WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume change caused

  1. What causes the hippocampal volume decrease in depression? : Are neurogenesis, glial changes and apoptosis implicated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czeh, B.; Lucassen, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Even though in vivo imaging studies document significant reductions of hippocampal volume in depressed patients, the exact underlying cellular mechanisms are unclear. Since stressful life events are associated with an increased risk of developing depression, preclinical studies in which animals are

  2. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether previously reported changes in venous blood volume and composition induced by acute hypoglycaemia in humans are representative for the entire body we measured erythrocyte 51Cr content, haematocrit, plasma volume, intravascular albumin content and transcapillary escape rate...... of albumin in arterial and venous blood in seven healthy subjects before and during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. In both vascular sites blood 51Cr content and the haematocrit increased, plasma volume and intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin increased during...

  3. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    -induced hypoglycaemia with total autonomic blockade (alpha-adrenoceptor blockade combined with beta-adrenoceptor blockade and atropine); and insulin-induced hypoglycaemia without any autonomic blockade. In the experiments without autonomic blockade the peripheral venous hematocrit increased, plasma volume decreased......, intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin increased. In both experiments with autonomic blockade the increase in venous haematocrit was abolished, yet plasma volume decreased, intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin...... increased in these experiments. Thus, the changes in plasma volume and composition in response to hypoglycaemia are due to the combined actions of adrenaline and of insulin....

  4. CLIMATE CHANGES: CAUSES AND IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Slave

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Present brings several environmental problems for people. Many of these are closely related, but by far the most important problem is the climate change. In the course of Earth evolution, climate has changed many times, sometimes dramatically. Warmer eras always replaced and were in turn replaced by glacial ones. However, the climate of the past almost ten thousand years has been very stable. During this period human civilization has also developed. In the past nearly 100 years - since the beginning of industrialization - the global average temperature has increased by approx. 0.6 ° C (after IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, faster than at any time in the last 1000 years.

  5. Climate Change: Evidence and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The fundamentals of climate change are well established: greenhouse gases warm the planet; their concentrations in the atmosphere are increasing; Earth has warmed, and is going to continue warming with a range of impacts. This article summarises the contents of a recent publication issued by the UK's Royal Society and the US National Academy of…

  6. How does climate change cause extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Abigail E; Aiello-Lammens, Matthew E; Fisher-Reid, M Caitlin; Hua, Xia; Karanewsky, Caitlin J; Ryu, Hae Yeong; Sbeglia, Gena C; Spagnolo, Fabrizio; Waldron, John B; Warsi, Omar; Wiens, John J

    2013-01-07

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to be a major cause of species extinctions in the next 100 years. But what will actually cause these extinctions? For example, will it be limited physiological tolerance to high temperatures, changing biotic interactions or other factors? Here, we systematically review the proximate causes of climate-change related extinctions and their empirical support. We find 136 case studies of climatic impacts that are potentially relevant to this topic. However, only seven identified proximate causes of demonstrated local extinctions due to anthropogenic climate change. Among these seven studies, the proximate causes vary widely. Surprisingly, none show a straightforward relationship between local extinction and limited tolerances to high temperature. Instead, many studies implicate species interactions as an important proximate cause, especially decreases in food availability. We find very similar patterns in studies showing decreases in abundance associated with climate change, and in those studies showing impacts of climatic oscillations. Collectively, these results highlight our disturbingly limited knowledge of this crucial issue but also support the idea that changing species interactions are an important cause of documented population declines and extinctions related to climate change. Finally, we briefly outline general research strategies for identifying these proximate causes in future studies.

  7. Volume changes in unrestrained structural lightweight concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-08-01

    In this study a comparator-type measuring system was developed to accurately determine volume change characteristics of one structural lightweight concrete. The specific properties studied were the coefficient of linear thermal expansion and unrestra...

  8. Changes of pituitary gland volume in Kennedy disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, C C; Teismann, I K; Konrad, C; Heindel, W L; Schiffbauer, H

    2013-12-01

    Kennedy disease is a rare X-linked neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the androgen-receptor gene. Apart from neurologic signs, this mutation can cause a partial androgen insensitivity syndrome with typical alterations of gonadotropic hormones produced by the pituitary gland. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the impact of Kennedy disease on pituitary gland volume under the hypothesis that endocrinologic changes caused by partial androgen insensitivity may lead to morphologic changes (ie, hypertrophy) of the pituitary gland. Pituitary gland volume was measured in sagittal sections of 3D T1-weighted 3T-MR imaging data of 8 patients with genetically proven Kennedy disease and compared with 16 healthy age-matched control subjects by use of Multitracer by a blinded, experienced radiologist. The results were analyzed by a univariant ANOVA with total brain volume as a covariant. Furthermore, correlation and linear regression analyses were performed for pituitary volume, patient age, disease duration, and CAG repeat expansion length. Intraobserver reliability was evaluated by means of the Pearson correlation coefficient. Pituitary volume was significantly larger in patients with Kennedy disease (636 [±90] mm(3)) than in healthy control subjects (534 [±91] mm(3)) (P = .041). There was no significant difference in total brain volume (P = .379). Control subjects showed a significant decrease in volume with age (r = -0.712, P = .002), whereas there was a trend to increasing gland volume in patients with Kennedy disease (r = 0.443, P = .272). Gland volume correlated with CAG repeat expansion length in patients (r = 0.630, P = .047). The correlation coefficient for intraobserver reliability was 0.94 (P pituitary volume that correlated with the CAG repeat expansion length. This could reflect hypertrophy as the result of elevated gonadotropic hormone secretion caused by the androgen receptor mutation with partial

  9. Saturation volume changes and resistivity changes in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1976-01-01

    Saturation defect concentrations generated by thermal neutron irradiation of 235 U doped nickel at liquid helium temperature were measured by changes in electrical resistivity and volume. The experimental procedure is described

