WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume describe approaches

  1. Modeling Approaches for Describing Microbial Population Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita

    , ethanol and biomass throughout the reactor. This work has proven that the integration of CFD and population balance models, for describing the growth of a microbial population in a spatially heterogeneous reactor, is feasible, and that valuable insight on the interplay between flow and the dynamics......Although microbial populations are typically described by averaged properties, individual cells present a certain degree of variability. Indeed, initially clonal microbial populations develop into heterogeneous populations, even when growing in a homogeneous environment. A heterogeneous microbial......) to predict distributions of certain population properties including particle size, mass or volume, and molecular weight. Similarly, PBM allow for a mathematical description of distributed cell properties within microbial populations. Cell total protein content distributions (a measure of cell mass) have been...

  2. A Semantic Approach to Describe Geospatial Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Sidney Roberto

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly using geospatial data from the Web to produce geographic information. One big challenge is to find the relevant data, which often is based on keywords or even file names. However, these approaches lack semantics. Thus, it is necessary to provide mechanisms to prepare data to help retrieval of semantically relevant data. This paper proposes an approach to attack this problem. This approach is based on semantic annotations that use geographic metadata and ontologies to describe heterogeneous geospatial data. Semantic annotations are RDF/XML files that rely on a FGDC metadata schema, filled with appropriate ontology terms, and stored in a XML database. The proposal is illustrated by a case study of semantic annotations of agricultural resources, using domain ontologies.

  3. Two heuristic approaches to describe periodicities in genomic microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Aßmus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the first part we discuss the filtering of panels of time series based on singular value decomposition. The discussion is based on an approach where this filtering is used to normalize microarray data. We point out effects on the periodicity and phases for time series panels. In the second part we investigate time dependent periodic panels with different phases. We align the time series in the panel and discuss the periodogram of the aligned time series with the purpose of describing the periodic structure of the panel. The method is quite powerful assuming known phases in the model, but it deteriorates rapidly for noisy data.  

  4. An ontological approach to describing neurons and their relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, David J.; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Martone, Maryann E.; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2012-01-01

    The advancement of neuroscience, perhaps one of the most information rich disciplines of all the life sciences, requires basic frameworks for organizing the vast amounts of data generated by the research community to promote novel insights and integrated understanding. Since Cajal, the neuron remains a fundamental unit of the nervous system, yet even with the explosion of information technology, we still have few comprehensive or systematic strategies for aggregating cell-level knowledge. Progress toward this goal is hampered by the multiplicity of names for cells and by lack of a consensus on the criteria for defining neuron types. However, through umbrella projects like the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) and the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF), we have the opportunity to propose and implement an informatics infrastructure for establishing common tools and approaches to describe neurons through a standard terminology for nerve cells and a database (a Neuron Registry) where these descriptions can be deposited and compared. This article provides an overview of the problem and outlines a solution approach utilizing ontological characterizations. Based on illustrative implementation examples, we also discuss the need for consensus criteria to be adopted by the research community, and considerations on future developments. A scalable repository of neuron types will provide researchers with a resource that materially contributes to the advancement of neuroscience. PMID:22557965

  5. An ontological approach to describing neurons and their relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Hamilton

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of neuroscience, perhaps the most information rich discipline of all the life sciences, requires basic frameworks for organizing the vast amounts of data generated by the research community to promote novel insights and integrated understanding. Since Cajal, the neuron remains a fundamental unit of the nervous system, yet even with the explosion of information technology, we still have few comprehensive or systematic strategies for aggregating cell-level knowledge. Progress toward this goal is hampered by the multiplicity of names for cells and by lack of a consensus on the criteria for defining neuron types. However, through umbrella projects like the Neuroscience Information Framework and the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility, we have the opportunity to propose and implement an informatics infrastructure for establishing common tools and approaches to describe neurons through a standard terminology for nerve cells and a database (a Neuron Registry where these descriptions can be deposited and compared. This article provides an overview of the problem and outlines a solution approach utilizing ontological characterizations.

  6. Sensitivity analysis approach to multibody systems described by natural coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Wang, Yabin

    2014-03-01

    The classical natural coordinate modeling method which removes the Euler angles and Euler parameters from the governing equations is particularly suitable for the sensitivity analysis and optimization of multibody systems. However, the formulation has so many principles in choosing the generalized coordinates that it hinders the implementation of modeling automation. A first order direct sensitivity analysis approach to multibody systems formulated with novel natural coordinates is presented. Firstly, a new selection method for natural coordinate is developed. The method introduces 12 coordinates to describe the position and orientation of a spatial object. On the basis of the proposed natural coordinates, rigid constraint conditions, the basic constraint elements as well as the initial conditions for the governing equations are derived. Considering the characteristics of the governing equations, the newly proposed generalized-α integration method is used and the corresponding algorithm flowchart is discussed. The objective function, the detailed analysis process of first order direct sensitivity analysis and related solving strategy are provided based on the previous modeling system. Finally, in order to verify the validity and accuracy of the method presented, the sensitivity analysis of a planar spinner-slider mechanism and a spatial crank-slider mechanism are conducted. The test results agree well with that of the finite difference method, and the maximum absolute deviation of the results is less than 3%. The proposed approach is not only convenient for automatic modeling, but also helpful for the reduction of the complexity of sensitivity analysis, which provides a practical and effective way to obtain sensitivity for the optimization problems of multibody systems.

  7. Optimality approaches to describe characteristic fluvial patterns on landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Kyungrock; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-05-12

    Mother Nature has left amazingly regular geomorphic patterns on the Earth's surface. These patterns are often explained as having arisen as a result of some optimal behaviour of natural processes. However, there is little agreement on what is being optimized. As a result, a number of alternatives have been proposed, often with little a priori justification with the argument that successful predictions will lend a posteriori support to the hypothesized optimality principle. Given that maximum entropy production is an optimality principle attempting to predict the microscopic behaviour from a macroscopic characterization, this paper provides a review of similar approaches with the goal of providing a comparison and contrast between them to enable synthesis. While assumptions of optimal behaviour approach a system from a macroscopic viewpoint, process-based formulations attempt to resolve the mechanistic details whose interactions lead to the system level functions. Using observed optimality trends may help simplify problem formulation at appropriate levels of scale of interest. However, for such an approach to be successful, we suggest that optimality approaches should be formulated at a broader level of environmental systems' viewpoint, i.e. incorporating the dynamic nature of environmental variables and complex feedback mechanisms between fluvial and non-fluvial processes.

  8. A geostatistical approach for describing spatial pattern in stream networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganio, L.M.; Torgersen, C.E.; Gresswell, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The shape and configuration of branched networks influence ecological patterns and processes. Recent investigations of network influences in riverine ecology stress the need to quantify spatial structure not only in a two-dimensional plane, but also in networks. An initial step in understanding data from stream networks is discerning non-random patterns along the network. On the other hand, data collected in the network may be spatially autocorrelated and thus not suitable for traditional statistical analyses. Here we provide a method that uses commercially available software to construct an empirical variogram to describe spatial pattern in the relative abundance of coastal cutthroat trout in headwater stream networks. We describe the mathematical and practical considerations involved in calculating a variogram using a non-Euclidean distance metric to incorporate the network pathway structure in the analysis of spatial variability, and use a non-parametric technique to ascertain if the pattern in the empirical variogram is non-random.

  9. Describing spatial pattern in stream networks: A practical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganio, L.M.; Torgersen, C.E.; Gresswell, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The shape and configuration of branched networks influence ecological patterns and processes. Recent investigations of network influences in riverine ecology stress the need to quantify spatial structure not only in a two-dimensional plane, but also in networks. An initial step in understanding data from stream networks is discerning non-random patterns along the network. On the other hand, data collected in the network may be spatially autocorrelated and thus not suitable for traditional statistical analyses. Here we provide a method that uses commercially available software to construct an empirical variogram to describe spatial pattern in the relative abundance of coastal cutthroat trout in headwater stream networks. We describe the mathematical and practical considerations involved in calculating a variogram using a non-Euclidean distance metric to incorporate the network pathway structure in the analysis of spatial variability, and use a non-parametric technique to ascertain if the pattern in the empirical variogram is non-random.

  10. Describing failure in geomaterials using second-order work approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Nicot

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Geomaterials are known to be non-associated materials. Granular soils therefore exhibit a variety of failure modes, with diffuse or localized kinematical patterns. In fact, the notion of failure itself can be confusing with regard to granular soils, because it is not associated with an obvious phenomenology. In this study, we built a proper framework, using the second-order work theory, to describe some failure modes in geomaterials based on energy conservation. The occurrence of failure is defined by an abrupt increase in kinetic energy. The increase in kinetic energy from an equilibrium state, under incremental loading, is shown to be equal to the difference between the external second-order work, involving the external loading parameters, and the internal second-order work, involving the constitutive properties of the material. When a stress limit state is reached, a certain stress component passes through a maximum value and then may decrease. Under such a condition, if a certain additional external loading is applied, the system fails, sharply increasing the strain rate. The internal stress is no longer able to balance the external stress, leading to a dynamic response of the specimen. As an illustration, the theoretical framework was applied to the well-known undrained triaxial test for loose soils. The influence of the loading control mode was clearly highlighted. It is shown that the plastic limit theory appears to be a particular case of this more general second-order work theory. When the plastic limit condition is met, the internal second-order work is nil. A class of incremental external loadings causes the kinetic energy to increase dramatically, leading to the sudden collapse of the specimen, as observed in laboratory.

  11. The white matter query language: a novel approach for describing human white matter anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Demian; Makris, Nikos; Rathi, Yogesh; Shenton, Martha; Kikinis, Ron; Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a novel method to describe human white matter anatomy using an approach that is both intuitive and simple to use, and which automatically extracts white matter tracts from diffusion MRI volumes. Further, our method simplifies the quantification and statistical analysis of white matter tracts on large diffusion MRI databases. This work reflects the careful syntactical definition of major white matter fiber tracts in the human brain based on a neuroanatomist's expert knowledge. The framework is based on a novel query language with a near-to-English textual syntax. This query language makes it possible to construct a dictionary of anatomical definitions that describe white matter tracts. The definitions include adjacent gray and white matter regions, and rules for spatial relations. This novel method makes it possible to automatically label white matter anatomy across subjects. After describing this method, we provide an example of its implementation where we encode anatomical knowledge in human white matter for ten association and 15 projection tracts per hemisphere, along with seven commissural tracts. Importantly, this novel method is comparable in accuracy to manual labeling. Finally, we present results applying this method to create a white matter atlas from 77 healthy subjects, and we use this atlas in a small proof-of-concept study to detect changes in association tracts that characterize schizophrenia.

  12. A Population Pharmacokinetic Approach to Describe Cephalexin Disposition in Adult and Aged Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Prados

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to characterize the pharmacokinetics of orally administered cephalexin to healthy adult and aged dogs, using a population pharmacokinetic approach. Two hundred and eighty-six cephalexin plasma concentrations obtained from previous pharmacokinetic studies were used. Sex, age, pharmaceutical formulation, and breed were evaluated as covariates. A one-compartment model with an absorption lag-time (Tlag best described the data. The final model included age (adult; aged on apparent volume of distribution (Vd/F, apparent elimination rate (ke/F, and Tlag; sex (female; male on ke/F, and breed (Beagle; mixed-breed on Vd/F. Addition of the covariates to the model explained 78% of the interindividal variability (IIV in Vd/F, 36% in ke/F, and 24% in Tlag, respectively. Formulation did not affect the variability of any of the pharmacokinetic parameters. Tlag was longer, whereas Vd/F and ke/F were lower in aged compared to adult animals; in female aged dogs ke/F was lower than in male aged dogs; however, the differences were of low magnitude. Different disposition of cephalexin may be expected in aged dogs.

  13. A Statistical Approach to Describe Highly Excited Heavy and Superheavy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Peng-Hui; Li, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    A statistical approach based on the Weisskopf evaporation theory has been developed to describe the de-excitation process of highly excited heavy and superheavy nuclei, in particular for the proton-rich nuclei. The excited nucleus is cooled by evaporating $\\gamma$-ray, light particles (neutrons, protons, $\\alpha$ etc) in competition with the binary fission, in which the structure effects (shell correction, fission barrier, particle separation energy) contribute to the processes. The formation of residual nuclei is evaluated via sequential emission of possible particles above the separation energies. The available data of fusion-evaporation excitation functions in the $^{28}$Si+$^{198}$Pt reaction can be reproduced nicely well within the approach.

  14. To describe or prescribe: assumptions underlying a prescriptive nursing process approach to spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, Barbara; Sawatzky, Rick

    2006-06-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to spirituality in nursing practice. Much of the literature on spiritual care uses the nursing process to describe this aspect of care. However, the use of the nursing process in the area of spirituality may be problematic, depending upon the understandings of the nature and intent of this process. Is it primarily a descriptive process meant to make visible the nursing actions to provide spiritual support, or is it a prescriptive process meant to guide nursing actions for intervening in the spirituality of patients? A prescriptive nursing process approach implies influencing, and in some cases reframing, the spirituality of patients and thereby extends beyond general notions of spiritual support. In this paper we discuss four problematic assumptions that form the basis for a prescriptive approach to spiritual care. We conclude that this approach extends the nursing role beyond appropriate professional boundaries, making it ethically problematic.

  15. Morphological study of transpterional-insula approach using volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Linpei; Su, Lue; Sun, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yao, Jihang; Li, Youqiong; Luo, Qi

    2012-11-01

    This study describes the measurements of inferior circular insular sulcus (ICIS) and the shortest distance from ICIS to the temporal horn and determines the position of the incision, which does less harm to the temporal stem in the transpterional-insula approach using volume-rendering technique. Results of the research showed that one-third point over the anterior side of ICIS may be the ideal penetration point during operation. And there is no difference between 2 hemispheres (P ICIS from other Chinese researches demonstrated that volume rendering is a reliable method in insular research that enables mass measurements.

  16. A novel approach to describing and detecting performance anti-patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jinfang; Wang, Yihan; Hu, Peipei; Wang, Bin

    2017-08-01

    Anti-pattern, as an extension to pattern, describes a widely used poor solution which can bring negative influence to application systems. Aiming at the shortcomings of the existing anti-pattern descriptions, an anti-pattern description method based on first order predicate is proposed. This method synthesizes anti-pattern forms and symptoms, which makes the description more accurate and has good scalability and versatility as well. In order to improve the accuracy of anti-pattern detection, a Bayesian classification method is applied in validation for detection results, which can reduce false negatives and false positives of anti-pattern detection. Finally, the proposed approach in this paper is applied to a small e-commerce system, the feasibility and effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated further through experiments.

  17. A statistical approach to describe highly excited heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Hui; Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2016-09-01

    A statistical approach based on the Weisskopf evaporation theory has been developed to describe the de-excitation process of highly excited heavy and superheavy nuclei, in particular for the proton-rich nuclei. The excited nucleus is cooled by evaporating γ-rays, light particles (neutrons, protons, α etc) in competition with binary fission, in which the structure effects (shell correction, fission barrier, particle separation energy) contribute to the processes. The formation of residual nuclei is evaluated via sequential emission of possible particles above the separation energies. The available data of fusion-evaporation excitation functions in the 28Si+198Pt reaction can be reproduced nicely within the approach. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program in China (2015CB856903), National Natural Science Foundation of China Projects (11175218, U1332207, 11475050, 11175074), and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  18. Minimally invasive esthetic therapy: a case report describing the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rodrigo Carlos; Chambrone, Leandro; Colombini, Bella Luna; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Britto, Isabella Maria; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    The decision-making process for the treatment of esthetic areas is based on the achievement of a healthy, harmonious, and pleasant smile. These conditions are directly associated with a solid knowledge of tooth anatomy and proportions, as well as the smile line, soft tissue morphology, and osseous architecture. To achieve these objectives, a multidisciplinary approach may be necessary to create long-term harmony between the final restoration and the adjacent teeth, and the health of the surrounding soft and hard tissues. This case report describes the application of a minimally invasive therapy on a 33-year-old woman seeking esthetic treatment. Minimally invasive periodontal plastic surgery associated with porcelain laminate veneers yielded satisfactory esthetics and minimal trauma to dental and periodontal tissues. Such a combined approach may be considered a viable option for the improvement of "white" and "red" esthetics.

  19. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fulco, U.L. [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Albuquerque, E.L., E-mail: eudenilson@gmail.com [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Caetano, E.W.S. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Freire, V.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: → One-step renormalization approach to describe the DBL-DNA molecule. → Electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model. → A quasiperiodic sequence to mimic the DNA nucleotides arrangement. → Electronic transmission spectra. → I-V characteristics. -- Abstract: We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  20. Non-equilibrium statistical mechanical approach for describing heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sventek, J.S.

    1978-11-01

    With the availability of heavy-ion projectiles (A > 4) at low to intermediate energies (4 < E/A < 10), products showing various stages of relaxation for certain macroscopic variables (center-of-mass energy, orbital angular momentum, etc.) were produced in various reactions. The distributions for these macroscopic variables showed a correlation between the stage of relaxation reached and the net amount of mass transfer which had occurred in the reaction. There was also evidence that there was an asymmetry in the number of net transfers necessary for complete relaxation between stripping and pickup reactions. A model for describing the time-evolution of these reactions was formulated, the keystone of which is a master-equation approach for describing the time-dependence of the mass-asymmetry. This, coupled with deterministic equations of motion for the other macroscopic coordinates in the reaction lead to calculated distributions which provide an excellent qualitative description of these reactions, and, in some cases, quantitatively reproduce the experimental data quite well. 61 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Modeling approaches to describe H2O and CO2 exchange in mare ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchev, A.; Novenko, E.; Volkova, E.

    2012-04-01

    The modern climatic conditions is strongly influenced by both internal variability of climatic system, and various external natural and anthropogenic factors (IPCC 2007). Significant increase of concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and especially the growth of atmospheric CO2 due to human activity are considered as the main factors that are responsible for global warming and climate changes. A significant part of anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed from the atmosphere by land biota and especially by vegetation cover. However, it is still not completely clear what is the role of different land ecosystems and especially forests and mares in global cycles of H2O and CO2 and what is a sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate changes. Within the frameworks of this study the spatial and temporal variability of H2O and CO2 fluxes in different types of mare ecosystems of the forest-steppe zone in European part of Russia was described using modeling approaches and results of field measurements. For this modeling and experimental study the mare ecosystems of Tula region were selected. The Tula region is located mostly in the forest-steppe zone and it is unique area for such studies because almost all existed types of mare ecosystems of Northern Eurasia distinguished by a geomorphological position, water and mineral supply can be found there. Most mares in Tula region have a relatively small size and surrounded by very heterogeneous forests that make not possible an application of the classical measuring and modeling approaches e.g. an eddy covariance technique or one-dimensional H2O and CO2 exchange models for flux estimation in such sites. In our study to describe the radiation, sensible heat, H2O and CO2 exchange between such heterogeneous mare ecosystems and the atmosphere a three-dimensional model Forbog-3D and one-dimensional Mixfor-SVAT were applied. The main concept used in the Forbog-3D and Mixfor-SVAT models is an aggregated description of physical and

  2. Global and Local Approaches Describing Critical Phenomena on the Developing and Developed Financial Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Dariusz

    We define and confront global and local methods to analyze the financial crash-like events on the financial markets from the critical phenomena point of view. These methods are based respectively on the analysis of log-periodicity and on the local fractal properties of financial time series in the vicinity of phase transitions (crashes). The log-periodicity analysis is made in a daily time horizon, for the whole history (1991-2008) of Warsaw Stock Exchange Index (WIG) connected with the largest developing financial market in Europe. We find that crash-like events on the Polish financial market are described better by the log-divergent price model decorated with log-periodic behavior than by the power-law-divergent price model usually discussed in log-periodic scenarios for developed markets. Predictions coming from log-periodicity scenario are verified for all main crashes that took place in WIG history. It is argued that crash predictions within log-periodicity model strongly depend on the amount of data taken to make a fit and therefore are likely to contain huge inaccuracies. Next, this global analysis is confronted with the local fractal description. To do so, we provide calculation of the so-called local (time dependent) Hurst exponent H loc for the WIG time series and for main US stock market indices like DJIA and S&P 500. We point out dependence between the behavior of the local fractal properties of financial time series and the crashes appearance on the financial markets. We conclude that local fractal method seems to work better than the global approach - both for developing and developed markets. The very recent situation on the market, particularly related to the Fed intervention in September 2007 and the situation immediately afterwards is also analyzed within fractal approach. It is shown in this context how the financial market evolves through different phases of fractional Brownian motion. Finally, the current situation on American market is

  3. Application of machine learning methods to describe the effects of conjugated equine estrogens therapy on region-specific brain volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Ramon; Espeland, Mark A; Goveas, Joseph S; Davatzikos, Christos; Gaussoin, Sarah A; Maldjian, Joseph A; Brunner, Robert L; Kuller, Lewis H; Johnson, Karen C; Mysiw, W Jerry; Wagner, Benjamin; Resnick, Susan M

    2011-05-01

    Use of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) has been linked to smaller regional brain volumes in women aged ≥65 years; however, it is unknown whether this results in a broad-based characteristic pattern of effects. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess regional volumes of normal tissue and ischemic lesions among 513 women who had been enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of CEE therapy for an average of 6.6 years, beginning at ages 65-80 years. A multivariate pattern analysis, based on a machine learning technique that combined Random Forest and logistic regression with L(1) penalty, was applied to identify patterns among regional volumes associated with therapy and whether patterns discriminate between treatment groups. The multivariate pattern analysis detected smaller regional volumes of normal tissue within the limbic and temporal lobes among women that had been assigned to CEE therapy. Mean decrements ranged as high as 7% in the left entorhinal cortex and 5% in the left perirhinal cortex, which exceeded the effect sizes reported previously in frontal lobe and hippocampus. Overall accuracy of classification based on these patterns, however, was projected to be only 54.5%. Prescription of CEE therapy for an average of 6.6 years is associated with lower regional brain volumes, but it does not induce a characteristic spatial pattern of changes in brain volumes of sufficient magnitude to discriminate users and nonusers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A describing function approach to bipolar RF-power amplifier simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidkjær, Jens

    1981-01-01

    A method for fast and accurate computations of the primary performance parameters such as gain, efficiency, output power, and bandwidth in class-C biased RF-power amplifier stages is presented. The method is based on a describing function characterization of the RF-power transistor where the term...

  5. PROBABILISTIC-PHYSICAL APPROACH TO DESCRIBE AND DETERMINE THE RELIABILITY OF CARS

    OpenAIRE

    Muradian, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The article aims to develop an algorithm and a sequence of description and determination of car reliability to predict certain quantitative indicators of the studied elements, parts and units, or a car as a whole on the basis of probabilistic-physical approach. Methodology. For the calculation of the indicators of reliability, durability and safety of cars the probabilistic-physical method was used, which takes into account the resources consumption inevitable in the operation of car...

  6. Homogeneous Diffusion Solid Model as a Realistic Approach to Describe Adsorption onto Materials with Different Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabio, E.; Zamora, F.; González-García, C. M.; Ledesma, B.; Álvarez-Murillo, A.; Román, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the adsorption kinetics of p-nitrophenol (PNP) onto several commercial activated carbons (ACs) with different textural and geometrical characteristics was studied. For this aim, a homogeneous diffusion solid model (HDSM) was used, which does take the adsorbent shape into account. The HDSM was solved by means of the finite element method (FEM) using the commercial software COMSOL. The different kinetic patterns observed in the experiments carried out can be described by the developed model, which shows that the sharp drop of adsorption rate observed in some samples is caused by the formation of a concentration wave. The model allows one to visualize the changes in concentration taking place in both liquid and solid phases, which enables us to link the kinetic behaviour with the main features of the carbon samples.

  7. Phenomenological approach to describe logistic growth and carrying capacity-dependent growth processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DIBYENDU BISWAS; SWARUP PORIA; SANKAR NARAYAN PATRA

    2016-11-01

    In this communication, different classes of phenomenological universalities of carrying capacity dependent growth processes have been proposed. The logistic as well as carrying capacity-dependent West-type allometry-based biological growths can be explained in this proposed framework. It is shown that logistic and carrying capacity-dependent West-type growths are phenomenologically identical in nature. However, there is a difference between them in terms of coefficients involved in the phenomenological descriptions. Involuted Gompertz function, used to describe biological growth processes undergoing atrophy or a demographic and economic system undergoing involution or regression, can be addressed in this proposed environment-dependent description. It is also found phenomenologically that the energy intake of an organism depends on carrying capacity whereas metabolic cost does not depend on carrying capacity. In addition, some other phenomenologicaldescriptions have been examined in this proposed framework and graphical representations of variation of different parameters involved in the description are executed.

  8. Direct construction of predictive models for describing growth Salmonella enteritidis in liquid eggs – a one-step approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to develop a new approach using a one-step approach to directly construct predictive models for describing the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in liquid egg white (LEW) and egg yolk (LEY). A five-strain cocktail of SE, induced to resist rifampicin at 100 mg/L, ...

  9. A hierarchical knowledge-based approach for retrieving similar medical images described with semantic annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Camille; Beaulieu, Christopher F; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L

    2014-06-01

    Computer-assisted image retrieval applications could assist radiologist interpretations by identifying similar images in large archives as a means to providing decision support. However, the semantic gap between low-level image features and their high level semantics may impair the system performances. Indeed, it can be challenging to comprehensively characterize the images using low-level imaging features to fully capture the visual appearance of diseases on images, and recently the use of semantic terms has been advocated to provide semantic descriptions of the visual contents of images. However, most of the existing image retrieval strategies do not consider the intrinsic properties of these terms during the comparison of the images beyond treating them as simple binary (presence/absence) features. We propose a new framework that includes semantic features in images and that enables retrieval of similar images in large databases based on their semantic relations. It is based on two main steps: (1) annotation of the images with semantic terms extracted from an ontology, and (2) evaluation of the similarity of image pairs by computing the similarity between the terms using the Hierarchical Semantic-Based Distance (HSBD) coupled to an ontological measure. The combination of these two steps provides a means of capturing the semantic correlations among the terms used to characterize the images that can be considered as a potential solution to deal with the semantic gap problem. We validate this approach in the context of the retrieval and the classification of 2D regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from computed tomographic (CT) images of the liver. Under this framework, retrieval accuracy of more than 0.96 was obtained on a 30-images dataset using the Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG) index that is a standard technique used to measure the effectiveness of information retrieval algorithms when a separate reference standard is available. Classification

  10. CADDIS Volume 4. Data Analysis: Selecting an Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    An approach for selecting statistical analyses to inform causal analysis. Describes methods for determining whether test site conditions differ from reference expectations. Describes an approach for estimating stressor-response relationships.

  11. A multi-dimensional approach for describing internal bleeding in an artery: implications for Doppler ultrasound guiding HIFU hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Zhang, Dong; Guo, Xiasheng; Gong, Xiufen; Fei, Xingbo

    2008-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound has shown promise in detecting and localizing internal bleeding. A mathematical approach was developed to describe the internal bleeding of the injured artery surrounded by tissue. This approach consisted of a two-dimensional (2D) model describing the injured vessel and a one-dimensional model (1D) mimicking the downstream of the vessel system. The validity of this approach was confirmed by both the numerical simulation and in vivo measurement of a normal porcine femoral artery. Furthermore, the artery was injured using a 16-gauge needle to model a penetrating injury. The velocity waveform at the puncture site was modeled and compared with those at the upstream and downstream of the artery. The results demonstrated that there was a significant increase in magnitude and a phase lag for the peak systolic velocity at the injury site. These results were qualitatively in agreement with the in vivo experiment. Flow turbulence indicated by this approach was also observed in a color Doppler image in the form of a checkered color pattern. This approach might be useful for quantitative internal bleeding detection and localization. Also, the phase lag of the peak systolic velocity was indicated to be potential in the application of internal bleeding detection.

  12. A multi-dimensional approach for describing internal bleeding in an artery: implications for Doppler ultrasound guiding HIFU hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Di; Zhang Dong; Guo Xiasheng; Gong Xiufen [Institute of Acoustics, Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Fei Xingbo [Beijing Yuande Biomedical Company, Beijing 100176 (China)], E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2008-09-21

    Doppler ultrasound has shown promise in detecting and localizing internal bleeding. A mathematical approach was developed to describe the internal bleeding of the injured artery surrounded by tissue. This approach consisted of a two-dimensional (2D) model describing the injured vessel and a one-dimensional model (1D) mimicking the downstream of the vessel system. The validity of this approach was confirmed by both the numerical simulation and in vivo measurement of a normal porcine femoral artery. Furthermore, the artery was injured using a 16-gauge needle to model a penetrating injury. The velocity waveform at the puncture site was modeled and compared with those at the upstream and downstream of the artery. The results demonstrated that there was a significant increase in magnitude and a phase lag for the peak systolic velocity at the injury site. These results were qualitatively in agreement with the in vivo experiment. Flow turbulence indicated by this approach was also observed in a color Doppler image in the form of a checkered color pattern. This approach might be useful for quantitative internal bleeding detection and localization. Also, the phase lag of the peak systolic velocity was indicated to be potential in the application of internal bleeding detection.

  13. A two-layer depth-averaged approach to describe the regime stratification in collapses of dry granular columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, L.; Carravetta, A.; Martino, R.; Tai, Y. C.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of dry granular flows is still insufficiently understood. Several depth-averaged approaches, where the flow motion is described through hydrodynamic-like models with suitable resistance laws, have been proposed in the last decades to describe the propagation of avalanches and debris flows. Yet, some important features of the granular flow dynamics cannot be well delivered. For example, it is very challenging to capture the progressive deposition process, observed in collapses and dam-break flows over rough beds, where an upper surface flow is found to coexist with a lower creeping flow. The experimental observations of such flows suggest the existence of a flow regime stratification caused by different momentum transfer mechanisms. In this work, we propose a two-layer depth-averaged model, aiming at describing such a stratification regime inside the flowing granular mass. The model equations are derived for both two-dimensional plane and axi-symmetric flows. Mass and momentum balances of each layer are considered separately, so that different constitutive laws are introduced. The proposed model is equipped with a closure equation accounting for the mass flux at the interface between the layers. Numerical results are compared with experimental data of axi-symmetric granular collapses to validate the proposed approach. The model delivers sound agreement with experimental data when the initial aspect ratios are small. In case of large initial aspect ratios, it yields a significant improvement in predicting the final shape of deposit and also the run-out distances. Further comparisons with different numerical models show that the two-layer approach is capable of correctly describing the main features of the final deposit also in the case of two-dimensional granular collapses.

  14. Integrative Taxonomic Approach for Describing a New Cryptic Species of Bush Frog (Raorchestes: Anura: Rhacophoridae from the Western Ghats, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Priti

    Full Text Available A new cryptic species of bush frog Raorchestes honnametti sp. nov. is described from the south-eastern part of the Western Ghats, India. This newly described species belongs to the Charius clade and is morphologically similar to other clade members--R. charius and R. griet. Therefore, an integrative taxonomic approach based on molecular and bioacoustic analysis along with morphology was used to delimit the new species. Raorchestes honnametti sp. nov., is currently known only from Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Tiger Reserve, a part of Biligiri Rangaswamy horst mountain range (a mountain formed due movement of two faults formed during the Late Quaternary period (1.8-2.58 Ma. Discovery of cryptic species from a highly speciose and well-studied genus Raorchestes hints at the possible existence of several more cryptic species in this genus. We discuss the possible reasons for crypsis and emphasize the need for continued systematic surveys of amphibians across the Western Ghats.

  15. Integrative Taxonomic Approach for Describing a New Cryptic Species of Bush Frog (Raorchestes: Anura: Rhacophoridae) from the Western Ghats, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti, H; Roshmi, Rekha Sarma; Ramya, Badrinath; Sudhira, H S; Ravikanth, G; Aravind, Neelavara Anantharam; Gururaja, Kotambylu Vasudeva

    2016-01-01

    A new cryptic species of bush frog Raorchestes honnametti sp. nov. is described from the south-eastern part of the Western Ghats, India. This newly described species belongs to the Charius clade and is morphologically similar to other clade members--R. charius and R. griet. Therefore, an integrative taxonomic approach based on molecular and bioacoustic analysis along with morphology was used to delimit the new species. Raorchestes honnametti sp. nov., is currently known only from Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Tiger Reserve, a part of Biligiri Rangaswamy horst mountain range (a mountain formed due movement of two faults) formed during the Late Quaternary period (1.8-2.58 Ma). Discovery of cryptic species from a highly speciose and well-studied genus Raorchestes hints at the possible existence of several more cryptic species in this genus. We discuss the possible reasons for crypsis and emphasize the need for continued systematic surveys of amphibians across the Western Ghats.

  16. Modeling Approach for Estimating Co-Produced Water Volumes and Saltwater Disposal Volumes in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Management of produced fluids has become an important issue in Oklahoma because large volumes of saltwater are co-produced with oil and gas, and disposed into saltwater disposal wells at high rates. Petroleum production increased from 2009-2015, especially in central and north-central Oklahoma where the Mississippian and Hunton zones were redeveloped using horizontal wells and dewatering techniques that have led to a disproportional increase in produced water volumes. Improved management of co-produced water, including desalination for beneficial reuse and decreased saltwater disposal volumes, is only possible if spatial and temporal trends can be defined and related to the producing zones. It is challenging to quantify the volumes of co-produced water by region or production zone because co-produced water volumes are generally not reported. Therefore, the goal of this research is to estimate co-produced water volumes for 2008-present with an approach that can be replicated as petroleum production shifts to other regions. Oil and gas production rates from subsurface zones were multiplied by ratios of H2O:oil and H2O:gas for the respective zones. Initial H2O:oil and H2O:gas ratios were adjusted/calibrated, by zone, to maximize correlation of county-scale produced H2O estimates versus saltwater disposal volumes from 2013-2015. These calibrated ratios were then used to compute saltwater disposal volumes from 2008-2012 because of apparent data gaps in reported saltwater disposal volumes during that timeframe. This research can be used to identify regions that have the greatest need for produced water treatment systems. The next step in management of produced fluids is to explore optimal energy-efficient strategies that reduce deleterious effects.

  17. Efficient volume preserving approach for skeleton-based implicit surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史红兵; 童若锋; 董金祥

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient way to preserve the volume of implicit surfaces generated by skeletons. Recursive subdivision is used to efficiently calculate the volume. The criterion for subdivision is obtained by using the property of density functions and treating different types of skeletons respectively to get accurate minimum and maximum distances from a cube to a skeleton. Compared with the criterion generated by other ways such as using traditional Interval Analysis, Affine Arithmetic, or Lipschitz condition, our approach is much better both in speed and accuracy.

  18. Development of theoretical approach for describing electronic properties of hetero-interface systems under applied bias voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Kenji; Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a theoretical approach for describing the electronic properties of hetero-interface systems under an applied electrode bias. The finite-temperature density functional theory is employed for controlling the chemical potential in their interfacial region, and thereby the electronic charge of the system is obtained. The electric field generated by the electronic charging is described as a saw-tooth-like electrostatic potential. Because of the continuum approximation of dielectrics sandwiched between electrodes, we treat dielectrics with thicknesses in a wide range from a few nanometers to more than several meters. Furthermore, the approach is implemented in our original computational program named grid-based coupled electron and electromagnetic field dynamics (GCEED), facilitating its application to nanostructures. Thus, the approach is capable of comprehensively revealing electronic structure changes in hetero-interface systems with an applied bias that are practically useful for experimental studies. We calculate the electronic structure of a SiO2-graphene-boron nitride (BN) system in which an electrode bias is applied between the graphene layer and an electrode attached on the SiO2 film. The electronic energy barrier between graphene and BN is varied with an applied bias, and the energy variation depends on the thickness of the BN film. This is because the density of states of graphene is so low that the graphene layer cannot fully screen the electric field generated by the electrodes. We have demonstrated that the electronic properties of hetero-interface systems are well controlled by the combination of the electronic charging and the generated electric field.

  19. Drug and Alcohol Studies (Volume 4: Policy approaches)

    OpenAIRE

    Macgregor, S.; Thom, B

    2014-01-01

    VOLUME FOUR: POLICY APPROACHES Preface Robert MacCoun and Peter Reuter The Varieties of Drug Control at the Dawn of the 21st Century Comparative Analysis of Alcohol Control Policies in 30 Countries Donald Brand et al A Comparative Study of 38 European Countries Limited Rationality and the Limits of Supply Reduction Jonathan Caulkins and Robert MacCoun The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy Craig Reinerman, Peter Cohen and Hendrien Kaal Cannabis in Amsterdam and San Francisco AIDS and Injecting ...

  20. Describing the interannual variability of precipitation with the derived distribution approach: effects of record length and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Claudio I.; Sebastián Moraga, Jorge; Pranzini, Geri; Molnar, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Interannual variability of precipitation is traditionally described by fitting a probability model to yearly precipitation totals. There are three potential problems with this approach: a long record (at least 25-30 years) is required in order to fit the model, years with missing rainfall data cannot be used, and the data need to be homogeneous, i.e., one has to assume stationarity. To overcome some of these limitations, we test an alternative methodology proposed by Eagleson (1978), based on the derived distribution (DD) approach. It allows estimation of the probability density function (pdf) of annual rainfall without requiring long records, provided that continuously gauged precipitation data are available to derive external storm properties. The DD approach combines marginal pdfs for storm depths and inter-arrival times to obtain an analytical formulation of the distribution of annual precipitation, under the simplifying assumptions of independence between events and independence between storm depth and time to the next storm. Because it is based on information about storms and not on annual totals, the DD can make use of information from years with incomplete data; more importantly, only a few years of rainfall measurements should suffice to estimate the parameters of the marginal pdfs, at least at locations where it rains with some regularity. For two temperate locations in different climates (Concepción, Chile, and Lugano, Switzerland), we randomly resample shortened time series to evaluate in detail the effects of record length on the DD, comparing the results with the traditional approach of fitting a normal (or lognormal) distribution. Then, at the same two stations, we assess the biases introduced in the DD when using daily totalized rainfall, instead of continuously gauged data. Finally, for randomly selected periods between 3 and 15 years in length, we conduct full blind tests at 52 high-quality gauging stations in Switzerland, analyzing the ability

  1. A Hybrid 3D Learning-and-Interaction-based Segmentation Approach Applied on CT Liver Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Danciu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical volume segmentation in various imaging modalities using real 3D approaches (in contrast to slice-by-slice segmentation represents an actual trend. The increase in the acquisition resolution leads to large amount of data, requiring solutions to reduce the dimensionality of the segmentation problem. In this context, the real-time interaction with the large medical data volume represents another milestone. This paper addresses the twofold problem of the 3D segmentation applied to large data sets and also describes an intuitive neuro-fuzzy trained interaction method. We present a new hybrid semi-supervised 3D segmentation, for liver volumes obtained from computer tomography scans. This is a challenging medical volume segmentation task, due to the acquisition and inter-patient variability of the liver parenchyma. The proposed solution combines a learning-based segmentation stage (employing 3D discrete cosine transform and a probabilistic support vector machine classifier with a post-processing stage (automatic and manual segmentation refinement. Optionally, an optimization of the segmentation can be achieved by level sets, using as initialization the segmentation provided by the learning-based solution. The supervised segmentation is applied on elementary cubes in which the CT volume is decomposed by tilling, thus ensuring a significant reduction of the data to be classified by the support vector machine into liver/not liver. On real volumes, the proposed approach provides good segmentation accuracy, with a significant reduction in the computational complexity.

  2. EPOSHQ-a new approach to describe charmed mesons in pp, pA and AA collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichelin, J.; Guiot, B.; Ozvenschuck, V.; Nahrgang, M.; Gossiaux, P. B.; Werner, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present first results of a new approach, EPOSHQ, which combines the EPOS3 event generator with the heavy quarks physics. In this approach light and heavy quarks are simultaneously created in the elementary collisions. The heavy quarks interact by elastic and radiative collisions with the plasma constituents, given by the EPOS3 approach, employing the full Boltzmann collision integral. This approach will allow for the description of correlations between light and heavy mesons.

  3. WE-AB-BRA-02: Development of Biomechanical Models to Describe Dose-Volume Response to Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, M; Polan, D; Feng, M; Lawrence, T; Haken, R Ten; Brock, K [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy treatment for liver metastases causes marked liver hypertrophy in areas receiving low dose and atrophy/fibrosis in areas receiving high dose. The purpose of this work is to develop and evaluate a biomechanical model-based dose-response model to describe these liver responses to SBRT. Methods: In this retrospective study, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, Morfeus, was expanded to include dose-based boundary conditions. Liver and tumor volumes were contoured on the planning images and CT/MR images three months post-RT and converted to finite element models. A thermal expansion-based relationship correlating the delivered dose and volume response was generated from 22 patients previously treated. This coefficient, combined with the planned dose, was applied as an additional boundary condition to describe the volumetric response of the liver of an additional cohort of metastatic liver patients treated with SBRT. The accuracy of the model was evaluated based on overall volumetric liver comparisons and the target registration error (TRE) using the average deviations in positions of identified vascular bifurcations on each set of registered images, with a target accuracy of the 2.5mm isotropic dose grid (vector dimension 4.3mm). Results: The thermal expansion coefficient models the volumetric change of the liver to within 3%. The accuracy of Morfeus with dose-expansion boundary conditions a TRE of 5.7±2.8mm compared to 11.2±3.7mm using rigid registration and 8.9±0.28mm using Morfeus with only spatial boundary conditions. Conclusion: A biomechanical model has been developed to describe the volumetric and spatial response of the liver to SBRT. This work will enable the improvement of correlating functional imaging with delivered dose, the mapping of the delivered dose from one treatment onto the planning images for a subsequent treatment, and will further provide information to assist

  4. A direct renormalization group approach for the excluded volume problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, S. L. A.; Chaves, C. M.

    1980-03-01

    We propose a position-space renormalization group approach for the excluded volume problem in a square lattice by considering “percolating” self-avoiding paths in a b×b cell, where b=2,3,4: Two ways of counting the paths are presented. The values obtained for the exponent v converge respectively to 0.731 and 0.720, close to the usually accepted value v=0.75. Comments on the relation between percolation and self-avoiding walks are made.

  5. New Approach for Error Reduction in the Volume Penalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Iwakami-Nakano, Wakana; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Hattori, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The volume penalization method offers an efficient way to numerically simulate flows around complex-shaped bodies which move and/or deform in general. In this method a penalization term which has permeability eta and a mask function is added to a governing equation as a forcing term in order to impose different dynamics in solid and fluid regions. In this paper we investigate the accuracy of the volume penalization method in detail. We choose the one-dimensional Burgers' equation as a governing equation since it enables us extensive study and it has a nonlinear term similar to the Navier-Stokes equations. It is confirmed that the error which consists of the discretization/truncation error, the penalization error, the round-off error, and others has the same features as those in previous results when we use the standard definition of the mask function. As the number of grid points increases, the error converges to a non-zero constant which is equal to the penalization error. We propose a new approach for reduc...

  6. Frost Formation: Optimizing solutions under a finite volume approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrons, E.; Perez-Segarra, C. D.; Oliet, C.

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional transient formulation of the frost formation process is developed by means of a finite volume approach. Emphasis is put on the frost surface boundary condition as well as the wide range of empirical correlations related to the thermophysical and transport properties of frost. A study of the numerical solution is made, establishing the parameters that ensure grid independence. Attention is given to the algorithm, the discretised equations and the code optimization through dynamic relaxation techniques. A critical analysis of four cases is carried out by comparing solutions of several empirical models against tested experiments. As a result, a discussion on the performance of such parameters is started and a proposal of the most suitable models is presented.

  7. Rosacea Fulminans Precipitated by Acute Stress: A Case Report Describing an Integrative Approach for a Patient Reluctant to Use Isotretinoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerkamp, Patrick; Mousdicas, Nico; Bednarek, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Context Rosacea fulminans is a rare skin disorder with a multifactorial etiology. Stress is one of the common precipitating factors of this condition but is not often targeted in treatment. Isotretinoin is considered part of the first-line therapy for this condition but, in cases where its use is restricted, other therapeutic interventions as part of an integrative approach may be effective. Patient Concerns A 38-y-old female presented with rosacea fulminans brought on by an acutely stressful event. After multiple failed therapies, she experienced resolution of her symptoms with a combination of systemic corticosteroids, antibiotics, diet modification, and stress reduction, with the treatment of stress playing a significant role. Conclusions Stress management and diet modification are key adjunctive therapies in the treatment of rosacea fulminans and need to be addressed more often in treatment. In cases where patients are reluctant or unable to take isotretinoin, an integrative approach may be effective in achieving symptomatic improvement. PMID:28223895

  8. [DNA barcoding of animal and plant species as an approach for their molecular identification and describing of diversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneer, V S

    2009-01-01

    DNA barcoding was recently developed as a method of species identification across a broad range of eucaryotes taxa by sequencing a standardized short DNA fragment. Due to modern technologies, it is possible to do this with a tiny piece of any tissue taken from an organism at any developmental phase, often without damaging it. A variable 5' half of mitochondial gene CO1 is suggested as a standard region for most of animals; it is not identified yet for fungi and plants. "The Barcode of Life Initiative" implies creating and developing the barcode library for all the species on Earth to facilitate both assigning of newly obtained specimens to the known species and for discovering new and cryptic species or at least their provisional recognition. This approach has a great potential for the use in global biodiversity studies, especially in the case of poorly investigated taxa and environments. The initiative in question involves accomplish of a new web-based sequence database with rigorous rules for taxonomic information on the specimens and records of their storage as well as for standards of sequence quality and their entry. Critical objections of opponents to DNA barcoding are reviewed as well as limitations of the approach, the problems to be taken into consideration, and the fields where it can be used. Numerous recent studies on different animal groups convincingly demonstrate the efficacy of DNA barcoding and its potentials. The latter depends on availability of comprehensive and unbiased reference database implying correct identification of the source specimens and adequate knowledge of intraspecies variation, so the Barcode Initiative would be more successful as a part of the integrative analysis of the taxs being barcoded.

  9. A kinetic approach to describe trace-element distribution between particles and solution in natural aquatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Urs P.; Li, Yuan-Hui; Santschi, Peter H.

    1984-07-01

    The partitioning of radioactive trace elements between seawater and particulate matter from surface sediments and sediment traps was investigated in laboratory experiments. For the elements Na, Zn, Se, Sr, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Th and Pa (group I) constant distribution coefficients ( Kd) were found after a few days of equilibration, whereas the elements Be, Mn, Co and Fe (group II) showed an increasing Kd over the whole time of observation of 108 days. The time dependence of Kd is described by an adsorption-desorption equilibrium (group I elements), followed by a lattice transport reaction step (group II elements). The reaction rate constants are compared to Mn oxidation rates and to adsorption rate constants derived from in situ measurements of the U/Th disequilibrium as available from literature.

  10. The effects of intracranial volume adjustment approaches on multiple regional MRI volumes in healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eVoevodskaya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In neurodegeneration research, normalization of regional volumes by intracranial volume (ICV is important to estimate the extent of disease-driven atrophy. There is little agreement as to whether raw volumes, volume-to-ICV fractions or regional volumes from which the ICV factor has been regressed out should be used for volumetric brain imaging studies. Using multiple regional cortical and subcortical volumetric measures generated by Freesurfer (51 in total, the main aim of this study was to elucidate the implications of these adjustment approaches. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data were analyzed from two large cohorts, the population-based PIVUS cohort (N=406, all subjects age 75 and the Alzheimer disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI cohort (N=724. Further, we studied whether the chosen ICV normalization approach influenced the relationship between hippocampus and cognition in the three diagnostic groups of the ADNI cohort (Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy individuals. The ability of raw vs adjusted hippocampal volumes to predict diagnostic status was also assessed. In both cohorts raw volumes correlate positively with ICV, but do not scale directly proportionally with it. The correlation direction is reversed for all volume-to-ICV fractions, except the lateral and third ventricles. Most grey matter fractions are larger in females, while lateral ventricle fractions are greater in males. Residual correction effectively eliminated the correlation between the regional volumes and ICV and removed gender differences. The association between hippocampal volumes and cognition was not altered by ICV normalization. Comparing prediction of diagnostic status using the different approaches, small but significant differences were found. The choice of normalization approach should be carefully considered when designing a volumetric brain imaging study.

  11. Metabolic potential of microbial mats and microbialites: Autotrophic capabilities described by an in silico stoichiometric approach from shared genomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-08-01

    Microbialites and microbial mats are complex communities with high phylogenetic diversity. These communities are mostly composed of bacteria and archaea, which are the earliest living forms on Earth and relevant to biogeochemical evolution. In this study, we identified the shared metabolic pathways for uptake of inorganic C and N in microbial mats and microbialites based on metagenomic data sets. An in silico analysis for autotrophic pathways was used to trace the paths of C and N to the system, following an elementary flux modes (EFM) approach, resulting in a stoichiometric model. The fragility was analyzed by the minimal cut sets method. We found four relevant pathways for the incorporation of CO2 (Calvin cycle, reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, and dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle), some of them present only in archaea, while nitrogen fixation was the most important source of N to the system. The metabolic potential to incorporate nitrate to biomass was also relevant. The fragility of the network was low, suggesting a high redundancy of the autotrophic pathways due to their broad metabolic diversity, and highlighting the relevance of reducing power source. This analysis suggests that microbial mats and microbialites are "metabolic pumps" for the incorporation of inorganic gases and formation of organic matter.

