnia;while the level of Pa (CO2) > 60 mmHg was for diagnosing hypercapnia.The diagnostic cutoff and the suitable adjustment target and adjustment target range of the Pet(CO2) were confirmed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve.Results The data from 381 arterial blood gas analysis results were gained,of which 151 times belonged to hypocapnia,and the rate was 39.6%,the other 230 cases were normal,and no case was of hypercapnia.The area under the ROC curve was 0.895,and the area of the standard error was 0.016.There was a statistical significance in Pet(CO2) value for the diagnosis of hypocapnia(P =0.000).The lower the value of Pet (CO2),the greater the likelihood of hypocapnia,and 95 % confidence interval area was 0.864-0.926.The Pet (CO2) optimal diagnostic cutoff value determined in accordance with Youden index was 30.5 mmHg.When Pet (CO2) among 41.5 mmHg,sensitivity was 100%.Conclusions Diagnostic cutoff value for forecasting hypocapnia is 30.5 mmHg.The suitable adjustment target of mechanical ventilation parameter adjustment is 41.5 mmHg for the Pet(CO2).The target range of mechanical ventilation parameter adjustment is 30.6-41.5 mmHg for the Pet(CO2).%目的 探讨预测低碳酸血症的呼气末二氧化碳分压[Pet(CO2)]

  1. Transport Mechanisms for CO2-CH4 Exchange and Safe CO2 Storage in Hydrate-Bearing Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Arne Birkedal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 injection in hydrate-bearing sediments induces methane (CH4 production while benefitting from CO2 storage, as demonstrated in both core and field scale studies. CH4 hydrates have been formed repeatedly in partially water saturated Bentheim sandstones. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and CH4 consumption from pump logs have been used to verify final CH4 hydrate saturation. Gas Chromatography (GC in combination with a Mass Flow Meter was used to quantify CH4 recovery during CO2 injection. The overall aim has been to study the impact of CO2 in fractured and non-fractured samples to determine the performance of CO2-induced CH4 hydrate production. Previous efforts focused on diffusion-driven exchange from a fracture volume. This approach was limited by gas dilution, where free and produced CH4 reduced the CO2 concentration and subsequent driving force for both diffusion and exchange. This limitation was targeted by performing experiments where CO2 was injected continuously into the spacer volume to maintain a high driving force. To evaluate the effect of diffusion length multi-fractured core samples were used, which demonstrated that length was not the dominating effect on core scale. An additional set of experiments is presented on non-fractured samples, where diffusion-limited transportation was assisted by continuous CO2 injection and CH4 displacement. Loss of permeability was addressed through binary gas (N2/CO2 injection, which regained injectivity and sustained CO2-CH4 exchange.

  2. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF ISOFLURANE VS HALOTHANE TO ATTENUATE HAEMODYNAMIC RESPONSE DUE TO CO 2 PNEUMOPERI- TONEUM DURING LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a relatively new sur gical procedure which is enjoying ever increasing popularit y and presenting new anesthetic challenges. Volatile anesthetics play an important ro le in the management of haemodynamic changes due to CO2 pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopi c surgeries. The aim of the study is to evaluate Isoflurane Vs Halothane as an adjunct t o obtund haemodynamic response due to CO2 pneumoperitoneum. MATERIALS & METHODS: 50 patients aged 20-60 yrs of either sex belonging to ASA grade I & II scheduled for electiv e laparoscopic cholecystectomy admitted in MLB Medical College, Jhansi were randomly divided i nto two group. Group I – O 2 : N 2 O + Inhalational agent (Isoflurane 1.5-2% Group II – O 2 : N 2 O + Inhalational agent (Halothane 1.5-2% RESULTS : Hypertensive response due to CO 2 pneumoperitoneum was well suppressed by Isoflurane (1.5-2% {Group-I} which maintained pulse rate at a relatively higher side than halothane, (1.5-2%{Group II} decreased mean arteria l pressure more significantly than halothane without any difference in arterial oxygen saturation (SPO 2 and end tidal CO 2 concentration (E T CO 2 . CONCLUSION : This can be concluded from the study that Isoflur ane (Group-I more effectively attenuated the haemodyna mic response due to CO 2 pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared to Halothane (Group-II under balanced anesthetic technique.

  3. Research on the physical properties of supercritical CO2 and the log evaluation of CO2-bearing volcanic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Baozhi; Lei, Jian; Zhang, Lihua; Guo, Yuhang

    2017-10-01

    CO2-bearing reservoirs are difficult to distinguish from other natural gas reservoirs during gas explorations. Due to the lack of physical parameters for supercritical CO2, particularly neutron porosity, at present a hydrocarbon gas log evaluation method is used to evaluate CO2-bearing reservoirs. The differences in the physical properties of hydrocarbon and CO2 gases have led to serious errors. In this study, the deep volcanic rock of the Songliao Basin was the research area. In accordance with the relationship between the density and acoustic velocity of supercritical CO2 and temperature and pressure, the regularity between the CO2 density and acoustic velocity, and the depth of the area was established. A neutron logging simulation was completed based on a Monte Carlo method. Through the simulation of the wet limestone neutron logging, the relationship between the count rate ratio of short and long space detectors and the neutron porosity was acquired. Then, the nature of the supercritical CO2 neutron moderation was obtained. With consideration given to the complexity of the volcanic rock mineral composition, a volcanic rock volume model was established, and the matrix neutron and density parameters were acquired using the ECS log. The properties of CO2 were applied in the log evaluation of the CO2-bearing volcanic reservoirs in the southern Songliao Basin. The porosity and saturation of CO2 were obtained, and a reasonable application was achieved in the CO2-bearing reservoir.

  4. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim......The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  5. CO2 Sequestration short course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  6. CO2 transport in normovolemic anemia: complete compensation and stability of blood CO2 tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, S; Alberts, M K; Bishop, M J; Bidani, A; Swenson, E R

    1997-07-01

    Isovolemic hemodilution does not appear to impair CO2 elimination nor cause CO2 retention despite the important role of red blood cells in blood CO2 transport. We studied this phenomenon and its physiological basis in eight New Zealand White rabbits that were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated at a fixed minute ventilation. Isovolemic anemia was induced by simultaneous blood withdrawal and infusion of 6% hetastarch in sequential stages; exchange transfusions ranged from 15-30 ml in volume. Variables measured after each hemodilution included hematocrit (Hct), arterial and venous blood gases, mixed expired PCO2 and PO2, and blood pressure; also, O2 consumption, CO2 production, cardiac output (Q), and physiological dead space were calculated. Data were analyzed by comparison of changes in variables with changes in Hct and by using the model of capillary gas exchange described by Bidani (J. Appl. Physiol. 70: 1686-1699, 1991). There was complete compensation for anemia with stability of venous and arterial PCO2 between Hct values of 36 +/- 3 and 12 +/- 1%, which was predicted by the mathematical model. Over this range of hemodilution, Q rose 50%, and the O2 extraction ratio increased 61% without a decline in CO2 production or a rise in alveolar ventilation. The dominant compensations maintaining CO2 transport in normovolemic anemia include an increased Q and an augmented Haldane effect arising from the accompanying greater O2 extraction.

  7. CO2 absorption characteristics of monoethanol amine aqueous solution and recovery of CO2 from marine engine exhaust; Monoethanol amine suiyoeki no CO2 kyushu tokusei to hakuyo kikan no CO2 kaishu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikame, M.; Suga, S.; Hiraoka, K.; Kumakura, T. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-04-13

    Investigations were made on characteristics of CO2 absorption into monoethanol amine aqueous solution under normal pressure as a method of recovering CO2, the CO2 concentration and effect of the accompanying gases. Furthermore, assuming a large marine diesel engine using methanol as a fuel, the experimental result was used to discuss a size of the CO2 absorbing device. Assuming exhaust gases from a methanol-fueled diesel engine and steam reformed gas of methanol, from which CO2 is to be recovered, the experiment used two kinds of accompanying gases, N2 and H2, and the CO2 concentrations of 5% to 25% by volume. The relationship between the CO2 material balance and the substance movement between gas and liquid based on the double boundary film theory was put into order to derive an experiment equation. This equation was capable of expression with an error of less than {plus_minus}35%. This paper indicates by using the experimental result a method to derive the size of an absorbing and filling layer for CO2 in exhaust gases from a methanol fueled marine diesel engine. Given an example, the volume of the filling layer in the absorption column is required to be about 12% of the engine volume of 770m{sup 3}, and the absorption flow rate to be 65.4kg/s. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Connecting CO2. Feasibility study CO2 network Southwest Netherlands; Connecting CO2. Haalbaarheidsstudie CO2-netwerk Zuidwest-Nederland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, M.

    2009-06-10

    An overview is given of supply and demand of CO2 in the region Southwest Netherlands and the regions Antwerp and Gent in Belgium. Also attention is paid to possible connections between these regions [Dutch] Een inventarisatie wordt gegeven van vraag en aanbod van CO2 in de regio Zuidwest- Nederland en de regios Antwerpen en Gent in Belgie. Ook worden mogelijke koppelingen tussen de regios besproken.

  9. Our trial to develop a risk assessment tool for CO2 geological storage (GERAS-CO2GS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A.; Sakamoto, Y.; Komai, T.

    2012-12-01

    We will introduce our researches about to develop a risk assessment tool named 'GERAS-CO2GS' (Geo-environmental Risk Assessment System, CO2 Geological Storage Risk Assessment System) for 'Carbon Dioxide Geological Storage (Geological CCS)'. It aims to facilitate understanding of size of impact of risks related with upper migration of injected CO2. For gaining public recognition about feasibility of Geological CCS, quantitative estimation of risks is essential, to let public knows the level of the risk: whether it is negligible or not. Generally, in preliminary hazard analysis procedure, potential hazards could be identified within Geological CCS's various facilities such as: reservoir, cap rock, upper layers, CO2 injection well, CO2 injection plant and CO2 transport facilities. Among them, hazard of leakage of injected C02 is crucial, because it is the clue to estimate risks around a specific injection plan in terms of safety, environmental protection effect and economy. Our risk assessment tool named GERAS-CO2GS evaluates volume and rate of retention and leakage of injected CO2 in relation with fractures and/or faults, and then it estimates impact of seepages on the surface of the earth. GERAS-CO2GS has four major processing segments: (a) calculation of CO2 retention and leakage volume and rate, (b) data processing of CO2 dispersion on the surface and ambient air, (c) risk data definition and (d) evaluation of risk. Concerning to the injection site, we defined a model, which is consisted from an injection well and a geological strata model: which involves a reservoir, a cap rock, an upper layer, faults, seabed, sea, the surface of the earth and the surface of the sea. For retention rate of each element of CO2 injection site model, we use results of our experimental and numerical studies on CO2 migration within reservoirs and faults with specific lithological conditions. For given CO2 injection rate, GERAS-CO2GS calculates CO2 retention and leakage of each segment

  10. Assessing intravascular volume by difference in pulse pressure in pigs submitted to graded hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Gunther J; Hiltebrand, Luzius B; Fukui, Kimiko; Cohen, Delphine; Hager, Helmut; Kurz, Andrea M

    2006-10-01

    We assessed changes in intravascular volume monitored by difference in pulse pressure (dPP%) after stepwise hemorrhage in an experimental pig model. Six pigs (23-25 kg) were anesthetized (isoflurane 1.5 vol%) and mechanically ventilated to keep end-tidal CO2 (etCO2) at 35 mmHg. A PA-catheter and an arterial catheter were placed via femoral access. During and after surgery, animals received lactated Ringer's solution as long as they were considered volume responders (dPP>13%). Then animals were allowed to stabilize from the induction of anesthesia and insertion of catheters for 30 min. After stabilization, baseline measurements were taken. Five percent of blood volume was withdrawn, followed by another 5%, and then in 10%-increments until death from exsanguination occurred. After withdrawal of 5% of blood volume, all pigs were considered volume responders (dPP>13%); dPP rose significantly from 6.1+/-3.3% to 19.4+/-4.2%. The regression analysis of stepwise hemorrhage revealed a linear relation between blood loss (hemorrhage in %) and dPP (y=0.99*x+14; R2=0.7764; P<.0001). In addition, dPP was the only parameter that changed significantly between baseline and a blood loss of 5% (P<0.01), whereas cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate, MAP, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and systemic vascular resistance, respectively, remained unchanged. We conclude that in an experimental hypovolemic pig model, dPP correlates well with blood loss.

  11. 呼气末二氧化碳分压的变化对感染性休克机械通气患者容量反应性的预测价值%The value of changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure induced by passive leg raising test in predicting fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧芝栋; 严洁; 许红阳; 梁锋鸣; 杨挺; 王大鹏; 高飞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test whether the changes of partial end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (PETCO2) during passive leg raising (PLR) predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock.Methods Forty-two mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock admitted from January 2012 to November 2012 were prospectively recruited.Hemodynamic parameters monitored by a pulse indicator continuous cardiac output(PiCCO) device and PETCO2 monitored by an expiratory-CO2 device were studied at baseline,after PLR,and after volume expansion.Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in cardiac index (CI) of 15% or greater after volume expansion.The correlation between PLR-induced CI change (△CIPLR) and PETCO2 (△PETCO2-PLR) was analyzed.The value of △PETCO2-PLR to predict fluid responsiveness was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.Results A total of 42 patients were enrolled in this study,of whom,24 had a CI increase of ≥ 15% after volume expansion (responders).After PLR,CI and PETCO2 were both significantly increased in the response group compared with baseline [(21.4 ± 12.9) % of CI and (9.6 ± 4.7) % of PETCO2,P < 0.05],while no significant changes were observed (P > 0.05) in the non-response group.Both △CIPLR and △PETCO2-PLR were significantly higher in responder group than in the non-responder group (both P < 0.05).△CI and △PETCO2 after PLR were strongly correlated (r =0.64,P < 0.05).In responders after PLR,the area under ROC curve of △PETCO2-PLR was 0.900 ± 0.056 (95% CI 0.775-1.000,P < 0.05).An increase of ≥ 5% in △PETCO2-PLR predicted fluid responsiveness with a sensitivity of 88.0% and specificity of 88.2%.Conclusions The change of PETCO2 induced by passive leg raising is a non-invasive and easy way to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock.%目的 探讨呼气末二氧化碳分压(PETCO2)在被动抬腿试验中的变化及

  12. CO2 Emissions From Fuel Combustion. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process, the IEA is making available for free download the ''Highlights'' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion now for sale on IEA Bookshop. This annual publication contains, for more than 140 countries and regions: estimates of CO2 emissions from 1971 to 2011; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; a decomposition of CO2 emissions into driving factors; and CO2emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, key sources, and other relevant information. The nineteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP-19), in conjunction with the ninth meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 9), met in Warsaw, Poland from 11 to 22 November 2013. This volume of ''Highlights'', drawn from the full-scale study, was specially designed for delegations and observers of the meeting in Warsaw.

  13. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  14. Holiday CO2: Inference from the Salt Lake City data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, J.; Fung, I. Y.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Stephens, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    A network of high-frequency CO2 sensors has been established in Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah (http://co2.utah.edu/), and the annual/monthly pattern of CO2 variability is consistent with a priori estimates of CO2 fluxes (McKain et al., 2012). Here we ask if short-term changes in anthropogenic sources can be detected, and present a case study of Thanksgiving holiday, when traffic and energy use patterns are expected to be different from that during the rest of the month. CO2 mole fraction is much higher during the Thanksgiving holidays than the other days in November 2008 for all 5 sites in SLC, and a similar pattern is found in other years. Taking into account that the wind speed is relatively low in downtown SLC compared to the other SLC sites, the downtown site is further investigated to minimize the meteorological influence on CO2. In order to understand the relative contributions to the high level of CO2 during the Thanksgiving holidays, we carried out a multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of the rate of CO2 change against various sources. Mobile CO2 sources are assumed to be proportional to local traffic data and residential CO2 sources are assumed to depend exponentially on temperature. Vulcan data were used to specify the other anthropogenic sources (commercial, industrial, nonroad, electricity, aircraft, and cement). The MLR analysis shows that during the Thanksgiving holidays CO2 contributions from residential and commercial CO2 are larger than that during the rest of November, and mobile sources represent only a relatively small contribution. The study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting changes in urban source contributions using high-frequency measurements in combination with daily PBL height and local traffic volume data.

  15. The CO2nnect activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  16. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  17. Monitoring subsurface CO2 storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winthaegen, P.; Arts, R.; Schroot, B.M.

    2005-01-01

    An overview is given of various currently applied monitoring techniques for CO2 storage. Techniques are subdivided in correspondence to their applicability for monitoring three distinct realms. These are: - the atmosphere and the near-surface; - the overburden (including faults and wells); - the

  18. CO2 Abatement In The Iron And Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    The iron and steel industry is the largest industrial source of CO2 emissions due to the energy intensity of steel production, its reliance on carbon-based fuels and reductants, and the large volume of steel produced -- over 1414 Mt in 2010. With the growing concern over climate change, steel makers are faced with the challenge of finding ways of lowering CO2 emissions without seriously undermining process efficiency or considerably adding to costs. This report examines ways of abating CO2 emissions from raw materials preparation (coking, sintering and pelletising plants) through to the production of liquid steel in basic oxygen furnaces and electric arc furnaces. Direct reduction and smelting reduction processes are covered, as well as iron making in a blast furnace. A range of technologies and measures exist for lowering CO2 emissions including minimising energy consumption and improving energy efficiency, changing to a fuel and/or reducing agent with a lower CO2 emission factor (such as wood charcoal), and capturing the CO2 and storing it underground. Significant CO2 reductions can be achieved by combining a number of the available technologies. If carbon capture and storage is fitted than steel plants could become near zero emitters of CO2.

  19. PET(CO2) measurement and feature extraction of capnogram signals for extubation outcomes from mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasera, Carmen C; Gewehr, Pedro M; Domingues, Adriana Maria T

    2015-02-01

    Capnography is a continuous and noninvasive method for carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, and it has become the standard of care for basic respiratory monitoring for intubated patients in the intensive care unit. In addition, it has been used to adjust ventilatory parameters during mechanical ventilation (MV). However, a substantial debate remains as to whether capnography is useful during the process of weaning and extubation from MV during the postoperative period. Thus, the main objective of this study was to present a new use for time-based capnography data by measuring the end-tidal CO2 pressure ([Formula: see text]), partial pressure of arterial CO2 ([Formula: see text]) and feature extraction of capnogram signals before extubation from MV to evaluate the capnography as a predictor of outcome extubation in infants after cardiac surgery. Altogether, 82 measurements were analysed, 71.9% patients were successfully extubated, and 28.1% met the criteria for extubation failure within 48 h. The ROC-AUC analysis for quantitative measure of the capnogram showed significant differences (p CO2 values in patients who had returned MV was 82.8  ±  21 mmHg at the time of extubation failure. Thus, [Formula: see text] measurements and analysis of features extracted from a capnogram can differentiate extubation outcomes in infant patients under MV, thereby reducing the physiologic instability caused by failure in this process.

  20. Excitation of CO2/+/ by electron impact on CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentall, J. E.; Coplan, M. A.; Kushlis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of a discrepancy concerning the correct value of the cross section for excitation of the CO2(+) B state by electron impact on CO2. It is suggested that the reason for the disparate results obtained by various authors for the B state can be traced to a calibration error due to scattered light. In particular, the tungsten filament lamps used in the experiments cited have very low intensity at wavelengths below 3000 A where the B state emissions occur, so that even a small amount of scattered light in the spectrometer will produce a large error in the measured cross section. In a remeasurement of the cross section for excitation of the B state at an energy of 150 eV it was found that at 2900 A the scattered light signal, if uncorrected for, would introduce an error of about 50%.

  1. Multiwell CO2 injectivity: impact of boundary conditions and brine extraction on geologic CO2 storage efficiency and pressure buildup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Jason E; McKenna, Sean A; Dewers, Thomas A; Roach, Jesse D; Kobos, Peter H

    2014-01-21

    CO2 storage efficiency is a metric that expresses the portion of the pore space of a subsurface geologic formation that is available to store CO2. Estimates of storage efficiency for large-scale geologic CO2 storage depend on a variety of factors including geologic properties and operational design. These factors govern estimates on CO2 storage resources, the longevity of storage sites, and potential pressure buildup in storage reservoirs. This study employs numerical modeling to quantify CO2 injection well numbers, well spacing, and storage efficiency as a function of geologic formation properties, open-versus-closed boundary conditions, and injection with or without brine extraction. The set of modeling runs is important as it allows the comparison of controlling factors on CO2 storage efficiency. Brine extraction in closed domains can result in storage efficiencies that are similar to those of injection in open-boundary domains. Geomechanical constraints on downhole pressure at both injection and extraction wells lower CO2 storage efficiency as compared to the idealized scenario in which the same volumes of CO2 and brine are injected and extracted, respectively. Geomechanical constraints should be taken into account to avoid potential damage to the storage site.

  2. Study on Phase Equilibrium Properties for CO2+Cosolvent Binary Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the constant volume, visual method is used to measure thc critical point of CO2toluene, CO2+cyclohexane, CO2+n-butyraldehyde, CO2+i-butyraldchyde, CO2+methanol and CO2+alcohol binary systems. The relationship between critical point and the concentration of the entrainer for different substances has been discussed, and the comparison of the phase behavior of single component system and that of binary systems have been carried out.

  3. Borehole Seismic Monitoring of Injected CO2 at the Frio Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Hoversten, G.M.; Peterson, JohnE.; Korneev, Valeri A.

    2006-04-21

    As part of a small scale sequestration test (about 1500 tonsof CO2) in a saline aquifer, time-lapse borehole seismic surveys wereconducted to aid in characterization of subsurface CO2 distribution andmaterial property changes induced by the injected CO2. A VSP surveydemonstrated a large increase (about 75 percent) in seismic reflectivitydue to CO2 injection and allowed estimation of the spatial extent of CO2induced changes. A crosswell survey imaged a large seismic velocitydecrease (up to 500 m/s) within the injection interval and provided ahigh resolution image of this velocity change which maps the subsurfacedistribution of CO2 between two wells. Numerical modeling of the seismicresponse uses the crosswell measurements to show that this small CO2volume causes a large response in the seismic reflectivity. This resultdemonstrates that seismic detection of small CO2 volumes in salineaquifers is feasible and realistic.

  4. Fang CO2 med Aminosyrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai

    2010-01-01

    Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer.......Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer....

  5. CO2 Utilization and Storage in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaef, T.; Glezakou, V.; Owen, T.; Miller, Q.; Loring, J.; Davidson, C.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Surging natural gas production from fractured shale reservoirs and the emerging concept of utilizing anthropogenic CO2 for secondary recovery and permanent storage is driving the need for understanding fundamental mechanisms controlling gas adsorption and desorption processes, mineral volume changes, and impacts to transmissivity properties. Early estimates indicate that between 10 and 30 gigatons of CO2 storage capacity may exist in the 24 shale gas plays included in current USGS assessments. However, the adsorption of gases (CO2, CH4, and SO2) is not well understood and appears unique for individual clay minerals. Using specialized experimental techniques developed at PNNL, pure clay minerals were examined at relevant pressures and temperatures during exposure to CH4, CO2, and mixtures of CO2-SO2. Adsorbed concentrations of methane displayed a linear behavior as a function of pressure as determined by a precision quartz crystal microbalance. Acid gases produced differently shaped adsorption isotherms, depending on temperature and pressure. In the instance of kaolinite, gaseous CO2 adsorbed linearly, but in the presence of supercritical CO2, surface condensation increased significantly to a peak value before desorbing with further increases in pressure. Similarly shaped CO2 adsorption isotherms derived from natural shale samples and coal samples have been reported in the literature. Adsorption steps, determined by density functional theory calculations, showed they were energetically favorable until the first CO2 layer formed, corresponding to a density of ~0.35 g/cm3. Interlayer cation content (Ca, Mg, or Na) of montmorillonites influenced adsorbed gas concentrations. Measurements by in situ x-ray diffraction demonstrate limited CO2 diffusion into the Na-montmorillonite interlayer spacing, with structural changes related to increased hydration. Volume changes were observed when Ca or Mg saturated montmorillonites in the 1W hydration state were exposed to

  6. Longitudinal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging CO2 Stress Testing in Individual Adolescent Sports-Related Concussion Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W Alan C; Ellis, Michael J; Ryner, Lawrence N; Morissette, Marc P; Pries, Philip J; Dufault, Brenden; Essig, Marco; Mikulis, David J; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced neuroimaging studies in concussion have been limited to detecting group differences between concussion patients and healthy controls. In this small pilot study, we used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CO2 stress testing to longitudinally assess cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) in individual sports-related concussion (SRC) patients. Six SRC patients (three males and three females; mean age = 15.7, range = 15-17 years) underwent longitudinal brain MRI CO2 stress testing using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and model-based prospective end-tidal CO2 targeting under isoxic conditions. First-level and second-level comparisons were undertaken using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to score the scans and compare them to an atlas of 24 healthy control subjects. All tests were well tolerated and without any serious adverse events. Anatomical MRI was normal in all study participants. The CO2 stimulus was consistent between the SRC patients and control subjects and within SRC patients across the longitudinal study. Individual SRC patients demonstrated both quantitative and qualitative patient-specific alterations in CVR (p correlated strongly with clinical findings, and that persisted beyond clinical recovery. Standardized brain MRI CO2 stress testing is capable of providing a longitudinal assessment of CVR in individual SRC patients. Consequently, larger prospective studies are needed to examine the utility of brain MRI CO2 stress testing as a clinical tool to help guide the evaluation, classification, and longitudinal management of SRC patients.

  7. CO2 ice structure and density under Martian atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T. P.; Salzmann, C. G.; Plane, J. M. C.; Murray, B. J.

    2017-09-01

    Clouds composed of CO2 ice form throughout the Martian atmosphere. In the mesosphere, CO2 ice clouds are thought to form via heterogeneous ice nucleation on nanoparticles of meteoric origin at temperatures often below 100 K. Lower altitude CO2 ice clouds in the wintertime polar regions form up to around 145 K and lead to the build-up of the polar ice caps. However, the crystal structure and related fundamental properties of CO2 ice under Martian conditions are poorly characterised. Here we present X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of CO2 ice, grown via deposition from the vapour phase under temperature and pressure conditions analogous to the Martian mesosphere. A crystalline cubic structure was determined, consistent with the low-pressure polymorph (CO2-I, space group Pa-3 (No. 205)). CO2 deposited at temperatures of 80-130 K and pressures of 0.01-1 mbar was consistent with dry ice and previous literature measurements, thus removing the possibility of a more complicated phase diagram for CO2 in this region. At 80 K, a lattice parameter of 5.578 ± 0.002 Å, cell volume of 173.554 ± 0.19 Å3 and density of 1.684 ± 0.002 g cm-3 was determined. Using these measurements, we determined the thermal expansion of CO2 across 80-130 K that allowed for a fit of CO2 ice density measurements across a larger temperature range (80-195 K) when combined with literature data (CO2 density = 1.72391 - 2.53 × 10-4T - 2.87 × 10-6 T2). Temperature-dependent CO2 density values are used to estimate sedimentation velocities and heterogeneous ice nucleation rates, showing an increase in nucleation rate of up to a factor of 1000 when compared to commonly used literature values. This temperature-dependent equation of state is therefore suggested for use in future studies of Martian mesospheric CO2 clouds. Finally, we discuss the possible shapes of crystals of CO2 ice in the Martian atmosphere and show that a range of shapes including cubes and octahedra as well as a combination of the

  8. Acute and Chronic Exposure to CO2 in Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D.; Wu, J.; Barr, Y. R.; Watkins, S. D.

    2010-01-01

    Spacecraft and space stations, similar to other habitable confined spaces such as submarines, need to provide a breathable atmosphere for their inhabitants. The inevitable production of CO2 during respiration necessitates life support systems that "scrub" the atmosphere and lower CO2 levels. Due to operational limitations associated with space flight (limited mass, volume, power, and consumables) CO2 is not scrubbed down to its terrestrial equivalent of 0.03% CO2 (ppCO2 of 0.23 mmHg), but is kept below 0.7% (ppCO2 of 5.3 mmHg), a level established in NASA s 180-day mission Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) to be safe and unlikely to cause symptoms. Reports of space flight crewmembers becoming symptomatic with headaches, fatigue, and malaise at levels below those known to cause such symptoms terrestrially has prompted studies measuring the levels of CO2 on both the space shuttle and the space station. Data from cabin atmosphere sampling were collected on space shuttle missions STS-113, STS-122, STS-123, and International Space Station Expeditions 12-15 and 17, and the measured CO2 levels were then correlated to symptoms reported by the crew. The results indicate that a correlation exists between CO2 levels and symptomatology, however causality cannot be established at this time. While the short-term effects of elevated CO2 exposure are well known terrestrially, less is known regarding potential long-term effects of prolonged exposure to a CO2-rich environment or how the physiological changes caused by microgravity may interact with such exposures. Other challenges include limitations in the CO2 monitors used, lack of convection in the microgravity environment, and formation of localized CO2 pockets. As it is unclear if the unique environment of space increases sensitivity to CO2 or if other confounding factors are present, further research is planned to elucidate these points. At the same time, efforts are underway to update the SMAC to a lower level

  9. Performance of CO2 enrich CNG in direct injection engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmansyah, W. B.; Ayandotun, E. Z.; Zainal, A.; Aziz, A. R. A.; Heika, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the undeveloped natural gas fields in Malaysia with high carbon dioxide (CO2) content ranging from 28% to 87%. For this experiment, various CO2 proportions by volume were added to pure natural gas as a way of simulating raw natural gas compositions in these fields. The experimental tests were carried out using a 4-stroke single cylinder spark ignition (SI) direct injection (DI) compressed natural gas (CNG) engine. The tests were carried out at 180° and 300° before top dead centre (BTDC) injection timing at 3000 rpm, to establish the effects on the engine performance. The results show that CO2 is suppressing the combustion of CNG while on the other hand CNG combustion is causing CO2 dissociation shown by decreasing CO2 emission with the increase in CO2 content. Results for 180° BTDC injection timing shows higher performance compared to 300° BTDC because of two possible reasons, higher volumetric efficiency and higher stratification level. The results also showed the possibility of increasing the CO2 content by injection strategy.

  10. RODZAJE METOD SEKWESTRACJI CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia LUBAŃSKA

    Full Text Available Z pojęciem ochrony środowiska wiąże się bardzo szeroko w ostatnim czasie omawiane zagadnienie dotyczące ograniczenia emisji CO2. Konsekwencją globalnych zmian klimatu wywołanego przez ludzi jest wzrost stężenia atmosferycznego gazów cieplarnianych, które powodują nasilający się efekt cieplarniany. Wzrasta na świecie liczba ludności, a co za tym idzie wzrasta konsumpcja na jednego mieszkańca, szczególnie w krajach szeroko rozwiniętych gospodarczo. Protokół z Kioto ściśle określa działania jakie należy podjąć w celu zmniejszenia stężenia dwutlenku węgla w atmosferze. Pomimo maksymalnej optymalizacji procesu spalania paliw kopalnianych wykorzystywanych do produkcji energii, zastosowania odnawialnych źródeł energii zmiana klimatu jest nieunikniona i konsekwentnie będzie postępować przez kolejne dekady. Prognozuje się, że duże znaczenie odegra nowoczesna technologia, która ma za zadanie wychwycenie CO2 a następnie składowanie go w odpowiednio wybranych formacjach geologicznych (CCS- Carbon Capture and Storage. Eksperci są zgodni, że ta technologia w niedalekiej przyszłości stanie się rozwiązaniem pozwalającym ograniczyć ogromną ilość emisji CO2 pochodzącą z procesów wytwarzania energii z paliw kopalnych. Z analiz Raportu IPCC wynika, iż technologia CSS może się przyczynić do ok. 20% redukcji emisji dwutlenku węgla przewidzianej do 2050 roku [3]. Zastosowanie jej napotyka na wiele barier, nie tylko technologicznych i ekonomicznych, ale także społecznych. Inną metodą dającą ujemne źródło emisji CO2 jest możliwość wykorzystania obszarów leśnych o odpowiedniej strukturze drzewostanu. Środkiem do tego celu, oprócz ograniczenia zużycia emisjogennych paliw kopalnych (przy zachowaniu zasad zrównoważonego rozwoju może być intensyfikacja zalesień. Zwiększanie lesistości i prawidłowa gospodarka leśna należy do najbardziej efektywnych sposobów kompensowania

  11. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Owen, Antionette T.; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-02-11

    The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto poorly crystalline kaolinite (KGa-2) at conditions relevant to geologic sequestration has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The QCM data indicated linear adsorption of CO2 (0-0.3 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) onto the kaolinite surface up through the gaseous state (0.186 g/cm3). However in the supercritical region, CO2 adsorption increases dramatically, reaching a peak (0.9-1.0 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) near 0.43 g/cm3, before declining rapidly to surface adsorption values equivalent or below gaseous CO2. This adsorption profile was not observed with He or N2. Comparative density functional studies of CO2 interactions with kaolinite surface models rule out CO2 intercalation and confirm that surface adsorption is favored up to approximately 0.35 g/cm3 of CO2, showing distorted T-shaped CO2-CO2 clustering, typical of supercritical CO2 aggregation over the surface as the density increases. Beyond this point, the adsorption energy gain for any additional CO2 becomes less than the CO2 interaction energy (~0.2 eV) in the supercritical medium resulting in overall desorption of CO2 from the kaolinite surface.

  12. Low level CO2 effects on pulmonary function in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, J.; Mueller, K.; Elliott, A.; Gerzer, D.; Strohl, K. P.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether chamber exposure to low levels of CO2 results in functional alterations in gas mixing and closing volume in humans. Four healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.7% CO2 and to 1.2% CO2. Spirometry, lung volumes, single breath nitrogen washout, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) by two methods, and cardiac output were measured in triplicate. Values were obtained over two non-consecutive days during the training period (control) and on days 2 or 3, 4, 6, 10, 13, and 23 of exposure to each CO2 level. Measurements were made during the same time of day. There was one day of testing after exposure, while still in the chamber but off carbon dioxide. The order of testing, up until measurements of DLCO and cardiac output, were randomized to avoid presentation effects. The consistent findings were a reduction in diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and a fall in cardiac output, occurring to a similar degree with both exposures. For the group as a whole, there was no indication of major effects on spirometry, lung volumes, gas mixing or dead space. We conclude that small changes may occur in the function of distal gas exchanging units; however, these effects were not associated with any adverse health effects. The likelihood of pathophysiologic changes in lung function or structure with 0.7 or 1.2% CO2 exposure for this period of time, is therefore, low.

  13. 低分压CO2回收新技术捕集水泥窑气中CO2的侧线试验%Bypass experiment for capturing CO2 from cement furnace flue gas by low pressure CO2 recovery technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄汉根

    2011-01-01

    A bypass experiment facility for capturing CO2 from cement furnace flue gas is designed. A self-developed blended amine is used for CO2 capturing. The experimental results show that the CO2 volume content in the purified gas is lower than 1.41%, while the CO2 purity of the product gas is higher than 99 %. Using this technology, CO2 emission reduction can be realized. At the same time, CO2 product with high purity can be produced. This technology can be used as an effective technological support for enterprises to reduce CO2 emission.%设计了一套水泥窑气CO2捕集的侧线试验装置,利用自主研发的复合胺溶剂捕集窑气中的CO2.试验结果表明.新型复合胺溶剂能使净化气中CO2体积分数降至1.41%以下,产品气中CO2体积分数达到99%以上.采用该技术,可实现CO2减排并获得高纯度的CO2产品气,为企业的CO2减排提供技术支持.