  10. High resolution gas volume change sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirckx, Joris J. J.; Aernouts, Jef E. F.; Aerts, Johan R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Changes of gas quantity in a system can be measured either by measuring pressure changes or by measuring volume changes. As sensitive pressure sensors are readily available, pressure change is the commonly used technique. In many physiologic systems, however, buildup of pressure influences the gas exchange mechanisms, thus changing the gas quantity change rate. If one wants to study the gas flow in or out of a biological gas pocket, measurements need to be done at constant pressure. In this article we present a highly sensitive sensor for quantitative measurements of gas volume change at constant pressure. The sensor is based on optical detection of the movement of a droplet of fluid enclosed in a capillary. The device is easy to use and delivers gas volume data at a rate of more than 15 measurements/s and a resolution better than 0.06 μl. At the onset of a gas quantity change the sensor shows a small pressure artifact of less than 15 Pa, and at constant change rates the pressure artifact is smaller than 10 Pa or 0.01% of ambient pressure

  11. Causes for contemporary regional sea level changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammer, Detlef; Cazenave, Anny; Ponte, Rui M; Tamisiea, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Regional sea level changes can deviate substantially from those of the global mean, can vary on a broad range of timescales, and in some regions can even lead to a reversal of long-term global mean sea level trends. The underlying causes are associated with dynamic variations in the ocean circulation as part of climate modes of variability and with an isostatic adjustment of Earth's crust to past and ongoing changes in polar ice masses and continental water storage. Relative to the coastline, sea level is also affected by processes such as earthquakes and anthropogenically induced subsidence. Present-day regional sea level changes appear to be caused primarily by natural climate variability. However, the imprint of anthropogenic effects on regional sea level-whether due to changes in the atmospheric forcing or to mass variations in the system-will grow with time as climate change progresses, and toward the end of the twenty-first century, regional sea level patterns will be a superposition of climate variability modes and natural and anthropogenically induced static sea level patterns. Attribution and predictions of ongoing and future sea level changes require an expanded and sustained climate observing system.

  12. Effect of large volume paracentesis on plasma volume--a cause of hypovolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, H.W.; Rakov, N.E.; Savage, E.; Reynolds, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    Large volume paracentesis, while effectively relieving symptoms in patients with tense ascites, has been generally avoided due to reports of complications attributed to an acute reduction in intravascular volume. Measurements of plasma volume in these subjects have been by indirect methods and have not uniformly confirmed hypovolemia. We have prospectively evaluated 18 patients (20 paracenteses) with tense ascites and peripheral edema due to chronic liver disease undergoing 5 liter paracentesis for relief of symptoms. Plasma volume pre- and postparacentesis was assessed by a 125 I-labeled human serum albumin dilution technique as well as by the change in hematocrit and postural blood pressure difference. No significant change in serum sodium, urea nitrogen, hematocrit or postural systolic blood pressure difference was noted at 24 or 48 hr after paracentesis. Serum creatinine at 24 hr after paracentesis was unchanged but a small but statistically significant increase in serum creatinine was noted at 48 hr postparacentesis. Plasma volume changed -2.7% (n = 6, not statistically significant) during the first 24 hr and -2.8% (n = 12, not statistically significant) during the 0- to 48-hr period. No complications from paracentesis were noted. These results suggest that 5 liter paracentesis for relief of symptoms is safe in patients with tense ascites and peripheral edema from chronic liver disease

  13. The Utilization of Remotely Sensed Data to Analyze the Estimated Volume of Pyroclastic Deposits and Morphological Changes Caused by the 2010-2015 Eruption of Sinabung Volcano, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Fajar; Suwarsono; Sofan, Parwati

    2016-08-01

    In this research, remotely sensed data has been used to estimate the volume of pyroclastic deposits and analyze morphological changes that have resulted from the eruption of Sinabung volcano. Topographic information was obtained from these data and used for rapid mapping to assist in the emergency response. Topographic information and change analyses (pre- and syn- eruption) were conducted using digital elevation models (DEMs) for the period 2010-2015. Advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) global digital elevation model (GDEM) data from 2009 were used to generate the initial DEMs for the condition prior to the eruption of 2010. Satellite pour l'observation de la terre 6 (SPOT 6) stereo images acquired on 21 June 2015 and were used to make a DEM for that time. The results show that the estimated total volume of lava and pyroclastic deposits, produced during the period 2010 to mid-2015 is approximately 2.8 × 108 m3. This estimated volume of pyroclastic deposits can be used to predict the magnitude of future secondary lahar hazards, which are also related to the capacity of rivers in the area. Morphological changes are illustrated using cross-sectional analysis of the deposits, which are currently deposited to the east, southeast and south of the volcano. Such analyses can also help in forecasting the direction of the future flow hazards. The remote sensing and analysis methods used at Sinabung can also be applied at other volcanoes and to assess the threats of other types of hazards such as landslides and land subsidence.

  14. CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF CLIMATE CHANGE

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Stanisoara

    2014-01-01

    Climate change, arising from the greenhouse effect of heattrapping gases, is a global problem. All nations are involved in both its causes and consequences. Currently developed nations are the largest emitters of greenhouse gases, but emissions by developing nations will grow considerably in coming decades. The most recent scientific evidence indicates that effects during the twenty-first century may range from a global temperature increase of 1.1ºC (2ºF) up to 6.4ºC. In addition to simply wa...

  15. Relative blood volume changes underestimate total blood volume changes during hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dasselaar, Judith J.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Pruim, Jan; Nijnuis, Hugo; Wiersum, Anneke; de Jong, Paul E.; Huisman, Roel M.; Franssen, Casper F. M.