  12. A New Method for Describing the Mechanism of a Chemical Reaction Based on the Unified Reaction Valley Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenli; Sexton, Thomas; Kraka, Elfi; Freindorf, Marek; Cremer, Dieter

    2016-02-09

    The unified reaction valley approach (URVA) used for a detailed mechanistic analysis of chemical reactions is improved in three different ways: (i) Direction and curvature of path are analyzed in terms of internal coordinate components that no longer depend on local vibrational modes. In this way, the path analysis is no longer sensitive to path instabilities associated with the occurrences of imaginary frequencies. (ii) The use of third order terms of the energy for a local description of the reaction valley allows an extension of the URVA analysis into the pre- and postchemical regions of the reaction path, which are typically characterized by flat energy regions. (iii) Configurational and conformational processes of the reaction complex are made transparent even in cases where these imply energy changes far less than a kcal/mol by exploiting the topology of the potential energy surface. As examples, the rhodium-catalyzed methanol carbonization, the Diels-Alder reaction between 1,3-butadiene and ethene, and the rearrangement of HCN to CNH are discussed.

  13. Poor concurrence between disabilities as described by patients and established assessment tools three months after stroke: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tistad, Malin; Ytterberg, Charlotte; Tham, Kerstin; von Koch, Lena

    2012-02-15

    Disability/problems, one phenomenon underlying people's need for health care services, can be viewed both from the perspectives of people with stroke (felt problems), and the health professionals (assessed problems). The aim was to describe felt problems three months after stroke and to explore the concurrence between felt problems and assessed problems. The patients (n=203) received care in the stroke units at Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden. Felt problems, drawn from an open question, were categorized. Results from established assessment tools: Katz Extended Index of ADL (KI); Barthel Index (BI) and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) represented assessed problems. Items/domains in the assessment tools that corresponded to the categories of felt problems were identified and comparisons performed. The category Fatigue had the largest number of felt problems (n=58, 28%). Fourteen out of the 24 categories of felt problems had corresponding items/domains in the assessment tools. KE/BI failed to identify 16-57% and SIS 0-33% of the felt problems. There was a substantial lack of concurrence between felt and assessed problems. The results indicate that the use of standardized instruments should be complemented by a dialog if health services are to be based on problems experienced by the patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 'Weather Value at Risk': A uniform approach to describe and compare sectoral income risks from climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettenthaler, Franz; Köberl, Judith; Bird, David Neil

    2016-02-01

    We extend the concept of 'Weather Value at Risk' - initially introduced to measure the economic risks resulting from current weather fluctuations - to describe and compare sectoral income risks from climate change. This is illustrated using the examples of wheat cultivation and summer tourism in (parts of) Sardinia. Based on climate scenario data from four different regional climate models we study the change in the risk of weather-related income losses between some reference (1971-2000) and some future (2041-2070) period. Results from both examples suggest an increase in weather-related risks of income losses due to climate change, which is somewhat more pronounced for summer tourism. Nevertheless, income from wheat cultivation is at much higher risk of weather-related losses than income from summer tourism, both under reference and future climatic conditions. A weather-induced loss of at least 5% - compared to the income associated with average reference weather conditions - shows a 40% (80%) probability of occurrence in the case of wheat cultivation, but only a 0.4% (16%) probability of occurrence in the case of summer tourism, given reference (future) climatic conditions. Whereas in the agricultural example increases in the weather-related income risks mainly result from an overall decrease in average wheat yields, the heightened risk in the tourism example stems mostly from a change in the weather-induced variability of tourism incomes. With the extended 'Weather Value at Risk' concept being able to capture both, impacts from changes in the mean and the variability of the climate, it is a powerful tool for presenting and disseminating the results of climate change impact assessments. Due to its flexibility, the concept can be applied to any economic sector and therefore provides a valuable tool for cross-sectoral comparisons of climate change impacts, but also for the assessment of the costs and benefits of adaptation measures.

  15. Structured assessment approach: Version I. Applied demonstration of output results. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, 1.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility (HFCF) and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the third volume, Applied Demonstration of Output Results, of a four-volume document. It presents the outputs for each of the four levels of the SAA Version 1 computational package. Two types of outputs are discussed: detailed output findings and summary output tables. The summary output tables are used to aggregate the detailed output findings in a condensed form for NRC analyst consumption. Specific output results are presented for an HFCF, which is described in Volume II.

  16. Price dynamics and trading volume: A semiparametric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierdijk, L.; Nijman, T.E.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the relation between price impact and trading volume for a sample of stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The parametric VAR-models that have been used in the literature impose strong proportionality and symmetry restrictions on the price impact of trades,

  17. Volumes of Solids of Revolution. A Unified Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Morales, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to compute the volume of a solid of revolution as a double integral in a very simple way. Then, we see that the classical methods (disks and shells) are recovered if this double integral is computed by each of the two possible applications of Fubini's theorem. As a further application we also show how Pappus' theorem is obtained from our formula.

  18. Then and Now: Approaches to Understanding Children's Literature in Two Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M Bani-Khair

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper investigates two main volumes taken from Children's Literature Association Quarterly; the earlier one is Vol. 11 published in 1986, and the other one, a more recent one, Vol. 32 published in 2007, as to understand the differences and similarities regarding the approaches used in the articles to understand Children's Literature in terms of its multifarious aspects such us, literary genres, styles, themes, and methodologies. Such kind of comparison yielded that those differences between those two volumes cover new thematic suggestions, new treatment and projection of characters, and strict scholarship which make the newer volume different in terms of approaches from the earlier one. The research also concluded that modern analytical perspectives are probably the most obvious transformations and changes in the second volume. Keywords: Volume, approach, childhood, construction, scholarship, transformation, modernism, historicism, analysis

  19. Performance of plane-wave-based LDA+U and GGA+U approaches to describe magnetic coupling in molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Pablo; Loschen, Christoph; Moreira, Ibério De P R; Illas, Francesc

    2009-11-15

    This work explores the performance of periodic plane wave density functional theory calculations with an on-site Coulomb correction to the standard LDA and GGA exchange-correlation potential--commonly used to describe strongly correlated solids--in describing the magnetic coupling constant of a series of molecular compounds representative of dinuclear Cu complexes and of organic diradicals. The resulting LDA+U or GGA+U formalisms, lead to results comparable to experiment and to those obtained by means of standard hybrid functionals provided that the value of the U parameter is adequately chosen. Hence, these methods offer an alternative efficient computational scheme to correct LDA and GGA approaches to adequately describe the electronic structure and magnetic coupling in large molecular magnetic systems, although at the expenses of introducing an empirical (U) parameter. For all investigated copper dinuclear systems, the LDA+U and GGA+U approaches lead to an improvement in the description of magnetic properties over the original LDA and GGA schemes with an accuracy similar to that arising from the hybrid B3LYP functional, by increasing the on-site Coulomb repulsion with a moderate U value. Nevertheless, the introduction of an arbitrary U value in the 0-10 eV range most often provides the correct ground-state spin distribution and the correct sign of the magnetic coupling constant.

  20. Generalized Navier Boundary Condition for a Volume Of Fluid approach using a Finite-Volume method

    CERN Document Server

    Boelens, A M P

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an analytical Volume Of Fluid (VOF) implementation of the Generalized Navier Boundary Condition is presented based on the Brackbill surface tension model. The model is validated by simulations of droplets on a smooth surface in a planar geometry. Looking at the static behavior of the droplets, it is found that there is a good match between the droplet shape resolved in the simulations and the theoretically predicted shape for various values of the Young's angle. Evaluating the spreading of a droplet on a completely wetting surface, the Voinov-Tanner-Cox law ($\\theta \\propto \\text{Ca}^{1/3}$) can be observed. At later times scaling follows $r \\propto t^{1/2}$, suggesting spreading is limited by inertia. These observations are made without any fitting parameters except the slip length.

  1. Volume-area scaling approach versus flowline model in glacier volume projections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radic, V.; Hock, Regine; Oerlemans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Volume–area scaling provides a practical alternative to ice-flow modelling to account for glacier size changes when modelling the future evolution of glaciers; however, uncertainties remain as to the validity of this approach under non-steady conditions. We address these uncertainties by deriving sc

  2. A novel approach to predict the excess volume of hydrocarbon mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkers, H. J.; Bosma, J. C.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores whether principles obtained for the packing of solid macroscopic particles can be applied to the study of excess volumes of liquid mixtures. The approach is applied to mixtures of 'pure' hydrocarbons, i.e. containing only C- and H-atoms. In this new approach a set of equations wa

  3. Lattice approach to finite volume form-factors of the Massive Thirring (Sine-Gordon) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Árpád

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, that the light-cone lattice approach for the Massive-Thirring (sine-Gordon) model, through the quantum inverse scattering method, admits an appropriate framework for computing the finite volume form-factors of local operators of the model. In this work we compute the finite volume diagonal matrix elements of the U(1) conserved current in the pure soliton sector of the theory. Based on the systematic large volume expansion of our results, we conjecture an exact expression for the finite volume expectation values of local operators in pure soliton states. At large volume in leading order these expectation values have the same form as in purely elastic scattering theories, but exponentially small corrections differ from previous Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz conjectures of purely elastic scattering theories.

  4. Simple Waveforms, Simply Described

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first Lazarus Project calculations, it has been frequently noted that binary black hole merger waveforms are 'simple.' In this talk we examine some of the simple features of coalescence and merger waveforms from a variety of binary configurations. We suggest an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This allows a coherent description, of both the inspiral waveforms, derivable from post-Newtonian(PN) calculations, and the numerically determined merger-ringdown. We focus particularly on similarities in the features of various Multipolar waveform components Generated by various systems. The late-time phase evolution of most L these waveform components are accurately described with a sinple analytic fit. We also discuss apparent relationships among phase and amplitude evolution. Taken together with PN information, the features we describe can provide an approximate analytic description full coalescence wavefoRms. complementary to other analytic waveforns approaches.

  5. FLUID-BASED SIMULATION APPROACH FOR HIGH VOLUME CONVEYOR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying WANG; Chen ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    High volume conveyor systems in distribution centers have very large footprint and can handle large volumes and hold thousands of items. Traditional discrete-event cell-based approach to simulate such networks becomes computationally challenging. An alternative approach, in which the traffic is represented by segments of fluid flow of different density instead of individual packages, is presented in this paper to address this challenge. The proposed fluid-based simulation approach is developed using a Hybrid Petri Nets framework. The underlying model is a combination of an extension of a Batches Petri Nets (BPN) and a Stochastic Petri Nets (SPN). The extensions are in the inclusion of random elements and relaxation of certain structural constraints. Some adaptations are also made to fit the target system modeling. The approach is presented with an example.

  6. Then and Now: Approaches to Understanding Children's Literature in Two Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Khair, Baker M.; Khawaldeh, Imad M.

    2016-01-01

    This research paper investigates two main volumes taken from "Children's Literature Association Quarterly"; the earlier one is Vol. 11 published in 1986, and the other one, a more recent one, Vol. 32 published in 2007, as to understand the differences and similarities regarding the approaches used in the articles to understand Children's…

  7. A multi-criteria approach to camera motion design for volume data animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Hsien; Zhang, Yubo; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2013-12-01

    We present an integrated camera motion design and path generation system for building volume data animations. Creating animations is an essential task in presenting complex scientific visualizations. Existing visualization systems use an established animation function based on keyframes selected by the user. This approach is limited in providing the optimal in-between views of the data. Alternatively, computer graphics and virtual reality camera motion planning is frequently focused on collision free movement in a virtual walkthrough. For semi-transparent, fuzzy, or blobby volume data the collision free objective becomes insufficient. Here, we provide a set of essential criteria focused on computing camera paths to establish effective animations of volume data. Our dynamic multi-criteria solver coupled with a force-directed routing algorithm enables rapid generation of camera paths. Once users review the resulting animation and evaluate the camera motion, they are able to determine how each criterion impacts path generation. In this paper, we demonstrate how incorporating this animation approach with an interactive volume visualization system reduces the effort in creating context-aware and coherent animations. This frees the user to focus on visualization tasks with the objective of gaining additional insight from the volume data.

  8. Precise segmentation of multiple organs in CT volumes using learning-based approach and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Zheng, Yefeng; Birkbeck, Neil; Zhang, Jingdan; Kohlberger, Timo; Tietjen, Christian; Boettger, Thomas; Duncan, James S; Zhou, S Kevin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method by incorporating information theory into the learning-based approach for automatic and accurate pelvic organ segmentation (including the prostate, bladder and rectum). We target 3D CT volumes that are generated using different scanning protocols (e.g., contrast and non-contrast, with and without implant in the prostate, various resolution and position), and the volumes come from largely diverse sources (e.g., diseased in different organs). Three key ingredients are combined to solve this challenging segmentation problem. First, marginal space learning (MSL) is applied to efficiently and effectively localize the multiple organs in the largely diverse CT volumes. Second, learning techniques, steerable features, are applied for robust boundary detection. This enables handling of highly heterogeneous texture pattern. Third, a novel information theoretic scheme is incorporated into the boundary inference process. The incorporation of the Jensen-Shannon divergence further drives the mesh to the best fit of the image, thus improves the segmentation performance. The proposed approach is tested on a challenging dataset containing 188 volumes from diverse sources. Our approach not only produces excellent segmentation accuracy, but also runs about eighty times faster than previous state-of-the-art solutions. The proposed method can be applied to CT images to provide visual guidance to physicians during the computer-aided diagnosis, treatment planning and image-guided radiotherapy to treat cancers in pelvic region.

  9. A risk management approach to double-shell tank waste volume versus storage capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Thurkow, T.J.; Fritz, R.L.; Nuhlestein, L.O.; Allen, M.R.; Stuart, R.J. [ARES Corp. (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A risk-based assessment of the overall waste volume versus double-shell tank storage capacity was conducted to develop fallback positions for projections where the waste volume was at a high risk of exceeding capacity. This study was initiated to provide that assessment. A working simulation model was the primary deliverable of this study. The model validates the approach and demonstrates that simulation analysis can provide a method of tracking uncertainties in available data, assessing probabilities, and serves as a tool to be used by management to determine the consequences of various off-normal occurrences.

  10. Hot and Dense Hadron Gas (HG): A New Excluded-volume approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, S K

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a thermodynamically consistent equation of state (EOS), based on excluded-volume approach, for a hot, dense hadron gas (HG). We calculate various thermodynamical quantities of HG and various hadron ratios and compare our model results with the results of other excluded-volume models and experimental data. We also calculate various transport coefficients such as $\\eta/s$ etc. and compare them with other HG model results. Furthermore, we test the validity of our model in getting the rapidity spectra of various hadrons and the effect of flow on them is investigated by matching our predictions with the experimental data.

  11. Confocal microscopy as a useful approach to describe gill rakers of Asian species of carp and native filter-feeding fishes of the upper Mississippi River system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walleser, L R; Howard, D R; Sandheinrich, M B; Gaikowski, M P; Amberg, J J

    2014-11-01

    To better understand potential diet overlap among exotic Asian species of carp and native species of filter-feeding fishes of the upper Mississippi River system, microscopy was used to document morphological differences in the gill rakers. Analysing samples first with light microscopy and subsequently with confocal microscopy, the three-dimensional structure of gill rakers in Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and Dorosoma cepedianum was more thoroughly described and illustrated than previous work with traditional microscopy techniques. The three-dimensional structure of gill rakers in Ictiobus cyprinellus was described and illustrated for the first time.

  12. Confocal microscopy as a useful approach to describe gill rakers of Asian species of carp and native filter-feeding fishes of the upper Mississippi River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza R. Walleser,; D.R. Howard,; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Amberg, Jon J.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand potential diet overlap among exotic Asian species of carp and native species of filter-feeding fishes of the upper Mississippi River system, microscopy was used to document morphological differences in the gill rakers. Analysing samples first with light microscopy and subsequently with confocal microscopy, the three-dimensional structure of gill rakers in Hypophthalmichthys molitrix,Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and Dorosoma cepedianum was more thoroughly described and illustrated than previous work with traditional microscopy techniques. The three-dimensional structure of gill rakers in Ictiobus cyprinellus was described and illustrated for the first time.

  13. Patterns of failure after the reduced volume approach for elective nodal irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Ki Ho; Lee, Jeong Eun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the patterns of nodal failure after radiotherapy (RT) with the reduced volume approach for elective neck nodal irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty-six NPC patients who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy with the reduced volume approach for ENI were reviewed. The ENI included retropharyngeal and level II lymph nodes, and only encompassed the echelon inferior to the involved level to eliminate the entire neck irradiation. Patients received either moderate hypofractionated intensity-modulated RT for a total of 72.6 Gy (49.5 Gy to elective nodal areas) or a conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal RT for a total of 68.4-72 Gy (39.6-45 Gy to elective nodal areas). Patterns of failure, locoregional control, and survival were analyzed. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 3 to 80 months). The out-of-field nodal failure when omitting ENI was none. Three patients developed neck recurrences (one in-field recurrence in the 72.6 Gy irradiated nodal area and two in the elective irradiated region of 39.6 Gy). Overall disease failure at any site developed in 11 patients (19.6%). Among these, there were six local failures (10.7%), three regional failures (5.4%), and five distant metastases (8.9%). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 87.1%, and the distant failure-free rate was 90.4%; disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years was 80% and 86.8%, respectively. No patient developed nodal failure in the omitted ENI site. Our investigation has demonstrated that the reduced volume approach for ENI appears to be a safe treatment approach in NPC.

  14. An Electric Field Volume Integral Equation Approach to Simulate Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Remis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an electric field volume integral equation approach to simulate surface plasmon propagation along metal/dielectric interfaces. Metallic objects embedded in homogeneous dielectric media are considered. Starting point is a so-called weak-form of the electric field integral equation. This form is discretized on a uniform tensor-product grid resulting in a system matrix whose action on a vector can be computed via the fast Fourier transform. The GMRES iterative solver is used to solve the discretized set of equations and numerical examples, illustrating surface plasmon propagation, are presented. The convergence rate of GMRES is discussed in terms of the spectrum of the system matrix and through numerical experiments we show how the eigenvalues of the discretized volume scattering operator are related to plasmon propagation and the medium parameters of a metallic object.

  15. Benchmarking Post-Hartree–Fock Methods To Describe the Nonlinear Optical Properties of Polymethines: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction (ADC) Approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Knippenberg, Stefan

    2016-10-07

    Third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of polymethine dyes have been widely studied for applications such as all-optical switching. However, the limited accuracy of the current computational methodologies has prevented a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the lowest excited states and their influence on the molecular optical and NLO properties. Here, attention is paid to the lowest excited-state energies and their energetic ratio, as these characteristics impact the figure-of-merit for all-optical switching. For a series of model polymethines, we compare several algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) schemes for the polarization propagator with approximate second-order coupled cluster (CC2) theory, the widely used INDO/MRDCI approach and the symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) algorithm incorporating singles and doubles linked excitation operators (SAC-CI SD-R). We focus in particular on the ground-to-excited state transition dipole moments and the corresponding state dipole moments, since these quantities are found to be of utmost importance for an effective description of the third-order polarizability γ and two-photon absorption spectra. A sum-overstates expression has been used, which is found to quickly converge. While ADC(3/2) has been found to be the most appropriate method to calculate these properties, CC2 performs poorly.

  16. Describing the heavy-ion above-barrier fusion using the bare potentials resulting from Migdal and M3Y double-folding approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Systematic calculations of the Coulomb barrier parameters for collisions of spherical nuclei are performed within the framework of the double folding approach. The value of the parameter {B}Z={Z}P{Z}T/({A}P{1/3}+{A}T{1/3}) (which estimates the Coulomb barrier height) varies in these calculations from 10 MeV up to 150 MeV. The nuclear densities came from the Hartree-Fock calculations which reproduce the experimental charge densities with good accuracy. For the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction two analytical approximations known in the literature are used: the M3Y and Migdal forces. The calculations show that Migdal interaction always results in the higher Coulomb barrier. Moreover, as B Z increases the difference between the M3Y and Migdal barrier heights systematically increases as well. As the result, the above barrier fusion cross sections calculated dynamically with the M3Y forces and surface friction are in agreement with the data. The cross sections calculated with the Migdal forces are always below the experimental data even without accounting for the dissipation.

  17. Describing the heavy-ion above-barrier fusion using the bare potentials resulting from Migdal and M3Y double-folding approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Gontchar, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Systematic calculations of the Coulomb barrier parameters for collisions of spherical nuclei are performed within the framework of the double folding approach. The value of the parameter $B_Z=Z_PZ_T/(A^{1/3}_P+(A^{1/3}_P)$ (which estimates the Coulomb barrier height) varies in these calculations from 10 MeV up to 150 MeV. The nuclear densities came from the Hartree-Fock calculations which reproduce the experimental charge densities with good accuracy. For the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction two analytical approximations known in the literature are used: the M3Y and Migdal forces. The calculations show that Migdal interaction always results in the higher Coulomb barrier. Moreover, as $B_Z$ increases the difference between the M3Y and Migdal barrier heights systematically increases as well. As the result, the above barrier fusion cross sections calculated dynamically with the M3Y forces and surface friction are in agreement with the data. The cross sections calculated with the Migdal forces are always bel...

  18. Benchmarking Post-Hartree-Fock Methods To Describe the Nonlinear Optical Properties of Polymethines: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction (ADC) Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippenberg, Stefan; Gieseking, Rebecca L; Rehn, Dirk R; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Dreuw, Andreas; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2016-11-08

    Third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of polymethine dyes have been widely studied for applications such as all-optical switching. However, the limited accuracy of the current computational methodologies has prevented a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the lowest excited states and their influence on the molecular optical and NLO properties. Here, attention is paid to the lowest excited-state energies and their energetic ratio, as these characteristics impact the figure-of-merit for all-optical switching. For a series of model polymethines, we compare several algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) schemes for the polarization propagator with approximate second-order coupled cluster (CC2) theory, the widely used INDO/MRDCI approach and the symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) algorithm incorporating singles and doubles linked excitation operators (SAC-CI SD-R). We focus in particular on the ground-to-excited state transition dipole moments and the corresponding state dipole moments, since these quantities are found to be of utmost importance for an effective description of the third-order polarizability γ and two-photon absorption spectra. A sum-overstates expression has been used, which is found to quickly converge. While ADC(3/2) has been found to be the most appropriate method to calculate these properties, CC2 performs poorly.

  19. Use of latent class analysis approach to describe drug and sexual HIV risk patterns among injection drug users in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Syed W B; Ross, Michael W; Lai, Dejian; Risser, Jan M

    2014-04-01

    Following latent class analysis (LCA) approach we examined patterns of HIV risk using two related domains of behavior: drug use, and sexual activity among 523 injection drug users (IDUs) recruited into the 2009 National HIV behavioral surveillance system. Using posterior probability of endorsing six drug and sexual items, we identified three distinct classes representing underlying HIV risk. Forty percent of our participants were at highest risk, 25 % at medium risk, and 35 % at lowest risk for HIV infection. Compared to the Lowest-risk class members, the Highest-risk class members had riskier drug and sexual behaviors and had higher prevalence of HIV cases (6 vs. 4 %). This analysis underscores the merit of LCA to empirically identify risk patterns using multiple indicators and our results show HIV risk varies among IDUs as their drug and sexual behaviors. Tailored and targeted prevention and treatment interventions for the dual risk pattern are required rather than for drug or sexual risk in silos.

  20. A pragmatic performance reporting approach for describing PV Hybrid systems within mini-grids. Work in progress from IEA's PVPS Task 11 Act. 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swingler, Andrew [Schneider Electric, Burnaby, BC (Canada). Renewable Energies Business

    2010-07-01

    Reviewers of available PV hybrid system and mini-grid case studies are often limited to information detailing the size of the main system components (PV, battery and generator) and perhaps some historical anecdotes recalling major maintenance activities. While this enables rapid insight into the capital cost and perhaps the overall reliability of the system, this information communicates little in the way of system performance from a levelized cost of electricity and GHG emissions point of view - or what can be considered 'the business' perspective. Key system performance information must be available to effectively communicate operational system performance so system operators or perspective customers. Activity 31 of the IEA's PVPS Task 11 looks at how performance reporting can be useful, why it is often absent and what can be done to improve the current situation. This paper reviews some past work in the area of data acquisition and performance calculation used for describing PV Hybrid and mini-grid systems. In particular the IEC 61724 PV performance monitoring standard and results from the 'Benchmarking RE Components and Systems' project are considered. Ultimately, a stripped-down, easier-to-implement and flexible method for monitoring and reporting on key performance indicators is proposed based, in part, on the prior literature. The proposed framework is then used to briefly discuss the performance of two monitored PV hybrid mini-grid examples. (orig.)

  1. Describe Your Favorite Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Isaac; Dill, Vicky

    1993-01-01

    A third grader describes Ms. Gonzalez, his favorite teacher, who left to accept a more lucrative teaching assignment. Ms. Gonzalez' butterflies unit covered everything from songs about social butterflies to paintings of butterfly wings, anatomy studies, and student haiku poems and biographies. Students studied biology by growing popcorn plants…

  2. Approaches to describing inter-rater reliability of the overall clinical appearance of febrile infants and toddlers in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Walsh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To measure inter-rater agreement of overall clinical appearance of febrile children aged less than 24 months and to compare methods for doing so.Study Design and Setting. We performed an observational study of inter-rater reliability of the assessment of febrile children in a county hospital emergency department serving a mixed urban and rural population. Two emergency medicine healthcare providers independently evaluated the overall clinical appearance of children less than 24 months of age who had presented for fever. They recorded the initial ‘gestalt’ assessment of whether or not the child was ill appearing or if they were unsure. They then repeated this assessment after examining the child. Each rater was blinded to the other’s assessment. Our primary analysis was graphical. We also calculated Cohen’s κ, Gwet’s agreement coefficient and other measures of agreement and weighted variants of these. We examined the effect of time between exams and patient and provider characteristics on inter-rater agreement.Results. We analyzed 159 of the 173 patients enrolled. Median age was 9.5 months (lower and upper quartiles 4.9–14.6, 99/159 (62% were boys and 22/159 (14% were admitted. Overall 118/159 (74% and 119/159 (75% were classified as well appearing on initial ‘gestalt’ impression by both examiners. Summary statistics varied from 0.223 for weighted κ to 0.635 for Gwet’s AC2. Inter rater agreement was affected by the time interval between the evaluations and the age of the child but not by the experience levels of the rater pairs. Classifications of ‘not ill appearing’ were more reliable than others.Conclusion. The inter-rater reliability of emergency providers’ assessment of overall clinical appearance was adequate when described graphically and by Gwet’s AC. Different summary statistics yield different results for the same dataset.

  3. Local distributions of wealth to describe health inequalities in India: a new approach for analyzing nationally representative household survey data, 1992-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego G Bassani

    Full Text Available Worse health outcomes including higher morbidity and mortality are most often observed among the poorest fractions of a population. In this paper we present and validate national, regional and state-level distributions of national wealth index scores, for urban and rural populations, derived from household asset data collected in six survey rounds in India between 1992-3 and 2007-8. These new indices and their sub-national distributions allow for comparative analyses of a standardized measure of wealth across time and at various levels of population aggregation in India.Indices were derived through principal components analysis (PCA performed using standardized variables from a correlation matrix to minimize differences in variance. Valid and simple indices were constructed with the minimum number of assets needed to produce scores with enough variability to allow definition of unique decile cut-off points in each urban and rural area of all states.For all indices, the first PCA components explained between 36% and 43% of the variance in household assets. Using sub-national distributions of national wealth index scores, mean height-for-age z-scores increased from the poorest to the richest wealth quintiles for all surveys, and stunting prevalence was higher among the poorest and lower among the wealthiest. Urban and rural decile cut-off values for India, for the six regions and for the 24 major states revealed large variability in wealth by geographical area and level, and rural wealth score gaps exceeded those observed in urban areas.The large variability in sub-national distributions of national wealth index scores indicates the importance of accounting for such variation when constructing wealth indices and deriving score distribution cut-off points. Such an approach allows for proper within-sample economic classification, resulting in scores that are valid indicators of wealth and correlate well with health outcomes, and enables wealth

  4. Morphological study of surgical approach by superior temporal sulcus-temporal horn of lateral ventricle approach using volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Jia, Linpei; Dong, Yidian; Zhao, Hang; Liu, Haoyuan; Yang, Kerong; Li, Youqiong

    2014-03-01

    In this research, we acquired the length of the superior temporal sulcus, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, and the approach angle between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle measuring 98 specimens by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the point of the superior temporal sulcus, which is closest to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, aimed at finding out the best entrance point of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle and reducing the damage to optic radiation as well as other nerve fibers during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 3/5 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point, and there is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  5. Combining small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic approaches for assessing brain chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolhoff, Ann M; Nautiyal, Katherine M; Nemes, Peter; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Silver, Rae; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2013-03-19

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured changes in individual hippocampi from the mast cell mutant mouse strain, C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh). These mice have a naturally occurring mutation in the white spotting locus that causes reduced c-Kit receptor expression and an inability of mast cells to differentiate from their hematopoietic progenitors. Compared with their littermates, the mast cell-deficient mice have profound deficits in spatial learning, memory, and neurogenesis. A total of 18 distinct metabolites were identified in the hippocampus that discriminated between the C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh) and control mice. The combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression changes revealed a number of altered pathways. Importantly, results from both platforms indicated that multiple pathways are impacted, including amino acid metabolism, increasing the confidence in each approach. Because the CE-MS and expression profiling are both amenable to small-volume analysis, this integrated analysis is applicable to a range of volume-limited biological systems.

  6. Automated mass detection in contrast-enhanced CT colonography: an approach based on contrast and volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luboldt, W. [University Hospital Essen, Clinic and Policlinic of Angiology, Essen (Germany); Multiorgan Screening Foundation (Germany); Tryon, C. [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Kroll, M.; Vogl, T.J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Toussaint, T.L. [Multiorgan Screening Foundation (Germany); Holzer, K. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Hoepffner, N. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Gastroenterology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to design and test an algorithm for automating mass detection in contrast-enhanced CT colonography (CTC). Five patients with known colorectal masses underwent a pre-surgical contrast-enhanced (120 ml volume 1.6 g iodine/s injection rate, 60 s scan delay) CTC in high spatial resolution (16-slice CT: collimation: 16 x 0.75 mm, tablefeed: 24 mm/0.5 s, reconstruction increment: 0.5 mm). A CT-density- and volume-based algorithm searched for masses in the colonic wall, which was extracted before by segmenting and dilating the colonic air lumen and subtracting the inner air. A radiologist analyzed the detections and causes of false positives. All masses were detected, and false positives were easy to identify. Combining CT density with volume as a cut-off is a promising approach for automating mass detection that should be further refined and also tested in contrast-enhanced MR colonography. (orig.)

  7. An integrated, multi-sensing approach to describe the dynamic relations between turbulence, fluid-forces, and reconfiguration of a submerged plant model in steady flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves; Aberle, Jochen; Dijkstra, Jasper; Myrhaug, Dag

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic vegetation plays a vital role in ecohydrological systems regulating many physical, chemical, and biological processes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, plant-flow interactions are of particular interest to a wide range of disciplines. While early studies of the interactions between vegetation and flowing water employed simplified and non-flexible structures such as rigid cylinders, recent studies have included flexible plants to identify the main characteristics of the hydrodynamics of vegetated flows. However, the description of plant reconfiguration has often been based on a static approach, i.e. considering the plant's deformation under a static load and neglecting turbulent fluctuations. Correlations between drag fluctuations, plant movements, and upstream turbulence were recently established showing that shear layer turbulence at the surface of the different plant elements (such as blades or stems) can contribute significantly to the dynamic behaviour of the plant. However, the relations between plant movement and force fluctuations might change under varying flow velocities, and although this point is crucial for mixing processes and plant dislodgement by fatigue, these aspects of fluid-structure interactions applied to aquatic vegetation remain largely unexplored. Using an innovative combination of sensing techniques in one set of experiments, this study investigates the relations between turbulence, fluctuating fluid forces and movements of a flexible cylindrical plant surrogate. A silicone-based flexible cylinder was attached at the bottom of a 1m wide flume in fully-developed uniform flow. The lower 22 cm of the plant surrogate were made of plain flexible silicone, while the higher 13cm included a casted rigid sensor, measuring accelerations at the tip of the surrogate. Forces were sampled at high frequencies at the surrogate's base by a 6-degrees-of-freedom force/torque sensor measuring down to the gram

  8. A white matter lesion-filling approach to improve brain tissue volume measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Valverde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis white matter (WM lesions can affect brain tissue volume measurements of voxel-wise segmentation methods if these lesions are included in the segmentation process. Several authors have presented different techniques to improve brain tissue volume estimations by filling WM lesions before segmentation with intensities similar to those of WM. Here, we propose a new method to refill WM lesions, where contrary to similar approaches, lesion voxel intensities are replaced by random values of a normal distribution generated from the mean WM signal intensity of each two-dimensional slice. We test the performance of our method by estimating the deviation in tissue volume between a set of 30 T1-w 1.5 T and 30 T1-w 3 T images of healthy subjects and the same images where: WM lesions have been previously registered and afterwards replaced their voxel intensities to those between gray matter (GM and WM tissue. Tissue volume is computed independently using FAST and SPM8. When compared with the state-of-the-art methods, on 1.5 T data our method yields the lowest deviation in WM between original and filled images, independently of the segmentation method used. It also performs the lowest differences in GM when FAST is used and equals to the best method when SPM8 is employed. On 3 T data, our method also outperforms the state-of-the-art methods when FAST is used while performs similar to the best method when SPM8 is used. The proposed technique is currently available to researchers as a stand-alone program and as an SPM extension.

  9. Showing their true colors: a practical approach to volume rendering from serial sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metscher Brian D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to more modern imaging methods, conventional light microscopy still offers a range of substantial advantages with regard to contrast options, accessible specimen size, and resolution. Currently, tomographic image data in particular is most commonly visualized in three dimensions using volume rendering. To date, this method has only very rarely been applied to image stacks taken from serial sections, whereas surface rendering is still the most prevalent method for presenting such data sets three-dimensionally. The aim of this study was to develop standard protocols for volume rendering of image stacks of serial sections, while retaining the benefits of light microscopy such as resolution and color information. Results Here we provide a set of protocols for acquiring high-resolution 3D images of diverse microscopic samples through volume rendering based on serial light microscopical sections using the 3D reconstruction software Amira (Visage Imaging Inc.. We overcome several technical obstacles and show that these renderings are comparable in quality and resolution to 3D visualizations using other methods. This practical approach for visualizing 3D micro-morphology in full color takes advantage of both the sub-micron resolution of light microscopy and the specificity of histological stains, by combining conventional histological sectioning techniques, digital image acquisition, three-dimensional image filtering, and 3D image manipulation and visualization technologies. Conclusions We show that this method can yield "true"-colored high-resolution 3D views of tissues as well as cellular and sub-cellular structures and thus represents a powerful tool for morphological, developmental, and comparative investigations. We conclude that the presented approach fills an important gap in the field of micro-anatomical 3D imaging and visualization methods by combining histological resolution and differentiation of details with

  10. Showing their true colors: a practical approach to volume rendering from serial sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Stephan; Schwaha, Thomas; Metscher, Brian D

    2010-04-21

    In comparison to more modern imaging methods, conventional light microscopy still offers a range of substantial advantages with regard to contrast options, accessible specimen size, and resolution. Currently, tomographic image data in particular is most commonly visualized in three dimensions using volume rendering. To date, this method has only very rarely been applied to image stacks taken from serial sections, whereas surface rendering is still the most prevalent method for presenting such data sets three-dimensionally. The aim of this study was to develop standard protocols for volume rendering of image stacks of serial sections, while retaining the benefits of light microscopy such as resolution and color information. Here we provide a set of protocols for acquiring high-resolution 3D images of diverse microscopic samples through volume rendering based on serial light microscopical sections using the 3D reconstruction software Amira (Visage Imaging Inc.). We overcome several technical obstacles and show that these renderings are comparable in quality and resolution to 3D visualizations using other methods. This practical approach for visualizing 3D micro-morphology in full color takes advantage of both the sub-micron resolution of light microscopy and the specificity of histological stains, by combining conventional histological sectioning techniques, digital image acquisition, three-dimensional image filtering, and 3D image manipulation and visualization technologies. We show that this method can yield "true"-colored high-resolution 3D views of tissues as well as cellular and sub-cellular structures and thus represents a powerful tool for morphological, developmental, and comparative investigations. We conclude that the presented approach fills an important gap in the field of micro-anatomical 3D imaging and visualization methods by combining histological resolution and differentiation of details with 3D rendering of whole tissue samples. We demonstrate the

  11. Pharmacobezoars described and demystified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Serge-Emile

    2011-02-01

    A bezoar is a concretion of foreign material that forms and persists in the gastrointestinal tract. Bezoars are classified by their material origins. Phytobezoars contain plant material, trichobezoars contain hair, lactobezoars contain milk proteins, and pharmacobezoars contain pharmaceutical products. Tablets, suspensions, and even insoluble drug delivery vehicles can, on rare occasions, and sometimes under specific circumstances, form pharmacobezoars. The goal of this review is to catalog and examine all of the available reports in the English language medical literature that convincingly describe the formation and management of pharmacobezoars. Articles included in this review were identified by performing searches using the terms "bezoar," "pharmacobezoar," and "concretion" in the following databases: OVID MEDLINE, PubMed, and JSTOR. The complete MEDLINE and JSTOR holdings were included in the search without date ranges. The results were limited to English language publications. Articles that described nonmedication bezoars were not included in the review. Articles describing phytobezoars, food bezoars, fecal impactions, illicit drug packet ingestions, enteral feeding material bezoars, and hygroscopic diet aid bezoars were excluded. The bibliographic references within the articles already accumulated were then examined in order to gather additional pharmacobezoar cases. The cases are grouped by pharmaceutical agent that formed the bezoar, and groupings are arranged in alphabetical order. Discussions and conclusions specific to each pharmaceutical agent are included in that agent's subheading. Patterns and themes that emerged in the review of the assembled case reports are reviewed and presented in a more concise format. Pharmacobezoars form under a wide variety of circumstances and in a wide variety of patients. They are difficult to diagnose reliably. Rules for suspecting, diagnosing, and properly managing a pharmacobezoar are highly dependent on the

  12. A moving control volume approach to computing hydrodynamic forces and torques on immersed bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia, Nishant; Johansen, Hans; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh

    2017-10-01

    We present a moving control volume (CV) approach to computing hydrodynamic forces and torques on complex geometries. The method requires surface and volumetric integrals over a simple and regular Cartesian box that moves with an arbitrary velocity to enclose the body at all times. The moving box is aligned with Cartesian grid faces, which makes the integral evaluation straightforward in an immersed boundary (IB) framework. Discontinuous and noisy derivatives of velocity and pressure at the fluid-structure interface are avoided and far-field (smooth) velocity and pressure information is used. We re-visit the approach to compute hydrodynamic forces and torques through force/torque balance equations in a Lagrangian frame that some of us took in a prior work (Bhalla et al., 2013 [13]). We prove the equivalence of the two approaches for IB methods, thanks to the use of Peskin's delta functions. Both approaches are able to suppress spurious force oscillations and are in excellent agreement, as expected theoretically. Test cases ranging from Stokes to high Reynolds number regimes are considered. We discuss regridding issues for the moving CV method in an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) context. The proposed moving CV method is not limited to a specific IB method and can also be used, for example, with embedded boundary methods.

  13. An element-based finite-volume method approach for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcondes, Francisco [Federal University of Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Material Science], e-mail: marcondes@ufc.br; Varavei, Abdoljalil; Sepehrnoori, Kamy [The University of Texas at Austin (United States). Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Dept.], e-mails: varavei@mail.utexas.edu, kamys@mail.utexas.edu

    2010-07-01

    An element-based finite-volume approach in conjunction with unstructured grids for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation is presented. In this approach, both the discrete fracture and the matrix mass balances are taken into account without any additional models to couple the matrix and discrete fractures. The mesh, for two dimensional domains, can be built of triangles, quadrilaterals, or a mix of these elements. However, due to the available mesh generator to handle both matrix and discrete fractures, only results using triangular elements will be presented. The discrete fractures are located along the edges of each element. To obtain the approximated matrix equation, each element is divided into three sub-elements and then the mass balance equations for each component are integrated along each interface of the sub-elements. The finite-volume conservation equations are assembled from the contribution of all the elements that share a vertex, creating a cell vertex approach. The discrete fracture equations are discretized only along the edges of each element and then summed up with the matrix equations in order to obtain a conservative equation for both matrix and discrete fractures. In order to mimic real field simulations, the capillary pressure is included in both matrix and discrete fracture media. In the implemented model, the saturation field in the matrix and discrete fractures can be different, but the potential of each phase in the matrix and discrete fracture interface needs to be the same. The results for several naturally fractured reservoirs are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. (author)

  14. How Mathematics Describes Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklu, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The circle of life is something we have all heard of from somewhere, but we don't usually try to calculate it. For some time we have been working on analyzing a predator-prey model to better understand how mathematics can describe life, in particular the interaction between two different species. The model we are analyzing is called the Holling-Tanner model, and it cannot be solved analytically. The Holling-Tanner model is a very common model in population dynamics because it is a simple descriptor of how predators and prey interact. The model is a system of two differential equations. The model is not specific to any particular set of species and so it can describe predator-prey species ranging from lions and zebras to white blood cells and infections. One thing all these systems have in common are critical points. A critical point is a value for both populations that keeps both populations constant. It is important because at this point the differential equations are equal to zero. For this model there are two critical points, a predator free critical point and a coexistence critical point. Most of the analysis we did is on the coexistence critical point because the predator free critical point is always unstable and frankly less interesting than the coexistence critical point. What we did is consider two regimes for the differential equations, large B and small B. B, A, and C are parameters in the differential equations that control the system where B measures how responsive the predators are to change in the population, A represents predation of the prey, and C represents the satiation point of the prey population. For the large B case we were able to approximate the system of differential equations by a single scalar equation. For the small B case we were able to predict the limit cycle. The limit cycle is a process of the predator and prey populations growing and shrinking periodically. This model has a limit cycle in the regime of small B, that we solved for

  15. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müzeyyen Gönül

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.”

  16. A pyramid-based approach to visual exploration of a large volume of vehicle trajectory data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing SUN; Xiang LI

    2012-01-01

    Advances in positioning and wireless communicating technologies make it possible to collect large volumes of trajectory data of moving vehicles in a fast and convenient fashion.These data can be applied to traffic studies.Behind this application,a methodological issue that still requires particular attention is the way these data should be spatially visualized.Trajectory data physically consists of a large number of positioning points.With the dramatic increase of data volume,it becomes a challenge to display and explore these data.Existing commercial software often employs vector-based indexing structures to facilitate the display of a large volume of points,but their performance downgrades quickly when the number of points is very large,for example,tens of millions.In this paper,a pyramid-based approach is proposed.A pyramid method initially is invented to facilitate the display of raster images through the tradeoff between storage space and display time.A pyramid is a set of images at different levels with different resolutions.In this paper,we convert vector-based point data into raster data,and build a gridbased indexing structure in a 2D plane.Then,an image pyramid is built.Moreover,at the same level of a pyramid,image is segmented into mosaics with respect to the requirements of data storage and management.Algorithms or procedures on grid-based indexing structure,image pyramid,image segmentation,and visualization operations are given in this paper.A case study with taxi trajectory data in Shanghai is conducted.Results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the existing commercial software.

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY PROBLEM AND STUDY OF APPROACH BASED ON FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Sherina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been aimed to carry out a study of peculiarities that arise in a numerical simulation of the electrical impedance tomography (EIT problem. Static EIT image reconstruction is sensitive to a measurement noise and approximation error. A special consideration has been given to reducing of the approximation error, which originates from numerical implementation drawbacks. This paper presents in detail two numerical approaches for solving EIT forward problem. The finite volume method (FVM on unstructured triangular mesh is introduced. In order to compare this approach, the finite element (FEM based forward solver was implemented, which has gained the most popularity among researchers. The calculated potential distribution with the assumed initial conductivity distribution has been compared to the analytical solution of a test Neumann boundary problem and to the results of problem simulation by means of ANSYS FLUENT commercial software. Two approaches to linearized EIT image reconstruction are discussed. Reconstruction of the conductivity distribution is an ill-posed problem, typically requiring a large amount of computation and resolved by minimization techniques. The objective function to be minimized is constructed of measured voltage and calculated boundary voltage on the electrodes. A classical modified Newton type iterative method and the stochastic differential evolution method are employed. A software package has been developed for the problem under investigation. Numerical tests were conducted on simulated data. The obtained results could be helpful to researches tackling the hardware and software issues for medical applications of EIT.

  18. VOXEL-BASED APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING URBAN TREE VOLUME FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vonderach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of single trees and the determination of related parameters has been recognized in recent years, e.g. for forest inventories or management. For urban areas an increasing interest in the data acquisition of trees can be observed concerning aspects like urban climate, CO2 balance, and environmental protection. Urban trees differ significantly from natural systems with regard to the site conditions (e.g. technogenic soils, contaminants, lower groundwater level, regular disturbance, climate (increased temperature, reduced humidity and species composition and arrangement (habitus and health status and therefore allometric relations cannot be transferred from natural sites to urban areas. To overcome this problem an extended approach was developed for a fast and non-destructive extraction of branch volume, DBH (diameter at breast height and height of single trees from point clouds of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. For data acquisition, the trees were scanned with highest scan resolution from several (up to five positions located around the tree. The resulting point clouds (20 to 60 million points are analysed with an algorithm based on voxel (volume elements structure, leading to an appropriate data reduction. In a first step, two kinds of noise reduction are carried out: the elimination of isolated voxels as well as voxels with marginal point density. To obtain correct volume estimates, the voxels inside the stem and branches (interior voxels where voxels contain no laser points must be regarded. For this filling process, an easy and robust approach was developed based on a layer-wise (horizontal layers of the voxel structure intersection of four orthogonal viewing directions. However, this procedure also generates several erroneous "phantom" voxels, which have to be eliminated. For this purpose the previous approach was extended by a special region growing algorithm. In a final step the volume is determined layer-wise based on the

  19. New approach to the perception of 3D shape based on veridicality, complexity, symmetry and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Sawada, Tadamasa; Li, Yunfeng; Kropatsch, Walter G; Steinman, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress towards understanding 3D shape perception made possible by appreciating the significant role that veridicality and complexity play in the natural visual environment. The ability to see objects as they really are "out there" is derived from the complexity inherent in the 3D object's shape. The importance of both veridicality and complexity was ignored in most prior research. Appreciating their importance made it possible to devise a computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from only one of its 2D images. This model uses a simplicity principle consisting of only four a priori constraints representing properties of 3D shapes, primarily their symmetry and volume. The model recovers 3D shapes from a single 2D image as well, and sometimes even better, than a human being. In the rare recoveries in which errors are observed, the errors made by the model and human subjects are very similar. The model makes no use of depth, surfaces or learning. Recent elaborations of this model include: (i) the recovery of the shapes of natural objects, including human and animal bodies with limbs in varying positions (ii) providing the model with two input images that allowed it to achieve virtually perfect shape constancy from almost all viewing directions. The review concludes with a comparison of some of the highlights of our novel, successful approach to the recovery of 3D shape from a 2D image with prior, less successful approaches.

  20. Linking flood peak, flood volume and inundation extent: a DEM-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolho, Cédric; Furusho-Percot, Carina; Blaquière, Simon; Brettschneider, Marco; Andréassian, Vazken

    2017-04-01

    Traditionally, flood inundation maps are computed based on the Shallow Water Equations (SWE) in one or two dimensions, with various simplifications that have proved to give good results. However, the complexity of the SWEs often requires a numerical resolution which can need long computing time, as well as detailed cross section data: this often results in restricting these models to rather small areas abundant with high quality data. This, along with the necessity for fast inundation mapping, are the reason why rapid inundation models are being designed, working for (almost) any river with a minimum amount of data and, above all, easily available data. Our model tries to follow this path by using a 100m DEM over France from which are extracted a drainage network and the associated drainage areas. It is based on two pre-existing methods: (1) SHYREG (Arnaud et al.,2013), a regionalized approach used to calculate the 2-year and 10-year flood quantiles (used as approximated bankfull flow and maximum discharge, respectively) for each river pixel of the DEM (below a 10 000 km2 drainage area) and (2) SOCOSE (Mailhol,1980), which gives, amongst other things, an empirical formula of a characteristic flood duration (for each pixel) based on catchment area, average precipitation and temperature. An overflow volume for each river pixel is extracted from a triangular shaped synthetic hydrograph designed with SHYREG quantiles and SOCOSE flood duration. The volume is then spread from downstream to upstream one river pixel at a time. When the entire hydrographic network is processed, the model stops and generates a map of potential inundation area associated with the 10-year flood quantile. Our model can also be calibrated using past-events inundation maps by adjusting two parameters, one which modifies the overflow duration, and the other, equivalent to a minimum drainage area for river pixels to be flooded. Thus, in calibration on a sample of 42 basins, the first draft of the

  1. A statistical approach to the initial volume problem in Single Particle Analysis by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorzano, C O S; Vargas, J; de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Otón, J; Álvarez-Cabrera, A L; Abrishami, V; Sesmero, E; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2015-03-01

    Cryo Electron Microscopy is a powerful Structural Biology technique, allowing the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules. In particular, the structural study of purified macromolecules -often referred as Single Particle Analysis(SPA)- is normally performed through an iterative process that needs a first estimation of the three-dimensional structure that is progressively refined using experimental data. It is well-known the local optimisation nature of this refinement, so that the initial choice of this first structure may substantially change the final result. Computational algorithms aiming to providing this first structure already exist. However, the question is far from settled and more robust algorithms are still needed so that the refinement process can be performed with sufficient guarantees. In this article we present a new algorithm that addresses the initial volume problem in SPA by setting it in a Weighted Least Squares framework and calculating the weights through a statistical approach based on the cumulative density function of different image similarity measures. We show that the new algorithm is significantly more robust than other state-of-the-art algorithms currently in use in the field. The algorithm is available as part of the software suite Xmipp (http://xmipp.cnb.csic.es) and Scipion (http://scipion.cnb.csic.es) under the name "Significant".