  14. CyclicCO2R: production of cyclic carbonates from CO2 using renewable feedstocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Håkonsen, S.F.; Heyn, R.; Offermans, W.; Leitner, W.; Ostapowicz, T.; Müller, T. E.; Mul, G.; North, M.; Ngomsik-Fanselow, A.F.; Sarron, E.; Sigurbjörnsson, O.; Schäffner, B.

    2013-01-01

    The consortium behind CyclicCO2R wants to kick-start the implementation of CO2 utilization technologies by converting CO2 into a high value-added product, thus providing a showcase that inspires industry to further develop technologies utilizing CO2 as a sustainable raw material and valorizing CO2

  15. CyclicCO2R: production of cyclic carbonates from CO2 using renewable feedstocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Håkonsen, S.F.; Heyn, R.; Offermans, W.; Leitner, W.; Ostapowicz, T.; Müller, T. E.; Mul, G.; North, M.; Ngomsik-Fanselow, A.F.; Sarron, E.; Sigurbjörnsson, O.; Schäffner, B.

    2013-01-01

    The consortium behind CyclicCO2R wants to kick-start the implementation of CO2 utilization technologies by converting CO2 into a high value-added product, thus providing a showcase that inspires industry to further develop technologies utilizing CO2 as a sustainable raw material and valorizing CO2 i

  16. Deicing with Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lijun; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Changhong; Guo, Fei; Zhu, Guangzhi; Gu, Shanqiang

    2010-11-01

    A model of deicing with Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers for simulation using ANSYS software is presented. Experiments with a 300-W, 1-ms, 60-Hz Nd:YAG laser and a 500- to 2000-W cw CO2 laser are reported. The Nd:YAG laser is considered as a volume thermal source, and the CO2 laser as a plane thermal source. The model and the simulation results can describe both Nd:YAG and CO2 laser deicing well. The results of the simulation and experiments suggest that the melting rates for the two lasers are almost equal at the same laser power density. So are the melting efficiencies. The hard and transparent ice irradiated by the Nd:YAG laser becomes opaque and loose, because the thermal stress is distributed in the body of the ice, while the ice irradiated by the CO2 laser is still transparent and hard, because thermal stress hardly occurs. So the laser with characteristics of high output power and large ice absorbing length can be selected for the power line laser deicing system, and Nd:YAG laser is more appropriate for power-line deicing than CO2 laser.

  17. CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CO2 Virtual Data Environment is a comprehensive effort at bringing together the models, data, and tools necessary to perform research on atmospheric CO2.This...

  18. Why capture CO2 from the atmosphere?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, David W

    2009-01-01

    Air capture is an industrial process for capturing CO2 from ambient air; it is one of an emerging set of technologies for CO2 removal that includes geological storage of biotic carbon and the acceleration of geochemical weathering...

  19. Weeks Island gravity stable CO2 pilot: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, J.R.; Perry, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Weeks Island ''S'' sand Reservoir B (''S'' RB) gravity-stable CO2 field test was completed during February 1988. Injection started in October 1978 and production began in January 1981 in this high-permeability, steeply-dipping sandstone reservoir. About 264,000 barrels of oil or 65 percent of the starting volume has been recovered. A 24-percent pore-volume slug of CO2 mixed with about six mole percent of natural gas (mostly methane) was injected at the start of the pilot. Since 1983, produced CO2 plus hydrocarbon gases have been recycled. CO2 usage statistics are 9.34 MCF/BO with recycle and 3.24 MCF/BO based on purchased CO2. Previous annual reports document the pilot design, implementation, and early results for the 1977 to June 1981 time period. This report is a review of early pilot history and a more detailed account of the post June 1981 results and overall interpretation. A reservoir-simulation history match of pilot performance plus core and log data from a 1983 swept-zone evaluation well are described in this report. A brief description of the production facility and an account of the corrosion control program are also included. 11 refs., 34 figs.

  20. Prediction of the viscosity reduction due to dissolved CO2 of and an elementary approach in the supercritical CO2 assisted continuous particle production of a polyester resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, Sameer P.; Nieborg, Vincent H. J.; Picchioni, Francesco; Janssen, L. P. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The dissolution of CO2 in a polymer causes plasticization of the polymer and hence, its viscosity is reduced. A model based on the free volume theory has been used for a polyester resin, which shows a considerable reduction in the viscosity due to dissolved M. Therefore, superctitical CO2 has been u

  1. Calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, B. van der; Egberts, P.

    2008-01-01

    Often we need to know how much CO2 we can store in a certain underground space, or how much such space we need to store a given amount of CO2. In a recent attempt (Bradshaw et al., 2006) to list various regional and global estimates of CO2 storage capacity (Figure 1), the estimates reported are ofte

  2. Calculating subsurface CO2 storage capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, B. van der; Egberts, P.

    2008-01-01

    Often we need to know how much CO2 we can store in a certain underground space, or how much such space we need to store a given amount of CO2. In a recent attempt (Bradshaw et al., 2006) to list various regional and global estimates of CO2 storage capacity (Figure 1), the estimates reported are

  3. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  4. Mesoporous amine-bridged polysilsesquioxane for CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2011-01-01

    A novel class of amine-supported sorbents based on amine-bridged mesoporous polysilsesquioxane was developed via a simple one-pot sol-gel process. The new sorbent allows the incorporation of a large amount of active groups without sacrificing surface area or pore volume available for CO2 capture, leading to a CO2 capture capacity of 3.2 mmol g−1 under simulated flue gas conditions. The sorbent is readily regenerated at 100°C and exhibits good stability over repetitive adsorption-desorption cycling.

  5. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Production of cement is an energy intensive process and is the source of considerable CO2emissions. Itis estimated that the cement industry contributes around 8% of total global CO2emissions. CO2is oneof the major greenhouse gases. In the atmosphere, the CO2concentration has increased from 310 ppmvin 1960 to 390 ppmv in 2012, probably due to human activity. A lot of research is being carried out forreducing CO2emissions from large stationary sources. Ofwhich, the carbonate looping process is ...

  6. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  7. A Review of CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery with a Simulated Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandadige Samintha Anne Perera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a comprehensive study of the CO2-EOR (Enhanced oil recovery process, a detailed literature review and a numerical modelling study. According to past studies, CO2 injection can recover additional oil from reservoirs by reservoir pressure increment, oil swelling, the reduction of oil viscosity and density and the vaporization of oil hydrocarbons. Therefore, CO2-EOR can be used to enhance the two major oil recovery mechanisms in the field: miscible and immiscible oil recovery, which can be further increased by increasing the amount of CO2 injected, applying innovative flood design and well placement, improving the mobility ratio, extending miscibility, and controlling reservoir depth and temperature. A 3-D numerical model was developed using the CO2-Prophet simulator to examine the effective factors in the CO2-EOR process. According to that, in pure CO2 injection, oil production generally exhibits increasing trends with increasing CO2 injection rate and volume (in HCPV (Hydrocarbon pore volume and reservoir temperature. In the WAG (Water alternating gas process, oil production generally increases with increasing CO2 and water injection rates, the total amount of flood injected in HCPV and the distance between the injection wells, and reduces with WAG flood ratio and initial reservoir pressure. Compared to other factors, the water injection rate creates the minimum influence on oil production, and the CO2 injection rate, flood volume and distance between the flood wells have almost equally important influence on oil production.

  8. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  9. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases.

  10. Amine scrubbing for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Gary T

    2009-09-25

    Amine scrubbing has been used to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from natural gas and hydrogen since 1930. It is a robust technology and is ready to be tested and used on a larger scale for CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants. The minimum work requirement to separate CO2 from coal-fired flue gas and compress CO2 to 150 bar is 0.11 megawatt-hours per metric ton of CO2. Process and solvent improvements should reduce the energy consumption to 0.2 megawatt-hour per ton of CO2. Other advanced technologies will not provide energy-efficient or timely solutions to CO2 emission from conventional coal-fired power plants.

  11. CO2气腹对每搏变异度和脉搏灌注变异指数的影响%The effect of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum on stroke volume variation and plethysmographic variability index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳芳; 刘健; 高炟鹏; 嵇晴; 李伟彦

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察气腹对腹腔镜胆囊切除术(LC)患者每搏变异度(SVV)和脉搏灌注变异指数(PVI)的影响及两者相关性干扰.方法 择期全麻下行腹腔镜胆囊切除术患者40例,常规麻醉诱导后气管插管,控制呼吸,潮气量10 ml/kg,呼吸频率8~12次/分.血流动力学平稳后5 min(气腹前)及CO2人工气腹压力12 cm H2O无任何刺激5 min后(气腹后)采用FloTrac/Vigileo系统测量SW,同步采用Masimo Radical 7脉搏血氧仪测量PVI.结果 与气腹前比较,气腹后患者SVV、PVI明显升高(P<0.05).相关性分析显示:气腹前SVV与PVI、气腹后SVV与PVI均呈中等正相关(分别为r=0.556,P<0.01和r=0.415,P<0.01).结论 气腹后SVV、PVI均明显升高,且与气腹前有明显的线性回归关系,但气腹不影响PVI与SVV的良好相关性.

  12. Extraction of stevia glycosides with CO2 + water, CO2 + ethanol, and CO2 + water + ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pasquel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Stevia leaves are an important source of natural sugar substitute. There are some restrictions on the use of stevia extract because of its distinctive aftertaste. Some authors attribute this to soluble material other than the stevia glycosides, even though it is well known that stevia glycosides have to some extent a bitter taste. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to develop a process to obtain stevia extract of a better quality. The proposed process includes two steps: i Pretreatment of the leaves by SCFE; ii Extraction of the stevia glycosides by SCFE using CO2 as solvent and water and/or ethanol as cosolvent. The mean total yield for SCFE pretreatment was 3.0%. The yields for SCFE with cosolvent of stevia glycosides were below 0.50%, except at 120 bar, 16°C, and 9.5% (molar of water. Under this condition, total yield was 3.4%. The quality of the glycosidic fraction with respect to its capacity as sweetener was better for the SCFE extract as compared to extract obtained by the conventional process. The overall extraction curves were well described by the Lack extended model.

  13. TREATMENT OF NATURAL GAS BY ADSORPTION OF CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristýna Hádková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Apart from burning, one of the possible uses of natural gas is as a fuel for motor vehicles. There are two types of fuel from natural gas — CNG (Compressed Natural Gas or LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas. Liquefaction of natural gas is carried out for transport by tankers, which are an alternative to long-distance gas pipelines, as well as for transport over short distance, using LNG as a fuel for motor vehicles. A gas adjustment is necessary to get LNG. As an important part of the necessary adjustment of natural gas to get LNG, a reduction of CO2 is needed. There is a danger of the carbon dioxide freezing during the gas cooling. This work deals with the testing of adsorption removal of CO2 from natural gas. The aim of these measurements was to find a suitable adsorbent for CO2 removal from natural gas. Two different types of adsorbents were tested: activated carbon and molecular sieve. The adsorption properties of the selected adsorbents were tested and compared. The breakthrough curves for CO2 for both adsorbents were measured. The conditions of the testing were estimated according to conditions at a gas regulation station — 4.0MPa pressure and 8 °C temperature. Natural gas was simulated by model gas mixture during the tests. The breakthrough volume was set as the gas volume passing through the adsorber up to the CO2 concentration of 300 ml/m3 in the exhaust gas. The thermal and pressure desorption of CO2 from saturated adsorbents were also tested after the adsorption.

  14. Covalent Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yongfei; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-04-20

    As an emerging class of porous crystalline materials, covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are excellent candidates for various applications. In particular, they can serve as ideal platforms for capturing CO2 to mitigate the dilemma caused by the greenhouse effect. Recent research achievements using COFs for CO2 capture are highlighted. A background overview is provided, consisting of a brief statement on the current CO2 issue, a summary of representative materials utilized for CO2 capture, and an introduction to COFs. Research progresses on: i) experimental CO2 capture using different COFs synthesized based on different covalent bond formations, and ii) computational simulation results of such porous materials on CO2 capture are summarized. Based on these experimental and theoretical studies, careful analyses and discussions in terms of the COF stability, low- and high-pressure CO2 uptake, CO2 selectivity, breakthrough performance, and CO2 capture conditions are provided. Finally, a perspective and conclusion section of COFs for CO2 capture is presented. Recent advancements in the field are highlighted and the strategies and principals involved are discussed.

  15. Porous Organic Polymers for CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Teng, Baiyang

    2013-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has long been regarded as the major greenhouse gas, which leads to numerous negative effects on global environment. The capture and separation of CO2 by selective adsorption using porous materials proves to be an effective way to reduce the emission of CO2 to atmosphere. Porous organic polymers (POPs) are promising candidates for this application due to their readily tunable textual properties and surface functionalities. The objective of this thesis work is to develop new POPs with high CO2 adsorption capacities and CO2/N2 selectivities for post-combustion effluent (e.g. flue gas) treatment. We will also exploit the correlation between the CO2 capture performance of POPs and their textual properties/functionalities. Chapters Two focuses on the study of a group of porous phenolic-aldehyde polymers (PPAPs) synthesized by a catalyst-free method, the CO2 capture capacities of these PPAPs exceed 2.0 mmol/g at 298 K and 1 bar, while keeping CO2/N2 selectivity of more than 30 at the same time. Chapter Three reports the gas adsorption results of different hyper-cross-linked polymers (HCPs), which indicate that heterocyclo aromatic monomers can greatly enhance polymers’ CO2/N2 selectivities, and the N-H bond is proved to the active CO2 adsorption center in the N-contained (e.g. pyrrole) HCPs, which possess the highest selectivities of more than 40 at 273 K when compared with other HCPs. Chapter Four emphasizes on the chemical modification of a new designed polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM) with high CO2/N2 selectivity (50 at 273 K), whose experimental repeatability and chemical stability prove excellent. In Chapter Five, we demonstrate an improvement of both CO2 capture capacity and CO2/N2 selectivity by doping alkali metal ions into azo-polymers, which leads a promising method to the design of new porous organic polymers.

  16. Epoxy based oxygen enriched porous carbons for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Deepak; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.

    2017-08-01

    Oxygen enriched carbon adsorbents were successfully synthesized for the first time from template zeolite and epoxy resin as precursor using a nanocasting technique. Carbonization and CO2 activation were performed at various temperatures (500-800 °C) to prepare different carbon structure adsorbents. Several characterization techniques were used to characterize the textural structure, oxygen content and surface functional groups of the adsorbents. The carbon adsorbents show high oxygen content (47.51%), highest surface area (SBET = 686.37 m2 g-1) and pore volume (0.60 cm3 g-1), respectively. The materials were evaluated thermogravimetrically at different adsorption temperatures (30-100 °C) and CO2 concentrations (6-100%). Adsorbent prepared at 700 °C exhibited highest CO2 uptake of 0.91 mmol g-1 due to high surface basicity. Further, regeneration studies of adsorbent exhibited easy regenerability and stability over four multiple adsorptions-desorption cycles. Kinetic models for CO2 adsorption at various CO2 concentrations and temperatures were studied and it was found that the fractional order provided best fitting for the adsorption behavior with an error of less than 3%. The experimental data for CO2 adsorption were analyzed using different isothermal models and found that the Freundlich isothermal model presented perfect fit among all isotherm models depicting heterogeneous adsorbent surface. The isosteric heat of adsorption was estimated to be 11.75 kJ mol-1, indicating physiosorption process. Overall, the above results suggested that the synthesized adsorbent using nanocasting technique provides a feasible way for CO2 capture from point source due to their environmentally benign nature, low cost and stable adsorption capacity.

  17. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  18. Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 sorbent for highly selective CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuwu; Zhai, Xinru; Liu, Dongyang; Sun, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Different CO2 absorbents-modified SBA-15 materials are used as CO2 sorbent to improve the selectivity of CH4/CO2 separation. The SBA-15 sorbents modified by physical CO2 absorbents are very limited to increasing CO2 adsorption and present poor selectivity. However, the SBA-15 sorbents modified by chemical CO2 absorbents increase CO2 adsorption capacity obviously. The separation coefficients of CO2/CH4 increase in this case. The adsorption and regeneration properties of the SBA-15 sorbents modified by TEA, MDEA and DIPA have been compared. The SBA-15 modified by triethanolamine (TEA) presents better CO2/CH4 separation performance than the materials modified by other CO2 absorbents.

  19. Gas condensate reservoir characterisation for CO2 geological storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    calculations demonstrate that injection of produced and additional gas (CO2 and sour gases) is economically viable and ecologically safe. Gas injection monitoring using surface injection well head pressures and measured injected volumes demonstrates a highly effective gas injection process. Injection well head pressure response shows no increase, indicating absence of compartmentalization close to the near well bore gas injection region in reservoir. And injector pulse study shows interconnectivity across the injection region highlighting good quality reservoir across the potential CO2 injection zones. Preliminary CO2 storage potential was also estimated for this type of geological site.

  20. Pentaethylenehexamine-Loaded Hierarchically Porous Silica for CO2 Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchun Ji

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, amine-functionalized materials as a prospective chemical sorbent for post combustion CO2 capture have gained great interest. However, the amine grafting for the traditional MCM-41, SBA-15, pore-expanded MCM-41 or SBA-15 supports can cause the pore volume and specific surface area of sorbents to decrease, significantly affecting the CO2 adsorption-desorption dynamics. To overcome this issue, hierarchical porous silica with interparticle macropores and long-range ordering mesopores was prepared and impregnated with pentaethylenehexamine. The pore structure and amino functional group content of the modified silicas were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, N2 adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectra. Moreover, the effects of the pore structure as well as the amount of PEHA loading of the samples on the CO2 adsorption capacity were investigated in a fixed-bed adsorption system. The CO2 adsorption capacity reached 4.5 mmol CO2/(g of adsorbent for HPS−PEHA-70 at 75 °C. Further, the adsorption capacity for HPS-PEHA-70 was steady after a total of 15 adsorption-desorption cycles.

  1. Strain development in smectite clays upon exposure to CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, S. M.; Spiers, C. J.; Busch, A.

    2012-04-01

    swelling (0.55 ± 0.46% at 10MPa CO2 pressure) is found for clay with an initial d001 spacing equivalent to 9.8Å. For an initial spacing of 9.8Å ≤ d001 ≤ 11Å, swelling decreases systematically with decreasing d-spacing at all pressures investigated. The strain effect is already observed at low CO2 pressure (1MPa) and expansion appears to be completed at PCO2 ~ 8MPa. Shale/claystone samples containing 53% smectite displays a volume increase of ~1.0%, at T = 45°C and PCO2 = 10MPa. No swelling effects were observed in identical experiments performed using Argon gas. Our results demonstrate that montmorillonite swells by up to a few percent due to uptake of CO2. Whether the CO2 actually penetrates the interlayer region or is adsorbed at clay crystallite surfaces remains unclear. No evidence is found for CO2 induced dehydration (shrinkage) of the crystal structure. For smectite-bearing caprocks above carbon sequestration reservoirs, our results suggest that a minor swelling can be expected if CO2 migrates into caprocks and faults, probably closing any open fractures or joints and thus reducing bulk permeability. Acknowledgement: this project is funded by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  2. Advanced technology development reducing CO2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sup

    2010-09-15

    Responding to Korean government policies on green growth and global energy/ environmental challenges, SK energy has been developing new technologies to reduce CO2 emissions by 1) CO2 capture and utilization, 2) efficiency improvement, and 3) Li-ion batteries. The paper introduces three advanced technologies developed by SK energy; GreenPol, ACO, and Li-ion battery. Contributing to company vision, a more energy and less CO2, the three technologies are characterized as follows. GreenPol utilizes CO2 as a feedstock for making polymer. Advanced Catalytic Olefin (ACO) reduces CO2 emission by 20% and increase olefin production by 17%. Li-ion Batteries for automotive industries improves CO2 emission.

  3. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  4. CO2 Allowance and Electricity Price Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    With the introduction of CO2 emission constraints on power generators in the European Union, climate policy is starting to have notable effects on energy markets. This paper sheds light on the links between CO2 prices, electricity prices, and electricity costs to industry. It is based on a series of interviews with industrial and electricity stakeholders, as well as a rich literature seeking to estimate the exact effect of CO2 prices on electricity prices.

  5. [A new colorimetric CO2 indicator Colibri].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, T; Hanaoka, K

    1996-06-01

    A new colorimetric carbon dioxide (CO2) indicator Colibri is a disposable, compact and light weighted device. Colibri does not need to be calibrated and is easily usable in an emergency. It indicates blue with CO2 below 4 mmHg and becomes yellow with CO2 above 40 mmHg. In comparison with EASY CAP, Colibri functions for a longer period and it has a humidifier and a bacterial filter. Colibri is useful for emergency situations and anesthetic care.

  6. Kinetics of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from champagne glasses in tasting conditions: the role of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Villaume, Sandra; Cilindre, Clara; Jeandet, Philippe

    2009-03-11

    Measurements of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from a flute poured with a standard Champagne wine initially holding about 11 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2) were presented, in tasting conditions, all along the first 10 min following the pouring process. Experiments were performed at three sets of temperature, namely, 4 degrees C, 12 degrees C, and 20 degrees C, respectively. It was demonstrated that the lower the champagne temperature, the lower CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute. Therefore, the lower the champagne temperature, the lower its progressive loss of dissolved CO(2) concentration with time, which constitutes the first analytical proof that low champagne temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps retains its effervescence. A correlation was also proposed between CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute poured with champagne and its continuously decreasing dissolved CO(2) concentration. Finally, the contribution of effervescence to the global kinetics of CO(2) release was discussed and modeled by the use of results developed over recent years. The temperature dependence of the champagne viscosity was found to play a major role in the kinetics of CO(2) outgassing from a flute. On the basis of this bubbling model, the theoretical influence of champagne temperature on CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from a flute was discussed and found to be in quite good accordance with our experimental results.

  7. Synthetic biology for CO2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fuyu; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2016-11-01

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and chemicals is a potential approach to reduce CO2 emission and fossil-fuel consumption. Autotrophic microbes can utilize energy from light, hydrogen, or sulfur to assimilate atmospheric CO2 into organic compounds at ambient temperature and pressure. This provides a feasible way for biological production of fuels and chemicals from CO2 under normal conditions. Recently great progress has been made in this research area, and dozens of CO2-derived fuels and chemicals have been reported to be synthesized by autotrophic microbes. This is accompanied by investigations into natural CO2-fixation pathways and the rapid development of new technologies in synthetic biology. This review first summarizes the six natural CO2-fixation pathways reported to date, followed by an overview of recent progress in the design and engineering of CO2-fixation pathways as well as energy supply patterns using the concept and tools of synthetic biology. Finally, we will discuss future prospects in biological fixation of CO2.

  8. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar

    performed recently has focused on CO2capture from fossil fuel-based power plants. Inherently,this process is especially suitablefor cement plants, as CaO used for CO2capture is also a majoringredient for clinker production. Thus, a detailed investigation was carried outto study the applicationof......% of the inlet CO2 was captured by highly deactivated limestone, which had a maximum CO2 capture capacity of 11.5%, with an inlet Ca/C ratio of 13. So, the performance of the carbonator can be defined by the inlet Ca/C ratio, which can be estimated if the maximum capture capacity of limestone is known...

  9. Reaction of CO2 and brine at the interface between Portland cement and casing steel: Application to CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J. W.; Zhang, J.; Lichtner, P. C.; Grigg, R.; Svec, B.; Pawar, R.

    2008-12-01

    diffusion of CO2 into the cement matrix and carbonation of the cement to CaCO3. The cement interface did not appear to have been significantly eroded. The experiment was used to calibrate numerical models for corrosion rates and for cement carbonation. These results were applied to interpret samples recovered from a CO2-enhanced oil recovery field (SACROC in West Texas; Carey et al. 2007, Int J. Greenhouse Gas Control, 1: 75-85). The results suggest that CO2-brine flux must have been limited along the cement-casing interface because the casing showed very little corrosion. They also suggest that CO2 penetration along the cement-formation interface was limited in volume because the depth of carbonation at SACROC was limited. These microscale models suggest that cement-casing flow has the potential to be self-limiting due to precipitation of CO2 and that standard logging measurements of casing integrity can be used to assess whether significant flow of CO2-brine has occurred at the casing interface.

  10. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Shao, Habing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    Current research into Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. However, potential leakage of CO2 can cause environmental problems, particularly if freshwater resources are nearby. In this regards, it is important to understand the chemistry of CO2 and the water system. CO2 leakage across the fluid interface (CO2 and water) is controlled by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the storage and in the freshwater body. Once the CO2 is in solution, it equilibrates with the bicarbonate and carbonate ions. According to Millero (1994)such a system can be characterized by two parameters out of the four: total alkalinity (TA), total carbonate (TCO2), fugacity of CO2(fCO2) and pH. In the present modeling study, we are interested in the (i) CO2 leakage into a freshwater body (while injecting CO2 for storage) through an inclined fracture and (ii) characterization of the system by measuring fugacity of CO2 and pH. According to work presented by Singh et al. (2012), about 31% of injected CO2 leaks into the freshwater body. Solubility of CO2 in water follows Henry's law, while the Henry constant, K0 is calculated by an empirical relation developed by Murray and Riley (1971), which is a function of salinity and temperature. According to our results, pH and fugacity both appear to be a linear function of temperature. To simulate the discussed problem, a corresponding numerical module has been developed for multi-component fluid flow coupled with heat and mass transport processes. Governing equations and Volume Translated Peng-Robinson equations of state are implemented within the object-oriented finite element code OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012; www.opengeosys.org). Primary variables are pressure, temperature and salinity which are obtained by solving the governing equations in a monolithic way The governing equations are discretized spatially within the context of a Galerkin approach, whereas the temporal

  11. Effect of CO2, nutrients and light on coastal plankton. IV. Physiological responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobrino, C.; Segovia, M.; Neale, P. J.; Mercado, J. M.; Garcia-Gomez, C.; Kulk, G.; Lorenzo, M. R.; Camarena, T.; van de Poll, W. H.; Spilling, K.; Ruan, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the physiological response of phytoplankton to the interacting effects of 3 factors affected by global climate change: CO2, nutrient loading and irradiance. Treatments had a high and low level for each factor: CO2 was bubbled at 1000 ppm by volume versus present atmospheric values; high n

  12. [Extraction of lobetyolin from codonopsis with supercritical CO2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongju; Li, Shufen; Min, Jiang; Bao, Xiaomei

    2009-03-01

    To develop a green and rapid method for extraction of lobetyolin from C. pilosula. Extraction of lobetyolin from C. pilosula with supercritical carbon dioxide in the presence of ethanol was studied. The effects of pressure, temperature, volume of cosolvent and extraction time on efficiency and their interactive relationships were discussed, based on central composite design and response surface methodology (RSM). The key effect factor was volume of cosolvent. The extraction yield of lobetyolin was 0.078 6 mg x g(-1) when C. pilosula (40-60 mesh) was extracted at 30 MPa, 60 degrees C and 2 L x min(-1) (as CO2 in normal pressure and temperature) for 100 minutes with supercritical CO2 and 1 mL x min(-1) ethanol as dynamic cosolvent. This result is better than that obtained from traditional method. Therefore, the optimized process is valuable for extraction of lobetyolin from C. pilosula.

  13. Trombólise na embolia pulmonar maciça com base na capnografia volumétrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Mello Moreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se do primeiro relato envolvendo uma paciente em pós-operatório recente de neurocirurgia submetida à trombólise química por embolia pulmonar (EP maciça e, por não apresentar condições clínicas, sem exame de imagem. Dados clínicos, gasométricos e capnográficos permitiram decidir pela trombólise com segurança. O gradiente P(a-etCO2 passou de 46,4 mmHg para 11,8 mmHg (normal < 5 mmHg e a fração do espaço morto alveolar end-tidal passou de 0,85 para 0,37 (normal < 0,15 do período pré-trombólise para o sétimo dia pós-trombólise. Conclui-se que a capnografia volumétrica (CV foi útil no diagnóstico, bem como no acompanhamento clínico da paciente.

  14. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO$_2$ and CO$_2$-N$_2$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V−1s−1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V−1s−1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This secon...

  15. CO2 Interaction with Geomaterials (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, V.; Howard, B. H.; Lynn, R. J.; Warzinski, R. P.; Hur, T.; Myshakin, E. M.; Lopano, C. L.; Voora, V. K.; Al-Saidi, W. A.; Jordan, K. D.; Cygan, R. T.; Guthrie, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas #3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or “geopolymer”) theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2

  16. CO2 sensitivity of the complexity of phrenic neurograms in the piglet during early maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Metin

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of hypercapnia on the dynamics of the phrenic neurogram in the piglet in two different age groups: 3-7 days (n = 11) and 10-16 days (n = 9). The phrenic neurogram was recorded from 17 piglets (3-16 days old) during control (40% O2 with 3-5% end-tidal CO2), mild hypercapnia (40% O2 with 7% CO2) and severe hypercapnia (40% O2 with 15% CO2) and analyzed using the approximate entropy (ApEn) method. The mean values of the approximate entropy (complexity) of phrenic neurograms during the first 7 days of the postnatal age were 1.56 ± 0.1 (standard deviation) during normal breathing, 1.51 ± 0.1 during mild hypercapnia and 1.37 ± 0.08 during severe hypercapnia. These values for the 10-16 days age group were 1.51 ± 0.1 during control, 1.49 ± 0.11 during mild hypercapnia and 1.38 ± 0.05 during severe hypercapnia. The mean values of phrenic neurogram durations during the first 7 days of the postnatal age were 0.82 ± 0.03 (standard deviation) s during normal breathing, 0.85 ± 0.007 s during mild hypercapnia and 0.65 ± 0.05 s during severe hypercapnia. These values for the 10-16 days age group were 0.97 ± 0.09 s during control, 1.10 ± 0.05 during mild hypercapnia and 0.78 ± 0.05 s during severe hypercapnia. Our results show that the complexity values of the phrenic neurogram were significantly decreased when the CO2 concentration was shifted from control or mild to severe hypercapnia (p < 0.05) for both the 3-7 days old and the 10-16 days old groups. In addition, the duration of the phrenic neurogram decreased when the concentration was shifted from control or mild to severe hypercapnia (p < 0.05). But no significant changes in the duration of the phrenic neurogram were observed between control and mild hypercapnia concentration. These results suggest that severe hypercapnia can be characterized with a significant decrease of the complexity values and durations of the phrenic neurogram during inspiration during early

  17. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...

  18. Monitoring Options for CO2 Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, R.; Winthaegen, P.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of various monitoring techniques for CO2 storage that is structured into three categories-instrumentation in a well (monitoring well); instrumentation at the (near) surface (surface geophysical methods); and sampling at the (near) surface measuring CO2 concentration

  19. CO2 capture research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerman, J.C.; Kuramochi, T.; Egmond, S. van

    2008-01-01

    The global climate is changing due to human activities. This human‑induced climate change is mainly caused by global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. Most scientists agree that in order to mitigate climate change, by 2050, global CO2 emissions must be reduced by at least 50% co

  20. Photocatalytic CO2 Activation by Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Chieh-Chao

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic activation of CO2 and water has potential for producing fuels by conversion of photon energy. However, the low productivity still limits practical application. In this study, the goal was to gain more fundamental insight in CO2 activation, and to provide guidelines for rational design

  1. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  2. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team members expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  3. CO2 Rekentool voor Tuinbouw: Handleiding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiller, S.R.C.H.; Danse, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Dit document is een handleiding bij de online CO2 Rekentool voor Tuinbouw Ketens. De CO2 tool is mogelijk gemaakt door de financiële bijdrage van Productschap Tuinbouw en het Ministerie van Landbouw, Natuur en Voedselkwaliteit (LNV). De tool is ontwikkeld door het onderzoeksconsortium WUR, BMA en AI

  4. CO2 capture, transport, storage and utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing CO2 emissions requires an integrated CO2 management approach. The dependency between the different industry sectors is higher than commonly acknowledged and covers all areas; capture, transport, storage and utilisation. TNO is one of Europe’s largest independent research organisations and p

  5. Improved Criteria for Increasing CO2 Storage Potential with CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, J.; Pawar, R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been found that deployment of CO2 capture and storage technology at large scales will be difficult without significant incentives. One of the technologies that has been a focus in recent years is CO2 enhanced oil/gas recovery, where additional hydrocarbon recovery provides an economic incentive for deployment. The way CO2 EOR is currently deployed, maximization of additional oil production does not necessarily lead to maximization of stored CO2, though significant amounts of CO2 are stored regardless of the objective. To determine the potential of large-scale CO2 storage through CO2 EOR, it is necessary to determine the feasibility of deploying this technology over a wide range of oil/gas field characteristics. In addition it is also necessary to accurately estimate the ultimate CO2 storage potential and develop approaches that optimize oil recovery along with long-term CO2 storage. This study uses compositional reservoir simulations to further develop technical screening criteria that not only improve oil recovery, but maximize CO2 storage during enhanced oil recovery operations. Minimum miscibility pressure, maximum oil/ CO2 contact without the need of significant waterflooding, and CO2 breakthrough prevention are a few key parameters specific to the technical aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery that maximize CO2 storage. We have developed reduced order models based on simulation results to determine the ultimate oil recovery and CO2 storage potential in these formations. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate a methodology that can be used to determine feasibility and long-term CO2 storage potential of CO2 EOR technology.

  6. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  7. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  8. Numerical modeling of cold magmatic CO2 flux measurements for the exploration of hidden geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Loïc.; Wanner, Christoph; Pan, Lehua

    2015-10-01

    The most accepted conceptual model to explain surface degassing of cold magmatic CO2 in volcanic-geothermal systems involves the presence of a gas reservoir. In this study, numerical simulations using the TOUGH2-ECO2N V2.0 package are performed to get quantitative insights into how cold CO2 soil flux measurements are related to reservoir and fluid properties. Although the modeling is based on flux data measured at a specific geothermal site, the Acoculco caldera (Mexico), some general insights have been gained. Both the CO2 fluxes at the surface and the depth at which CO2 exsolves are highly sensitive to the dissolved CO2 content of the deep fluid. If CO2 mainly exsolves above the reservoir within a fracture zone, the surface CO2 fluxes are not sensitive to the reservoir size but depend on the CO2 dissolved content and the rock permeability. For gas exsolution below the top of the reservoir, surface CO2 fluxes also depend on the gas saturation of the deep fluid as well as the reservoir size. The absence of thermal anomalies at the surface is mainly a consequence of the low enthalpy of CO2. The heat carried by CO2 is efficiently cooled down by heat conduction and to a certain extent by isoenthalpic volume expansion depending on the temperature gradient. Thermal anomalies occur at higher CO2 fluxes (>37,000 g m-2 d-1) when the heat flux of the rising CO2 is not balanced anymore. Finally, specific results are obtained for the Acoculco area (reservoir depth, CO2 dissolved content, and gas saturation state).