    Background: Measurements of relative blood volume changes (ARBV) during hemodialysis (HD) are based on hemoconcentration and assume uniform mixing of erythrocytes and plasma throughout the circulation. However, whole-body hematocrit (Ht) is lower than systemic Ht. During HD, a change in the ratio

  16. Changes in Upper Airway Volume Following Orthognathic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcussen, Lillian; Stokbro, Kasper; Aagaard, Esben; Torkov, Peter; Thygesen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Reduced volume of the internal skeletal dimensions of the face is 1 of the main causes of obstructive sleep apnea, and attention to patients' airways is necessary when planning orthognathic treatment. This study aims to describe changes in upper airway volume following virtually planned orthognathic surgery.A retrospective pilot study was designed with 30 randomly selected patients (10 men and 20 women, aged 23.1 ± 6.8 years, molar-relations: 15 neutral, 8 distal, and 7 mesial). Cone-beam computed tomography scans were performed before surgery and 1 week following surgery. The authors did total upper airway volume measurements and obtained 1-mm slices at vertical levels in the velo-, oro-, and hypopharynx and at the smallest visible cross-section.Measurements before and after surgery were compared using Student t test.After orthognathic surgery, the minimum cross-sectional area at the vertical level increased from 83 mm ± 33 before surgery to 102 mm ± 36 after surgery (P = 0.019). In patients with neutral and distal occlusions, the minimum cross-sectional slice volume increased in 87% but in only 57% with mesial occlusion.The present findings suggest that orthognathic surgery increases upper airway volume parameters, but a few patients have continued impairment of the airways following orthognathic surgery. Further studies are needed to confirm an individual surgical planning approach that potentially could bring the minimum cross sectional area out of the risk zone.

  17. Clinically significant change in stroke volume in pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wolferen, S.A.; van de Veerdonk, M.C.; Mauritz, G.J.; Jacobs, W.; Marcus, J.T.; Marques, K.M.J.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Heijmans, M.W.; Boonstra, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Westerhof, N.; Noordegraaf, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stroke volume is probably the best hemodynamic parameter because it reflects therapeutic changes and contains prognostic information in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Stroke volume directly reflects right ventricular function in response to its load, without the correction of compensatory

  18. Unpredictable visual changes cause temporal memory averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2007-09-01

    Various factors influence the perceived timing of visual events. Yet, little is known about the ways in which transient visual stimuli affect the estimation of the timing of other visual events. In the present study, we examined how a sudden color change of an object would influence the remembered timing of another transient event. In each trial, subjects saw a green or red disk travel in circular motion. A visual flash (white frame) occurred at random times during the motion sequence. The color of the disk changed either at random times (unpredictable condition), at a fixed time relative to the motion sequence (predictable condition), or it did not change (no-change condition). The subjects' temporal memory of the visual flash in the predictable condition was as veridical as that in the no-change condition. In the unpredictable condition, however, the flash was reported to occur closer to the timing of the color change than actual timing. Thus, an unpredictable visual change distorts the temporal memory of another visual event such that the remembered moment of the event is closer to the timing of the unpredictable visual change.

  19. Contrast media osmolality and plasma volume changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, A.L.; Lui, D.; Dawson, P.; Middlesex Hospital, London

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the plasma volume expansion consequent on the hyperosmolality of contrast media is presented. In the case of the ratio 1.5 media theory and experiment coincide closely but in the case of the ratio 3 media the observed changes exceed the predicted. It is proposed that this is due partly to the slower diffusion of the ratio 3 media out of the intravascular space and partly due to the fact that the osmotic load presented by these media is greater than would be expected from a study of their commercial solutions in which osmolality is reduced by molecular aggregation. The implications for the relative haemodynamic effects of different contrast media are discussed. The osmotic effects of contrast media also play a part in determining the image quality achievable in intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA). It is predicted that ratio 3 contrast media will give better quality images in IV-DSA than ratio 1.5 media. (orig.)

  20. Estimating the rates of mass change, ice volume change and snow volume change in Greenland from ICESat and GRACE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobbe, D.C.; Ditmar, P.G.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the quantification of ongoing mass and volume changes over the Greenland ice sheet. For that purpose, we used elevation changes derived from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry mission and monthly variations of the Earth’s gravity field

  1. Biochemical changes in blood caused by radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapol'skaya, N.A.; Fedorova, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    The changes were studied occurring in some biochemical indicators in blood at chronic peroral administration of strontium-90, cesium-137 and iodine-131 in amounts resulting in accumulation of commensurable doses in critical organs corresponding to each isotope

  2. Human choice and climate change. Volume 1: The societal framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynor, S.; Malone, E.

    1998-01-01

    This book is Volume 1 of a four-volume set which assesses social science research that is relevant to global climate change from a wide-ranging interdisciplinary perspective. Attention is focused on the societal framework as it relates to climate change. This series is indispensable reading for scientists and engineers wishing to make an effective contribution to the climate change policy debate

  3. Climate change freezing caused by overheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrara, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Based on the principal findings from an extensive study of the Arctic, the subject of an international symposium held in Reykjavik, Iceland, in November of 2004, the Arctic Region is heating up twice as fast as the average for the rest of the world. If warming continues at this pace, or even faster, the most significant effects of future climate changes will occur in the polar regions, and the greatest threat seems to be the collapse of the Gulf Stream [it

  4. Soil Overconsolidation Changes Caused by Dynamic Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotr, Kanty; Sławomir, Kwiecień; Jerzy, Sękowski

    2017-10-01

    In the dynamic replacement method (DR) the soil is improved by initially dropping a large weight (typically 8-20 t) pounder from a significant height up to 25 m. The created crater is filled with a stronger material (gravel, rubble, stone aggregate, debris), and the pounder is dropped once or multiple times again. The construction of dynamic replacement pillars influences the parameters of the adjacent soil. It results from the energy generated by dropping a pounder into the soil. In the current practice, these changes are not taken into the account during the design. This paper focuses on the changes of overconsolidation ratio (OCR) and in situ coefficient of lateral earth pressure (K) values estimated base on cone penetration test (CPTU) and Dilatometric test (DMT) performed at a test site. A single column was constructed and the ground around the column was examined using CPTU and DMT, performed at different distances from the column centre (2, 3, 4 and 6 m) and at different time intervals (during construction and 1, 8, 30 days later). The column was constructed in so-called transition soils (between cohesive and non-cohesive). While interpreting the results of the research, the authors addressed the matter of choosing the procedure of OCR and K indication for transition soils (in this case described as silts and/or sandy silts). Overconsolidation changes may differ depending on the chosen analysis procedure (for cohesive or non-cohesive soils). On the basis of the analysis presented in the paper and the observation of soil (acknowledged as cohesive according to macroscopic observations) during column excavation, it was decided that for more detailed analyses methods dedicated to cohesive soils should be applied. Generally, it can be stated that although the changes were complex, DR pillar formation process resulted in the increase of these parameters. The average increases of OCR and K values were 25% and 10% respectively. The post installation values are not