  2. An Adaptive Prediction-Based Approach to Lossless Compression of Floating-Point Volume Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fout, N; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we address the problem of lossless compression of scientific and medical floating-point volume data. We propose two prediction-based compression methods that share a common framework, which consists of a switched prediction scheme wherein the best predictor out of a preset group of linear predictors is selected. Such a scheme is able to adapt to different datasets as well as to varying statistics within the data. The first method, called APE (Adaptive Polynomial Encoder), uses a family of structured interpolating polynomials for prediction, while the second method, which we refer to as ACE (Adaptive Combined Encoder), combines predictors from previous work with the polynomial predictors to yield a more flexible, powerful encoder that is able to effectively decorrelate a wide range of data. In addition, in order to facilitate efficient visualization of compressed data, our scheme provides an option to partition floating-point values in such a way as to provide a progressive representation. We compare our two compressors to existing state-of-the-art lossless floating-point compressors for scientific data, with our data suite including both computer simulations and observational measurements. The results demonstrate that our polynomial predictor, APE, is comparable to previous approaches in terms of speed but achieves better compression rates on average. ACE, our combined predictor, while somewhat slower, is able to achieve the best compression rate on all datasets, with significantly better rates on most of the datasets.

  3. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  4. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  5. A new approach for volume reconstruction in TomoPIV with the alternating direction method of multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, Ioana; Herzet, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    We adapt and import into the TomoPIV scenery a fast algorithm for solving the volume reconstruction problem. Our approach is based on the reformulation of the volume reconstruction task as a constrained optimization problem and the resort to the ‘alternating directions method of multipliers’ (ADMM). The inherent primal-dual algorithm is summarized in this article to solve the optimization problem related to the TomoPIV. In particular, the general formulation of the volume reconstruction problem considered in this paper allows one to: (i) take explicitly into account the level of the noise affecting the data; (ii) account for both the nonnegativity and the sparsity of the solution. Experiments on a numerical TomoPIV benchmark show that the proposed framework is a serious contender for the state-of-the-art.

  6. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    Automated fast (5-20 min) synovial membrane volume determination by MRI, based on pre-set post-gadolinium-DTPA enhancement thresholds, was evaluated as a substitute for a time-consuming (45-120 min), previously validated, manual segmentation method. Twenty-nine knees [rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 13...... or synovial membrane volume, e.g. no systematic errors were found. The inter-MRI variation, evaluated in three knees and three wrists, was higher than by manual segmentation, particularly due to sensitivity to malalignment artefacts. Examination of test objects proved the high accuracy of the general...... methodology for volume determinations (maximal error 6.3%). Preceded by the determination of reproducibility and the optimal threshold at the available MR unit, automated 'threshold' segmentation appears to be acceptable when changes rather than absolute values of synovial membrane volumes are most important...

  7. The influence of trading volume on market efficiency: The DCCA approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukpitak, Jessada; Hengpunya, Varagorn

    2016-09-01

    For a single market, the cross-correlation between market efficiency and trading volume, which is an indicator of market liquidity, is attentively analysed. The study begins with creating time series of market efficiency by applying time-varying Hurst exponent with one year sliding window to daily closing prices. The time series of trading volume corresponding to the same time period used for the market efficiency is derived from one year moving average of daily trading volume. Subsequently, the detrended cross-correlation coefficient is employed to quantify the degree of cross-correlation between the two time series. It was found that values of cross-correlation coefficient of all considered stock markets are close to 0 and are clearly out of range in which correlation being considered significant in almost every time scale. Obtained results show that the market liquidity in term of trading volume hardly has effect on the market efficiency.

  8. Interactive volume exploration of petascale microscopy data streams using a visualization-driven virtual memory approach

    KAUST Repository

    Hadwiger, Markus

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the first volume visualization system that scales to petascale volumes imaged as a continuous stream of high-resolution electron microscopy images. Our architecture scales to dense, anisotropic petascale volumes because it: (1) decouples construction of the 3D multi-resolution representation required for visualization from data acquisition, and (2) decouples sample access time during ray-casting from the size of the multi-resolution hierarchy. Our system is designed around a scalable multi-resolution virtual memory architecture that handles missing data naturally, does not pre-compute any 3D multi-resolution representation such as an octree, and can accept a constant stream of 2D image tiles from the microscopes. A novelty of our system design is that it is visualization-driven: we restrict most computations to the visible volume data. Leveraging the virtual memory architecture, missing data are detected during volume ray-casting as cache misses, which are propagated backwards for on-demand out-of-core processing. 3D blocks of volume data are only constructed from 2D microscope image tiles when they have actually been accessed during ray-casting. We extensively evaluate our system design choices with respect to scalability and performance, compare to previous best-of-breed systems, and illustrate the effectiveness of our system for real microscopy data from neuroscience. © 1995-2012 IEEE.

  9. Differentiating SIADH from Cerebral/Renal Salt Wasting: Failure of the Volume Approach and Need for a New Approach to Hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesaka, John K; Imbriano, Louis; Mattana, Joseph; Gallagher, Dympna; Bade, Naveen; Sharif, Sairah

    2014-12-08

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality. Its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are in a state of flux. It is evident that hyponatremic patients are symptomatic with a potential for serious consequences at sodium levels that were once considered trivial. The recommendation to treat virtually all hyponatremics exposes the need to resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma of deciding whether to water restrict a patient with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or administer salt and water to a renal salt waster. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of SIADH and renal salt wasting (RSW), and the difficulty in differentiating SIADH from RSW, and review the origin of the perceived rarity of RSW, as well as the value of determining fractional excretion of urate (FEurate) in differentiating both syndromes, the high prevalence of RSW which highlights the inadequacy of the volume approach to hyponatremia, the importance of changing cerebral salt wasting to RSW, and the proposal to eliminate reset osmostat as a subtype of SIADH, and finally propose a new algorithm to replace the outmoded volume approach by highlighting FEurate. This algorithm eliminates the need to assess the volume status with less reliance on determining urine sodium concentration, plasma renin, aldosterone and atrial/brain natriuretic peptide or the BUN to creatinine ratio.

  10. Differentiating SIADH from Cerebral/Renal Salt Wasting: Failure of the Volume Approach and Need for a New Approach to Hyponatremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Maesaka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality. Its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are in a state of flux. It is evident that hyponatremic patients are symptomatic with a potential for serious consequences at sodium levels that were once considered trivial. The recommendation to treat virtually all hyponatremics exposes the need to resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma of deciding whether to water restrict a patient with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH or administer salt and water to a renal salt waster. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of SIADH and renal salt wasting (RSW, and the difficulty in differentiating SIADH from RSW, and review the origin of the perceived rarity of RSW, as well as the value of determining fractional excretion of urate (FEurate in differentiating both syndromes, the high prevalence of RSW which highlights the inadequacy of the volume approach to hyponatremia, the importance of changing cerebral salt wasting to RSW, and the proposal to eliminate reset osmostat as a subtype of SIADH, and finally propose a new algorithm to replace the outmoded volume approach by highlighting FEurate. This algorithm eliminates the need to assess the volume status with less reliance on determining urine sodium concentration, plasma renin, aldosterone and atrial/brain natriuretic peptide or the BUN to creatinine ratio.

  11. Application of the Price-Volume Approach in Cases of Innovative Drugs Where Value-Based Pricing is Inadequate: Description of Real Experiences in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messori, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Several cases of expensive drugs designed for large patient populations (e.g. sofosbuvir) have raised a complex question in terms of drug pricing. Even assuming value-based pricing, the treatment with these drugs of all eligible patients would have an immense budgetary impact, which is unsustainable also for the richest countries. This raises the need to reduce the prices of these agents in comparison with those suggested by the value-based approach and to devise new pricing methods that can achieve this goal. The present study discusses in detail the following two methods: (i) The approach based on setting nation-wide budget thresholds for individual innovative agents in which a fixed proportion of the historical pharmaceutical expenditure represents the maximum budget attributable to an innovative treatment; (ii) The approach based on nation-wide price-volume agreements in which drug prices are progressively reduced as more patients receive the treatment. The first approach has been developed in the USA by the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review and has been applied to PCSK9 inhibitors (alirocumab and evolocumab). The second approach has been designed for the Italian market and has found a systematic application to manage the price of ranibizumab, sofosbuvir, and PCSK9 inhibitors. While, in the past, price-volume agreements have been applied only on an empirical basis (i.e. in the absence of any quantitative theoretical rule), more recently some explicit mathematical models have been described. The performance of these models is now being evaluated on the basis of the real-world experiences conducted in some European countries, especially Italy.

  12. FORECASTING CHINA'S FOREIGN TRADE VOLUME WITH A KERNEL-BASED HYBRID EC-ONOMETRIC-AI ENSEMBLE LEARNING APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lean YU; Shouyang WANG; Kin Keung LAI

    2008-01-01

    Due to the complexity of economic system and the interactive effects between all kinds of economic variables and foreign trade, it is not easy to predict foreign trade volume. However, the difficulty in predicting foreign trade volume is usually attributed to the limitation of many conventional forecasting models. To improve the prediction performance, the study proposes a novel kernel-based ensemble learning approach hybridizing econometric models and artificial intelligence (AI) models to predict China's foreign trade volume. In the proposed approach, an important econometric model, the co-integration-based error correction vector auto-regression (EC-VAR) model is first used to capture the impacts of all kinds of economic variables on Chinese foreign trade from a multivariate linear anal-ysis perspective. Then an artificial neural network (ANN) based EC-VAR model is used to capture the nonlinear effects of economic variables on foreign trade from the nonlinear viewpoint. Subsequently, for incorporating the effects of irregular events on foreign trade, the text mining and expert's judgmental adjustments are also integrated into the nonlinear ANN-based EC-VAR model. Finally, all kinds of economic variables, the outputs of linear and nonlinear EC-VAR models and judgmental adjustment model are used as input variables of a typical kernel-based support vector regression (SVR) for en-semble prediction purpose. For illustration, the proposed kernel-based ensemble learning methodology hybridizing econometric techniques and AI methods is applied to China's foreign trade volume predic-tion problem. Experimental results reveal that the hybrid econometric-AI ensemble learning approach can significantly improve the prediction performance over other linear and nonlinear models listed in this study.

  13. New Approach to Purging Monitoring Wells: Lower Flow Rates Reduce Required Purging Volumes and Sample Turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is generally accepted that monitoring wells must be purged to access formation water to obtain “representative” ground water quality samples. Historically anywhere from 3 to 5 well casing volumes have been removed prior to sample collection to evacuate the standing well water...

  14. TRADABLE CREDITS FOR STORM WATER VOLUME: AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR SUSTAINABLE URBAN WATERSHED MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increased storm water runoff rate and volume caused by urbanization, and their detrimental effects on stream habitat and morphology, is well documented. In most cases, current storm water management policies are focused on attenuating peak flow rates. While these policies may...

  15. Identifying Structure-Property Relationships Through DREAM.3D Representative Volume Elements and DAMASK Crystal Plasticity Simulations: An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Martin; Groeber, Michael; Haase, Christian; Molodov, Dmitri A.; Roters, Franz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-03-01

    Predicting, understanding, and controlling the mechanical behavior is the most important task when designing structural materials. Modern alloy systems—in which multiple deformation mechanisms, phases, and defects are introduced to overcome the inverse strength-ductility relationship—give raise to multiple possibilities for modifying the deformation behavior, rendering traditional, exclusively experimentally-based alloy development workflows inappropriate. For fast and efficient alloy design, it is therefore desirable to predict the mechanical performance of candidate alloys by simulation studies to replace time- and resource-consuming mechanical tests. Simulation tools suitable for this task need to correctly predict the mechanical behavior in dependence of alloy composition, microstructure, texture, phase fractions, and processing history. Here, an integrated computational materials engineering approach based on the open source software packages DREAM.3D and DAMASK (Düsseldorf Advanced Materials Simulation Kit) that enables such virtual material development is presented. More specific, our approach consists of the following three steps: (1) acquire statistical quantities that describe a microstructure, (2) build a representative volume element based on these quantities employing DREAM.3D, and (3) evaluate the representative volume using a predictive crystal plasticity material model provided by DAMASK. Exemplarily, these steps are here conducted for a high-manganese steel.

  16. Identifying Structure-Property Relationships Through DREAM.3D Representative Volume Elements and DAMASK Crystal Plasticity Simulations: An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Martin; Groeber, Michael; Haase, Christian; Molodov, Dmitri A.; Roters, Franz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-05-01

    Predicting, understanding, and controlling the mechanical behavior is the most important task when designing structural materials. Modern alloy systems—in which multiple deformation mechanisms, phases, and defects are introduced to overcome the inverse strength-ductility relationship—give raise to multiple possibilities for modifying the deformation behavior, rendering traditional, exclusively experimentally-based alloy development workflows inappropriate. For fast and efficient alloy design, it is therefore desirable to predict the mechanical performance of candidate alloys by simulation studies to replace time- and resource-consuming mechanical tests. Simulation tools suitable for this task need to correctly predict the mechanical behavior in dependence of alloy composition, microstructure, texture, phase fractions, and processing history. Here, an integrated computational materials engineering approach based on the open source software packages DREAM.3D and DAMASK (Düsseldorf Advanced Materials Simulation Kit) that enables such virtual material development is presented. More specific, our approach consists of the following three steps: (1) acquire statistical quantities that describe a microstructure, (2) build a representative volume element based on these quantities employing DREAM.3D, and (3) evaluate the representative volume using a predictive crystal plasticity material model provided by DAMASK. Exemplarily, these steps are here conducted for a high-manganese steel.

  17. Prediction of Currency Volume Issued in Taiwan Using a Hybrid Artificial Neural Network and Multiple Regression Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehjen E. Shao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the volume of currency issued by a country always affects its interest rate, price index, income levels, and many other important macroeconomic variables, the prediction of currency volume issued has attracted considerable attention in recent years. In contrast to the typical single-stage forecast model, this study proposes a hybrid forecasting approach to predict the volume of currency issued in Taiwan. The proposed hybrid models consist of artificial neural network (ANN and multiple regression (MR components. The MR component of the hybrid models is established for a selection of fewer explanatory variables, wherein the selected variables are of higher importance. The ANN component is then designed to generate forecasts based on those important explanatory variables. Subsequently, the model is used to analyze a real dataset of Taiwan's currency from 1996 to 2011 and twenty associated explanatory variables. The prediction results reveal that the proposed hybrid scheme exhibits superior forecasting performance for predicting the volume of currency issued in Taiwan.

  18. A volume-amending method to improve mass conservation of level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XiangYang; WANG YueFa; YU GengZhi; YANG Chao; MAO ZaiSha

    2008-01-01

    A volume-amending method is developed both to keep the level set function as an algebraic distance function and to preserve the bubble mass in a level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows with the significantly deformed free interface. After the traditional reinitialization procedure, a vol-ume-amending method is added for correcting the position of the interface according to mass loss/gain error until the mass error falls in the allowable range designated in advance. The level set approach with this volume-amending method incorporated has been validated by three test cases: the motion of a single axisymmetrical bubble or drop in liquid, the motion of a two-dimensional water drop falling through the air into a water pool, and the interactional motion of two buoyancy-driven three-dimensional deformable bubbles. The computational results with this volume-amending method in-corporated are in good agreement with the reported experimental data and the mass is well preserved in all cases.

  19. A volume-amending method to improve mass conservation of level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A volume-amending method is developed both to keep the level set function as an algebraic distance function and to preserve the bubble mass in a level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows with the significantly deformed free interface. After the traditional reinitialization procedure, a vol-ume-amending method is added for correcting the position of the interface according to mass loss/gain error until the mass error falls in the allowable range designated in advance. The level set approach with this volume-amending method incorporated has been validated by three test cases: the motion of a single axisymmetrical bubble or drop in liquid, the motion of a two-dimensional water drop falling through the air into a water pool, and the interactional motion of two buoyancy-driven three- dimensional deformable bubbles. The computational results with this volume-amending method in-corporated are in good agreement with the reported experimental data and the mass is well preserved in all cases.

  20. Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Automatic Volume Determination of Glioblastomas Based on Several Manual Expert Segmentations

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Kappus, Christoph; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is one of the highest malignant human neoplasms. During the course of disease, the evaluation of tumor volume is an essential part of the clinical follow-up. However, manual segmentation for acquisition of tumor volume is a time-consuming process. In this paper, a new approach for the automatic segmentation and volume determination of glioblastomas (glioblastoma multiforme) is presented and evaluated. The approach uses a user-defined seed point inside the glioma to set up a directed 3D graph. The nodes of the graph are obtained by sampling along rays that are sent through the surface points of a polyhedron. After the graph has been constructed, the minimal s-t cut is calculated to separate the glioblastoma from the background. For evaluation, 12 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data sets were manually segmented slice by slice, by neurosurgeons with several years of experience in the resection of gliomas. Afterwards, the manual se...

  1. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  2. Crest lines extraction in volume 3D medical images : a multi-scale approach

    OpenAIRE

    Monga, Olivier; Lengagne, Richard; Deriche, Rachid

    1994-01-01

    Projet SYNTIM; Recently, we have shown that the differential properties of the surfaces represented by 3D volumic images can be recovered using their partial derivatives. For instance, the crest lines can be characterized by the first, second and third partial derivatives of the grey level function $I(x,y,z)$. In this paper, we show that~: - the computation of the partial derivatives of an image can be improved using recursive filters which approximate the Gaussian filter, - a multi-scale app...

  3. Combining Small-Volume Metabolomic and Transcriptomic Approaches for Assessing Brain Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Nemes, Peter; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Silver, Rae; Jonathan V. Sweedler

    2013-01-01

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry (CE–MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured chan...

  4. Novel computational approach for studying ph effects, excluded volume and ion-ion correlations in electrical double layers around polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven

    , which are important details for proper description of EDL properties. In this thesis, we implement an efficient and accurate classical solvation density functional theory (CDSFT) for EDLs of spherical macroions and cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes. This approach extends the capabilities of mean field approximations by taking into account electrostatic ion-ion correlations, size asymmetry and excluded volume effects without compromising the computational cost. We apply the computational tool to study the structural and thermodynamic properties of the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA and spherical nanoparticles. We demonstrate that the presence of solvent molecules at experimental concentration and size values has a significant impact on the layering of ions. This layering directly influences the integrated charge and mean electrostatic potential in the diffuse region of the spherical electrical double layer (SEDL) and have a noticeable impact on the behavior of zeta potential (ZP). Recently, we have extended the aforementioned CSDFT to account for the charge-regulated mechanisms of the macroion surface on the structural and thermodynamic properties of spherical EDLs. In the approach, the CSDFT is combined with a surface complexation model to account for ion correlation and excluded volume effects on the surface titration of spherical macroions. We apply the proposed computational approach to describe the role that the ion size and solvent excluded volume play on the surface titration properties of silica nanoparticles. We analyze the effects of the nanoparticle size, pH and salt concentration of the aqueous solution on the nanoparticle's surface charge and zeta potential. The results reveal that surface charge density and zeta potential significantly depend on excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects as well as on pH for monovalent ion species at high salt concentrations. Overall, our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo

  5. Framework and guidelines for implementing the co-management approach: volume I : context, concept and principles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop a common understanding of the co-management approach in fisheries management and to provide an overview of the various frameworks used for its implementation...

  6. APPROACH TO ESTIMATION OF THE MARKET VOLUME FOR COMPANIES OPERATING IN THE B2B SEGMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla B. Kochergina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the approach for estimating amount of alive enterprises inRussia. The main focus is on the way of detecting an business-active companiesusing the formal signs. The author proposes some signs for indicating of thebusiness activity. The developed model allows to clarify the amount of active enterprises in stages using those signs. The author provides the approach how to applythis model for different markets.

  7. Forecasting of exported volume for brazilian fruits by time series analysis: an arima/garch approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdinardo Moreira Barreto de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to offer econometric forecasting models to the Brazilian exported volume fruits, with a view to assisting the planning and production control, also motivated by the existence of a few published papers dealing with this issue. In this sense, it was used the ARIMA/GARCH models, considering, likewise, the occurrence of a multiplicative stochastic seasonality in these series. They were collected 300 observations of exported net weight (kg between Jan/1989 and Dec/2013 of the following fruits: pineapple, banana, orange, lemon, apple, papaya, mango, watermelon, melon and grape, which selection criteria was its importance in the exported basket fruit, because they represented 97% of total received dollars, and 99% of total volume sold in 2010, of a population about 28 kinds of exported fruits. The results showed that it was not only observed the existence of a 12 month multiplicative seasonality in banana and mango. On the other hand, they were identified two fruits groups: (1 those which are continuously exported, and (2 those which have export peaks. On the quality of the models, they were considered satisfactory for six of the ten fruits analyzed. On the volatility, it was seen a high persistence in banana and papaya series, pointing to the existence of a structural break in time series, which could be linked to the economic crises happened in the last 17 years.

  8. Approaching a more Complete Picture of Rockfall Activity: Seismic and LiDAR Detection, Loaction and Volume Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Michael; Mohadjer, Solmaz; Turowski, Jens; Ehlers, Todd; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall activity in steep alpine landscapes is often difficult to survey due to its infrequent nature. Classic approaches are limited by temporal and spatial resolution. In contrast, seismic monitoring provides access to catchment-wide analysis of activity patterns in rockfall-dominated environments. The deglaciated U-shaped Lauterbrunnen Valley in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland, is a perfect example of such landscapes. It was instrumented with up to six broadband seismometers and repeatedly surveyed by terrestrial LiDAR to provide independent validation data. During August-October 2014 and April-June 2015 more than 23 (LiDAR) to hundred (seismic) events were detected. Their volumes range from conditions that control such processes in a comprehensive way. Taken together, the combined LiDAR and seismic monitoring approach provides high fidelity spatial and temporal resolution of individual events.

  9. A finite volume approach for the simulation of nonlinear dissipative acoustic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    A form of the conservation equations for fluid dynamics is presented, deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A CLAWPACK based, 2D finite volume method using the Roe linearization was implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. In order to validate the code, two different tests have been performed: one against a special Taylor shock-like analytic solution, the other against published results on a HIFU system, both with satisfactory results. The code is based on CLAWPACK and is written for parallel execution on a GPU, thus improving performance by a factor of over 60 when compared to the standard CLAWPACK code.

  10. A finite volume alternate direction implicit approach to modeling selective laser melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Mohanty, Sankhya

    2013-01-01

    is proposed for modeling single-layer and few-layers selective laser melting processes. The ADI technique is implemented and applied for two cases involving constant material properties and non-linear material behavior. The ADI FV method consume less time while having comparable accuracy with respect to 3D...... to accurately simulate the process, are constrained by either the size or scale of the model domain. A second challenging aspect involves the inclusion of non-linear material behavior into the 3D implicit FE models. An alternating direction implicit (ADI) method based on a finite volume (FV) formulation......Over the last decade, several studies have attempted to develop thermal models for analyzing the selective laser melting process with a vision to predict thermal stresses, microstructures and resulting mechanical properties of manufactured products. While a holistic model addressing all involved...

  11. A multiresolution image based approach for correction of partial volume effects in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussion, N; Hatt, M; Lamare, F; Bizais, Y; Turzo, A; Rest, C Cheze-Le; Visvikis, D [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Brest (France)

    2006-04-07

    Partial volume effects (PVEs) are consequences of the limited spatial resolution in emission tomography. They lead to a loss of signal in tissues of size similar to the point spread function and induce activity spillover between regions. Although PVE can be corrected for by using algorithms that provide the correct radioactivity concentration in a series of regions of interest (ROIs), so far little attention has been given to the possibility of creating improved images as a result of PVE correction. Potential advantages of PVE-corrected images include the ability to accurately delineate functional volumes as well as improving tumour-to-background ratio, resulting in an associated improvement in the analysis of response to therapy studies and diagnostic examinations, respectively. The objective of our study was therefore to develop a methodology for PVE correction not only to enable the accurate recuperation of activity concentrations, but also to generate PVE-corrected images. In the multiresolution analysis that we define here, details of a high-resolution image H (MRI or CT) are extracted, transformed and integrated in a low-resolution image L (PET or SPECT). A discrete wavelet transform of both H and L images is performed by using the 'a trous' algorithm, which allows the spatial frequencies (details, edges, textures) to be obtained easily at a level of resolution common to H and L. A model is then inferred to build the lacking details of L from the high-frequency details in H. The process was successfully tested on synthetic and simulated data, proving the ability to obtain accurately corrected images. Quantitative PVE correction was found to be comparable with a method considered as a reference but limited to ROI analyses. Visual improvement and quantitative correction were also obtained in two examples of clinical images, the first using a combined PET/CT scanner with a lymphoma patient and the second using a FDG brain PET and corresponding T1

  12. Talking and Testing: Discourse Approaches to the Assessment of Oral Proficiency. Studies in Bilingualism, Volume 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard, Ed.; He, Agnes Weiyun, Ed.

    Papers on second language oral proficiency testing include: "Language Proficiency Interviews: A Discourse Approach" (Agnes Weiyun He, Richard Young); "Re-Analyzing the OPI: How Much Does It Look Like Natural Conversation?" (Marysia Johnson, Andrea Tyler); "Evaluating Learner Interactional Skills: Conversation at the Micro Level" (Heidi…

  13. Performed Culture: An Approach to East Asian Language Pedagogy. Pathways to Advanced Skills Series, Volume 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Matthew; Warnick, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This book is a general introduction to the performed culture approach, which trains students how to express themselves in a way that native speakers of the target culture feel appropriate in given situations. Target readership includes Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language teachers and graduate students. Chapters of this book include: (1)…

  14. On Narrative Inquiry: Approaches to Language and Literacy (An NCRLL Volume). Language & Literacy Series. NCRLL Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, David; Vinz, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Can stories about students and classrooms be the basis for meaningful research? In this book, the authors describe and tell illustrative stories about the potential and limits of narrative for the purpose of inquiry in English education. They argue that narrative inquiry is uniquely suited to the questions educators are asking in the field today.…

  15. Hybrid finite-volume-ROM approach to non-linear aerospace fluid-structure interaction modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mowat, AGB

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available frame, describe the fluid domain while the structure is represented by a quadratic modal reduced order model (ROM). A Runge-Kutta dual-timestepping method is employed for the fluid solver, and three upwind schemes are considered viz. AUSM+ -up, HLLC...

  16. Five Describing Factors of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboer, Peter; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Oort, Frans J.

    2016-01-01

    Two subtypes of dyslexia (phonological, visual) have been under debate in various studies. However, the number of symptoms of dyslexia described in the literature exceeds the number of subtypes, and underlying relations remain unclear. We investigated underlying cognitive features of dyslexia with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. A…

  17. Five describing factors of dyslexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamboer, P.; Vorst, H.C.M.; Oort, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Two subtypes of dyslexia (phonological, visual) have been under debate in various studies. However, the number of symptoms of dyslexia described in the literature exceeds the number of subtypes, and underlying relations remain unclear. We investigated underlying cognitive features of dyslexia with

  18. Five Describing Factors of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboer, Peter; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Oort, Frans J.

    2016-01-01

    Two subtypes of dyslexia (phonological, visual) have been under debate in various studies. However, the number of symptoms of dyslexia described in the literature exceeds the number of subtypes, and underlying relations remain unclear. We investigated underlying cognitive features of dyslexia with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. A…

  19. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  20. Understanding the acoustics of Papal Basilicas in Rome by means of a coupled-volumes approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    The paper investigates the acoustics of the four World-famous Papal Basilicas in Rome, namely Saint Peter's, St. John Lateran's, St. Paul's outside the Walls, and Saint Mary's Major. They are characterized by different dimensions, materials, and architectural features, as well as by a certain number of similarities. In addition, their complexity determines significant variation in their acoustics depending on the relative position of source and receivers. A detailed set of acoustic measurements was carried out in each church, using both spatial (B-format) and binaural microphones, and determining the standard ISO 3382 descriptors. The results are analyzed in relation to the architectural features, pointing out the differences observed in terms of listening experience. Finally, in order to explain some of the results found in energy-based parameters, the churches were analyzed as a system of acoustically coupled volumes. The latter explained most of the anomalies observed in the distribution of acoustic parameters, while showing at the same time that secondary spaces (aisles, chapels) play a different role depending on the amount of sound absorption located in the main nave.

  1. Narrow band SWIR hyperspectral imaging: a new approach based on volume Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, M.; Lessard, S.; Blais-Ouellette, S.

    2012-06-01

    Volume Bragg grating technology has enabled the development of a new type of staring hyperspectral camera. Based on Bragg Tunable filters, these hyperspectral cameras have both high spectral and spatial resolution, and significantly higher sensitivity than competing technologies like push broom spectrometer, liquid crystal tunable filters, or acousto-optic tunable filters. They are minimally sensitive to polarization and their spectral isolation can reach 106. Here we thus present an innovative tool to collect SWIR hyperspectral data with high spectral and spatial resolution. This new instrument is based on a 3nm bandwidth Bragg Tunable Filter, continuously tunable from 1.0um and 2.5um. Because high spectral resolution also means less light per channel, a low noise custom HgCdTe (MCT) camera was also developed to meet the requirement of the filter. The high speed capability of more than 300 fps and the low operating temperature of 200K (deep cooled option to 77K) allow full frame 500 spectral channel datacube acquisitions in minimal time. Basic principle of this imaging filter will be reviewed as well as the custom MCT camera performances. High resolution hyperspectral measurements will be demonstrated between 1.0um and 2.5um on different objects.

  2. Human Factors Design Principles for Instrument Approach Procedure Charts. Volume 1. Readability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    34 Bourdary Box% " White Space as Boundaries " Proximity " Silarity Chapter 5 describes the visual tools that can be used to ensure that alphanumeric and...the variations in stroke width can be. Horizontal strokes are hairline thin while vertical strokes have a iauch heavier weight. hi contrast, the sms...Hopkin, 1975) investigated the legibility requirements of low altitude, high speed flight using charts presented on displays from film strips. He

  3. Using fundamental equations to describe basic phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    constraining the total charge of refrigerant in the system, which is missing.In traditional mathematical modelling of a refrigeration cycle/system, the influence from the total charge of refrigerant on the system behaviour is normally not modelled explicitly. Instead, parameters such as superheat......When the fundamental thermodynamic balance equations (mass, energy, and momentum) are used to describe the processes in a simple refrigeration system, then one finds that the resulting equation system will have a degree of freedom equal to one. Further investigations reveal that it is the equation...... and the before mentioned parameters. In doing so, a systematic use of control volumes for modelling a refrigeration system is outlined....

  4. An Approach to the Use of Depth Cameras for Weed Volume Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Dorado, José; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Ribeiro, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The use of depth cameras in precision agriculture is increasing day by day. This type of sensor has been used for the plant structure characterization of several crops. However, the discrimination of small plants, such as weeds, is still a challenge within agricultural fields. Improvements in the new Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor can capture the details of plants. The use of a dual methodology using height selection and RGB (Red, Green, Blue) segmentation can separate crops, weeds, and soil. This paper explores the possibilities of this sensor by using Kinect Fusion algorithms to reconstruct 3D point clouds of weed-infested maize crops under real field conditions. The processed models showed good consistency among the 3D depth images and soil measurements obtained from the actual structural parameters. Maize plants were identified in the samples by height selection of the connected faces and showed a correlation of 0.77 with maize biomass. The lower height of the weeds made RGB recognition necessary to separate them from the soil microrelief of the samples, achieving a good correlation of 0.83 with weed biomass. In addition, weed density showed good correlation with volumetric measurements. The canonical discriminant analysis showed promising results for classification into monocots and dictos. These results suggest that estimating volume using the Kinect methodology can be a highly accurate method for crop status determination and weed detection. It offers several possibilities for the automation of agricultural processes by the construction of a new system integrating these sensors and the development of algorithms to properly process the information provided by them. PMID:27347972

  5. An Approach to the Use of Depth Cameras for Weed Volume Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio Andújar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of depth cameras in precision agriculture is increasing day by day. This type of sensor has been used for the plant structure characterization of several crops. However, the discrimination of small plants, such as weeds, is still a challenge within agricultural fields. Improvements in the new Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor can capture the details of plants. The use of a dual methodology using height selection and RGB (Red, Green, Blue segmentation can separate crops, weeds, and soil. This paper explores the possibilities of this sensor by using Kinect Fusion algorithms to reconstruct 3D point clouds of weed-infested maize crops under real field conditions. The processed models showed good consistency among the 3D depth images and soil measurements obtained from the actual structural parameters. Maize plants were identified in the samples by height selection of the connected faces and showed a correlation of 0.77 with maize biomass. The lower height of the weeds made RGB recognition necessary to separate them from the soil microrelief of the samples, achieving a good correlation of 0.83 with weed biomass. In addition, weed density showed good correlation with volumetric measurements. The canonical discriminant analysis showed promising results for classification into monocots and dictos. These results suggest that estimating volume using the Kinect methodology can be a highly accurate method for crop status determination and weed detection. It offers several possibilities for the automation of agricultural processes by the construction of a new system integrating these sensors and the development of algorithms to properly process the information provided by them.

  6. An Approach to the Use of Depth Cameras for Weed Volume Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Dorado, José; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Ribeiro, Angela

    2016-06-25

    The use of depth cameras in precision agriculture is increasing day by day. This type of sensor has been used for the plant structure characterization of several crops. However, the discrimination of small plants, such as weeds, is still a challenge within agricultural fields. Improvements in the new Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor can capture the details of plants. The use of a dual methodology using height selection and RGB (Red, Green, Blue) segmentation can separate crops, weeds, and soil. This paper explores the possibilities of this sensor by using Kinect Fusion algorithms to reconstruct 3D point clouds of weed-infested maize crops under real field conditions. The processed models showed good consistency among the 3D depth images and soil measurements obtained from the actual structural parameters. Maize plants were identified in the samples by height selection of the connected faces and showed a correlation of 0.77 with maize biomass. The lower height of the weeds made RGB recognition necessary to separate them from the soil microrelief of the samples, achieving a good correlation of 0.83 with weed biomass. In addition, weed density showed good correlation with volumetric measurements. The canonical discriminant analysis showed promising results for classification into monocots and dictos. These results suggest that estimating volume using the Kinect methodology can be a highly accurate method for crop status determination and weed detection. It offers several possibilities for the automation of agricultural processes by the construction of a new system integrating these sensors and the development of algorithms to properly process the information provided by them.

  7. Choroidal Mapping; a Novel Approach for Evaluating Choroidal Thickness and Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Noori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a limited number of non-invasive imaging techniques available for assessing the choroid, a structure that may be affected by a variety of retinal disorders or become primarily involved in conditions such as polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy and choroidal tumors. The introduction of enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT has provided the advantage of in vivo cross-sectional imaging of the choroid, similar to the retina, with standard commercially available spectraldomain OCT machines. In this article, we review this imaging technique and introduce choroidal mapping as a novel approach for obtaining accurate topographic and volumetric information on the choroid in normal and diseased states.

  8. 3D modeling of forces between magnet and HTS in a levitation system using new approach of the control volume method based on an unstructured grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloui, L., E-mail: lotfi.alloui@lgep.supelec.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Laboratoire de modelisation des systemes energetiques (LMSE), Universite de Biskra, 07000 Biskra (Algeria); Bouillault, F., E-mail: bouillault@lgep.supelec.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bernard, L., E-mail: laurent.bernardl@lgep.supelc.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Leveque, J., E-mail: jean.leveque@green.uhp-nancy.fr [Groupe de recherche en electronique et electrotechnique de Nancy, Universite Henry Poincare, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper we present new 3D numerical model to calculate the vertical and the guidance forces in high temperature superconductors taking into account the influence of the flux creep phenomena. In the suggested numerical model, we adopt a new approach of the control volume method. This approach is based on the use of an unstructured grid which can be used to model more complex geometries. A comparison of the control volume method results with experiments verifies the validity of this approach and the proposed numerical model. Based on this model, the levitation force's relaxation at different temperatures was also studied.

  9. Structured assessment approach version 1. License submittal document content and format for material control and accounting assessment. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, I.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the second volume, the License Submittal Document Content and Format for Material Control and Accounting Assessment, of a four-volume document. It presents the content and format of the LSD necessary for Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) assessment with the SAA Version 1. The LSD is designed to provide the necessary data input to perform all four stages of analyses associated with the SAA. A full-size but Hypothetical Fuel Cycle Facility (HFCF) is used as an example to illustrate the required input data content and data format and to illustrate the procedure for generating the LSD. Generation of the LSD is the responsibility of the nuclear facility licensee applicant.

  10. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Identification of problems and alternative approaches. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multi-disciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The final phase of the project focused on identification of the most significant human factors problems with respect to safe and effective operation of the teletherapy system and an identification and assessment of alternative approaches for resolving the problems. This report presents the findings of this final phase.

  11. A New Approach to Image-Based Estimation of Food Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Hassannejad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A balanced diet is the key to a healthy lifestyle and is crucial for preventing or dealing with many chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Therefore, monitoring diet can be an effective way of improving people’s health. However, manual reporting of food intake has been shown to be inaccurate and often impractical. This paper presents a new approach to food intake quantity estimation using image-based modeling. The modeling method consists of three steps: firstly, a short video of the food is taken by the user’s smartphone. From such a video, six frames are selected based on the pictures’ viewpoints as determined by the smartphone’s orientation sensors. Secondly, the user marks one of the frames to seed an interactive segmentation algorithm. Segmentation is based on a Gaussian Mixture Model alongside the graph-cut algorithm. Finally, a customized image-based modeling algorithm generates a point-cloud to model the food. At the same time, a stochastic object-detection method locates a checkerboard used as size/ground reference. The modeling algorithm is optimized such that the use of six input images still results in an acceptable computation cost. In our evaluation procedure, we achieved an average accuracy of 92 % on a test set that includes images of different kinds of pasta and bread, with an average processing time of about 23 s.

  12. A data-driven approach for modeling post-fire debris-flow volumes and their uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the novel application of genetic programming to evolve nonlinear post-fire debris-flow volume equations from variables associated with a data-driven conceptual model of the western United States. The search space is constrained using a multi-component objective function that simultaneously minimizes root-mean squared and unit errors for the evolution of fittest equations. An optimization technique is then used to estimate the limits of nonlinear prediction uncertainty associated with the debris-flow equations. In contrast to a published multiple linear regression three-variable equation, linking basin area with slopes greater or equal to 30 percent, burn severity characterized as area burned moderate plus high, and total storm rainfall, the data-driven approach discovers many nonlinear and several dimensionally consistent equations that are unbiased and have less prediction uncertainty. Of the nonlinear equations, the best performance (lowest prediction uncertainty) is achieved when using three variables: average basin slope, total burned area, and total storm rainfall. Further reduction in uncertainty is possible for the nonlinear equations when dimensional consistency is not a priority and by subsequently applying a gradient solver to the fittest solutions. The data-driven modeling approach can be applied to nonlinear multivariate problems in all fields of study. ?? 2011.

  13. Multi-Disciplinary Approaches to Intelligently Sharing Large-Volumes of Real-Time Sensor Data During Natural Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart E Middleton

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe our knowledge-based service architecture for multi-risk environmental decision-support, capable of handling geo-distributed heterogeneous real-time data sources. Data sources include tide gauges, buoys, seismic sensors, satellites, earthquake alerts, Web 2.0 feeds to crowd source 'unconventional' measurements, and simulations of Tsunami wave propagation. Our system of systems multi-bus architecture provides a scalable and high performance messaging backbone. We are overcoming semantic interoperability between heterogeneous datasets by using a self-describing 'plug-in' data source approach. As crises develop we can agilely steer the processing server and adapt data fusion and mining algorithm configurations in real-time.

  14. A numerical-statistical approach to determining the representative elementary volume (REV of cement paste for measuring diffusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete diffusivity is a function of its microstructure on many scales, ranging from nanometres to millimetres. Multi-scale techniques are therefore needed to model this parameter. Representative elementary volume (REV, in conjunction with the homogenization principle, is one of the most common multi-scale approaches. This study aimed to establish a procedure for establishing the REV required to determine cement paste diffusivity based on a three-step, numerical-statistical approach. First, several series of 3D cement paste microstructures were generated with HYMOSTRUC3D, a cement hydration and microstructure model, for different volumes of cement paste and w/c ratios ranging from 0.30 to 0.60. Second, the finite element method was used to simulate the diffusion of tritiated water through these microstructures. Effective cement paste diffusivity values for different REVs were obtained by applying Fick’s law. Finally, statistical analysis was used to find the fluctuation in effective diffusivity with cement paste volume, from which the REV was then determined. The conclusion drawn was that the REV for measuring diffusivity in cement paste is 100x100x100 μm3.

    La difusividad del hormigón depende de su microestructura a numerosas escalas, desde nanómetros hasta milímetros, por lo que se precisa de técnicas multiescala para representar este parámetro. Junto con el principio de homogeneización, uno de los métodos multiescala más habituales es el volumen elemental representativo (VER. El objeto de este estudio era establecer un procedimiento que permitiera determinar el VER necesario para calcular la difusividad de la pasta de cemento, basándose en un método numéricoestadístico que consta de tres etapas. Primero, se crearon varias series de microestructuras de pasta de cemento en 3D con HYMOSTRUC3D, un programa que permite crear un modelo de la hidratación y microestructura del cemento. Luego se empleó el método de

  15. Reappraisal of the geothermal potential at Colli Albani volcano (Italy): a new approach to the volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, G.; De Benedetti, A. A.; Ramazzotti, P.; Bonamico, A.; Mattei, M.

    2012-04-01

    High enthalpy geothermal reservoirs are usually associated with fractured rocks. Secondary permeability is however difficult to be predicted thus making it difficult to locate the most productive volumes of the reservoirs. The calculation of the energetic potential in geothermal areas suffers of the large uncertainties associated with secondary permeability issues, facing the task of the interplay between stratification and fracturing on the anisotropic distribution of secondary permeability. The object of this work is the research and informatization of available data for the Colli Albani (Latium, Central Italy) geothermal system, in order to propose a qualitative approach and quantitative identification and description of geothermal systems, applied to the Colli Albani area as a case history. The identification of the rock volumes most promising in terms of industrial exploitation needs the definition of an evaluation matrix. The considered data can be placed in a three dimensional matrix with A axis that accounts for the modeling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data, and a B axis that accounts for the thermal modeling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are strongly influenced by the geological model therefore, as for the case of Colli Albani, there is certainly a lot of scope into revising existing geological reconstructions of the reservoirs in Central Italy and accordingly reconsidering the interpolation and modeling of both thermal and geophysical data. For the scope of this work, we have taken into account the maps descriptive the thermal structure and the deep distribution of the top of the geothermal reservoirs produced by ENEL and AGIP between the 1970s and 1990s for Cental Italy, and we have detailed the internal structure of the substrate, considering more recent direct and indirect data on the nature of the substratum. Finally, we discuss the implementation

  16. "A gift from heaven" or "This was not for me". A mixed methods approach to describe experiences of participation in an outsourced physical activity program for persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmelmaier, Ingrid; Lindkvist, Åsa; Nordgren, Birgitta; Opava, Christina H

    2015-03-01

    Most persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not perform health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA). Evaluations of innovative HEPA programs need to be complemented with descriptive and qualitative data from the users. The aim of this mixed methods study was to explore and describe how a subgroup of the RA population perceives participation during the first year of an outsourced 2-year HEPA program. Data were collected by a study-specific postal survey to 220 program participants (response rate 87%, n = 191) and by interviews with a purposefully selected subsample of 35, including completers and dropouts. The survey data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and the interviews by qualitative content analysis.The survey demonstrated increased self-reported physical activity in 165 participants (86%). After the first year of the program, participants reported having performed "regular" or "periodical" circuit training (78%) and physical activity in daily life (92%). The most valued program components were circuit training and physical activity in daily life, both rated median 5/5. Coach support, prompts by text messages, and expert lectures were rated median 4/5. Five categories emerged from the interviews describing expectations, facilitators, gains, maintenance, and obstacles/suggestions for improvement of the program. The results demonstrate that HEPA outside health care is highly appreciated by a subgroup of the RA population. Professional coaching and prompts by text messages seem to be particularly useful facilitators. Individual preferences emphasize the need to tailor settings, exercise formats, and behavioral support for HEPA even in a narrow, self-selected group with RA.

  17. Model estimation of cerebral hemodynamics between blood flow and volume changes: a data-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua-Liang; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Yi; Coca, Daniel; Li, Liang-Min; Mayhew, J E W; Billings, Stephen A

    2009-06-01

    It is well known that there is a dynamic relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). With increasing applications of functional MRI, where the blood oxygen-level-dependent signals are recorded, the understanding and accurate modeling of the hemodynamic relationship between CBF and CBV becomes increasingly important. This study presents an empirical and data-based modeling framework for model identification from CBF and CBV experimental data. It is shown that the relationship between the changes in CBF and CBV can be described using a parsimonious autoregressive with exogenous input model structure. It is observed that neither the ordinary least-squares (LS) method nor the classical total least-squares (TLS) method can produce accurate estimates from the original noisy CBF and CBV data. A regularized total least-squares (RTLS) method is thus introduced and extended to solve such an error-in-the-variables problem. Quantitative results show that the RTLS method works very well on the noisy CBF and CBV data. Finally, a combination of RTLS with a filtering method can lead to a parsimonious but very effective model that can characterize the relationship between the changes in CBF and CBV.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Particle Mixing in Dispersed Gas-Liquid-Solid Flows using a Combined Volume of Fluid and Discrete Particle Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, Niels G.; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a hybrid model is presented for the numerical simulation of gas-liquid-solid flows using a combined Volume Of Fluid (VOF) and Discrete Particle (DP) approach applied for respectively dispersed gas bubbles and solid particles present in the continuous liquid phase. The hard sphere DP mo

  19. Direct numerical simulation of particle mixing in dispersed gas-liquid-solid flows using a combined volume of fluid and discrete particle approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, Niels G.; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a hybrid model is presented for the numerical simulation of gas-liquid-solid flows using a combined Volume Of Fluid (VOF) and Discrete Particle (DP) approach applied for respectively dispersed gas bubbles and solid particles present in the continuous liquid phase. The hard sphere DP mo

  20. Using neural networks to describe tracer correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Lary

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and methane volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.. In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation coefficient between simulated and training values of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE which has continuously observed CH4  (but not N2O from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  1. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: A free-volume scaled-particle approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Oversteegen, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc co

  2. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: A free-volume scaled-particle approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Oversteegen, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc

  3. An integrated approach to seismic event location: 1. Evaluating how method of location affects the volume of groups of hypocenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Clifford A.

    1992-11-01

    When seismic events occur in spatially compact clusters, the volume and geometric characteristics of these clusters often provides information about the relative effectiveness of different location methods, or about physical processes occurring within the hypocentral region. This report defines and explains how to determine the convex polyhedron of minimum volume (CPMV) surrounding a set of points. We evaluate both single-event and joint hypocenter determination (JHD) relocations for three rather different clusters of seismic events: (1) nuclear explosions from Muroroa relocated using P and PKP phases reported by the ISC; (2) intermediate depth earthquakes near Bucaramanga, Colombia, relocated using P and PKP phases reported by the ISC; and (3) shallow earthquakes near Vanuatu (formerly, the New Hebrides), relocated using P and S phases from a local station network. This analysis demonstrates that different location methods markedly affect the volume of the CPMV, however, volumes for JHD relations are not always smaller than volumes for single-event relocations.

  4. Numerical modelling in building thermo-aeraulics: from CFD modelling to an hybrid finite volume / zonal approach; Modelisation numerique de la thermoaeraulique du batiment: des modeles CFD a une approche hybride volumes finis / zonale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellivier, A.

    2004-05-15

    For 3D modelling of thermo-aeraulics in building using field codes, it is necessary to reduce the computing time in order to model increasingly larger volumes. The solution suggested in this study is to couple two modelling: a zonal approach and a CFD approach. The first part of the work that was carried out is the setting of a simplified CFD modelling. We propose rules for use of coarse grids, a constant effective viscosity law and adapted coefficients for heat exchange in the framework of building thermo-aeraulics. The second part of this work concerns the creation of fluid Macro-Elements and their coupling with a calculation of CFD finite volume type. Depending on the boundary conditions of the problem, a local description of the driving flow is proposed via the installation and use of semi-empirical evolution laws. The Macro-Elements is then inserted in CFD computation: the values of velocity calculated by the evolution laws are imposed on the CFD cells corresponding to the Macro-Element. We use these two approaches on five cases representative of thermo-aeraulics in buildings. The results are compared with experimental data and with traditional RANS simulations. We highlight the significant gain of time that our approach allows while preserving a good quality of numerical results. (author)

  5. Plans should abstractly describe intended behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfleger, K.; Hayes-Roth, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Planning is the process of formulating a potential course of action. How courses of action (plans) produced by a planning module are represented and how they are used by execution-oriented modules of a complex agent to influence or dictate behavior are critical architectural issues. In contrast to the traditional model of plans as executable programs that dictate precise behaviors, we claim that autonomous agents inhabiting dynamic, unpredictable environments can make better use of plans that only abstractly describe their intended behavior. Such plans only influence or constrain behavior, rather than dictating it. This idea has been discussed in a variety of contexts, but it is seldom incorporated into working complex agents. Experiments involving instantiations of our Adaptive Intelligent Systems architecture in a variety of domains have demonstrated the generality and usefulness of the approach, even with our currently simple plan representation and mechanisms for plan following. The behavioral benefits include (1) robust improvisation of goal-directed behavior in response to dynamic situations, (2) ready exploitation of dynamically acquired knowledge or behavioral capabilities, and (3) adaptation based on dynamic aspects of coordinating diverse behaviors to achieve multiple goals. In addition to these run-time advantages, the approach has useful implications for the design and configuration of agents. Indeed, the core ideas of the approach are natural extensions of fundamental ideas in software engineering.