  9. Avaliação da correlação entre o dióxido de carbono expirado e o débito cardíaco em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca com circulação extracorpórea Evaluación de la correlación entre el dióxido de carbono expirado y el débito cardíaco en pacientes sometidos a la cirugía cardíaca con circulación extracorpórea Correlation between end-tidal carbon dioxide levels and cardiac output during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Takesaki Miyaji

    2004-10-01

    flujo sanguíneo pulmonar (circulación. Cuando el metabolismo y la ventilación son constantes, el CO2 expirado refleja el flujo sanguíneo pulmonar y, de esta forma, el débito cardíaco (DC. Este estudio tiene como objetivo la evaluación de la correlación entre el dióxido de carbono expirado (P ET CO2 y el débito cardíaco en pacientes sometidos a la cirugía cardíaca con circulación extracorpórea (CEC. MÉTODO: Fueron estudiados 25 pacientes sometidos a la cirugía de revascularización miocárdica con CEC. Después de la intubación traqueal tuvo inicio la monitorización de la P ET CO2. La determinación del débito cardíaco (DC fue hecha por método de termodiluición con el uso de catéter de Swan-Ganz y la PaCO2 fue evaluada a través de gasometría arterial. Los parámetros del estudio fueron evaluados en cuatro momentos: luego después de la inducción de la anestesia general; antes de la circulación extracorpórea, al término de la circulación extracorpórea y al final de la cirugía. RESULTADOS: El teste estadístico no demostró una correlación entre el CO2 expirado y el DC, así como el gradiente de dióxido de carbono arterial y expirado (Ga-eCO2 y el DC. Fue encontrada correlación entre la variación de los valores de la P ET CO2, Ga-eCO2 y DC en relación al basal antes de la CEC con pérdida de la correlación después de la CEC hasta el final de la cirugía. CONCLUSIONES: En este estudio, donde se evalúan pacientes sometidos a cirugía cardíaca con CEC, las alteraciones de relación ventilación/perfusión ocurridas a lo largo del procedimiento son, probablemente, los factores determinantes de la diminución de la correlación entre el débito cardíaco y el valor de dióxido de carbono expirado.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: End-tidal carbon dioxide (P ET CO2 not only reflects pulmonary ventilation but also carbon dioxide production (metabolism and pulmonary blood supply (circulation. During constant metabolism and ventilation, P ET CO2

  10. CO2-based Flows on Ancient and Modern Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, N.

    2002-12-01

    Outburst flood channels from the Hesperian and Amazonian Epochs of Mars have conventionally been interpreted as evidence for catastrophic release of groundwater and surface floods akin to jokulhlaups. The Channeled Scablands of Washington state, USA are a type example of this mechanism. However, on Mars there are problems with storage of the large volumes of water in the subsurface, and little evidence for surface impoundments. To explain the volume of erosion requires multiple floods from each source area, which leads to problems of recharge on a cryogenic planet. An alternative model for the floods has been developed in the last few years that explains the outbursts as the violent escape of pressurized liquid CO2, rather than liquid water. The CO2 is trapped underground beneath frozen icy regolith (permafrost) up to 1 km thick, which provides an effective topseal. When the outburst begins, explosive degassing generates a debris cloud akin to a volcanic pyroclastic flow, but at cryogenic temperature. The cloud flows downhill as a density flow, and could potentially erode the observed channels on Mars. Other terrestrial analogues include submarine density flows, which display considerable morphological similarities to Martian channels. There remain some significant problems with CO2-based flow models. To date, no numerical flow model has been offered to support the intuitive conceptual model, and the degree of erosion vs deposition does not match expectation from small-scale flows on Earth. Progress on a numerical flow model will be discussed briefly, as well as scaling relationships that may explain the degree of erosion seen in the channels of Mars. Acknowledging these shortcomings, we nonetheless suggest that the implications of a cold, dry, CO2-based flow model are so significant that the model deserves more attention from the geophysical and planetary science communities. If the model is sustainable, then the implications for the volatile history and thermal

  11. CO2 deserts: implications of existing CO2 supply limitations for carbon management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Richard S; Clarens, Andres F; Liu, Xiaowei; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to mitigate the impacts of climate change will require deep reductions in anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the scale of gigatonnes per year. CO2 capture and utilization and/or storage technologies are a class of approaches that can substantially reduce CO2 emissions. Even though examples of this approach, such as CO2-enhanced oil recovery, are already being practiced on a scale >0.05 Gt/year, little attention has been focused on the supply of CO2 for these projects. Here, facility-scale data newly collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was processed to produce the first comprehensive map of CO2 sources from industrial sectors currently supplying CO2 in the United States. Collectively these sources produce 0.16 Gt/year, but the data reveal the presence of large areas without access to CO2 at an industrially relevant scale (>25 kt/year). Even though some facilities with the capability to capture CO2 are not doing so and in some regions pipeline networks are being built to link CO2 sources and sinks, much of the country exists in "CO2 deserts". A life cycle analysis of the sources reveals that the predominant source of CO2, dedicated wells, has the largest carbon footprint further confounding prospects for rational carbon management strategies.

  12. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs.

  13. Effects of CO2 leakage on soil bacterial communities from simulated CO2-EOR areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Yang, Yongjun; Ma, Yanjun; Hou, Huping; Zhang, Shaoliang; Ma, Jing

    2016-05-18

    CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) has been proposed as a viable option for flooding oil and reducing anthropogenic CO2 contribution to the atmospheric pool. However, the potential risk of CO2 leakage from the process poses a threat to the ecological system. High-throughput sequencing was used to investigate the effects of CO2 emission on the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities. The diversity of bacterial communities notably decreased with increasing CO2 flux. The composition of bacterial communities varied along the CO2 flux, with increasing CO2 flux accompanied by increases in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla, but decreases in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi phyla. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the genus Lactobacillus increased sharply when the CO2 flux was at its highest point. Alpha and beta diversity analysis revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by CO2 flux. The redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that differences in bacterial communities were best explained by soil pH values which related to CO2 flux. These results could be useful for evaluating the risk of potential CO2 leakages on the ecosystems associated with CO2-EOR processes.

  14. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  15. Elevated CO2 and Soil Nitrogen Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K.; Schlesinger, W.

    2002-12-01

    Although forests can be large terrestrial carbon sinks, soil fertility can limit carbon sequestration in response to increased atmospheric CO2. During five years of CO2 fertilization (ambient + 200ppm) at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, net primary production increased significantly by an average of 25% in treatment plots. Total nitrogen in the foliar canopy increased by 16%, requiring an additional 1.3 g N m-2yr-1 to be taken up from soils under elevated CO2. Mechanisms supporting increased nitrogen acquisition have not been identified. Here we report on biological N-fixation rates, using the acetylene reduction assay, in litter and mineral soil during three years of the CO2 enrichment experiment. Lack of a significant CO2 treatment effect on acetylene reduction indicates that carbon is not directly limiting biological N fixation. Nutrient addition experiments using a complete block design with glucose, Fe, Mo and P indicate biological N fixation is co-limited by molybdenum and carbon. These results suggest even if elevated atmospheric CO2 enhances below-ground carbon availability via root exudation, biological nitrogen fixation may not be stimulated due to micronutrient limitations. Assessment of future carbon sequestration by forest stands must consider limitations imposed by site fertility, including micronutrients.

  16. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  17. Theoretical simulation of CO2 capture in organic cage impregnated with polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingyuan; Li, Wenliang; Zhang, Jingping

    2017-04-05

    To explore the adsorption and separation properties of CO2 in a novel material consisting of a series of polyoxometalates (POMs) impregnated within supramolecular porous catenane (shorted as SPC), grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations and ab initio calculations were used. GCMC simulations showed this impregnation can enhance CO2 /CH4 (or CO2 /N2 ) selectivity almost 30 times compared to the bare SPC due to the strong interaction of CO2 with the nPOMs@SPC structures. And, the loading of CO2 inhibits the adsorption of CH4 (or N2 ) as CO2 occupying the preferred adsorption sites. Furthermore, the effect of number, mass, and volume of POMs inserted in SPC on CO2 /CH4 (or CO2 /N2 ) selectivity over large pressure range was investigated in detail. Additionally, the accurate ab initio calculations further confirmed our GCMC simulations. As a result, the proposed nPOMs@SPC structures are promising candidates for CO2 /N2 and CO2 /CH4 separations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes - scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 μm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints - are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces. This finding is applicable for the behavior of dissolution at pore, core, and field scales when water-filled pores and pore clusters of varying size are surrounded

  19. CO2 laser in vitreoretinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlin, D.B.; Patel, C.K.; Wood, O.R.; Llovera, I.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation from a CO2 laser has the dual effect of phototransection and photocoagulation. Incisions have been made in scleral-chorioretinal tissue, lens tissue, and the vitreous body (with and without membrane formation). Results indicate that the CO2 laser may be useful in intravitreal surgery. Its simultaneous cutting and coagulating properties may make the experimental transvitreal chorioretinal biopsy and the full-thickness ocular wall resection for small melanosarcomas of the choroid clinical possibilities in the not too distant future. Finally, the effects of CO2 laser radiation on the normal human lens suggests the possibility of the dissolution of cataracts by laser irradiation.

  20. Spin polarization effect for Co2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Bao Wen-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT)(b3p86) of Gaussian 03 has been used to optimize the structure of the Co2molecule, a transition metal element molecule. The result shows that the ground state for the Co2 molecule is a 7-multiple state, indicating a spin polarization effect in the Co2 molecule. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state is not mingled with wavefunctions of higher-energy states. So for the ground state of Co2 molecule to be a 7-multiple state is the indicative of spin polarization effect of the Co2molecule, that is, there exist 6 parallel spin electrons in a Co2 molecule. The number of non-conjugated electrons is the greatest. These electrons occupy different spacial orbitals so that the energy of the Co2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin in the Co2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule,which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and the other states of the Co2 molecule are derived. The dissociation energy De for the ground state of Co2 molecule is 4.0489eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2061 nm, and vibration frequency 11.2222 aJ.nm-4respectively(1 a.J=10-18 J). The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Co2 molecule ωexe,Be, and αe are 0.7202 cm-1, 0.1347 cm-1, and 2.9120× 10-1 cm-1 respectively. And ωexe is the non-syntonic part of frequency, Be is the rotational constant, αe is revised constant of rotational constant for non-rigid part of Co2 molecule.

  1. Structurally simple complexes of CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Luke J.; Robertson, Katherine N.; Richard A. Kemp; TUONONEN, Heikki; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added p...

  2. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective...... control which can solve future global environmental problems. The economic gains from 'hot air' distributions of permits and CO2 trade make the system politically attractive to potential participants. For example, vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe are to be expected. It will probably...

  3. A leak monitoring method for CO2 storage sites using ratio of ∆CO2:∆O2 at the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M. M.; Norman, A. L.; Layzell, D. B.; Amiri, N.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology has a high potential for reducing carbon emission at large scales. However, the success of CCS projects vastly depends on the continuous monitoring of injected CO2 and ensuring it remains below ground. The technology currently available for monitoring sites are mainly adopted from disciplines which are effective at detecting high volume leaks but may not be reliable in distinguishing seepage of CO2 from underground and fossil fuel combustion at the surface. We have constructed a numerical model that includes soil characteristics and the bio-geo-chemical dynamics of near surface soils and soil gases. The simulation of our model can predict O2 and CO2 profiles in soil and differential ratios with respect to atmospheric concentrations (∆CO2 and ∆O2), and distinguish CO2 leaks. Experiments on a 1-m soil column have been conducted using dual channel IR and fuel cell analyzers to verify our model predictions. The preliminary results show that measured O2 and CO2 concentrations in near-surface soil layers and the ratio of ∆CO2:∆O2 at the soil surface are in agreement with our model. Based on initial results it is expected that this method of monitoring will able to detect fluxes as small as 2-6µmole/m2/s of CO 2 leakage.

  4. Impact of pressure and temperature on CO2-brine-mica contact angles and CO2-brine interfacial tension: Implications for carbon geo-sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad; Al-Yaseri, Ahmed Z; Barifcani, Ahmed; Lebedev, Maxim; Iglauer, Stefan

    2016-01-15

    Precise characterization of wettability of CO2-brine-rock system and CO2-brine interfacial tension at reservoir conditions is essential as they influence capillary sealing efficiency of caprocks, which in turn, impacts the structural and residual trapping during CO2 geo-sequestration. In this context, we have experimentally measured advancing and receding contact angles for brine-CO2-mica system (surface roughness ∼12nm) at different pressures (0.1MPa, 5MPa, 7MPa, 10MPa, 15MPa, 20MPa), temperatures (308K, 323K, and 343K), and salinities (0wt%, 5wt%, 10wt%, 20wt% and 30wt% NaCl). For the same experimental matrix, CO2-brine interfacial tensions have also been measured using the pendant drop technique. The results indicate that both advancing and receding contact angles increase with pressure and salinity, but decrease with temperature. On the contrary, CO2-brine interfacial tension decrease with pressure and increase with temperature. At 20MPa and 308K, the advancing angle is measured to be ∼110°, indicating CO2-wetting. The results have been compared with various published literature data and probable factors responsible for deviations have been highlighted. Finally we demonstrate the implications of measured data by evaluating CO2 storage heights under various operating conditions. We conclude that for a given storage depth, reservoirs with lower pressures and high temperatures can store larger volumes and thus exhibit better sealing efficiency.

  5. CO2 emissions in the steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kundak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Global CO2 emissions caused by the burning of fossil fuels over the past century are presented. Taking into consideration the total world production of more than 1,3 billion tons of steel, the steel industry produces over two billion tons of CO2. Reductions in CO2 emissions as a result of technological improvements and structural changes in steel production in industrialized countries during the past 40 years are described. Substantial further reductions in those emissions will not be possible using conventional technologies. Instead, a radical cutback may be achieved if, instead of carbon, hydrogen is used for direct iron ore reduction. The cost and the ensuing CO2 generation in the production of hydrogen as a reducing agent from various sources are analysed.

  6. Hoeveel CO2 kostte deze paprika?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.X.

    2011-01-01

    Ondernemers in de tuinbouwsector kunnen dankzij een nieuw protocol de CO2-voetafdruk van hun product van zaaigoed tot supermarktschap berekenen. Daarbij zit een tool die de telers, handelaren en transporteurs kan laten zien waar de uitstoot plaatsvindt.

  7. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  8. Translucent CO2 ice on Mars ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frederic; Andrieu, Francois; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The Martian climate is driven by the condensation/sublimation of CO2 representing 95% of the atmosphere. Many active surface features (such dark spot, dark flows), have been potentially linked to CO2 exchange. Understanding the surface/atmosphere interactions is a major issue, for both atmospheric but also surface science. This study aims at estimating the physical properties of the seasonal CO2 ice deposits. Are these deposits granular or compact? What is the thickness of the ice? How much impurities are included within the ice? These questions have been highly debated in the literature, in particular the presence of a translucent slab ice, the link with the H2O cycle. In particular the cold jet geyser model requires translucent CO2 ice. We use radiative transfer models to simulate spectroscopic data from the CRISM instrument and perform an inversion to estimate model's parameters though time. We then discuss the consistency of the results with other datasets.

  9. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  10. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat, Bartholomeus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Atlas Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity. This paper describes the design, development, construction and commissioning of the IBL CO2 cooling system. It describes the challenges overcome and the important lessons learned for the development of future systems which are now under design for the Phase-II upgrade detectors.

  11. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  12. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CO2 control for during ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on mars is challenging. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters have impractical logistics penalties, and regenerable...

  13. CO2 phytotron established in Ailaoshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Understanding the Uinteractions between ecological systems and the environment is a priority for the studies of global change, evolutionary biology, and functional genomics.Controlled environment facilities,like CO2 phytotrons, are necessary for acquiring such an understanding.

  14. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A practical CO2 control system for ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on Mars have not yet been developed. TDA Research, Inc. proposes to develop a durable,...

  15. Combustion of hythane diluted with CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hraiech Ibtissem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing concern about energy shortage and environmental protection, improving engine fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions have become major research topics in combustion and engine development. Hythane (a blend of hydrogen H2 and natural gas NG has generated a significant interest as an alternative fuel for the future. This paper describes an experimental study of the effects of CO2 addition on the stability of a turbulent jet diffusion NG-H2 flame. The mole fraction of hydrogen (% H2 in NG-H2 mixture was varied from 0% to 50%. The equivalence ratio of the hythane/CO2/air mixture was kept at stoichiometry. The results show that the lift-off height increases with the addition of CO2 at various % H2 content in hythane. However, we observe that with 20% H2, we can obtain a stable flame diluted with 40% CO2, while for 0% H2, the flame is blown out above 20% CO2. This means that the limits of flame blowing out are pushed with the additions of H2. Moreover, the results show that for %H2 content in NG-H2 fuel up to 10%, the addition of CO2 could produce lifted flame if the % CO2 is low. At higher % CO2 dilution, flame would remain attached until blow-out. This is mainly due to the fact that the dilution leads to ejection velocities very high but reactivity of the mixture does not change so the flame tends to stretch.

  16. Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Corell, Dennis Dan

    Denne rapport indeholder en beskrivelse af arbejdet udført i og resultaterne af forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ” Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur” og udgør slutrapportering for dette projekt.......Denne rapport indeholder en beskrivelse af arbejdet udført i og resultaterne af forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ” Udvikling af CO2 neutralt byrumsarmatur” og udgør slutrapportering for dette projekt....

  17. The Twelve Principles of CO2 CHEMISTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emilia S

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  18. The twelve principles of CO2 Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Leitner, Walter; Streng, Emelia S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a set of 12 Principles, based on the acronym CO2 CHEMISTRY, which are intended to form a set of criteria for assessing the viability of different processes or reactions for using CO2 as a feedstock for making organic chemicals. The principles aim to highlight the synergy of Carbon Dioxide Utilisation (CDU) with the components of green and sustainable chemistry as well as briefly pointing out the connection to the energy sector.

  19. Trapping atmospheric CO2 with gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Webb, Paul B; Kruger, Hedi; Bühl, Michael; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2014-10-07

    The ability of gold-hydroxides to fix CO2 is reported. [Au(IPr)(OH)] and [{Au(IPr)}2(μ-OH)][BF4] react with atmospheric CO2 to form the trigold carbonate complex [{Au(IPr)}3(μ(3)-CO3)][BF4]. Reactivity studies revealed that this complex behaves as two basic and one cationic Au centres, and that it is catalytically active. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments have been carried out.

  20. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    GÜVENÇ, A.; MEHMETOĞLU, Ü.; ÇALIMLI, A.

    1999-01-01

    Extraction of ethanol was studied from both synthetic ethanol solution and fermentation broth using supercritical CO2 in an extraction apparatus in ranges of 313 to 333 K and 80 to 160 atmospheres, for varying extraction times. The experimental system consists mainly of four parts: a CO2 storage system, a high-pressure liquid pump, an extractor and a product collection unit. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. Effects of temperature, pressure, extraction time, initial ethan...

  1. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  2. Reducing CO2 emission from bitumen upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John

    2011-07-15

    The treatment of sand oil can result in significant CO2 emission. Ceramatec Inc. has developed a technology to reduce the emission of CO2 during the upgrading of feedstocks bearing heteroatoms. This technology can be applied to kerogen derived oil (shale oil) and heavy oil as well as to bitumen from oil sands. Metallic sodium is used as the reducing and heteroatom scavenging agent. Hydrogen, methane or other hydrocarbons may be used to cap radicals formed in the process. But using methane can lead to lower material and capital costs, greater product yield, and lower CO2 emission. During the upgrading process, the aromatic constituents remain in the product, after treatment with sodium and removal of sulphur, nitrogen and metals. Aromatic saturation is not required with sodium, so less hydrogen is needed which leads to reduced CO2 emission. The reason is that CO2 is emitted in the steam methane reforming (SMR) process where hydrogen is produced. An example is introduced to demonstrate the reduction of CO2 emission from hydrogen production. Another advantage of the sodium/methane upgrading process is the incorporation of methane into the fuel. In addition, the total acid number, TAN, becomes negligible in the sodium upgrading processes. Ceramatec has also developed a process for the recovery of sodium from the sodium salts generated in the sodium/methane upgrading process.

  3. On the Vertical Gradient in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, A. R.; Fung, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Attempts to constrain surface fluxes of carbon from atmospheric measurements of carbon dioxide have primarily focused on surface boundary layer measurements, because information about surface fluxes is least diluted close to the locations where the fluxes occur. However, errors in model ventilation of air in the vertical can be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes. Satellites which measure column integrated CO2 are expected to represent a major advance in part because they observe the entire atmospheric column. Recent work has highlighted the fact that vertical gradients in carbon concentrations can give us information about where vertical mixing errors are likely to be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes, but passive tracer evidence suggests that models that capture vertical profiles on the ocean do poorly on the land (and vice versa), suggesting that the problem of correctly treating vertical mixing in inverse studies is more fundamental than picking the "best" model. We consider observations of the vertical gradient in CO2 from aircrafts and from a comparison of satellites that observe in the near infrared (which observe the column integrated CO2 field) and the thermal infrared (which observe the upper troposphere). We evaluate the feasibility of using these satellites for determining the vertical gradient in CO2. We examine how observations of the vertical gradient of CO2 allow us to differentiate the imprint of vertical mixing and the imprint in surface fluxes on the observed field of atmospheric CO2.

  4. CO2 efflux from cleared mangrove peat.

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    Catherine E Lovelock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CO(2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured CO(2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO(2 efflux. CO(2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10,600 tonnes km(-2 year(-1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km(2 year(-1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO(2 efflux (27 umol m(-2 s(-1, but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO(2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks.

  5. Charged Covalent Triazine Frameworks for CO2 Capture and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukcakir, Onur; Je, Sang Hyun; Talapaneni, Siddulu Naidu; Kim, Daeok; Coskun, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The quest for the development of new porous materials addressing both CO2 capture from various sources and its conversion into useful products is a very active research area and also critical in order to develop a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly society. Here, we present the first charged covalent triazine framework (cCTF) prepared by simply heating nitrile functionalized dicationic viologen derivatives under ionothermal reaction conditions using ZnCl2 as both solvent and trimerization catalyst. It has been demonstrated that the surface area, pore volume/size of cCTFs can be simply controlled by varying the synthesis temperature and the ZnCl2 content. Specifically, increasing the reaction temperature led to controlled increase in the mesopore content and facilitated the formation of hierarchical porosity, which is critical to ensure efficient mass transport within porous materials. The resulting cCTFs showed high specific surface areas up to 1247 m(2) g(-1), and high physicochemical stability. The incorporation of ionic functional moieties to porous organic polymers improved substantially their CO2 affinity (up to 133 mg g(-1), at 1 bar and 273 K) and transformed them into hierarchically porous organocatalysts for CO2 conversion. More importantly, the ionic nature of cCTFs, homogeneous charge distribution together with hierarchical porosity offered a perfect platform for the catalytic conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates in the presence of epoxides through an atom economy reaction in high yields and exclusive product selectivity. These results clearly demonstrate the promising aspect of incorporation of charged units into the porous organic polymers for the development of highly efficient porous organocatalysts for CO2 capture and fixation.

  6. CO2 Laser Cutting of Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, S.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    The lamination, matrix properties, fiber orientation, and relative volume fraction of matrix of polymer structure make this polymer hard to process. The cutting of polymer composite using CO2 laser could involve in producing penetration energy in the process. Identification of the dominant factors that significantly affect the cut quality is important. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the CO2 spot size of beam cutting for Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite (GFRP). The focal length selected 9.5mm which gave smallest focus spot size according to the cutting requirements. The effect of the focal length on the cut quality was investigated by monitoring the surface profile and focus spot size. The beam parameter has great effect on both the focused spot size and surface quality.

  7. CO2 Emission Factors for Coals

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    P. Orlović-Leko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emission factors are used in greenhouse gas inventories to estimate emissions from coal combustion. In the absence of direct measures, emissions factors are frequently used as a quick, low cost way to estimate emissions values. Coal combustion has been a major contributor to the CO2 flux into the atmosphere. Nearly all of the fuel carbon (99 % in coal is converted to CO2 during the combustion process. The carbon content is the most important coal parameter which is the measure of the degree of coalification (coal rank. Coalification is the alteration of vegetation to form peat, succeeded by the transformation of peat through lignite, sub-bituminous, bituminous to anthracite coal. During the geochemical or metamorphic stage, the progressive changes that occur within the coal are an increase in the carbon content and a decrease in the hydrogen and oxygen content resulting in a loss of volatiles. Heterogeneous composition of coal causes variation in CO2 emission from different coals. The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has produced guidelines on how to produce emission inventories which includes emission factors. Although 2006 IPCC Guidelines provided the default values specified according to the rank of the coal, the application of country-specific emission factors was recommended when estimating the national greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses the differences between country-specific emission factors and default IPCC CO2 emission factors, EF(CO2, for coals. Also, this study estimated EF(CO2 for two different types of coals and peat from B&H, on the basis fuel analyses. Carbon emission factors for coal mainly depend on the carbon content of the fuel and vary with both rank and geographic origin, which supports the idea of provincial variation of carbon emission factors. Also, various other factors, such as content of sulphur, minerals and macerals play an important role and influence EF(CO2 from coal. Carbonate minerals

  8. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    size is suitable for high efficiency. For Q-switched operation, the optimal energy extraction relies on the pump intensity, pump volume, and pump duration which is inversely proportion to the repetition rate. CW and Q-switched Ho:YLF lasers with different linear cavity configurations have been designed and demonstrated for a 30 W Tm:fiber pump laser. The CW Ho laser slope efficiency and optical-to-optical efficiencies reach 65% and 55%, respectively. The pulsed laser efficiency depends on the repetition rate. For 1 kHz operation, the optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. Currently, the injection seeding success rate is between 99.4% and 99.95%. After a ten thousand pulses, the standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz. It meets the requirements of highly precise CO2 concentration measurement. In conclusion, an injection seeded, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser has been developed for a coherent CO2 differential absorption lidar. This master-slave laser system has high optical-to-optical efficiency and seeding success rate. It can potentially meet the requirements of the coherent detection of CO2 concentration by a differential absorption lidar technique.

  9. Classification of CO2 Geologic Storage: Resource and Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The use of the term capacity to describe possible geologic storage implies a realistic or likely volume of CO2 to be sequestered. Poor data quantity and quality may lead to very high uncertainty in the storage estimate. Use of the term "storage resource" alleviates the implied certainty of the term "storage capacity". This is especially important to non- scientists (e.g. policy makers) because "capacity" is commonly used to describe the very specific and more certain quantities such as volume of a gas tank or a hotel's overnight guest limit. Resource is a term used in the classification of oil and gas accumulations to infer lesser certainty in the commercial production of oil and gas. Likewise for CO2 sequestration, a suspected porous and permeable zone can be classified as a resource, but capacity can only be estimated after a well is drilled into the formation and a relatively higher degree of economic and regulatory certainty is established. Storage capacity estimates are lower risk or higher certainty compared to storage resource estimates. In the oil and gas industry, prospective resource and contingent resource are used for estimates with less data and certainty. Oil and gas reserves are classified as Proved and Unproved, and by analogy, capacity can be classified similarly. The highest degree of certainty for an oil or gas accumulation is Proved, Developed Producing (PDP) Reserves. For CO2 sequestration this could be Proved Developed Injecting (PDI) Capacity. A geologic sequestration storage classification system is developed by analogy to that used by the oil and gas industry. When a CO2 sequestration industry emerges, storage resource and capacity estimates will be considered a company asset and consequently regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Additionally, storage accounting and auditing protocols will be required to confirm projected storage estimates and assignment of credits from actual injection. An example illustrates the use of

  10. Application of CO2 in BOF%转炉应用CO2技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万雪峰; 曹东; 刘祥; 朱晓雷; 廖相巍

    2015-01-01

    By the thermodynamic analysis of top blowing CO2 in the converter,combined with laboratory simulation re-sult of top blowing O2+CO2 mixture gas in converter,some key parameters of CO2 used in converter were established. It is concluded that although pure CO2 injected in the converter could achieve decarburize,the drop of temperature was rath-er large. When the CO2 supplying intensity was 3.0 m3/(t·min),the reduction of temperature was 15.1℃/min;By blow-ing O2+CO2 mixture gas,temperature balance could be realized,but the largest theoretical proportion of CO2 in mixture gas was 79.1%;with the increase of CO2 proportion,the carbon and oxygen product of molten steel at the blowing end was reduced,under the condition of φ(CO2)∶φ(O2)=1∶1,the carbon and oxygen product could be controlled in the range of (25~32)×10-8.%通过对转炉顶吹CO2的热力学分析,结合实验室模拟转炉顶吹O2+CO2混合气体试验结果,确立了CO2在转炉中应用的关键参数。得出在转炉中顶吹纯CO2虽可脱碳,但温降较大,顶吹CO2供气强度为3.0 m3/(t·min)时,钢液温降速率为15.1℃/min;通过喷吹O2+CO2混合气体可实现温度平衡,但CO2配比的最大理论比例为79.1%;随着混合气体中CO2比例增大,吹炼终点钢液碳氧积降低,当φ(CO2)∶φ(O2)=1∶1时可控碳氧积为(25~32)×10-8。

  11. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Identification of earliest signals heralding volcanic unrest benefits from the unambiguous detection of precursors that reflect deviation of magmatic systems from metastable background activity. Ascent and emplacement of new basaltic magma at depth may precede eruptions by weeks to months. Transient localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions stemming from exsolution from depressurized magma are expected, and have been observed weeks to months ahead of magmatic surface activity. Detecting such CO2 precursors by continuous ground-based monitoring operations is unfortunately not a widely implemented method yet, save a handful of volcanoes. Detecting CO2 emissions from space offers obvious advantages - however it is technologically challenging, not the least due to the increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, against which a surface emission signal is hard to discern. In a multi-year project, we have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 passive degassing signals using observations from the Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Since 2010, we have observed over 40 active volcanoes from space using GOSAT's special target mode. Over 72% of targets experienced at least one eruption over that time period, demonstrating the potential utility of space-borne CO2 observations in non-imaging target-mode (point source monitoring mode). While many eruption precursors don't produce large enough CO2 signals to exceed space-borne detection thresholds of current satellite sensors, some of our observations have nevertheless already shown significant positive anomalies preceding eruptions at basaltic volcanoes. In 2014, NASA launched its first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). Its observation strategy differs from the single-shot GOSAT instrument. At the expense of GOSAT's fast time series capability (3-day repeat cycle, vs. 16 for OCO-2), its 8-footprint continuous swath can slice

  12. Space Suit CO2 Washout During Intravehicular Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Phillip M.; Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2010-01-01

    Space suit carbon dioxide (CO2) washout refers to the removal of CO2 gas from the oral-nasal area of a suited astronaut's (or crewmember's) helmet using the suit's ventilation system. Inadequate washout of gases can result in diminished mental/cognitive abilities as well as headaches and light headedness. In addition to general discomfort, these ailments can impair an astronaut s ability to perform mission-critical tasks ranging from flying the space vehicle to performing lunar extravehicular activities (EVAs). During design development for NASA s Constellation Program (CxP), conflicting requirements arose between the volume of air flow that the new Orion manned space vehicle is allocated to provide to the suited crewmember and the amount of air required to achieve CO2 washout in a space suit. Historically, space suits receive 6.0 actual cubic feet per minute (acfm) of air flow, which has adequately washed out CO2 for EVAs. For CxP, the Orion vehicle will provide 4.5 acfm of air flow to the suit. A group of subject matter experts (SM Es) among the EVA Systems community came to an early consensus that 4.5 acfm may be acceptable for low metabolic rate activities. However, this value appears very risky for high metabolic rates, hence the need for further analysis and testing. An analysis was performed to validate the 4.5 acfm value and to determine if adequate CO2 washout can be achieved with the new suit helmet design concepts. The analysis included computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling cases, which modeled the air flow and breathing characteristics of a human wearing suit helmets. Helmet testing was performed at the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to provide a gross-level validation of the CFD models. Although there was not a direct data correlation between the helmet testing and the CFD modeling, the testing data showed trends that are very similar to the CFD modeling. Overall, the analysis yielded

  13. Primary, secondary, and tertiary amines for CO2 capture: designing for mesoporous CO2 adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Seung Su; Choi, Ung Su

    2011-09-15

    CO(2) emissions, from fossil-fuel-burning power plants, the breathing, etc., influence the global worming on large scale and the man's work efficiency on small scale. The reversible capture of CO(2) is a prominent feature of CO(2) organic-inorganic hybrid adsorbent to sequester CO(2). Herein, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), [3-(methylamino)propyl] trimethoxysilane (MAPTMS), and [3-(diethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane (DEAPTMS) are immobilized on highly ordered mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) to catch CO(2) as primary, secondary, and tertiary aminosilica adsorbents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the immobilized APTMS, MAPTMS, and DEAPTMS on the SBA-15. We report an interesting discovery that the CO(2) adsorption and desorption on the adsorbent depend on the amine type of the aminosilica adsorbent. The adsorbed CO(2) was easily desorbed from the adsorbent with the low energy consumption in the order of tertiary, secondary, and primary amino-adsorbents while the adsorption amount and the bonding-affinity increased in the reverse order. The effectiveness of amino-functionalized (1(o), 2(o), and 3(o) amines) SBA-15s as a CO(2) capturing agent was investigated in terms of adsorption capacity, adsorption-desorption kinetics, and thermodynamics. This work demonstrates apt amine types to catch CO(2) and regenerate the adsorbent, which may open new avenues to designing "CO(2) basket".

  14. Fingerprinting captured CO2 using natural tracers: Determining CO2 fate and proving ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gilfillan, Stuart; Johnston, Gareth; Stuart, Finlay; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In the long term, captured CO2 will most likely be stored in large saline formations and it is highly likely that CO2 from multiple operators will be injected into a single saline formation. Understanding CO2 behavior within the reservoir is vital for making operational decisions and often uses geochemical techniques. Furthermore, in the event of a CO2 leak, being able to identify the owner of the CO2 is of vital importance in terms of liability and remediation. Addition of geochemical tracers to the CO2 stream is an effective way of tagging the CO2 from different power stations, but may become prohibitively expensive at large scale storage sites. Here we present results from a project assessing whether the natural isotopic composition (C, O and noble gas isotopes) of captured CO2 is sufficient to distinguish CO2 captured using different technologies and from different fuel sources, from likely baseline conditions. Results include analytical measurements of CO2 captured from a number of different CO2 capture plants and a comprehensive literature review of the known and hypothetical isotopic compositions of captured CO2 and baseline conditions. Key findings from the literature review suggest that the carbon isotope composition will be most strongly controlled by that of the feedstock, but significant fractionation is possible during the capture process; oxygen isotopes are likely to be controlled by the isotopic composition of any water used in either the industrial process or the capture technology; and noble gases concentrations will likely be controlled by the capture technique employed. Preliminary analytical results are in agreement with these predictions. Comparison with summaries of likely storage reservoir baseline and shallow or surface leakage reservoir baseline data suggests that C-isotopes are likely to be valuable tracers of CO2 in the storage reservoir, while noble gases may be particularly valuable as tracers of potential leakage.