  5. Clinically significant change in stroke volume in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolferen, Serge A; van de Veerdonk, Marielle C; Mauritz, Gert-Jan; Jacobs, Wouter; Marcus, J Tim; Marques, Koen M J; Bronzwaer, Jean G F; Heymans, Martijn W; Boonstra, Anco; Postmus, Pieter E; Westerhof, Nico; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2011-05-01

    Stroke volume is probably the best hemodynamic parameter because it reflects therapeutic changes and contains prognostic information in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Stroke volume directly reflects right ventricular function in response to its load, without the correction of compensatory increased heart rate as is the case for cardiac output. For this reason, stroke volume, which can be measured noninvasively, is an important hemodynamic parameter to monitor during treatment. However, the extent of change in stroke volume that constitutes a clinically significant change is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the minimal important difference (MID) in stroke volume in PH. One hundred eleven patients were evaluated at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up with a 6-min walk test (6MWT) and cardiac MRI. Using the anchor-based method with 6MWT as the anchor, and the distribution-based method, the MID of stroke volume change could be determined. After 1 year of treatment, there was, on average, a significant increase in stroke volume and 6MWT. The change in stroke volume was related to the change in 6MWT. Using the anchor-based method, an MID of 10 mL in stroke volume was calculated. The distribution-based method resulted in an MID of 8 to 12 mL. Both methods showed that a 10-mL change in stroke volume during follow-up should be considered as clinically relevant. This value can be used to interpret changes in stroke volume during clinical follow-up in PH.

  6. climate change: causes, effects and mitigation measures-a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    Both natural and human causes of climate change including the earth's orbital changes, solar variations .... analysis supported by climate models have revealed that cloud ... clouds could actually exert a small cooling effect as temperature ...

  7. KCNQ1 channels sense small changes in cell volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; MacAulay, Nanna

    2003-01-01

    Many important physiological processes involve changes in cell volume, e.g. the transport of salt and water in epithelial cells and the contraction of cardiomyocytes. In this study, we show that voltage-gated KCNQ1 channels, which are strongly expressed in epithelial cells or cardiomyocytes......, and KCNQ4 channels, expressed in hair cells and the auditory tract, are tightly regulated by small cell volume changes when co-expressed with aquaporin 1 water-channels (AQP1) in Xenopus oocytes. The KCNQ1 and KCNQ4 current amplitudes precisely reflect the volume of the oocytes. By contrast, the related...... KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 channels, which are prominently expressed in neurons, are insensitive to cell volume changes. The sensitivity of the KCNQ1 and KCNQ4 channels to cell volume changes is independent of the presence of the auxiliary KCNE1-3 subunits, although modulated by KCNE1 in the case of KCNQ1...

  8. Understanding the causes of architecture changes using OSS mailing lists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Wei; Liang, Peng; Tang, Anthony; Van Vliet, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The causes of architecture changes can tell about why architecture changes, and this knowledge can be captured to prevent architecture knowledge vaporization and architecture degeneration. But the causes are not always known, especially in open source software (OSS) development. This makes it very

  9. Causes of Resistance to Change. What Managers Should Do?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Stegaroiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Change is considered, in more and more cases, an inevitable process and the development of an organization largely depends on how it reacts and adapts to transformations occurring. Change has both positive and negative aspects, it implies experiment and creation of something new and different, but it also means destruction of familiar facts and relationships. The implementation failure rate of organizational change remains high and one of the most common causes of this is considered to be the resistance to change. Although the resistance to change is considered a natural reaction, it is necessary to understand the causes and identify the measures for its reduction. Using content analysis of representative works, as a research method, we identified a number of factors that cause resistance to change and methods than can be used to decrease it, in order to successful implement the organizational change. Journal:Risk in the Contemporary Economy, Proceedings Conference

  10. Hydrological Changes of the Irtysh River and the Possible Causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, F.; Xia, Z.; Li, F.; Guo, L.; Yang, F.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrological changes of the Irtysh River were analyzed concerning the changes of annual runoff and its distribution features within a year measured by coefficient of variation and concentration degree. Abrupt changes were detected by the heuristic segmentation method. Possible causes of the

  11. Climate change: Causes, effects and mitigation measures- A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... far more than at any time in the last 650,000 years resulting in climate change or global warming. Both natural and human causes of climate change including the earth's orbital changes, ... food production, loss of biodiversity, food insecurity, decreased animal health et cetera.

  12. White matter volume changes in people who develop psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterfang, Mark; McGuire, Philip K; Yung, Alison R; Phillips, Lisa J; Velakoulis, Dennis; Wood, Stephen J; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T; Brewer, Warrick; Soulsby, Bridget; Desmond, Patricia; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos

    2008-09-01

    Grey matter changes have been described in individuals who are pre- and peri-psychotic, but it is unclear if these changes are accompanied by changes in white matter structures. To determine whether changes in white matter occur prior to and with the transition to psychosis in individuals who are pre-psychotic who had previously demonstrated grey matter reductions in frontotemporal regions. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine regional white matter volume in 75 people with prodromal symptoms. A subset of the original group (n=21) were rescanned at 12-18 months to determine white matter volume changes. Participants were retrospectively categorised according to whether they had or had not developed psychosis at follow-up. Comparison of the baseline MRI data from these two subgroups revealed that individuals who later developed psychosis had larger volumes of white matter in the frontal lobe, particularly in the left hemisphere. Longitudinal comparison of data in individuals who developed psychosis revealed a reduction in white matter volume in the region of the left fronto-occipital fasciculus. Participants who had not developed psychosis showed no reductions in white matter volume but increases in a region subjacent to the right inferior parietal lobule. The reduction in volume of white matter near the left fronto-occipital fasciculus may reflect a change in this tract in association with the onset of frank psychosis.