  6. A novel geotechnical/geostatistical approach for exploration and production of natural gas from multiple geologic strata, Phase 1. Volume 2, Geology and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.; Brunk, R.; Hawkins, L. [BDM Engineering Services Co., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    This research program has been designed to develop and verify a unique geostatistical approach for finding natural gas resources. The project has been conducted by Beckley College, Inc., and BDM Engineering Services Company (BDMESC) under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). This section, Volume II, contains a detailed discussion of the methodology used and the geological and production information collected and analyzed for this study. A companion document, Volume 1, provides an overview of the program, technique and results of the study. In combination, Volumes I and II cover the completion of the research undertaken under Phase I of this DOE project, which included the identification of five high-potential sites for natural gas production on the Eccles Quadrangle, Raleigh County, West Virginia. Each of these sites was selected for its excellent potential for gas production from both relatively shallow coalbeds and the deeper, conventional reservoir formations.

  7. A novel geotechnical/geostatistical approach for exploration and production of natural gas from multiple geologic strata, Phase 1. Volume 2, Geology and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.; Brunk, R.; Hawkins, L. [BDM Engineering Services Co., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    This research program has been designed to develop and verify a unique geostatistical approach for finding natural gas resources. The project has been conducted by Beckley College, Inc., and BDM Engineering Services Company (BDMESC) under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). This section, Volume II, contains a detailed discussion of the methodology used and the geological and production information collected and analyzed for this study. A companion document, Volume 1, provides an overview of the program, technique and results of the study. In combination, Volumes I and II cover the completion of the research undertaken under Phase I of this DOE project, which included the identification of five high-potential sites for natural gas production on the Eccles Quadrangle, Raleigh County, West Virginia. Each of these sites was selected for its excellent potential for gas production from both relatively shallow coalbeds and the deeper, conventional reservoir formations.

  8. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: A free-volume scaled-particle approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lekkerkerker, H. N. W.; Oversteegen, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc concentrations in systems now experimentally available. The gas–liquid equilibrium of the spheres becomes stable at comparable size ratios as with bimodal mixtures of spheres or mixtures of rods and ...

  9. Using default inheritance to describe LTAG

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, R; Weir, D; Evans, Roger; Gazdar, Gerald; Weir, David

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation into how the set of elementary trees of a Lexicalized Tree Adjoining Grammar can be represented in the lexical knowledge representation language DATR (Evans & Gazdar 1989a,b). The LTAG under consideration is based on the one described in Abeille et al. (1990). Our approach is similar to that of Vijay-Shanker & Schabes (1992) in that we formulate an inheritance hierarchy that efficiently encodes the elementary trees. However, rather than creating a new representation formalism for this task, we employ techniques of established utility in other lexically-oriented frameworks. In particular, we show how DATR's default mechanism can be used to eliminate the need for a non-immediate dominance relation in the descriptions of the surface LTAG entries. This allows us to embed the tree structures in the feature theory in a manner reminiscent of HPSG subcategorisation frames, and hence express lexical rules as relations over feature structures.

  10. Single breath-hold 3D measurement of left atrial volume using compressed sensing cardiovascular magnetic resonance and a non-model-based reconstruction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulis, Orestis; Monney, Pierre; Bermano, Amit; Vaxman, Amir; Gotsman, Craig; Schwitter, Janine; Stuber, Matthias; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Schwitter, Juerg

    2015-06-11

    Left atrial (LA) dilatation is associated with a large variety of cardiac diseases. Current cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) strategies to measure LA volumes are based on multi-breath-hold multi-slice acquisitions, which are time-consuming and susceptible to misregistration. To develop a time-efficient single breath-hold 3D CMR acquisition and reconstruction method to precisely measure LA volumes and function. A highly accelerated compressed-sensing multi-slice cine sequence (CS-cineCMR) was combined with a non-model-based 3D reconstruction method to measure LA volumes with high temporal and spatial resolution during a single breath-hold. This approach was validated in LA phantoms of different shapes and applied in 3 patients. In addition, the influence of slice orientations on accuracy was evaluated in the LA phantoms for the new approach in comparison with a conventional model-based biplane area-length reconstruction. As a reference in patients, a self-navigated high-resolution whole-heart 3D dataset (3D-HR-CMR) was acquired during mid-diastole to yield accurate LA volumes. Phantom studies. LA volumes were accurately measured by CS-cineCMR with a mean difference of -4.73 ± 1.75 ml (-8.67 ± 3.54%, r2 = 0.94). For the new method the calculated volumes were not significantly different when different orientations of the CS-cineCMR slices were applied to cover the LA phantoms. Long-axis "aligned" vs "not aligned" with the phantom long-axis yielded similar differences vs the reference volume (-4.87 ± 1.73 ml vs. -4.45 ± 1.97 ml, p = 0.67) and short-axis "perpendicular" vs. "not-perpendicular" with the LA long-axis (-4.72 ± 1.66 ml vs. -4.75 ± 2.13 ml; p = 0.98). The conventional bi-plane area-length method was susceptible for slice orientations (p = 0.0085 for the interaction of "slice orientation" and "reconstruction technique", 2-way ANOVA for repeated measures). To use the 3D-HR-CMR as the reference for LA volumes

  11. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation. PMID:27648083

  12. A New, Effective and Low-Cost Three-Dimensional Approach for the Estimation of Upper-Limb Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Buffa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to validate a new procedure (SkanLab for the three-dimensional estimation of total arm volume. SkanLab is based on a single structured-light Kinect sensor (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA and on Skanect (Occipital, San Francisco, CA, USA and MeshLab (Visual Computing Lab, Pisa, Italy software. The volume of twelve plastic cylinders was measured using geometry, as the reference, water displacement and SkanLab techniques (two raters and repetitions. The right total arm volume of thirty adults was measured by water displacement (reference and SkanLab (two raters and repetitions. The bias and limits of agreement (LOA between techniques were determined using the Bland–Altman method. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and the standard error of measurement. The bias of SkanLab in measuring the cylinders volume was −21.9 mL (−5.7% (LOA: −62.0 to 18.2 mL; −18.1% to 6.7% and in measuring the volume of arms’ was −9.9 mL (−0.6% (LOA: −49.6 to 29.8 mL; −2.6% to 1.4%. SkanLab’s intra- and inter-rater reliabilities were very high (ICC >0.99. In conclusion, SkanLab is a fast, safe and low-cost method for assessing total arm volume, with high levels of accuracy and reliability. SkanLab represents a promising tool in clinical applications.

  13. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: a free-volume scaled-particle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oversteegen, S M; Lekkerkerker, H N W

    2004-02-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc concentrations in systems now experimentally available. The gas-liquid equilibrium of the spheres becomes stable at comparable size ratios as with bimodal mixtures of spheres or mixtures of rods and spheres. Introducing finite thickness of the platelets gives rise to a significant lowering of the fluid branch of the binodal. Copyright 2004 American Institute of Physics

  14. Effects of approach and injection volume on diffusion of mepivacaine hydrochloride during local analgesia of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claunch, Kevin M; Eggleston, Randy B; Baxter, Gary M

    2014-11-15

    To compare the effects of 2 approaches and 2 injection volumes on diffusion of mepivacaine hydrochloride for local analgesia of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve (DBLPN) in horses. Experimental study. 16 adult horses. Either 2 mL (low volume) or 8 mL (high volume) of mepivacaine hydrochloride-iohexol (50:50 mixture) was injected by means of 1 of 2 techniques to produce analgesia of the DBLPN. For technique 1, the needle was inserted 15 mm distal to the head of the fourth metatarsal bone and directed perpendicular to the limb. For technique 2, the needle was inserted 20 mm distal to the head of the fourth metatarsal bone and was directed in a proximodorsal direction. Lateromedial radiographs were obtained before and 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Radiographs were evaluated to determine the proximal and distal extent of diffusion of the contrast solution and presumably anesthetic agent and whether contrast agent appeared to be present in the tarsal sheath or tarsometatarsal joint. A high degree of variability in contrast solution diffusion was noted among injections. High-volume injections diffused significantly further proximally and distally than did low-volume injections. Contrast agent was documented within the tarsal sheath in 5 of 32 (16%) injections and within the tarsometatarsal joint in 2 of 32 (6%) injections. No significant difference was found for risk of inadvertent tarsal sheath or tarsometatarsal joint injection between the 2 techniques or the 2 volumes of anesthetic used. Mepivacaine diffused significantly further distally with technique 1 than with technique 2 but diffused significantly further proximally with technique 2 than with technique 1. For both techniques, diffusion in the distal but not the proximal direction significantly increased over time. Results indicated that the proximal and distal diffusion of the mepivacaine-iohexol solution was quite variable following either DBLPN nerve block technique.

  15. Lesson Plans for the Busy Librarian: A Standards Based Approach for the Elementary Library Media Center, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    The author designed this book, like Volume I of the set, to give elementary school librarians a quick, enjoyable way to coordinate with teachers to teach information literacy and literacy skills aligned with national standards. The chapters in the book include: (1) Kindergarten Lesson Plans; (2) First-Grade Lesson Plans; (3) Second-Grade Lesson…

  16. A principal component approach for predicting the stem volume in Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil using airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Alberto Silva; Carine Klauberg; Andrew T. Hudak; Lee A. Vierling; Veraldo Liesenberg; Samuel P. C. e Carvalho; Luiz C. E. Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Improving management practices in industrial forest plantations may increase production efficiencies, thereby reducing pressures on native tropical forests for meeting global pulp needs. This study aims to predict stem volume (V) in plantations of fast-growing Eucalyptus hybrid clones located in southeast Brazil using field plot and airborne Light Detection...

  17. Volume overload cleanup: An approach for on-line SPE-GC, GPC-GC, and GPC-SPE-GC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkdijk, H.; Mol, H.G.J.; Nagel, B. van der

    2007-01-01

    A new concept for cleanup, based on volume overloading of the cleanup column, has been developed for on-line coupling of gel permeation chromatography (GPC), solid-phase extraction (SPE), or both, to gas chromatography (GC). The principle is outlined and the applicability demonstrated by the determi

  18. Efficient embryo transfer in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) with a reduced transfer volume: a non-surgical approach with cryopreserved late-stage embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Motohashi, Hideyuki H; Kumon, Mami; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Okada, Hironori; Okada, Takashi; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    Among primates, the common marmoset is suitable for primate embryology research. Its small body size, however, has delayed the technical development of efficient embryo transfer. Furthermore, three factors have been determined to adversely affect the performance of marmoset embryo transfer: nonsurgical approaches, the use of cryopreserved embryos, and the use of late-stage embryos. Here we performed embryo transfer under conditions that included the above three factors and using either a small (1 μl or less) or a large volume (2-3 μl) of medium. The pregnancy and birth rates were 50% (5/10) and 27% (3/11), respectively, when using the large volume, and 80% (8/10) and 75% (9/12), respectively, when using the small volume. The latter scores exceed those of previous reports using comparable conditions. Thus, it appears that these three previously considered factors could be overcome, and we propose that reducing the transfer volume to 1 μl or less is essential for successful marmoset embryo transfer.

  19. Describing Ecosystem Complexity through Integrated Catchment Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, C. L.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Peiffer, S.

    2011-12-01

    Land use and climate change have been implicated in reduced ecosystem services (ie: high quality water yield, biodiversity, and agricultural yield. The prediction of ecosystem services expected under future land use decisions and changing climate conditions has become increasingly important. Complex policy and management decisions require the integration of physical, economic, and social data over several scales to assess effects on water resources and ecology. Field-based meteorology, hydrology, soil physics, plant production, solute and sediment transport, economic, and social behavior data were measured in a South Korean catchment. A variety of models are being used to simulate plot and field scale experiments within the catchment. Results from each of the local-scale models provide identification of sensitive, local-scale parameters which are then used as inputs into a large-scale watershed model. We used the spatially distributed SWAT model to synthesize the experimental field data throughout the catchment. The approach of our study was that the range in local-scale model parameter results can be used to define the sensitivity and uncertainty in the large-scale watershed model. Further, this example shows how research can be structured for scientific results describing complex ecosystems and landscapes where cross-disciplinary linkages benefit the end result. The field-based and modeling framework described is being used to develop scenarios to examine spatial and temporal changes in land use practices and climatic effects on water quantity, water quality, and sediment transport. Development of accurate modeling scenarios requires understanding the social relationship between individual and policy driven land management practices and the value of sustainable resources to all shareholders.

  20. Improving clinical outcomes among hemodialysis patients: a proposal for a "volume first" approach from the chief medical officers of US dialysis providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Daniel E; Brunelli, Steven M; Hunt, Abigail; Schiller, Brigitte; Glassock, Richard; Maddux, Frank W; Johnson, Douglas; Parker, Tom; Nissenson, Allen

    2014-11-01

    Addressing fluid intake and volume control requires alignment and coordination of patients, providers, dialysis facilities, and payers, potentially necessitating a "Volume First" approach. This article reports the consensus opinions achieved at the March 2013 symposium of the Chief Medical Officers of 14 of the largest dialysis providers in the United States. These opinions are based on broad experience among participants, but often reinforced by only observational and frequently retrospective studies, highlighting the lack of high-quality clinical trials in nephrology. Given the high morbidity and mortality rates among dialysis patients and the absence of sufficient trial data to guide most aspects of hemodialysis therapy, participants believed that immediate attempts to improve care based on quality improvement initiatives, physiologic principles, and clinical experiences are warranted until such time as rigorous clinical trial data become available. The following overarching consensus opinions emerged. (1) Extracellular fluid status should be a component of sufficient dialysis, such that approaching normalization of extracellular fluid volume should be a primary goal of dialysis care. (2) Fluid removal should be gradual and dialysis treatment duration should not routinely be less than 4 hours without justification based on individual patient factors. (3) Intradialytic sodium loading should be avoided by incorporating dialysate sodium concentrations set routinely in the range of 134-138 mEq/L, avoidance of routine use of sodium modeling, and avoidance of hypertonic saline solution. (4) Dietary counseling should emphasize sodium avoidance.

  1. Theoretical approach to study the effect of free volumes on the physical behavior of polymer stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, T.; Majumder, T. Pal

    2011-06-01

    It was clearly indicative that the polymer chains make a tremendous interaction with the tilt angle in case of a polymer stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (PSFLC). After suitable consideration of such interaction, we expanded the Landau free energy for a PSFLC system. We theoretically demonstrated the effect of free volumes, which expected to create bulk self-energy, on the physical functionalities of a PSFLC system. Then we obtained spontaneous polarization, tilt angle, rotational viscosity and dielectric constant strongly correlated with the assumed interactions. We also observed a shift of transition temperature highly influenced by this interaction between polymer network and liquid crystal molecules. A microscopical picture of this polymer-liquid crystal interaction is provided in view of the free volume charge density present in the composite system.

  2. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 1. Guideline approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1985-05-01

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. This volume includes specific recommendations for decision-making managers and site operators on how to use these guidelines. The more detailed discussions about the code selection approach are provided. 242 refs., 6 figs.

  3. The United States Remains Unprepared for Oil Import Disruptions. Volume II. Detailed Review of Current Emergency Programs and Alternative Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-29

    Conservation Act ERA Economic Regulatory Administration ERDO Emergency Reserve Drawdown Obligation ESS Emergency Sharing System ESSD Emergency Strategies and...a fraction of the base period volume. Each prime supplier (a refiner or wholesaler who first transports gasoline into a State) generally must use a...that State. Each prime supplier must set aside 5 percent of supply for this purpose. 1/See U.S. General Accounting Office, "Gasoline Allocation A Chaotic

  4. An artificial intelligence approach for modeling volume and fresh weight of callus - A case study of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Ali; Fadavi, Ali; Mortazavian, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-05-21

    Cumin (Cuminum cyminum Linn.) is valued for its aroma and its medicinal and therapeutic properties. A supervised feedforward artificial neural network (ANN) trained with back propagation algorithms, was applied to predict fresh weight and volume of Cuminum cyminum L. calli. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate input/output dependency of the eleven input parameters. Area, feret diameter, minor axis length, perimeter and weighted density parameters were chosen as input variables. Different training algorithms, transfer functions, number of hidden nodes and training iteration were studied to find out the optimum ANN structure. The network with conjugate gradient fletcher-reeves (CGF) algorithm, tangent sigmoid transfer function, 17 hidden nodes and 2000 training epochs was selected as the final ANN model. The final model was able to predict the fresh weight and volume of calli more precisely relative to multiple linear models. The results were confirmed by R(2)≥0.89, R(i)≥0.94 and T value ≥0.86. The results for both volume and fresh weight values showed that almost 90% of data had an acceptable absolute error of ±5%.

  5. Estimating the volume and age of water stored in global lakes using a geo-statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messager, Mathis Loïc; Lehner, Bernhard; Grill, Günther; Nedeva, Irena; Schmitt, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Lakes are key components of biogeochemical and ecological processes, thus knowledge about their distribution, volume and residence time is crucial in understanding their properties and interactions within the Earth system. However, global information is scarce and inconsistent across spatial scales and regions. Here we develop a geo-statistical model to estimate the volume of global lakes with a surface area of at least 10 ha based on the surrounding terrain information. Our spatially resolved database shows 1.42 million individual polygons of natural lakes with a total surface area of 2.67 × 106 km2 (1.8% of global land area), a total shoreline length of 7.2 × 106 km (about four times longer than the world's ocean coastline) and a total volume of 181.9 × 103 km3 (0.8% of total global non-frozen terrestrial water stocks). We also compute mean and median hydraulic residence times for all lakes to be 1,834 days and 456 days, respectively.

  6. A novel geotechnical/geostatistical approach for exploration and production of natural gas from multiple geologic strata, Phase 1. Volume 1, Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.; Brunk, R.; Hawkins, L. [BDM Engineering Services Co., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    This research program has been designed to develop and verify a unique geostatistical approach for finding natural gas resources. The research has been conducted by Beckley College, Inc. (Beckley) and BDM Engineering Services Company (BDMESC) under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Phase 1 of the project consisted of compiling and analyzing relevant geological and gas production information in selected areas of Raleigh County, West Virginia, ultimately narrowed to the Eccles, West Virginia, 7 {1/2} minute Quadrangle. The Phase 1 analysis identified key parameters contributing to the accumulation and production of natural gas in Raleigh County, developed analog models relating geological factors to gas production, and identified specific sites to test and verify the analysis methodologies by drilling. Based on the Phase 1 analysis, five sites have been identified with high potential for economic gas production. Phase 2 will consist of drilling, completing, and producing one or more wells at the sites identified in the Phase 1 analyses. The initial well is schedules to the drilled in April 1991. This report summarizes the results of the Phase 1 investigations. For clarity, the report has been prepared in two volumes. Volume 1 presents the Phase 1 overview; Volume 2 contains the detailed geological and production information collected and analyzed for this study.

  7. Design of Finite Element Tools for Coupled Surface and Volume Meshes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel K(o)ster; Oliver Kriessl; Kunibert G. Siebert

    2008-01-01

    Many problems with underlying variational structure involve a coupling of volume with surface effects. A straight-forward approach in a finite element discretization is to make use of the surface triangulation that is naturally induced by the volume triangulation. In an adaptive method one wants to facilitate "matching" local mesh modifications, i.e., local refinement and/or coarsening, of volume and surface mesh with standard tools such that the surface grid is always induced by the volume grid. We describe the concepts behind this approach for bisectional refinement and describe new tools incorporated in the finite element toolbox ALBERTA. We also present several important applications of the mesh coupling.

  8. A new MODIS based approach for gas flared volumes estimation: the case of the Val d'Agri Oil Center (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacava, T.; Faruolo, M.; Coviello, I.; Filizzola, C.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2014-12-01

    Gas flaring is one of the most controversial energetic and environmental issues the Earth is facing, moreover contributing to the global warming and climate change. According to the World Bank, each year about 150 Billion Cubic Meter of gas are being flared globally, that is equivalent to the annual gas use of Italy and France combined. Besides, about 400 million tons of CO2 (representing about 1.2% of global CO2 emissions) are added annually into the atmosphere. Efforts to evaluate the impact of flaring on the surrounding environment are hampered by lack of official information on flare locations and volumes. Suitable satellite based techniques could offers a potential solution to this problem through the detection and subsequent mapping of flare locations as well as gas emissions estimation. In this paper a new methodological approach, based on the Robust Satellite Techniques (RST), a multi-temporal scheme of satellite data analysis, was developed to analyze and characterize the flaring activity of the largest Italian gas and oil pre-treatment plant (ENI-COVA) located in Val d'Agri (Basilicata) For this site, located in an anthropized area characterized by a large environmental complexity, flaring emissions are mainly related to emergency conditions (i.e. waste flaring), being the industrial process regulated by strict regional laws. With reference to the peculiar characteristics of COVA flaring, the RST approach was implemented on 13 years of EOS-MODIS (Earth Observing System - Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) infrared data to detect COVA-related thermal anomalies and to develop a regression model for gas flared volume estimation. The methodological approach, the whole processing chain and the preliminarily achieved results will be shown and discussed in this paper. In addition, the possible implementation of the proposed approach on the data acquired by the SUOMI NPP - VIIRS (National Polar-orbiting Partnership - Visible Infrared Imaging

  9. Investigation of Adaptive-threshold Approaches for Determining Area-Time Integrals from Satellite Infrared Data to Estimate Convective Rain Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; VonderHaar, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    The principal goal of this project is to establish relationships that would allow application of area-time integral (ATI) calculations based upon satellite data to estimate rainfall volumes. The research is being carried out as a collaborative effort between the two participating organizations, with the satellite data analysis to determine values for the ATIs being done primarily by the STC-METSAT scientists and the associated radar data analysis to determine the 'ground-truth' rainfall estimates being done primarily at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSM&T). Synthesis of the two separate kinds of data and investigation of the resulting rainfall-versus-ATI relationships is then carried out jointly. The research has been pursued using two different approaches, which for convenience can be designated as the 'fixed-threshold approach' and the 'adaptive-threshold approach'. In the former, an attempt is made to determine a single temperature threshold in the satellite infrared data that would yield ATI values for identifiable cloud clusters which are closely related to the corresponding rainfall amounts as determined by radar. Work on the second, or 'adaptive-threshold', approach for determining the satellite ATI values has explored two avenues: (1) attempt involved choosing IR thresholds to match the satellite ATI values with ones separately calculated from the radar data on a case basis; and (2) an attempt involved a striaghtforward screening analysis to determine the (fixed) offset that would lead to the strongest correlation and lowest standard error of estimate in the relationship between the satellite ATI values and the corresponding rainfall volumes.

  10. Wisconsin Inventor & Entrepreneur Clubs: Investment in an Innovative Approach to Entrepreneurship. Rural Research Report. Volume 20, Issue 1, Winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Research on entrepreneurship in rural areas has increasingly stressed the importance of a supportive environment and social networks in enhancing innovation. This report examines a novel approach to promoting entrepreneurship using regional Inventor & Entrepreneur (I&E) Clubs. A telephone survey of 21 I&E Clubs was completed to collect…

  11. Curriculum Assessment Using Artificial Neural Network and Support Vector Machine Modeling Approaches: A Case Study. IR Applications. Volume 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chau-Kuang

    2010-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) approaches have been on the cutting edge of science and technology for pattern recognition and data classification. In the ANN model, classification accuracy can be achieved by using the feed-forward of inputs, back-propagation of errors, and the adjustment of connection weights. In…

  12. Wisconsin Inventor & Entrepreneur Clubs: Investment in an Innovative Approach to Entrepreneurship. Rural Research Report. Volume 20, Issue 1, Winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Research on entrepreneurship in rural areas has increasingly stressed the importance of a supportive environment and social networks in enhancing innovation. This report examines a novel approach to promoting entrepreneurship using regional Inventor & Entrepreneur (I&E) Clubs. A telephone survey of 21 I&E Clubs was completed to collect information…

  13. How Do Children Describe Spatial Relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M. V.; Richardson, J. Ryder

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study of children's production of locative prepositions in order to test H. Clark's hypotheses regarding the acquisition of spatial terms. Subjects were required to describe the spatial arrangement of two balls arranged in each of three spatial dimensions. (SED)

  14. A volume-preserving sharpening approach for the propagation of sharp phase boundaries in multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2011-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models that recover a macroscopic description of multiphase flow of immiscible liquids typically represent the boundaries between phases using a scalar function, the phase field, that varies smoothly over several grid points. Attempts to tune the model parameters to minimise the widths of these interfaces typically lead to the interfaces becoming fixed to the underlying grid instead of advecting with the fluid velocity. This phenomenon, known as lattice pinning, is strikingly similar to that associated with the numerical simulation of conservation laws coupled to stiff algebraic source terms. We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the model problem proposed by LeVeque and Yee (1990) [3] to study the latter phenomenon in the context of computational combustion, and offer a volume-conserving extension in multiple space dimensions. Inspired by the random projection method of Bao and Jin (2000) [1] we further generalise this formulation by introducing a uniformly distributed quasi-random variable into the term responsible for the sharpening of phase boundaries. This method is mass conserving, gives correct average propagation speeds over many timesteps, and is shown to significantly delay the onset of pinning as the interface width is reduced. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Describing Service-Oriented Architecture by Extended Darwin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tao; SHEN Mei-e; YING Shi; YE Peng; LIANG Zao-qing

    2005-01-01

    Describing Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is critical in the development of Web-based system. In this paper, an approach for describing SOA by extended Darwin is proposed. The requirements for describing SOA, which are different from that of ordinary architecture, are highlighted firstly, and then a solution for extending Darwin is presented. Using the extended Darwin, service components and connectors can be described explicit by the extended construct, as well as precise operational semantics of SOA by the π-calculus. Finally an example of supply-chain management system is given for manifesting the effect of the extended Darwin.

  16. Did goethe describe attention deficit hyperactivity disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazza, Sara; Scaglione, Cesa; Poppi, Massimo; Rizzo, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    As early as 1846, the typical symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were described by Heinrich Hoffmann (1809-1894). However, in Goethe's masterpiece Faust (1832), the character of Euphorion strongly suggests ADHD diagnosis.

  17. describing a collaborative clothing design process between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ISSN 0378-5254 Journal of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences, Vol 43, 2015. Designing success: describing a ... PROCESS BETWEEN APPRENTICE DESIGNERS AND EXPERT DESIGN ...... decision-making. Thinking Skills and ...

  18. Analysis of Partial Volume Effects on Accurate Measurement of the Hippocampus Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Hajiesmaeili; Jamshid Dehmeshki; Tim Ellis

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal volume loss is an important biomarker in distinguishing subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and its measurement in magnetic resonance images (MRI) is influenced by partial volume effects (PVE). This paper describes a post-processing approach to quantify PVE for correction of the hippocampal volume by using a spatial fuzzyC-means (SFCM) method. The algorithm is evaluated on a dataset of 20 T1-weighted MRI scans sampled at two different resolutions. The corrected volumes for left and right hippocampus (HC) which are 23% and 18% for the low resolution and 6% and 5% for the high resolution datasets, respectively are lower than hippocampal volume results from manual segmentation. Results show the importance of applying this technique in AD detection with low resolution datasets.

  19. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  20. Predictors and outcomes of lead extraction requiring a bailout femoral approach: Data from 2 high-volume centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chami, Mikhael F; Merchant, Faisal M; Waheed, Anam; Khattak, Furqan; El-Khalil, Jad; Patel, Adarsh; Sayegh, Michael N; Desai, Yaanik; Leon, Angel R; Saba, Samir

    2017-04-01

    Lead extraction (LE) infrequently requires the use of the "bailout" femoral approach. Predictors and outcomes of femoral extraction are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine the predictors of need for femoral LE and its outcomes. Consecutive patients who underwent LE at our centers were identified. Baseline demographic characteristics, procedural outcomes, and clinical outcomes were ascertained by medical record review. Patients were stratified into 2 groups on the basis of the need for femoral extraction. A total of 1080 patients underwent LE, of whom 50 (4.63%) required femoral extraction. Patients requiring femoral extraction were more likely to have leads with longer dwell time (9.5 ± 6.0 years vs 5.7 ± 4.3 years; P extracted per procedure (2.0 ± 1.0 vs 1.7 ± 0.9; P = .003), and to have infection as an indication for extraction (72% vs 37.2%; P extraction group than in the nonfemoral group (58% and 76% vs 94.7% and 97.9 %, respectively; P extraction was needed in ~5% of LEs. Longer lead dwell time, higher number of leads extracted per procedure, and the presence of infection predicted the need for femoral extraction. Procedural success of femoral extraction was low, highlighting the fact that this approach is mostly used as a bailout strategy and thus selects for more challenging cases. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Morphologic Study of Superior Temporal Sulcus-Amygdaloid Body and Lateral Fissure-Amygdaloid Body Surgical Approach by Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuan; Ren, Bichen; Chang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jinnan; Li, Youqiong; Duan, Haobo; Cheng, Kailiang; Wang, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    In this research, 83 patients were measured by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering technique. The authors acquired the curve length of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure on the cerebral hemisphere, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the center of amygdaloid body separately, the vertical diameter, the transversal diameter, and the anteroposterior diameter of the amygdaloid body and the 2 approach angles between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the center of amygdaloid body and the shortest segment from lateral fissure to the center of the amygdaloid body. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the 2 points of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure, which are closest to the center of amygdaloid body, aimed at finding out the best entrance points of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the amygdaloid body and reducing the damage to the nerve fibers or blood vessels during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 1/4 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point and the point at the front side 1/3 of the lateral fissure. There is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  2. Quantum formalism to describe binocular rivalry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2009-11-01

    On the basis of the general character and operation of the process of perception, a formalism is sought to mathematically describe the subjective or abstract/mental process of perception. It is shown that the formalism of orthodox quantum theory of measurement, where the observer plays a key role, is a broader mathematical foundation which can be adopted to describe the dynamics of the subjective experience. The mathematical formalism describes the psychophysical dynamics of the subjective or cognitive experience as communicated to us by the subject. Subsequently, the formalism is used to describe simple perception processes and, in particular, to describe the probability distribution of dominance duration obtained from the testimony of subjects experiencing binocular rivalry. Using this theory and parameters based on known values of neuronal oscillation frequencies and firing rates, the calculated probability distribution of dominance duration of rival states in binocular rivalry under various conditions is found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. This theory naturally explains an observed marked increase in dominance duration in binocular rivalry upon periodic interruption of stimulus and yields testable predictions for the distribution of perceptual alteration in time.

  3. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, H; Steffensen, E; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2012-01-01

    technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose: To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC......, and glioblastomas. Results: rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r ¼ 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r ¼ 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated......-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods: Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and r...

  4. The effects of ultrasound guidance and neurostimulation on the minimum effective anesthetic volume of mepivacaine 1.5% required to block the sciatic nerve using the subgluteal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelli, Giorgio; Ghisi, Daniela; Fanelli, Andrea; Ortu, Andrea; Moschini, Elisa; Berti, Marco; Ziegler, Stefanie; Fanelli, Guido

    2009-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ultrasound (US) guidance may reduce the minimum effective anesthetic volume (MEAV(50)) of 1.5% mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve with a subgluteal approach compared with neurostimulation (NS). After premedication and single-injection femoral nerve block, 60 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block with either NS (n = 30) or US (n = 30). In the US group, the sciatic nerve was localized between the ischial tuberosity and the greater trochanter. In the NS group, the appropriate muscular response (foot plantar flexion or inversion) was elicited (1.5 mA, 2 Hz, 0.1 ms) and maintained to mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve compared with NS.

  5. Methodological approaches to planar and volumetric scintigraphic imaging of small volume targets with high spatial resolution and sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Biologia Molecular], e-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.br; Braga, J. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica; Correa, R. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Ciencia Espacial e Atmosferica; Leite, J.P. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia, Psiquiatria e Psicologia Medica; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica

    2009-08-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a non-invasive imaging technique, which provides information reporting the functional states of tissues. SPECT imaging has been used as a diagnostic tool in several human disorders and can be used in animal models of diseases for physiopathological, genomic and drug discovery studies. However, most of the experimental models used in research involve rodents, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller in linear dimensions than man. Consequently, images of targets obtained with conventional gamma-cameras and collimators have poor spatial resolution and statistical quality. We review the methodological approaches developed in recent years in order to obtain images of small targets with good spatial resolution and sensitivity. Multi pinhole, coded mask- and slit-based collimators are presented as alternative approaches to improve image quality. In combination with appropriate decoding algorithms, these collimators permit a significant reduction of the time needed to register the projections used to make 3-D representations of the volumetric distribution of target's radiotracers. Simultaneously, they can be used to minimize artifacts and blurring arising when single pinhole collimators are used. Representation images are presented, which illustrate the use of these collimators. We also comment on the use of coded masks to attain tomographic resolution with a single projection, as discussed by some investigators since their introduction to obtain near-field images. We conclude this review by showing that the use of appropriate hardware and software tools adapted to conventional gamma-cameras can be of great help in obtaining relevant functional information in experiments using small animals. (author)

  6. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 8: Design approaches. UPH. Appendix E: Lower reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Operational, construction, and geotechnical requirements were examined. Overriding considerations including operating range, volume, construction methods, cavern cross section and reservoir layout were studied within the context of minimizing facility costs and optimizing the plant layout. The study led to a preliminary arrangement of fourteen parallel caverns, each 60 ft wide by 85 ft high in cross section and 3610 ft in length. The requirements for and preliminary design of the intermediate reservoir in the case of a two step UPH facility is also described. The design and the cost estimates presented are based on the requirements for a 2000 MW plant providing 20,000 MWh of storage at a nominal head of 4600 ft.

  7. Dos Enfoques en el Diseño de un Observador Asintótico para un Proceso Fermentativo Descrito por Ecuaciones Diferenciales Parciales Two Approaches in the Design of an Asymptotic Observer for a Fermentative Process Described by Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrén Aguilar-Garnica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo, se presentan dos enfoques de diseño de un observador asintótico para un sistema fermentativo descrito por ecuaciones diferenciales parciales (EDP. En el primer enfoque, denominado reducción posterior, se diseña el observador directamente sobre el modelo en EDP y después, tanto el modelo como el observador, son reducidos a un conjunto de ecuaciones diferenciales ordinarias (EDO mediante el Método de Colocación Ortogonal (MCO. En el segundo enfoque, denominado reducción temprana, el modelo en EDP, es inicialmente reducido a EDO, usando también el MCO y luego, el observador asintótico es diseñado para el modelo reducido. El estudio muestra, mediante un análisis de la dinámica del error de estimación para ambos enfoques, que el comportamiento dinámico del observador asintótico es independiente del enfoque de diseño utilizado.This paper presents two approaches for the design of an asymptotic observer for a fermentative process described by partial differential equations (PDE. In the first approach, termed late lumping, the observer is designed for the PDE model and then both the observer and the model are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations (ODE by means of the Orthogonal Collocation Method (OCM. In the second approach, termed early lumping, the PDE model is initially reduced to an ODE set by using the OCM and then the asymptotic observer is designed for the reduced model. The study demonstrates that by analyzing the estimation error dynamics for both design approaches, the dynamic behavior of the asymptotic observer is fully independent of the design approach used.

  8. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor.

  9. Prototype Procedures to Describe Army Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    the development of the content for the prototype approach – Mr. Roy Campbell, Mr. Joseph Caramagno, Dr. Jesse Erdheim, Dr. Laura Ford, Dr. Amy Hooper...including their physical locations, relationships, and characteristics. Medicine and Dentistry : Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to

  10. Disposition of recently described species of Penicillium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Samson, Robert A.; Stolk, Amelia C.

    1990-01-01

    Hundred and twenty-two species, varieties, and new combinations of Penicillium, Eupenicillium, and Talaromyces described since 1977 have been studied taxonomically and screened for mycotoxin production. Only 48 taxa could be accepted: Eupenicillium angustiporcatum, E. cryptum, E. lineolatum, E. limo

  11. Disposition of recently described species of Penicillium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Samson, Robert A.; Stolk, Amelia C.

    1990-01-01

    Hundred and twenty-two species, varieties, and new combinations of Penicillium, Eupenicillium, and Talaromyces described since 1977 have been studied taxonomically and screened for mycotoxin production. Only 48 taxa could be accepted: Eupenicillium angustiporcatum, E. cryptum, E. lineolatum, E. limo

  12. How Digital Native Learners Describe Themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Eight university students from the "digital native" generation were interviewed about the connections they saw between technology use and learning, and also their reactions to the popular press claims about their generation. Themes that emerged from the interviews were coded to show patterns in how digital natives describe themselves.…

  13. Is the Water Heating Curve as Described?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, H. G.; Oliva, A. I.

    2008-01-01

    We analysed the heating curve of water which is described in textbooks. An experiment combined with some simple heat transfer calculations is discussed. The theoretical behaviour can be altered by changing the conditions under which the experiment is modelled. By identifying and controlling the different parameters involved during the heating…

  14. A Dualistic Model To Describe Computer Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitezki, Peter; Engel, Michael

    1985-07-01

    The Dualistic Model for Computer Architecture Description uses a hierarchy of abstraction levels to describe a computer in arbitrary steps of refinement from the top of the user interface to the bottom of the gate level. In our Dualistic Model the description of an architecture may be divided into two major parts called "Concept" and "Realization". The Concept of an architecture on each level of the hierarchy is an Abstract Data Type that describes the functionality of the computer and an implementation of that data type relative to the data type of the next lower level of abstraction. The Realization on each level comprises a language describing the means of user interaction with the machine, and a processor interpreting this language in terms of the language of the lower level. The surface of each hierarchical level, the data type and the language express the behaviour of a ma-chine at this level, whereas the implementation and the processor describe the structure of the algorithms and the system. In this model the Principle of Operation maps the object and computational structure of the Concept onto the structures of the Realization. Describing a system in terms of the Dualistic Model is therefore a process of refinement starting at a mere description of behaviour and ending at a description of structure. This model has proven to be a very valuable tool in exploiting the parallelism in a problem and it is very transparent in discovering the points where par-allelism is lost in a special architecture. It has successfully been used in a project on a survey of Computer Architecture for Image Processing and Pattern Analysis in Germany.

  15. Functional approach to exploring climatic and landscape controls of runoff generation. 1. Behavioral constraints on runoff volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongyi; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Tian, Fuqiang; Harman, Ciaran

    2014-12-09

    Inspired by the Dunne diagram, the climatic and landscape controls on the partitioning of annual runoff into its various components (Hortonian and Dunne overland flow and subsurface stormflow) are assessed quantitatively, from a purely theoretical perspective. A simple distributed hydrologic model has been built sufficient to simulate the effects of different combinations of climate, soil, and topography on the runoff generation processes. The model is driven by a sequence of simple hypothetical precipitation events, for a large combination of climate and landscape properties, and hydrologic responses at the catchment scale are obtained through aggregation of grid-scale responses. It is found, first, that the water balance responses, including relative contributions of different runoff generation mechanisms, could be related to a small set of dimensionless similarity parameters. These capture the competition between the wetting, drying, storage, and drainage functions underlying the catchment responses, and in this way, provide a quantitative approximation of the conceptual Dunne diagram. Second, only a subset of all hypothetical catchment/climate combinations is found to be ‘‘behavioral,’’ in terms of falling sufficiently close to the Budyko curve, describing mean annual runoff as a function of climate aridity. Furthermore, these behavioral combinations are mostly consistent with the qualitative picture presented in the Dunne diagram, indicating clearly the commonality between the Budyko curve and the Dunne diagram. These analyses also suggest clear interrelationships amongst the ‘‘behavioral’’ climate, soil, and topography parameter combinations, implying these catchment properties may be constrained to be codependent in order to satisfy the Budyko curve.

  16. LiveDescribe: Can Amateur Describers Create High-Quality Audio Description?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branje, Carmen J.; Fels, Deborah I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The study presented here evaluated the usability of the audio description software LiveDescribe and explored the acceptance rates of audio description created by amateur describers who used LiveDescribe to facilitate the creation of their descriptions. Methods: Twelve amateur describers with little or no previous experience with…

  17. How Can We Observe and Describe Chaos?

    CERN Document Server

    Kossakowski, A; Togawa, Y; Kossakowski, Andrzej; Ohya, Masanori; Togawa, Yosio

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new approach to define chaos in dynamical systems from the point of view of Information Dynamics. Observation of chaos in reality depends upon how to observe it, for instance, how to take the scale in space and time. Therefore it is natural to abandon taking several mathematical limiting procedures. We take account of them, and chaos degree previously introduced is redefined in this paper.

  18. Frameworks for understanding and describing business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Roslender, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides in a chronological fashion an introduction to six frameworks that one can apply to describing, understanding and also potentially innovating business models. These six frameworks have been chosen carefully as they represent six very different perspectives on business models ...... Maps (2001) • Intellectual Capital Statements (2003) • Chesbrough’s framework for Open Business Models (2006) • Business Model Canvas (2008)......This chapter provides in a chronological fashion an introduction to six frameworks that one can apply to describing, understanding and also potentially innovating business models. These six frameworks have been chosen carefully as they represent six very different perspectives on business models...... and in this manner “complement” each other. There are a multitude of varying frameworks that could be chosen from and we urge the reader to search and trial these for themselves. The six chosen models (year of release in parenthesis) are: • Service-Profit Chain (1994) • Strategic Systems Auditing (1997) • Strategy...

  19. Describing Spirituality at the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Pam Shockey; Berry, Devon M

    2015-09-01

    Spirituality is salient to persons nearing the end of life (EOL). Unfortunately, researchers have not been able to agree on a universal definition of spirituality reducing the effectiveness of spiritual research. To advance spiritual knowledge and build an evidence base, researchers must develop creative ways to describe spirituality as it cannot be explicitly defined. A literature review was conducted to determine the common attributes that comprise the essence of spirituality, thereby creating a common ground on which to base spiritual research. Forty original research articles (2002 to 2012) focusing on EOL and including spiritual definitions/descriptions were reviewed. Analysis identified five attributes that most commonly described the essence of spirituality, including meaning, beliefs, connecting, self-transcendence, and value.

  20. Nurse managers describe their practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshawsky, Nora E; Lake, Sharon W; Brandford, Arica

    2013-01-01

    Hospital work environments that support the professional practice of nurses are critical to patient safety. Nurse managers are responsible for creating these professional practice environments for staff nurses, yet little is known about the environments needed to support nurse managers. Domains of nurse managers' practice environment have recently been defined. This is a secondary analysis of 2 cross-sectional studies of organizational characteristics that influence nurse manager practice. Content analysis of the free text comments from 127 nurse managers was used to illustrate the 8 domains of nurse managers' practice environments. Nurse managers valued time spent with their staff; therefore, workloads must permit meaningful interaction. Directors demonstrated trust when they empowered nurse managers to make decisions. Administrative leaders should build patient safety cultures on the basis of shared accountability and mutual respect among the health care team. The expectations of nurse managers have greatly expanded in the volume and complexity of direct reports, patient care areas, and job functions. The nurse managers in this analysis reported characteristics of their practice environments that limit their role effectiveness and may negatively impact organizational performance. Further research is needed to understand the effects of nurse managers' practice environments on staff and patient outcomes.

  1. On Gaussian Beams Described by Jacobi's Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Steven Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Gaussian beams describe the amplitude and phase of rays and are widely used to model acoustic propagation. This paper describes four new results in the theory of Gaussian beams. (1) It is shown that the \\v{C}erven\\'y equations for the amplitude and phase are equivalent to the classical Jacobi Equation of differential geometry. The \\v{C}erven\\'y equations describe Gaussian beams using Hamilton-Jacobi theory, whereas the Jacobi Equation expresses how Gaussian and Riemannian curvature determine geodesic flow on a Riemannian manifold. Thus the paper makes a fundamental connection between Gaussian beams and an acoustic channel's so-called intrinsic Gaussian curvature from differential geometry. (2) A new formula $\\pi(c/c")^{1/2}$ for the distance between convergence zones is derived and applied to several well-known profiles. (3) A class of "model spaces" are introduced that connect the acoustics of ducting/divergence zones with the channel's Gaussian curvature $K=cc"-(c')^2$. The "model" SSPs yield constant Gauss...

  2. The PAVE (peeling-assisted volume-enhancing) lift: A retrospective 6-year clinical analysis of a combined approach for facial rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Kai Oliver; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Jaminet, Patrick; Gonser, Phillipp

    2016-08-01

    The peeling-assisted volume-enhancing (PAVE) lift is a single-stage approach that combines superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) plication techniques with fat grafting and different peeling agents. To evaluate the safety of this approach, we analyzed the records of 159 patients who underwent surgery between 2008 and 2014. The percentage of complications observed was not higher than values reported in the literature for each treatment entity: surgical facelift: n=3 haematomas (1.89 %), n=2; temporary apraxia of the mandibular branch (1.26%); fat transfer: minor asymmetry in n = 5 cases (3.14%); peeling: temporary hyperpigmentation in trichloroacetic acid (n = 5; 3.8%) and phenol peels (n = 4; 3.1%), permanent hypopigmentation (n = 6; 5.6%), formation of skin miliae persisting longer than 2 to 3 months (n = 5; 4.6%) and prolonged erythema (n = 3; 0.28%) in phenol peels. The single-stage use of chemical peels, autologous fat transfer, and surgical rhytidectomy was safe.

  3. Generalized Partial Volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Sporring, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV). Their theoret......Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV...

  4. An Evolving Framework for Describing Student Engagement in Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Flavio S.; diSessa, Andrea A.; Sherin, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement in classroom activities is usually described as a function of factors such as human needs, affect, intention, motivation, interests, identity, and others. We take a different approach and develop a framework that models classroom engagement as a function of students' "conceptual competence" in the "specific content" (e.g., the…

  5. Simplified stock markets described by number operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagarello, F.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we continue our systematic analysis of the operatorial approach previously proposed in an economical context and we discuss a mixed toy model of a simplified stock market, i.e. a model in which the price of the shares is given as an input. We deduce the time evolution of the portfolio of the various traders of the market, as well as of other observable quantities. As in a previous paper, we solve the equations of motion by means of a fixed point like approximation.

  6. Classification system to describe workpieces definitions

    CERN Document Server

    Macconnell, W R

    2013-01-01

    A Classification System to Describe Workpieces provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects and principles of coding. This book discusses the various applications of the classification system of coding.Organized into three chapters, this book begins with an overview of the requirements of a system of classification pertaining adequately and equally to design, production, and work planning. This text then examines the purpose of the classification system in production to determine the most suitable means of machining a component. Other chapters consider the optimal utilization of m

  7. Is an eclipse described in the Odyssey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikouzis, Constantino; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2008-07-01

    Plutarch and Heraclitus believed a certain passage in the 20th book of the Odyssey ("Theoclymenus's prophecy") to be a poetic description of a total solar eclipse. In the late 1920s, Schoch and Neugebauer computed that the solar eclipse of 16 April 1178 B.C.E. was total over the Ionian Islands and was the only suitable eclipse in more than a century to agree with classical estimates of the decade-earlier sack of Troy around 1192-1184 B.C.E. However, much skepticism remains about whether the verses refer to this, or any, eclipse. To contribute to the issue independently of the disputed eclipse reference, we analyze other astronomical references in the Epic, without assuming the existence of an eclipse, and search for dates matching the astronomical phenomena we believe they describe. We use three overt astronomical references in the epic: to Boötes and the Pleiades, Venus, and the New Moon; we supplement them with a conjectural identification of Hermes's trip to Ogygia as relating to the motion of planet Mercury. Performing an exhaustive search of all possible dates in the span 1250-1115 B.C., we looked to match these phenomena in the order and manner that the text describes. In that period, a single date closely matches our references: 16 April 1178 B.C.E. We speculate that these references, plus the disputed eclipse reference, may refer to that specific eclipse.

  8. On Redundancy in Describing Linguistic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Borissov Pericliev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On Redundancy in Describing Linguistic Systems The notion of system of linguistic elements figures prominently in most post-Saussurian linguistics up to the present. A “system” is the network of the contrastive (or, distinctive features each element in the system bears to the remaining elements. The meaning (valeur of each element in the system is the set of features that are necessary and jointly sufficient to distinguish this element from all others. The paper addresses the problems of “redundancy”, i.e. the occurrence of features that are not strictly necessary in describing an element in a system. Redundancy is shown to smuggle into the description of linguistic systems, this infelicitous practice illustrated with some examples from the literature (e.g. the classical phonemic analysis of Russian by Cherry, Halle, and Jakobson, 1953. The logic and psychology of the occurrence of redundancy are briefly sketched and it is shown that, in addition to some other problems, redundancy leads to a huge and unresolvable ambiguity of descriptions of linguistic systems (the Buridan’s ass problem.

  9. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Polkey

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgical lung volume reduction can improve exercise performance and forced expiratory volume in one second in patients with emphysema. However, the procedure is associated with a 5% mortality rate and a nonresponse rate of 25%. Accordingly, interest has focused on alternative ways of reducing lung volume. Two principle approaches are used: collapse of the diseased area using blockers placed endobronchially and the creation of extrapulmonary pathways. Preliminary data from the former approach suggest that it can be successful and that the magnitude of success is related to reduction in dynamic hyperinflation.