  15. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags using CO2 diluted sources: CO2 uptakes and energy requirements

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    Renato eBaciocchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of carbonation experiments performed on Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF steel slag samples employing gas mixtures containing 40 and 10% CO2 vol. simulating the gaseous effluents of gasification and combustion processes respectively, as well as 100% CO2 for comparison purposes. Two routes were tested, the slurry phase (L/S=5 l/kg, T=100 °C and Ptot=10 bar and the thin film (L/S =0.3-0.4 l/kg, T=50 °C and Ptot=7-10 bar routes. For each one, the CO2 uptake achieved as a function of the reaction time was analyzed and on this basis the energy requirements associated to each carbonation route and gas mixture composition were estimated considering to store the CO2 emissions of a medium size natural gas fired power plant (20 MW. For the slurry phase route, maximum CO2 uptakes ranged from around 8% at 10% CO2, to 21.1% (BOF-a and 29.2% (BOF-b at 40% CO2 and 32.5% (BOF-a and 40.3% (BOF-b at 100% CO2. For the thin film route, maximum uptakes of 13% (BOF-c and 19.5% (BOF-d at 40% CO2, and 17.8% (BOF-c and 20.2% (BOF-d at 100% were attained. The energy requirements of the two analyzed process routes appeared to depend chiefly on the CO2 uptake of the slag. For both process route, the minimum overall energy requirements were found for the tests with 40% CO2 flows (i.e. 1400-1600 MJ/t CO2 for the slurry phase and 2220-2550 MJ/t CO2 for the thin film route.

  16. Evaluation of Differences between PaCO2 and ETCO2 by Age as Measured during General Anesthesia with Patients in a Supine Position

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    Kenichi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the arterial to end-tidal partial pressure gradient of carbon dioxide according to age in the supine position during general anesthesia. Methods. From January 2001 to December 2013, we evaluated 596 patients aged ≥16 years who underwent general anesthesia in the supine position. The anesthetic charts of these 596 patients, all classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, were retrospectively reviewed to investigate the accuracy of PaCO2 and ETCO2. Results. The a-ETCO2 was 3.0 ± 2.1 mmHg for patients aged 16 to <65 years and 4.1±3.1 mmHg for patients ≥65 years. The a-ETCO2 was 2.4±3.1 mmHg for patients aged 16 to 25 years, 3.1±2.2 mmHg for patients aged 26 to 35 years, 3.0±2.2 mmHg for patients aged 36 to 45 years, 3.4±2.0 mmHg for patients aged 46 to 55 years, 3.2±2.0 mmHg for patients aged 56 to 64 years, 4.3±3.2 mmHg for patients aged 65 to 74 years, and 3.7±2.8 mmHg for patients aged 75 to 84 years. Conclusion. The arterial to end-tidal partial pressure gradient of carbon dioxide tended to increase with increasing age.

  17. Risk, liability, and economic issues with long-term CO2 storage—A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    Given a scarcity of commercial-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects, there is a great deal of uncertainty in the risks, liability, and their cost implications for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). The probabilities of leakage and the risk of induced seismicity could be remote, but the volume of geologic CO2 storage (GCS) projected to be necessary to have a significant impact on increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere is far greater than the volumes of CO2 injected thus far. National-level estimates of the technically accessible CO2storage resource (TASR) onshore in the United States are on the order of thousands of gigatons of CO2 storage capacity, but such estimates generally assume away any pressure management issues. Pressure buildup in the storage reservoir is expected to be a primary source of risk associated with CO2 storage, and only a fraction of the theoretical TASR could be available unless the storage operator extracts the saltwater brines or other formation fluids that are already present in the geologic pore space targeted for CO2 storage. Institutions, legislation, and processes to manage the risk, liability, and economic issues with CO2 storage in the United States are beginning to emerge, but will need to progress further in order to allow a commercial-scale CO2 storage industry to develop in the country. The combination of economic tradeoffs, property rights definitions, liability issues, and risk considerations suggests that CO2 storage offshore of the United States may be more feasible than onshore, especially during the current (early) stages of industry development.

  18. Controle de Sitophilus zeamais Mots. através de diferentes concentrações de CO2 e O2 Control of Sitophilus zeamais Mots with different concentrations of CO2 and O2

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    Jerson Vanderlei Carús Guedes

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Instalou-se um experimento com objetivo de avaliar o efeito de diferentes concentrações dos gases: CO2 e O2 balanceado com N, no controle de Sitophilus zeamais. Utilizou-se parcelas subdivididas no tempo com parcela principal distribuída segundo o delineamento inteiramente casualizado com quatro repetições. A unidade experimental constou de um vidro com volume de cinco litros, onde estavam acondicionados 0,15 kg de milho desinfestado e 200 insetos adultos não sexados. Foram avaliadas oito concentrações de gases (tratamentos: 0,03% de CO2 e 21% de O2 (testemunha, 10% de CO2 e 16% de O2, 15% CO2 e 16% O2, 20% CO2 e 16% O2, 0% CO2 e 5% O2, 0% CO2 e 1% O2, 75% CO2 e 5% O2, e 12% CO2 e 8% O2. Os resultados demonstraram que 20% de CO2 controla totalmente os insetos em cinco dias. Tratamento com 15% de CO2 associado com 5% de O2, controla a totalidade dos insetos após dez dias. Concentração de 1% O2, sem adição de CO2, também controla 100% da população de Sitophilus zeamais. após 15 dias.This experiment was carried out aiming to evaluate the effect of different CO2 and 0(2 concentrations on the contral of Sitophilus zeamais. The experimental design was a split-plot in time, with the main plot distribucted in a completly randomized design, with four replications. The plot was consisted of a 5-liter glass chamber, in which 0.15 kg of desinfected maize with 200 unsexed adults insects. Eight gas concentrations were avaluated: 0.03% of CO2 and 21% of O2 (control, 10% of CO2 and 16% of O2, 15% of CO2 and 16% of O2, 20% of CO2 and 16% of O2, 0% of CO2 and 5% of O2, 0% of CO2 and 1% of O2, 15% of CO2 and 5% of O2 and 12% of CO2 and 8% of O2. Results demonstrated that 20% of CO2 controlled the insects in five days. Treatment with 15% of CO2 and 5% of 0(2 controlled 100% of insects in 10 days and 0% of CO2 and 1% of O2 controlled in 15 days.

  19. THEORETICAL STUDY OF CO2:N2 ADSORPTION IN FAUJASITE IMPREGNATED WITH MONOETHANOLAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. O. Lima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMany efforts have been made to develop amine-based solid adsorbents for capture of CO2 by adsorption. Compared with the traditional process of absorption in aqueous solutions of amines, the adsorbents with amine immobilized in solids generally result in processes with lower capital and energy costs. The literature contains some experimental studies of CO2 adsorption in impregnated materials; however, few studies are devoted to the theoretical interpretation of this system in terms of CO2 capture for post-combustion (N2 mixture with a low partial pressure of CO2. Therefore, this study investigates the adsorption of a CO2:N2 mixture on zeolite NaX impregnated with monoethanolamine (MEA, using molecular simulation. A model of NaX impregnated with MEA was proposed and the adsorption of a 15:85 (CO2:N2 mixture was investigated based on the Monte Carlo method. The simulation of the MEA impregnated zeolite at 25 ˚C predicted higher CO2 selectivity and significant improvement in the heat of adsorption. Unfortunately, the adsorption heat improvement did not translate into corresponding increases in the amount of adsorbed CO2. Moreover, MEA concentrations higher than 12 wt% hindered the adsorption of CO2molecules. An explanation for the results in terms of occupied volumes and interaction energies is presented.

  20. Optimization of antitumor treatment conditions for transcutaneous CO2 application: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueha, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Onishi, Yasuo; Harada, Risa; Minoda, Masaya; Toda, Mitsunori; Hara, Hitomi; Fukase, Naomasa; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akisue, Toshihiro; Sakai, Yoshitada

    2017-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) therapy can be applied to treat a variety of disorders. We previously found that transcutaneous application of CO2 with a hydrogel decreased the tumor volume of several types of tumors and induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. However, only one condition of treatment intensity has been tested. For widespread application in clinical antitumor therapy, the conditions must be optimized. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the duration, frequency, and treatment interval of transcutaneous CO2 application and antitumor effects in murine xenograft models. Murine xenograft models of three types of human tumors (breast cancer, osteosarcoma, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma/undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma) were used to assess the antitumor effects of transcutaneous CO2 application of varying durations, frequencies, and treatment intervals. In all human tumor xenografts, apoptosis was significantly induced by CO2 treatment for ≥10 min, and a significant decrease in tumor volume was observed with CO2 treatments of >5 min. The effect on tumor volume was not dependent on the frequency of CO2 application, i.e., twice or five times per week. However, treatment using 3- and 4-day intervals was more effective at decreasing tumor volume than treatment using 2- and 5-day intervals. The optimal conditions of transcutaneous CO2 application to obtain the best antitumor effect in various tumors were as follows: greater than 10 min per application, twice per week, with 3- and 4-day intervals, and application to the site of the tumor. The results suggest that this novel transcutaneous CO2 application might be useful to treat primary tumors, while mitigating some side effects, and therefore could be safe for clinical trials.

  1. CO2-Water-Rock Wettability: Variability, Influencing Factors, and Implications for CO2 Geostorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-05-16

    Carbon geosequestration (CGS) has been identified as a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and thus significantly mitigate climate change. In CGS, CO2 is captured from large point-source emitters (e.g., coal fired power stations), purified, and injected deep underground into geological formations for disposal. However, the CO2 has a lower density than the resident formation brine and thus migrates upward due to buoyancy forces. To prevent the CO2 from leaking back to the surface, four trapping mechanisms are used: (1) structural trapping (where a tight caprock acts as a seal barrier through which the CO2 cannot percolate), (2) residual trapping (where the CO2 plume is split into many micrometer-sized bubbles, which are immobilized by capillary forces in the pore network of the rock), (3) dissolution trapping (where CO2 dissolves in the formation brine and sinks deep into the reservoir due to a slight increase in brine density), and (4) mineral trapping (where the CO2 introduced into the subsurface chemically reacts with the formation brine or reservoir rock or both to form solid precipitates). The efficiency of these trapping mechanisms and the movement of CO2 through the rock are strongly influenced by the CO2-brine-rock wettability (mainly due to the small capillary-like pores in the rock which form a complex network), and it is thus of key importance to rigorously understand CO2-wettability. In this context, a substantial number of experiments have been conducted from which several conclusions can be drawn: of prime importance is the rock surface chemistry, and hydrophilic surfaces are water-wet while hydrophobic surfaces are CO2-wet. Note that CO2-wet surfaces dramatically reduce CO2 storage capacities. Furthermore, increasing pressure, salinity, or dissolved ion valency increases CO2-wettability, while the effect of temperature is not well understood. Indeed theoretical understanding of CO2-wettability and the ability to

  2. Carbon Dioxide Clusters: (CO_2)_6 to (CO_2)13

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Dehghany, M.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2011-06-01

    We recenty reported assignments of specific infrared bands in the CO_2 νb{3} region (˜2350 wn) to (CO_2)_6, (CO_2)_7, (CO_2)_9, (CO_2)10, (CO_2)11, (CO_2)12, and (CO_2)13. Spectra are obtained by direct absorption using a rapid-scan tuneable diode laser spectrometer to probe a pulsed supersonic slit-jet expansion and assignments are facilitated by recent calculations of Takeuchi based on the Murthy potential. (CO_2)_6 is a symmetric top with S_6 point group symmetry which can be thought of as a stack of two planar cyclic trimers. (CO_2)13 is also an S_6 symmetric top, and consists of a single CO_2 monomer surrounded by an slightly distorted icosahedral cage. The remaining clusters are asymmetric tops without symmetry. Here we report additional CO_2 cluster results. Calculations based on the SAPT-s potential indicate that the structure of (CO_2)10 may be slightly different from that given by Takeuchi/Murthy. An additional band is observed for each of (CO_2)13 and (CO_2)10. A feature observed at 2378.2 wn is assigned as a (CO_2)_6 parallel combination band involving the sum of a fundamental and a low-lying intermolecular vibration. Most significantly, two bands are assigned to a second isomer of (CO_2)_6. This is also a symmetric top, but now with S_4 symmetry. The two symmetric hexamer isomers observed spectroscopically correspond well with the lowest energy structures given by both the SAPT-s and Murthy intermolecular potentials. [1] J. Norooz Oliaee, M. Dehgany, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A.R.W. McKellar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 1297 (2011). [2] H. Takeuchi, J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 5703 (2008); C.S. Murthy, S.F. O'Shea, and I.R. McDonald, Mol. Phys. 50, 531 (1983). [3] R. Bukowski, J. Sadlej, B. Jeziorski, P. Jankowski, K. Szalewicz, S.A. Kucharski, H.L. Williams, and B.M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 3785 (1999)

  3. CO2 and CO Simulations and Their Source Signature Indicated by CO/CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Randy; Huisheng, Bian

    2004-01-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS-4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes fiom the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  4. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...... profitable trade. Also, a periodical renewal of permits makes it possible to tighten target levels in the future.......The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost......-effective control which can solve future global environmental problems. The gains from CO2 trade may give vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe, for example, and it will probably not pay to cheat if quotas are renewed periodically by the UN. Cheating countries are then to be excluded from further...

  5. The Idea of Global CO2 Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost-effective co...... not pay to cheat if quotas are renewed periodically by the UN. Cheating countries are then to be excluded from further profitable trade. Also, a periodical renewal of permits makes it possible to tighten target levels in the future.......The US has been criticized for wanting to earn a fortune on a global CO2 market. However, compared to the situation without trade and provided that such a market is designed so that it does not pay to cheat, a global CO2 market may provide the world with an epoch-making means of cost......-effective control which can solve future global environmental problems. The economic gains from 'hot air' distributions of permits and CO2 trade make the system politically attractive to potential participants. For example, vital financial subsidies from the EU to Eastern Europe are to be expected. It will probably...

  6. A cost effective CO2 strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    by the Ministry of Transport, with the Technical University of Denmark as one of the main contributors. The CO2-strategy was to be based on the principle of cost-effectiveness. A model was set up to assist in the assessment. The model consists of a projection of CO2-emissions from road and rail modes from 2020...... are evaluated according to CO2 reduction potential and according to the ‘shadow price’ on a reduction of one ton CO2. The shadow price reflects the costs (and benefits) of the different measures. Comparing the measures it is possible to identify cost effective measures, but these measures are not necessarily......, a scenario-part and a cost-benefit part. Air and sea modes are not analyzed. The model adopts a bottom-up approach to allow a detailed assessment of transport policy measures. Four generic areas of intervention were identified and the likely effect on CO2 emissions, socioeconomic efficiency and other...

  7. Antarctic ice-sheet response to atmospheric CO2 and insolation in the Middle Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schulz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Foraminiferal oxygen isotopes from deep-sea sediment cores suggest that a rapid expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet took place in the Middle Miocene around 13.9 million years ago. The origin for this transition is still not understood satisfactorily. One possible cause is a drop in the partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2 in combination with orbital forcing. A complication is the large uncertainty in the magnitude and timing of the reconstructed pCO2 variability and additionally the low temporal resolution of the available pCO2 records in the Middle Miocene. We used an ice sheet-climate model of reduced complexity to assess variations in Antarctic ice sheet volume induced by pCO2 and insolation forcing in the Middle Miocene. The ice-sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 was tested for several scenarios with constant pCO2 forcing or a regular decrease in pCO2. This showed that small, ephemeral ice sheets existed under relatively high atmospheric CO2 conditions (between 640–900 ppm, whereas more stable, large ice sheets occurred when pCO2 was less than ~600 ppm. The main result of this study is that the pCO2-level must have declined just before or during the period of oxygen-isotope increase, thereby crossing a pCO2 glaciation threshold of around 615 ppm. After the decline, the exact timing of the Antarctic ice-sheet expansion depends also on the relative minimum in summer insolation at approximately 13.89 million years ago. Although the mechanisms described appear to be robust, the exact values of the pCO2 thresholds are likely to be model-dependent.

  8. Geologic Storage of CO2: Leakage Pathways and Environmental Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celia, M. A.; Peters, C. A.; Bachu, S.

    2002-05-01

    Geologic storage of CO2 appears to be an attractive option for carbon mitigation because it offers sufficient capacity to solve the problem, and it can be implemented with existing technology. Among the list of options for storage sites, depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs and deep saline aquifers are two major categories. While injection into hydrocarbon reservoirs offers immediate possibilities, especially in the context of enhanced oil recovery, it appears that deep saline aquifers provide the extensive capacity necessary to solve the problem over the decade to century time scale. Capacity and technology argue favorably for this option, but remaining obstacles to implementation include capture technologies, overall economic considerations, and potential environmental consequences of the injection. Of these, the environmental questions may be most difficult to solve. Experience from CO2 floods for enhanced oil recovery and from CO2 and acid gas disposal operations indicates that geological storage of CO2 is safe over the short term for comparatively small amounts of CO2. However, there is no experience to date regarding the long-term fate and safety of the large volumes of CO2 that must be injected to significantly reduce atmospheric emissions. In order to make proper evaluation of environmental risks, the full range of possible environmental consequences must be considered. Most of these environmental concerns involve migration and leakage of CO2 into shallow portions of the subsurface and eventually into the atmosphere. In shallow subsurface zones, elevated levels of carbon dioxide can cause pH changes, leading to possible mobilization of ground-water contaminants including metals. In the unsaturated zone, vegetation can be adversely affected, as can other ecosystem components. At the land surface, elevated levels of CO2 can lead to asphyxiation in humans and other animals. And finally, in the atmosphere, CO2 that leaks from underground diminishes the effectiveness

  9. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of CO2-HX complexes using the CO2 asymmetric stretch chromophore: CO2HF(DF) and CO2HCl(DCl) linear and CO2HBr bent equilibrium geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, S. W.; Zeng, Y. P.; Wittig, C.; Beaudet, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectra associated with the CO2 asymmetric stretch vibration have been recorded for weakly bonded gas-phase complexes of CO2 with HF, DF, HCl, DCl, and HBr, using tunable diode laser spectroscopy and a pulsed slit expansion (0.15×38 mm2) that provides >20 MHz overall resolution. Results obtained with CO2-HF are in agreement with earlier studies, in which the HF-stretch region near 3900 cm-1 was examined. In both cases, broad linewidths suggest subnanosecond predissociation. With CO2-DF, the natural linewidths are markedly narrower than with CO2-HF (e.g., 28 vs 182 MHz), and this difference is attributed to slower predissociation, possibly implicating resonances in the case of CO2-HF. Both CO2-HF and CO2-DF exhibited overlapping features: simple P and R branches associated with a linear rotor, and P and R branches containing doublets. As in earlier studies, the second feature can be assigned to either a slightly asymmetric rotor with Ka=1, or a hot band involving a low-frequency intermolecular bend mode. Results obtained with CO2-HCl are in excellent agreement with earlier microwave measurements on the ground vibrational state, and the vibrationally excited state is almost identical to the lower state. Like CO2-DF, linewidths of CO2-HCl and CO2-DCl are much sharper than those of CO2-HF, and in addition, CO2-HCl and CO2-DCl exhibited weak hot bands, as were also evident with CO2-HF and CO2-DF. Upon forming complexes with either HF or HCl, the asymmetric stretch mode of CO2 underwent a blue shift relative to uncomplexed CO2. This can be understood in terms of the nature of the hydrogen bonds, and ab initio calculations are surprisingly good at predicting these shifts. Deuteration of both HF and HCl resulted in further blue shifts of the band origins. These additional shifts are attributed to stronger intermolecular interactions, i.e., deuteration lowers the zero-point energy, and in a highly anharmonic field this results in a more compact average

  10. Investigation into optimal CO2 concentration for CO2 capture from aluminium production

    OpenAIRE

    Mathisen, Anette; Sørensen, Henriette; Melaaen, Morten Christian; Müller, Gunn-Iren

    2013-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from aluminum production has been simulated using Aspen Plus and Aspen Hysys. The technology used for aluminum production is the Hall-Héroult and the current cell design necessitates that large amounts of false air is supplied to the cells. This results in a CO2 concentration in the process gas at around 1 vol%, which is considered uneconomical for CO2 capture. Therefore, the aim of this investigation is to evaluate the CO2 capture from aluminum production when the process g...

  11. Measuring Nitrous Oxide Mass Transfer into Non-Aqueous CO2BOL CO2 Capture Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zwoster, Andy; Heldebrant, David J.

    2016-03-28

    This paper investigates CO2 absorption behavior in CO2BOL solvents by decoupling the physical and chemical effects using N2O as a non-reactive mimic. Absorption measurements were performed using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed using a “first generation” CO2 binding organic liquid (CO2BOL), comprised of an independent base and alcohol. Measurements were made with N2O at a lean (0.06 mol CO2/mol BOL) and rich (0.26 mol CO2/mol BOL) loading, each at three temperatures (35, 45 and 55 °C). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (kg') were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance – determined from a correlation from literature – from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting kg' values for N2O in CO2BOLs were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous MEA under comparable conditions, which is supported by published measurements of Henry’s coefficients for N2O in various solvents. These results suggest that the physical solubility contribution for CO2 absorption in CO2BOLs is greater than that of aqueous amines, an effect that may pertain to other non-aqueous solvents.

  12. Behavior of CO2/water flow in porous media for CO2 geological storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Yu, Minghao; Liu, Yu; Yang, Mingjun; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Ziqiu; Suekane, Tetsuya; Song, Yongchen

    2017-04-01

    A clear understanding of two-phase fluid flow properties in porous media is of importance to CO2 geological storage. The study visually measured the immiscible and miscible displacement of water by CO2 using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and investigated the factor influencing the displacement process in porous media which were filled with quartz glass beads. For immiscible displacement at slow flow rates, the MR signal intensity of images increased because of CO2 dissolution; before the dissolution phenomenon became inconspicuous at flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). For miscible displacement, the MR signal intensity decreased gradually independent of flow rates, because supercritical CO2 and water became miscible in the beginning of CO2 injection. CO2 channeling or fingering phenomena were more obviously observed with lower permeable porous media. Capillary force decreases with increasing particle size, which would increase permeability and allow CO2 and water to invade into small pore spaces more easily. The study also showed CO2 flow patterns were dominated by dimensionless capillary number, changing from capillary finger to stable flow. The relative permeability curve was calculated using Brooks-Corey model, while the results showed the relative permeability of CO2 slightly decreases with the increase of capillary number.

  13. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: a Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, A.; Sasselov, D.; Podolak, M.

    2017-03-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction large enough to form an external mantle composed of high-pressure water-ice polymorphs and also lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone, so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global, deep, liquid ocean. For these ocean planets, we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2, the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that, in a steady state, the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is established. The exact value depends on the subpolar surface temperature. Our results suggest the possibility of a negative feedback mechanism, unique to water planets, where a reduction in the subpolar temperature drives more CO2 into the atmosphere to increase the greenhouse effect.

  14. Metal-CO2 Batteries on the Road: CO2 from Contamination Gas to Energy Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhang; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-01-20

    Rechargeable nonaqueous metal-air batteries attract much attention for their high theoretical energy density, especially in the last decade. However, most reported metal-air batteries are actually operated in a pure O2 atmosphere, while CO2 and moisture in ambient air can significantly impact the electrochemical performance of metal-O2 batteries. In the study of CO2 contamination on metal-O2 batteries, it has been gradually found that CO2 can be utilized as the reactant gas alone; namely, metal-CO2 batteries can work. On the other hand, investigations on CO2 fixation are in focus due to the potential threat of CO2 on global climate change, especially for its steadily increasing concentration in the atmosphere. The exploitation of CO2 in energy storage systems represents an alternative approach towards clean recycling and utilization of CO2 . Here, the aim is to provide a timely summary of recent achievements in metal-CO2 batteries, and inspire new ideas for new energy storage systems. Moreover, critical issues associated with reaction mechanisms and potential directions for future studies are discussed.

  15. CO2 utilization: Developments in conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdogan Alper

    2017-03-01

    The potential utilization of CO2, captured at power plants, should also been taken into consideration for sustainability. This CO2 source, which is potentially a raw material for the chemical industry, will be available at sufficient quality and at gigantic quantity upon realization of on-going tangible capture projects. Products resulting from carboxylation reactions are obvious conversions. In addition, provided that enough supply of energy from non-fossil resources, such as solar [1], is ensured, CO2 reduction reactions can produce several valuable commodity chemicals including multi-carbon compounds, such as ethylene and acrylic acid, in addition to C1 chemicals and polymers. Presently, there are only few developing technologies which can find industrial applications. Therefore, there is a need for concerted research in order to assess the viability of these promising exploratory technologies rationally.

  16. The ATLAS IBL CO2 Cooling System

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat, Bartholomeus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra B-layer in the space obtained by a reduced beam pipe. This new pixel detector called the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (<-35⁰C) than the previous developed CO2 cooling systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the high expected radiation dose up to 550 fb^-1 integrated luminosity.

  17. Membraneless water filtration using CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Shardt, Orest; Warren, Patrick; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Water purification technologies such as ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis utilize porous membranes to remove suspended particles and solutes. These membranes, however, cause many drawbacks such as a high pumping cost and a need for periodic replacement due to fouling. Here we show an alternative membraneless method for separating suspended particles by exposing the colloidal suspension to CO2. Dissolution of CO2 into the suspension creates solute gradients that drive phoretic motion of particles, or so-called diffusiophoresis. Due to the large diffusion potential built up by the dissociation of carbonic acid, colloidal particles move either away from or towards the gas-liquid interface depending on their surface charge. Our findings suggest a means to separate particles without membranes or filters, thus reducing operating and maintenance costs. Using the directed motion of particles induced by exposure to CO2, we demonstrate a scalable, continuous flow, membraneless particle filtration process that exhibits very low pressure drop and is essentially free from fouling.

  18. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlaat, B.; Ostrega, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Bortolin, C.; Vogt, S.; Godlewski, J.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; Van Overbeek, M.; Blaszcyk, T.

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Pixel detector has been equipped with an extra pixel layer in the space obtained by a smaller radius beam pipe. This new pixel layer called the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) was installed in 2014 and is operational in the current ATLAS data taking. The IBL detector is cooled with evaporative CO2 and is the first of its kind in ATLAS. The ATLAS IBL CO2 cooling system is designed for lower temperature operation (systems in High Energy Physics experiments. The cold temperatures are required to protect the pixel sensors for the expected high radiation dose received at an integrated luminosity of 550 fb1. This paper describes the design, development, construction and commissioning of the IBL CO2 cooling system. It describes the challenges overcome and the important lessons learned for the development of future systems which are now under design for the Phase-II upgrade detectors.

  19. Upscaling of enzyme enhanced CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne Berthold

    the mass transfer of CO2 with slow-capturing but energetically favorable solvents can open up a variety of new process options for this technology. The ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which enhances the mass transfer of CO2 in the lungs by catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2, is one very...... promising mass transfer rate promoter for CCS. This process has been previously been tested successfully in lab scale and in some rare cases in pilot scale, but no validated process model for this technology has been published yet. This PhD thesis presents an investigation of the feasibility of enzyme...... enzyme kinetic model and validating it against in-house pilot plant experiments. The work consisted of identifying a suitable enzyme-solvent system and the ideal process conditions by comparing mass transfer rates of different solvents and enzyme enhanced solvents in a lab scale wetted wall column...

  20. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...... monotonously. Such a variation is caused by scalar advection in the trunk space and reveals itself as a decrease or increase in vertical fluxes over the forest relative to carbon dioxide exchange of the underlying forest. The effect was more pronounced in model forests where the leaf area is concentrated...

  1. Equilibrium Solubility of CO2 in Alkanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium solubility of CO2 were measured in aqueous solutions of Monoethanolamine (MEA) and N,N-diethylethanolamine(DEEA). Equilibrium cells are generally used for these measurements. In this study, the equilibrium data were measured from the calorimetry. For this purpose a reaction calorimeter...... (model CPA 122 from ChemiSens AB, Sweden) was used. The advantage of this method is being the measurement of both heats of absorption and equilibrium solubility data of CO2 at the same time. The measurements were performed for 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA solutions as a function of CO2 loading at three...... different temperatures 40, 80 and 120 ºC. The measured 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA data were compared with the literature data obtained from different equilibrium cells which validated the use of calorimeters for equilibrium solubility measurements....

  2. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  3. Local CO2-induced swelling of shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluymakers, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2017-04-01

    In heterogeneous shale rocks, CO2 adsorbs more strongly to organic matter than to the other components. CO2-induced swelling of organic matter has been shown in coal, which is pure carbon. The heterogeneity of the shale matrix makes an interesting case study. Can local swelling through adsorption of CO2 to organic matter induce strain in the surrounding shale matrix? Can fractures close due to CO2-induced swelling of clays and organic matter? We have developed a new generation of microfluidic high pressure cells (up to 100 bar), which can be used to study flow and adsorption phenomena at the microscale in natural geo-materials. The devices contain one transparent side and a shale sample on the other side. The shale used is the Pomeranian shale, extracted from 4 km depth in Poland. This formation is a potential target of a combined CO2-storage and gas extraction project. To answer the first question, we place the pressure cell under a Veeco NT1100 Interferometer, operated in Vertical Scanning Interferometry mode and equipped with a Through Transmissive Media objective. This allows for observation of local swelling or organic matter with nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer lateral resolution. We expose the sample to CO2 atmospheres at different pressures. Comparison of the interferometry data and using SEM-EDS maps plus optical microscopy delivers local swelling maps where we can distinguish swelling of different mineralogies. Preliminary results indicate minor local swelling of organic matter, where the total amount is both time- and pressure-dependent.

  4. High efficiency nanocomposite sorbents for CO2 capture based on amine-functionalized mesoporous capsules

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2011-01-01

    A novel high efficiency nanocomposite sorbent for CO2 capture has been developed based on oligomeric amine (polyethylenimine, PEI, and tetraethylenepentamine, TEPA) functionalized mesoporous silica capsules. The newly synthesized sorbents exhibit extraordinary capture capacity up to 7.9 mmol g-1 under simulated flue gas conditions (pre-humidified 10% CO 2). The CO2 capture kinetics were found to be fast and reached 90% of the total capacities within the first few minutes. The effects of the mesoporous capsule features such as particle size and shell thickness on CO2 capture capacity were investigated. Larger particle size, higher interior void volume and thinner mesoporous shell thickness all improved the CO2 capacity of the sorbents. PEI impregnated sorbents showed good reversibility and stability during cyclic adsorption-regeneration tests (50 cycles). © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Do Tree Stems Recapture Respired CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilman, B.; Angert, A.

    2016-12-01

    Tree stem respiration is an important, yet not well understood, component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Predicting how trees as whole organisms respond to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 requires understanding of the variability in the fraction of assimilated carbon allocated to respiration, versus the allocation to growth, damage repair, and to rhizosphere symbionts. Here we used the ratio of CO2 efflux/O2 influx (Apparent Respiratory Quotient, ARQ) to study stem respiration. The ARQ in trees stems is predicted to be 1.0, as a result of carbohydrates metabolism. Lower than 1.0 ARQ values may indicate a local assimilation of respired CO2, or dissolution and transport of CO2 in the xylem stream. We measured stems ARQ in 16 tree species at tropical, Mediterranean and temperate ecosystems using stem chambers and in-vitro incubations. The CO2 and O2 were measured by a system we developed, which is based on an IRGA and a Fuel-cell O2 analyzer (Hilman and Angert 2016). We found typical values of ARQ in the range of 0.4-0.8. Since incubations of detach stem tissues yielded similar ARQ values, and since the influence of natural variations in the transpiration stream on ARQ was found to be small, we conclude that the removal of the respired CO2 is not via dissolution in the xylem stream. Using 13C labeling, dark fixation of stem tissues was detected, which is most probably phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) mediated. Hence, we suggest that in-stem dark fixation of respired CO2 to organic acids (e.g. malate) affects the outgoing efflux. Further research should determine if these organic acids are transported to the canopy, stored in the stem, or transported to the roots to serve as exudates. Hilman B, Angert A (2016) Measuring the ratio of CO2 efflux to O2 influx in tree stem respiration. Tree Physiol 2016, doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpw057

  6. A cost effective CO2 strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , a scenario-part and a cost-benefit part. Air and sea modes are not analyzed. The model adopts a bottom-up approach to allow a detailed assessment of transport policy measures. Four generic areas of intervention were identified and the likely effect on CO2 emissions, socioeconomic efficiency and other...... concerns of the potential measures within those intervention areas: • Reductions in the need to travel • Improved efficiency of the transport system • Improved fuel efficiency of transport activities • Reduced CO2 intensity of the fuels Within each area a number of measures were analysed. The measures...

  7. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig

    2014-01-29

    The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late

  8. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...... perspectives for decreasing the heat requirement. However, a scientific understanding of the processes is required. The thermodynamic properties of the NH3–CO2–H2O system were described using the extended UNIQUAC electrolyte model developed by Thomsen and Rasmussen in a temperature range from 0 to 110°C...

  9. Leak Path Development in CO2 Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsater, M.; Todorovic, J.; Opedal, N.; Lavrov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wells have in numerous scientific works been denoted the "weak link" of safe and cost-efficient CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Whether they are active or abandoned, all wells are man-made intrusions into the storage reservoir with sealing abilities depending on degradable materials like steel and cement. If dense CO2 is allowed to expand (e.g. due to leakage) it will cool down its surroundings and cause strong thermal and mechanical loading on the wellbore. In addition, CO2 reacts chemically with rock, cement and steel. To ensure long-term underground containment, it is therefore necessary to study how, why, where and when leakage occurs along CO2wells. If cement bonding to rock or casing is poor, leak paths can form already during drilling and completion of the well. In the present work, we have mapped the bonding quality of cement-rock and cement-steel interfaces - and measured their resistance towards CO2 flow. This involved a large experimental matrix including different rocks, steels, cement types and well fluids. The bonding qualities were measured on composite cores using micro computed tomography (µ-CT), and CO2 was flooded through the samples to determine leakage rates. These were further compared to numerical simulations of leakage through the digitalized µ-CT core data, and CO2chemical interactions with the materials were mapped using electron microscopy. We also present a new laboratory set-up for measuring how well integrity is affected by downhole temperature variations - and we showcase some initial results. Our work concludes that leak path development in CO2 wells depends critically on the drilling fluids and presflushes/spacers chosen already during drilling and completion of a well. Fluid films residing on rock and casing surfaces strongly degrade the quality of cement bonding. The operation of the well is also important, as even slight thermal cycling (between 10°C and 95°C on casing) leads to significant de-bonding of the annular cement.

  10. Toxic emissions and devaluated CO2-neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    with a climate policy whose goals of CO2-reduction were made operational by green-wash. Arguments are given for the devaluation of CO2- neutrality in case of burning wood. Alternative practices as storing C in high quality wood products and/or leaving wood in the forest are recommended. A counter......-productive effect of dioxin formation in the cooling phase of wood burning appliances has been registered akin to de-novo-synthesis in municipal solid waste incinerators. Researchers, regulators and the public are, however, still preoccupied by notions of oven design and operation parameters, assuming that dioxin...