  13. Volume-change-free GeTeN films for high-performance phase-change memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, You; Hosaka, Sumio; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Yu, Qi

    2013-01-01

    N-doping into GeTe is investigated with the aim of reducing the volume change upon crystallization, which usually induces a huge internal stress in phase-change memory devices. It is demonstrated that the thickness change upon crystallization of a N-doped GeTe (GeTeN) film is almost zero when N is doped in an appropriate amount. Cracks resulting from the stress caused by volume change disappear and the mean crystal size decreases by more than 50% upon N-doping into GeTe. It is thought that the volume-change-free behaviour is due to the formation of low-density nitride and grain refinement. (paper)

  14. Investigations of the changes in the bentonite structure caused by the different treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Stojiljković S.; Stamenković M.; Kostić D.; Miljković M.; Arsić B.; Savić I.; Savić I.

    2015-01-01

    The bentonite was treated in different ways and the changes in structure were monitored. Acid activation with sulphuric acid of investigated bentonite caused the increase in specific volume of micropore-mesopore. It was shown that activation by acid obtained at a constant temperature and constant period of time provides the possibility to obtain samples of bentonite of searched porosity only by changing the concentration of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. ...

  15. Change in brain and lesion volumes after CEE therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Mark A.; Hogan, Patricia E.; Resnick, Susan M.; Bryan, R. Nick; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Goveas, Joseph S.; Davatzikos, Christos; Kuller, Lewis H.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Bushnell, Cheryl D.; Shumaker, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether smaller brain volumes in older women who had completed Women's Health Initiative (WHI)-assigned conjugated equine estrogen–based hormone therapy (HT), reported by WHI Memory Study (WHIMS)-MRI, correspond to a continuing increased rate of atrophy an average of 6.1 to 7.7 years later in WHIMS-MRI2. Methods: A total of 1,230 WHI participants were contacted: 797 (64.8%) consented, and 729 (59%) were rescanned an average of 4.7 years after the initial MRI scan. Mean annual rates of change in total brain volume, the primary outcome, and rates of change in ischemic lesion volumes, the secondary outcome, were compared between treatment groups using mixed-effect models with adjustment for trial, clinical site, age, intracranial volumes, and time between MRI measures. Results: Total brain volume decreased an average of 3.22 cm3/y in the active arm and 3.07 cm3/y in the placebo arm (p = 0.53). Total ischemic lesion volumes increased in both arms at a rate of 0.12 cm3/y (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Conjugated equine estrogen–based postmenopausal HT, previously assigned at WHI baseline, did not affect rates of decline in brain volumes or increases in brain lesion volumes during the 4.7 years between the initial and follow-up WHIMS-MRI studies. Smaller frontal lobe volumes were observed as persistent group differences among women assigned to active HT compared with placebo. Women with a history of cardiovascular disease treated with active HT, compared with placebo, had higher rates of accumulation in white matter lesion volume and total brain lesion volume. Further study may elucidate mechanisms that explain these findings. PMID:24384646

  16. Change in Seroma Volume During Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rajiv; Spierer, Marnee; Mutyala, Subhakar; Thawani, Nitika; Cohen, Hillel W.; Hong, Linda; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: After breast-conserving surgery, a seroma often forms in the surgical cavity. If not drained, it may affect the volume of tumor bed requiring a boost after whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Our objective was to evaluate the change in seroma volume that occurs during WBRT, before boost planning. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed of women receiving breast-conserving therapy with evidence of seroma at the time of WBRT planning. Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed before WBRT and before the tumor bed boost. All patients received either a hypofractionated (42.4 Gy/16 fraction + 9.6 Gy/4 fraction boost) or standard fractionated (50.4 Gy/28 fraction + 10 Gy/5 fraction boost) regimen. Seroma volumes were contoured and compared on CT at the time of WBRT simulation and tumor bed boost planning. Results: Twenty-four patients with evidence of seroma were identified and all patients received WBRT without drainage of the seroma. Mean seroma volume before WBRT and at boost planning were significantly different at 65.7 cm 3 (SD, 50.5 cm 3 ) and 35.6 cm 3 (SD, 24.8 cm 3 ), respectively (p < 0.001). Mean and median reduction in seroma volume during radiation were 39.6% (SD, 23.8%) and 46.2% (range, 10.7-76.7%), respectively. Fractionation schedule was not correlated with change in seroma volume. Length of time from surgery to start of radiation therapy showed an inverse correlation with change in seroma volume (Pearson correlation r = -0.53, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The volume of seroma changes significantly during WBRT. Consequently, the accuracy of breast boost planning is likely affected, as is the volume of normal breast tissue irradiated. CT-based boost planning before boost irradiation is suggested to ensure appropriate coverage.

  17. Environmental law and climate change : Volumes I & II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, Jonathan

    Two volume set that brings together 54 of the most influential and important scientific journal articles in the field of climate law, thematically grouped together as follows: introducing climate law, theories and approaches, climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, climate justice,

  18. Epidural anesthesia, hypotension, and changes in intravascular volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Foss, Nicolai B; Svensén, Christer

    2004-01-01

    receiving hydroxyethyl starch. RESULTS: Plasma volume did not change per se after thoracic epidural anesthesia despite a decrease in blood pressure. Plasma volume increased with fluid administration but remained unchanged with vasopressors despite that both treatments had similar hemodynamic effects...... constant was 56 ml/min. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic epidural anesthesia per se does not lead to changes in blood volumes despite a reduction in blood pressure. When fluid is infused, there is a dilution, and the fluid initially seems to be located centrally. Because administration of hydroxyethyl starch......BACKGROUND: The most common side effect of epidural or spinal anesthesia is hypotension with functional hypovolemia prompting fluid infusions or administration of vasopressors. Short-term studies (20 min) in patients undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia suggest that plasma volume may increase when...

  19. Pituitary volumes are changed in patients with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Baykara, Sema; Mermi, Osman; Yildirim, Hanefi; Akaslan, Unsal

    2016-03-01

    Our study group previously measured pituitary volumes and found a relationship between somatoform disoders and pituitary volumes. Therefore, in conversion disorder, another somatoform disorder, we hypothesized that pituitary gland volumes would be reduced. Twenty female patients and healthy controls were recruited to the present investigation. The volumes of the pituitary gland were determined by using a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. We found that the pituitary gland volumes of the patients with conversion disorder were significantly smaller than those of healthy control subjects. In the patients with conversion disorder but not in the healthy control group, a significant negative correlation between the duration of illness and pituitary gland volume was determined. In summary, in the present study, we suggest that the patients with conversion disorder have smaller pituitary volumes compared to those of healthy control subjects. Further studies should confirm our data and ascertain whether volumetric alterations determined in the patients with conversion disorder can be changed with treatment or if they change over time.