  10. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 8: Design approaches: UPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    The development of the design approaches used to determine the plant and overall layout for a underground pumped hydroelectric (UPH) storage facility having a maximum generating capacity of 2000 MW and a storage capacity of 20,000 MWh is discussed. Key factors were the selection of the high head pump-turbine equipment and the geotechnical considerations relevant to the underground cavern designs. The comparison of pump-turbine alternatives is described leading to the selection for detailed study of both a single-step configurations, using multistage reversible pump-turbines, and a two-step configuration, with single-stage reversible pump-turbines.

  11. Stimulated recall interviews for describing pragmatic epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Christopher W.; Meredith, Dawn C.

    2015-12-01

    Students' epistemologies affect how and what they learn: do they believe physics is a list of equations, or a coherent and sensible description of the physical world? In order to study these epistemologies as part of curricular assessment, we adopt the resources framework, which posits that students have many productive epistemological resources that can be brought to bear as they learn physics. In previous studies, these epistemologies have been either inferred from behavior in learning contexts or probed through surveys or interviews outside of the learning context. We argue that stimulated recall interviews provide a contextually and interpretively valid method to access students' epistemologies that complement existing methods. We develop a stimulated recall interview methodology to assess a curricular intervention and find evidence that epistemological resources aptly describe student epistemologies.

  12. Does Guru Granth Sahib describe depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sikhism is a relatively young religion, with Guru Granth Sahib as its key religious text. This text describes emotions in everyday life, such as happiness, sadness, anger, hatred, and also more serious mental health issues such as depression and psychosis. There are references to the causation of these emotional disturbances and also ways to get out of them. We studied both the Gurumukhi version and the English translation of the Guru Granth Sahib to understand what it had to say about depression, its henomenology, and religious prescriptions for recovery. We discuss these descriptions in this paper and understand its meaning within the context of clinical depression. Such knowledge is important as explicit descriptions about depression and sadness can help encourage culturally appropriate assessment and treatment, as well as promote public health through education.

  13. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  14. Describing and Enhancing Collaboration at the Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Beatty

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer-based learning materials differ from classroom practice in that they seldom explicitly offer opportunities for collaboration. Despite this, students do collaborate, helping one another through the content and affordances of computer materials. But, in doing so, students meet with challenges. Paradoxically, these challenges can either inspire or discourage learning and second-language acquisition. This paper, based on research with twenty Hong Kong university students in a controlled experiment, evaluates challenges to collaboration at the computer as evidenced by discourse. The students were videotaped and their discourse transcribed and evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively, according to a set of discourse markers created to describe collaborative, non-collaborative and ambiguous strategies. The paper begins by exploring the differences between collaboration and similar terms such as teamwork and cooperative learning then goes on to define collaboration in the context of computer-assisted learning. It ends by presenting practical suggestions for software designers, teachers and students to enhance collaboration at the computer.

  15. Can the genetic code be mathematically described?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego L

    2004-04-01

    From a mathematical point of view, the genetic code is a surjective mapping between the set of the 64 possible three-base codons and the set of 21 elements composed of the 20 amino acids plus the Stop signal. Redundancy and degeneracy therefore follow. In analogy with the genetic code, non-power integer-number representations are also surjective mappings between sets of different cardinality and, as such, also redundant. However, none of the non-power arithmetics studied so far nor other alternative redundant representations are able to match the actual degeneracy of the genetic code. In this paper we develop a slightly more general framework that leads to the following surprising results: i) the degeneracy of the genetic code is mathematically described, ii) a new symmetry is uncovered within this degeneracy, iii) by assigning a binary string to each of the codons, their classification into definite parity classes according to the corresponding sequence of bases is made possible. This last result is particularly appealing in connection with the fact that parity coding is the basis of the simplest strategies devised for error correction in man-made digital data transmission systems.

  16. An approach to the verification of a fault-tolerant, computer-based reactor safety system: A case study using automated reasoning: Volume 1: Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, G.H.; Kljaich, J.; Smith, B.T.; Wojcik, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of automating the verification process for computer systems. The intent is to demonstrate that both the software and hardware that comprise the system meet specified availability and reliability criteria, that is, total design analysis. The approach to automation is based upon the use of Automated Reasoning Software developed at Argonne National Laboratory. This approach is herein referred to as formal analysis and is based on previous work on the formal verification of digital hardware designs. Formal analysis represents a rigorous evaluation which is appropriate for system acceptance in critical applications, such as a Reactor Safety System (RSS). This report describes a formal analysis technique in the context of a case study, that is, demonstrates the feasibility of applying formal analysis via application. The case study described is based on the Reactor Safety System (RSS) for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). This is a system where high reliability and availability are tantamount to safety. The conceptual design for this case study incorporates a Fault-Tolerant Processor (FTP) for the computer environment. An FTP is a computer which has the ability to produce correct results even in the presence of any single fault. This technology was selected as it provides a computer-based equivalent to the traditional analog based RSSs. This provides a more conservative design constraint than that imposed by the IEEE Standard, Criteria For Protection Systems For Nuclear Power Generating Stations (ANSI N42.7-1972).

  17. An approach to the verification of a fault-tolerant, computer-based reactor safety system: A case study using automated reasoning: Volume 2, Appendixes: Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, G.H.; Kljaich, J.; Smith, B.T.; Wojcik, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of automating the verification process for computer systems. The intent is to demonstrate that both the software and hardware that comprise the system meet specified availability and reliability criteria, that is, total design analysis. The approach to automation is based upon the use of Automated Reasoning Software developed at Argonne National Laboratory. This approach is herein referred to as formal analysis and is based on previous work on the formal verification of digital hardware designs. Formal analysis represents a rigorous evaluation which is appropriate for system acceptance in critical applications, such as a Reactor Safety System (RSS). This report describes a formal analysis technique in the context of a case study, that is, demonstrates the feasibility of applying formal analysis via application. The case study described is based on the Reactor Safety System (RSS) for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). This is a system where high reliability and availability are tantamount to safety. The conceptual design for this case study incorporates a Fault-Tolerant Processor (FTP) for the computer environment. An FTP is a computer which has the ability to produce correct results even in the presence of any single fault. This technology was selected as it provides a computer-based equivalent to the traditional analog based RSSs. This provides a more conservative design constraint than that imposed by the IEEE Standard, Criteria For Protection Systems For Nuclear Power Generating Stations (ANSI N42.7-1972).

  18. Design for volume reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, R.; Boks, C.; Stevels, A.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally packaging design-for-sustainability (DfS) strongly focuses on resource conservation and material recycling. The type and amount of materials used has been the driver in design. For consumer electronics (CE) products this weight-based approach is too limited; a volume-based approach is

  19. Council on Anthropology and Education Newsletter. Volume III, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, John Ed.

    General information on format, included, materials, broad concerns, objectives, and availability of the newsletter are described in Volume I, ED 048 049. This issue focuses on ethnology, offering two papers presented at the American Anthropological Association symposiums. The lead paper presents a psycho-cultural developmental approach to the…

  20. Review of Upscaling Methods for Describing Unsaturated Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BD Wood

    2000-09-26

    The representation of small-scale features can be a challenge when attempting to model unsaturated flow in large domains. Upscaling methods offer the possibility of reducing the amount of resolution required to adequately simulate such a problem. In this report, the various upscaling techniques that are discussed in the literature are reviewed. The following upscaling methods have been identified from the literature: (1) stochastic methods, (2) renormalization methods, and (3) volume averaging and homogenization methods; in addition, a final technique, full resolution numerical modeling, is also discussed. Each of these techniques has its advantages and disadvantages. The trade-off is a reduction in accuracy in favor of a method that is easier to employ. For practical applications, the most reasonable approach appears to be one in which any of the upscaling methods identified above maybe suitable for upscaling in regions where the variations in the parameter fields are small. For regions where the subsurface structure is more complex, only the homogenization and volume averaging methods are probably suitable. With the continual increases in computational capacity, fill-resolution numerical modeling may in many instances provide a tractable means of solving the flow problem in unsaturated systems.

  1. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H. (Den Sundhedsfaglige Kandidatuddannelse, Aarhus Universitet Bygning 1264, Aarhus (Denmark); University College Nordjylland, Aalborg (Denmark)), Email: hnt@ucn.dk; Steffensen, E. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsson, E. M. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Background. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the evaluation of brain tumors. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is usually obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using normal appearing white matter as reference region. The emerging perfusion technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose. To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods. Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and rCBV maps, with contralateral normal appearing white matter and cerebellum as reference regions. Larger ROIs were drawn for histogram analyses. The type and grade of the gliomas were obtained by histopathology. Statistical comparison was made between diffuse astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastomas. Results. rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r = 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r = 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated (0.61 < r < 0.93), whereas for kurtosis and peak height, the correlation coefficient was about 0.3 when comparing rCBF and rCBV values for the same reference region. Neither rCBF nor rCBV quantification provided a statistically significant difference between the three types of gliomas. However, both rCBF and rCBV tended to increase with tumor grade and to be lower in patients who had undergone resection/treatment. Conclusion. rCBF measurements normalized to white matter

  2. The large-volume high-pressure facility at GSECARS: A 'Swiss-army-knife' approach to synchrotron-based experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanbin; Rivers, Mark; Sutton, Steve; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Uchida, Takeyuki; Sanehira, Takeshi; (UC)

    2009-06-01

    A number of new techniques have been developed at the large-volume press (LVP) high-pressure facility at the GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) sector of the advanced photon source (APS). This article describes the 10 MN (1000 T) and 2.5 MN (250 T) hydraulic presses in the insertion device (ID) and bending magnet (BM) beamlines, respectively, with several apparatus and various diffraction and imaging techniques developed since the inception of the facility. Several Kawai-type high-pressure modules, whose second-stage anvils range from 10 mm to 25.4 mm in edge lengths, are used in the hydraulic presses, with pressure (P) and temperature (T) capabilities up to 30 GPa and 3000 K. A DIA-type apparatus can be compressed in both presses for studies requiring large sample volumes. A deformation DIA (D-DIA) has been developed to allow controlled deformation studies on both crystalline and glass materials, using monochromatic diffraction and imaging, up to 20 GPa and 1800 K. A high-pressure tomography apparatus is available for conducting tomography studies at high P and T, with a typical spatial resolution of a few micrometers. Toroidal anvil modules provide large 2{theta} angles for studies of non-crystalline materials, and a new large D-DIA module is under construction for double-stage megabar pressure generation as well as deformation on large samples with the capability of acoustic emission detection. The flexible design of the monochromator at the BM beamline makes it feasible to switch between monochromatic and white-beam mode during an experiment, ideal for monochromatic imaging studies (e.g., high-P tomography) with energy-dispersive diffraction for pressure measurements. A new angle-dispersive diffraction technique has been developed for high P-T crystallography studies, where a solid-state detector is step-scanned, thereby collecting a large number of angle-dispersive spectra over a wide range of photon energies recorded in the multi-channel analyzer. An ultrasonic

  3. approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Rodabaugh

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the results of the first detailed and systematic study of the family of fifth order implicit linear multistep methods requiring function evaluations at four backpoints are given. Also described is a practical and efficient nonlinear optimization procedure which made it possible to locate in a precise manner the methods of this type which possess optimal ranges of relative stability in the sense-that the corresponding relative stability regions contain maximal disks centered at the origin.

  4. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same

  5. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same

  6. Utility of Quantitative 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT for 90yttrium-Labelled Microsphere Treatment Planning: Calculating Vascularized Hepatic Volume and Dosimetric Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Garin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of SPECT/CT for volume measurements and to report a case illustrating the major impact of SPECT/CT in calculating the vascularized liver volume and dosimetry prior to injecting radiolabelled yttrium-90 microspheres (Therasphere. Materials and Methods. This was a phantom study, involving volume measurements carried out by two operators using SPECT and SPECT/CT images. The percentage of error for each method was calculated, and interobserver reproducibility was evaluated. A treatment using Therasphere was planned in a patient with three hepatic arteries, and the quantitative analysis of SPECT/CT for this patient is provided. Results. SPECT/CT volume measurements proved to be accurate (mean error <6% for volumes ≥16 cm3 and reproductive (interobserver agreement = 0.9. In the case report, 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT identified a large liver volume, not previously identified with angiography, which was shown to be vascularized after selective MAA injection into an arterial branch, resulting in a large modification in the activity of Therasphere used. Conclusions. MAA SPECT/CT is accurate for vascularized liver volume measurements, providing a valuable contribution to the therapeutic planning of patients with complex hepatic vascularization.

  7. What Is the Standard Volume to Increase a Cup Size for Breast Augmentation Surgery? A Novel Three-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nina-Marie; Lovric, Vedran; Parr, William C H; Walsh, W R; Moradi, Pouria

    2017-05-01

    Breast augmentation surgery poses many challenges, and meeting the patient's expectations is one of the most important. Previous reports equate 100 cc to a one-cup-size increase; however, no studies have confirmed this between commercially available bras. The aim of this study was to identify the volume increase between cup sizes across different brands and the relationship with implant selection. Five bra cup sizes from three different companies were analyzed for their volume capacity. Three methods were used to calculate the volume of the bras: (1) linear measurements; (2) volume measurement by means of water displacement; and (3) volume calculation after three-dimensional reconstruction of serial radiographic data (computed tomography). The clinical arm consisted of 79 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgery from February 1, 2014, to June 30, 2016. Answers from a short questionnaire in combination with the implant volume were analyzed. Across all three brands, the interval volume increase varied between sizes, but not all were above 100 cc. There was some variation in the volume capacity of the same cup size among the different brands. The average incremental increase in bra cup size across all three brands in the laboratory arm was 135 cc. The mean volume increase per cup size was 138.23 cc in the clinical arm. This article confirms that there is no standardization within the bra manufacturing industry. On the basis of this study, patients should be advised that 130 to 150 cc equates to a one-cup-size increase. Bras with narrower band widths need 130 cc and wider band widths require 150 cc to increase one cup size.

  8. Development of an Interpretive Structural Model and Strategies for Implementation Based on a Descriptive and Prescriptive Analysis of Resources for Environmental Education/Studies. A Sourcebook for the Design of a Regional Environmental Learning System, Volume IV: Conducting Collective Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, John N.

    The steps, approaches, and tools of the collective inquiry process posited by a Regional Environmental Learning System is the subject of this volume. Approaches discussed include: (1) charette approach, (2) AT&T/Battelle approach, and (3) the Washington State approach. Tools for collective inquiry are described and field tests are discussed.…

  9. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  10. Development of a compressive surface capturing formulation for modelling free-surface flow by using the volume-of-fluid approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available combines a blended higher resolution scheme with the addition of an artificial compressive term to the volume-of-fluid equation. This reduces the numerical smearing of the interface associated with explicit higher resolution schemes while limiting...

  11. Knowledge epidemics and population dynamics models for describing idea diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of ideas is often closely connected to the creation and diffusion of knowledge and to the technological evolution of society. Because of this, knowledge creation, exchange and its subsequent transformation into innovations for improved welfare and economic growth is briefly described from a historical point of view. Next, three approaches are discussed for modeling the diffusion of ideas in the areas of science and technology, through (i) deterministic, (ii) stochastic, and (iii) statistical approaches. These are illustrated through their corresponding population dynamics and epidemic models relative to the spreading of ideas, knowledge and innovations. The deterministic dynamical models are considered to be appropriate for analyzing the evolution of large and small societal, scientific and technological systems when the influence of fluctuations is insignificant. Stochastic models are appropriate when the system of interest is small but when the fluctuations become significant for its evolution...

  12. New models for describing outliers in meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rose; Jackson, Dan

    2016-09-01

    An unobserved random effect is often used to describe the between-study variation that is apparent in meta-analysis datasets. A normally distributed random effect is conventionally used for this purpose. When outliers or other unusual estimates are included in the analysis, the use of alternative random effect distributions has previously been proposed. Instead of adopting the usual hierarchical approach to modelling between-study variation, and so directly modelling the study specific true underling effects, we propose two new marginal distributions for modelling heterogeneous datasets. These two distributions are suggested because numerical integration is not needed to evaluate the likelihood. This makes the computation required when fitting our models much more robust. The properties of the new distributions are described, and the methodology is exemplified by fitting models to four datasets. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Failure of random matrix theory to correctly describe quantum dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottos, T; Cohen, D

    2001-12-01

    Consider a classically chaotic system that is described by a Hamiltonian H(0). At t=0 the Hamiltonian undergoes a sudden change (H)0-->H. We consider the quantum-mechanical spreading of the evolving energy distribution, and argue that it cannot be analyzed using a conventional random-matrix theory (RMT) approach. Conventional RMT can be trusted only to the extent that it gives trivial results that are implied by first-order perturbation theory. Nonperturbative effects are sensitive to the underlying classical dynamics, and therefore the Planck's over 2 pi-->0 behavior for effective RMT models is strikingly different from the correct semiclassical limit.

  14. Renormalized Volumes with Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    We develop a general regulated volume expansion for the volume of a manifold with boundary whose measure is suitably singular along a separating hypersurface. The expansion is shown to have a regulator independent anomaly term and a renormalized volume term given by the primitive of an associated anomaly operator. These results apply to a wide range of structures. We detail applications in the setting of measures derived from a conformally singular metric. In particular, we show that the anomaly generates invariant (Q-curvature, transgression)-type pairs for hypersurfaces with boundary. For the special case of anomalies coming from the volume enclosed by a minimal hypersurface ending on the boundary of a Poincare--Einstein structure, this result recovers Branson's Q-curvature and corresponding transgression. When the singular metric solves a boundary version of the constant scalar curvature Yamabe problem, the anomaly gives generalized Willmore energy functionals for hypersurfaces with boundary. Our approach ...

  15. Determination of Shale Volume and Distribution Patterns and Effective Porosity from Well Log Data Based On Cross-Plot Approach for A Shaly Carbonate Gas Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Siyamak; Moeini, Mohammad; Kamal Ghassem al-Askari, Mohammad; Hamed Mahvelati, Elaheh

    2016-10-01

    Determination of shale volume distribution is one of the most important factors that has to be considered in formation evaluation, since existence of shale reduces effective porosity and permeability of the reservoir. In this paper, shale volume and distribution (dispersed, laminar and structural) and formation effective porosity are estimated from well log data and cross-plots. Results show that distribution of shale is mainly dispersed with few of laminar ones, and the quality of reservoir (effective porosity) decreases with depth resulting in low productivity of gas wells drilled in lower zones. Good agreement of estimated shale volumes and effective porosities from neutron-density cross-plot with the values determined from gamma ray log (CGR) and core analysis demonstrates the accuracy and applicability of these plots in determination of petrophysical parameters from conventional log data.

  16. Small-Volume Injections: Evaluation of Volume Administration Deviation From Intended Injection Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Chen, Michael I; Claure, Rebecca E; Drover, David R; Efron, Bradley; Fitch, William L; Hammer, Gregory B

    2017-10-01

    In the perioperative period, anesthesiologists and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses routinely prepare and administer small-volume IV injections, yet the accuracy of delivered medication volumes in this setting has not been described. In this ex vivo study, we sought to characterize the degree to which small-volume injections (≤0.5 mL) deviated from the intended injection volumes among a group of pediatric anesthesiologists and pediatric postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses. We hypothesized that as the intended injection volumes decreased, the deviation from those intended injection volumes would increase. Ten attending pediatric anesthesiologists and 10 pediatric PACU nurses each performed a series of 10 injections into a simulated patient IV setup. Practitioners used separate 1-mL tuberculin syringes with removable 18-gauge needles (Becton-Dickinson & Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ) to aspirate 5 different volumes (0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mL) of 0.25 mM Lucifer Yellow (LY) fluorescent dye constituted in saline (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) from a rubber-stoppered vial. Each participant then injected the specified volume of LY fluorescent dye via a 3-way stopcock into IV tubing with free-flowing 0.9% sodium chloride (10 mL/min). The injected volume of LY fluorescent dye and 0.9% sodium chloride then drained into a collection vial for laboratory analysis. Microplate fluorescence wavelength detection (Infinite M1000; Tecan, Mannedorf, Switzerland) was used to measure the fluorescence of the collected fluid. Administered injection volumes were calculated based on the fluorescence of the collected fluid using a calibration curve of known LY volumes and associated fluorescence.To determine whether deviation of the administered volumes from the intended injection volumes increased at lower injection volumes, we compared the proportional injection volume error (loge [administered volume/intended volume]) for each of the 5 injection volumes using a linear

  17. The effects of section thickness on the estimation of liver volume by the Cavalieri principle using computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emirzeoglu, Mehmet [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey); Sahin, Bunyamin [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey)]. E-mail: bsahin@omu.edu.tr; Selcuk, Mustafa B. [Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey); Kaplan, Suleyman [Department of Histology and Embryology, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey)

    2005-12-15

    Estimation of liver volume using routine CT scans has been described previously. We have, however, not found a gold standard study which analyzes the effect of section thickness on the estimation of liver volume using CT images. In the present study, five normal livers obtained from cadavers were scanned using a Spiral CT Scanner (Xpress/GX Toshiba, Tocigi-Ken) in the horizontal plane. Consecutive sections at a thickness of 10, 5 and 1 mm were used to estimate the total volume of the livers by means of the Cavalieri principle. With a view to evaluating inter-observer differences, liver volume was estimated by three observers. The estimated volume using the classical volume estimation formula did not concur with the actual volume of the livers obtained by the fluid displacement technique. The section thickness has an over- or under-projection effect on the estimated volume. The obtained volume estimation results were, therefore, calibrated using three different approaches. The volume obtained by the calibration formulae did not differ statistically from actual liver volumes (P < 0.05). There were also no significant differences between the performers' estimates (P > 0.05). Results showed that the effect of section thickness on the volume estimates could not be omitted and the obtained values could be calibrated using the proposed approaches presented in this study.

  18. Finding related functional neuroimaging volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a content-based image retrieval technique for finding related functional neuroimaging experiments by voxelization of sets of stereotactic coordinates in Talairach space, comparing the volumes and reporting related volumes in a sorted list. Voxelization is accomplished by convolving each...

  19. In their own words: describing Canadian physician leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Anita J; Dickson, Graham; Wirtzfeld, Debrah; Van Aerde, John

    2016-07-04

    Purpose This is the first study to compile statistical data to describe the functions and responsibilities of physicians in formal and informal leadership roles in the Canadian health system. This mixed-methods research study offers baseline data relative to this purpose, and also describes physician leaders' views on fundamental aspects of their leadership responsibility. Design/methodology/approach A survey with both quantitative and qualitative fields yielded 689 valid responses from physician leaders. Data from the survey were utilized in the development of a semi-structured interview guide; 15 physician leaders were interviewed. Findings A profile of Canadian physician leadership has been compiled, including demographics; an outline of roles, responsibilities, time commitments and related compensation; and personal factors that support, engage and deter physicians when considering taking on leadership roles. The role of health-care organizations in encouraging and supporting physician leadership is explicated. Practical implications The baseline data on Canadian physician leaders create the opportunity to determine potential steps for improving the state of physician leadership in Canada; and health-care organizations are provided with a wealth of information on how to encourage and support physician leaders. Using the data as a benchmark, comparisons can also be made with physician leadership as practiced in other nations. Originality/value There are no other research studies available that provide the depth and breadth of detail on Canadian physician leadership, and the embedded recommendations to health-care organizations are informed by this in-depth knowledge.

  20. Extended nonlinear feedback model for describing episodes of high inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybisz, Martín A.; Szybisz, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    An extension of the nonlinear feedback (NLF) formalism to describe regimes of hyper- and high-inflation in economy is proposed in the present work. In the NLF model the consumer price index (CPI) exhibits a finite time singularity of the type 1 /(tc - t) (1 - β) / β, with β > 0, predicting a blow up of the economy at a critical time tc. However, this model fails in determining tc in the case of weak hyperinflation regimes like, e.g., that occurred in Israel. To overcome this trouble, the NLF model is extended by introducing a parameter γ, which multiplies all terms with past growth rate index (GRI). In this novel approach the solution for CPI is also analytic being proportional to the Gaussian hypergeometric function 2F1(1 / β , 1 / β , 1 + 1 / β ; z) , where z is a function of β, γ, and tc. For z → 1 this hypergeometric function diverges leading to a finite time singularity, from which a value of tc can be determined. This singularity is also present in GRI. It is shown that the interplay between parameters β and γ may produce phenomena of multiple equilibria. An analysis of the severe hyperinflation occurred in Hungary proves that the novel model is robust. When this model is used for examining data of Israel a reasonable tc is got. High-inflation regimes in Mexico and Iceland, which exhibit weaker inflations than that of Israel, are also successfully described.

  1. First order reversal curves diagrams for describing ferroelectric switching characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Mitoseriu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available First Order Reversal Curves (FORC are polarization-field dependences described between saturation field Esat and a variable reversal field Er∈(-Esat, Esat. The FORC diagrams were proposed to describe some characteristics of the switching process in ferroelectrics. The approach is related to the Preisach model which considers the distribution of the elementary switchable units over their coercive and bias fields. The influence of the anisotropic porosity in Pb(Zr,TiO3 bulk ceramics on the FORC distributions demonstrated the existence of a positive/negative bias as a result of the confinement induced by anisotropy. The reducing of grain size in Ba(Zr,TiO3 ceramics causes an increase of the ratio of the reversible/irreversible components of the polarization on the FORC distribution indicating the tendency of system towards the superparaelectric state. The FORC method demonstrates to provide a kind of ‘fingerprinting’ of various types of switching characteristics in ferroic systems.

  2. Topological Active Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreira N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The topological active volumes (TAVs model is a general model for 3D image segmentation. It is based on deformable models and integrates features of region-based and boundary-based segmentation techniques. Besides segmentation, it can also be used for surface reconstruction and topological analysis of the inside of detected objects. The TAV structure is flexible and allows topological changes in order to improve the adjustment to object's local characteristics, find several objects in the scene, and identify and delimit holes in detected structures. This paper describes the main features of the TAV model and shows its ability to segment volumes in an automated manner.

  3. Sex determination using discriminant analysis of upper and lower extremity bones: New approach using the volume and surface area of digital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, U-Young; Kim, In-Beom; Kwak, Dai-Soon

    2015-08-01

    This study used 110 CT images taken from donated Korean cadavers to create 3-D models of the following upper and lower limb bones: the clavicle, scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, hip bone (os coxa), femur, patella (knee cap), tibia, talus, and calcaneus. In addition, the bone volume and surface area were calculated to determine sex differences using discriminant analysis. Significant sex differences were found in all bones with respect to volume and surface area (phip bone>tibia>humerus>scapula), although the order of surface area was different. The largest surface area in men was the femur and in women was the hip bone (psex determination (94%). When using the surface area of multiple bones, the maximum accuracy (99.4%) was achieved. The equation was as follows: (discriminant equation of surface area; femalesex determination.

  4. Liquid Metering Centrifuge Sticks (LMCS): A Centrifugal Approach to Metering Known Sample Volumes for Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Clarke, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Phase separation is one of the most significant obstacles encountered during the development of analytical methods for water quality monitoring in spacecraft environments. Removing air bubbles from water samples prior to analysis is a routine task on earth; however, in the absence of gravity, this routine task becomes extremely difficult. This paper details the development and initial ground testing of liquid metering centrifuge sticks (LMCS), devices designed to collect and meter a known volume of bubble-free water in microgravity. The LMCS uses centrifugal force to eliminate entrapped air and reproducibly meter liquid sample volumes for analysis with Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE). C-SPE is a sorption-spectrophotometric platform that is being developed as a potential spacecraft water quality monitoring system. C-SPE utilizes solid phase extraction membranes impregnated with analyte-specific colorimetric reagents to concentrate and complex target analytes in spacecraft water samples. The mass of analyte extracted from the water sample is determined using diffuse reflectance (DR) data collected from the membrane surface and an analyte-specific calibration curve. The analyte concentration can then be calculated from the mass of extracted analyte and the volume of the sample analyzed. Previous flight experiments conducted in microgravity conditions aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft demonstrated that the inability to collect and meter a known volume of water using a syringe was a limiting factor in the accuracy of C-SPE measurements. Herein, results obtained from ground based C-SPE experiments using ionic silver as a test analyte and either the LMCS or syringes for sample metering are compared to evaluate the performance of the LMCS. These results indicate very good agreement between the two sample metering methods and clearly illustrate the potential of utilizing centrifugal forces to achieve phase separation and metering of water samples in microgravity.

  5. A Study of the Transient Response of Duct Junctions: Measurements and Gas-Dynamic Modeling with a Staggered Mesh Finite Volume Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J. Torregrosa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Duct junctions play a major role in the operation and design of most piping systems. The objective of this paper is to establish the potential of a staggered mesh finite volume model as a way to improve the description of the effect of simple duct junctions on an otherwise one-dimensional flow system, such as the intake or exhaust of an internal combustion engine. Specific experiments have been performed in which different junctions have been characterized as a multi-port, and that have provided precise and reliable results on the propagation of pressure pulses across junctions. The results obtained have been compared to simulations performed with a staggered mesh finite volume method with different flux limiters and different meshes and, as a reference, have also been compared with the results of a more conventional pressure loss-based model. The results indicate that the staggered mesh finite volume model provides a closer description of wave dynamics, even if further work is needed to establish the optimal calculation settings.

  6. Strength in Numbers: Describing the Flooded Area of Isolated Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terrie M.; Haag, Kim H.

    2006-01-01

    others (2005) documents bathymetric mapping approaches, the frequency of flooding in different areas of the wetlands, and the relation between flooding and vegetation in these wetlands. This fact sheet describes bathymetric mapping approaches and partial results from two natural marshes (Hillsborough River State Park Marsh, and Green Swamp Marsh) and one impaired marsh (W-29 Marsh) that is located on a municipal well field and is affected by ground-water withdrawals. (fig. 1).

  7. Use of unbound volumes of drug distribution in pharmacokinetic calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepensky, David

    2011-01-18

    Volume of drug distribution is a primary pharmacokinetic parameter. This study assessed effects of drugs' plasma protein binding and tissue distribution on volume of drug distribution and identified the most appropriate ways for its calculation. Effects of the distribution factors on the unbound and total drug plasma concentrations and on the corresponding volumes of distribution were studied using pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation approach based on in vitro and in vivo concentration vs. time data of diazepam, a model drug with extensive plasma protein binding and tissue distribution. Pharmacokinetics of diazepam were appropriately described by three-compartment pharmacokinetic model that incorporated the processes of plasma protein binding and tissue permeation. According to this model, displacement of the drug from plasma proteins increases the unbound (but not the total) plasma concentrations and induces faster drug elimination from the body. The distribution pattern of the drug in the body and the time course of unbound (pharmacologically active) drug concentrations correlated with the unbound volumes of distribution, but not with the total volumes of distribution. In conclusion, unbound volumes of distribution appropriately describe the drug distribution pattern and the time course of unbound drug concentrations and are recommended for use as primary pharmacokinetic parameters in pharmaceutical research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Equations to describe brain size across the continuum of human lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzage, Matthew; Blüml, Stefan; Seri, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    Equations fitting the normative values for gender-specific brain size changes are available. However, these equations do not fit for all age ranges across the human lifespan and particularly have failed to examine the fit across the continuum of prenatal and postnatal human life. We sought to develop a parametric equation that best describes the changes in gender-specific brain size as a function of age across the continuum of prenatal and postnatal human life. Brain weight and brain volume data retrieved from the literature were combined to perform a meta-analysis. Additions to previously published findings included collecting a dataset that spanned the continuum of human lifespan, logarithmic transformation of the data and utilization of the Birch equation. We used Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) for quantitative evaluation of the new equations. A total of 2,011 brain weight data points spanning from 10 weeks of fetal gestation to over 90 years of age were retrieved. Using our approach, we developed equations with improved fits and lower or similar AIC values compared to the published equations. The new equations are modifications of the basic Birch model. These equations are the first to describe the gender-specific brain weight changes through the continuum of both prenatal and postnatal human life while achieving a level of accuracy similar to or better than the previous, more age-restricted models. The new equations are improved compared to previously used equations and may be useful to those who study brain development, particularly researchers interested in prenatal and postnatal brain size.

  9. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  10. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 8: Design approaches: UPH. Appendix A: Upper reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Overriding considerations including operating range, volume and lining of reservoir, embankment design, intake/outlet arrangements and filling and make up water provisions were studied within the context of minimizing facility costs and optimizing the plant layout. The study led to the selection of a reservoir formed by embankment of compacted rockfill together with an intake/outlet structure located in the embankment. The reservoir floor and upstream slopes of the embankment will have an asphalt lining to prevent leakage. The material and cost estimates presented are based on the requirements for a 2000 MW plant providing 20,000 MWh of storage with a nominal head of 4600 ft.

  11. The Differential Equation Algorithm for General Deformed Swept Volumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪国平; 华宣积; 孙家广

    2000-01-01

    The differential equation approach for characterizing swept volume boundaries is extended to include objects experiencing deformation. For deformed swept volume, it is found that the structure and algorithm of sweep-envelope differential equation (SEDE) are similar between the deformed and the rigid swept volumes. The efficiency of SEDE approach for deformed swept volume is proved with an example.

  12. Scan-based volume animation driven by locally adaptive articulated registrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Taehyun; Lewis, J P; Neumann, Ulrich; Nayak, Krishna S

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a complete system to create anatomically accurate example-based volume deformation and animation of articulated body regions, starting from multiple in vivo volume scans of a specific individual. In order to solve the correspondence problem across volume scans, a template volume is registered to each sample. The wide range of pose variations is first approximated by volume blend deformation (VBD), providing proper initialization of the articulated subject in different poses. A novel registration method is presented to efficiently reduce the computation cost while avoiding strong local minima inherent in complex articulated body volume registration. The algorithm highly constrains the degrees of freedom and search space involved in the nonlinear optimization, using hierarchical volume structures and locally constrained deformation based on the biharmonic clamped spline. Our registration step establishes a correspondence across scans, allowing a data-driven deformation approach in the volume domain. The results provide an occlusion-free person-specific 3D human body model, asymptotically accurate inner tissue deformations, and realistic volume animation of articulated movements driven by standard joint control estimated from the actual skeleton. Our approach also addresses the practical issues arising in using scans from living subjects. The robustness of our algorithms is tested by their applications on the hand, probably the most complex articulated region in the body, and the knee, a frequent subject area for medical imaging due to injuries.

  13. Colloids in Paints Colloids and Interface Science, Volume 6

    CERN Document Server

    Tadros, Tharwat F

    2011-01-01

    The first modern approach to relate fundamental research to the applied science of colloids, this series bridges academic research and practical applications, thus providing the information vital to both. Written by the very best scientists in their respective disciplines, this volume describes the role of colloids in paints, highlighting the importance of fundamental research in industrial applications.For surface, polymer and physicochemists, materials scientists, and chemical engineers.

  14. Physical activity over a decade modifies age-related decline in perfusion, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity of the posterior default-mode network-A multimodal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan; Salami, Alireza; Wåhlin, Anders; Nyberg, Lars

    2016-05-01

    One step toward healthy brain aging may be to entertain a physically active lifestyle. Studies investigating physical activity effects on brain integrity have, however, mainly been based on single brain markers, and few used a multimodal imaging approach. In the present study, we used cohort data from the Betula study to examine the relationships between scores reflecting current and accumulated physical activity and brain health. More specifically, we first examined if physical activity scores modulated negative effects of age on seven resting state networks previously identified by Salami, Pudas, and Nyberg (2014). The results revealed that one of the most age-sensitive RSN was positively altered by physical activity, namely, the posterior default-mode network involving the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Second, within this physical activity-sensitive RSN, we further analyzed the association between physical activity and gray matter (GM) volumes, white matter integrity, and cerebral perfusion using linear regression models. Regions within the identified DMN displayed larger GM volumes and stronger perfusion in relation to both current and 10-years accumulated scores of physical activity. No associations of physical activity and white matter integrity were observed. Collectively, our findings demonstrate strengthened PCC-cortical connectivity within the DMN, larger PCC GM volume, and higher PCC perfusion as a function of physical activity. In turn, these findings may provide insights into the mechanisms of how long-term regular exercise can contribute to healthy brain aging. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Describing current and potential markets for alternative-fuel vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-26

    Motor vehicles are a major source of greenhouse gases, and the rising numbers of motor vehicles and miles driven could lead to more harmful emissions that may ultimately affect the world`s climate. One approach to curtailing such emissions is to use, instead of gasoline, alternative fuels: LPG, compressed natural gas, or alcohol fuels. In addition to the greenhouse gases, pollutants can be harmful to human health: ozone, CO. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorized EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards to control this. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) was the first new law to emphasize strengthened energy security and decreased reliance on foreign oil since the oil shortages of the 1970`s. EPACT emphasized increasing the number of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFV`s) by mandating their incremental increase of use by Federal, state, and alternative fuel provider fleets over the new few years. Its goals are far from being met; alternative fuels` share remains trivial, about 0.3%, despite gains. This report describes current and potential markets for AFV`s; it begins by assessing the total vehicle stock, and then it focuses on current use of AFV`s in alternative fuel provider fleets and the potential for use of AFV`s in US households.

  16. Canonical quantization of a string describing N branes at angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesando, Igor

    2014-12-01

    We study the canonical quantization of a bosonic string in presence of N twist fields. This generalizes the quantization of the twisted string in two ways: the in and out states are not necessarily twisted and the number of twist fields N can be bigger than 2. In order to quantize the theory we need to find the normal modes. Then we need to define a product between two modes which is conserved. Because of this we need to use the Klein-Gordon product and to separate the string coordinate into the classical and the quantum part. The quantum part has different boundary conditions than the original string coordinates but these boundary conditions are precisely those which make the operator describing the equation of motion self adjoint. The splitting of the string coordinates into a classical and quantum part allows the formulation of an improved overlap principle. Using this approach we then proceed in computing the generating function for the generic correlator with L untwisted operators and N (excited) twist fields for branes at angles. We recover as expected the results previously obtained using the path integral. This construction explains why these correlators are given by a generalization of the Wick theorem.

  17. Attempts to Improve Absolute Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow in Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Simplified T1-Weighted Steady-State Cerebral Blood Volume Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirestam, R.; Knutsson, L.; Risberg, J.; Boerjesson, S.; Larsson, E.M.; Gustafson, L.; Passant, U.; Staahlberg, F. [Depts. of Medical Radiation Physics, Diagnostic Radiology, Psychiatry, and Psychogeriatrics, Lund Univ, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Background: Attempts to retrieve absolute values of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) have typically resulted in overestimations. Purpose: To improve DSC-MRI CBF estimates by calibrating the DSC-MRI-based cerebral blood volume (CBV) with a corresponding T1-weighted (T1W) steady-state (ss) CBV estimate. Material and Methods: 17 volunteers were investigated by DSC-MRI and 133Xe SPECT. Steady-state CBV calculation, assuming no water exchange, was accomplished using signal values from blood and tissue, before and after contrast agent, obtained by T1W spin-echo imaging. Using steady-state and DSC-MRI CBV estimates, a calibration factor K = CBV(ss)/CBV(DSC) was obtained for each individual. Average whole-brain CBF(DSC) was calculated, and the corrected MRI-based CBF estimate was given by CBF(ss) = KxCBF(DSC). Results: Average whole-brain SPECT CBF was 40.1{+-}6.9 ml/min 100 g, while the corresponding uncorrected DSC-MRI-based value was 69.2{+-}13.8 ml/mi 100 g. After correction with the calibration factor, a CBF(ss) of 42.7{+-}14.0 ml/min 100 g was obtained. The linear fit to CBF(ss)-versus-CBF(SPECT) data was close to proportionality (R = 0.52). Conclusion: Calibration by steady-state CBV reduced the population average CBF to a reasonable level, and a modest linear correlation with the reference 133Xe SPECT technique was observed. Possible explanations for the limited accuracy are, for example, large-vessel partial-volume effects, low post-contrast signal enhancement in T1W images, and water-exchange effects.

  18. The Case for a New Approach to Sex Education Mounts; Will Policymakers Heed the Message? Guttmacher Policy Review. Volume 10, Number 2, Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Heather D.

    2007-01-01

    Abstinence-only-until-marriage education is a key component of social conservatives' global moral and religious agenda, and the cornerstone of the Bush administration's approach to reducing U.S. teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates. Fearful of being portrayed as anti-abstinence, policymakers have continued to support these…

  19. Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System. Volume II. Appendix III. Media Cost Data. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, William E.; And Others

    Basic cost estimates for selected instructional media are tabled in this document, Part II (Appendix III) of the report "Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System" by William E. Rhode and others. Learning materials production costs are given for motion pictures, still visuals, videotapes, live…

  20. Using a Data Mining Approach to Develop a Student Engagement-Based Institutional Typology. IR Applications, Volume 18, February 8, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jing; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Hayek, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Data mining provides both systematic and systemic ways to detect patterns of student engagement among students at hundreds of institutions. Using traditional statistical techniques alone, the task would be significantly difficult--if not impossible--considering the size and complexity in both data and analytical approaches necessary for this…

  1. Reading the World, the Globe, and the Cosmos: Approaches to Teaching Literature for the Twenty-First Century. Global Studies in Education. Volume 28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Suzanne S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this book is restore the centrality of pedagogy in governing the ways literary texts are received, experienced, and interpreted by students in the classroom. Utilizing a method of pedagogical criticism, it provides an account of core approaches to teaching literature that have emerged across history and the conceptual values…

  2. Joint Precision Approach and Landing System Nunn-McCurdy Breach Root Cause Analysis and Portfolio Assessment Metrics for DoD Weapons Systems. Volume 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    career , he oversaw Army acquisition during a time of war and change. General Bolton was an admired mentor to many pilots and military acquisition...civil standard for precision approach and land- ing. The FAA was indecisive regarding the future of ILS because it changed the ILS drawdown multiple

  3. High-energy molecular lasers self-controlled volume-discharge lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, V V

    2016-01-01

    This book displays the physics and design of high-power molecular lasers. The lasers described are self-controlled volume-discharge lasers. The book explains self-sustained discharge lasers, self-initiated discharge lasers and technical approaches to laser design. Important topics discussed are laser efficiency, laser beam quality and electric field homogeneity. The book contains many new innovative applications.

  4. Review of Upscaling Methods for Describing Unsaturated Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2000-09-26

    Representing samll-scale features can be a challenge when one wants to model unsaturated flow in large domains. In this report, the various upscaling techniques are reviewed. The following upscaling methods have been identified from the literature: stochastic methods, renormalization methods, volume averaging and homogenization methods. In addition, a final technique, full resolution numerical modeling, is also discussed.

  5. Physical activity over a decade modifies age-related decline in perfusion, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity of the posterior default mode network : a multimodal approach

    OpenAIRE

    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan; Salami, Alireza; Wåhlin, Anders; Nyberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    One step toward healthy brain aging may be to entertain a physically active lifestyle. Studies investigating physical activity effects on brain integrity have, however, mainly been based on single brain markers, and few used a multimodal imaging approach. In the present study, we used cohort data from the Betula study to examine the relationships between scores reflecting current and accumulated physical activity and brain health. More specifically, we first examined if physical activity scor...

  6. A finite volume approach to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element using local analytical solution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, A. [Atomic Energy Authority (AEA), Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center

    2014-11-15

    In this paper we implement the local analytical solution technique to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element. This method has shown to be very accurate in estimating the temperature field for axisymmetric problems even for coarse mesh. It is shown that this method reduces to the analytical solution for unidirectional heat transfer in the radial direction in homogeneous media. The technique is based on finding an analytical expression for the temperature field in the radial direction within each grid cell. This means that the temperature field in each cell is allowed to change in a nonlinear fashion along the radial direction. We compare this technique with the traditional finite volume technique and show that; with only few cells in the radial direction, this technique arrives at the mesh-independent solution quite accurately whereas it required denser mesh to arrive closer to this solution using traditional techniques. This method is proposed to the 1D codes that are currently being used to simulate thermalhydraulic characteristics of reactor systems. Furthermore, we also implement the experimental temperature field algorithm in which the governing equations are approximated for each cell as it would without extra manipulation to the governing equations. This technique is very simple and separates the physics from the solving part.

  7. Dry lake beds as sources of dust in Australia during the Late Quaternary: A volumetric approach based on lake bed and deflated dune volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farebrother, Will; Hesse, Paul P.; Chang, Hsing-Chung; Jones, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Dust affects Earth's climate, ecology and economies across a broad range of scales, both temporally and spatially, and is an integral part of the earth's climate system. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of inland lake beds to dust emissions both locally and globally. This study aims to explore the relative volumetric importance of ephemeral lakes that emit dust to the Australian southeastern dust path over the last glacial cycle. SRTM DEMs and GIS analyses of long-term (up to 80 ka) lake-bed deflation volumes and deposition of sand-sized sediment onto downwind source bordering dunes were used to derive estimates of transported dust mass. A strong power relationship was found between lake area and the mass of deflated lake bed sediments. Total dust masses for the largest 53 lakes in southeastern Australia were derived using the relationship between lake area and dust mass and used to determine an upper value for total dust mass deflated from lake beds in southeastern Australia. Ephemeral lake-derived dust was found to represent at most 13% of the dust derived from southeastern Australia deposited in the southern Pacific over the last 80 ka or 22% over the last 40 ka. Lake Eyre (the largest lake) has contributed at most 3% of the Australian southeast dust plume. These results imply that there are significant additional sources of dust in Australia over these timescales, such as floodplains or dunefields, and that modelling must allow for diverse climatic and geomorphic controls on dust production.

  8. Parametric approaches to micro-scale characterization of tissue volumes in vivo and ex vivo: Imaging microvasculature, attenuation, birefringence, and stiffness (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, David D.; Chin, Lixin; Gong, Peijun; Wijesinghe, Philip; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Allen, Wesley M.; Klyen, Blake R.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    INVITED TALK Advances in imaging tissue microstructure in living subjects, or in freshly excised tissue with minimum preparation and processing, are important for future diagnosis and surgical guidance in the clinical setting, particularly for application to cancer. Whilst microscopy methods continue to advance on the cellular scale and medical imaging is well established on the scale of the whole tumor or organ, it is attractive to consider imaging the tumor environment on the micro-scale, between that of cells and whole tissues. Such a scenario is ideally suited to optical coherence tomography (OCT), with the twin attractions of requiring little or no tissue preparation, and in vivo capability. OCT's intrinsic scattering contrast reveals many morphological features of tumors, but is frequently ineffective in revealing other important aspects, such as microvasculature, or in reliably distinguishing tumor from uninvolved stroma. To address these shortcomings, we are developing several advances on the basic OCT approach. We are exploring speckle fluctuations to image tissue microvasculature and we have been developing several parametric approaches to tissue micro-scale characterization. Our approaches extract, from a three-dimensional OCT data set, a two-dimensional image of an optical parameter, such as attenuation or birefringence, or a mechanical parameter, such as stiffness, that aids in characterizing the tissue. This latter method, termed optical coherence elastography, parallels developments in ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Parametric imaging of birefringence and of stiffness both show promise in addressing the important issue of differentiating cancer from uninvolved stroma in breast tissue.

  9. Biochemical kinetics in changing volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowski, Piotr H; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    The need of taking into account the change of compartment volume when developing chemical kinetics analysis inside the living cell is discussed. Literature models of a single enzymatic Michaelis-Menten process, glycolytic oscillations, and mitotic cyclin oscillations were tested with appropriate theoretical extension in the direction of volume modification allowance. Linear and exponential type of volume increase regimes were compared. Due to the above, in a growing cell damping of the amplitude, phase shift, and time pattern deformation of the metabolic rhythms considered were detected, depending on the volume change character. The performed computer simulations allow us to conclude that evolution of the cell volume can be an essential factor of the chemical kinetics in a growing cell. The phenomenon of additional metabolite oscillations caused by the periodic cell growth and division was theoretically predicted and mathematically described. Also, the hypothesis of the periodized state in the growing cell as the generalization of the steady-state was formulated.

  10. Describing Earth System Simulations with the Metafor CIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Metafor project has developed a Common Information Model (CIM using the ISO1900 series formalism to describe the sorts of numerical experiments carried out by the earth system modelling community, the models they use, and the simulations that result. Here we describe the mechanism by which the CIM was developed, and its key properties. We introduce the conceptual and application versions and the controlled vocabularies developed in the context of supporting the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5. We describe how the CIM has been used in experiments to describe model coupling properties and describe the near term expected evolution of the CIM.

  11. Describing Earth system simulations with the Metafor CIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, B. N.; Balaji, V.; Bentley, P.; Callaghan, S.; DeLuca, C.; Denvil, S.; Devine, G.; Elkington, M.; Ford, R. W.; Guilyardi, E.; Lautenschlager, M.; Morgan, M.; Moine, M.-P.; Murphy, S.; Pascoe, C.; Ramthun, H.; Slavin, P.; Steenman-Clark, L.; Toussaint, F.; Treshansky, A.; Valcke, S.

    2012-11-01

    The Metafor project has developed a common information model (CIM) using the ISO19100 series formalism to describe numerical experiments carried out by the Earth system modelling community, the models they use, and the simulations that result. Here we describe the mechanism by which the CIM was developed, and its key properties. We introduce the conceptual and application versions and the controlled vocabularies developed in the context of supporting the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We describe how the CIM has been used in experiments to describe model coupling properties and describe the near term expected evolution of the CIM.

  12. Describing Earth system simulations with the Metafor CIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Lawrence

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Metafor project has developed a common information model (CIM using the ISO19100 series formalism to describe numerical experiments carried out by the Earth system modelling community, the models they use, and the simulations that result. Here we describe the mechanism by which the CIM was developed, and its key properties. We introduce the conceptual and application versions and the controlled vocabularies developed in the context of supporting the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5. We describe how the CIM has been used in experiments to describe model coupling properties and describe the near term expected evolution of the CIM.