  11. Carbon monoxide : A quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamnitzer, Ulrike; Karstens, Ute; Kromer, Bernd; Neubert, Rolf E. M.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Schroeder, Hartwig; Levin, Ingeborg

    2006-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and radiocarbon ((CO2)-C-14) measurements have been made in Heidelberg from 2001 to 2004 in order to determine the regional fossil fuel CO2 component and to investigate the application of CO as a quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2 (CO2(foss)). The obs

  12. Vapor-liquid Phase Equilibria for CO2+Tertpentanol Binary System at Elevated Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; LUO Jian-cheng; YANG Hao; CHEN Kai-xun

    2011-01-01

    Vapor-liquid phase equilibrium data of tertpentanol in carbon dioxide were measured at temperatures of 313.4,323.4,333.5 and 343.5 K and in the pressure range of 4.56-11.44 MPa.The phase equilibium apparatus used in the work was a variable-volume high-pressure cell.The experimental data were reasonably correlated with Peng-Robinson equation of state(PR-EOS) together with van der Waals-2 two-parameter mixing rules.Henry's Law constants and partial molar volumes of CO2 at infinite dilution were estimated with Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky equation,and Henry's Law constants increase with increasing temperature,however,partial molar volumes of CO2 at infinite dilution are negative whose magnitudes decrease with temperature.Partial molar volumes of CO2 and tertpentanol in liquid phase at equilibrium were calculated.

  13. Multi-technique monitoring of CO2 leakage from an engineered CO2 leakage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Apple, M. E.; Dobeck, L.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring of canopy and soil geophysical and geochemical properties in vadose zone by multiple techniques were carried out from 1999 to 2012 using an engineered CO2 release to simulate the CO2 leakage from CO2 storage at an agricultural plot at Bozeman, MT. The CO2 release was based on a horizontally-drilled well of 100 m at a depth of about 2.0-2.3m (Fig.1). Techniques utilized include hyperspectral and infrared radiation of various vegetations, electric conductivity in soil, magnetic field at the ground surface, and soil gas composition and dynamics using various gas sensors and soil moisture sensors. Measurements were made at several sites along a transect perpendicular to the releasing well, along which the soil CO2 concentration attenuated from high to normal condition at control site. The response of the canopy hyperspectral reflectance, infrared radiation, soil geophysical properties such as soil electric conductivity, top soil magnetic susceptibility and magnetic field, soil gas composition such as CO2 and O2 concentration to CO2 release at different rates were quantified and will be shown at this presentation. Fig.2 shows some examples of the results. The different responses at the impact and control sites are used to assess the effectiveness for CO2 surface and near-surface detection when a possible CO2 leakage occurs.ig.1. A schematic showing the injection and release of CO2 at an agricultral plot in Bozeman, MT. ig.2. Some examples of results showing the response of vegetation, hyperspectral reflectance, soil electric conductivity, soil O2 concentration to the release of CO2.

  14. Application value of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure monitoring in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema receiving early nonivasive positive pressure ventilation%潮气末二氧化碳分压监测在急性心源性肺水肿患者早期无创正压通气救治中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐友勇; 王正艳; 杨中卫; 李威; 石明; 邝军

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨潮气末二氧化碳分压(PETCO2)监测在急性心源性肺水肿患者早期无创正压通气救治中的应用价值.方法 选择2011年2月至2015年5月在湖北医药学院附属东风医院急性心源性肺水肿患者88例,均给予无创正压通气治疗,在通气前后进行血流动力学(心率、收缩压、舒张压、平均动脉压(MAP)、心排血量、心脏指数、心搏指数)、血气指标[pH、动脉血氧分压(PaO2)、二氧化碳分压(PaCO2)]与PETCO2监测,并随访调查预后情况.结果 通气后患者的心排血量、心脏指数与心搏指数值明显降低,与通气前比较差异有统计学意义[(3.3±1.1) L/min比(4.1 ±1.1)L/min、(2.1 ±0.4)L/(min·m2)比(2.6 ±0.6) L/(min·m2)、(25±7)ml/m2比(29±4)ml/m2,P<0.05];心率、收缩压、舒张压与MAP通气前后差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).通气后患者的血气pH、PaO2值较通气前高,而PaCO2值较通气前低,差异有统计学意义[(7.35±0.45)比(7.23±0.24)、(88 ±9) mmHg(1 mmHg =0.133 kPa)比(52±8) mmHg、(39±8)mmHg比(47±9) mmHg,P<0.05].通气后患者的PETCO2为(34±5) mmHg,明显高于通气前的(28±5)mmHg,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).随访至2016年1月,88例患者中发生联合心血管不良事件12例,发生率为13.6%;Pearson相关分析显示急性心源性肺水肿的预后与通气前的PETCO2、心脏指数、心搏指数及PaCO2存在明显相关性(r=0.443、0.342、0.294、0.331,P<0.05).结论 无创正压通气早期救治急性心源性肺水肿能有效改善心功能与血气状况,对于PETCO2也有明显影响,而PETCO2监测能有效判定病情,预测预后情况.%Objective To investigate the application value of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2) monitoring in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema receiving early nonivasive positive pressure ventilation.Methods Totally 88 patients confirmed as acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema from February 2011 to May 2015

  15. Volcanic CO2 Emissions and Glacial Cycles: Coupled Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, J. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Katz, R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Following the mid-Pleistocene transition, the dominant period of glacial cycles changed from 40 ka to 100 ka. It is broadly accepted that the 40 ka glacial cycles were driven by cyclical changes in obliquity. However, this forcing does not explain the 100 ka glacial cycles. Mechanisms proposed for 100 ka cycles include isostatic bed depression and proglacial lakes destabilising the Laurentide ice sheet, non-linear responses to orbital eccentricity, and Antarctic ice sheets influencing deep-ocean stratification. None of these are universally accepted. Here we investigate the hypothesis that variations in volcanic CO2 emissions can cause 100 ka glacial cycles. Any proposed mechanism for 100 ka glacial cycles must give the Earth's climate system a memory of 10^4 - 10^5years. This timescale is difficult to achieve for surface processes, however it is possible for the solid Earth. Recent work suggests volcanic CO2 emissions change in response to glacial cycles [1] and that there could be a 50 ka delay in that response [2]. Such a lagged response could drive glacial cycles from 40 ka cycles to an integer multiple of the forcing period. Under what conditions could the climate system admit such a response? To address this, we use a simplified climate model modified from Huybers and Tziperman [3]. Our version comprises three component models for energy balance, ice sheet growth and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The model is driven by insolation alone with other components varying according to a system of coupled, differential equations. The model is run for 500 ka to produce several glacial cycles and the resulting changes in global ice volume and atmospheric CO2 concentration.We obtain a switch from 40 ka to 100 ka cycles as the volcanic CO2 response to glacial cycles is increased. These 100 ka cycles are phase-locked to obliquity, lasting 80 or 120 ka. Whilst the MOR response required (in this model) is larger than plausible estimates based on [2], it illustrates the

  16. Uncertainties in the CO2 buget associated to boundary layer dynamics and CO2-advection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaikkonen, J.P.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between boundary layer dynamics and carbon dioxide (CO2) budget in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by using mixed-layer theory. We derive a new set of analytical relations to quantify the uncertainties on the estimation of the bulk CO2 mixing ratio and the inferr

  17. Uncertainties in the CO2 buget associated to boundary layer dynamics and CO2-advection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaikkonen, J.P.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between boundary layer dynamics and carbon dioxide (CO2) budget in the convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by using mixed-layer theory. We derive a new set of analytical relations to quantify the uncertainties on the estimation of the bulk CO2 mixing ratio and the inferr

  18. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: A Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Amit; Podolak, Morris

    2016-01-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction that is large enough to form an external mantle composed of high pressure water ice polymorphs and that lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global deep liquid ocean. For these ocean planets we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2; the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that in steady state the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When the wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is esta...

  19. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  20. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a long-lasting decrease in the CO2 threshold for apnea in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, N A; Baker, T L

    2017-01-01

    Two critical parameters that influence breathing stability are the levels of arterial pCO2 at which breathing ceases and subsequently resumes - termed the apneic and recruitment thresholds (AT and RT, respectively). Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a chemoreflex-independent, long-lasting increase in phrenic burst amplitude, a form of plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). The physiological significance of iPMF is unknown. To determine if iPMF and neural apnea have long-lasting physiological effects on breathing, we tested the hypothesis that patterns of neural apnea that induce iPMF also elicit changes in the AT and RT. Phrenic nerve activity and end-tidal CO2 were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, ventilated rats to quantify phrenic nerve burst amplitude and the AT and RT before and after three patterns of neural apnea that differed in their duration and ability to elicit iPMF: brief intermittent neural apneas, a single brief "massed" neural apnea, or a prolonged neural apnea. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that patterns of neural apnea that elicited iPMF also resulted in changes in the AT and RT. Specifically, intermittent neural apneas progressively decreased the AT with each subsequent neural apnea, which persisted for at least 60min. Similarly, a prolonged neural apnea elicited a long-lasting decrease in the AT. In both cases, the magnitude of the AT decrease was proportional to iPMF. In contrast, the RT was transiently decreased following prolonged neural apnea, and was not proportional to iPMF. No changes in the AT or RT were observed following a single brief neural apnea. Our results indicate that the AT and RT are differentially altered by neural apnea and suggest that specific patterns of neural apnea that elicit plasticity may stabilize breathing via a decrease in the AT.

  1. Projecting human development and CO2 emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luís; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2012-01-01

    We estimate cumulative CO2 emissions during the period 2000 to 2050 from developed and developing countries based on the empirical relationship between CO2 per capita emissions (due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production) and corresponding HDI. In order to project per capita emissions of individual countries we make three assumptions which are detailed below. First, we use logistic regressions to fit and extrapolate the HDI on a country level as a function of time. This is mainly motivated by the fact that the HDI is bounded between 0 and 1 and that it decelerates as it approaches 1. Second, we employ for individual countries the correlations between CO2 per capita emissions and HDI in order to extrapolate their emissions. This is an ergodic assumption. Third, we let countries with incomplete data records evolve similarly as their close neighbors (in the emissions-HDI plane, see Fig. 1 in the main text) with complete time series of CO2 per capita emissions and HDI. Country-based emissions estimates a...

  2. 50 years of CO2 experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyree, L. Jr [Liquid Carbonic Corp., PRAXAIR Inc., Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An overview is given of the experiences with the use of CO2 as a refrigerant at the Liquid Carbonic Corporation, now owned by PRAXAIR Inc. The overview is presented in the form of copies of overhead sheets, presented in Session 2 on Applications

  3. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...

  4. Kosten en baten CO2-emissiereductie maatregelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, B.; Tieben, B.; Weda, J.; Hekkenberg, M.; Smekens, K.; Vethman, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment has requested the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) and SEO Economic Research (SEO) to investigate the costs and benefits of a broad range of technical measures to realise CO2 emission reductions. The research aims to identify th

  5. Harvesting Energy from CO2 Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelers, H.V.M.; Schaetzle, O.; Paz-García, J.M.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    When two fluids with different compositions are mixed, mixing energy is released. This holds true for both liquids and gases, though in the case of gases, no technology is yet available to harvest this energy source. Mixing the CO2 in combustion gases with air represents a source of energy with a to

  6. CO2 laser used in cosmetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chenglie

    1993-03-01

    Cases of various kinds of warts, nevi, papillomas, skin angiomas, ephilises, skin vegetation, scars and brandy noses were vaporized and solidified with a 2.5 - 8 W low power CO2 laser with an overall satisfaction rate up to 99.8% and the satisfaction rate for one time 92%.

  7. Warming the early Earth - CO2 reconsidered

    CERN Document Server

    Von Paris, P; Grenfell, L; Patzer, B; Hedelt, P; Stracke, B; Trautmann, T; Schreier, F

    2008-01-01

    Despite a fainter Sun, the surface of the early Earth was mostly ice-free. Proposed solutions to this so-called "faint young Sun problem" have usually involved higher amounts of greenhouse gases than present in the modern-day atmosphere. However, geological evidence seemed to indicate that the atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the Archaean and Proterozoic were far too low to keep the surface from freezing. With a radiative-convective model including new, updated thermal absorption coefficients, we found that the amount of CO2 necessary to obtain 273 K at the surface is reduced up to an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. For the late Archaean and early Proterozoic period of the Earth, we calculate that CO2 partial pressures of only about 2.9 mb are required to keep its surface from freezing which is compatible with the amount inferred from sediment studies. This conclusion was not significantly changed when we varied model parameters such as relative humidity or surface albedo, obtaining CO2 ...

  8. Agriculture waste and rising CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, there are many uncertainties concerning agriculture’s role in global environmental change including the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. A viable and stable world food supply depends on productive agricultural systems, but environmental concerns within agriculture have to...

  9. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  10. Sustainable Process Networks for CO2 Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Kongpanna, P.; Pavarajam, V.

    carbonate and ethylene carbonate are just some of the possible products that can be formed. Each of these involves CO2 and a co-reactant, such as hydrogen, which may also be captured from process purge streams. The process network evolves as some of the reactions involve products from other reactions...

  11. Economic optimization of CO2 pipeline configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoope, M.M.J.; Ramirez, C.A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an economic optimization tool is developed taking into account different steel grades, inlet pressure, diameter and booster stations for point-to-point pipelines as well as for simple networks. Preliminary results show that gaseous CO2 transport is cost effective for relatively smal

  12. Cutting weeds with a CO2 laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, T.; Schou, Jørgen; Christensen, S.

    2001-01-01

    treatment. The relationship between dry weight and laser energy was analysed using a non-linear dose-response regression model. The regression parameters differed significantly between the weed species. At all growth stages and heights S. arvensis was more difficult to cut with a CO2 laser than C. album...

  13. Rhizosphere Responses to Elevated CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drigo, B.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; de Bruijn, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to have major consequences on C cycling and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Experimentation during the last two to three decades using a large variety of approaches have provided sufficient information to conclude that the enrichment of atmosphe

  14. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

    2007-06-01

    Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2

  15. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ammoura

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is challenging, but essential in order to utilize CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration, during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town-Energy Balance (TEB urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI and urban-rural contrasts. Boundary layer heights (BLH at urban, sub-urban and rural sites are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, that are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. Only nocturnal BLH at sub-urban sites are slightly underestimated a few nights, with a bias less than 50 m. At Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL growth reaches the measurement height. The timing of the CO2 cycle is well captured by the model, with only small biases on CO2 concentrations, mainly linked to the misrepresentation of anthropogenic emissions, as the Eiffel site is at the heart of trafic emission sources. At sub-urban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a very strong spatio-temporal variability. The CO2 cycle at these sites is generally well reproduced by the model, even if some biases on the nocturnal maxima appear in the Paris plume parly due to small errors on the vertical

  16. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  17. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lac, C.; Donnelly, R. P.; Masson, V.; Pal, S.; Donier, S.; Queguiner, S.; Tanguy, G.; Ammoura, L.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is challenging, but essential in order to utilize CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration, during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town-Energy Balance (TEB) urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) and urban-rural contrasts. Boundary layer heights (BLH) at urban, sub-urban and rural sites are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, that are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. Only nocturnal BLH at sub-urban sites are slightly underestimated a few nights, with a bias less than 50 m. At Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) growth reaches the measurement height. The timing of the CO2 cycle is well captured by the model, with only small biases on CO2 concentrations, mainly linked to the misrepresentation of anthropogenic emissions, as the Eiffel site is at the heart of trafic emission sources. At sub-urban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a very strong spatio-temporal variability. The CO2 cycle at these sites is generally well reproduced by the model, even if some biases on the nocturnal maxima appear in the Paris plume parly due to small errors on the vertical transport, or in

  18. Effects of dissolved CO2 on Shallow Freshwater Microbial Communities simulating a CO2 Leakage Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, D. M.; Lowry, G. V.; Gregory, K.

    2013-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration is likely to be part of a comprehensive strategy to minimize the atmospheric release of greenhouse gasses, establishing a concern of sequestered CO2 leakage into overlying potable aquifers. Leaking CO2 may affect existing biogeochemical processes and therefore water quality. There is a critical need to understand the evolution of CO2 exposed microbial communities that influence the biogeochemistry in these freshwater aquifers. The evolution of microbial ecology for different CO2 exposure concentrations was investigated using fluid-slurry samples obtained from a shallow freshwater aquifer (55 m depth, 0.5 MPa, 22 °C, Escatawpa, MS). The microbial community of well samples upstream and downstream of CO2 injection was characterized. In addition, batch vessel experiments were conducted with the upstream aquifer samples exposed to varying pCO2 from 0% to 100% under reservoir temperature and pressure for up to 56 days. The microbial community of the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment were analyzed with 16S rRNA clone libraries and qPCR. In both the in situ experiment and the batch reactor experiment, DNA concentration did not correlate with CO2 exposure. Both the in situ experiment and the batch reactors displayed a changing microbial community with increased CO2 exposure. The well water isolate, Curvibacter, appeared to be the most tolerant genus to high CO2 concentrations in the in situ experiments and to mid-CO2 concentrations in the batch reactors. In batch reactors with pCO2 concentrations higher than experienced in situ (pCO2 = 0.5 MPa), Pseudomonas appeared to be the most tolerant genus. Findings provide insight into a dynamic biogeochemical system that will alter with CO2 exposure. Adapted microbial populations will eventually give rise to the community that will impact the metal mobility and water quality. Knowledge of the surviving microbial populations will enable improved models for predicting the fate of CO2

  19. Measuring Carbon-based Contaminant Mineralization Using Combined CO2 Flux and Radiocarbon Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Thomas J.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Cuenca, Richard H.; Hagimoto, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A method is described which uses the absence of radiocarbon in industrial chemicals and fuels made from petroleum feedstocks which frequently contaminate the environment. This radiocarbon signal — or rather the absence of signal — is evenly distributed throughout a contaminant source pool (unlike an added tracer) and is not impacted by biological, chemical or physical processes (e.g., the 14C radioactive decay rate is immutable). If the fossil-derived contaminant is fully degraded to CO2, a harmless end-product, that CO2 will contain no radiocarbon. CO2 derived from natural organic matter (NOM) degradation will reflect the NOM radiocarbon content (usually <30,000 years old). Given a known radiocarbon content for NOM (a site background), a two end-member mixing model can be used to determine the CO2 derived from a fossil source in a given soil gas or groundwater sample. Coupling the percent CO2 derived from the contaminant with the CO2 respiration rate provides an estimate for the total amount of contaminant degraded per unit time. Finally, determining a zone of influence (ZOI) representing the volume from which site CO2 is collected allows determining the contaminant degradation per unit time and volume. Along with estimates for total contaminant mass, this can ultimately be used to calculate time-to-remediate or otherwise used by site managers for decision-making. PMID:27805601

  20. Desmodesmus sp. 3Dp86E-1-a novel symbiotic chlorophyte capable of growth on pure CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovchenko, Alexei; Gorelova, Olga; Selyakh, Irina; Semenova, Larisa; Chivkunova, Olga; Baulina, Olga; Lobakova, Elena

    2014-10-01

    A novel chlorophyte Desmodesmus sp. 3Dp86E-1 isolated from a White Sea hydroid Dynamena pumila was cultivated at CO2 levels from atmospheric (the 'low-CO2' conditions) to pure carbon dioxide (the 5, 20, and 100 % CO2 conditions) under high (480 μE/(m(2) s) PAR) light. After 7 days of cultivation, the '100 % CO2' (but not 5 or 20 % CO2) cells possessed ca. four times higher chlorophyll content per dry weight (DW) unit than the low-CO2 culture. The rate of CO2 fixation under 100 % CO2 comprised ca. 1.5 L/day per L culture volume. After a lag period which depended on the CO2 level, biomass accumulation and volumetric fatty acid (FA) content of the Desmodesmus sp. 3Dp86E-1 bubbled with CO2-enriched gas mixtures increased and was comparable to that of the culture continuously bubbled with air. Under the low-to-moderate CO2 conditions, the FA percentage of the algal cells increased (to 40 % DW) whereas under high-CO2 conditions, FA percentage did not exceed 15 % DW. A strong increase in oleate (18:1) proportion of total FA at the expense of linolenate (18:3) was recorded in the '100 % CO2' cells. Electron microscopy and pulse-amplitude-modulated chlorophyll fluorescence investigation revealed no damage to or significant downregulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in '100 % CO2' cells grown at the high-PAR irradiance. Possible mechanisms of high-CO2 tolerance of Desmodesmus sp. 3Dp86E-1 are discussed in view of its symbiotic origin and possible application for CO2 biomitigation.

  1. The Li–CO2 battery: a novel method for CO2 capture and utilization

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Shaomao

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel primary Li-CO2 battery that consumes pure CO2 gas as its cathode. The battery exhibits a high discharge capacity of around 2500 mA h g-1 at moderate temperatures. At 100 °C the discharge capacity is close to 1000% higher than that at 40 °C, and the temperature dependence is significantly weaker for higher surface area carbon cathodes. Ex-situ FTIR and XRD analyses convincingly show that lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) is the main component of the discharge product. The feasibility of similar primary metal-CO2 batteries based on earth abundant metal anodes, such as Al and Mg, is demonstrated. The metal-CO2 battery platform provides a novel approach for simultaneous capturing of CO2 emissions and producing electrical energy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  3. A cross-association model for CO2-methanol and CO2-ethanol mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-association model was proposed for CO2-alcohol mixtures based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT).CO2 was treated as a pseudo-associating molecule and both the self-association between alcohol hydroxyls and the cross-association between CO2 and alcohol hydroxyls were considered.The equilibrium properties from low temperature-pressure to high temperature-pressure were investigated using this model.The calculated p-x and p-p diagrams of CO2-methanol and CO2-ethanol mixtures agreed with the experimental data.The results showed that when the cross-association was taken into account for Helmholtz free energy,the calculated equilibrium properties could be significantly improved,and the error prediction of the three phase equilibria and triple points in low temperature regions could be avoided.

  4. High precision dual-inlet IRMS measurements of the stable isotopes of CO2 and the N2O/CO2 ratio from polar ice core samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Bauska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important constraint on mechanisms of past carbon cycle variability is provided by the stable isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric carbon dioxide (δ13C-CO2 trapped in polar ice cores, but obtaining very precise measurements has proven to be a significant analytical challenge. Here we describe a new technique to determine the δ13C of CO2 at exceptional precision, as well as measuring the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios. In this method, ancient air is extracted from relatively large ice samples (~ 400 grams with a dry-extraction "ice-grater" device. The liberated air is cryogenically purified to a CO2 and N2O mixture and analyzed with a micro-volume equipped dual-inlet IRMS (Thermo MAT 253. The reproducibility of the method, based on replicate analysis of ice core samples, is 0.02‰ for δ13C-CO2 and 2 ppm and 4 ppb for the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios, respectively (1-sigma pooled standard deviation. Our experiments show that minimizing water vapor pressure in the extraction vessel by housing the grating apparatus in a ultra-low temperature freezer (−60 °C improves the precision and decreases the experimental blank of the method. We describe techniques for accurate calibration of small samples and the application of a mass spectrometric method based on source fragmentation for reconstructing the N2O history of the atmosphere. The oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 is also investigated, confirming previous observations of oxygen exchange between gaseous CO2 and solid H2O within the ice archive. These data offer a possible constraint on oxygen isotopic fractionation during H2O and CO2 exchange below the H2O bulk melting temperature.

  5. Comparison of efficacy of pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation in children undergoing laparoscopic surgery%腹腔镜手术患儿压力控制通气和容量控制通气效果的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯继峰; 郑剑秋; 周蜀克

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation in children undergoing laparoscopic surgery.Methods Thirty ASA Ⅰ or Ⅱ children of both sexes,aged 12-36 months,weighing 9-15 kg,scheduled for laparoscopic surgery,were randomly divided into two groups (n =15 each):pressure-controlled ventilation group (group P) and volume-controlled ventilation group (group Ⅴ).After anesthesia was induced with propofol 2-4 mg/kg,vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg and fentanyl 2 μg/kg,the children received endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation.The maximum inspiratory pressure was adjusted to make the tidal volume (VT) achieve 12 ml/kg in group P and the VT was set at 12 ml/kg in group V.The end-tidal pressure of carbon dioxide (PET CO2) was controlled at 35-45 mm Hg.The mean arterial blood pressure (MAP),heart rate (HR),arterial carbpn dioxide tension (PaCO2),PETCO2,minute ventilation and peak airway pressure were recorded immediately after intubation (T0),immediately before skin incision (T1),after 30 minutes of pneumoperitoneum (T2) and 15 minutes after the end of pneumoperitoneum (T3).Arterial blood samples were taken at the same time points mentioned above for blood gas analysis.Dynamic lung compliance and the ratio of the physiological dead space to the tidal volume were calculated.Results Compared with group Ⅴ,PaCO2 and PET CO2 were significantly decreased and dynamic lung compliance was significantly increased at T1-2,and minute ventilation and peak airway pressure were significantly decreased at T0-3 in group P (P < 0.01).There was no significant difference in MAP,HR and the ratio of the physiological dead space to the tidal volume between the two groups (P > 0.05).Conclusion Compared with volume-controlled ventilation,pressure-controlled ventilation can better improve the ventilatory efficacy,is more beneficial to gas exchange and reduces the influence of pneumoperitoneum on respiratory function in children

  6. Sustained effects of atmospheric [CO2] and nitrogen availability on forest soil CO2 efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, A Christopher; Palmroth, Sari; Johnsen, Kurt H; McCarthy, Heather R; Oren, Ram

    2014-04-01

    Soil CO2 efflux (Fsoil ) is the largest source of carbon from forests and reflects primary productivity as well as how carbon is allocated within forest ecosystems. Through early stages of stand development, both elevated [CO2] and availability of soil nitrogen (N; sum of mineralization, deposition, and fixation) have been shown to increase gross primary productivity, but the long-term effects of these factors on Fsoil are less clear. Expanding on previous studies at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, we quantified the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil using daily measurements from automated chambers over 10 years. Consistent with previous results, compared to ambient unfertilized plots, annual Fsoil increased under elevated [CO2] (ca. 17%) and decreased with N (ca. 21%). N fertilization under elevated [CO2] reduced Fsoil to values similar to untreated plots. Over the study period, base respiration rates increased with leaf productivity, but declined after productivity saturated. Despite treatment-induced differences in aboveground biomass, soil temperature and water content were similar among treatments. Interannually, low soil water content decreased annual Fsoil from potential values - estimated based on temperature alone assuming nonlimiting soil water content - by ca. 0.7% per 1.0% reduction in relative extractable water. This effect was only slightly ameliorated by elevated [CO2]. Variability in soil N availability among plots accounted for the spatial variability in Fsoil , showing a decrease of ca. 114 g C m(-2) yr(-1) per 1 g m(-2) increase in soil N availability, with consistently higher Fsoil in elevated [CO2] plots ca. 127 g C per 100 ppm [CO2] over the +200 ppm enrichment. Altogether, reflecting increased belowground carbon partitioning in response to greater plant nutritional needs, the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil in this stand are sustained beyond the early stages of stand development and

  7. CO2 acquisition in Chlamydomonas acidophila is influenced mainly by CO2, not phosphorus, availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijkerman, Elly; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Beardall, John

    2014-09-01

    The extremophilic green microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila grows in very acidic waters (pH 2.3-3.4), where CO2 is the sole inorganic carbon source. Previous work has revealed that the species can accumulate inorganic carbon (Ci) and exhibits high affinity CO2 utilization under low-CO2 (air-equilibrium) conditions, similar to organisms with an active CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), whereas both processes are down-regulated under high CO2 (4.5 % CO2) conditions. Responses of this species to phosphorus (Pi)-limited conditions suggested a contrasting regulation of the CCM characteristics. Therefore, we measured external carbonic anhydrase (CAext) activities and protein expression (CAH1), the internal pH, Ci accumulation, and CO2-utilization in cells adapted to high or low CO2 under Pi-replete and Pi-limited conditions. Results reveal that C. acidophila expressed CAext activity and expressed a protein cross-reacting with CAH1 (the CAext from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Although the function of this CA remains unclear, CAext activity and high affinity CO2 utilization were the highest under low CO2 conditions. C. acidophila accumulated Ci and expressed the CAH1 protein under all conditions tested, and C. reinhardtii also contained substantial amounts of CAH1 protein under Pi-limitation. In conclusion, Ci utilization is optimized in C. acidophila under ecologically relevant conditions, which may enable optimal survival in its extreme Ci- and Pi-limited habitat. The exact physiological and biochemical acclimation remains to be further studied.

  8. Sensitivity of simulated CO2 concentration to regridding of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Errors in the specification or utilization of fossil fuel CO2 emissions within carbon budget or atmospheric CO2 inverse studies can alias the estimation of biospheric and oceanic carbon exchange. A key component in the simulation of CO2 concentrations arising from fossil fuel emissions is the spatial distribution of the emission near coastlines. Finite grid resolution can give rise to mismatches between the emissions and simulated atmospheric dynamics which differ over land or water. We test these mismatches by examining simulated global atmospheric CO2 concentration driven by two different approaches to regridding fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The two approaches are: (1 a commonly-used method that allocates emissions to gridcells with no attempt to ensure dynamical consistency with atmospheric transport; (2 an improved method that reallocates emissions to gridcells to ensure dynamically consistent results. Results show large spatial and temporal differences in the simulated CO2 concentration when comparing these two approaches. The emissions difference ranges from −30.3 Tg C gridcell−1 yr−1 (−3.39 kg C m−2 yr−1 to +30.0 Tg C gridcell−1 yr−1 (+2.6 kg C m−2 yr−1 along coastal margins. Maximum simulated annual mean CO2 concentration differences at the surface exceed ±6 ppm at various locations and times. Examination of the current CO2 monitoring locations during the local afternoon, consistent with inversion modeling system sampling and measurement protocols, finds maximum hourly differences at 38 stations exceed ±0.10 ppm with individual station differences exceeding −32 ppm. The differences implied by not accounting for this dynamical consistency problem are largest at monitoring sites proximal to large coastal urban areas and point sources. These results suggest that studies comparing simulated to observed atmospheric CO2 concentration, such as atmospheric CO2 inversions, must take measures to correct for this potential

  9. Thermodynamic Analysis and Comparison on Low Temperature CO2-NH3 Cascade Refrigeration Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查世彤; 马一太; 申江; 李敏霞

    2003-01-01

    This paper is focused on the cascade refrigeration cycle using natural refrigerant CO2-NH3. The properties of refrigerants CO2 and NH3 are introduced and analyzed.CO2 has the advantage in low stage of cascade refrigeration cycle due to its good characteristics and properties. The thermodynamic analysis results of the CO2-NH3 cascade refrigeration cycle demonstrates that the cycle has an optimum condensation temperature of low stage and also has an optimum flow rate ratio.By comparing with the R13-R22 and NH3-NH3 cascade refrigeration cycles, the mass flow rate ratio of CO2-NH3 is larger than those of R13-R22 and NH3-NH3, the theoretical COP of CO2-NH3 cascade refrigeration cycle is larger than that of the R13-R22 cascade cycle and smaller than that of the NH3-NH3 cascade cycle. But the real COP of CO2-NH3 cascade cycle will be higher than those of R13-R22 and NH3-NH3 because the specific volume of CO2 at low temperature does not change much and its dynamic viscosity is also small.

  10. Explaining Dutch emissions of CO2; a decomposition analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Hoen; Machiel Mulder

    2003-01-01

    Decomposition of CO2 data of the Netherlands shows that much progress has been made with reduction of CO2 emissions by changing to less CO2 intensive technologies. Moreover, demand shifted to products that are produced with less CO2 emission. Further, shifts in the inputs needed in the production process also managed to decrease the CO2 emissions. These effects, however, were more than compensated by increased CO2 emission due to economic growth. Especially growth in exports led to substantia...

  11. Detection of CO2 leakage by the surface-soil CO2-concentration monitoring (SCM) system in a small scale CO2 release test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Gitak; Yu, Soonyoung; Sung, Ki-Sung; Choi, Byoung-Young; Park, Jinyoung; Han, Raehee; Kim, Jeong-Chan; Park, Kwon Gyu

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of CO2 release through the ground surface is essential to testify the safety of CO2 storage projects. We conducted a feasibility study of the multi-channel surface-soil CO2-concentration monitoring (SCM) system as a soil CO2 monitoring tool with a small scale injection. In the system, chambers are attached onto the ground surface, and NDIR sensors installed in each chamber detect CO2 in soil gas released through the soil surface. Before injection, the background CO2 concentrations were measured. They showed the distinct diurnal variation, and were positively related with relative humidity, but negatively with temperature. The negative relation of CO2 measurements with temperature and the low CO2 concentrations during the day imply that CO2 depends on respiration. The daily variation of CO2 concentrations was damped with precipitation, which can be explained by dissolution of CO2 and gas release out of pores through the ground surface with recharge. For the injection test, 4.2 kg of CO2 was injected 1 m below the ground for about 30 minutes. In result, CO2 concentrations increased in all five chambers, which were located less than 2.5 m of distance from an injection point. The Chamber 1, which is closest to the injection point, showed the largest increase of CO2 concentrations; while Chamber 2, 3, and 4 showed the peak which is 2 times higher than the average of background CO2. The CO2 concentrations increased back after decreasing from the peak around 4 hours after the injection ended in Chamber 2, 4, and 5, which indicated that CO2 concentrations seem to be recovered to the background around 4 hours after the injection ended. To determine the leakage, the data in Chamber 2 and 5, which had low increase rates in the CO2 injection test, were used for statistical analysis. The result shows that the coefficient of variation (CV) of CO2 measurements for 30 minutes is efficient to determine a leakage signal, with reflecting the abnormal change in CO2

  12. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lac

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is a challenging and interesting task needed to be performed in order to utilise CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework and to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town Energy Balance (TEB urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 modelling between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the urban heat island (UHI with stronger urban–rural contrasts on temperature at night than during the day by up to 7 °C. Boundary layer heights (BLH have been evaluated on urban, suburban and rural sites during the campaign, and also on a suburban site over 1 yr. The diurnal cycles of the BLH are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, which are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. The main discrepancy is a small negative bias over urban and suburban sites during nighttime (respectively 45 m and 5 m, leading to a few overestimations of nocturnal CO2 mixing ratios at suburban sites and a bias of +5 ppm. The diurnal CO2 cycle is generally well captured for all the sites. At the Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL growth reaches the measurement height. At suburban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a strong spatio-temporal variability. A

  13. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lac, C.; Donnelly, R. P.; Masson, V.; Pal, S.; Riette, S.; Donier, S.; Queguiner, S.; Tanguy, G.; Ammoura, L.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is a challenging and interesting task needed to be performed in order to utilise CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework and to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town Energy Balance (TEB) urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 modelling between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the urban heat island (UHI) with stronger urban-rural contrasts on temperature at night than during the day by up to 7 °C. Boundary layer heights (BLH) have been evaluated on urban, suburban and rural sites during the campaign, and also on a suburban site over 1 yr. The diurnal cycles of the BLH are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, which are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. The main discrepancy is a small negative bias over urban and suburban sites during nighttime (respectively 45 m and 5 m), leading to a few overestimations of nocturnal CO2 mixing ratios at suburban sites and a bias of +5 ppm. The diurnal CO2 cycle is generally well captured for all the sites. At the Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) growth reaches the measurement height. At suburban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a strong spatio-temporal variability. A sensitivity test without

  14. The Study on MMP of CO2 and Formation Oil in Huan 26 Block%欢26块地层油与CO2最小混相压力研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武毅; 司勇

    2011-01-01

    Based on simulate reservoir formation conditions of Huan 26 block, study the effect of CO2 flooding by using slim tube experiment and determine the MMP of CO2 and the formation oil. The results show that, in the same volume of CO2 injection, the higher injection pressure, the greater the accumulated recovery; CO2 begin breakthrough and produced gas oil ratio rapid increase when gas injection volume is reached (0.62 ~0. 8) PV, the higher injection pressure, the more injection volume when CO2 breakthrough, but the produced gas oil ratio increase faster after CO2 breakthrough. The MMP of CO2 and formation oil in Huan 26 is 23.6 Mpa, which can reach CO2 miscible flooding in formation pressure. The injection pressure as high as possible flooding when conduct CO2 immiscible displacement and so can obtaine better displacement effect.%在模拟欢26块油藏地层条件下,利用细管实验研究了CO2驱油效果,并测定地层油与CO2的最小混相压力.结果表明,在同样CO2注入量下,注入压力越大,累积采收率越大;注气量达到(0.62 ~0.8)PV后,CO2突破,生产气油比急剧上升,注入压力越大,CO2突破时注气量越多,但CO2突破后生产气油比上升越快.欢26块地层油与CO2的最小混相压力为23.6 MPa,在地层压力可以达到CO2混相驱,在进行CO2非混相驱时,注入压力尽可能高,这样可取得更好地驱油效果.