  20. Changes in cardiac output and incidence of volume overload in cirrhotics receiving 20% albumin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasthry, Saggere M; Kumar, Manoj; Khumuckham, Jelen S; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to develop volume over load, have increased capillary permeability and latent or overt cardiomyopathy. Whether albumin infusion causes volume overload in cirrhotics has not been adequately studied. Ninety nine consecutive cirrhotic patients receiving 1gm per kg albumin infusion were evaluated for development of volume overload. Clinical, echocardiographic and haemodynamic changes were closely monitored during and after albumin infusion. Thirty (30.30%) patients developed volume overload. Patients with higher BMI (P=.003), lower CTP (P=.01) and MELD (P=.034) were more often associated with the development of volume overload. Though baseline diastolic dysfunction was present in 82.8% of the patients, it did not influence the development of volume overload or changes in the cardiac output. The cardiac output increased significantly after albumin infusion (4.9±1.554 L/min to 5.86±1.85 L/min, Palbumin infusion develop volume overload, specially, those with higher BMI and lower severity of liver disease. Cardiac output increases after albumin infusion, and, baseline diastolic dysfunction has little effect on the development of volume overload or changes in cardiac output. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Change of the human taste bud volume over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srur, Ehab; Stachs, Oliver; Guthoff, Rudolf; Witt, Martin; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Just, Tino

    2010-08-01

    The specific aim of this study is to measure the taste volume in healthy human subjects over a 2.5-month period and to demonstrate morphological changes of the peripheral taste organs. Eighteen human taste buds in four fungiform papillae (fPap) were examined over a 10-week period. The fungiform papillae investigated were selected based on the form of the papillae or the arrangement of surface taste pores. Measurements were performed over 10 consecutive weeks, with five scans in a day once a week. The following parameters were measured: height and diameter of the taste bud, diameter of the fungiform papilla and diameter of the taste pore. The findings of this exploratory study indicated that (1) taste bud volumes changed over a 10-week period, (2) the interval between two volume maxima within the 10-week period was 3-5 weeks, and (3) the diameter of the fPap did not correlate with the volume of a single taste bud or with the volume of all taste buds in the fPap within the 10-week period. This exploratory in vivo study revealed changes in taste bud volumes in healthy humans with age-related gustatory sensitivity. These findings need to be considered when studying the effect of denervation of fungiform papillae in vivo using confocal microscopy. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurement of cell volume changes by fluorescence self-quenching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, J.F.; Litman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    At high concentrations, certain fluorophores undergo self-quenching, i.e., fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing fluorophore concentration. Accordingly, the self-quenching properties can be used for measuring water volume changes in lipid vesicles. In cells, quantitative determination...... concentrations of the fluorophore calcein suitable for measurement of changes in cell water volume by self-quenching. The relationship between calcein fluorescence intensity, when excited at 490 nm (its excitation maximum), and calcein concentration was investigated in vitro and in various cultured cell types...... to a decrease in calcein fluorescence with high signal-to-noise ratio (>15). Similar results were obtained with the fluorophore BCECF when excited at its isosbestic wavelength (436 nm). The present results demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence self-quenching to measure rapid changes in cell water volume....

  3. ICP curve morphology and intracranial flow-volume changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unnerbäck, Mårten; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Reinstrup, Peter

    2018-01-01

    proposed to shape the ICP curve. This study tested the hypothesis that the ICP curve correlates to intracranial volume changes. METHODS: Cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were performed in neuro-intensive care patients with simultaneous ICP monitoring. The MRI was set......BACKGROUND: The intracranial pressure (ICP) curve with its different peaks has been extensively studied, but the exact physiological mechanisms behind its morphology are still not fully understood. Both intracranial volume change (ΔICV) and transmission of the arterial blood pressure have been...

  4. Early changes in left atrial volume after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkestrom, R.; Andersen, Mads J; Ersboll, M.

    2016-01-01

    . The objective was to assess changes in LA volume early after MI in patients with diastolic dysfunction and the relation to invasive hemodynamics and natriuretic peptides. Methods: 62 patients with left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) >= 45%, diastolic E/e' > 8 and LA volume index >34 ml/m(2) within 48 h......Background: Dilatation of left atrium (LA) reflects chronic LA pressure or volume overload that possesses considerable prognostic information. Little is known regarding the interaction between LA remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (MI) and left atrial pressure at rest and during exercise...... of MI were enrolled. After 1 and 4 months blood sampling, echocardiography and right heart catheterization were performed during exercise test. Results: LA remodeling was considered in patients with a change from mild (35-41 ml/m(2)), to severe (>48ml/m(2)) dilatation after 4 months (Found in 22...

  5. Changes in olfactory bulb volume following lateralized olfactory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoias, S; Pietsch, K; Hummel, T

    2017-08-01

    Repeated exposure to odors modifies olfactory function. Consequently, "olfactory training" plays a significant role in hyposmia treatment. In addition, numerous studies show that the olfactory bulb (OB) volume changes in disorders associated with olfactory dysfunction. Aim of this study was to investigate whether and how olfactory bulb volume changes in relation to lateralized olfactory training in healthy people. Over a period of 4 months, 97 healthy participants (63 females and 34 males, mean age: 23.74 ± 4.16 years, age range: 19-43 years) performed olfactory training by exposing the same nostril twice a day to 4 odors (lemon, rose, eucalyptus and cloves) while closing the other nostril. Before and after olfactory training, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed to measure OB volume. Furthermore, participants underwent lateralized odor threshold and odor identification testing using the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery.OB volume increased significantly after olfactory training (11.3 % and 13.1 % respectively) for both trained and untrained nostril. No significant effects of sex, duration and frequency of training or age of the subjects were seen. Interestingly, PEA odor thresholds worsened after training, while olfactory identification remained unchanged.These data show for the first time in humans that olfactory training may involve top-down process, which ultimately lead to a bilateral increase in olfactory bulb volume.