  13. Probabilistic estimation of glacier volume and glacier bed topography: the Andean glacier Huayna West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Moya Quiroga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glacier retreat will increase sea level and decrease fresh water availability. Glacier retreat will also induce morphologic and hydrologic changes due to the formation of glacial lakes. Hence, it is important not only to estimate glacier volume, but also to understand the spatial distribution of ice thickness. There are several approaches for estimating glacier volume and glacier thickness. However, it is not possible to select an optimal approach that works for all locations. It is important to analyse the relation between the different glacier volume estimations and to provide confidence intervals of a given solution. The present study presents a probabilistic approach for estimating glacier volume and its confidence interval. Glacier volume of the Andean glacier Huayna West was estimated according to different scaling relations. Besides, glacier volume and glacier thickness were estimated assuming plastic behaviour. The present study also analysed the influence of considering a variable glacier density due to ice firn densification. It was found that the different estimations are described by a lognormal probability distribution. Considering a confidence level of 90%, the estimated glacier volume is 0.0275 km3 ± 0.0052 km3. Considering a confidence level of 90%, the estimated glacier thickness is 24.98 m with a confidence of ±4.67 m. The mean basal shear stress considering plastic behaviour is 82.5 kPa. The reconstruction of glacier bed topography showed the future formation of a glacier lake with a maximum depth of 32 m.

  14. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G., E-mail: wnoid@chem.psu.edu [Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed “pressure-matching” variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, U{sub V}(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing U{sub V}, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that U{sub V} accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the “simplicity” of the model.

  15. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  16. Mass and Volume Optimization of Space Flight Medical Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, A. B.; Foy, Millennia Hope; Myers, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Resource allocation is a critical aspect of space mission planning. All resources, including medical resources, are subject to a number of mission constraints such a maximum mass and volume. However, unlike many resources, there is often limited understanding in how to optimize medical resources for a mission. The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that estimates medical event occurrences and mission outcomes for different mission profiles. IMM simulates outcomes and describes the impact of medical events in terms of lost crew time, medical resource usage, and the potential for medically required evacuation. Previously published work describes an approach that uses the IMM to generate optimized medical kits that maximize benefit to the crew subject to mass and volume constraints. We improve upon the results obtained previously and extend our approach to minimize mass and volume while meeting some benefit threshold. METHODS We frame the medical kit optimization problem as a modified knapsack problem and implement an algorithm utilizing dynamic programming. Using this algorithm, optimized medical kits were generated for 3 mission scenarios with the goal of minimizing the medical kit mass and volume for a specified likelihood of evacuation or Crew Health Index (CHI) threshold. The algorithm was expanded to generate medical kits that maximize likelihood of evacuation or CHI subject to mass and volume constraints. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In maximizing benefit to crew health subject to certain constraints, our algorithm generates medical kits that more closely resemble the unlimited-resource scenario than previous approaches which leverage medical risk information generated by the IMM. Our work here demonstrates that this algorithm provides an efficient and effective means to objectively allocate medical resources for spaceflight missions and provides an effective means of addressing tradeoffs in medical resource allocations and crew mission success

  17. Determination of sample size for a multi-class classifier based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms: a volume under the surface approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Yupeng; Sriram, T N

    2014-06-14

    Data on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found to be useful in predicting phenotypes ranging from an individual's class membership to his/her risk of developing a disease. In multi-class classification scenarios, clinical samples are often limited due to cost constraints, making it necessary to determine the sample size needed to build an accurate classifier based on SNPs. The performance of such classifiers can be assessed using the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curve (AUC) for two classes and the Volume Under the ROC hyper-Surface (VUS) for three or more classes. Sample size determination based on AUC or VUS would not only guarantee an overall correct classification rate, but also make studies more cost-effective. For coded SNP data from D(≥2) classes, we derive an optimal Bayes classifier and a linear classifier, and obtain a normal approximation to the probability of correct classification for each classifier. These approximations are then used to evaluate the associated AUCs or VUSs, whose accuracies are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. We give a sample size determination method, which ensures that the difference between the two approximate AUCs (or VUSs) is below a pre-specified threshold. The performance of our sample size determination method is then illustrated via simulations. For the HapMap data with three and four populations, a linear classifier is built using 92 independent SNPs and the required total sample sizes are determined for a continuum of threshold values. In all, four different sample size determination studies are conducted with the HapMap data, covering cases involving well-separated populations to poorly-separated ones. For multi-classes, we have developed a sample size determination methodology and illustrated its usefulness in obtaining a required sample size from the estimated learning curve. For classification scenarios, this methodology will help scientists determine whether a sample

  18. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  19. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 8: Design approaches - UPH. Appendix B: Shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    An assessment of shaft requirements for an underground pumped hydroelectric (UPH) facility is documented. Shaft requirements for both the construction and the permanent operation phases of the facility are outlined. Possible shaft arrangements are developed and the design of shaft linings is discussed. Methods of shaft sinking are reviewed. Alternative schedules for the sinking of the shafts are described and a preferred schedule selected. The material presented and also the cost estimates are based on the requirements for a 2000 MW plant providing 20,000 MWh of storage with a nominal head of 4600 ft. Studies subsequently carried out, including power plant design, head optimization analyses for the overall UPH surface and underground configuration, and further refinement of selected designs, have modified some of the material given.

  20. Using an Extended Kalman Filter Learning Algorithm for Feed-Forward Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lary, David J.; Mussa, Yussuf

    2004-01-01

    In this study a new extended Kalman filter (EKF) learning algorithm for feed-forward neural networks (FFN) is used. With the EKF approach, the training of the FFN can be seen as state estimation for a non-linear stationary process. The EKF method gives excellent convergence performances provided that there is enough computer core memory and that the machine precision is high. Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). The neural network was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation coefficient between simulated and training values of 0.9997. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  1. Using an extended Kalman filter learning algorithm for feed-forward neural networks to describe tracer correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Lary

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study a new extended Kalman filter (EKF learning algorithm for feed-forward neural networks (FFN is used. With the EKF approach, the training of the FFN can be seen as state estimation for a non-linear stationary process. The EKF method gives excellent convergence performances provided that there is enough computer core memory and that the machine precision is high. Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.. The neural network was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation coefficient between simulated and training values of 0.9997. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  2. R-Curve Approach to Describe the Fracture Resistance of Tool Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picas, Ingrid; Casellas, Daniel; Llanes, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This work addresses the events involved in the fracture of tool steels, aiming to understand the effect of primary carbides, inclusions, and the metallic matrix on their effective fracture toughness and strength. Microstructurally different steels were investigated. It is found that cracks nucleate on carbides or inclusions at stress values lower than the fracture resistance. It is experimentally evidenced that such cracks exhibit an increasing growth resistance as they progressively extend, i.e., R-curve behavior. Ingot cast steels present a rising R-curve, which implies that the effective toughness developed by small cracks is lower than that determined with long artificial cracks. On the other hand, cracks grow steadily in the powder metallurgy tool steel, yielding as a result a flat R-curve. Accordingly, effective toughness for this material is mostly independent of the crack size. Thus, differences in fracture toughness values measured using short and long cracks must be considered when assessing fracture resistance of tool steels, especially when tool performance is controlled by short cracks. Hence, material selection for tools or development of new steel grades should take into consideration R-curve concepts, in order to avoid unexpected tool failures or to optimize microstructural design of tool steels, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of the photodynamic activity of xanthene dyes on Artemia salina described by chemometric approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellosi, Diogo S; Batistela, Vagner R; Souza, Vagner R de; Scarminio, Ieda S; Caetano, Wilker; Hioka, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    The development of drugs for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an important area of research due to their growing use in medical applications. Therefore, it is important to develop new bioassay methods for PDT photosensitizers that are inexpensive, easy to handle and highly sensitive to environmental conditions. Xanthene dyes (fluorescein, rose bengal B, erythrosine B and eosin Y) with LED light sources were investigated using Artemia salina as a bioindicator of photodynamic activity. In this study, three factors were investigated: (i) photosensitizers concentration, (ii) the LED irradiation time and (iii) the waiting time between the addition of the photosensitizers and the beginning of the irradiation. To analyze the photo-killing of A. salina, it was employed a 2³ full factorial design. The death of A. salina was related to dye structure and the interaction between the irradiation time and the photosensitizers concentration. About 60% of crustaceans death was obtained using rose bengal B, which presentes the highest quantum yield of singlet oxygen due to the number of iodide substituents in the xanthenes ring. The proposed bioassay using A. salina, xanthene dyes and LED irradiation was found suitable for quantitative PDT drug evaluation.

  4. Spatial stochastic and analytical approaches to describe the complex hydraulic variability inherent channel geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hadadin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of basin hydrology on channel hydraulic variability for incised streams were investigated using available field data sets and models of watershed hydrology and channel hydraulics for Yazoo River Basin, USA. The study presents the hydraulic relations of bankfull discharge, channel width, mean depth, cross- sectional area, longitudinal slope, unit stream power, and runoff production as a function of drainage area using simple linear regression. The hydraulic geometry relations were developed for sixty one streams, twenty of them are classified as channel evaluation model (CEM Types IV and V and forty one of them are streams of CEM Types II and III. These relationships are invaluable to hydraulic and water resources engineers, hydrologists, and geomorphologists, involved in stream restoration and protection. These relations can be used to assist in field identification of bankfull stage and stream dimension in un-gauged watersheds as well as estimation of the comparative stability of a stream channel.

    Results of this research show good fit of hydraulic geometry relationships in the Yazoo River Basin. The relations indicate that bankfull discharge, channel width, mean depth, cross-sectional area have stronger correlation to changes in drainage area than the longitudinal slope, unit stream power, and runoff production for streams CEM Types II and III. The hydraulic geometry relations show that runoff production, bankfull discharge, cross-sectional area, and unit stream power are much more responsive to changes in drainage area than are channel width, mean depth, and slope for streams of CEM Types IV and V. Also, the relations show that bankfull discharge and cross-sectional area are more responsive to changes in drainage area than are other hydraulic variables for streams of CEM Types II and III. The greater the regression slope, the more responsive to changes in drainage area will be.

  5. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.

    2011-10-01

    We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  6. A disaggregating approach to describe overland flow occurrence within a catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigiak, O.; Romanowicz, R.; van Loon, E.E.; Sterk, G.; Beven, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    A parametrically parsimonious, data-based model was built on observations at hillslope and catchment scale to simulate the distribution of overland flow within a small East African Highlands catchment (Kwalei, Tanzania). A rainfall-flow Data Based Mechanistic model identified catchment effective rai

  7. An Integrated Modeling Approach for Describing Fate and Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in Estuarine Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Nguyen Viet, T.; Wang, X.; Chen, H.; Gin, K. Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    The fate and transport processes of emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems are complex, which are not only determined by their own properties but also influenced by the environmental setting, physical, chemical and biological processes. A 3D-emerging contaminant model has been developed based on Delft3D water quality model and coupled with a hydrodynamic model and a catchment-scale 1D- hydrological and hydraulic model to study the possible fate and transport mechanisms of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in Marina Reservoir in Singapore. The main processes in the contaminant model include partitioning (among detritus, dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton), settling, resuspension and degradation. We used the integrated model to quantify the distribution of the total PFCs and two major components, namely perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the water, sediments and organisms in the reservoir. The model yielded good agreement with the field measurements when evaluated based on the datasets in 2009 and 2010 as well as recent observations in 2013 and 2014. Our results elucidate that the model can be a useful tool to characterize the occurrence, sources, sinks and trends of PFCs both in the water column and in the sediments in the reservoir. Thisapproach provides a better understanding of mechanisms that influence the fate and transport of emerging contaminants and lays down a framework for future experiments to further explore how the dominant environmental factors change towards mitigation of emerging contaminants in the reservoirs.

  8. Generalized Fick Jacobs Approach for describing Adsorption Desorption Kinetics in Irregular Pores under Non Equilibrium Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ledesma-Durán, Aldo; Santamaría-Holek, Iván

    2016-01-01

    We present a study exploring the range of applicability of a generalized Fick Jacobs equation in the case when diffusive mass transport of a fluid along a pore includes chemical reactions in the bulk and pore surface. The study contemplates nonequilibrium boundary conditions and makes emphasis on the comparison between the predictions coming from the projected Fick Jacobs description and the corresponding predictions of the original two dimensional mass balance equation, establishing a simple cuantitative criterion of validity of the projected description. For the adsorption desorption process, we demonstrate that the length and the local curvature of the pore are the relevant geometric quantities for its description, allowing for giving very precise predictions of the mass concentration along the pore. Some schematic cases involving adsorption and chemical reaction are used to quantify with detail the concentration profiles in transient and stationary states involving equilibrium and nonequilibrium situation...

  9. Evaluation of the photodynamic activity of Xanthene Dyes on Artemia salina described by chemometric approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo S. Pellosi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of drugs for photodynamic therapy (PDT is an important area of research due to their growing use in medical applications. Therefore, it is important to develop new bioassay methods for PDT photosensitizers that are inexpensive, easy to handle and highly sensitive to environmental conditions. Xanthene dyes (fluorescein, rose bengal B, erythrosine B and eosin Y with LED light sources were investigated using Artemia salina as a bioindicator of photodynamic activity. In this study, three factors were investigated: (i photosensitizers concentration, (ii the LED irradiation time and (iii the waiting time between the addition of the photosensitizers and the beginning of the irradiation. To analyze the photo-killing of A. salina, it was employed a 23 full factorial design. The death of A. salina was related to dye structure and the interaction between the irradiation time and the photosensitizers concentration. About 60% of crustaceans death was obtained using rose bengal B, which presentes the highest quantum yield of singlet oxygen due to the number of iodide substituents in the xanthenes ring. The proposed bioassay using A. salina, xanthene dyes and LED irradiation was found suitable for quantitative PDT drug evaluation.

  10. A Partitioned Correlation Function Interaction approach for describing electron correlation in atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Verdebout, S; Jönsson, P; Gaigalas, G; Fischer, C Froese; Godefroid, M

    2013-01-01

    Traditional multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) and configuration interaction (CI) methods are based on a single orthonormal orbital basis (OB). For atoms with complicated shell structures, a large OB is needed to saturate all the electron correlation effects. The large OB leads to massive configuration state function (CSF) expansions that are difficult to handle. We show that it is possible to relax the orthonormality restriction on the OB and break down the originally large calculations to a set of smaller ones that can be run in parallel. Each calculation determines a partitioned correlation function (PCF) that accounts for a specific correlation effect. The PCFs are built on optimally localized orbital sets and are added to a zero-order multireference (MR) function to form a total wave function. The mixing coefficients of the PCFs are fixed from a small generalized eigenvalue problem. The required matrices are computed using a biorthonormal transformation technique. The new method, called partitioned c...

  11. M3C: A Computational Approach To Describe Statistical Fragmentation of Excited Molecules and Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Néstor F; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando

    2017-02-07

    The Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo method, based on a random sampling of the density of states, is revisited for the study of molecular fragmentation in the gas phase (isolated molecules, atomic and molecular clusters, complex biomolecules, etc.). A random walk or uniform random sampling in the configurational space (atomic positions) and a uniform random sampling of the relative orientation, vibrational energy, and chemical composition of the fragments is used to estimate the density of states of the system, which is continuously updated as the random sampling populates individual states. The validity and usefulness of the method is demonstrated by applying it to evaluate the caloric curve of a weakly bound rare gas cluster (Ar13), to interpret the fragmentation of highly excited small neutral and singly positively charged carbon clusters (Cn, n = 5,7,9 and Cn(+), n = 4,5) and to simulate the mass spectrum of the acetylene molecule (C2H2).

  12. Drugs as instruments: Describing and testing a behavioral approach to the study of neuroenhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Brand

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroenhancement (NE is the non-medical use of psychoactive substances to produce a subjective enhancement in psychological functioning and experience. So far empirical investigations of individuals’ motivation for NE however have been hampered by the lack of theoretical foundation. This study aimed to apply drug instrumentalization theory to user motivation for NE. We argue that NE should be defined and analyzed from a behavioral perspective rather than in terms of the characteristics of substances used for NE. In the empirical study we explored user behavior by analyzing relationships between drug options (use over-the-counter products, prescription drugs, illicit drugs and postulated drug instrumentalization goals (e.g. improved cognitive performance, counteracting fatigue, improved social interaction. Questionnaire data from 1,438 university students were subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to address the question of whether analysis of drug instrumentalization should be based on the assumption that users are aiming to achieve a certain goal and choose their drug accordingly or whether NE behavior is more strongly rooted in a decision to try or use a certain drug option. We used factor mixture modeling to explore whether users could be separated into qualitatively different groups defined by a shared ‘goal × drug option’ configuration. Our results indicate, first, that individuals’ decisions about NE are eventually based on personal attitude to drug options (e.g. willingness to use an over-the-counter product but not to abuse prescription drugs rather than motivated by desire to achieve a specific goal (e.g. fighting tiredness for which different drug options might be tried. Second, data analyses suggested two qualitatively different classes of users. Both predominantly used over-the-counter products, but ‘neuroenhancers’ might be characterized by a higher propensity to instrumentalize over-the-counter products for virtually all investigated goals whereas ‘fatigue-fighters’ might be inclined to use over-the-counter products exclusively to fight fatigue. We believe that psychological investigations like these are essential, especially for designing programs to prevent risky behavior.

  13. Drugs As Instruments: Describing and Testing a Behavioral Approach to the Study of Neuroenhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Ralf; Wolff, Wanja; Ziegler, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Neuroenhancement (NE) is the non-medical use of psychoactive substances to produce a subjective enhancement in psychological functioning and experience. So far empirical investigations of individuals' motivation for NE however have been hampered by the lack of theoretical foundation. This study aimed to apply drug instrumentalization theory to user motivation for NE. We argue that NE should be defined and analyzed from a behavioral perspective rather than in terms of the characteristics of substances used for NE. In the empirical study we explored user behavior by analyzing relationships between drug options (use over-the-counter products, prescription drugs, illicit drugs) and postulated drug instrumentalization goals (e.g., improved cognitive performance, counteracting fatigue, improved social interaction). Questionnaire data from 1438 university students were subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to address the question of whether analysis of drug instrumentalization should be based on the assumption that users are aiming to achieve a certain goal and choose their drug accordingly or whether NE behavior is more strongly rooted in a decision to try or use a certain drug option. We used factor mixture modeling to explore whether users could be separated into qualitatively different groups defined by a shared "goal × drug option" configuration. Our results indicate, first, that individuals' decisions about NE are eventually based on personal attitude to drug options (e.g., willingness to use an over-the-counter product but not to abuse prescription drugs) rather than motivated by desire to achieve a specific goal (e.g., fighting tiredness) for which different drug options might be tried. Second, data analyses suggested two qualitatively different classes of users. Both predominantly used over-the-counter products, but "neuroenhancers" might be characterized by a higher propensity to instrumentalize over-the-counter products for virtually all investigated goals whereas "fatigue-fighters" might be inclined to use over-the-counter products exclusively to fight fatigue. We believe that psychological investigations like these are essential, especially for designing programs to prevent risky behavior.

  14. Strategy Ranges: Describing Change in Prospective Elementary Teachers' Approaches to Mental Computation of Sums and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the sets of mental computation strategies used by prospective elementary teachers to compute sums and differences of whole numbers. In the context of an intervention designed to improve the number sense of prospective elementary teachers, participants were interviewed pre/post, and their mental computation strategies were…

  15. Strategy Ranges: Describing Change in Prospective Elementary Teachers' Approaches to Mental Computation of Sums and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the sets of mental computation strategies used by prospective elementary teachers to compute sums and differences of whole numbers. In the context of an intervention designed to improve the number sense of prospective elementary teachers, participants were interviewed pre/post, and their mental computation strategies were…

  16. Audio-Described Educational Materials: Ugandan Teachers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormnaes, Siri; Sellaeg, Nina

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and discusses a qualitative, descriptive, and exploratory study of how 12 visually impaired teachers in Uganda experienced audio-described educational video material for teachers and student teachers. The study is based upon interviews with these teachers and observations while they were using the material either…

  17. Type specimens of Pectinidae (Bivalvia) described by Ignaz von Born

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Born described in two publications (1778, 1780) the molluscs in the collection of Empress Maria Theresa (1717-1780), now in the Natural History Museum at Vienna. In this paper the Pectinidae type material is described. Ten new species were introduced of which Argopecten nucleus (Born, 1778) and Minn

  18. Type specimens of Pectinidae (Bivalvia) described by Ignaz von Born

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Born described in two publications (1778, 1780) the molluscs in the collection of Empress Maria Theresa (1717-1780), now in the Natural History Museum at Vienna. In this paper the Pectinidae type material is described. Ten new species were introduced of which Argopecten nucleus (Born, 1778) and Minn

  19. Thermodynanmic relations between selected parameters describing unsaturated flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, C M

    1980-05-01

    The first law of thermodynamics is applied to unsaturated flow by replacing the usual PdV term (P is pressure and V is volume) for chemical system which appears there by psi d theta/sub s/ (phi is matric suction and theta/sub s/ is the degree of saturation). If the assumption is made that hysteretic behavior of the moisture characteristic can be ignored, all the usual thermodynamic relations can be derived in which P is replaced by phi and V is replaced by theta/sub s/ and the various thermodynamic potentials, internal energy, U, entropy S, and so on, are understood to be normalized to unit void volume of the soil being considered. This leads to a thermodynamically derived theoretical expression for the slope of the moisture characteristic in terms of theta/sub s/, temperature, T, and the thermal expansivity of water, ..beta../sub l/. When hysteresis is considered, it is shown that for certain types of laboratory experiments the area enclosed by the main branches of the hysteresis loop in the phi - theta/sub s/ plane, or by extension any closed loop traversed by the system in the phi - theta/sub s/ plane, represents, to the extent that the sample temperature is kept constant during the adsorption-desorption process, the void volume of the sample multiplied by the integral of the temperature and the differential of the entropy generated by carrying out the cyclic adsorption-desorption process. These results when combined with an explicit representation of phi interms of an integral over the poor radius distribution allow an explicit calculation of the entropy change in terms of physical parameters.

  20. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell Barrera

    2014-12-31

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  1. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  2. Controlling chaos in dynamical systems described by maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crispin, Y.; Marduel, C. [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The problem of suppressing chaotic behavior in dynamical systems is treated using a feedback control method with limited control effort. The proposed method is validated on archetypal systems described by maps, i.e. discrete-time difference equations. The method is also applicable to dynamical systems described by flows, i.e. by systems of ordinary differential equations. Results are presented for the one-dimensional logistic map and for a two-dimensional Lotka-Volterra map describing predator-prey population dynamics. It is shown that chaos can be suppressed and the system stabilized about a period-1 fixed point of the maps.

  3. Surface and Volume Grid Generation in Parametric Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzuyi; Soni, Bharat K.; Benjamin, Ted; Williams, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The algorithm for surface modeling and volume grid generation using parametric Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) geometric representation are presented. The enhanced re-parameterization algorithm which can yield a desired physical distribution on the curve, surface, and volume is also presented. This approach bridges the gap between computer aided design surface/volume definition and surface/volume grid generation.

  4. Volume-effect and radiotherapy [2]. Part 2: volume-effect and normal tissue; Effet volume en radiotherapie [2]. Deuxieme partie: volume et tolerance des tissus sains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Caudry, M.; Trouette, R.; Vendrely, V.; Causse, N.; Recaldini, L.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Atlan, D. [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    The first part of our work has focused on the relationship bet men tumor Volume and tumor control. Indeed, it is well known that the importance of irradiated volume could be a main parameter of radiation-induced complications. Numerous mathematical models have described the correlation between the irradiated volume and the risk of adverse effects. These models should predict the complication rate of each treatment planning. At the present time late effects have been the most studied. In this report we firstly propose a review of different mathematical models described for volume effect. Secondly, we will discuss whether these theoretical considerations can influence our view of radiation treatment planning optimization. (authors)

  5. Describing soil surface microrelief by crossover length and fractal dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate description of soil surface topography is essential because different tillage tools produce different soil surface roughness conditions, which in turn affects many processes across the soil surface boundary. Advantages of fractal analysis in soil microrelief assessment have been recognised but the use of fractal indices in practice remains challenging. There is also little information on how soil surface roughness decays under natural rainfall conditions. The objectives of this work were to investigate the decay of initial surface roughness induced by natural rainfall under different soil tillage systems and to compare the performances of a classical statistical index and fractal microrelief indices. Field experiments were performed on an Oxisol at Campinas, São Paulo State (Brazil. Six tillage treatments, namely, disc harrow, disc plow, chisel plow, disc harrow + disc level, disc plow + disc level and chisel plow + disc level were tested. Measurements were made four times, firstly just after tillage and subsequently with increasing amounts of natural rainfall. Duplicated measurements were taken per treatment and date, yielding a total of 48 experimental surfaces. The sampling scheme was a square grid with 25×25 mm point spacing and the plot size was 1350×1350 mm, so that each data set consisted of 3025 individual elevation points. Statistical and fractal indices were calculated both for oriented and random roughness conditions, i.e. after height reading have been corrected for slope and for slope and tillage tool marks. The main drawback of the standard statistical index random roughness, RR, lies in its no spatial nature. The fractal approach requires two indices, fractal dimension, D, which describes how roughness changes with scale, and crossover length, l, specifying the variance of surface microrelief at a reference scale. Fractal parameters D and l, were estimated by two independent self-affine models

  6. Storyboard GALILEO CRUISE SCIENCE OPPORTUNITIES describes asteroid encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Storyboard with mosaicked image of an asteroid and entitled GALILEO CRUISE SCIENCE OPPORTUNITIES describes asteroid objectives. These objectives include: first asteroid encounter; surface geology, composition size, shape, mass; and relation of primitive bodies to meteorites.

  7. US Forest Service Survey parcels described by metes and bounds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting survey parcels described by a metes and bounds description. Examples include: land lots, housing subdivision lots, mineral...

  8. On the Cauchy Problem Describing an Electron-Phonon Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jo(a)o-Paulo DIAS; Mário FIGUEIRA; Filipe OLIVEIRA

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a model is derived to describe a quartic anharmonic interatomic interaction with an external potential involving a pair electron-phonon. The authors study the corresponding Cauchy Problem in the semilinear and quasilinear cases.

  9. Digital data sets describing metropolitan areas in the conterminous US

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set describes metropolitan areas in the conterminous United States, developed from U.S. Bureau of the Census boundaries of Consolidated Metropolitan...

  10. Representations of Canonical Commutation Relations Describing Infinite Coherent States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the infinite volume limit of quantized photon fields in multimode coherent states. We show that for states containing a continuum of coherent modes, it is mathematically and physically natural to consider their phases to be random and identically distributed. The infinite volume states give rise to Hilbert space representations of the canonical commutation relations which we construct concretely. In the case of random phases, the representations are random as well and can be expressed with the help of Itô stochastic integrals. We analyze the dynamics of the infinite state alone and the open system dynamics of small systems coupled to it. We show that under the free field dynamics, initial phase distributions are driven to the uniform distribution. We demonstrate that coherences in small quantum systems, interacting with the infinite coherent state, exhibit Gaussian time decay. The decoherence is qualitatively faster than the one caused by infinite thermal states, which is known to be exponentially rapid only. This emphasizes the classical character of coherent states.

  11. Zulma Ageitos de Castellanos: Publications and status of described taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Javier H; Urteaga, Diego; Teso, Valeria

    2015-10-28

    Zulma Ageitos de Castellanos was an Argentinian malacologist working in the "Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo" at La Plata University where she taught invertebrate zoology between 1947 and 1990. Her scientific publications are listed in chronological order. Described genus-group and species-group taxa are listed. Information about the type locality and type material, and taxonomic remarks are also provided. Finally, type material of all described taxa was requested and, when located, illustrated.

  12. Model checking biological systems described using ambient calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Priami, Corrado; Qualia, Paola;

    2005-01-01

    Model checking biological systems described using ambient calculus. In Proc. of the second International Workshop on Computational Methods in Systems Biology (CMSB04), Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics 3082:85-103, Springer, 2005.......Model checking biological systems described using ambient calculus. In Proc. of the second International Workshop on Computational Methods in Systems Biology (CMSB04), Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics 3082:85-103, Springer, 2005....

  13. Describing spatiotemporal couplings in ultrashort pulses using coupling coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Shu-Guang; Dan You-Quan; Zhang Bin; Sun Nian-Chun; Sui Zhan

    2011-01-01

    Three coupling coefficients are defined to describe spatiotemporal coupling in ultrashort pulses.With these coupling coefficients,the first-order spatiotemporal couplings of Gaussian pulse and beam are described analytically.Also,the first-order and the second-order spatiotemporal couplings caused by angular dispersion elements are studied using these coupling coefficients.It can be shown that these coupling coefficients are dimensionless and normalized,and readily indicate the severity of spatiotemporal coupling.

  14. Describing the Elephant: Framing a Discussion on Command and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    July–August 2014 Air & Space Power Journal | 17 From the Guest Editor Describing the Elephant Framing a Discussion on Command and Control Col Henry...DATE JUL 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Describing the Elephant: Framing a Discussion on...path ahead for better understanding and op- erational performance in this complex core function. To move down this path requires a common frame of

  15. The Coriolis Effect Further Described in the Seventeenth Century

    CERN Document Server

    Graney, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Claude Francis Milliet Dechales described the Coriolis effect in his 1674 Cursus seu Mundus Mathematicus. Dechales discussed and illustrated the deflection of both falling bodies and of projectiles launched toward the poles that should occur on a rotating Earth. Interestingly, this was done as an argument against the Earth's rotation, the deflections not having been observed at the time. Dechales's work follows on that of Giovanni Battista Riccioli, who had also described the effect in his Almagestum Novum of 1651.

  16. A review of volume-area scaling of glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, David B; Pfeffer, W Tad; Kaser, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Volume-area power law scaling, one of a set of analytical scaling techniques based on principals of dimensional analysis, has become an increasingly important and widely used method for estimating the future response of the world's glaciers and ice caps to environmental change. Over 60 papers since 1988 have been published in the glaciological and environmental change literature containing applications of volume-area scaling, mostly for the purpose of estimating total global glacier and ice cap volume and modeling future contributions to sea level rise from glaciers and ice caps. The application of the theory is not entirely straightforward, however, and many of the recently published results contain analyses that are in conflict with the theory as originally described by Bahr et al. (1997). In this review we describe the general theory of scaling for glaciers in full three-dimensional detail without simplifications, including an improved derivation of both the volume-area scaling exponent γ and a new derivation of the multiplicative scaling parameter c. We discuss some common misconceptions of the theory, presenting examples of both appropriate and inappropriate applications. We also discuss potential future developments in power law scaling beyond its present uses, the relationship between power law scaling and other modeling approaches, and some of the advantages and limitations of scaling techniques.

  17. DescribeX: A Framework for Exploring and Querying XML Web Collections

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzolo, Flavio

    2008-01-01

    This thesis introduces DescribeX, a powerful framework that is capable of describing arbitrarily complex XML summaries of web collections, providing support for more efficient evaluation of XPath workloads. DescribeX permits the declarative description of document structure using all axes and language constructs in XPath, and generalizes many of the XML indexing and summarization approaches in the literature. DescribeX supports the construction of heterogeneous summaries where different document elements sharing a common structure can be declaratively defined and refined by means of path regular expressions on axes, or axis path regular expression (AxPREs). DescribeX can significantly help in the understanding of both the structure of complex, heterogeneous XML collections and the behaviour of XPath queries evaluated on them. Experimental results demonstrate the scalability of DescribeX summary refinements and stabilizations (the key enablers for tailoring summaries) with multi-gigabyte web collections. A com...

  18. Three Decades of Volume Change of a Small Greenlandic Glacier Using Ground Penetrating Radar, Structure from Motion, and Aerial Photogrammetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcer, M.; Stentoft, Peter Alexander; Bjerre, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Glaciers in the Arctic are losing mass at an increasing rate. Here we use surface topography derived from Structure from Motion (SfM) and ice volume from ground penetrating radar (GPR) to describe the 2014 state of Aqqutikitsoq glacier (2.85 km) on Greenland's west coast. A photogrammetrically...... topography, the approach constitutes a viable alternative where the use of drones is not possible. Our investigations constitute the first glacier on Greenland's west coast where ice volume was determined and volume change calculated. The glacier's thinning rate is comparable to, for example, the Swiss Alps...

  19. Three Decades of Volume Change of a Small Greenlandic Glacier Using Ground Penetrating Radar, Structure from Motion, and Aerial Photogrammetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcer, M.; Stentoft, Peter Alexander; Bjerre, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Glaciers in the Arctic are losing mass at an increasing rate. Here we use surface topography derived from Structure from Motion (SfM) and ice volume from ground penetrating radar (GPR) to describe the 2014 state of Aqqutikitsoq glacier (2.85 km) on Greenland's west coast. A photogrammetrically...... topography, the approach constitutes a viable alternative where the use of drones is not possible. Our investigations constitute the first glacier on Greenland's west coast where ice volume was determined and volume change calculated. The glacier's thinning rate is comparable to, for example, the Swiss Alps...... and underlines that arctic glaciers are subject to fast changes....

  20. Linguistic terms describing different types of armour in Persian manuscripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article investigates different terms describing armour and its diverse typology in Persian martial tradition taken from a selected number of 47 dated Persian manuscripts from the 10th to the 19th centuries C.E. Both human and animal armour used in battlefields are described.

    El presente artículo describe, a partir de 47 manuscritos persas datados entre el siglo X y el siglo XIX d.C., los diversos términos que han designado las armaduras y sus diversas tipologías en la tradición marcial persa, tanto en lo que se refiere a armaduras para hombres como aquellas elaboradas para los animales de batalla.

  1. Algorithm describing pressure distribution of non-contact TNT explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Kiciński

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. The aim of this study is to develop a computational algorithm, describing the shock wave pressure distribution in the space induced by non-contact TNT explosion. The procedure describes pressure distribution on a damp surface of the hull. Simulations have been carried out using Abaqus/CAE. The study also shows the pressure waveform descriptions provided by various authors and presents them in charts. The formulated conclusions convince efficiency of the algorithm application.[b]Keywords:[/b] Underwater explosion, shock wave, CAE, TNT, Kobben class submarine

  2. Dynamic modelling of pectin extraction describing yield and functional characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nina Marianne; Cognet, T.; Santacoloma, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    A dynamic model of pectin extraction is proposed that describes pectin yield, degree of esterification and intrinsic viscosity. The dynamic model is one dimensional in the peel geometry and includes mass transport of pectin by diffusion and reaction kinetics of hydrolysis, degradation and de-esterification....... The model takes into account the effects of the process conditions such as temperature and acid concentration on extraction kinetics. It is shown that the model describes pectin bulk solution concentration, degree of esterification and intrinsic viscosity in pilot scale extractions from lime peel...

  3. Describing baseball pitch movement with right-hand rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahill, A Terry; Baldwin, David G

    2007-07-01

    The right-hand rules show the direction of the spin-induced deflection of baseball pitches: thus, they explain the movement of the fastball, curveball, slider and screwball. The direction of deflection is described by a pair of right-hand rules commonly used in science and engineering. Our new model for the magnitude of the lateral spin-induced deflection of the ball considers the orientation of the axis of rotation of the ball relative to the direction in which the ball is moving. This paper also describes how models based on somatic metaphors might provide variability in a pitcher's repertoire.

  4. An autocatalytic kinetic model for describing microbial growth during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarz, Albert; Augusto, Pedro E D

    2015-01-01

    The mathematical modelling of the behaviour of microbial growth is widely desired in order to control, predict and design food and bioproduct processing, stability and safety. This work develops and proposes a new semi-empirical mathematical model, based on an autocatalytic kinetic, to describe the microbial growth through its biomass concentration. The proposed model was successfully validated using 15 microbial growth patterns, covering the three most important types of microorganisms in food and biotechnological processing (bacteria, yeasts and moulds). Its main advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as the interpretation of its parameters. It is shown that the new model can be used to describe the behaviour of microbial growth.

  5. A Quark Transport Theory to describe Nucleon--Nucleon Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kalmbach, U; Biro, T S; Mosel, U

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of the Friedberg-Lee model we formulate a semiclassical transport theory to describe the phase-space evolution of nucleon-nucleon collisions on the quark level. The time evolution is given by a Vlasov-equation for the quark phase-space distribution and a Klein-Gordon equation for the mean-field describing the nucleon as a soliton bag. The Vlasov equation is solved numerically using an extended testparticle method. We test the confinement mechanism and mean-field effects in 1+1 dimensional simulations.

  6. Newly Described Tumor Entities in Sinonasal Tract Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal tract (nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses) is extremely challenging due in part to the tremendous diversity of tumor types that may arise in this region. Compounding the difficulty, a number of new sinonasal tumor entities have been recently described, and pathologists may not yet be familiar with these neoplasms. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the newly described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and renal cell-like adenocarcinoma.

  7. Exact Eigenstates for a Class of Model Describing Interactions Among Five Bosonic Modes with Multiphoton Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGWen-Xing; LIJia-Hua; LIWei-Bin; LUOJin-Ming; XIEXiao-Tao; WEIHua

    2004-01-01

    We present an efficient approach to studying the spectra and eigenstates for the model describing interactions among five bosonic modes without using the assumption of the Bethe ansatz. The exact analytical results of all the eigenstates and eigenvalues are in terms of a parameter A for a class of models describing five-mode multiphoton process. The parameter is determined by the roots of a polynomial and is solvable analytically or numerically.

  8. Use of the gamma function in equations which describe ruminal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approach (Mertens & Loften, 1980), and the use of markers (Graham ... eliminate the problems of the model of McDonald (1981), since it does not include a lag ..... rate of in vitro cellulose disappearance as a possible estimator of digestible ...

  9. Describing dengue epidemics: Insights from simple mechanistic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Maíra; Stollenwerk, Nico; Kooi, Bob W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a set of nested models to be applied to dengue fever epidemiology. We perform a qualitative study in order to show how much complexity we really need to add into epidemiological models to be able to describe the fluctuations observed in empirical dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence data offering a promising perspective on inference of parameter values from dengue case notifications.

  10. Superintendents Describe Their Leadership Styles: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James J.; Wang, Chuang

    2013-01-01

    Superintendents from eight southeastern United States school districts self-described their leadership styles across the choices of autocratic, laissez-faire, democratic, situational, servant, or transformational. When faced with this array of choices, the superintendents chose with arguable equitableness, indicating that successful leaders can…

  11. Comparing Theoretical Perspectives in Describing Mathematics Departments: Complexity and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Kim; Watson, Anne; De Geest, Els

    2010-01-01

    We draw on two studies of mathematics departments in 11-18 comprehensive maintained schools in England to compare and contrast the insights provided by differing theoretical perspectives. In one study, activity theory was used to describe common features of the work of three departments. In the other, a mathematics department was viewed and…

  12. Describing Elementary Certification Methods across the Elementary Music Career Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Christina L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe elementary music method choice and certification method choice overall and across the elementary music career cycle. Participants (N = 254) were categorized as Level I or Elementary Division in a southwestern music education association database. The questionnaire included 25 four-point Likert-type items…

  13. Icosahedral symmetry described by an incommensurately modulated crystal structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolny, Janusz; Lebech, Bente

    1986-01-01

    A crystal structure model of an incommensurately modulated structure is presented. Although six different reciprocal vectors are used to describe the model, all calculations are done in three dimensions making calculation of the real-space structure trivial. Using this model, it is shown that both...

  14. Describing, Instantiating and Evaluating a Reference Architecture : A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris

    2003-01-01

    The result of a domain maturing is the emergence of reference architectures that offer numerous advantages to software architects and other stakeholders. However there is no straightforward way to describe a reference architecture and in sequence to design instances for specific systems, while at th

  15. The Tortricidae described by J. C. Fabricius (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baixeras, Joaquin; Karsholt, Ole

    2011-01-01

    The identity and nomenclature of the 88 species of Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) described by J. C. Fabricius are reviewed. Type material deposited in the Natural History Museum Denmark is illustrated. Lectotypes for Tinea compositella (Fabricius, 1775), Pyralis rivellana (Fabricius, 1775) and P...

  16. Digital data set describing surficial geology in the conterminous US

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set describes surficial geology of the conterminous United States. The data set was generated from a U.S. Geological Survey 1:7,500,000-scale map...

  17. Describing the Corneal Shape after Wavefront-Optimized Photorefractive Keratectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tim; Wijdh, Robert H. J.; Koopmans, Steven A.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a procedure for describing wavefront-optimized photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) corneas and to characterize PRK-induced changes in shape. METHODS: We analyzed preoperative and postoperative corneal elevation data of 41 eyes of 41 patients (mean [±SD] age, 38 [±11] years) who und

  18. Avicenna, the first to describe thyroid-related orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabipour, Iraj; Burger, Albert; Moharreri, Muhammad-Reza; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2009-01-01

    The history of the association of goiter and orbital disease is discussed. Although Graves and Basedow are credited with the first descriptions of this association, it was described many years earlier between AD 1000 and 1110 by two Persian physicians and philosophers, Avicenna and Al-Jurjani.

  19. Interpersonal Problems of People Who Describe Themselves as Lonely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Rita de Sales; Horowitz, Leonard M.

    1979-01-01

    The complaint "I am lonely" summarizes specific interpersonal difficulties in socializing. The UCLA Loneliness Scale identifies lonely and not-lonely students who described their major interpersonal problems by performing a Q-sort with a standardized set of problems. Results show that lonely people consistently report problems of…

  20. Collective learning in schools described: building collective learning capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiest, Eric; Teurlings, C.; Ansems, E.; Bakx, A.; Grootswagers, A.; Heijmen-Versteegen,; Jongen,; Uphoff,

    2005-01-01

    Processes of collective learning are expected to increase the professionalism of teachers and school leaders. Little is known about the processes of collective learning which take place in schools and about the way in which those processes may be improved. This paper describes a research into proces

  1. A Framework for Describing Variations in State Early Intervention Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, Donna; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Wagner, Mary; Cameto, Renee; McKenna, Patti

    2000-01-01

    Information about the early intervention service systems in 20 states was gathered and organized into dimensions of a framework for describing early intervention systems at the state and local levels. Results indicate considerable variation exists on eligibility criteria, agencies involved in early intervention, and models of intake and service…

  2. Development of Parametric Mass and Volume Models for an Aerospace SOFC/Gas Turbine Hybrid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornabene, Robert; Wang, Xiao-yen; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Freeh, Joshua E.

    2005-01-01

    In aerospace power systems, mass and volume are key considerations to produce a viable design. The utilization of fuel cells is being studied for a commercial aircraft electrical power unit. Based on preliminary analyses, a SOFC/gas turbine system may be a potential solution. This paper describes the parametric mass and volume models that are used to assess an aerospace hybrid system design. The design tool utilizes input from the thermodynamic system model and produces component sizing, performance, and mass estimates. The software is designed such that the thermodynamic model is linked to the mass and volume model to provide immediate feedback during the design process. It allows for automating an optimization process that accounts for mass and volume in its figure of merit. Each component in the system is modeled with a combination of theoretical and empirical approaches. A description of the assumptions and design analyses is presented.

  3. A visual metaphor describing neural dynamics in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico J M van Beveren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In many scientific disciplines the use of a metaphor as an heuristic aid is not uncommon. A well known example in somatic medicine is the 'defense army metaphor' used to characterize the immune system. In fact, probably a large part of the everyday work of doctors consists of 'translating' scientific and clinical information (i.e. causes of disease, percentage of success versus risk of side-effects into information tailored to the needs and capacities of the individual patient. The ability to do so in an effective way is at least partly what makes a clinician a good communicator. Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder which affects approximately 1% of the population. Over the last two decades a large amount of molecular-biological, imaging and genetic data have been accumulated regarding the biological underpinnings of schizophrenia. However, it remains difficult to understand how the characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia such as hallucinations and delusions are related to disturbances on the molecular-biological level. In general, psychiatry seems to lack a conceptual framework with sufficient explanatory power to link the mental- and molecular-biological domains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present an essay-like study in which we propose to use visualized concepts stemming from the theory on dynamical complex systems as a 'visual metaphor' to bridge the mental- and molecular-biological domains in schizophrenia. We first describe a computer model of neural information processing; we show how the information processing in this model can be visualized, using concepts from the theory on complex systems. We then describe two computer models which have been used to investigate the primary theory on schizophrenia, the neurodevelopmental model, and show how disturbed information processing in these two computer models can be presented in terms of the visual metaphor previously described. Finally, we describe the

  4. What do we teach? What do we know? A methodology for describing archaeological skills and knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Collis

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available I recommend that we should move to a flexible, modular system, in describing courses and training, in defining the skills needed to operate as archaeologists and professional career structures, and in describing ourselves as archaeologists. A 'Thesaurus' of skills and knowledge can be constructed, with levels of expertise, which will give us a simple and flexible tool for describing the range of activities necessary to the profession. Two or three examples are discussed, and ways in which quality can be controlled without too much bureaucracy. Potentially this approach has a world-wide application.

  5. Pixels Intensity Evolution to Describe the Plastic Films Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Briñez-De León

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes an approach for mechanical behavior description in the plastic film deformation using techniques for the images analysis, which are based on the intensities evolution of fixed pixels applied to an images sequence acquired through polarizing optical assembly implemented around the platform of the plastic film deformation. The pixels intensities evolution graphs, and mechanical behavior graphic of the deformation has dynamic behaviors zones which could be associated together.

  6. Canonical quantization of a string describing N branes at angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Pesando

    2014-12-01

    The splitting of the string coordinates into a classical and quantum part allows the formulation of an improved overlap principle. Using this approach we then proceed in computing the generating function for the generic correlator with L untwisted operators and N (excited twist fields for branes at angles. We recover as expected the results previously obtained using the path integral. This construction explains why these correlators are given by a generalization of the Wick theorem.

  7. Galactic Rotation Described with Bulge+Disk Gravitational Models

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, C F

    2008-01-01

    Observations reveal that mature spiral galaxies consist of stars, gases and plasma approximately distributed in a thin disk of circular shape, usually with a central bulge. The rotation velocities quickly increase from the galactic center and then achieve a constant velocity from the core to the periphery. The basic dynamic behavior of a mature spiral galaxy, such as the Milky Way, is well described by simple models balancing Newtonian gravitational forces against the centrifugal forces associated with a rotating thin axisymmetric disk. In this research, we investigate the effects of adding central bulges to thin disk gravitational models. Even with the addition of substantial central bulges, all the critical essential features of our thin disk gravitational models are preserved. (1) Balancing Newtonian gravitational and centrifugal forces at every point within the disk yields computed radial mass distributions that describe the measured rotation velocity profiles of mature spiral galaxies successfully. (2) T...

  8. Oculoectodermal syndrome: twentieth described case with new manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiras, Daniela de Almeida; Leal, Deborah Maria de Castro Barbosa; Kozmhinsky, Valter; Querino, Marina Coutinho Domingues; Regueira, Marina Genesia da Silva; Studart, Maria Gabriela de Morais

    2016-01-01

    Oculoectodermal syndrome is a rare disease characterized by the association of aplasia cutis congenita, epibulbar dermoids, and other abnormalities. This report describes the twentieth case of the disease. We report a 4-year-old female child who presented with the classical features of the syndrome: aplasia cutis congenita and epibulbar dermoids. Our case expands the clinical spectrum of the disease to include: diffuse hyperpigmentation (some following the Blaschko´s lines); hypopigmented skin areas on the trunk; arachnoid cyst on the right fronto-parietal border; rounded left side of the hippocampus; and dermoid cyst underlying the bulb-medullary transition. Our patient also reported infantile hemangioma on the right wrist and verrucous hemangioma on the left leg, the latter not previously described in the literature.

  9. A six-parameter space to describe galaxy diversification

    CERN Document Server

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar; Davoust, Emmanuel; Thuillard, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy diversification proceeds by transforming events like accretion, interaction or mergers. These explain the formation and evolution of galaxies that can now be described with many observables. Multivariate analyses are the obvious tools to tackle the datasets and understand the differences between different kinds of objects. However, depending on the method used, redundancies, incompatibilities or subjective choices of the parameters can void the usefulness of such analyses. The behaviour of the available parameters should be analysed before an objective reduction of dimensionality and subsequent clustering analyses can be undertaken, especially in an evolutionary context. We study a sample of 424 early-type galaxies described by 25 parameters, ten of which are Lick indices, to identify the most structuring parameters and determine an evolutionary classification of these objects. Four independent statistical methods are used to investigate the discriminant properties of the observables and the partitioni...

  10. Statistical models describing the energy signature of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacher, Peder; Madsen, Henrik; Thavlov, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one third of the primary energy production in Denmark is used for heating in buildings. Therefore efforts to accurately describe and improve energy performance of the building mass are very important. For this purpose statistical models describing the energy signature of a building, i.......e. the heat dynamics of the building, have been developed. The models can be used to obtain rather detailed knowledge of the energy performance of the building and to optimize the control of the energy consumption for heating, which will be vital in conditions with increasing fluctuation of the energy supply...... or varying energy prices. The paper will give an overview of statistical methods and applied models based on experiments carried out in FlexHouse, which is an experimental building in SYSLAB, Risø DTU. The models are of different complexity and can provide estimates of physical quantities such as UA...