  15. On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hirsch

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of its ubiquitous release on land and well-characterized atmospheric loss, radon-222 has been very useful for deducing fluxes of greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, and N2O. It is shown here that the radon-tracer method, used in previous studies to calculate regional-scale greenhouse gas fluxes, returns a weighted-average flux (the flux field F weighted by the sensitivity of the measurements to that flux field, f rather than an evenly-weighted spatial average flux. A synthetic data study using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model and modeled CO2 fluxes suggests that the discrepancy between the sensitivity-weighted average flux and evenly-weighted spatial average flux can be significant in the case of CO2, due to covariance between F and f for biospheric CO2 fluxes during the growing season and also for anthropogenic CO2 fluxes in general. A technique is presented to correct the radon-tracer derived fluxes to yield an estimate of evenly-weighted spatial average CO2 fluxes. A new method is also introduced for correcting the CO2 flux estimates for the effects of radon-222 radioactive decay in the radon-tracer method.

  16. On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hirsch

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of its ubiquitous release on land and well-characterized atmospheric loss, radon-222 has been very useful for deducing fluxes of greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, and N2O. It is shown here that the radon-tracer method, used in previous studies to calculate regional-scale greenhouse gas fluxes, returns a weighted-average flux (the flux field F weighted by the sensitivity of the measurements to that flux field, f rather than an evenly-weighted spatial average flux. A synthetic data study using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model and modeled CO2 fluxes suggests that the discrepancy between the sensitivity-weighted average flux and evenly-weighted spatial average flux can be significant in the case of CO2, due to covariance between F and f for biospheric CO2 fluxes during the growing season and also for anthropogenic CO2 fluxes in general. A technique is presented to correct the radon-tracer derived fluxes to yield an estimate of evenly-weighted spatial average CO2 fluxes. A new method is also introduced for correcting the CO2 flux estimates for the effects of radon-222 radioactive decay in the radon-tracer method.

  17. Global CO2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT retrievals of total column CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present one of the first estimates of the global distribution of CO2 surface fluxes using total column CO2 measurements retrieved by the SRON-KIT RemoTeC algorithm from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. We derive optimized fluxes from June 2009 to December 2010. We estimate fluxes from surface CO2 measurements to use as baselines for comparing GOSAT data-derived fluxes. Assimilating only GOSAT data, we can reproduce the observed CO2 time series at surface and TCCON sites in the tropics and the northern extra-tropics. In contrast, in the southern extra-tropics GOSAT XCO2 leads to enhanced seasonal cycle amplitudes compared to independent measurements, and we identify it as the result of a land–sea bias in our GOSAT XCO2 retrievals. A bias correction in the form of a global offset between GOSAT land and sea pixels in a joint inversion of satellite and surface measurements of CO2 yields plausible global flux estimates which are more tightly constrained than in an inversion using surface CO2 data alone. We show that assimilating the bias-corrected GOSAT data on top of surface CO2 data (a reduces the estimated global land sink of CO2, and (b shifts the terrestrial net uptake of carbon from the tropics to the extra-tropics. It is concluded that while GOSAT total column CO2 provide useful constraints for source–sink inversions, small spatiotemporal biases – beyond what can be detected using current validation techniques – have serious consequences for optimized fluxes, even aggregated over continental scales.

  18. Global CO2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT retrievals of total column CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Torn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present one of the first estimates of the global distribution of CO2 surface fluxes using total column CO2 measurements retrieved from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. We derive optimized fluxes from June 2009 to December 2010. We estimate fluxes from surface CO2 measurements to use as baselines for comparing GOSAT data-derived fluxes. Assimilating only GOSAT data, we can reproduce the observed CO2 time series at surface and TCCON sites in the tropics and the northern extra-tropics. In contrast, in the southern extra-tropics GOSAT XCO2 leads to enhanced seasonal cycle amplitudes compared to independent measurements, and we identify it as the result of a land-sea bias in our GOSAT XCO2 retrievals. A bias correction in the form of a global offset between GOSAT land and sea pixels in a joint inversion of satellite and surface measurements of CO2 yields plausible global flux estimates which are more tightly constrained than in an inversion using surface CO2 data alone. We show that assimilating the bias-corrected GOSAT data on top of surface CO2 data (a reduces the estimated global land sink of CO2, and (b shifts the terrestrial net uptake of carbon from the tropics to the extra-tropics. It is concluded that while GOSAT total column CO2 provide useful constraints for source-sink inversions, small spatiotemporal biases – beyond what can be detected using current validation techniques – have serious consequences for optimized fluxes, even aggregated over continental scales.

  19. The Relationship Between CO2 Levels and CO2 Related Symptoms Reported on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBaalen, M.; Law, J.; Foy, M.; Wear, M. L.; Mason, S.; Mendez, C.; Meyers, V.

    2014-01-01

    Medical Operations, Toxicology, and the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health collaborated to assess the association of CO2 levels on board the International Space Station and USOS crew reported symptoms inflight, i.e. headache and vision changes. Private Medical Conference (PMC) documents and the weekly Space Medicine Operations Team (SMOT) Notes were used to provide a robust data set of inflight medical events. All events and non-events were documented independent of CO2 levels and other potential contributors. Average (arithmetic mean) and single point maximum ppCO2 was calculated for the 24 hours and 7 days prior to the PMC or SMOT date and time provided by LSAH. Observations falling within the first 7 days of flight (147) were removed from the datasets analyzed to avoid confounding with Space Adaptation Syndrome. The final analysis was based on 1716 observations. For headache, 46 headaches were observed. CO2 level, age at launch, time inflight, and data source were all significantly associated with headache. In particular, for each 1 mmHg increase in CO2, the odds of a crewmember reporting a headache doubled. For vision changes, 29 reports of vision changes were observed. These observations were not found to be statistically associated with CO2 levels as analyzed. While the incidence of headache has was not high (3%), headaches may be an indicator of underlying increases in intracranial pressure, which may result likely from the synergy between CO2-induced cerebral vasodilatation and decreased venous drainage in microgravity. Vision changes were inconsistently reported and as a result did not align appropriately with the CO2 levels. Further analysis is needed. Our results support ongoing efforts to lower the CO2 exposure limits in spacecraft.

  20. CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques

    OpenAIRE

    Bouallou, Chakib

    2010-01-01

    PDF file available for free at http://pubs.ub.ro/?pg=revues&rev=cscc6&num=201011&vol=1&aid=2975; International audience; This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give so...

  1. CO2 mineralization-bridge between storage and utilization of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerlings, Hans; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2013-01-01

    CO2 mineralization comprises a chemical reaction between suitable minerals and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The CO2 is effectively sequestered as a carbonate, which is stable on geological timescales. In addition, the variety of materials that can be produced through mineralization could find applications in the marketplace, which makes implementation of the technology more attractive. In this article, we review recent developments and assess the current status of the CO2 mineralization field. In an outlook, we briefly describe a few mineralization routes, which upon further development have the potential to be implemented on a large scale.

  2. Dynamic breathing of CO2 by hydrotalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Shinsuke; Sahoo, Pathik; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi; Labuta, Jan; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Watanabe, Ken; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Suehara, Shigeru; Iyi, Nobuo

    2013-12-04

    The carbon cycle of carbonate solids (e.g., limestone) involves weathering and metamorphic events, which usually occur over millions of years. Here we show that carbonate anion intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH), a class of hydrotalcite, undergoes an ultrarapid carbon cycle with uptake of atmospheric CO2 under ambient conditions. The use of (13)C-labeling enabled monitoring by IR spectroscopy of the dynamic exchange between initially intercalated (13)C-labeled carbonate anions and carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2. Exchange is promoted by conditions of low humidity with a half-life of exchange of ~24 h. Since hydrotalcite-like clay minerals exist in Nature, our finding implies that the global carbon cycle involving exchange between lithosphere and atmosphere is much more dynamic than previously thought.

  3. Thermodynamic modeling of CO2 mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Martin Gamel

    performed satisfactorily and predicted the general behavior of the systems, but qCPA used fewer adjustable parameters to achieve similar predictions. It has been demonstrated that qCPA is a promising model which, compared to CPA, systematically improves the predictions of the experimentally determined phase......, accurate predictions of the thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria of mixtures containing CO2 are challenging with classical models such as the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state (EoS). This is believed to be due to the fact, that CO2 has a large quadrupole moment which the classical models...... do not explicitly account for. In this thesis, in an attempt to obtain a physically more consistent model, the cubicplus association (CPA) EoS is extended to include quadrupolar interactions. The new quadrupolar CPA (qCPA) can be used with the experimental value of the quadrupolemoment...

  4. Streamer parameters and breakdown in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, M.; Avaheden, J.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Votteler, T.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 is a promising gas for the replacement of SF6 in high-voltage transmission and distribution networks due to its lower environmental impact. The insulation properties of CO2 are, therefore, of great interest. For this, the properties of streamers are important, since they determine the initial discharge propagation and possibly the transition to a leader. The present experimental investigation addresses the streamer inception and propagation at ambient temperature in the pressure range 0.05-0.5 MPa at both polarities. Streamer parameters, namely the stability field, radius and velocity, were deduced in uniform and in strongly non-uniform background fields. The measured breakdown fields can then be understood by streamer propagation and streamer-to-leader transition.

  5. CO2 Impacts on the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael; Bauer, James; Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony; Stevenson, Rachel; Yelle, Roger

    2014-09-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will pass Mars at the extremely close distance of 140,000 km on 2014 Oct 19. This encounter is unique---a record close approach to a planet with spacecraft that can observe its passage---and currently, all 5 Mars orbiters have plans to observe the comet and/or its effects on the planet. Gas from the comet's coma is expected to collide with the Martian atmosphere, altering the abundances of some species and producing significant heating, inflating the upper atmosphere. We propose DDT observations with Spitzer/IRAC to measure the comet's CO2+CO coma (observing window Oct 30 - Nov 20), to use these measurements to derive the coma's CO2 density at Mars during the closest approach, and to aid the interpretation of any observed effects or changes in the Martian atmosphere.

  6. Batch production of micron size particles from poly(ethylene glycol) using supercritical CO2 as a processing solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, Sameer P.; Picchioni, Francesco; Janssen, L. P. B. M.

    2007-01-01

    The major advantage of using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) as a solvent in polymer processing is an enhancement in the free volume of a polymer due to dissolved CO2, which causes a considerable reduction in the viscosity. This allows spraying the polymer melt at low temperatures to produce micr

  7. Batch production of micron size particles from poly(ethylene glycol) using supercritical CO2 as a processing solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, Sameer P.; Picchioni, Francesco; Janssen, L. P. B. M.

    The major advantage of using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) as a solvent in polymer processing is an enhancement in the free volume of a polymer due to dissolved CO2, which causes a considerable reduction in the viscosity. This allows spraying the polymer melt at low temperatures to produce

  8. Continuous CO2 extractor and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None listed

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this CRADA was to assist in technology transfer from Russia to the US and assist in development of the technology improvements and applications for use in the U.S. and worldwide. Over the period of this work, ORNL has facilitated design, development and demonstration of a low-pressure liquid extractor and development of initial design for high-pressure supercritical CO2 fluid extractor.

  9. Aridity under conditions of increased CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Peter; Roderick, Micheal L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    A string of recent of studies led to the wide-held assumption that aridity will increase under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming. Such results generally build upon analyses of changes in the 'aridity index' (the ratio of potential evaporation to precipitation) and can be described as a direct thermodynamic effect on atmospheric water demand due to increasing temperatures. However, there is widespread evidence that contradicts the 'warmer is more arid' interpretation, leading to the 'global aridity paradox' (Roderick et al. 2015, WRR). Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of modeled changes in a broad set of dryness metrics (primarily based on a range of measures of water availability) over a large range of realistic atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We use an ensemble of simulations from of state-of-the-art climate models to analyse both equilibrium climate experiments and transient historical simulations and future projections. Our results show that dryness is, under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and related global warming, generally decreasing at global scales. At regional scales we do, however, identify areas that undergo changes towards drier conditions, located primarily in subtropical climate regions and the Amazon Basin. Nonetheless, the majority of regions, especially in tropical and mid- to northern high latitudes areas, display wetting conditions in a warming world. Our results contradict previous findings and highlight the need to comprehensively assess all aspects of changes in hydroclimatological conditions at the land surface. Roderick, M. L., P. Greve, and G. D. Farquhar (2015), On the assessment of aridity with changes in atmospheric CO2, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5450-5463

  10. CO2 enhanced oil recovery economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Realistic estimates of potential enhanced oil recovery (EOR) reserve additions range from 15 to 50 billion bbl. Oil price, technical advancements, and taxation will strongly influence how much of this potential can be realized. EOR can be implemented on a large scale in the near term, and can contribute significantly to domestic oil production by the late 1980s. The contribution of CO2 injection recovery processes to this enhancement of oil reserves is examined with regard to economics and technology.

  11. Inbound Logistics Cost and CO2 Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Kökler, Cihan

    2010-01-01

    Business has globalized rapidly during the last decades. Distances between point of origin and point of consumption have increased as a result of globalization. Today’s increased distances mean that companies require faster logistic responses. Air transportation is preferred because it’s worldwide lead-time, of just 1-2 day, fulfill business expectations. However, transportation operation costs have risen dramatically and there are growing concerns about the high CO2 emission levels associate...

  12. Pulpotomies with CO2 laser in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Jose A. P.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Gioso, Marco A.; Pesce, Hildeberto F.; Jatene, Adib D.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of dental pulps submitted to shallow pulpotomy followed by CO2 laser radiation at five different procedures. For this purpose, initially 66 dogs' teeth were opened and about 2 or 3 mm of coronal dental pulp was removed. Continuous irrigation with saline solution was implemented. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 11 each. After cessation of bleeding, in group I, CO2 laser (Xanar-20, USA) was irradiated for 1 second at a power of 5 watts; in group II, 2 seconds at 3 watts; in Group III, 2 seconds at 5 watts; in Group IV, 1 second at 3 watts; in Group V, a continuous mode at 3 watts; Group VI served as a control, with no laser irradiation. The results showed no clinical differences between the 3 W and 5 W powers. Time period of irradiation exposition influenced definitively the clinical appearance of the dental pulps. Groups I and IV (1 second) were unable to stop the bleeding, which persisted over 15 minutes for all teeth. This may be due to the intense heat generated by CO2 laser, causing vasodilatation. Groups II and III displayed a similar appearance, but bleeding stopped in about 10 minutes. Group V (continuous mode) had no bleeding after irradiation, but a plasma-like liquid would come out for almost 2 minutes. When comparing to the control (Group VI), all the pulps would assume a jelly-like aspect, with black granulated tissue on the surface, covering totally the pulps of Group V and partially the other groups. The histological results will be discussed in a further study. From the data obtained, it seems that CO2 laser irradiation for pulpotomies should be done in a continuous mode, for clinical convenience in terms of time taken and effective irradiation.

  13. The effects of CO2 and nutrient fertilisation on the growth and temperature response of the mangrove Avicennia germinans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reef, Ruth; Slot, Martijn; Motro, Uzi; Motro, Michal; Motro, Yoav; Adame, Maria F; Garcia, Milton; Aranda, Jorge; Lovelock, Catherine E; Winter, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    In order to understand plant responses to both the widespread phenomenon of increased nutrient inputs to coastal zones and the concurrent rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, CO2-nutrient interactions need to be considered. In addition to its potential stimulating effect on photosynthesis and growth, elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of photosynthesis. The scarcity of experiments testing how elevated CO2 affects the temperature response of tropical trees hinders our ability to model future primary productivity. In a glasshouse study, we examined the effects of elevated CO2 (800 ppm) and nutrient availability on seedlings of the widespread mangrove Avicennia germinans. We assessed photosynthetic performance, the temperature response of photosynthesis, seedling growth and biomass allocation. We found large synergistic gains in both growth (42 %) and photosynthesis (115 %) when seedlings grown under elevated CO2 were supplied with elevated nutrient concentrations relative to their ambient growing conditions. Growth was significantly enhanced under elevated CO2 only under high-nutrient conditions, mainly in above-ground tissues. Under low-nutrient conditions and elevated CO2, root volume was more than double that of seedlings grown under ambient CO2 levels. Elevated CO2 significantly increased the temperature optimum for photosynthesis by ca. 4 °C. Rising CO2 concentrations are likely to have a significant positive effect on the growth rate of A. germinans over the next century, especially in areas where nutrient availability is high.

  14. CO2 Adsorption to Sub-Single Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Ilton, Eugene [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Hauss, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Schaef, Herbert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may react with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of 0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 . The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At low pressure increasing CO2 adsorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak or no temperature dependence. Supercritical fluids, sorption phenomena, carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration, caprock integrity

  15. A Comparison of Measurements of Change in Respiratory Status in Spontaneously Breathing Volunteers by the ExSpiron Noninvasive Respiratory Volume Monitor Versus the Capnostream Capnometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George W; George, Christy A; Harvey, Brian C; Freeman, Jenny E

    2017-01-01

    Current respiratory monitoring technologies such as pulse oximetry and capnography have been insufficient to identify early signs of respiratory compromise in nonintubated patients. Pulse oximetry, when used appropriately, will alert the caregiver to an episode of dangerous hypoxemia. However, desaturation lags significantly behind hypoventilation and alarm fatigue due to false alarms poses an additional problem. Capnography, which measures end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) and respiratory rate (RR), has not been universally used for nonintubated patients for multiple reasons, including the inability to reliably relate EtCO2 to the level of impending respiratory compromise and lack of patient compliance. Serious complications related to respiratory compromise continue to occur as evidenced by the Anesthesiology 2015 Closed Claims Report. The Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation has stressed the need to improve monitoring modalities so that "no patient will be harmed by opioid-induced respiratory depression." A recently available, Food and Drug Administration-approved noninvasive respiratory volume monitor (RVM) can continuously and accurately monitor actual ventilation metrics: tidal volume, RR, and minute ventilation (MV). We designed this study to compare the capabilities of capnography versus the RVM to detect changes in respiratory metrics. Forty-eight volunteer subjects completed the study. RVM measurements (MV and RR) were collected simultaneously with capnography (EtCO2 and RR) using 2 sampling methods (nasal scoop cannula and snorkel mouthpiece with in-line EtCO2 sensor). For each sampling method, each subject performed 6 breathing trials at 3 different prescribed RRs (slow [5 min], normal [12.6 ± 0.6 min], and fast [25 min]). All data are presented as mean ± SEM unless otherwise indicated. Following transitions in prescribed RRs, the RVM reached a new steady state value of MV in 37.7 ± 1.4 seconds while EtCO2 changes were notably slower, often failing to reach a

  16. CO2 cooling for HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Verlaat; Van Lysebetten, A

    2008-01-01

    The new generation silicon detectors require more efficient cooling of the front-end electronics and the silicon sensors themselves. To minimize reverse annealing of the silicon sensors the cooling temperatures need to be reduced. Other important requirements of the new generation cooling systems are a reduced mass and a maintenance free operation of the hardware inside the detector. Evaporative CO2 cooling systems are ideal for this purpose as they need smaller tubes than conventional systems. The heat transfer capability of evaporative CO2 is high. CO2 is used as cooling fluid for the LHCb-VELO and the AMS-Tracker cooling systems. A special method for the fluid circulation is developed at Nikhef to get a very stable temperature of both detectors without any active components like valves or heaters inside. This method is called 2-phase Accumulator Controlled Loop (2PACL) and is a good candidate technology for the design of the future cooling systems for the Atlas and CMS upgrades.

  17. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  18. CO2 flux geothermometer for geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C. F.; Bloomberg, S.; Fridriksson, T.; Oladottir, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A new geothermometer (TCO2 Flux) is proposed based on soil diffuse CO2 flux and shallow temperature measurements made on areas of steam heated, thermally altered ground above active geothermal systems. This CO2 flux geothermometer is based on a previously reported CO2 geothermometer that was designed for use with fumarole analysis. The new geothermometer provides a valuable additional exploration tool for estimating subsurface temperatures in high-temperature geothermal systems. Mean TCO2 Flux estimates fall within the range of deep drill hole temperatures at Wairakei (New Zealand), Tauhara (New Zealand), Rotokawa (New Zealand), Ohaaki (New Zealand), Reykjanes (Iceland) and Copahue (Argentina). The spatial distribution of geothermometry estimates is consistent with the location of major upflow zones previously reported at the Wairakei and Rotokawa geothermal systems. TCO2 Flux was also evaluated at White Island (New Zealand) and Reporoa (New Zealand), where limited sub-surface data exists. Mode TCO2 Flux at White Island is high (320 °C), the highest of the systems considered in this study. However, the geothermometer relies on mineral-water equilibrium in neutral pH reservoir fluids, and would not be reliable in such an active and acidic environment. Mean TCO2 Flux at Reporoa (310 °C) is high, which indicates Reporoa has a separate upflow from the nearby Waiotapu geothermal system; an outflow from Waiotapu would not be expected to have such high temperature.

  19. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  20. Reconstructing CO2 concentrations in basaltic melt inclusions using Raman analysis of vapor bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aster, Ellen M.; Wallace, Paul J.; Moore, Lowell R.; Watkins, James; Gazel, Esteban; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Melt inclusions record valuable information about pre-eruptive volatile concentrations of melts. However, a vapor bubble commonly forms in inclusions after trapping, and this decreases the dissolved CO2 concentration in the melt (glass) phase in the inclusion. To quantify CO2 loss to vapor bubbles, Raman spectroscopic analysis was used to determine the density of CO2 in bubbles in melt inclusions from two Cascade cinder cones near Mt. Lassen and two Mexican cinder cones (Jorullo, Parícutin). Using analyses of dissolved CO2 and H2O in the glass in the inclusions, the measured CO2 vapor densities were used to reconstruct the original dissolved CO2 contents of the melt inclusions at the time of trapping. Our results show that 30-90% of the CO2 in a melt inclusion is contained in the vapor bubble, values similar to those found in other recent studies. We developed a model for vapor bubble growth to show how post-entrapment bubbles form in melt inclusions as a result of cooling, crystallization, and eruptive quenching. The model allows us to predict the bubble volume fraction as a function of ΔT (the difference between the trapping temperature and eruptive temperature) and the amount of CO2 lost to a bubble. Comparison of the Raman and modeling methods shows highly variable agreement. For 10 of 17 inclusions, the two methods are within ± 550 ppm CO2 (avg. difference 290 ppm), equivalent to ±~300 bars uncertainty in estimated trapping pressure for restored inclusions. Discrepancies between the two methods occur for inclusions that have been strongly affected by post-entrapment diffusive H+ loss, because this process enhances bubble formation. For our dataset, restoring the CO2 lost to vapor bubbles increases inferred trapping pressures of the inclusions by 600 to as much as 4000 bars, highlighting the importance of accounting for vapor bubble formation in melt inclusion studies.

  1. CO2-neutral cities. Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard, Tilburg [Netherlands]; CO2-neutrale steden. Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard, Tilburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, J.; Braber, K.; Voskuilen, Th.; Manders, H.; Rovers, V.

    2007-11-16

    The three Dutch cities of Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard and Tilburg asked BuildDesk to undertake a survey of the options for realizing a CO2 neutral energy supply in their cities. In principle, this entails direct energy consumption for living, working (incl. industry) and mobility. With the developed 'Road maps towards CO2 neutral' each city holds their own guideline with which they can suit the action to the word. [mk]. [Dutch] De drie steden Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard en Tilburg hebben BuildDesk de opdracht gegeven een verkenning uit te voeren naar de mogelijkheid om een CO2-neutrale energievoorziening in hun stad te realiseren. Daarbij gaat het in principe om het directe energiegebruik voor wonen, werken (incl. industrie) en mobiliteit. Met de ontwikkelde 'Roadmaps naar CO2-neutraal' heeft elke stad een eigen richtsnoer in handen waarmee ze actief de daad bij het woord kan voegen.

  2. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass.

  3. Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, A. E.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design A. Andrews, T. Ryerson, J. Peischl, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, P. Tans An extensive dataset of CO2 concentrations including enhancements in point and area source plumes is available from in situ measurements collected using the NOAA P-3 and NCAR Electra research aircraft during seven major field projects from 1999 through 2010. Research flights sampled emission plumes from coal-, oil-, and natural gas-fired electric utility power plants, industrial facilities, and urban areas. Plume sampling often included horizontal transects at several altitudes and multiple distances downwind. CO2 data from crosswind transects upwind and downwind, coupled with ancillary measurements of co-emitted nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, along with plume location, and wind speed and direction permit unambiguous attribution and quantification of atmospheric plumes from individual sources. Certain point sources were revisited on multiple flights over the course of 1-2 month long field projects and on successive field projects spanning several years. Sampling occurred primarily in the summertime, daytime continental boundary layer, with some plume studies performed after dark and in the spring, fall, and winter seasons. The data provide rigorously calibrated, measurement-based constraints on the expected range of atmospheric CO2 plume enhancements that can be used to assess satellite sensor concepts. Crosswind near-field (~5 km) transects in the summer daytime mixed-layer downwind of the strongest point sources were characterized by peak plume CO2 mixing ratio enhancements >100 ppm above background for the 100-m spatial averages reported from the moving aircraft. On many flights, the aircraft tracked such emissions plumes beyond 150 km downwind, or up to 10 hours of transport time, until plume enhancements were indistinguishable from background variability in CO2

  4. Natural Analogues of CO2 Geological Storage; Analogos Naturales del Almacenamiento Geologico de CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Recreo, F.

    2007-07-20

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide is nowadays, internationally considered as the most effective method for greenhouse gas emission mitigation, in order to minimize the global climate change universally accepted. Nevertheless, the possible risks derived of this long-term storage have a direct influence on its public acceptance. Among the favourable geological formations to store CO2, depleted oil and gas fields, deep saline reservoirs, and unamiable coal seams are highlighted. One of the most important objectives of the R and D projects related to the CO2 geological storage is the evaluation of the CO2 leakage rate through the above mentioned geological formations. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary to increase our knowledge on the interaction among CO2, storage and sealing formations, as well as on the flow paths and the physical resistance of the sealing formation. The quantification of the CO2 leakage rate is essential to evaluate the effects on the human and animal health, as well as for the ecosystem and water quality. To achieve these objectives, the study of the natural analogues is very useful in order to know the natural leakage rate to the atmosphere, its flow paths, the physical, chemical and mineralogical modifications due to the long term interaction processes among the CO2 and the storage and sealing formations, as well as the effects on the groundwaters and ecosystems. In this report, we have tried to summarise the main characteristics of the natural reservoirs and surficial sources of CO2, which are both natural analogues of the geological storage and CO2 leakage, studied in EEUU, Europe and Australia. The main objective of this summary is to find the possible applications for long-term risk prediction and for the performance assessment by means of conceptual and numerical modelling, which will allow to validate the predictive models of the CO2 storage behaviour, to design and develop suitable monitoring techniques to control the CO2 behaviour

  5. Entornos Agroambientales: Almacenes Naturales De Co2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Isidro Sánchez Leyva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultivos únicos eternos y la extinción de especies; contaminaciones atmosféricas, edáficas e hídricas; la ampliación del agujero de la capa de Ozono, etc. unido al mal uso de la tierra contribuyen al empobrecimiento de comunidades y naciones. Se evaluaron sistemas de cultivos múltiples como sumideros naturales o bancos de CO2. Y se intercalaron leguminosas por sus conocidos y probados beneficios y otras especies anuales en árboles y arbustos conducidos desde 1988-90 en el macizo montañoso Sagüa-Baracoa, Gran Tierra de Sabaneta, El Salvador y valle Guaso provincia Guantánamo; Calabaza de Sagüa de Tánamo y Mayarí, Holguín. Diseñándose 3 ó 4 réplicas según las variantes y laderas y utilizados rangos múltiples de Newman-Kell (P<1%. Para el cálculo de biomasa vegetal se aplicaron fórmulas midiéndose la necromasa bajo el arbolado y el C orgánico edáfico. Se determinó el valor o índice relativo de biomasa, el índice relativo de banco de CO2 y el potencial mínimo de retención del CO2 en el sistema según la edad del cultivo; observándose el suelo erosionado en el predio mediante simple fórmula propuesta. Se observaron formas ecológicas de labor y cultivo. La canavalia fue el cultivo más efectivo considerando la respuesta del C edáfico. Se tuvo en cuenta la productividad y el banco de CO2 por el efecto positivo de ambos factores sobre el medio y dada la relevancia creciente de la reducción de las emisiones de CO2, a la vez que se evita la sobre-explotación y la deforestación. Se significó la necesidad de fajas interarboladas en monocultivos anuales.

  6. CO2 removal from biogas by using membrane absorption technology%利用膜吸收技术分离沼气中CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晏水平; 陈竞翱; 艾平; 王媛媛; 张衍林

    2012-01-01

    为了综合沼气CO2化学吸收法和膜分离法技术的优点,采用疏水性聚丙烯中空纤维膜接触器作为反应器,以净化气中CH4体积分数、系统CO2传质速率和能耗因子为主要指标,研究了常压下乙醇胺(MEA)、二乙醇胺(DEA)和三乙醇胺(TEA)吸收剂对模拟沼气的CO2分离性能.结果表明,膜CO2吸收技术可应用于沼气CO2分离,当采用MEA作为吸收剂,且沼气流量为120 L/h时,净化气中CH4体积分数可达97.8%,而沼气流量为300 L/h时,系统CO2传质速率达到最高,为18.03 mol/(m2·h),且吸收剂的CO2分离性能排序为:MEA>DEA>TEA>H2O.能耗因子分析结果表明,0.175~0.20 mol/mol为较优的MEA贫液CO2负荷,DEA的气液比可选择16.7 L/L.膜CO2吸收系统的经济性分析结果显示,膜吸收系统具有较低的CO2分离成本,且当沼气工程规模由1 000 m3/d增加到12 000 m3/d时,膜CO2吸收系统的单位沼气CO2分离成本将下降78.6%,达到0.50元/m3.该文研究结果可对沼气的高效提纯提供参考.%In order to integrate the unique advantages of chemical absorption technology and membrane separation technology used to capture CO2 from biogas, membrane CO2 absorption technology was put forward in this study. Based on the CH4 volume fraction in the treated gas, CO2 mass transfer rate of absorption and energy consumption factor, CO2 removal performances from the simulated biogas by monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA) and triethanolamine (TEA) were experimented by using hydrophobic polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor as CO2 absorber. Results showed that CO2 can be successfully captured from biogas by using membrane CO2 absorption technology. And when MEA was selected to act as CO2 absorbent and biogas flow rate was 120 L/h, CH4 volume fraction can be increased from 60% to up to 97.8%. But CO2 mass transfer rate of absorption can reach the maximum, approximate 18.03 mol/(m2-h) by adopting 300 L/h biogas flow rate. In

  7. Strategies for CO2 capture from different CO2 emission sources by vacuum swing adsorption technology☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghua Ling; Penny Xiao; Augustine Ntiamoah; Dong Xu; Paul Webley; Yuchun Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Different VSA (Vacuum Swing Adsorption) cycles and process schemes have been evaluated to find suitable process configurations for effectively separating CO2 from flue gases from different industrial sectors. The cycles were studied using an adsorption simulator developed in our research group, which has been suc-cessfully used to predict experimental results over several years. Commercial zeolite APGIII and granular ac-tivated carbon were used as the adsorbents. Three-bed VSA cycles with-and without-product purge and 2-stage VSA systems have been investigated. It was found that for a feed gas containing 15%CO2 (representing flue gas from power plants), high CO2 purities and recoveries could be obtained using a three-bed zeolite APGIII VSA unit for one stage capture, but with more stringent conditions such as deeper vacuum pressures of 1–3 kPa. 2-stage VSA process operated in series allowed us to use simple process steps and operate at more realistic vacuum pressures. With a vacuum pressure of 10 kPa, final CO2 purity of 95.3%with a recov-ery of 98.2%were obtained at specific power consumption of 0.55 MJ·(kg CO2)−1 from feed gas containing 15%CO2. These numbers compare very well with those obtained from a single stage process operating at 1 kPa vacuum pressure. The feed CO2 concentration was very influential in determining the desorption pressure necessary to achieve high separation efficiency. For feed gases containing N30%CO2, a single-stage VSA capture process operating at moderate vacuum pressure and without a product purge, can achieve very high product purities and recoveries.

  8. CO2 for enhanced oil recovery and secure storage of CO2 in reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yunhang

    2015-01-01

    CO2-EOR(Enhanced Oil Recovery) is an effective and useful technology that can not only increase the oil production to meet the increasing need for energy around the world, but also mitigate the negtive influence of global green house effect. Different categories of oil recovery methods including primary recovery, secondary recovery, and EOR technologies are introduced at first. Then the history, global distribution, screening criteria, mechanisms, advantages and disadvantages of CO2-EOR are d...

  9. CO2 Sequestration within Spent Oil Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, H.; Worrall, F.; Gluyas, J.; Morgan, C.; Fraser, J.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide deposits of oil shales are thought to represent ~3 trillion barrels of oil. Jordanian oil shale deposits are extensive and of high quality, and could represent 100 billion barrels of oil, leading to much interest and activity in the development of these deposits. The exploitation of oil shales has raised a number of environmental concerns including: land use, waste disposal, water consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions. The dry retorting of oil shales can overcome a number of the environmental impacts, but this leaves concerns over management of spent oil shale and CO2 production. In this study we propose that the spent oil shale can be used to sequester CO2 from the retorting process. Here we show that by conducting experiments using high pressure reaction facilities, we can achieve successful carbonation of spent oil shale. High pressure reactor facilities in the Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, are capable of reacting solids with a range of fluids up to 15 MPa and 350°C, being specially designed for research with supercritical fluids. Jordanian spent oil shale was reacted with high pressure CO2 in order to assess whether there is potential for sequestration. Fresh and reacted materials were then examined by: Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. Jordanian spent oil shale was found to sequester up to 5.8 wt % CO2, on reacting under supercritical conditions, which is 90% of the theoretical carbonation. Jordanian spent oil shale is composed of a large proportion of CaCO3, which on retorting decomposes, forming CaSO4 and Ca-oxides which are the focus of carbonation reactions. A factorially designed experiment was used to test different factors on the extent of carbonation, including: pressure; temperature; duration; and the water content. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) techniques were then used to determine the significance of

  10. Bell pepper plants cultived in CO2 enriched environment. III: Fruit characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende, Fatima Conceição; UFLA; Frizzone, José Antonio; USP; Pereira, Anderson Soares; USP

    2008-01-01

    The experiment was carried out at Esalq/USP, Piracicaba/SP and its objective was to study the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations and water volume on pepper crops, Capsicum annum L. (Solanaceae), planted in pots inside plastic greenhouse. In the morning four levels of CO2 (367, 600, 800 and 1000 µmol . mol-1) were applied daily. A drip irrigation system, having one drip by plant, used to irrigate the pots every other day. Four water volumes (30.89 L; 40.7 L; 61.86 L and 82.83 L) with...