  6. Changes in atheroma volume estimated from digitized femoral arteriograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Erikson, U.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of treatment in patients with cardiovascular risk factors, valid and reproducible methods for assessing changes in atheroma volume are required. We postulated that these changes could be accurately estimated by repeat measurement of the lumen volume of the artery to be studied. With a computer-based technique, the lumen volume of a 20 cm segment of the femoral artery was measured in arteriograms from 107 patients with hypercholesterolemia. Films were digitized with use of a high-resolution scanner, cross-sectional areas were calculated with a slice thickness of 150 μm and the lumen volume was obtained by their integration. The validity of the method was demonstrated in model experiments. An automatic algorithm to correct for changes due to patient positioning was developed and validated in a model experiment. With repeat measurment 10 min and 11 to 13 months apart the coefficients of variation were 2.9% (N=107) and 6.1% (N=29), respectively. (orig.)

  7. A longitudinal study of brain volume changes in normal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, Hidemasa, E-mail: takaoh-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Hayashi, Naoto [Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Ohtomo, Kuni [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of normal aging on brain volumes and examine the effects of age and sex on the rates of changes in global and regional brain volumes. Methods: A total of 199 normal subjects (65 females and 134 males, mean age = 56.4 ± 9.9 years, age range = 38.1–82.9 years) were included in this study. Each subject was scanned twice, at an interval of about 2 years (range = 1.5–2.3 years). Two-time-point percentage brain volume change (PBVC) was estimated with SIENA 2.6. Results: The mean annualized PBVC was −0.23%/y. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) for annual brain volume changes revealed a main effect of age. There was no main effect of sex, nor was there a sex-by-age interaction. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a negative correlation between age and edge displacement values mainly in the periventricular region. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that brain atrophy accelerates with increasing age and that there is no gender difference in the rate of brain atrophy.

  8. A longitudinal study of brain volume changes in normal aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Hidemasa; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of normal aging on brain volumes and examine the effects of age and sex on the rates of changes in global and regional brain volumes. Methods: A total of 199 normal subjects (65 females and 134 males, mean age = 56.4 ± 9.9 years, age range = 38.1–82.9 years) were included in this study. Each subject was scanned twice, at an interval of about 2 years (range = 1.5–2.3 years). Two-time-point percentage brain volume change (PBVC) was estimated with SIENA 2.6. Results: The mean annualized PBVC was −0.23%/y. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) for annual brain volume changes revealed a main effect of age. There was no main effect of sex, nor was there a sex-by-age interaction. Voxel-wise analysis revealed a negative correlation between age and edge displacement values mainly in the periventricular region. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that brain atrophy accelerates with increasing age and that there is no gender difference in the rate of brain atrophy

  9. General review on climate change problems: causes, potential effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martellet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Greenhouse gases and greenhouse effect principles are reviewed and climate changes due to the human activities are discussed: identification of gases, human or natural causes, composition evolution in the atmosphere and relative roles of greenhouse gases. The various tools and calculations methods for evaluating the climate change due to greenhouse effect are presented. Several problems are stated: evolution of the climate structure in 2030, variations of the climatic extremes and the extreme phenomena, augmentation or diminution of the storms on a warmed planet, long term evolution of the climate. Some consequences of a climate change are reviewed: sea level raising, climate change effects on ecosystems. Precision and validity of these predictions are discussed; recommendations for diminishing the uncertainties are proposed

  10. Investigations of the changes in the bentonite structure caused by the different treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bentonite was treated in different ways and the changes in structure were monitored. Acid activation with sulphuric acid of investigated bentonite caused the increase in specific volume of micropore-mesopore. It was shown that activation by acid obtained at a constant temperature and constant period of time provides the possibility to obtain samples of bentonite of searched porosity only by changing the concentration of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. By thermal activation of bentonite clay in the temperature range 100-1100 0C, samples of desired porosity were acquired. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 174007i br. TR 34020

  11. Changes in taste bud volume during taste disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srur, Ehab; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Just, Tino

    2011-08-01

    On-line mapping and serial volume measurements of taste buds with confocal laser scanning microscopy provide information on the peripheral gustatory organ over time. We report the volumetric measurements of four selected fungiform papillae over 8 weeks in a 62-year-old man with taste disturbance, which was more apparent on the right than on the left side. In the two papillae on the right side, no taste buds were detected within the fungiform papillae in the sixth and eighth week. During sixth and eighth week, there was no response to the highest presented stimuli in electrogustometry (1 mA) on the right-sided tongue tip nor at the tongue edge. The morphology (shape, diameter) of the fungiform papillae on both sides remained unchanged. Comparison of the time course of the volume changes revealed differences corresponding to gustatory sensitivity. These findings suggest that the time course of volume changes indicated taste disturbance in our patient, rather than morphological changes in the fungiform papillae. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geometric changes of parotid glands caused by hydration during chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kager, Petronella M.; Weerdenburg, Sanne C. C. van; Kranen, Simon R. van; Beek, Suzanne van; Lamers-Kuijper, Elisabeth A.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Remeijer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plan adaptation during the course of (chemo)radiotherapy of H&N cancer requires repeat CT scanning to capture anatomy changes such as parotid gland shrinkage. Hydration, applied to prevent nephrotoxicity from cisplatin, could temporarily alter the hydrogen balance and hence the captured anatomy. The aim of this study was to determine geometric changes of parotid glands as function of hydration during chemoradiotherapy compared to a control group treated with radiotherapy only. This study included an experimental group (n = 19) receiving chemoradiotherapy, and a control group (n = 19) receiving radiotherapy only. Chemoradiotherapy patients received cisplatin with 9 l of saline solution during hydration in the first, fourth and seventh week. The delineations of the parotid glands on the planning CT scan were automatically propagated to Cone Beam CT scans using deformable image registration. Relative volume and position of the parotid glands were determined at the second chemotherapy cycle (week four) and at fraction 35. When saline solution was administrated, the volume temporarily increased on the first day (7.2 %, p < 0.001), second day (10.8 %, p < 0.001) and third day (7.0 %, p = 0.016). The gland positions shifted lateral, the distance between glands increased on the first day with 1.5 mm (p < 0.001), on the second day 2.2 mm (p < 0.001). At fraction 35, with both groups the mean shrinkage was 24 % ± 11 % (1SD) and the mean medial distance between the parotid glands decreased by 0.47 cm ± 0.27 cm. Hydration significantly modulates parotid gland geometry. Unless, in the context of adaptive RT, a repeat CT scan is timed during a chemotherapy cycle, these effects are of minor clinical relevance