  11. Double sigmoidal models describing the growth of coffee berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Jesus Fernandes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to verify if the growth pattern of coffee berries, considering fresh mass accumulation over time, is double sigmoid and to select the most suitable nonlinear model to describe such behavior. Data used consisted of fourteen longitudinal observations of average fresh mass of coffee berries obtained in an experiment with the cultivar Obatã IAC 1669-20. The fits provided by the Logistic and Gompertz models were compared in their single and double versions. Parameters were estimated using the least squares method using the Gauss-Newton algorithm implemented in the nls function of the R software. It can be concluded that the growth pattern of the coffee fruit, in fresh mass accumulation, is double sigmoid. The double Gompertz and double Logistic models were adequate to describe such a growth curve, with a superiority of the double Logistic model.

  12. Which number system is "best" for describing empirical reality?

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Eugene Wigner's much discussed notion of the "unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics" in describing the physics of empirical reality is simultaneously both trivial and profound. After all, the relevant mathematics was, (in the first instance), originally developed in order to be useful in describing empirical reality. On the other hand, certain aspects of the mathematical superstructure have now taken on a life of their own, with at least some features of the mathematical superstructure greatly exceeding anything that can be directly probed or verified, or even justified, by empirical experiment. Specifically, I wish to raise the possibility that the real number system, (with its nevertheless pragmatically very useful tools of real analysis, and mathematically rigorous notions of differentiation and integration), may nevertheless constitute a "wrong turn" when it comes to modelling empirical reality. Without making any definitive recommendation, I shall discuss several alternatives.

  13. Curie law for systems described by kappa distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-01-01

    We derive the magnetization of a system, Pierre Curie's law, for paramagnetic particles out of thermal equilibrium described by kappa distributions. The analysis uses the theory and formulation of the kappa distributions that describe particle systems with a non-zero potential energy. Among other results, emphasis is placed on the effect of kappa distribution on the phenomenon of having strong magnetization at high temperatures. At thermal equilibrium, high temperature leads to weak magnetization. Out of thermal equilibrium, however, strong magnetization at high temperatures is rather possible, if the paramagnetic particle systems reside far from thermal equilibrium, i.e., at small values of kappa. The application of the theory to the space plasma at the outer boundaries of our heliosphere, the inner heliosheath, leads to an estimation of the ion magnetic moment for this space plasma, that is, μ ≈ 138+/-7 \\text{eV/nT} .

  14. The first fossil cephalopod statoliths to be described from Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, M. R.; MADDOCK, LINDA; Steurbaut, E.

    1980-01-01

    Statoliths of cephalopods are small, hard calcareous stones which lie within the cartilaginous skulls of octopods, sepioids and teuthoids1. Fossil statoliths, clearly belonging to genera which are alive today, have previously been described from 11 Cenozoic deposits spanning from the Eocene to the Pleistocene in North America2–5. Such statoliths are of particular interest because they provide a means of studying the evolution of living cephalopod groups which have no calcareous shells, includ...

  15. New model describing the dynamical behaviour of penetration rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Tohru; Minagawa, Hiroe; Chiba, Michiko

    2013-02-01

    We propose a hierarchical logistic equation as a model to describe the dynamical behaviour of a penetration rate of a prevalent stuff. In this model, a memory, how many people who already possess it a person who does not process it yet met, is considered, which does not exist in the logistic model. As an application, we apply this model to iPod sales data, and find that this model can approximate the data much better than the logistic equation.

  16. The scentscape: An integrative framework describing scents in servicescapes

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, Marc; Girard, Anna; Suppin, Anna-Caroline; Bartsch, Silke

    2016-01-01

    The systematic use of ambient scents is a trend in service companies that is accompanied by increasing research attention. However, we lack a theoretical framework that ad-dresses ambient scents' specific role in physical surroundings of services. Thus, this article develops the 'scentscape', a model that describes the process of olfactory stimulation and its impacts on customers and employees in service environments. The paper extends Bitner's servicescape model (1992) and combines it with G...

  17. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The first volume of this 4-volume report presents the basic rationale for an anthropological and cross-cultural approach to education, abstracts of 14 research projects sponsored by the American Anthropological Association, a proposal for the establishment of a Research Center for Anthropology and Education to be coordinated by the Association, a…

  18. Volume of a doubly truncated hyperbolic tetrahedron

    CERN Document Server

    Kolpakov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The present paper regards the volume function of a doubly truncated hyperbolic tetrahedron. Starting from the previous results of J. Murakami, U. Yano and A. Ushijima, we have developed a unified approach to expressing the volume in different geometric cases by dilogarithm functions and to treat properly the many analytic strata of the latter. Finally, several numeric examples are given.

  19. On the problems of describing joint axis alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kevin A; Greiner, Thomas M

    2008-01-01

    Each three-dimensional joint possesses at least one potentially oblique axis of rotation. Several systems are used to express joint axis alignment. One system, designated the plane projection (PP) method, describes angles based on orthogonal projections onto two, of the three, anatomical planes. Alternatively, a joint axis may be described in two different ways using two sequential Cardan angle rotations. These expression systems all lay claim to similar descriptive labels, such as deviation and elevation. Difficulties arise as researchers use these various methods to compare their own data to the results of others. A joint axis alignment, described as 27 degrees deviation and 41 degrees elevation in PP, differs by as much as 6 degrees when expressed as Cardan angles. Differences among expression systems increase as the joint axis alignment becomes more oblique -- eventually differing by as much as 75 degrees . This paper explores implications for this lack of congruence among the joint axis expression systems. Effective steps in dealing with these issues begin with recognizing the existence and extent of the problem. The paper provides a common set of algorithms to illustrate and alleviate the possible problems associated with the exchange of joint axis alignment data.

  20. On Differential Equations Describing 3-Dimensional Hyperbolic Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun-Yi; DING Qing; Keti Tenenblat

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of a (2+1)-dimensional differential equation describing threedimensional hyperbolic spaces (3-h.s.). The (2+1)-dimensional coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equation and its sister equation, the (2+1)-dimensional coupled derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation, are shown to describe 3-h.s. The (2+1)-dimensional generalized HF model: St = (1/2i [S, Sy] + 2iσS)x, σx = 1-4itr(SSxSy), in which S ∈ GLC(2)/GLC(1)×GLC(1),provides another example of (2+1)-dimensional differential equations describing 3-h.s. As a direct consequence, the geometric construction of an infinite number of conservation laws of such equations is illustrated. Furthermore we display a new infinite number of conservation laws of the (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation and the (2+1)odimensional derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation by a geometric way.

  1. Right posterior approach for pancreaticoduodenectomy: a new technical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Takehiro; Shima, Yasuo; Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Kozuki, Akihito; Tokumaru, Teppei; Saisaka, Yuichi

    2015-01-31

    The major goals that must be achieved during pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) include reduction of postoperative hemorrhage and/or operating time. We herein describe a new technique for PD examining right posterior approach PD. From January 2012 to December 2013, 116 patients underwent PD for periampullary or pancreatic disease. Of these 116 patients, 56 cases were surgically treated for pancreas head or periampullary malignancy and were studied for blood loss volume and length of operation. An interesting issue in the present study was related to operating time and intra-operative blood loss. The median blood loss volume and operating time were 349 mL (35-3,636 mL) and 276 min (188-467 min), respectively, in patients who underwent a right posterior-approach PD. The estimated operative blood loss volume and operative time are lower in right posterior approach PD, probably due to clearly detection a route of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery from the SMA and following early ligation of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery and reduced congestion of the pancreatic head.

  2. Perceptions and dietary intake of self-described healthy and unhealthy eaters with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Nancy E; Blake, Christine E; Saunders, Ruth

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to examine how community-dwelling adults with severe mental illness describe themselves as eaters and how these eating identities relate to dietary intake. Twenty participants completed one in-depth qualitative interview and three 24-h dietary recalls. Two distinct groups were identified; self-described healthy eaters (n = 10) and self-described unhealthy eaters (n = 10). Healthy eaters emphasized fruits and vegetables, limiting sweets, three meals a day, overcoming cost concerns, and benefits of healthy eating. Unhealthy eaters emphasized junk foods, fried foods, few fruits and vegetables, cost and household barriers to healthy eating, and concerns about consequences of unhealthy eating. Self-described healthy eaters consumed significantly more vegetables and less kilocalories, carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat than self-described unhealthy eaters. Understanding how eating identities relate to dietary intake provides important insights for development of more effective approaches to promote healthy eating in this high risk population.

  3. Describing Instrumental Music Teachers' Thinking: Implications for Understanding Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millican, J. Si

    2013-01-01

    Pedagogical content knowledge, the particular ways that teachers understand their subjects in order to instruct others, has been described and explored in the math and science education fields in some depth, yet little research exists illustrating this concept in music instruction. I used a descriptive approach to explore expert beginning band…

  4. Identifying and Describing Tutor Archetypes: The Pragmatist, the Architect, and the Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harootunian, Jeff A.; Quinn, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors identify and anecdotally describe three tutor archetypes: the pragmatist, the architect, and the surveyor. These descriptions, based on observations of remedial mathematics tutors at a land-grant university, shed light on a variety of philosophical beliefs regarding and pedagogical approaches to tutoring. An analysis…

  5. Collective properties of deformed atomic clusters described within a projected spherical basis

    OpenAIRE

    Raduta, A. A.; Raduta, Al. H.; Budaca, R.

    2011-01-01

    Several relevant properties of the Na clusters were studied by using a projected spherical single particle states.The proposed model is able to describe in an unified fashion the spherical and deformed clusters. Photoabsorbtion cross section is realistically explained within an RPA approach and a Shiff dipole moment as a transition operator

  6. Robustness of a cross contamination model describing transfer of pathogens during grinding of meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Sant’Ana, A. S.; Hansen, Solvej Katrine Holm

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a cross contamination model for its capability of describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes during grinding of varying sizes and numbers of pieces of meats in two grinder systems. Data from 19 trials were collected. Three evaluation approaches were...

  7. Robustness of a cross contamination model describing transfer of pathogens during grinding of meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Sant’Ana, A. S.; Hansen, Solvej Katrine Holm

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a cross contamination model for its capability of describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes during grinding of varying sizes and numbers of pieces of meats in two grinder systems. Data from 19 trials were collected. Three evaluation approaches were...

  8. Linear representations of SU(2) described by using Kravchuk polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    Cotfas, Nicolae

    2016-01-01

    We show that a new unitary transform with characteristics almost similar to those of the finite Fourier transform can be defined in any finite-dimensional Hilbert space. It is defined by using the Kravchuk polynomials, and we call it Kravchuk transform. Some of its properties are investigated and used in order to obtain a simple alternative description for the irreducible representations of the Lie algebra su(2) and group SU(2). Our approach offers a deeper insight into the structure of the l...

  9. DESCRIBING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF MISCONCEPTIONS IN SCIENCE TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Yağbasan, Rahmi; GÜLÇİÇEK, Arş. Gör. Çağlar

    2003-01-01

    Many teachers think of their students as tabula rasa and assume a role as a teacher that is oriented to fill students’ empty minds. The problem with this approach is that students’ minds are not empty vessels that can be simply filled but already contain certain preconceptions and intuitions which pave the way to misconceptions. A misconception can be defined as an individual’s understanding of a concept as substantially different from the commonly accepted scientific meaning of it...

  10. DESCRIBING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF MISCONCEPTIONS IN SCIENCE TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Yağbasan, Rahmi; GÜLÇİÇEK, Arş. Gör. Çağlar

    2014-01-01

    Many teachers think of their students as tabula rasa and assume a role as a teacher that is oriented to fill students’ empty minds. The problem with this approach is that students’ minds are not empty vessels that can be simply filled but already contain certain preconceptions and intuitions which pave the way to misconceptions. A misconception can be defined as an individual’s understanding of a concept as substantially different from the commonly accepted scientific meaning of it...

  11. A proposal to describe a phenomenon of expanding language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietorzecka, Kordula

    Changes of knowledge, convictions or beliefs are subjects of interest in frame of so called epistemic logic. There are various proposed descriptions of a process (or its results) in which so a called agent may invent certain changes in a set of sentences that he had already chosen as a point of his knowledge, convictions or beliefs (and this is also considered in case of many agents). In the presented paper we are interested in the changeability of an agent's language which is by its own independent from already mentioned changes. Modern epistemic formalizations assume that the agent uses a fixed (and so we could say: static) language in which he expresses his various opinions which may change. Our interest is to simulate a situation when a language is extended by adding to it new expressions which were not known by the agent so he couldn't even consider them as subjects of his opinions. Actually such a phenomenon happens both in natural and scientific languages. Let us mention a fact of expanding languages in process of learning or in result of getting of new data about some described domain. We propose a simple idealization of extending sentential language used by one agent. Actually the language is treated as a family of so called n-languages which get some epistemic interpretation. Proposed semantics enables us to distinguish between two different types of changes - these which occur because of changing agent's convictions about logical values of some n-sentences - we describe them using one place operator C to be read it changes that - and changes that consist in increasing the level of n-language by adding to it new expressions. However the second type of change - symbolized by variable G - may be also considered independently of the first one. The logical frame of our considerations comes from and it was originally used to describe Aristotelian theory of substantial changes. This time we apply the mentioned logic in epistemology.

  12. Foaming volume and foam stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sydney

    1947-01-01

    A method of measuring foaming volume is described and investigated to establish the critical factors in its operation. Data on foaming volumes and foam stabilities are given for a series of hydrocarbons and for a range of concentrations of aqueous ethylene-glycol solutions. It is shown that the amount of foam formed depends on the machinery of its production as well as on properties of the liquid, whereas the stability of the foam produced, within specified mechanical limitations, is primarily a function of the liquid.

  13. Analysis of a mathematical model describing necrotic tumor growth

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a model describing the growth of necrotic tumors in different regimes of vascularisation. The tumor consists of a necrotic core of death cells and a surrounding nonnecrotic shell. The corresponding mathematical formulation is a moving boundary problem where both boundaries delimiting the nonnecrotic shell are allowed to evolve in time.We determine all radially symmetric stationary solutions of the problem and reduce the moving boundary problem into a nonlinear evolution. Parabolic theory provides us the perfect context in order to show local well-posed of the problem for small initial data.

  14. Extended nonlinear feedback model for describing episodes of high inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Szybisz, M A; Szybisz, L.

    2016-01-01

    An extension of the nonlinear feedback (NLF) formalism to describe regimes of hyper- and high-inflation in economy is proposed in the present work. In the NLF model the consumer price index (CPI) exhibits a finite time singularity of the type $1/(t_c -t)^{(1- \\beta)/\\beta}$, with $\\beta>0$, predicting a blow up of the economy at a critical time $t_c$. However, this model fails in determining $t_c$ in the case of weak hyperinflation regimes like, e.g., that occurred in Israel. To overcome this...

  15. Can all neurobiological processes be described by classical physics?

    CERN Document Server

    Lisewski, A M

    1999-01-01

    We discuss results recently given in an article by M. Tegmark (quant-ph/9907009) where he argues that neurons can be described appropriately by pure classical physics. This letter is dedicated to the question if this is really the case when the role of dissipation and noise -- the two concurrent phenomena present in these biological structures -- is taken into account. We argue that dissipation and noise might well be of quantum origin and give also a possible reason why neural dynamics is not classical.

  16. [Health consequences of smoking electronic cigarettes are poorly described].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Wibholm, Niels Christoffer; Lange, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Despite increasing popularity, health consequences of vaping (smoking electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes) are poorly described. Few studies suggest that vaping has less deleterious effects on lung function than smoking conventional cigarettes. One large study found that e-cigarettes were as efficient as nicotine patches in smoking cessation. The long-term consequences of vaping are however unknown and while some experts are open towards e-cigarettes as a safer way of satisfying nicotine addiction, others worry that vaping in addition to presenting a health hazard may lead to an increased number of smokers of conventional cigarettes.

  17. Quadrupolar gravitational fields described by the $q-$metric

    CERN Document Server

    Quevedo, Hernando; Yerlan, Aimuratov

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Zipoy-Voorhees metric ($q-$metric) as the simplest static, axially symmetric solution of Einstein's vacuum field equations that possesses as independent parameters the mass and the quadrupole moment. In accordance with the black holes uniqueness theorems, the presence of the quadrupole completely changes the geometric properties of the corresponding spacetime that turns out to contain naked singularities for all possible values of the quadrupole parameter. The naked singularities, however, can be covered by interior solutions that correspond to perfect fluid sources with no specific equations of state. We conclude that the $q-$metric can be used to describe the entire spacetime generated by static deformed compact objects.

  18. Spectral Gaps of Dirac Operators Describing Graphene Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benguria, Rafael D.; Fournais, Søren; Stockmeyer, Edgardo; Van Den Bosch, Hanne

    2017-06-01

    The two-dimensional Dirac operator describes low-energy excitations in graphene. Different choices for the boundary conditions give rise to qualitative differences in the spectrum of the resulting operator. For a family of boundary conditions, we find a lower bound to the spectral gap around zero, proportional to |Ω|-1/2, where {Ω } \\subset R2 is the bounded region where the Dirac operator acts. This family contains the so-called infinite mass and armchair cases used in the physics literature for the description of graphene quantum dots.

  19. Can CA describe collective effects of polluting agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, A.

    2015-03-01

    Pollution represents one of the most relevant issues of our time. Several studies are on stage but, generally, they do not consider competitive effects, paying attention only to specific agents and their impact. In this paper, it is suggested a different scheme. At first, it is proposed a formal model of competitive noxious effects. Second, by generalizing a previous algorithm capable of describing urban growth, it is developed a cellular automata (CA) model that provides the effective impact of a variety of pollutants. The final achievement is a simulation tool that can model pollution combined effects and their dynamical evolution in relation to anthropized environments.

  20. Theory of control systems described by differential inclusions

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Zhengzhi; Huang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a brief introduction to the theory of finite dimensional differential inclusions, and deals in depth with control of three kinds of differential inclusion systems. The authors introduce the algebraic decomposition of convex processes, the stabilization of polytopic systems, and observations of Luré systems. They also introduce the elemental theory of finite dimensional differential inclusions, and the properties and designs of the control systems described by differential inclusions. Addressing the material with clarity and simplicity, the book includes recent research achievements and spans all concepts, concluding with a critical mathematical framework. This book is intended for researchers, teachers and postgraduate students in the area of automatic control engineering.

  1. Ruin Probabilities of a Surplus Process Described by PDMPs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-min He; Rong Wu; Hua-yue Zhang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we mainly study the ruin probability of a surplus process described by a piecewise deterministic Markov process (PDMP). An integro-differentiai equation for the ruin probability is derived. Under a certain assumption, it can be transformed into the ruin probability of a risk process whose premiums depend on the current reserves. Using the same argument as that in Asmussen and Nielsen[2], the ruin probability and its upper bounds are obtained. Finally, we give an analytic expression for ruin probability and its upper bounds when the claim-size is exponentially distributed.

  2. Describing fuzzy sets using a new concept:fuzzify functor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏克新; 王兆霞; 王权

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposed a fuzzify functor as an extension of the concept of fuzzy sets.The fuzzify functor and the first-order operated fuzzy set are defined.From the theory analysis,it can be observed that when the fuzzify functor acts on a simple crisp set,we get the first order fuzzy set or type-1 fuzzy set.By operating the fuzzify functor on fuzzy sets,we get the higher order fuzzy sets or higher type fuzzy sets and their membership functions.Using the fuzzify functor we can exactly describe the type-1 fuzz...

  3. Using UMLS metathesaurus concepts to describe medical images: dermatology vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, James W; Sneiderman, Charles A; Hameed, Kamran; Ackerman, Michael J; Hatton, Charlie

    2006-01-01

    Web servers at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) displayed images of ten skin lesions to practicing dermatologists and provided an online form for capturing text they used to describe the pictures. The terms were submitted to the UMLS Metathesaurus (Meta). Concepts retrieved, their semantic types, definitions and synonyms, were returned to each subject in a second web-based form. Subjects rated the concepts against their own descriptive terms. They submitted 825 terms, 346 of which were unique and 300 mapped to UMLS concepts. The dermatologists rated 295 concepts as 'Exact Match' and they accomplished both tasks in about 30 min.

  4. Efficient computation of GW energy level corrections for molecules described in a plane wave basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Bruno; Laflamme Janssen, Jonathan; Côté, Michel

    2013-03-01

    An efficient computational approach is presented to compute the ionisation energy and quasiparticle band gap at the level of the GW approximation when the Hilbert space is described in terms of plane waves. The method relies on ab initio calculations as a starting point. Then, the use of the Sternheimer equation eliminates slowly convergent sums on conduction states. Further, the Lanczos method is used to efficiently extract the most important eigenstates of the dielectric operator. This approach avoids the explicit computation of matrix elements of the dielectric operator in the plane wave basis, a crippling bottleneck of the brute force approach. The method is initially applied to organic molecules of current interest in the field of organic photovoltaics. Given the completeness of the plane wave basis, systematic convergence studies can be conducted. Furthermore, the method can readily be extended to describe polymers, which are also of interest for photovoltaic applications, but remain a significant computational challenge for methods based on localized basis sets.

  5. An Hierarchical Approach to Big Data

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, M G; Boch, T; Durand, D; Oberto, A; Merin, B; Stoehr, F; Genova, F; Pineau, F-X; Salgado, J

    2016-01-01

    The increasing volumes of astronomical data require practical methods for data exploration, access and visualisation. The Hierarchical Progressive Survey (HiPS) is a HEALPix based scheme that enables a multi-resolution approach to astronomy data from the individual pixels up to the whole sky. We highlight the decisions and approaches that have been taken to make this scheme a practical solution for managing large volumes of heterogeneous data. Early implementors of this system have formed a network of HiPS nodes, with some 250 diverse data sets currently available, with multiple mirror implementations for important data sets. This hierarchical approach can be adapted to expose Big Data in different ways. We describe how the ease of implementation, and local customisation of the Aladin Lite embeddable HiPS visualiser have been keys for promoting collaboration on HiPS.

  6. Asphere, O asphere, how shall we describe thee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, G. W.; Brophy, C. P.

    2008-09-01

    Two key criteria govern the characterization of nominal shapes for aspheric optical surfaces. An efficient representation describes the spectrum of relevant shapes to the required accuracy by using the fewest decimal digits in the associated coefficients. Also, a representation is more effective if it can, in some way, facilitate other processes - such as optical design, tolerancing, or direct human interpretation. With the development of better tools for their design, metrology, and fabrication, aspheric optics are becoming ever more pervasive. As part of this trend, aspheric departures of up to a thousand microns or more must be characterized at almost nanometre precision. For all but the simplest of shapes, this is not as easy as it might sound. Efficiency is therefore increasingly important. Further, metrology tools continue to be one of the weaker links in the cost-effective production of aspheric optics. Interferometry particularly struggles to deal with steep slopes in aspheric departure. Such observations motivated the ideas described in what follows for modifying the conventional description of rotationally symmetric aspheres to use orthogonal bases that boost efficiency. The new representations can facilitate surface tolerancing as well as the design of aspheres with cost-effective metrology options. These ideas enable the description of aspheric shapes in terms of decompositions that not only deliver improved efficiency and effectiveness, but that are also shown to admit direct interpretations. While it's neither poetry nor a cure-all, an old blight can be relieved.

  7. Evaluation of Geographic Indices Describing Health Care Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Agnus M; Park, Jong Heon; Kang, Sungchan; Kim, Yoon

    2017-01-01

    The accurate measurement of geographic patterns of health care utilization is a prerequisite for the study of geographic variations in health care utilization. While several measures have been developed to measure how accurately geographic units reflect the health care utilization patterns of residents, they have been only applied to hospitalization and need further evaluation. This study aimed to evaluate geographic indices describing health care utilization. We measured the utilization rate and four health care utilization indices (localization index, outflow index, inflow index, and net patient flow) for eight major procedures (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, surgery after hip fracture, knee replacement surgery, caesarean sections, hysterectomy, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging scans) according to three levels of geographic units in Korea. Data were obtained from the National Health Insurance database in Korea. We evaluated the associations among the health care utilization indices and the utilization rates. In higher-level geographic units, the localization index tended to be high, while the inflow index and outflow index were lower. The indices showed different patterns depending on the procedure. A strong negative correlation between the localization index and the outflow index was observed for all procedures. Net patient flow showed a moderate positive correlation with the localization index and the inflow index. Health care utilization indices can be used as a proxy to describe the utilization pattern of a procedure in a geographic unit.

  8. Workplace culture in psychiatric nursing described by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjenluoma, K; Rantanen, A; McCormack, B; Slater, P; Hahtela, N; Suominen, T

    2017-04-24

    This study looks to describe the workplace culture from the viewpoints of stress, job satisfaction and practice environment. Data were collected from nurses (n = 109) using a web-based survey, The Person-Centred Nursing Index, from two purposefully selected hospital districts in Finland. Data were statistically analysed. Nurses described their workplace culture in slightly positive terms. Nurses only occasionally experienced stress (mean = 2.56, SD = 0.55) and were fairly satisfied with their job (mean = 4.75, SD = 0.66) and their practice environment (mean = 4.42, SD = 0.81). Demographic variables such as the nurses' age, length of time in nursing, time at their present hospital, working shifts and their use of patient restriction were more frequently associated with their perceived workplace culture. Older nurses and those with a longer work history in the nursing profession tended to be more satisfied with their workplace culture in psychiatric nursing. Young and/or newly graduated nurses felt more negatively on their workplace culture; this issue should be recognised and addressed with appropriate support and mentoring. Nurses who used restrictive measures were more often less satisfied with their workplace culture. Continuous efforts are needed to reduce the use of coercive measures, which challenge also the managers to support nursing practice to be more person-centred. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Conjugated Molecules Described by a One-Dimensional Dirac Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Goyer, Francois

    2010-06-08

    Starting from the Hückel Hamiltonian of conjugated hydrocarbon chains (ethylene, allyl radical, butadiene, pentadienyl radical, hexatriene, etc.), we perform a simple unitary transformation and obtain a Dirac matrix Hamiltonian. Thus already small molecules are described exactly in terms of a discrete Dirac equation, the continuum limit of which yields a one-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian. Augmenting this Hamiltonian with specially adapted boundary conditions, we find that all the orbitals of the unsaturated hydrocarbon chains are reproduced by the continuous Dirac equation. However, only orbital energies close to the highest occupied molecular orbital/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy are accurately predicted by the Dirac equation. Since it is known that a continuous Dirac equation describes the electronic structure of graphene around the Fermi energy, our findings answer the question to what extent this peculiar electronic structure is already developed in small molecules containing a delocalized π-electron system. We illustrate how the electronic structure of small polyenes carries over to a certain class of rectangular graphene sheets and eventually to graphene itself. Thus the peculiar electronic structure of graphene extends to a large degree to the smallest unsaturated molecule (ethylene).

  10. Motion in a stochastic layer described by symbolic dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Elskens, Y. [Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France); Balescu, R. [Association Euratom, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-07-01

    The motion in the stochastic layer surrounding an island can be studied by using the standard map: this problem is of direct relevance to the diffusion of magnetic field lines in a tokamak. In a previous work it was shown that this process can be adequately modelled by a continuous time random walk (CTRW) describing transitions of the running point between three basins representing, respectively, trapped motion around the island, and passing motion above or below the island. The sticking property of the island deeply modifies the nature of the transport process, leading to sub-diffusive behavior. In the present work it is shown that the motion can be analyzed in terms of a symbolic dynamics which leads to the possibility of an automatic measurement of the data necessary for the construction of the CTRW. The logical features of the procedure are described, and the method is applied to an analysis of long time series, thus completing the results of the previous work. (author) 10 refs.

  11. Assessment of diffusion models to describe drying of roof tiles using generalized coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Vera S. O.; da Silva, Wilton Pereira; e Silva, Cleide M. D. P. S.; da Silva Júnior, Aluízio Freire; de Farias Aires, Juarez Everton; Rocha, Vicente P. T.

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to study the mass transient diffusion in solids with an arbitrary shape, highlighting boundary condition of the third kind. To this end, the numerical formalism to discretize the transient 3D diffusion equation written in generalized coordinates is presented. For the discretization, it was used the finite volume method with a fully implicit formulation. An application to drying of roof tiles has been done. Three models were used to describe the drying process: (1) the volume V and the effective mass diffusivity D are considered constant for the boundary condition of the first kind; (2) V and D are considered constant for the boundary condition of the third kind and (3) V and D are considered variable for the boundary condition of the third kind. For all models, the convective mass transfer coefficient h was considered constant. The analyses of the results obtained make it possible to affirm that the model 3 describes the drying process better than the other models.

  12. Assessment of the adequacy of bronchial stenting by flow-volume loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, Clare A.; Roebuck, Derek J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Pigott, Nick; Elliott, Martin J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Cardiothoracic Unit, London (United Kingdom); Dunne, Catherine [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Physiotherapy, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Airway compression is a common problem in children with certain forms of congenital heart disease. Although various surgical approaches are available to overcome this form of airway obstruction, internal stenting is necessary in a minority of patients. It can be difficult to assess the success of stenting at the time of the procedure, and the interval to successful extubation is usually used as an outcome measure. Measurement of relevant parameters of respiratory physiology with flow-volume and volume-pressure loops permits immediate quantitative assessment of the adequacy of stenting. A 3-month-old infant who underwent bronchial stenting and physiological assessment at the time of the procedure is described. (orig.)

  13. On universality of scaling law describing roughness of triple line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Musin, Albina; Whyman, Gene; Barkay, Zahava; Zinigrad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The fine structure of the three-phase (triple) line was studied for different liquids, various topographies of micro-rough substrates and various wetting regimes. Wetting of porous and pillar-based micro-scaled polymer surfaces was investigated. The triple line was visualized with the environmental scanning electron microscope and scanning electron microscope for the "frozen" triple lines. The value of the roughness exponent ζ for water (ice)/rough polymer systems was located within 0.55-0.63. For epoxy glue/rough polymer systems somewhat lower values of the exponent, 0.42 switch of the exponent, when the roughness size approaches to the correlation length of the defects, is also universal.

  14. Generalized morphological transformation for describing nonhomotopic object metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Liu, Wen-Yu; Zhu, Yaoting; Zhu, Guang-Xi

    2001-09-01

    Metamorphosis or morphing is the process of continuously transforming one object into another, and is popular in computer animation, industrial design, and growth simulation. In this paper, a novel metamorphosis approach is presented for computing continuous shape transformation between polyhedral objects. Metamorphosis can be achieved by decomposing two objects into sets of individual convex sub- objects respectively and constructing the mapping relationship of subsets, this method can solve the metamorphosis problem of two non-homotopic objects (including concave objects and holey objects). The results of object metamorphosis are also discussed in this paper. The experiments show that this method can generate natural, high quality metamorphosis results with simple computation. This method can also be used in font composition and interpolation between two keyframes in 2D and 3D computer animation automatically.

  15. Describing diffusion, reaction and convection on porous medium

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ajello, P C T; Nunes, G L

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model for the electrochemical deposition aimed at the production of inverse opals. The real system consists of an arrangement of sub micrometer spheres, through which the species in an electrolytic medium diffuses until they react to the electrode surface and become part thereof. Our model consists in formulating convenient boundary conditions for the transport equation, that somewhat resembles the real system but is nevertheless simple enough to be solved, and then solve it. Similar approach was taken by Nicholson [1, 2], except that, to avoid the difficulties regarding the boundary conditions, he considered none whatsoever, and proposed a modified diffusion coefficient for the porous medium instead. Apropos, our model, with moving boundary condition pertain to the class of problems know as The Stefan problem [3].

  16. A more robust Boolean model describing inhibitor binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoqian Steven XIE; Chao TANG

    2008-01-01

    From the first application of the Boolean model to the cell cycle regulation network of budding yeast, new regulative pathways have been discovered, par-ticularly in the G1/S transition circuit. This discovery called for finer modeling to study the essential biology, and the resulting outcomes are first introduced in the ar-ticle. A traditional Boolean network model set up for the new G1/S transition circuit shows that it cannot correctly simulate real biology unless the model parameters are fine tuned. The deficiency is caused by an overly coarse-grained description of the inhibitor binding process, which shall be overcome by a two-vector model proposed whose robustness is surveyed using random perturba-tions. Simulations show that the proposed two-vector model is much more robust in describing inhibitor binding processes within the Boolean framework.

  17. Does classical mechanics always adequately describe "classical physical reality"

    CERN Document Server

    Shemi-zadeh, V E

    2002-01-01

    The article is dedicated to discussion of irreversibility and foundation of statistical mechanics "from the first principles". Taking into account infinitesimal and, as it seems, neglectful for classical mechanics fluctuations of the physical vacuum, makes a deterministic motion of unstable dynamic systems is broken ("spontaneous determinism breaking", "spontaneous stochastization"). Vacuum fluctuations play part of the trigger, starting the powerful mechanism of exponent instability. The motion of the dynamic systems becomes irreversible and stochastic. Classical mechanics turns out to be applicable only for a small class of stable dynamic systems with zero Kolmogorov-Sinay entropy $h=0$. For alternative "Stochastic mechanics" there are corresponding equations of motion and Master Equation, describing irreversible evolution of the initial distribution function to equilibrium state.

  18. Detecting and describing the modular structures of weighted networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ke-Ping; Gao Zi-You

    2007-01-01

    In the functional properties of complex networks, modules play a central role.In this paper,we propose a new method to detect and describe the modular structures of weighted networks. In order to test the proposed method, as an example, we use our method to analyse the structural properties of the Chinese railway network. Here, the stations are regarded as the nodes and the track sections are regarded as the links. Rigorous analysis of the existing data shows that using the proposed algorithm, the nodes of network can be classified naturally. Moreover, there are several core nodes in each module. Remarkably, we introduce the correlation function Grs, and use it to distinguish the different modules in weighted networks.

  19. Angular momentum and torque described with the complex octonion

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to adopt the complex octonion to formulate the angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields. Applying the octonionic representation enables one single definition of angular momentum (or torque, force) to combine some physics contents, which were considered to be independent of each other in the past. J. C. Maxwell used simultaneously two methods, the vector terminology and quaternion analysis, to depict the electromagnetic theory. It motivates the paper to introduce the quaternion space into the field theory, describing the physical feature of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The spaces of two fields can be chosen as the quaternion spaces, while the coordinate component of quaternion space is able to be the complex number. The quaternion space of electromagnetic field is independent of that of gravitational field. These two quaternion spaces may compose one octonion space. Contrarily, one octonion space can be separated into two subspaces, the...

  20. Describing linguistic information in a behavioural framework: Possible or not?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Cooman, G. [Universiteit Gent, Zwijnaarde (Belgium)

    1996-12-31

    The paper discusses important aspects of the representation of linguistic information, using imprecise probabilities with a behavioural interpretation. We define linguistic information as the information conveyed by statements in natural language, but restrict ourselves to simple affirmative statements of the type {open_quote}subject-is-predicate{close_quote}. Taking the behavioural stance, as it is described in detail, we investigate whether it is possible to give a mathematical model for this kind of information. In particular, we evaluate Zadeli`s suggestion that we should use possibility measures to this end. We come to tile conclusion that, generally speaking, possibility measures are possibility models for linguistic information, but that more work should be done in order to evaluate the suggestion that they may be the only ones.

  1. Describing pulsar wind nebulae with a simple leptonic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Joachim; Hoppe, Stefan; Domainko, Wilfried; Hofmann, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Egberts, Kathrin [Institut fuer Astro- und Teilchenphysik, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    In recent years, Cherenkov telescopes like e.g. H.E.S.S. have identified a large number of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray sources as Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). The VHE-gamma-ray emission shows a rich diversity of spectral and spatial morphologies. Theoretical models can help to understand and interprete the observed source properties. A simple semi-analytical leptonic model describing VHE gamma-ray emission from PWNe is presented. It assumes diffusion with radiative cooling as the transport mechanism for electrons and their interaction with radiative and interstellar magnetic fields as the origin of electromagnetic radiation. In the framework of this model, spectral and spatial properties of the expected VHE gamma-ray emission from single PWNe may be estimated.

  2. Sociodemographic differences in dietary habits described by food frequency questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dynesen, Anja Weirsøe; Haraldsdottír, Johanna; Holm, Lotte;

    2003-01-01

    be a valuable supplement to traditional quantitative dietary surveys in monitoring sociodemographic changes in eating patterns. The results also underline the influence of sociodemographic status on dietary habits. SPONSORSHIP: The Danish Nutrition Council funded the study.......OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether a modest number of food frequency questions are sufficient to describe sociodemographic differences in dietary habits, and to identify sociodemographic characteristics of subjects adhering to food-based dietary guidelines operationalised in a "healthy-diet index...... frequency questions, a question on type of fat spreads used on bread, questions on seven sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: The summary of the healthy-diet index showed that the subjects who adhered to food-based dietary guidelines (top quintile) compared to those who did not (bottom quintile) were most...

  3. Probable technologies behind the Vimanas described in Ramayana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi.K.R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In Sanskrit literature there is a prominent place for Maharshi Valmiki‟s Ramayana. This is one of the very few popular epics which are translated to multiple languages across the world. It has seven kaandas (books, five hundred sargas (chapters and twenty four thousand slokas (verses in it. The vimanas are described in various kaandas of Ramayana. It is said that Ravana had the vimana which could appear and disappear, travel long distances with high speed based on the thought power of the master. A few years ago in the year 2013 researchers from the University of Minnesota have designed a model quadcopter which can be flown by the human thought power. As per Prof Bin He from the University of Minnesota, for the first time humans are able to control the flight of flying robots using just their thought sensed from non-invasive brain waves. German scientists from the Technical University of Munich under the leadership of Professor Tim Fricke have simulated the flight of aircraft using thought power of the pilots. This makes us think if such an aircraft with an advanced technology like this existed once upon a time during the era of Ramayana. Carvings of Ravana‟s vimana in Ellora cave temples help us in comparing it with that of modern Jetpack. Descriptions on seating capacity of Pushpaka vimana help us in comparing the same with Airbus 380-800 which can accommodate 853 passengers. Concepts of invisibility of aircrafts make us think of camouflaging techniques and stealth technology used in modern military aircrafts. All these features help us in analyzing the probable technologies behind vimanas described in Ramayana

  4. Assessing the state of substitution models describing noncoding RNA evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James E; Whelan, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is widely used to investigate the relationships between homologous sequences. RNA molecules have played a key role in these studies because they are present throughout life and tend to evolve slowly. Phylogenetic inference has been shown to be dependent on the substitution model used. A wide range of models have been developed to describe RNA evolution, either with 16 states describing all possible canonical base pairs or with 7 states where the 10 mismatched nucleotides are reduced to a single state. Formal model selection has become a standard practice for choosing an inferential model and works well for comparing models of a specific type, such as comparisons within nucleotide models or within amino acid models. Model selection cannot function across different sized state spaces because the likelihoods are conditioned on different data. Here, we introduce statistical state-space projection methods that allow the direct comparison of likelihoods between nucleotide models and 7-state and 16-state RNA models. To demonstrate the general applicability of our new methods, we extract 287 RNA families from genomic alignments and perform model selection. We find that in 281/287 families, RNA models are selected in preference to nucleotide models, with simple 7-state RNA models selected for more conserved families with shorter stems and more complex 16-state RNA models selected for more divergent families with longer stems. Other factors, such as the function of the RNA molecule or the GC-content, have limited impact on model selection. Our models and model selection methods are freely available in the open-source PHASE 3.0 software.

  5. Optimization of the electric field distribution in a large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, P.K.; Waker, A.J. (Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics)

    1992-10-01

    Large volume tissue-equivalent proportional counters are of interest in radiation protection metrology, as the sensitivity in terms of counts per unit absorbed dose in these devices increases as the square of the counter diameter. Conventional solutions to the problem of maintaining a uniform electric field within a counter result in sensitive volume to total volume ratios which are unacceptably low when counter dimensions of the order of 15 cm diameter are considered and when overall compactness is an important design criterion. This work describes the design and optimization of an arrangement of field discs set at different potentials which enable sensitive volume to total volume ratios to approach unity. The method has been used to construct a 12.7 cm diameter right-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter in which the sensitive volume accounts for over 95% of the total device volume and the gas gain uniformity is maintained to within 3% along the entire length of the anode wire. (author).

  6. Rockets and People. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Boris E; Siddiqi, Asif A. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Much has been written in the West on the history of the Soviet space program but few Westerners have read direct first-hand accounts of the men and women who were behind the many Russian accomplishments in exploring space.The memoirs of Academician Boris Chertok, translated from the original Russian, fills that gap.Chertok began his career as an electrician in 1930 at an aviation factory near Moscow.Twenty-seven years later, he became deputy to the founding figure of the Soviet space program, the mysterious Chief Designer Sergey Korolev. Chertok s sixty-year-long career and the many successes and failures of the Soviet space program constitute the core of his memoirs, Rockets and People. These writings are spread over four volumes. This is volume I. Academician Chertok not only describes and remembers, but also elicits and extracts profound insights from an epic story about a society s quest to explore the cosmos. In Volume 1, Chertok describes his early years as an engineer and ends with the mission to Germany after the end of World War II when the Soviets captured Nazi missile technology and expertise. Volume 2 takes up the story with the development of the world s first intercontinental ballistic missile ICBM) and ends with the launch of Sputnik and the early Moon probes. In Volume 3, Chertok recollects the great successes of the Soviet space program in the 1960s including the launch of the world s first space voyager Yuriy Gagarin as well as many events connected with the Cold War. Finally, in Volume 4, Chertok meditates at length on the massive Soviet lunar project designed to beat the Americans to the Moon in the 1960s, ending with his remembrances of the Energiya-Buran project.

  7. Conceptual framework describing a child's total (built, natural ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complexity of the components and their interactions that characterize children’s health and well-being are not adequately captured by current public health paradigms. Children are exposed to combinations of chemical and non-chemical stressors from their built, natural, and social environments at each lifestage and throughout their lifecourse. Children’s inherent characteristics (e.g., sex, genetics, pre-existing disease) and their activities and behaviors also influence their exposures to chemical and non-chemical stressors from these environments. We describe a conceptual framework that considers the interrelationships between inherent characteristics, activities and behaviors, and stressors (both chemical and non-chemical) from the built, natural, and social environments in influencing children’s health and well-being throughout their lifecourse. This framework is comprised of several intersecting circles that represent how stressors from the total environment interact with children’s inherent characteristics and their activities and behaviors to influence their health and well-being at each lifestage and throughout their lifecourse. We used this framework to examine the complex interrelationships between chemical and non-chemical stressors for two public health challenges specific to children: childhood obesity and general cognitive ability. One systematic scoping review showed that children’s general cognitive ability was influenced not only by

  8. Second order evolution equations which describe pseudospherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano Ferraioli, D.; de Oliveira Silva, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Second order evolution differential equations that describe pseudospherical surfaces are considered. These equations are equivalent to the structure equations of a metric with Gaussian curvature K = - 1, and can be seen as the compatibility condition of an associated sl (2 , R) -valued linear problem, also referred to as a zero curvature representation. Under the assumption that the linear problem is defined by 1-forms ωi =fi1 dx +fi2 dt, i = 1 , 2 , 3, with fij depending on (x , t , z ,z1 ,z2) and such that f21 = η, η ∈ R, we give a complete and explicit classification of equations of the form zt = A (x , t , z) z2 + B (x , t , z ,z1) . According to the classification, these equations are subdivided in three main classes (referred to as Types I-III) together with the corresponding linear problems. Explicit examples of differential equations of each type are determined by choosing certain arbitrary differentiable functions. Svinolupov-Sokolov equations admitting higher weakly nonlinear symmetries, Boltzmann equation and reaction-diffusion equations like Murray equation are some known examples of such equations. Other explicit examples are presented, as well.

  9. The complexity of organizational change: describing communication during organizational turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Organizational researchers and practitioners have been interested in organizational change for some time. Historically, they have directed most of their efforts at improving the efficiency of planned top-down change. These efforts were strategic attempts at altering parameters leading to transformational change. Most efforts failed to meet their intended purposes. Transformational organizational change has not been likely. The legitimate systems have been robust. There has been little systematic investigation of the communication occurring during these efforts. The purpose of this essay is to describe results of a mixed methods research project answering two research questions. (a) How do organizational members communicate during a time of turbulence? (b) What features of this communication suggest the potential for or resistance to transformative change? Comparing the results at the beginning of the period to other periods, gives insight into how social actors communicate and enact the organization during a threshold period where transformational change was possible. Results reveal identifiable patterns of communication as communication strategies, parameters, or basins of attraction. The overall pattern explains how micro communication patterns intersect and how the accumulation of these patterns may resist or accomplish change at a macro level.

  10. Describing the Breakbone Fever: IDODEN, an Ontology for Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraka, Elvira; Topalis, Pantelis; Dritsou, Vicky; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Louis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Background Ontologies represent powerful tools in information technology because they enhance interoperability and facilitate, among other things, the construction of optimized search engines. To address the need to expand the toolbox available for the control and prevention of vector-borne diseases we embarked on the construction of specific ontologies. We present here IDODEN, an ontology that describes dengue fever, one of the globally most important diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed IDODEN using open source software, and modeled it on IDOMAL, the malaria ontology developed previously. IDODEN covers all aspects of dengue fever, such as disease biology, epidemiology and clinical features. Moreover, it covers all facets of dengue entomology. IDODEN, which is freely available, can now be used for the annotation of dengue-related data and, in addition to its use for modeling, it can be utilized for the construction of other dedicated IT tools such as decision support systems. Conclusions/Significance The availability of the dengue ontology will enable databases hosting dengue-associated data and decision-support systems for that disease to perform most efficiently and to link their own data to those stored in other independent repositories, in an architecture- and software-independent manner. PMID:25646954

  11. Entropic-Skins Geometry to Describe Wall Turbulence Intermittency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Queiros-Conde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe the phenomenon of intermittency in wall turbulence and, more particularly, the behaviour of moments  and and intermittency exponents ζP with the order p and distance to the wall, we developed a new geometrical framework called “entropic-skins geometry” based on the notion of scale-entropy which is here applied to an experimental database of boundary layer flows. Each moment has its own spatial multi-scale support Ωp (“skin”. The model assumes the existence of a hierarchy of multi-scale sets Ωp ranged from the “bulk” to the “crest”. The crest noted characterizes the geometrical support where the most intermittent (the highest fluctuations in energy dissipation occur; the bulk is the geometrical support for the whole range of fluctuations. The model assumes then the existence of a dynamical flux through the hierarchy of skins. The specific case where skins display a fractal structure is investigated. Bulk fractal dimension  and crest dimension  are linked by a scale-entropy flux defining a reversibility efficiency  (d is the embedding dimension. The model, initially developed for homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, is applied here to wall bounded turbulence where intermittency exponents are measured by extended self-similarity. We obtained for intermittency exponents the analytical expression with γ ≈ 0.36 in agreement with experimental results.

  12. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Conceptual hierarchical modeling to describe wetland plant community organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, A.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Allen, T.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Using multivariate analysis, we created a hierarchical modeling process that describes how differently-scaled environmental factors interact to affect wetland-scale plant community organization in a system of small, isolated wetlands on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We followed the procedure: 1) delineate wetland groups using cluster analysis, 2) identify differently scaled environmental gradients using non-metric multidimensional scaling, 3) order gradient hierarchical levels according to spatiotem-poral scale of fluctuation, and 4) assemble hierarchical model using group relationships with ordination axes and post-hoc tests of environmental differences. Using this process, we determined 1) large wetland size and poor surface water chemistry led to the development of shrub fen wetland vegetation, 2) Sphagnum and water chemistry differences affected fen vs. marsh / sedge meadows status within small wetlands, and 3) small-scale hydrologic differences explained transitions between forested vs. non-forested and marsh vs. sedge meadow vegetation. This hierarchical modeling process can help explain how upper level contextual processes constrain biotic community response to lower-level environmental changes. It creates models with more nuanced spatiotemporal complexity than classification and regression tree procedures. Using this process, wetland scientists will be able to generate more generalizable theories of plant community organization, and useful management models. ?? Society of Wetland Scientists 2009.

  14. Advanced Mathematical Model to Describe the Production of Biodiesel Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmat S. Al-Salim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced mathematical model was used to capture the batch reactor characteristics of reacting compounds. The model was applied to batch reactor for the production of bio-diesel from palm and kapok oils. Results of the model were compared with experimental data in terms of conversion of transesterification reaction for the production of bio-diesel under unsteady state. A good agreement was obtained between our model predictions and the experimental data. Both experimental and modeling results showed that the conversion of triglycerides to methyl ester was affected by the process conditions. The transesterification process with temperature of about 70 oC, and methanol ratio to the triglyceride of about 5 times its stoichiometry, and the NAOH catalyst of wt 0.4%, appear to be acceptable process conditions for bio diesel process production from palm oil and kapok oil. The model can be applied for endothermic batch process. © 2009 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved[Received: 12 August 2009, Revised: 15 October 2009; Accepted: 18 October 2009][How to Cite: A.S. Ibrehem, H. S. Al-Salim. (2009. Advanced Mathematical Model to Describe the Production of Biodiesel Process. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(2: 37-42. doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.2.28.37-42][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.2.28.37-42

  15. Control volume based hydrocephalus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Wei, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a disease involving excess amounts of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Recent research has shown correlations to pulsatility of blood flow through the brain. However, the problem to date has presented as too complex for much more than statistical analysis and understanding. This talk will highlight progress on developing a fundamental control volume approach to studying hydrocephalus. The specific goals are to select physiologically control volume(s), develop conservation equations along with the experimental capabilities to accurately quantify terms in those equations. To this end, an in vitro phantom is used as a simplified model of the human brain. The phantom's design consists of a rigid container filled with a compressible gel. The gel has a hollow spherical cavity representing a ventricle and a cylindrical passage representing the aquaducts. A computer controlled piston pump supplies pulsatile volume fluctuations into and out of the flow phantom. MRI is used to measure fluid velocity, and volume change as functions of time. Independent pressure measurements and flow rate measurements are used to calibrate the MRI data. These data are used as a framework for future work with live patients.