  11. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work, th...

  12. Characterization of CO2 leakage into the freshwater body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok; Delfs, Jens Olaf; Shao, H.

    2013-01-01

    urrent research into CO2 capture and storage is dominated by improving the CO2 storage capacity. In this context, risk related to CO2 leakage is an important issue which may cause environmental problems, particularly when freshwater resources nearby are intruded by the CO2 plume. In this work...

  13. Recycling CO 2 ? Computational Considerations of the Activation of CO 2 with Homogeneous Transition Metal Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Drees, Markus

    2012-08-10

    Faced with depleting fossil carbon sources, the search for alternative energy carriers and energy storage possibilities has become an important issue. Nature utilizes carbon dioxide as starting material for storing sun energy in plant hydrocarbons. A similar approach, storing energy from renewable sources in chemical bonds with CO 2 as starting material, may lead to partial recycling of CO 2 created by human industrial activities. Unfortunately, currently available routes for the transformation of CO 2 involve high temperatures and are often not selective. With the development of more sophisticated methods and better software, theoretical studies have become both increasingly widespread and useful. This concept article summarizes theoretical investigations of the current state of the feasibility of CO 2 activation with molecular transition metal catalysts, highlighting the most promising reactions of CO 2 with olefins to industrially relevant acrylic acid/acrylates, and the insertion of CO 2 into metal-element bonds, particularly for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates and polymers. Rapidly improving computational power and methods help to increase the importance and accuracy of calculations continuously and make computational chemistry a useful tool helping to solve some of the most important questions for the future. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Potential Improvements of Supercritical CO2 Brayton Cycle by Modifying Critical Point of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Seok; Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is one of strong candidates for a next generation nuclear reactor. However, the conventional design of a SFR concept with an indirect Rankine cycle is subjected to a sodium water reaction, which can deteriorate the safety of a SFR. To prevent any hazards from sodium-water reaction, a SFR with the Brayton cycle using Helium or Supercritical Carbon dioxide (S-CO2) as working fluids can be an alternative approach to improve the current SFR design. As in a helium cycle, there has been an investigation to modify thermo-physical properties to increase the efficiency of the cycle and reduce the size of turbomachineries. Particularly, He-Xe or He-N2 binary mixture were successful to decrease the stages of turbomachines due to the increment of molecular weight of gas mixture than that of pure helium. Similar to the case of helium, CO2 has a potential to modify its thermo-physical properties by mixing with other gases. For instance, it was reported that critical point of CO2 can be shifted by mixing with different gases. Since, the efficiency of a S-CO2 cycle is limited to the critical point of CO2, the shift in critical point implies that there is a possibility of improving the cycle efficiency than the current design. This paper presents the results of a preliminary analysis to identify the effects of CO2 critical point modification on the Brayton cycle performance.

  15. CO2-Responsive Polymer-Functionalized Au Nanoparticles for CO2 Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Promthaveepong, Kittithat; Li, Nan

    2016-08-16

    Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) coated with stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) exhibit tunable optical properties responding to external stimuli and show promising sensing applications. We present a new CO2-responsive polymer, poly(N-(3-amidino)-aniline) (PNAAN), coated gold NPs (AuNPs) synthesized by directly reducing HAuCl4 with a CO2-responsive monomer N-(3-amidino)-aniline (NAAN). The amidine group of PNAAN can be protonated into a hydrophilic amidinium group by dissolved CO2 (dCO2). This induces the PNAAN to swell and detach from the AuNP surface, resulting in AuNP aggregation and color change. By monitoring the UV absorbance change of AuNPs, a sensitive dCO2 sensor with a linear range of 0.0132 to 0.1584 hPa and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0024 hPa is developed. This method shows dramatic improvement in sensitivity and convenience of sample preparation compared with the previously reported dCO2 sensor.

  16. Carbon Sequestration: Hydrogenation of CO2 to Formic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The concentration CO2 gas has become a great worldwide challenge because CO2 is considered as an important counterpart of greenhouse gases. The tremendous increase in the concentration of CO2 gas, elevated the worldwide temperature as well as it altered the climatic changes. Various physiochemical approached have been reported to trap the CO2 gas and the chemical conversion of CO2 to useful chemicals is one of them. This review covers the conversion of CO2 gas to formic acid. In this CO2 hydr...

  17. Carbon Sequestration: Hydrogenation of CO2 to Formic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyay Praveenkumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration CO2 gas has become a great worldwide challenge because CO2 is considered as an important counterpart of greenhouse gases. The tremendous increase in the concentration of CO2 gas, elevated the worldwide temperature as well as it altered the climatic changes. Various physiochemical approached have been reported to trap the CO2 gas and the chemical conversion of CO2 to useful chemicals is one of them. This review covers the conversion of CO2 gas to formic acid. In this CO2 hydrogenation reaction, both the homogeneous as well as heterogeneous catalytic systems were discussed along with the effect of solvent systems on reaction kinetics.

  18. Process-dependent residual trapping of CO2 in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that the nature and extent of residual CO2 trapping depend on the process by which the CO2 phase is introduced into the rock. We compare residual trapping of CO2 in Berea Sandstone by imbibing water into a core containing either exsolved CO2 or CO2 introduced by drainage. X-ray computed tomography measurements are used to map the spatial distribution of CO2 preimbibition and postimbibition. Unlike during drainage where the CO2 distribution is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the rock, the distribution of exsolved CO2 is comparatively uniform. Postimbibition, the CO2 distribution retained the essential features for both the exsolved and drainage cases, but twice as much residual trapping is observed for exsolved CO2 even with similar preimbibition gas saturations. Residually trapped exsolved gas also disproportionately reduced water relative permeability. Development of process-dependent parameterization will help better manage subsurface flow processes and unlock benefits from gas exsolution.

  19. Rapid coupling of Antarctic temperature and atmospheric CO2 during deglaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. van Ommen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic ice cores provide clear evidence of a close coupling between variations in Antarctic temperature and the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during the glacial/interglacial cycles of the past 800 thousand years. Precise information on the relative timing of the temperature and CO2 changes can assist in refining our understanding of the physical processes involved in this coupling. Here, we focus on the last deglaciation, 19 000 to 11 000 years before present, during which CO2 concentrations increased by ~80 parts per million by volume and Antarctic temperature increased by ~10 °C. Utilising a recently developed proxy for regional Antarctic temperature, derived from five near-coastal ice cores, and two ice core CO2 records with high dating precision, we show that the increase in CO2 lagged the increase in regional Antarctic temperature by only 0–400 years. This new value for the lag, consistent for both CO2 records, implies a faster feedback between temperature and CO2 than the centennial to millennial-scale lags suggested by previous studies.

  20. Solvent Effects on the Photothermal Regeneration of CO2 in Monoethanolamine Nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Du; Stolaroff, Joshuah; Esser-Kahn, Aaron

    2015-11-25

    A potential approach to reduce energy costs associated with carbon capture is to use external and renewable energy sources. The photothermal release of CO2 from monoethanolamine mediated by nanoparticles is a unique solution to this problem. When combined with light-absorbing nanoparticles, vapor bubbles form inside the capture solution and release the CO2 without heating the bulk solvent. The mechanism by which CO2 is released remained unclear, and understanding this process would improve the efficiency of photothermal CO2 release. Here we report the use of different cosolvents to improve or reduce the photothermal regeneration of CO2 captured by monoethanolamine. We found that properties that reduce the residence time of the gas bubbles (viscosity, boiling point, and convection direction) can enhance the regeneration efficiencies. The reduction of bubble residence times minimizes the reabsorption of CO2 back into the capture solvent where bulk temperatures remain lower than the localized area surrounding the nanoparticle. These properties shed light on the mechanism of release and indicated methods for improving the efficiency of the process. We used this knowledge to develop an improved photothermal CO2 regeneration system in a continuously flowing setup. Using techniques to reduce residence time in the continuously flowing setup, such as alternative cosolvents and smaller fluid volumes, resulted in regeneration efficiency enhancements of over 200%.

  1. Simulated 21st century's increase in oceanic suboxia by CO2-enhanced biotic carbon export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschlies, Andreas; Schulz, Kai G.; Riebesell, Ulf; Schmittner, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The primary impacts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on marine biogeochemical cycles predicted so far include ocean acidification, global warming induced shifts in biogeographical provinces, and a possible negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels by CO2-fertilized biological production. Here we report a new potentially significant impact on the oxygen-minimum zones of the tropical oceans. Using a model of global climate, ocean circulation, and biogeochemical cycling, we extrapolate mesocosm-derived experimental findings of a pCO2-sensitive increase in biotic carbon-to-nitrogen drawdown to the global ocean. For a simulation run from the onset of the industrial revolution until A.D. 2100 under a "business-as-usual" scenario for anthropogenic CO2 emissions, our model predicts a negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels, which amounts to 34 Gt C by the end of this century. While this represents a small alteration of the anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle, the model results reveal a dramatic 50% increase in the suboxic water volume by the end of this century in response to the respiration of excess organic carbon formed at higher CO2 levels. This is a significant expansion of the marine "dead zones" with severe implications not only for all higher life forms but also for oxygen-sensitive nutrient recycling and, hence, for oceanic nutrient inventories.

  2. NiCo2O4 spinel/ordered mesoporous carbons as noble-metal free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction and the influence of structure of catalyst support on the electrochemical activity of NiCo2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Li, Mian; Nsabimana, Anaclet; Guo, Liping

    2015-08-01

    Three ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) with different structures are used as catalyst supports for growth of NiCo2O4 spinel. The high surface area of OMCs provides more active sites to adsorb metal precursors. The porous structure confines the growth of NiCo2O4 and supplies more efficient transport passage for reactant molecules to access the active sites. Due to the structural characteristics of OMCs and catalytic properties of NiCo2O4, NiCo2O4/OMCs composites are highly active, cheap, and selective noble metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution. The electrochemical activity of NiCo2O4 supported on three OMCs with different structures, surface areas, pore sizes, pore volumes, and defective sites is studied. NiCo2O4/OMCs composites may be further used as efficient and inexpensive noble metal-free ORR catalysts in alkaline solution.

  3. The Werkendam natural CO2 accumulation: An analogue for CO2 storage in depleted oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Hangx, Suzanne; Kampman, Niko; Nover, Georg; Stanjek, Helge; Weniger, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    The Werkendam natural CO2 accumulation is hosted in the Röt (Early Triassic) sandstone of the West Netherlands Basin, at a depth of 2.8 km, about 20 km south-east of Rotterdam (NL). This reservoir, in a fault-bound structure, was oil-filled prior to charging with magmatic CO2 in the early Cretaceous. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to study long-term CO2-water-rock interactions in the presence of oil. This contribution will present the results of a detailed mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of core sections from the Werkendam CO2 reservoir and an adjacent, stratigraphically equivalent aquifer. X-ray diffraction combined with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry revealed that the reservoir samples contain substantially more feldspar and more barite and siderite than those from the aquifer, while the latter have higher hematite contents. These differences are attributed to the effects hydrocarbons and related fluids on diagenesis in the closed system of the CO2 reservoir versus the open-system of the aquifer. Petrophysical analyses yielded overall higher and more anisotropic permeability for the reservoir samples, while the porosity is overall not significantly different from that of their aquifer equivalents. The differences are most pronounced in coarse-grained sandstones. These have low anhydrite contents and contain traces of calcite, while all other analyzed samples contain abundant anhydrite, dolomite/ankerite and siderite, but no calcite. Detailed petrography revealed mm-sized zones of excessive primary porosity. These are attributed to CO2-induced dissolution of precompactional, grain-replacive anhydrite cement. Diagenetic dolomite/ankerite crystals are covered by anhedral, epitaxial ankerite, separated from the crystals by bitumen coats. Since these carbonates were oil-wet before CO2-charging, the overgrowths are interpreted to have grown after CO2-charging. Their anhedral habit suggests growth in a 2-phase water-CO2 system. Isotopic

  4. Ground-based integrated path coherent differential absorption lidar measurement of CO2: foothill target return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ishii

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT has made a great deal of effort to develop a coherent 2 μm differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL for measuring CO2 and wind speed. First, coherent Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA lidar experiments were conducted using the Co2DiaWiL and a foothill target (tree and ground surface located about 7.12 km south of NICT on 11, 27, and 28 December 2010. The detection sensitivity of a 2 μm IPDA lidar was examined in detail using the CO2 concentration measured by the foothill reflection. The precisions of CO2 measurements for the foothill target and 900, 4500 and 27 000 shot pairs were 6.5, 2.8, and 1.2%, respectively. The results indicated that a coherent IPDA lidar with a laser operating at a high pulse repetition frequency of a few tens of KHz is necessary for XCO2 (column-averaged dry air mixing ratio of CO2 measurement with a precision of 1–2 ppm in order to observe temporal and spatial variations in the CO2. Statistical comparisons indicated that, although a small amount of in situ data and the fact that they were not co-located with the foothill target made comparison difficult, the CO2 volume mixing ratio obtained by the Co2DiaWiL measurements for the foothill target and atmospheric returns was about −5 ppm lower than the 5 min running averages of the in situ sensor. Not only actual difference of sensing volume or the natural variability of CO2 but also the fluctuations of temperature could cause this difference. The statistical results indicated that there were no biases between the foothill target and atmospheric return measurements. The 2 μm coherent IPDA lidar can detect the CO2 volume mixing ratio change of 3% in the 5 min signal integration. In order to detect the position of the foothill target, to measure a range with a high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio, and to reduce uncertainty due to the presence of aerosols and clouds, it is

  5. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF CO2 DIRECT HYDROGENATION REACTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Fahai; Liu Dianhua; Hou Qiushi; Fang Dingye

    2001-01-01

    CO2 hydrogenation is one of important routes for the activation and effective utilization of CO2. In this paper, eighteen CO2 direct hydrogenation reactions are listed and their reaction heats and equilibrium constants are calculated. On the assumption that the reactions of CO2 and H2 are in stoichiometric ratio and the amount of whole reactants is one mole, the equilibrium conversions of CO2 are obtained.

  6. Parameterization of atmosphere–surface exchange of CO2 over sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Jensen, Bjarne; Glud, Ronnie;

    2014-01-01

    are discussed. We found the flux to be small during the late winter with fluxes in both directions. Not surprisingly we find that the resistance across the surface controls the fluxes and detailed knowledge of the brine volume and carbon chemistry within the brines as well as knowledge of snow cover and carbon...... chemistry in the ice are essential to estimate the partial pressure of pCO2 and CO2 flux. Further investigations of surface structure and snow cover and driving parameters such as heat flux, radiation, ice temperature and brine processes are required to adequately parameterize the surface resistance.......We suggest the application of a flux parameterization commonly used over terrestrial areas for calculation of CO2 fluxes over sea ice surfaces. The parameterization is based on resistance analogy.We present a concept for parameterization of the CO2 fluxes over sea ice suggesting to use properties...

  7. Respiratory Dialysis: Reduction in Dependence on Mechanical Ventilation by Venovenous Extracorporeal CO2 Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    console. Arterial tension of oxy- gen ( PaO2 , mm Hg) and CO2 (PaCO2, mm Hg) were measured at baseline, 2 hrs after insertion of the Hemolung and every 6 hrs... PaO2 was lower at 2 hrs, whereas PaCO2 was higher at 48 and 72 hrs after inser- tion when compared to baseline values (Table 1). The pH was unchanged...Tidal volume, mL 650 14 556 24 576 9 574 15 578 15 .087 .084 .16 .18 PaO2 , mm Hg 96 2 77 5 a 103 8 97 16 112 8 .04 .94 .55 .08 PaCO2

  8. Study on Critical Properties for CO2+Cosolvent Binary System and Ternary System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬畅; 吴向阳; 曹维良

    2002-01-01

    The performance of supercritical fluid (SCF) as a solvent can be greatly affected by addition of anentrainer to the system. In this study, a constant volume visual method is used to measure the critical point ofCO2+n-butyraldehyde, CO2+ i-butyraldehyde and CO2+alcohol binary systems and CO2+entrainer+trisodiumsalt of tri-(m-sulfonphenyl)phosphine (TPPTS) ternary systems, which provides us good theoretical basis for super-critical extraction and chemical reaction. The relationship between critical point and concentration of the entrainerare discussed. The phase behavior of binary system and that of ternary system are compared. The relationshipbetween the concentration of TPPTS and critical point of binary systems are also discussed.

  9. Solubilities of CO2 in some glycol ethers under high pressure by experimental determination and correlation☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang; Zhi Yun; Zhigang Tang; Xia Gui

    2016-01-01

    The binary vapor–liquid equilibrium data of CO2 in diethylene glycol (monomethyl, monoethyl, monobutyl, di-methyl, diethyl, dibutyl) ether were determined from 288.15 to 318.15 K at pressure up to 6 MPa based on the constant-volume method. It was found by contrast that the ether group in solvents can promote the CO2 absorp-tion, but the hydroxyl group will inhibit the CO2 absorption. Furthermore, the solubilities of CO2 showed an up-ward trend with the increasing molecular lengths of absorbents. The experimental data were also correlated with a modified Patel–Teja equation of state (PT EOS) combined with the traditional van der Waals one-fluid mixing rules and the results showed a satisfactory agreement between the model and the experimental data.

  10. Method for tracing simulated CO2 leak in terrestrial environment with a 13CO2 tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Christophe; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Facilities for the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes will be designed to prevent any leakage from the defined 'storage complex'. However, developing regulations and guidance throughout the world (e.g. the EC Directive and the USEPA Vulnerability Evaluation Framework) recognize the importance of assessing the potential for environmental impacts from CO2 storage. RISCS, a European (FP7) project, aims to improve understanding of those impacts that could plausibly occur in the hypothetical case that unexpected leakage occurs. As part of the RISCS project the potential impacts that an unexpected CO2 leaks might have on a cropland ecosystems was investigated. A CO2 exposure field experiment based on CO2 injection at 85 cm depth under an oats culture was designed. To facilitate the characterization of the simulated leaking zone the gas used for injection was produced from natural gas and had a δ13C of -46‰. The aim of the present communication is to depict how the injected gas was traced within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum using 13CO2 continuous cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS). Four subsurface experimental injection plots (6m x 3m) were set up. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, the field experiment was designed as to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient for each plot. For this purpose gas supply pipes were inserted at one extremity of each plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under the clayey plough layer of Norwegian moraine soils. Soil CO2 concentration and isotopic signature were punctually recorded: 1) in the soil at 20 cm depth at 6 positions distributed on the central transect, 2) at the surface following a (50x50 cm) grid sampling pattern, and 3) in the canopy atmosphere at 10, 20, 30 cm along three longitudinal transects (seven sampling point per transect). Soil CO2 fluxes and isotopic signature were finally

  11. Effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on soil CO2 efflux in a young longleaf pine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) can affect the quantity and quality of plant tissues which will impact carbon (C) cycling and storage in plant/soil systems and the release of CO2 back to the atmosphere. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated CO2 on soil CO2 efflux to predi...

  12. Mechanisms of CO2 Capture into Monoethanolamine Solution with Different CO2 Loading during the Absorption/Desorption Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bihong; Guo, Bingsong; Zhou, Zuoming; Jing, Guohua

    2015-09-01

    Though the mechanism of MEA-CO2 system has been widely studied, there is few literature on the detailed mechanism of CO2 capture into MEA solution with different CO2 loading during absorption/desorption processes. To get a clear picture of the process mechanism, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to analyze the reaction intermediates under different CO2 loadings and detailed mechanism on CO2 absorption and desorption in MEA was evaluated in this work. The results demonstrated that the CO2 absorption in MEA started with the formation of carbamate according to the zwitterion mechanism, followed by the hydration of CO2 to form HCO3(-)/CO3(2-), and accompanied by the hydrolysis of carbamate. It is interesting to find that the existence of carbamate will be influenced by CO2 loading and that it is rather unstable at high CO2 loading. At low CO2 loading, carbamate is formed fast by the reaction between CO2 and MEA. At high CO2 loading, it is formed by the reaction of CO3(-)/CO3(2-) with MEA, and the formed carbamate can be easily hydrolyzed by H(+). Moreover, CO2 desorption from the CO2-saturated MEA solution was proved to be a reverse process of absorption. Initially, some HCO3(-) were heated to release CO2 and other HCO3(-) were reacted with carbamic acid (MEAH(+)) to form carbamate, and the carbamate was then decomposed to MEA and CO2.

  13. Anthropogenic CO2 emissions in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Houghton

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the regional contributions and trends of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions is critical to design mitigation strategies aimed at stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gases. Here we report CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and land use change in Africa for various time periods. Africa was responsible for an average of 500 TgC y−1 for the period 2000–2005. These emissions resulted from the combustion of fossil fuels (260 TgC y−1 and land use change (240 TgC y−1. Over this period, the African share of global emissions from land use change was 17%. For 2005, the last year reported in this study, African fossil fuel emissions were 285 TgC accounting for 3.7% of the global emissions. The 2000–2005 growth rate in African fossil fuel emissions was 3.2% y−1, very close to the global average. Fossil fuel emissions per capita in Africa are among the lowest in the world, at 0.32 tC y−1 compared to the global average of 1.2 tC y−1. The average amount of carbon (C emitted as CO2 to produce 1 US $ of Gross Domestic Product (GDP in Africa in 2005 was 187 gC/$, close to the world average of 199 gC/$. With the fastest population growth in the world and rising per capita GDP, Africa is likely to increase its share of global emissions over the coming decades although emissions from Africa will remain low compared to other continents.

  14. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O' Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  15. CO2刺激响应聚合物%CO2-Stimuli Responsive Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯岸超; 闫强; 袁金颖

    2012-01-01

    CO2刺激响应性聚合物是新近发展起来的一类智能型刺激响应聚合物,是指在通入和排出CO2后,聚合物性质能够发生可逆性变化的新型聚合物。由于调控过程中仅仅涉及CO2以及一些惰性气体而不引入其他杂质,因此具有多方面的潜在应用价值。本文调研了这方面的工作,综述了几类CO2刺激响应聚合物的合成及其自组装,并指出了CO2刺激响应聚合物的应用前景和发展方向。%CO2-stimuli responsive polymers are a class of newly developed smart stimuli responsive polymers, which usually refers to the polymers possessing reversible changes upon admission and emission of C02. Since the regulation process only involves CO2 and inert gases, without the introduction of other impurities, there are many potential applications in this field. This article summarized recent research progress on the preparation of C02- stimuli responsive polymers, followed by the discussion of their self-assembly, classifying in accordance with the C02-switchable groups, such as primary amine, amide and some specific polymer chains. The development prospect of this research field and its potential applications are also discussed.

  16. CO2 acclimation impacts leaf isoprene emissions: evidence from past to future CO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo; van der Laan, Annick; Dekker, Stefan; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Isoprene is emitted by many plant species as a side-product of photosynthesis. Once in the atmosphere, isoprene exhibits climate forcing through various feedback mechanisms. In order to quantify the climate feedbacks of biogenic isoprene emission it is crucial to establish how isoprene emissions are effected by plant acclimation to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. A promising development for modelling CO2-induced changes in isoprene emissions is the Leaf-Energetic-Status model (referred to as LES-model hereafter, see Harrison et al., 2013 and Morfopoulos et al., 2014). This model simulates isoprene emissions based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on the imbalance between the photosynthetic electron supply of reducing power and the electron demands of carbon fixation. The energetic imbalance is critically related to the photosynthetic electron transport capacity (Jmax) and the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vcmax). Here we compare predictions of the LES-model with observed isoprene emission responses of Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) specimen that acclimated to CO2 growth conditions representative of the last glacial, the present and the end of this century (200, 400 and 800 ppm, respectively) for two growing seasons. These plants were grown in walk-in growth chambers with tight control of light, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic biochemical parameters Vcmax and Jmax were determined with a Licor LI-6400XT photosynthesis system. The relationship between photosynthesis and isoprene emissions was measured by coupling the photosynthesis system with a Proton-Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. Our empirical results support the LES-model and show that the fractional allocation of carbon to isoprene biosynthesis is reduced in response to both short-term and long-term CO2 increases. In the short term, an increase in CO2 stimulates photosynthesis through an increase in the leaf interior CO2

  17. Clay hydration/dehydration in dry to water-saturated supercritical CO2: Implications for caprock integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Miller, Quin R.; Chen, Jeffrey; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Martin, Paul F.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide will displace formation water, and the pore space adjacent to overlying caprocks could eventually be dominated by dry to water-saturated scCO2. Wet scCO2 is highly reactive and capable of carbonating and hydrating certain minerals, whereas anhydrous scCO2 can dehydrate water-containing minerals. Because these geochemical processes affect solid volume and thus porosity and permeability, they have the potential to affect the long-term integrity of the caprock seal. In this study, we investigate the swelling and shrinkage of an expandable clay found in caprock formations, montmorillonite (Ca-STx-1), when exposed to variable water-content scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar using a combination of in situ probes, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), and in situ attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). We show that the extent of montmorillonite clay swelling/shrinkage is dependent not only on water hydration/dehydration, but also on CO2 intercalation reactions. Our results also suggest a competition between water and CO2 for interlayer residency where increasing concentrations of intercalated water lead to decreasing concentrations of intercalated CO2. Overall, this paper demonstrates the types of measurements required to develop fundamental knowledge that will enhance modeling efforts and reduce risks associated with subsurface storage of CO2.

  18. Effects of elevated CO2 levels on root morphological traits and Cd uptakes of two Lolium species under Cd stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan JIA; Shi-rong TANG; Xue-hai JU; Li-na SHU; Shu-xing TU; Ren-wei FENG; Lorenzino GIUSTI

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the combined effects of elevated CO2 levels and cadmium (Cd) on the root morphological traits and Cd accumulation in Lolium multifiorum Lam. and Lolium perenne L. exposed to two CO2 levels (360 and 1 000 μl/L) and three Cd levels (0, 4, and 16 mg/L) under hydroponic conditions. The results show that elevated levels of CO2 increased shoot biomass more, compared to root biomass, but decreased Cd concentrations in all plant tissues. Cd exposure caused toxicity to both Lolium species, as shown by the restrictions of the root morphological parameters including root length, surface area, volume, and tip numbers. These parameters were significantly higher under elevated levels of CO2 than under ambient CO2, especially for the number of fine roots. The increases in magnitudes of those parameters triggered by elevated levels of CO2 under Cd stress were more than those under non-Cd stress, suggesting an ameliorated Cd stress under elevated levels of CO2. The total Cd uptake per pot, calculated on the basis of biomass, was significantly greater under elevated levels of CO2 than under ambient CO2.Ameliorated Cd toxicity, decreased Cd concentration, and altered root morphological traits in both Lolium species under elevated levels of CO2 may have implications in food safety and phytoremediation.

  19. Comparative CO2 flux measurements by eddy covariance technique using open- and closed-path gas analysers over the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiyoshi Kondo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct comparison of air–sea CO2 fluxes by open-path eddy covariance (OPEC and closed-path eddy covariance (CPEC techniques was carried out over the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Previous studies over oceans have shown that the CO2 flux by OPEC was larger than the bulk CO2 flux using the gas transfer velocity estimated by the mass balance technique, while the CO2 flux by CPEC agreed with the bulk CO2 flux. We investigated a traditional conflict between the CO2 flux by the eddy covariance technique and the bulk CO2 flux, and whether the CO2 fluctuation attenuated using the closed-path analyser can be measured with sufficient time responses to resolve small CO2 flux over oceans. Our results showed that the closed-path analyser using a short sampling tube and a high volume air pump can be used to measure the small CO2 fluctuation over the ocean. Further, the underestimated CO2 flux by CPEC due to the attenuated fluctuation can be corrected by the bandpass covariance method; its contribution was almost identical to that of H2O flux. The CO2 flux by CPEC agreed with the total CO2 flux by OPEC with density correction; however, both of them are one order of magnitude larger than the bulk CO2 flux.

  20. Lateral Diffusion of CO2 in Leaves Is Not Sufficient to Support Photosynthesis[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James I.L.; Gallouët, Emily; Lawson, Tracy; Cornic, Gabriel; Herbin, Raphaèle; Baker, Neil R.

    2005-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of CO2 was investigated in photosynthesizing leaves with different anatomy by gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence imaging using grease to block stomata. When one-half of the leaf surface of the heterobaric species Helianthus annuus was covered by 4-mm-diameter patches of grease, the response of net CO2 assimilation rate (A) to intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) indicated that higher ambient CO2 concentrations (Ca) caused only limited lateral diffusion into the greased areas. When single 4-mm patches were applied to leaves of heterobaric Phaseolus vulgaris and homobaric Commelina communis, chlorophyll a fluorescence images showed dramatic declines in the quantum efficiency of photosystem II electron transport (measured as Fq′/Fm′) across the patch, demonstrating that lateral CO2 diffusion could not support A. The Fq′/Fm′ values were used to compute images of Ci across patches, and their dependence on Ca was assessed. At high Ca, the patch effect was less in C. communis than P. vulgaris. A finite-volume porous-medium model for assimilation rate and lateral CO2 diffusion was developed to analyze the patch images. The model estimated that the effective lateral CO2 diffusion coefficients inside C. communis and P. vulgaris leaves were 22% and 12% of that for free air, respectively. We conclude that, in the light, lateral CO2 diffusion cannot support appreciable photosynthesis over distances of more than approximately 0.3 mm in normal leaves, irrespective of the presence or absence of bundle sheath extensions, because of the CO2 assimilation by cells along the diffusion pathway. PMID:16113223

  1. The Influence of CO2 Solubility in Brine on Simulation of CO2 Injection into Water Flooded Reservoir and CO2 WAG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2010-01-01

    Injection of CO2 into depleted oil reservoirs is not only a traditional way to enhance oil recovery but also a relatively cheaper way to sequester CO2 underground since the increased oil production can offset some sequestration cost. CO2 injection process is often applied to water flooded...... reservoirs and in many situations alternating injection of water and CO2 is required to stabilize the injection front. Both scenarios involve a large amount of water, making CO2 solubility in brine, which is around ten times higher than methane solubility, a non-negligible factor in the relevant reservoir...... simulations. In our previous study, a 1-D slimtube simulator, which rigorously accounts for both CO2 solubility in brine and water content in hydrocarbon phases using the Peng-Robinson EoS modified by Soreide and Whitson, has been used to investigate the influence of CO2 solubility on the simulation...

  2. Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

    2009-04-01

    Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and authorities - need to be confident of the security of the planned storage operation as well as the long term security of storage. A very important point is to show that the technical risks of CO2 storage can be managed with the help of a proper short and long term monitoring concept, as well as appropriate mitigation technologies e.g adequate abandonment procedures for leaking wells. To better explain the possible risks examples for leakage scenarios help the public to assess and to accept the technical risks of CO2 storage. At Ketzin we tried the following approach that can be summed up on the basis: Always tell the truth! This might be self-evident but it has to be stressed that credibility is of vital importance. Suspiciousness and distrust are best friends of fear. Undefined fear seems to be the major risk in public acceptance of geological CO2-storage. Misinformation and missing communication further enhance the denial of geological CO2 storage. When we started to plan and establish the Ketzin storage site, we ensured a forward directed communication. Offensive information activities, an information centre on site, active media politics and open information about the activities taking place are basics. Some of the measures were: - information of the competent authorities through meetings (mayor, governmental authorities) - information of the local public, e.g. hearings (while also inviting local, regional and nation wide media) - we always treated the local people and press first! - organizing of bigger events to inform the public on site, e.g. start of drilling activities (open

  3. Translating crustacean biological responses from CO2 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many studies of animal responses to ocean acidification focus on uniformly conditioned age cohorts that lack complexities typically found in wild populations. These studies have become the primary data source for predicting higher level ecological effects, but the roles of intraspecific interactions in re-shaping biological, demographic and evolutionary responses are not commonly considered. To explore this problem, I assessed responses in the mysid Americamysis bahia to bubbling of CO2-enriched and un-enriched air into the seawater supply in flow-through aquariums. I conducted one experiment using isolated age cohorts and a separate experiment using intact populations. The seawater supply was continuously input from Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA). The 28-day cohort study was maintained without resource or spatial limitations, whereas the 5-month population study consisted of stage-structured populations that were allowed to self-regulate. These differences are common features of experiments and were intentionally retained to demonstrate the effect of methodological approaches on perceptions of effect mechanisms. The CO2 treatment reduced neonate abundance in the cohort experiment (24% reduction due to a mean pH difference of −0.27) but not in the population experiment, where effects were small and were strongest for adult and stage 1 survival (3% change due to a mean pH difference of −0.25). I also found evidence of competition in the population exper

  4. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  5. On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-14

    Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

  6. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  7. CO(2) Inhibits Respiration in Leaves of Rumex crispus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, J S; Koch, G W; Bloom, A J

    1992-02-01

    Curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) was grown from seed in a glasshouse at an ambient CO(2) partial pressure of about 35 pascals. Apparent respiration rate (CO(2) efflux in the dark) of expanded leaves was then measured at ambient CO(2) partial pressure of 5 to 95 pascals. Calculated intercellular CO(2) partial pressure was proportional to ambient CO(2) partial pressure in these short-term experiments. The CO(2) level strongly affected apparent respiration rate: a doubling of the partial pressure of CO(2) typically inhibited respiration by 25 to 30%, whereas a decrease in CO(2) elicited a corresponding increase in respiration. These responses were readily reversible. A flexible, sensitive regulatory interaction between CO(2) (a byproduct of respiration) and some component(s) of heterotrophic metabolism is indicated.

  8. Investigation of CO2 precursors in roasted coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuju; Lim, Loong-Tak

    2017-03-15

    Two CO2 formation pathways (chlorogenic acid (CGA) degradation and Maillard reaction) during coffee roasting were investigated. CGA is shown not a major contributor to CO2 formation, as heating of this compound under typical roasting conditions did not release a large quantity of CO2. However, heating of a CGA moiety, caffeic acid, resulted in high yield of CO2 (>98%), suggesting that CGA hydrolysis could be the rate limiting step for CO2 formation from CGA. A large amount of CO2 was detected from glycine-sucrose model system under coffee roasting conditions, implying the importance of Maillard reactions in CO2 formation. Further studies on the heating of various components isolated from green coffee beans showed that CO2 was generated from various green coffee components, including water insoluble proteins and polysaccharides. Around 50% of CO2 was formed from thermal reactions of lower molecular weight compounds that represent ∼25% by weight in green coffee.

  9. Amine modeling for CO2 capture: internals selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Prakash; Aichele, Clint P

    2013-04-16

    Traditionally, trays have been the mass-transfer device of choice in amine absorption units. However, the need to process large volumes of flue gas to capture CO2 and the resultant high costs of multiple trains of large trayed columns have prompted process licensors and vendors to investigate alternative mass-transfer devices. These alternatives include third-generation random packings and structured packings. Nevertheless, clear-cut guidelines for selection of packings for amine units are lacking. This paper provides well-defined guidelines and a consistent framework for the choice of mass-transfer devices for amine absorbers and regenerators. This work emphasizes the role played by the flow parameter, a measure of column liquid loading and pressure, in the type of packing selected. In addition, this paper demonstrates the significant economic advantage of packings over trays in terms of capital costs (CAPEX) and operating costs (OPEX).

  10. Intraspecific variation in juvenile tree growth under elevated CO2 alone and with O3: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resco de Dios, Víctor; Mereed, Tessema E; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Tissue, David T; Voltas, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are expected to increase throughout this century, potentially fostering tree growth. A wealth of studies have examined the variation in CO2 responses across tree species, but the extent of intraspecific variation in response to elevated CO2 (eCO2) has, so far, been examined in individual studies and syntheses of published work are currently lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of eCO2 on tree growth (height, stem biomass and stem volume) and photosynthesis across genotypes to examine whether there is genetic variation in growth responses to eCO2 and to understand their dependence on photosynthesis. We additionally examined the interaction between the responses to eCO2 and ozone (O3), another global change agent. Most of the published studies so far have been conducted in juveniles and in Populus spp., although the patterns observed were not species dependent. All but one study reported significant genetic variation in stem biomass, and the magnitude of intraspecific variation in response to eCO2 was similar in magnitude to previous analyses on interspecific variation. Growth at eCO2 was predictable from growth at ambient CO2 (R(2) = 0.60), and relative rankings of genotype performance were preserved across CO2 levels, indicating no significant interaction between genotypic and environmental effects. The growth response to eCO2 was not correlated with the response of photosynthesis (P > 0.1), and while we observed 57.7% average increases in leaf photosynthesis, stem biomass and volume increased by 36 and 38.5%, respectively, and height only increased by 9.5%, suggesting a predominant role for carbon allocation in ultimately driving the response to eCO2 Finally, best-performing genotypes under eCO2 also responded better under eCO2 and elevated O3 Further research needs include widening the study of intraspecific variation beyond the genus Populus and examining the interaction between eCO2 and

  11. Reducing CO2 from shipping – do non-CO2 effects matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Eide

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Shipping is a growing sector in the global economy, and it contributions to global CO2 emissions are expected to increase. CO2 emissions from the world shipping fleet will likely be regulated in the near future, and studies have shown that significant emission reductions can be achieved at low cost. Regulations are being discussed for both existing ships as well as for future additions to the fleet. In this study a plausible CO2 emission reduction inventory is constructed for the cargo fleet existing in 2010, as well as for container ships, bulk ships and tankers separately. In the reduction inventories, CO2 emissions are reduced by 25–32% relative to baseline by applying 15 technical and operational emission reduction measures in accordance with a ship-type-specific cost-effectiveness criterion, and 9 other emission compounds are changed as a technical implication of reducing CO2. The overall climate and environmental effects of the changes to all 10 emission components in the reduction inventory are assessed using a chemical transport model, radiative forcing (RF models and a simple climate model. We find substantial environmental and health benefits with up to 5% reduction in surface ozone levels, 15% reductions in surface sulfate and 10% reductions in wet deposition of sulfate in certain regions exposed to heavy ship traffic. The major ship types show distinctly different contributions in specific locations. For instance, the container fleet contributes 50% of the sulfate decline on the west coast of North America. The global radiative forcing from a 1 yr emission equal to the difference between baseline and reduction inventory shows an initial strong positive forcing from non-CO2 compounds. This warming effect is due to reduced cooling by aerosols and methane. After approximately 25 yr, the non-CO2 forcing is balanced by the CO2 forcing. For the global mean temperature change, we find a shift from warming to cooling after approximately 60

  12. CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques

    CERN Document Server

    Bouallou, Chakib

    2010-01-01

    This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents.

  13. Reducing CO2 from shipping - do non-CO2 effects matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, M. S.; Dalsøren, S. B.; Endresen, Ø.; Samset, B.; Myhre, G.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Berntsen, T.

    2013-04-01

    Shipping is a growing sector in the global economy, and it contributions to global CO2 emissions are expected to increase. CO2 emissions from the world shipping fleet will likely be regulated in the near future, and studies have shown that significant emission reductions can be achieved at low cost. Regulations are being discussed for both existing ships as well as for future additions to the fleet. In this study a plausible CO2 emission reduction inventory is constructed for the cargo fleet existing in 2010, as well as for container ships, bulk ships and tankers separately. In the reduction inventories, CO2 emissions are reduced by 25-32% relative to baseline by applying 15 technical and operational emission reduction measures in accordance with a ship-type-specific cost-effectiveness criterion, and 9 other emission compounds are changed as a technical implication of reducing CO2. The overall climate and environmental effects of the changes to all 10 emission components in the reduction inventory are assessed using a chemical transport model, radiative forcing (RF) models and a simple climate model. We find substantial environmental and health benefits with up to 5% reduction in surface ozone levels, 15% reductions in surface sulfate and 10% reductions in wet deposition of sulfate in certain regions exposed to heavy ship traffic. The major ship types show distinctly different contributions in specific locations. For instance, the container fleet contributes 50% of the sulfate decline on the west coast of North America. The global radiative forcing from a 1 yr emission equal to the difference between baseline and reduction inventory shows an initial strong positive forcing from non-CO2 compounds. This warming effect is due to reduced cooling by aerosols and methane. After approximately 25 yr, the non-CO2 forcing is balanced by the CO2 forcing. For the global mean temperature change, we find a shift from warming to cooling after approximately 60 yr. The major ship

  14. Factors affecting the direct mineralization of CO2 with olivine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soonchul Kwon; Maohong Fan; Herbert F. M. DaCosta; Armistead G. Russell

    2011-01-01

    Olivine,one of the most abundant minerals existing in nature,is explored as a CO2 carbonation agent for direct carbonation of CO2 in flue gas.Olivine based CO2 capture is thermodynamically favorable and can form a stable carbonate for long-term storage.Experimental results have shown that water vapor plays an important role in improving CO2 carbonation rate and capacities.Other operation conditions including reaction temperature,initial CO2 concentration,residence time corresponding to the flow rate of CO2 gas stream,and water vapor concentration also considerably affect the performance of the technology.

  15. Factors affecting the direct mineralization of CO2 with olivine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soonchul; Fan, Maohong; DaCosta, Herbert F M; Russell, Armistead G

    2011-01-01

    Olivine, one of the most abundant minerals existing in nature, is explored as a CO2 carbonation agent for direct carbonation of CO2 in flue gas. Olivine based CO2 capture is thermodynamically favorable and can form a stable carbonate for long-term storage. Experimental results have shown that water vapor plays an important role in improving CO2 carbonation rate and capacities. Other operation conditions including reaction temperature, initial CO2 concentration, residence time corresponding to the flow rate of CO2 gas stream, and water vapor concentration also considerably affect the performance of the technology.

  16. Supercritical CO2 as a substitute of volatile hydrocarbons; Superkritisch CO2 vervangt vluchtige koolwaterstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, G. (ed.)

    2006-05-15

    In many cases supercritical carbon dioxide can replace volatile hydrocarbons in extraction processes. Currently gaseous or liquid CO2 is already used for industrial purification processes, extraction of caffeine from coffee and as a solvent for paint. Although supercritical extraction s a batch process the technique can be applied as a continuous process. [Dutch] In processen waar vluchtige koolwaterstoffen worden ingezet om stoffen te extraheren, biedt superkritisch CO2 een milieuvriendelijk alternatief. Het koolzuur dat zowel in de vloeistof- als gasfase zit, wordt dan ook steeds meer ingezet in extractieprocessen.

  17. Responses of soil CO2 efflux to changes in plant CO2 uptake and transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, János; de Luca, Giulia; Mészáros, Ádám; Trieber, Júlia; Gecse, Bernadett; Fóti, Szilvia; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Biotic drivers of soil respiration represent a significant supply-side (plant) control of the process. Those biotic drivers that integrate over longer time periods are useful in describing the phenological changes and physiological state of the vegetation, but they are not suitable to explain the diel variability of soil respiration. Two plant physiological processes, acting in opposite directions, could be relevant at diel timescale: (1) photosynthesis, and (2) transpiration. Firstly, it was recently found that photosynthesis has a time-lagged (a few hours) positive effect on the respiration of roots and root-associated microbes. This can be explainedby an increase in easily accessible non-structural hydrocarbon sources for the roots and root-associated organisms within this period. Secondly, it was found that the effect of transpiration could reduce root respiration due to CO2 transport through the transpiration stream, and this effect is expected to be immediate. Removing the effect of the abiotic drivers from the soil efflux signal could help to clarify the role of other driving variables. In the present study, we conducted manipulation measurements in lab environment to be able to detect the effects of the plant physiological variables (CO2 uptake, transpiration) on soil CO2 efflux. Plant individuals were planted into field soil samples in small pots. Transpiration manipulation was done by regulating vapour pressure of the air around the plant canopy and by inhibitors. Photosynthesis manipulation consisted of programmed absence of light. Isotopic signatures of soil respiration were used for estimating the contribution of the autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration components. 13CO2 concentration of the CO2 efflux of the different soil components was measured continuously in open system by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro G1101-i gas analyser). Keeling-plot approach was also used to calculate the isotopic signals of the sources. According to the

  18. The Study on CO2 Immiscible Mechanism in Low Permeability Reservoir%特低渗透油藏CO2非混相驱油机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明国; 李金珠; 王忠滨

    2011-01-01

    Because Shu l01 well area of Daqing Oilfield is low permeability reservoir, with reservoir conditions, through a series of laboratory experiments, the CO2 flooding mechanism is determined. Research shows that with the increased CO2 injection, dissolved gas oil ratio, volume expansion coefficient and coefficient increases, viscosity decreases, bound water volume expansion. When injection CO2 with 27 MPa, 1. 484 7 times the volume expansion of oil formation, the residual oil saturation decreased 11.43 %, formation of oil viscosity decreases the viscosity of 48.51% to the original, bound water volume expansion 1. 132 4 times. At the same time reducing the formation pressure from 27 MPa to the original formation pressure, the expansion will depend on dissolved CO2 can be taken out of crude oil 15.49%. In addition, after the injection of CO2, CO2-formation reduces the interfacial tension of oil, CO2 can lead light hydrocarbons in the formation of oil extraction and vaporization, thereby improving oil recovery.%针对大庆油田树101井区特低渗透油层,结合油藏条件,通过一系列室内实验,确定了CO2驱油机理.研究表明:随着CO2注入量增加,溶解油气比、体积系数和膨胀系数增大,黏度降低,束缚水体积膨胀.在27 MPa下注入CO2,地层油体积膨胀1.4847倍,残余油饱和度降低11.43%,地层油黏度降低到原黏度的48.51%,束缚水体积膨胀1.132 4倍.同时当地层压力从27 MPa降低到原始地层压力后,依靠溶解CO2膨胀能,可采出原油15.49%.此外,注入CO2后,CO2-地层油的界面张力降低,CO2可使地层油中的轻质烃抽提和汽化,从而提高采收率.

  19. 沼气中CO2含量对沼气灶性能的影响及对策%Effects and countermeasures of CO2 content in biogas on performance of biogas stove

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴万能; 秦朝葵; 杨贤潮; 马飞

    2011-01-01

    采用天然气掺混CO2的方法模拟沼气,在CO2体积分数为30%~50%条件下,测试了典型家用沼气灶的热工性能,研究了应对沼气气质变化的措施.结果表明:随C02含量的降低,沼气灶热流量增大,热效率升高,烟气中CO浓度升高,NOx浓度无显著变化.热流量大于3.26 kW时,现行测试方法不能真实反映热效率与CO2含量的关系.沼气中CO2含量的变化会显著改变沼气灶的热工性能,可能增加用户的抱怨和安全风险.在CO2体积分数小于40%时,根据CO2含量调整供气压力,可使灶具热流量保持稳定,并显著改善CO排放,可能成为沼气组分含量变化的应对措施.%The thermal performance of a typical domestic biogas stove supplied with biogas of different CO2 volume fractions was investigated. Possible technical measures in response to variations in biogas composition were studied as well. Mixed gas of natural gas and CO2 were produced so as to simulate the biogas in which CO2 volume fraction varied from 50% to 30%. With the decrease of CO2 percentage in the mixture, it was found that heat output, heat efficiency and CO emission increased, while NOX emission did not change significantly. When heat output was greater than 3.26 kW, the current testing method could not reflect the relationship between thermal efficiency and CO2 ratio exactly. Variations in the CO2 content in biogas significantly affected the thermal performance of the biogas stove, which maight increase complaints and security risks. When the volume fraction of CO2 was less than 40%, regulating the biogas pressure according to the CO2 content so as to stabilize heat output could significantly improve the CO emission, which may be regarded as a measure to cope with variations of CO2 content in biogas.

  20. Synthesis of NiCo2O4 nanostructures with different morphologies for the removal of methyl orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yaxi; Li, Haizhen; Ruan, Zhongyuan; Cui, Guijia; Yan, Shiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Aiming to investigate the adsorption removal performance of NiCo2O4 as water purification adsorbents, magnetic materials NiCo2O4 with six different morphologies were successfully synthesized by a facile method. NiCo2O4 with six different morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption, vibrating sample magnetometry and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry. In this study, we mainly explored the effect of specific surface area, pore volume and pore size on the performance for the removal of methyl orange, and the adsorption capacity followed an order of (b) NiCo2O4 nanorods > (e) balsam-like NiCo2O4 > (f) rose-like NiCo2O4 > (d) NiCo2O4 nanoribbons > (a) NiCo2O4 flowerlike nanostructures > (c) dandelion-like NiCo2O4 spheres. The results indicated that NiCo2O4 nanorods exhibited better adsorption performance. The reasons for the excellent adsorption capacity of NiCo2O4 nanorods were also discussed in depth by analyzing scale and surface characteristics. Besides, NiCo2O4 could be easily recovered from solution, which may avoid potential secondary pollution. Moreover, adsorption kinetics, the influence of pH and adsorption mechanism were comprehensively investigated. This finding indicated that NiCo2O4 were promising adsorbents for water purification.

  1. Consistent phase-change modeling for CO2-based heat mining operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Veje, Christian

    2017-01-01

    –gas phase transition with more accuracy and consistency. Calculation of fluid properties and saturation state were based on the volume translated Peng–Robinson equation of state and results verified. The present model has been applied to a scenario to simulate a CO2-based heat mining process. In this paper...

  2. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  3. CO2 Sequestration and Recycle by Photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven S.C. Chuang

    2004-02-01

    Visible light-photocatalysis could provide a cost-effective route to recycle CO2 to useful chemicals or fuels. Research is planned to study the reactivity of adsorbates, their role in the photosynthesis reaction, and their relation to the nature of surface sites during photosynthesis of methanol and hydrocarbons from CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O. The year two research focus catalyst screening and IR studies. Key research results show Pd/TiO2 exhibits the highest activity for hydrocarbon synthesis from photocatalytic reactions. The in situ IR could successfully monitor the adsorbate hydrocarbon species on Cu/TiO2. Year III research will focus on developing a better understanding of the key factors which control the catalyst activity.

  4. Beam profile analyzer for CO2 lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of an optoelectronic system to analyze the beam intensity profile of CO2 lasers is presented herein. The device collects the beam profile with a LiTaO3 pyroelectric detector and uses a sampling technique based on the acquisition of horizontal sections at different levels. The digital signal processing includes subroutines that drop down two dimensional and three dimensional beam profile displays to determine the laser beam parameters of optical power, peak pixel location, centroid location and width of the laser beam, with algorithms based on the ISO 11146 standard. With the systematic calibration of the analyzer was obtained in the measurement of power an error under 5%, for a 20–200 W range and an error under 1.6% for spatial measurements of a TEM00 laser. By design, the analyzer can be used during the laser process.

  5. CO2 breakthrough pressure and permeability for unsaturated low-permeability sandstone of the Ordos Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yu, Qingchun

    2017-07-01

    With rising threats from greenhouse gases, capture and injection of CO2 into suitable underground formations is being considered as a method to reduce anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. As the injected CO2 will remain in storage for hundreds of years, the safety of CO2 geologic sequestration is a major concern. The low-permeability sandstone of the Ordos Basin in China is regarded as both caprock and reservoir rock, so understanding the breakthrough pressure and permeability of the rock is necessary. Because part of the pore volume experiences a non-wetting phase during the CO2 injection and migration process, the rock may be in an unsaturated condition. And if accidental leakage occurs, CO2 will migrate up into the unsaturated zone. In this study, breakthrough experiments were performed at various degrees of water saturation with five core samples of low-permeability sandstone obtained from the Ordos Basin. The experiments were conducted at 40 °C and pressures of >8 MPa to simulate the geological conditions for CO2 sequestration. The results indicate that the degree of water saturation and the pore structure are the main factors affecting the rock breakthrough pressure and permeability, since the influence of calcite dissolution and clay mineral swelling during the saturation process is excluded. Increasing the average pore radius or most probable pore radius leads to a reduction in the breakthrough pressure and an increase by several orders of magnitude in scCO2 effective permeability. In addition, the breakthrough pressure rises and the scCO2 effective permeability decreases when the water saturation increases. However, when the average pore radius is greater than 0.151 μm, the degree of water saturation will has a little effect on the breakthrough pressure. On this foundation, if the most probable pore radius of the core sample reaches 1.760 μm, the breakthrough pressure will not be impacted by the increasing water saturation. We establish

  6. CO2 laser milling of hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Klasing, Manfred; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Drilling of bone and tooth tissue belongs to recurrent medical procedures (screw- and pin-bores, bores for implant inserting, trepanation etc.). Small round bores can be in general quickly produced with mechanical drills. Problems arise however by angled drilling, by the necessity to fulfill the drilling without damaging of sensitive soft tissue beneath the bone, or by the attempt to mill precisely noncircular small cavities. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The "milling" is done with a CO2 laser (10.6 μm) with pulse duration of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled galvanic beam scanner and with a fine water-spray, which helps to avoid thermal side-effects. The damaging of underlying soft tissue can be prevented through control of the optical or acoustical ablation signal. The ablation of hard tissue is accompanied with a strong glowing, which is absent during the laser beam action on soft tissue. The acoustic signals from the diverse tissue types exhibit distinct differences in the spectral composition. Also computer image analysis could be a useful tool to control the operation. Laser "milling" of noncircular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth is particularly interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser "milling" of the cavities without thermal damage and with minimal tapering. It included exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines and their combinations), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, optimal position of the spray. The optimized results give evidences for the applicability of the CO2 laser for biologically tolerable "milling" of deep cavities in the hard tissue.

  7. CO2 chemoreception in cardiorespiratory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Robert W

    2010-06-01

    Considerable progress has been made elucidating the cellular signals and ion channel targets involved in the response to increased CO2/H+ of brain stem neurons from chemosensitive regions. Intracellular pH (pHi) does not exhibit recovery from an acid load when extracellular pH (pHo) is also acid. This lack of pHi recovery is an essential but not unique feature of all chemosensitive neurons. These neurons have pH-regulating transporters, especially Na+/H+ exchangers, but some may also contain HCO3--dependent transporters as well. Studies in locus ceruleus (LC) neurons have shown that firing rate will increase in response to decreased pHi or pHo but not in response to increased CO2 alone. A number of K+ channels, as well as other channels, have been suggested to be targets of these pH changes with a fall of pH inhibiting these channels. In neurons from some regions it appears that multiple signals and multiple channels are involved in their chemosensitive response while in neurons from other regions a single signal and/or channel may be involved. Despite the progress, a number of key issues remain to be studied. A detailed study of chemosensitive signaling needs to be done in neurons from more brain stem regions. Fully describing the chemosensitive signaling pathways in brain stem neurons will offer new targets for therapies to alter the strength of central chemosensitivity and will yield new insights into the reason why there are multiple central chemoreceptive sites.

  8. Enhanced transport phenomena in CO2 sequestration and CO2 EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.

    2009-01-01

    The results of this thesis give insight into the (mass)-transfer during flow of gases, especially CO2, in various gas-liquid systems. A number of experiments was performed to investigate the transport phenomena through interfaces with and without surfactant monolayers. The observed phenomena have be

  9. Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.

    2011-06-08

    This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

  10. CO2-ECBM and CO2 Sequestration in Polish Coal Seam – Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Baran

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: The results indicate successful sorption of carbon dioxide in each experiment. This provides the rationale to study the application of the coal tested to obtain methane genetic origin genetic methane with the use of the CO2 injection.

  11. Enhanced transport phenomena in CO2 sequestration and CO2 EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.

    2009-01-01

    The results of this thesis give insight into the (mass)-transfer during flow of gases, especially CO2, in various gas-liquid systems. A number of experiments was performed to investigate the transport phenomena through interfaces with and without surfactant monolayers. The observed phenomena have be

  12. Enhanced transport phenomena in CO2 sequestration and CO2 EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.

    2009-01-01

    The results of this thesis give insight into the (mass)-transfer during flow of gases, especially CO2, in various gas-liquid systems. A number of experiments was performed to investigate the transport phenomena through interfaces with and without surfactant monolayers. The observed phenomena have

  13. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; García-Mateos, Francisco José; Rosas, Juana; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Cordero, Tomás

    2016-05-01

    A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2). In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt). Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  14. Nitrogen-rich porous adsorbents for CO2 capture and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Zhou; Zhao, Yanli

    2013-08-01

    The construction of physical or chemical adsorbents for CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) is a vital technology in the interim period on the way towards a sustainable low-carbon future. The search for efficient materials to satisfy the increasing demand for CCS has become extremely important. Porous materials, including porous silica, porous carbons, and newly developed metal-organic frameworks and porous organic polymers, possessing regular and well-defined porous geometry and having a high surface area and pore volume, have been widely studied for separations on laboratory scale. On account of the dipole-quadrupole interactions between the polarizable CO2 molecule and the accessible nitrogen site, the investigations have indicated that the incorporation of accessible nitrogen-donor groups into the pore walls of porous materials can improve the affinity to CO2 and increase the CO2 uptake capacity and selectivity. The CO2 -adsorption process based on solid nitrogen-rich porous adsorbents does generally not require heating of a large amount of water (60-70 wt%) for regeneration, while such a heating approach cannot be avoided in the regeneration of amine-based solution absorption processes. Thus, nitrogen-rich porous adsorbents show good regeneration properties without sacrificing high separation efficiency. As such, nitrogen-rich porous materials as highly promising CO2 adsorbents have been broadly fabricated and intensively investigated. This Focus Review highlights recent significant advances in nitrogen-rich porous materials for CCS.

  15. Supercritical CO2 Foaming of Radiation Cross-Linked Isotactic Polypropylene in the Presence of TAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Guang Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the maximum foaming temperature window is only about 4 °C for supercritical CO2 (scCO2 foaming of pristine polypropylene, it is important to raise the melt strength of polypropylene in order to more easily achieve scCO2 foaming. In this work, radiation cross-linked isotactic polypropylene, assisted by the addition of a polyfunctional monomer (triallylisocyanurate, TAIC, was employed in the scCO2 foaming process in order to understand the benefits of radiation cross-linking. Due to significantly enhanced melt strength and the decreased degree of crystallinity caused by cross-linking, the scCO2 foaming behavior of polypropylene was dramatically changed. The cell size distribution, cell diameter, cell density, volume expansion ratio, and foaming rate of radiation-cross-linked polypropylene under different foaming conditions were analyzed and compared. It was found that radiation cross-linking favors the foamability and formation of well-defined cell structures. The optimal absorbed dose with the addition of 2 wt % TAIC was 30 kGy. Additionally, the foaming temperature window was expanded to about 8 °C, making the handling of scCO2 foaming of isotactic polypropylene much easier.

  16. Modeling of CO2 solubility in single and mixed electrolyte solutions using statistical associating fluid theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2016-03-01

    Statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) is used to model CO2 solubilities in single and mixed electrolyte solutions. The proposed SAFT model implements an improved mean spherical approximation in the primitive model to represent the electrostatic interactions between ions, using a parameter K to correct the excess energies ("KMSA" for short). With the KMSA formalism, the proposed model is able to describe accurately mean ionic activity coefficients and liquid densities of electrolyte solutions including Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, Br- and SO42- from 298.15 K to 473.15 K using mostly temperature independent parameters, with sole exception being the volume of anions. CO2 is modeled as a non-associating molecule, and temperature-dependent CO2-H2O and CO2-ion cross interactions are used to obtain CO2 solubilities in H2O and in single ion electrolyte solutions. Without any additional fitting parameters, CO2 solubilities in mixed electrolyte solutions and synthetic brines are predicted, in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  17. Polyethyleneimine Incorporated Metal-Organic Frameworks Adsorbent for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yichao; Yan, Qiuju; Kong, Chunlong; Chen, Liang

    2013-01-01

    A series of polyethyleneimine (PEI) incorporated MIL-101 adsorbents with different PEI loadings were reported for the first time in the present work. Although the surface area and pore volume of MIL-101 decreased significantly after loading PEI, all the resulting composites exhibited dramatically enhanced CO2 adsorption capacity at low pressures. At 100 wt% PEI loading, the CO2 adsorption capacity at 0.15 bar reached a very competitive value of 4.2 mmol g−1 at 25°C, and 3.4 mmol g−1 at 50°C. More importantly, the resulting adsorbents displayed rapid adsorption kinetics and ultrahigh selectivity for CO2 over N2 in the designed flue gas with 0.15 bar CO2 and 0.75 bar N2. The CO2 over N2 selectivity was up to 770 at 25°C, and 1200 at 50°C. We believe that the PEI based metal-organic frameworks is an attractive adsorbent for CO2 capture. PMID:23681218

  18. Performance improvement of double-tube gas cooler in CO2 refrigeration system using nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Jahar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analyses of the double-tube gas cooler in transcritical carbon dioxide refrigeration cycle have been performed to study the performance improvement of gas cooler as well as CO2 cycle using Al2O3, TiO2, CuO and Cu nanofluids as coolants. Effects of various operating parameters (nanofluid inlet temperature and mass flow rate, CO2 pressure and particle volume fraction are studied as well. Use of nanofluid as coolant in double-tube gas cooler of CO2 cycle improves the gas cooler effectiveness, cooling capacity and COP without penalty of pumping power. The CO2 cycle yields best performance using Al2O3-H2O as a coolant in double-tube gas cooler followed by TiO2-H2O, CuO-H2O and Cu-H2O. The maximum cooling COP improvement of transcritical CO2 cycle for Al2O3-H2O is 25.4%, whereas that for TiO2-H2O is 23.8%, for CuO-H2O is 20.2% and for Cu-H2O is 16.2% for the given ranges of study. Study shows that the nanofluid may effectively use as coolant in double-tube gas cooler to improve the performance of transcritical CO2 refrigeration cycle.

  19. Amine-Impregnated Mesoporous Silica Nanotube as an Emerging Nanocomposite for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mengya; Yang, Huaming; Zhang, Xiangchao; Wang, Yutang; Tang, Aidong

    2016-07-13

    Pristine halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were pretreated to produce mesoporous silica nanotubes (MSiNTs), which was further impregnated with polyethenimine (PEI) to prepare an emerging nanocomposite MSiNTs/PEI (MP) for CO2 capture. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to analyze the influences of PEI loading amount and adsorption temperature on CO2 adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area (SBET) of MSiNTs was six times higher than that of HNTs, and the corresponding pore volume was more than two times higher than that of HNTs. The well dispersion of PEI within the nanotubes of MSiNTs benefits more CO2 gas adsorption, and the adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite could reach 2.75 mmol/g at 85 °C for 2 h. The CO2 adsorption on the nanocomposite was demonstrated to occur via a two-stage process: initially, a sharp linear weight increase at the beginning, and then a relatively slow adsorption step. The adsorption capacity could reach as high as 70% within 2 min. Also, the nanocomposite exhibited good stability on CO2 adsorption/desorption performance, indicating that the as-prepared emerging nanocomposite show an interesting application potential in the field of CO2 capture.

  20. The MMCO-EOT conundrum: same benthic δ18O, different CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stap, Lennert; van de Wal, Roderik; de Boer, Bas; Bintanja, Richard; Lourens, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge on temporal variations of Earth's climate over the past 38 Myr largely stems from benthic δ18O records. These records are difficult to interpret, however, since they document combined effects of deep-sea temperature and ice volume variations. Information on CO2 is expanding, but remains highly uncertain and intermittent. Attempts to determine the long-term relations between δ18O, sea level and CO2 from proxy data suffer from paucity of data and apparent inconsistency among different records. One outstanding issue is the difference recorded in proxy CO2 data between the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (EOT) and the Middle-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO), while similar levels of benthic δ18O are shown during these time periods. Here, we take a model-based approach to deconvolute the benthic δ18O signal, and reconcile knowledge on benthic δ18O, sea level, CO2 and temperature. We obtain continuous and mutually consistent 38-Myr-long simulations of these variables, by forcing a coupled ice sheet-climate model inversely with benthic δ18O observations. We investigate the factors influencing Arctic and Antarctic polar amplification, and the relation between sea level and CO2. Furthermore, we show that different CO2 between the EOT and MMCO, as indicated by proxy data, can only be obtained if we impose erosion or tectonic movement of the Antarctic continent over time.

  1. Permafrost carbon as a missing link to explain CO 2 changes during the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, K. A.; Bouttes, N.; Roche, D. M.; Chappellaz, J.; Krinner, G.

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric concentration of CO2 increased from 190 to 280 ppm between the last glacial maximum 21,000 years ago and the pre-industrial era. This CO2 rise and its timing have been linked to changes in the Earth’s orbit, ice sheet configuration and volume, and ocean carbon storage. The ice-core record of δ13CO2 (refs ,) in the atmosphere can help to constrain the source of carbon, but previous modelling studies have failed to capture the evolution of δ13CO2 over this period. Here we show that simulations of the last deglaciation that include a permafrost carbon component can reproduce the ice core records between 21,000 and 10,000 years ago. We suggest that thawing permafrost, due to increasing summer insolation in the northern hemisphere, is the main source of CO2 rise between 17,500 and 15,000 years ago, a period sometimes referred to as the Mystery Interval. Together with a fresh water release into the North Atlantic, much of the CO2 variability associated with the Bølling-Allerod/Younger Dryas period ~15,000 to ~12,000 years ago can also be explained. In simulations of future warming we find that the permafrost carbon feedback increases global mean temperature by 10-40% relative to simulations without this feedback, with the magnitude of the increase dependent on the evolution of anthropogenic carbon emissions.

  2. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa M Calvo-Muñoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2. In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  3. Novel Long-Term CO2 Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current Technology for CO2 removal from enclosed air of spacecraft utilizes LiOH canisters for CO2 absorption. This absorption is irreversible so longer flights...

  4. Monitoring solid oxide CO2 capture sorbents in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keturakis, Christopher J; Ni, Fan; Spicer, Michelle; Beaver, Michael G; Caram, Hugo S; Wachs, Israel E

    2014-12-01

    The separation, capture, and storage of CO2 , the major greenhouse gas, from industrial gas streams has received considerable attention in recent years because of concerns about environmental effects of increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. An emerging area of research utilizes reversible CO2 sorbents to increase conversion and rate of forward reactions for equilibrium-controlled reactions (sorption-enhanced reactions). Little fundamental information, however, is known about the nature of the sorbent surface sites, sorbent surface-CO2 complexes, and the CO2 adsorption/desorption mechanisms. The present study directly spectroscopically monitors Na2 O/Al2 O3 sorbent-CO2 surface complexes during adsorption/desorption with simultaneous analysis of desorbed CO2 gas, allowing establishment of molecular level structure-sorption relationships between individual surface carbonate complexes and the CO2 working capacity of sorbents at different temperatures.

  5. Understanding and predicting trends in north Atlantic CO2 uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Paul; Lebehot, Alice; Watson, Andy; McNeall, Doug; Ford, David; Schuster, Ute

    2017-04-01

    To determine the maximum carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions society must commit to, to remain below a given atmospheric CO2 threshold, the scientific community must robustly quantify what proportion of human emitted CO2 will be taken up by the land and marine carbon reservoirs. The North Atlantic Ocean is the most intense marine sink of anthropogenic CO2 on the planet, accounting for about a fifth of the global oceanic anthropogenic CO2 uptake, despite covering just 15% of the global ocean area. Carefully assessing uncertainties, we quantify the real-world trend in North Atlantic CO2 uptake over the past two decades. Comparing this to results from state-of-the-art climate models, we find that models are systematically underestimating the observed CO2 uptake trend. By performing a set of targeted climate model simulations, we diagnose and account for this bias, and produce the first set of observation-informed future ocean CO2 uptake predictions.

  6. Lipid accumulation and CO2 utilization of Nannochloropsis oculata in response to CO2 aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Chien-Ya; Tsai, Ming-Ta; Ong, Seow-Chin; Chen, Chiun-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    In order to produce microalgal lipids that can be transformed to biodiesel fuel, effects of concentration of CO(2) aeration on the biomass production and lipid accumulation of Nannochloropsis oculata in a semicontinuous culture were investigated in this study. Lipid content of N. oculata cells at different growth phases was also explored. The results showed that the lipid accumulation from logarithmic phase to stationary phase of N. oculata NCTU-3 was significantly increased from 30.8% to 50.4%. In the microalgal cultures aerated with 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% CO(2), the maximal biomass and lipid productivity in the semicontinuous system were 0.480 and 0.142 g L(-1)d(-1) with 2% CO(2) aeration, respectively. Even the N. oculata NCTU-3 cultured in the semicontinuous system aerated with 15% CO(2), the biomass and lipid productivity could reach to 0.372 and 0.084 g L(-1)d(-1), respectively. In the comparison of productive efficiencies, the semicontinuous system was operated with two culture approaches over 12d. The biomass and lipid productivity of N. oculata NCTU-3 were 0.497 and 0.151 g L(-1)d(-1) in one-day replacement (half broth was replaced each day), and were 0.296 and 0.121 g L(-1)d(-1) in three-day replacement (three fifth broth was replaced every 3d), respectively. To optimize the condition for long-term biomass and lipid yield from N. oculata NCTU-3, this microalga was suggested to grow in the semicontinuous system aerated with 2% CO(2) and operated by one-day replacement.

  7. CO2 emissions from Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Bagger, Anne

    2011-01-01

    rise to a substantial reduction of the CO2 emission in the construction phase. The present paper describes how the CO2 emission is reduced when using Super-light technology instead of traditional structural components. Estimations of the CO2 emissions from a number of projects using various...... construction methods suggest that building with Super-light structures may cut the CO2 emission in half, compared to traditional concrete structures, and reduce it to 25% compared to traditional steel structures....

  8. Simulation of CO2-Distribution in Fractured Oil Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Furuvik, Nora; Halvorsen, Britt

    2015-01-01

    Deep geologic injections and storage of Carbon dioxide (CO2) for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are an upcoming combination due to the potential for increased oil production from depleted oilfields at the same time reducing the carbon footprint from industrial sources. CO2-EOR refers to a technique for injection of supercritical-dense CO2 into an oil reservoir. Remaining oil, not producible by primary and secondary techniques, has been successfully produced using EOR with CO2 since early 1970??....

  9. Time-course of ventilation, arterial and pulmonary CO(2) tension during CO (