  16. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements.

  17. Digital clocks: simple Boolean models can quantitatively describe circadian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozgur E; Watterson, Steven; Parton, Andrew; Binns, Nigel; Millar, Andrew J; Ghazal, Peter

    2012-09-07

    The gene networks that comprise the circadian clock modulate biological function across a range of scales, from gene expression to performance and adaptive behaviour. The clock functions by generating endogenous rhythms that can be entrained to the external 24-h day-night cycle, enabling organisms to optimally time biochemical processes relative to dawn and dusk. In recent years, computational models based on differential equations have become useful tools for dissecting and quantifying the complex regulatory relationships underlying the clock's oscillatory dynamics. However, optimizing the large parameter sets characteristic of these models places intense demands on both computational and experimental resources, limiting the scope of in silico studies. Here, we develop an approach based on Boolean logic that dramatically reduces the parametrization, making the state and parameter spaces finite and tractable. We introduce efficient methods for fitting Boolean models to molecular data, successfully demonstrating their application to synthetic time courses generated by a number of established clock models, as well as experimental expression levels measured using luciferase imaging. Our results indicate that despite their relative simplicity, logic models can (i) simulate circadian oscillations with the correct, experimentally observed phase relationships among genes and (ii) flexibly entrain to light stimuli, reproducing the complex responses to variations in daylength generated by more detailed differential equation formulations. Our work also demonstrates that logic models have sufficient predictive power to identify optimal regulatory structures from experimental data. By presenting the first Boolean models of circadian circuits together with general techniques for their optimization, we hope to establish a new framework for the systematic modelling of more complex clocks, as well as other circuits with different qualitative dynamics. In particular, we anticipate

  18. Universal spatial correlation functions for describing and reconstructing soil microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina V; Gerke, Kirill M; Skvortsova, Elena B; Mallants, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Structural features of porous materials such as soil define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, or gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere) and solute transport. To characterize soil microstructure, conventional soil science uses such metrics as pore size and pore-size distributions and thin section-derived morphological indicators. However, these descriptors provide only limited amount of information about the complex arrangement of soil structure and have limited capability to reconstruct structural features or predict physical properties. We introduce three different spatial correlation functions as a comprehensive tool to characterize soil microstructure: 1) two-point probability functions, 2) linear functions, and 3) two-point cluster functions. This novel approach was tested on thin-sections (2.21×2.21 cm2) representing eight soils with different pore space configurations. The two-point probability and linear correlation functions were subsequently used as a part of simulated annealing optimization procedures to reconstruct soil structure. Comparison of original and reconstructed images was based on morphological characteristics, cluster correlation functions, total number of pores and pore-size distribution. Results showed excellent agreement for soils with isolated pores, but relatively poor correspondence for soils exhibiting dual-porosity features (i.e. superposition of pores and micro-cracks). Insufficient information content in the correlation function sets used for reconstruction may have contributed to the observed discrepancies. Improved reconstructions may be obtained by adding cluster and other correlation functions into reconstruction sets. Correlation functions and the associated stochastic reconstruction algorithms introduced here are universally applicable in soil science, such as for soil classification

  19. Spanish "fine tuning" of language to describe depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Antonio; Centeno, Carlos; Carvajal, Ana; Tejedor, María Angustias Portela; Urdiroz, Juliana; Martínez, Marina

    2009-08-01

    On screening tools for emotional distress, the terms "depression" and "anxiety" are commonly used for patients with advanced cancer. However, these terms could have negative connotations in Spanish such that cultural and unexpected differences in perception may invalidate or skew the results of the screening if the best terms are not chosen. The goal of this study was to determine the best expression that can be used to explore anxiety and depression in Spanish. A prospective study of 100 Spanish-speaking patients was performed. Spanish patients with cancer completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and six Verbal Numerical Scales (VNS) exploring the level of anxiety using the terms ansioso (anxious), nervioso (nervous), or intranquilo (uneasy/disquiet), and the level of depression using the terms deprimido (depressed), desanimado (discouraged), or triste (sad). The correlation, sensitivity, and specificity for all the VNS and HADS (8 and 11 cutoff points) were analyzed. The correlation (Spearman rho) between HADS and the anxiety VNS was r = 0.557 using "anxious"; r = 0.603 using "nervous"; and r = 0.594 using "uneasy." The correlation for the depression VNS was r = 0.662 using "depression"; r = 0.759 using "discouraged" and r = 0.596 using "sad"; alpha anxiety achieved the best levels for sensitivity (0.80) and specificity (0.70). The term "discouraged" with a cutoff point of 4 of 10 shows a sensitivity of 0.89, a specificity of 0.84, as well as a predictive positive value of 0.77 and a negative value of 0.93. In Spanish, the term desanimado seems to be more suitable in screening for depression. Alternate terms could be used to explore anxiety in Spanish. Exploring depression with simple questions in Spanish achieves greater accuracy than the same approach to exploring anxiety.

  20. Describing rainfall in northern Australia using multiple climate indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks Rogers, Cassandra Denise; Beringer, Jason

    2017-02-01

    Savanna landscapes are globally extensive and highly sensitive to climate change, yet the physical processes and climate phenomena which affect them remain poorly understood and therefore poorly represented in climate models. Both human populations and natural ecosystems are highly susceptible to precipitation variation in these regions due to the effects on water and food availability and atmosphere-biosphere energy fluxes. Here we quantify the relationship between climate phenomena and historical rainfall variability in Australian savannas and, in particular, how these relationships changed across a strong rainfall gradient, namely the North Australian Tropical Transect (NATT). Climate phenomena were described by 16 relevant climate indices and correlated against precipitation from 1900 to 2010 to determine the relative importance of each climate index on seasonal, annual and decadal timescales. Precipitation trends, climate index trends and wet season characteristics have also been investigated using linear statistical methods. In general, climate index-rainfall correlations were stronger in the north of the NATT where annual rainfall variability was lower and a high proportion of rainfall fell during the wet season. This is consistent with a decreased influence of the Indian-Australian monsoon from the north to the south. Seasonal variation was most strongly correlated with the Australian Monsoon Index, whereas yearly variability was related to a greater number of climate indices, predominately the Tasman Sea and Indonesian sea surface temperature indices (both of which experienced a linear increase over the duration of the study) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the climatic processes driving variability and, subsequently, the importance of understanding the relationships between rainfall and climatic phenomena in the Northern Territory in order to project future rainfall patterns in the

  1. Probabilistic models to describe the dynamics of migrating microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna L Schroeder

    Full Text Available In all but the most sterile environments bacteria will reside in fluid being transported through conduits and some of these will attach and grow as biofilms on the conduit walls. The concentration and diversity of bacteria in the fluid at the point of delivery will be a mix of those when it entered the conduit and those that have become entrained into the flow due to seeding from biofilms. Examples include fluids through conduits such as drinking water pipe networks, endotracheal tubes, catheters and ventilation systems. Here we present two probabilistic models to describe changes in the composition of bulk fluid microbial communities as they are transported through a conduit whilst exposed to biofilm communities. The first (discrete model simulates absolute numbers of individual cells, whereas the other (continuous model simulates the relative abundance of taxa in the bulk fluid. The discrete model is founded on a birth-death process whereby the community changes one individual at a time and the numbers of cells in the system can vary. The continuous model is a stochastic differential equation derived from the discrete model and can also accommodate changes in the carrying capacity of the bulk fluid. These models provide a novel Lagrangian framework to investigate and predict the dynamics of migrating microbial communities. In this paper we compare the two models, discuss their merits, possible applications and present simulation results in the context of drinking water distribution systems. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of stochastic dynamics on the composition of non-stationary microbial communities that are exposed to biofilms and provides a new avenue for modelling microbial dynamics in systems where fluids are being transported.

  2. Advanced Mathematical Model to Describe the Production of Biodiesel Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed S. Ibrehem

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced mathematical model was used to capture the batch reactor characteristics of reacting compounds. The model was applied to batch reactor for the production of bio-diesel from palm and kapok oils. Results of the model were compared with experimental data in terms of conversion of transesterification reaction for the production of bio-diesel under unsteady state. A good agreement was obtained between our model predictions and the experimental data. Both experimental and modeling results showed that the conversion of triglycerides to methyl ester was affected by the process conditions. The transesterification process with temperature of about 70 oC, and methanol ratio to the triglyceride of about 5 times its stoichiometry, and the NAOH catalyst of wt 0.4%, appear to be acceptable process conditions for bio diesel process production from palm oil and kapok oil. The model can be applied for endothermic batch process. © 2009 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved[Received: 12 August 2009, Revised: 15 October 2009; Accepted: 18 October 2009][How to Cite: A.S. Ibrehem, H. S. Al-Salim. (2009. Advanced Mathematical Model to Describe the Production of Biodiesel Process. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(2: 37-42.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.2.7109.37-42][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.2.7109.37-42 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7109 ] 

  3. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham

    2013-01-01

    cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis...

  4. Stability margin of linear systems with parameters described by fuzzy numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husek, Petr

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the linear systems with uncertain parameters described by fuzzy numbers. The problem of determining the stability margin of those systems with linear affine dependence of the coefficients of a characteristic polynomial on system parameters is studied. Fuzzy numbers describing the system parameters are allowed to be characterized by arbitrary nonsymmetric membership functions. An elegant solution, graphical in nature, based on generalization of the Tsypkin-Polyak plot is presented. The advantage of the presented approach over the classical robust concept is demonstrated on a control of the Fiat Dedra engine model and a control of the quarter car suspension model.

  5. Automated force volume image processing for biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Polyakov

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has now become a powerful technique for investigating on a molecular level, surface forces, nanomechanical properties of deformable particles, biomolecular interactions, kinetics, and dynamic processes. This paper specifically focuses on the analysis of AFM force curves collected on biological systems, in particular, bacteria. The goal is to provide fully automated tools to achieve theoretical interpretation of force curves on the basis of adequate, available physical models. In this respect, we propose two algorithms, one for the processing of approach force curves and another for the quantitative analysis of retraction force curves. In the former, electrostatic interactions prior to contact between AFM probe and bacterium are accounted for and mechanical interactions operating after contact are described in terms of Hertz-Hooke formalism. Retraction force curves are analyzed on the basis of the Freely Jointed Chain model. For both algorithms, the quantitative reconstruction of force curves is based on the robust detection of critical points (jumps, changes of slope or changes of curvature which mark the transitions between the various relevant interactions taking place between the AFM tip and the studied sample during approach and retraction. Once the key regions of separation distance and indentation are detected, the physical parameters describing the relevant interactions operating in these regions are extracted making use of regression procedure for fitting experiments to theory. The flexibility, accuracy and strength of the algorithms are illustrated with the processing of two force-volume images, which collect a large set of approach and retraction curves measured on a single biological surface. For each force-volume image, several maps are generated, representing the spatial distribution of the searched physical parameters as estimated for each pixel of the force-volume image.

  6. Automated Force Volume Image Processing for Biological Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Junbo; Duval, Jérôme F. L.; Brie, David; Francius, Grégory

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has now become a powerful technique for investigating on a molecular level, surface forces, nanomechanical properties of deformable particles, biomolecular interactions, kinetics, and dynamic processes. This paper specifically focuses on the analysis of AFM force curves collected on biological systems, in particular, bacteria. The goal is to provide fully automated tools to achieve theoretical interpretation of force curves on the basis of adequate, available physical models. In this respect, we propose two algorithms, one for the processing of approach force curves and another for the quantitative analysis of retraction force curves. In the former, electrostatic interactions prior to contact between AFM probe and bacterium are accounted for and mechanical interactions operating after contact are described in terms of Hertz-Hooke formalism. Retraction force curves are analyzed on the basis of the Freely Jointed Chain model. For both algorithms, the quantitative reconstruction of force curves is based on the robust detection of critical points (jumps, changes of slope or changes of curvature) which mark the transitions between the various relevant interactions taking place between the AFM tip and the studied sample during approach and retraction. Once the key regions of separation distance and indentation are detected, the physical parameters describing the relevant interactions operating in these regions are extracted making use of regression procedure for fitting experiments to theory. The flexibility, accuracy and strength of the algorithms are illustrated with the processing of two force-volume images, which collect a large set of approach and retraction curves measured on a single biological surface. For each force-volume image, several maps are generated, representing the spatial distribution of the searched physical parameters as estimated for each pixel of the force-volume image. PMID:21559483

  7. Effectiveness of quantitative MAA SPECT/CT for the definition of vascularized hepatic volume and dosimetric approach: phantom validation and clinical preliminary results in patients with complex hepatic vascularization treated with yttrium-90-labeled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Etienne; Lenoir, Laurence; Rolland, Yan; Laffont, Sophie; Pracht, Marc; Mesbah, Habiba; Porée, Philippe; Ardisson, Valérie; Bourguet, Patrick; Clement, Bruno; Boucher, Eveline

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the use of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) analysis for vascularized volume measurements in the use of the yttrium-90-radiolabeled microspheres (TheraSphere). A phantom study was conducted for the validation of SPECT/CT volume measurement. SPECT/CT quantitative analysis was used for the measurement of the volume of distribution of the albumin macroaggregates (MAA; i.e., the vascularized volume) in the liver and the tumor, and the total activity contained in the liver and the tumor in four consecutive patients presenting with a complex liver vascularization referred for a treatment with TheraSphere. SPECT/CT volume measurement proved to be accurate (mean error data, instead of angiography and CT data, results in modifying the activity injected for three treatments of eight. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SPECT/CT allows us to calculate the absorbed dose in the tumor and in the healthy liver, leading to doubling of the injected activity for one treatment of eight. MAA SPECT/CT is accurate for volume measurements. It provides a valuable contribution to the therapeutic planning of patients presenting with complex hepatic vascularization, in particular for calculating the vascularized liver volume, the activity to be injected and the absorbed doses. Studies should be conducted to assess the role of quantitative MAA/SPECT CT in therapeutic planning.

  8. A fresh view of cosmological models describing very early Universe: general solution of the dynamical equations

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, A T

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of any spherical cosmology with a scalar field (`scalaron') coupling to gravity is described by the nonlinear second-order differential equations for two metric functions and the scalaron depending on the `time' parameter. The equations depend on the scalaron potential and on arbitrary gauge function that describes time parameterizations. This dynamical system can be integrated for flat, isotropic models with very special potentials. But, somewhat unexpectedly, replacing the independent variable $t$ by one of the metric functions allows us to completely integrate the general spherical theory in any gauge and with arbitrary potentials. In this approach, inflationary solutions can be easily identified, explicitly derived, and compared to the standard approximate expressions. This approach is also applicable to intrinsically anisotropic models with a massive vector field (`vecton') as well as to some non-inflationary models.

  9. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  10. Describing, using 'recognition cones'. [parallel-series model with English-like computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhr, L.

    1973-01-01

    A parallel-serial 'recognition cone' model is examined, taking into account the model's ability to describe scenes of objects. An actual program is presented in an English-like language. The concept of a 'description' is discussed together with possible types of descriptive information. Questions regarding the level and the variety of detail are considered along with approaches for improving the serial representations of parallel systems.

  11. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  12. Sensitivity analysis of a biofilm model describing mixed growth of nitrite oxidisers in a CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornaros, M; Dokianakis, S N; Lyberatos, G

    2006-01-01

    A simple kinetic model has been developed for describing nitrite oxidation by autotrophic aerobic nitrifiers in a CSTR reactor, in which mixed (suspended and attached) growth conditions are prevailing. In this work, a critical dimensionless parameter is identified containing both biofilm characteristics and microbial kinetic parameters, as well as the specific (per volume) surface of the reactor configuration used. Evaluation of this dimensionless parameter can easily provide information on whether or not wall attachment is critical, and should be taken into account either in kinetic studies or in reactor design, when specific pollutants are to be removed from the waste influent stream. The effect of bulk dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on the validity of this model is addressed and minimum non-limiting DO concentrations are proposed depending on the reactor configuration.

  13. Control volume based hydrocephalus research; analysis of human data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Wei, Timothy; Voorhees, Abram; Madsen, Joseph; Anor, Tomer

    2010-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a neuropathophysiological disorder primarily diagnosed by increased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure within the brain. To date, utilization of clinical measurements have been limited to understanding of the relative amplitude and timing of flow, volume and pressure waveforms; qualitative approaches without a clear framework for meaningful quantitative comparison. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs enforce volume conservation principles in terms of pressure. Control volume analysis, through the integral mass and momentum conservation equations, ensures that pressure and volume are accounted for using first principles fluid physics. This approach is able to directly incorporate the diverse measurements obtained by clinicians into a simple, direct and robust mechanics based framework. Clinical data obtained for analysis are discussed along with data processing techniques used to extract terms in the conservation equation. Control volume analysis provides a non-invasive, physics-based approach to extracting pressure information from magnetic resonance velocity data that cannot be measured directly by pressure instrumentation.

  14. Evaluation of the MALDI-TOF MS profiling for identification of newly described Aeromonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vávrová, Andrea; Balážová, Tereza; Sedláček, Ivo; Tvrzová, Ludmila; Šedo, Ondrej

    2015-09-01

    The genus Aeromonas comprises primarily aquatic bacteria and also serious human and animal pathogens with the occurrence in clinical material, drinking water, and food. Aeromonads are typical for their complex taxonomy and nomenclature and for limited possibilities of identification to the species level. According to studies describing the use of MALDI-TOF MS in diagnostics of aeromonads, this modern chemotaxonomical approach reveals quite high percentage of correctly identified isolates. We analyzed 64 Aeromonas reference strains from the set of 27 species. After extending the range of analyzed Aeromonas species by newly described ones, we proved that MALDI-TOF MS procedure accompanied by Biotyper tool is not a reliable diagnostic technique for aeromonads. We obtained quite high percentage of false-positive, incorrect, and uncertain results. The identification of newly described species is accompanied with misidentifications that were observed also in the case of pathogenic aeromonads.

  15. A patient-centered approach to nurse orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgarner, S D; Biggerstaff, G H

    2000-01-01

    An orientation pathway was developed using a patient-centered approach. The pathway provides a guide or "road map" for the preceptor and new nurse to care for high-volume patient populations in medical and surgical units. Benefits include application of the nursing process, promotion of critical thinking skills, reduction of reality shock, and improvement in job satisfaction and retention. This article describes the rationale behind the approach and its application to nurse orientation. Steps in the process are described. Staff development educators can use the steps to develop orientation pathways for other practice settings.

  16. High Volume Manufacturing and Field Stability of MEMS Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack

    Low volume MEMS/NEMS production is practical when an attractive concept is implemented with business, manufacturing, packaging, and test support. Moving beyond this to high volume production adds requirements on design, process control, quality, product stability, market size, market maturity, capital investment, and business systems. In a broad sense, this chapter uses a case study approach: It describes and compares the silicon-based MEMS accelerometers, pressure sensors, image projection systems, and gyroscopes that are in high volume production. Although they serve several markets, these businesses have common characteristics. For example, the manufacturing lines use automated semiconductor equipment and standard material sets to make consistent products in large quantities. Standard, well controlled processes are sometimes modified for a MEMS product. However, novel processes that cannot run with standard equipment and material sets are avoided when possible. This reliance on semiconductor tools, as well as the organizational practices required to manufacture clean, particle-free products partially explains why the MEMS market leaders are integrated circuit manufacturers. There are other factors. MEMS and NEMS are enabling technologies, so it can take several years for high volume applications to develop. Indeed, market size is usually a strong function of price. This becomes a vicious circle, because low price requires low cost - a result that is normally achieved only after a product is in high volume production. During the early years, IC companies reduced cost and financial risk by using existing facilities for low volume MEMS production. As a result, product architectures are partially determined by capabilities developed for previous products. This chapter includes a discussion of MEMS product architecture with particular attention to the impact of electronic integration, packaging, and surfaces. Packaging and testing are critical, because they are

  17. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  18. A universal and flexible theodolite-camera system for making accurate measurements over large volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhu, Zhaokun; Yuan, Yun; Li, Lichun; Sun, Xiangyi; Yu, Qifeng; Ou, Jianliang

    2012-11-01

    Typically, optical measurement systems can achieve high accuracy over a limited volume, or cover a large volume with low accuracy. In this paper, we propose a universal way of integrating a camera with a theodolite to construct a theodolite-camera (TC) measurement system that can make measurements over a large volume with high accuracy. The TC inherits the advantages of high flexibility and precision from theodolite and camera, but it avoids the need to perform elaborate adjustments on the camera and theodolite. The TC provides a universal and flexible approach to the camera-on-theodolite system. We describe three types of TC based separately on: (i) a total station; (ii) a theodolite; and (iii) a general rotation frame. We also propose three corresponding calibration methods for the different TCs. Experiments have been conducted to verify the measuring accuracy of each of the three types of TC.

  19. Multifractal spectrums for volumes of spatial forms on surface of ZnxCd1-xTe-Si (111) heterostructures and estimation of the fractal surface energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvin, Pavel; Kryzhanivskyy, Vyacheslav; Lytvyn, Petro; Rashkovetskyi, Liubomyr

    2016-09-01

    Multifractal (MF) analysis is used to describe volumes of spatial forms that are formed on the surface of thin layers of ZnxCd1-xTe solid solution grown on the Si (111) substrate. MF analysis is performed on the basis of AFM images of the solid solution surface. The parameters of the MF spectrums for the distribution of volumes of the spatial forms, which formed the surface relief, were found. On the basis of a formal approach and data on the multifractal parameters for the volume and the area of the surface spatial forms the mathematic expression which takes into account the contribution of the fractal surface structure in its surface energy were proposed. The behavior of the surface energy of the system depending on the fractal parameters that describe the volume and the area of the spatial forms on the fractal surface were discussed.

  20. Development of limb volume measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, P. K.; Kadaba, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the reductions in orthostatic tolerance associated with weightlessness are not well established. Contradictory results from measurements of leg volume changes suggest that altered venomotor tone and reduced blood flow may not be the only contributors to orthostatic intolerance. It is felt that a more accurate limb volume system which is insensitive to environmental factors will aid in better quantification of the hemodynamics of the leg. Of the varous limb volume techniques presently available, the ultrasonic limb volume system has proven to be the best choice. The system as described herein is free from environmental effects, safe, simple to operate and causes negligible radio frequency interference problems. The segmental ultrasonic ultrasonic plethysmograph is expected to provide a better measurement of limb volume change since it is based on cross-sectional area measurements.

  1. Computer-assisted venous thrombosis volume quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, John; Dhibi, Mounir; Bressollette, Luc; Guias, Bruno; Solaiman, Basel

    2009-03-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) volume assessment, by verifying its risk of progression when anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapies are prescribed, is often necessary to screen life-threatening complications. Commonly, VT volume estimation is done by manual delineation of few contours in the ultrasound (US) image sequence, assuming that the VT has a regular shape and constant radius, thus producing significant errors. This paper presents and evaluates a comprehensive functional approach based on the combination of robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contours to calculate VT volume in a more accurate manner when applied to freehand 2-D US image sequences. Robust anisotropic filtering reduces image speckle noise without generating incoherent edge discontinuities. Prior knowledge of the VT shape allows initializing the deformable contour, which is then guided by the noise-filtering outcome. Segmented contours are subsequently used to calculate VT volume. The proposed approach is integrated into a system prototype compatible with existing clinical US machines that additionally tracks the acquired images 3-D position and provides a dense Delaunay triangulation required for volume calculation. A predefined robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contour parameter set enhances the system usability. Experimental results pertinence is assessed by comparison with manual and tetrahedron-based volume computations, using images acquired by two medical experts of eight plastic phantoms and eight in vitro VTs, whose independently measured volume is the reference ground truth. Results show a mean difference between 16 and 35 mm(3) for volumes that vary from 655 to 2826 mm(3). Two in vivo VT volumes are also calculated to illustrate how this approach could be applied in clinical conditions when the real value is unknown. Comparative results for the two experts differ from 1.2% to 10.08% of the smallest estimated value when the image acquisition cadences are similar.

  2. Cognitive neuroscience robotics B analytic approaches to human understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Asada, Minoru; Osaka, Mariko; Fujikado, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive Neuroscience Robotics is the first introductory book on this new interdisciplinary area. This book consists of two volumes, the first of which, Synthetic Approaches to Human Understanding, advances human understanding from a robotics or engineering point of view. The second, Analytic Approaches to Human Understanding, addresses related subjects in cognitive science and neuroscience. These two volumes are intended to complement each other in order to more comprehensively investigate human cognitive functions, to develop human-friendly information and robot technology (IRT) systems, and to understand what kind of beings we humans are. Volume B describes to what extent cognitive science and neuroscience have revealed the underlying mechanism of human cognition, and investigates how development of neural engineering and advances in other disciplines could lead to deep understanding of human cognition.

  3. Cognitive neuroscience robotics A synthetic approaches to human understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Asada, Minoru; Osaka, Mariko; Fujikado, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive Neuroscience Robotics is the first introductory book on this new interdisciplinary area. This book consists of two volumes, the first of which, Synthetic Approaches to Human Understanding, advances human understanding from a robotics or engineering point of view. The second, Analytic Approaches to Human Understanding, addresses related subjects in cognitive science and neuroscience. These two volumes are intended to complement each other in order to more comprehensively investigate human cognitive functions, to develop human-friendly information and robot technology (IRT) systems, and to understand what kind of beings we humans are. Volume A describes how human cognitive functions can be replicated in artificial systems such as robots, and investigates how artificial systems could acquire intelligent behaviors through interaction with others and their environment.

  4. Describing Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    York. Do Carmo , Manfredo P, [1976], Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, Prent- ice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Faugeras, 0. D., et. al, [1982...lightbulb. It is well-known (for exam~ple, do Carmo "" "..-’,.’.V .. .V...i ra I s ; ul ing-.. "’. Figure 11. The helicoid of a single blade. (Reproduced from [do Carmo 1976, Figure 2-27 Page 94]) where m and 1 are assumed

  5. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  6. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  7. On an isotherm thermodynamically consistent in Henry's region for describing gas adsorption in microporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera-Titus, Marc

    2010-05-15

    The Dubinin-Astakhov and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms, originally formulated from the classical volume filling theory of micropores, constitute the most accepted models for describing gas adsorption in microporous materials. The most important weakness of these equations relies on the fact that they do not reduce to Henry's law at low pressures, not providing therefore a proper characterization of adsorbents in the early stage of adsorption. In this paper, we propose a way out of this inherent problem using the thermodynamic isotherm developed in a previous study [J. Llorens, M. Pera-Titus, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 331 (2009) 302]. This isotherm allows the generation of a series of equations that make available a comprehensive description of gas adsorption for the whole set of relative pressures (including Henry's region), also providing explicit information about energy heterogeneity of the adsorbent through the two characteristic m parameters of the thermodynamic isotherm (i.e., m(1) and m(2)). The obtained isotherm converges into the Dubinin-Astakhov isotherm for relative pressures higher than 0.1, the characteristic α parameter of this isotherm being expressed as α=m(2)-1 and the affinity coefficient (β) as a sole function of m(2). An expression differing from the Dubinin-Astakhov isotherm has been obtained for describing Henry's region, providing relevant information about confinement effects when applied to zeolites.

  8. Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C.

    1998-02-01

    The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required for loading) used for weapon programs and for special use containers. When completed, the catalog will contain five volumes. Volume 1 for enduring stockpile programs (B53, B61, B83, W62, W76, W78, W80, W84, W87, and W88) and Volume 2, Special Use Containers, are being released. The catalog is intended as a source of information for weapon program engineers and also provides historical information. The catalog also will be published on the SNL Internal Web and will undergo periodic updates.

  9. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    - serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...... of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......, controlled cell death and cellular migration. Volume regulatory mechanisms has long been in focus for regulating cellular proliferation and my thesis work have been focusing on the role of Cl- channels in proliferation with specific emphasis on ICl, swell. Pharmacological blockage of the ubiquitously...

  10. Precision volume measurement system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  11. Computer-aided Nonlinear Control System Design Using Describing Function Models

    CERN Document Server

    Nassirharand, Amir

    2012-01-01

    A systematic computer-aided approach provides a versatile setting for the control engineer to overcome the complications of controller design for highly nonlinear systems. Computer-aided Nonlinear Control System Design provides such an approach based on the use of describing functions. The text deals with a large class of nonlinear systems without restrictions on the system order, the number of inputs and/or outputs or the number, type or arrangement of nonlinear terms. The strongly software-oriented methods detailed facilitate fulfillment of tight performance requirements and help the designer to think in purely nonlinear terms, avoiding the expedient of linearization which can impose substantial and unrealistic model limitations and drive up the cost of the final product. Design procedures are presented in a step-by-step algorithmic format each step being a functional unit with outputs that drive the other steps. This procedure may be easily implemented on a digital computer with example problems from mecha...

  12. African American mothers' self-described discipline strategies with young children in 1992 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCuyer, Elizabeth A; Christensen, Julie J; Kreher, Donna; Kearney, Margaret H; Kitzman, Harriet J

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative descriptive study, 30 young, unmarried, low-income African American mothers in Memphis, TN, were interviewed in 2011-2012 about their discipline strategies with their 12- to 19-month-old children. Using content analyses, their strategies were described and compared with those from a similar sample in 1992. Findings suggest both continuity and change during that 20-year period. More mothers in 2011-2012 described the use of distraction and time out, suggesting a wider variety of strategies than were used in 1992. These findings may help clinicians to better understand disciplinary methods in young low-income African American mothers such as these in Memphis. Approaching mothers in a respectful and culturally sensitive manner will help them focus on effective, developmentally appropriate strategies consistent with their own parenting goals.

  13. Group analysis of evolutionary integro-differential equations describing nonlinear waves: the general model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, Nail H [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden); Meleshko, Sergey V [School of Mathematics, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Rudenko, Oleg V, E-mail: nib@bth.se, E-mail: sergey@math.sut.ac.th, E-mail: rudenko@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Department of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-05

    The paper deals with an evolutionary integro-differential equation describing nonlinear waves. A particular choice of the kernel in the integral leads to well-known equations such as the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and others. Since the solutions of these equations describe many physical phenomena, the analysis of the general model studied in this paper is important. One of the methods for obtaining solutions of differential equations is provided by the Lie group analysis. However, this method is not applicable to integro-differential equations. Therefore, we discuss new approaches developed in modern group analysis and apply them to the general model considered in this paper. Reduced equations and exact solutions are also presented.

  14. A method for describing the canopy architecture of coppice poplar with allometric relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Eric; Sinoquet, Hervé

    2003-12-01

    A multi-scale biometric methodology for describing the architecture of fast-growing short-rotation woody crops is used to describe 2-year-old poplar clones during the second rotation. To allow for expressions of genetic variability observed within this species (i.e., growth potential, leaf morphology, coppice and canopy structure), the method has been applied to two clones: Ghoy (Gho) (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. x Populus nigra L.) and Trichobel (Tri) (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray x Populus trichocarpa). The method operates at the stool level and describes the plant as a collection of components (shoots and branches) described as a collection of metameric elements, themselves defined as a collection of elementary units (internode, petiole, leaf blade). Branching and connection between the plant units (i.e., plant topology) and their spatial location, orientation, size and shape (i.e., plant geometry) describe the plant architecture. The methodology has been used to describe the plant architecture of 15 selected stools per clone over a 5-month period. On individual stools, shoots have been selected from three classes (small, medium and large) spanning the diameter distribution range. Using a multi-scale approach, empirical allometric relationships were used to parameterize elementary units of the plant, topological relationships and geometry (e.g., distribution of shoot diameters on stool, shoot attributes from shoot diameter). The empirical functions form the basis of the 3-D Coppice Poplar Canopy Architecture model (3-D CPCA), which recreates the architecture and canopy structure of fast-growing coppice crops at the plot scale. Model outputs are assessed through visual and quantitative comparisons between actual photographs of the coppice canopy and simulated images. Overall, results indicate a good predictive ability of the 3-D CPCA model.

  15. The Application of Spherical Harmonics for Describing a Cube-Shape Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urtė Radvilaitė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper disccusses various models for discrete element methods of modelling particle shapes. The multi-sphere method is most frequently used, though a polyhedral approach and a hybrid sphero-polyhedral model can also be introduced. All above mentioned methods precisely approximate particle shapes, and difficulties in modelling contact between particles arise. Thus, there is a need to have an universal method that gives the analytical expression of the shape. For this purpose, spherical harmonics have been introduced. The article presents the concept of the spherical harmonics model and experimental results describing the cube-shape particle.

  16. Role of Berry phase theory for describing orbital magnetism: From magnetic heterostructures to topological orbital ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, J.-P.; Freimuth, F.; Nandy, A. K.; Zhang, H.; Blügel, S.; Mokrousov, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We address the importance of the modern theory of orbital magnetization for spintronics. Based on an all-electron first-principles approach, we demonstrate that the predictive power of the routinely employed "atom-centered" approximation is limited to materials like elemental bulk ferromagnets, while the application of the modern theory of orbital magnetization is crucial in chemically or structurally inhomogeneous systems such as magnetic thin films, and materials exhibiting nontrivial topology in reciprocal and real space, e.g., Chern insulators or noncollinear systems. We find that the modern theory is particularly crucial for describing magnetism in a class of materials that we suggest here—topological orbital ferromagnets.

  17. Generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth model accurately describing the switching processes in pseudo-single ferromagnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimpoesu, Dorin, E-mail: cdorin@uaic.ro; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Stancu, Alexandru [Department of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2013-12-14

    We propose a generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) type model to describe various experimentally observed angular dependencies of the switching field in non-single-domain magnetic particles. Because the nonuniform magnetic states are generally characterized by complicated spin configurations with no simple analytical description, we maintain the macrospin hypothesis and we phenomenologically include the effects of nonuniformities only in the anisotropy energy, preserving as much as possible the elegance of SW model, the concept of critical curve and its geometric interpretation. We compare the results obtained with our model with full micromagnetic simulations in order to evaluate the performance and limits of our approach.

  18. A UML-based ontology for describing hospital information system architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, A; Brigl, B; Wendt, T

    2001-01-01

    To control the heterogeneity inherent to hospital information systems the information management needs appropriate hospital information systems modeling methods or techniques. This paper shows that, for several reasons, available modeling approaches are not able to answer relevant questions of information management. To overcome this major deficiency we offer an UML-based ontology for describing hospital information systems architectures. This ontology views at three layers: the domain layer, the logical tool layer, and the physical tool layer, and defines the relevant components. The relations between these components, especially between components of different layers make the answering of our information management questions possible.

  19. Which Metrics Are Appropriate to Describe the Value of New Cancer Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with certain cancers are treated with curative intent, but for others the results are less favorable and different therapeutic approaches are needed. Early data suggest that new therapies, which modulate immune responses to cancers, may have potential for long-term survival in a proportion of cases. Therefore, it is timely to consider whether metrics generally used to describe the medical value of therapies for patients with common solid tumors remain appropriate for therapies with curative potential. Literature reviews were conducted to define how various stakeholders describe cure in oncology and to identify the endpoints used in clinical trials for selected solid tumors. The results showed that “cure” is described using various terms that can be divided broadly into lack of disease progression, eradication of cancerous cells, and survival. The review of trial endpoints showed frequent use of median overall survival (OS and progression- and response-related endpoints. Because these endpoints were mainly described in the context of chemotherapies that are not generally curative, they may not adequately capture outcomes of new therapeutic modalities with potential for long-term survival. More appropriate endpoints may include mean OS, cure fraction, and OS rate at landmark time points.

  20. A constrained von Mises distribution to describe fiber organization in thin soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, Cecile L M; Girard, Michael J; Ethier, C Ross

    2012-03-01

    The semi-circular von Mises distribution is widely used to describe the unimodal planar organization of fibers in thin soft tissues. However, it cannot accurately describe the isotropic subpopulation of fibers present in such tissues, and therefore an improved mathematical description is needed. We present a modified distribution, formed as a weighted mixture of the semi-circular uniform distribution and the semi-circular von Mises distribution. It is described by three parameters: β, which weights the contribution from each mixture component; k, the fiber concentration factor; and θ ( p ), the preferred fiber orientation. This distribution was used to fit data obtained by small-angle light scattering experiments from various thin soft tissues. Initial use showed that satisfactory fits of fiber distributions could be obtained (error generally constrained 2-parameter fiber distribution. Compared to the 3-parameter distribution, the constrained 2-parameter distribution fits experimental data well (error generally constrained 2-parameter approach was more robust to experimental noise. The constrained 2-parameter fiber distribution can replace the semi-circular von Mises distribution to describe unimodal planar organization of fibers in thin soft tissues. Inclusion of such a function in constitutive models for finite element simulations should provide better quantitative estimates of soft tissue biomechanics under normal and pathological conditions.

  1. Variable volume combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  2. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

  3. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume...... but are also essential for a number of physiological processes such as proliferation, controlled cell death, migration and endocrinology. The thesis have been focusing on two Channels, namely the swelling activated Cl- channel (ICl, swell) and the transient receptor potential Vanilloid (TRPV4) channel. I: Cl......- serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...

  4. Cellwise conservative unsplit advection for the volume of fluid method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    We present a cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) advection scheme for the volume of fluid method (VOF) in 2D. Contrary to other schemes based on explicit calculations of the flux balances, the CCU advection adopts a cellwise approach where the pre-images of the control volumes are traced backward......We present a cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) advection scheme for the volume of fluid method (VOF) in 2D. Contrary to other schemes based on explicit calculations of the flux balances, the CCU advection adopts a cellwise approach where the pre-images of the control volumes are traced...

  5. Geometry modeling and grid generation using 3D NURBS control volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzu-Yi; Soni, Bharat K.; Shih, Ming-Hsin

    1995-01-01

    The algorithms for volume grid generation using NURBS geometric representation are presented. The parameterization algorithm is enhanced to yield a desired physical distribution on the curve, surface and volume. This approach bridges the gap between CAD surface/volume definition and surface/volume grid generation. Computational examples associated with practical configurations have shown the utilization of these algorithms.

  6. Molecular density functional theory of water describing hydrophobicity at short and long length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2013-10-21

    We present an extension of our recently introduced molecular density functional theory of water [G. Jeanmairet et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 619 (2013)] to the solvation of hydrophobic solutes of various sizes, going from angstroms to nanometers. The theory is based on the quadratic expansion of the excess free energy in terms of two classical density fields: the particle density and the multipolar polarization density. Its implementation requires as input a molecular model of water and three measurable bulk properties, namely, the structure factor and the k-dependent longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities. The fine three-dimensional water structure around small hydrophobic molecules is found to be well reproduced. In contrast, the computed solvation free-energies appear overestimated and do not exhibit the correct qualitative behavior when the hydrophobic solute is grown in size. These shortcomings are corrected, in the spirit of the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory, by complementing the functional with a truncated hard-sphere functional acting beyond quadratic order in density, and making the resulting functional compatible with the Van-der-Waals theory of liquid-vapor coexistence at long range. Compared to available molecular simulations, the approach yields reasonable solvation structure and free energy of hard or soft spheres of increasing size, with a correct qualitative transition from a volume-driven to a surface-driven regime at the nanometer scale.

  7. Using correlation functions to describe complex multi-phase porous media structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Sizonenko, Timofey; Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill

    2017-04-01

    Multi-scale flow and transport modelling relies on multi-scale image/property fusion techniques. Previusly we have rigorously addressed binary porous media description and stochastic reconstruction problems. However, numerous porous media have more than two, usually solids and pores, phases, e.g., clays, organic, heavy minerals and such. In this contribution we develop efficient approaches to utilize correlation functions to describe such muti-phase soil and rock structures using large sets of cluster, linear and probability functions, including cross-correlations. The approach is tested on numerous 3D images, which were segmented into 3 and more relevant phases. It is shown that multi-phase correlation functions are potentially a very powerful tool to describe any type of porous media at hand and this study also provides a basis for multi-phase stochastic reconstruction techniques, necessary for multi-phase image fusion to obtain large 3D images of hierarchical porous media based on, for example, macro and micro X-ray tomography scans and FIB/BIB-SEM and SEM. References: 1) Karsanina, M.V., Gerke, K.M., Skvortsova, E.B. and Mallants, D. (2015) Universal spatial correlation functions for describing and reconstructing soil microstructure. PLoS ONE 10(5), e0126515. 2) Gerke, K. M., & Karsanina, M. V. (2015). Improving stochastic reconstructions by weighting correlation functions in an objective function. EPL (Europhysics Letters),111(5), 56002. 3) Gerke, K. M., Karsanina, M. V., Vasilyev, R. V., & Mallants, D. (2014). Improving pattern reconstruction using directional correlation functions. EPL (Europhysics Letters), 106(6), 66002. 4) Gerke, K.M., Karsanina, M. V, Mallants, D., 2015. Universal Stochastic Multiscale Image Fusion: An Example Application for Shale Rock. Sci. Rep. 5, 15880. doi:10.1038/srep15880

  8. A population-based model to describe geometrical uncertainties in radiotherapy: applied to prostate cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiarto, E.; Keijzer, M.; Storchi, P. R.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Bondar, L.; Mutanga, T. F.; de Boer, H. C. J.; Heemink, A. W.

    2011-02-01

    Local motions and deformations of organs between treatment fractions introduce geometrical uncertainties into radiotherapy. These uncertainties are generally taken into account in the treatment planning by enlarging the radiation target by a margin around the clinical target volume. However, a practical method to fully include these uncertainties is still lacking. This paper proposes a model based on the principal component analysis to describe the patient-specific local probability distributions of voxel motions so that the average values and variances of the dose distribution can be calculated and fully used later in inverse treatment planning. As usually only a very limited number of data for new patients is available; in this paper the analysis is extended to use population data. A basic assumption (which is justified retrospectively in this paper) is that general movements and deformations of a specific organ are similar despite variations in the shapes of the organ over the population. A proof of principle of the method for deformations of the prostate and the seminal vesicles is presented.

  9. A population-based model to describe geometrical uncertainties in radiotherapy: applied to prostate cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budiarto, E; Keijzer, M; Heemink, A W [Delft Institute of Applied Mathematics (DIAM), Technische Universiteit Delft, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Storchi, P R; Hoogeman, M S; Bondar, L; Mutanga, T F [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre. Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands); De Boer, H C J, E-mail: e.budiarto@tudelft.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-02-21

    Local motions and deformations of organs between treatment fractions introduce geometrical uncertainties into radiotherapy. These uncertainties are generally taken into account in the treatment planning by enlarging the radiation target by a margin around the clinical target volume. However, a practical method to fully include these uncertainties is still lacking. This paper proposes a model based on the principal component analysis to describe the patient-specific local probability distributions of voxel motions so that the average values and variances of the dose distribution can be calculated and fully used later in inverse treatment planning. As usually only a very limited number of data for new patients is available; in this paper the analysis is extended to use population data. A basic assumption (which is justified retrospectively in this paper) is that general movements and deformations of a specific organ are similar despite variations in the shapes of the organ over the population. A proof of principle of the method for deformations of the prostate and the seminal vesicles is presented.

  10. Interobserver agreement in describing video capsule endoscopy findings: a multicentre prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Alessandro; Cannizzaro, Renato; Pennazio, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Zancanella, Laura; Fusetti, Nadia; Simoni, Marzia; Cantoni, Franco; Melina, Raffaele; Alberani, Angela; Caravelli, Giancarlo; Villa, Federica; Chilovi, Fausto; Casetti, Tino; Iaquinto, Gaetano; D'imperio, Nicola; Gullini, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    Few studies have specifically addressed interobserver agreement in describing lesions identified during capsule endoscopy. The aim of our study is to evaluate interobserver agreement in the description of capsule endoscopy findings. Consecutive short segments of capsule endoscopy were prospectively observed by 8 investigators. Seventy-five videos were prepared by an external investigator (gold standard). The description of the findings was reported by the investigators using the same validated and standardized capsule endoscopy structured terminology. The agreement was assessed using Cohen's kappa statistic. As concerns the ability to detect a lesion, the agreement with the gold standard was moderate (kappa 0.48), as well as the agreement relating to the final diagnosis (κ 0.45). The best agreement was observed in identifying the presence of active bleeding (κ 0.72), whereas the poorest agreement concerned the lesion size (κ 0.32). The agreement with the GS was significantly better in endoscopists with higher case/volume of capsule endoscopy per year. Diagnostic concordance was better in the presence of angiectasia than in the presence of polyps or ulcers/erosions. Correct lesion identification and diagnosis seem more likely to occur in presence of angiectasia, and for readers with more experience in capsule endoscopy reading. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Using smooth sheets to describe groundfish habitat in Alaskan waters, with specific application to two flatfishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Mark; Reid, Jane A.; Golden, Nadine

    2016-10-01

    In this analysis we demonstrate how preferred fish habitat can be predicted and mapped for juveniles of two Alaskan groundfish species - Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and flathead sole (Hippoglossoides elassodon) - at five sites (Kiliuda Bay, Izhut Bay, Port Dick, Aialik Bay, and the Barren Islands) in the central Gulf of Alaska. The method involves using geographic information system (GIS) software to extract appropriate information from National Ocean Service (NOS) smooth sheets that are available from NGDC (the National Geophysical Data Center). These smooth sheets are highly detailed charts that include more soundings, substrates, shoreline and feature information than the more commonly-known navigational charts. By bringing the information from smooth sheets into a GIS, a variety of surfaces, such as depth, slope, rugosity and mean grain size were interpolated into raster surfaces. Other measurements such as site openness, shoreline length, proportion of bay that is near shore, areas of rocky reefs and kelp beds, water volumes, surface areas and vertical cross-sections were also made in order to quantify differences between the study sites. Proper GIS processing also allows linking the smooth sheets to other data sets, such as orthographic satellite photographs, topographic maps and precipitation estimates from which watersheds and runoff can be derived. This same methodology can be applied to larger areas, taking advantage of these free data sets to describe predicted groundfish essential fish habitat (EFH) in Alaskan waters.

  12. Intelligence for education: as described by Piaget and measured by psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayer, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Two separate paths to the concept of intelligence are discussed: the psychometric path being concerned with the measurement of intelligence, involving the methodology of norm-referenced testing; the path followed by Piaget, and others, addresses from the start the related question of how intelligence can be described, and employs a criterion-referenced methodology. The achievements of psychometrics are briefly described, with an argument that they now remain important tools of what Kuhn called 'normal science'. The criterion-referenced approach of Piaget and others is described, with evidence from intervention studies that the Genevan descriptions of children-in-action have allowed the choice of contexts within which children can profitably be challenged to go further in their thinking. Hence, Genevan psychology is also now a part of the normal science with important uses, shown both in neo-Piagetian studies and further research stemming from Geneva. Discussion of the 'Flynn effect' sheds light on both paths, with problems still unresolved. The argument is then developed that the relevance of neuroscience needs to be discussed to try to decide in what ways it may provide useful insights into intelligence.

  13. Volume of intersection of two cones

    CERN Document Server

    Balogun, F A; Cesareo, R

    2000-01-01

    Radiation measurements utilising collimated source and detector systems invariably result in a target volume described by the overlap of their fields of view. When these collimators are cylindrical, this is derived from the volume of intersection of two cones. In general, analysis of this volume does not lend itself to a direct analytical process. Here, numerical methods of estimating the common volume of two intersecting right cones are presented. These include methods which employ, (a) a sequential scanning of an elemental volume with a predetermined size across a defined space containing the volume of interest and (b) a Monte Carlo technique. The accuracy obtainable and the execution time in the first type of algorithm depend on the size of the elemental volume (bin-size). On the other hand, these two parameters are independent of the bin-size but dependent on the number of histories sampled, for the Monte Carlo technique. At 0 deg. angle of inclination, where an analytical estimation is easily obtained, t...

  14. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  15. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  16. Measurable inhomogeneities in stock trading volume flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortines, A. A. G.; Riera, R.; Anteneodo, C.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the statistics of volumes of shares traded in stock markets. We show that the stochastic process of trading volumes can be understood on the basis of a mixed Poisson process at the microscopic time level. The beta distribution of the second kind (also known as q-gamma distribution), that has been proposed to describe empirical volume histograms, naturally results from our analysis. In particular, the shape of the distribution at small volumes is governed by the degree of granularity in the trading process, while the exponent controlling the tail is a measure of the inhomogeneities in market activity. Furthermore, the present case furnishes empirical evidence of how power law probability distributions can arise as a consequence of a fluctuating intrinsic parameter.

  17. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  18. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  19. Volume regulation in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    function of iso-osmotic fluid transport that depends on Na+ recirculation. The causative relationship is discussed for a fluid-absorbing and a fluid-secreting epithelium of which the Na+ recirculation mechanisms have been identified. A large number of transporters and ion channels involved in cell volume...... regulation are cloned. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) exhibiting specific electrophysiological characteristics seems exclusive to serve cell volume regulation. This is contrary to K+ channels as well as cotransporters and exchange mechanisms that may serve both transepithelial transport and cell...

  20. Towards the Amplituhedron Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Ferro, Livia; Orta, Andrea; Parisi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently conjectured that scattering amplitudes in planar N=4 super Yang-Mills are given by the volume of the (dual) amplituhedron. In this paper we show some interesting connections between the tree-level amplituhedron and a special class of differential equations. In particular we demonstrate how the amplituhedron volume for NMHV amplitudes is determined by these differential equations. The new formulation allows for a straightforward geometric description, without any reference to triangulations. Finally we discuss possible implications for volumes related to generic N^kMHV amplitudes.