  13. Implications of changing scattering properties on Greenland ice sheet volume change from Cryosat-2 altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg

    2017-01-01

    ) in the elevation change algorithm, to correct for temporal changes in the ratio between surface- and volume-scatter in Cryosat-2 observations. We present elevation and volume changes for the Greenland ice sheet in the period from 2010 until 2014. The waveform parameters considered here are the backscatter...... waveform parameters to be applicable for correcting for changes in volume scattering. The best results in the Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric mode area of the GrIS are found when applying only the backscatter correction, whereas the best result in the Low Resolution Mode area is obtained by only......Long-term observations of surface elevation change of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is of utmost importance when assessing the state of the ice sheet. Satellite radar altimetry offers a long time series of data over the GrIS, starting with ERS-1 in 1991. ESA's Cryosat-2 mission, launched in 2010...

  14. Changes in plasma volume and baroreflex function following resistance exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz, L. L.; Tatro, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of change in plasma volume (PV) and baroreflex responses have been reported over 24 h immediately following maximal cycle exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if PV and baroreflex showed similar changes for 24 h after resistance exercise. Eight men were studied on 2 test days, 1 week apart. On 1 day, per cent change (% delta) in PV was estimated at 0,3, and 6 h after resistance exercise using haematocrit and haemoglobin. Baseline PV was measured 24 h after exercise using Evans blue dye. The carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response was measured before, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h post-exercise. Each subject performed six sets of the bench press and leg press with 10 repetitions per set with a load that induced failure within each set. On a control day, the protocol was used without exercise. Plasma volume did not change during the control day. There was a 20% decrease in PV immediately post-exercise; the recovery of the PV was rapid and complete within 3 h. PV was 20% greater 24 h post-exercise than on the control day. There were no differences in any of the baroreflex measurements. Therefore, it is suggested that PV shifts may occur without altering baroreflex sensitivity.

  15. [MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES OF THE LIVER IN OBTURATION JAUNDICE, CAUSED BY CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS, DEPENDING ON ITS DURATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipliviy, V A; Yevtushenko, D V; Naumova, O V; Andreyeshchev, S A; Yevtushenko, A V

    2016-02-01

    Abstract The results of surgical treatment of 184 patients for obturation jaundice, caused by choledocholithiasis, were analyzed. Morphological changes of the liver were studied in 20 patients. There were three groups of patients delineated, depending on the obturation jaundice duration: up to 7 days, from 8 to 14 days, more than 15 days, and also a group of patients after the bile outflow restoration. The obturation jaundice occurrence in choledocholithiasis is accompanied by significant morphological changes in the liver, severity of which is enhancing while the obturation jaundice persistence increasing. While persistence of obturation jaundice through 8 days and more the connective tissue volume is enhancing, a relative volume of hepatocytes is reducing and a stromal-parenchymatous index is increasing. The bile outflow restoration secures significant reduction of intensity of alterative and inflammatory changes in hepatic parenchyma, as well as activation of reparative processes in the tissue. In cholangitis, caused by P. aeruginosa and E. coli, according to morphological investigations data, in the liver a diffuse purulent cholangitis on background of chronic changes in accordance to duration of the obturation jaundice persists.

  16. Challenges in Accommodating Volume Change of Si Anodes for Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Minseong; Chae, Sujong; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-11-01

    Si has been considered as a promising alternative anode for next-generation Li-ion batteries (LIBs) because of its high theoretical energy density, relatively low working potential, and abundance in nature. However, Si anodes exhibit rapid capacity decay and an increase in the internal resistance, which are caused by the large volume changes upon Li insertion and extraction. This unfortunately limits their practical applications. Therefore, managing the total volume change remains a critical challenge for effectively alleviating the mechanical fractures and instability of solid-electrolyte-interphase products. In this regard, we review the recent progress in volume-change-accommodating Si electrodes and investigate their ingenious structures with significant improvements in the battery performance, including size-controlled materials, patterned thin films, porous structures, shape-preserving shell designs, and graphene composites. These representative approaches potentially overcome the large morphologic changes in the volume of Si anodes by securing the strain relaxation and structural integrity in the entire electrode. Finally, we propose perspectives and future challenges to realize the practical application of Si anodes in LIB systems.

  17. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  18. Cerebral blood volume changes in cats with acute increased intracranial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takashi; Kano, Mitsumasa; Ikeda, Takuya.

    1984-01-01

    We measured the changes in cerebral blood volume in cats with increased intracranial pressure with a high-speed CT scanner, employing contrast effects by the iodine agent. In acute increased intracranial pressure caused by raising the extradural pressure by 20 mmHg, cerebral blood volume showed a significant decrease by 32% in comparison with that at normal intracranial pressure. There was also a tendency that a decline of iodine was delayed with time at increased intracranial pressure than that at normal pressure. This was supposed to be a delay of cerebral circulation due to venous congestion. This experimental model and measuring method provide the changes in CBV in the same individual without any tedious procedure, and therefore this is a reliable method with respect to precision. (author)

  19. Intrathecal volume changes in lumbar spinal canal stenosis following extension and flexion: An experimental cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Wolfram; Schwert, Martin; Zirke, Sonja; von Schulze Pellengahr, Christoph; Wiese, Matthias; Lahner, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The spinal canal stenosis is a common disease in elderly. The thecal sac narrowing is considered as the anatomical cause for the disease. There is evidence that the anatomical proportions of the lumbar spinal canal are influenced by postural changes. The liquor volume shift during these postural changes is a valuable parameter to estimate the dynamic qualities of this disease. The aim of this human cadaver study was the determination of intrathecal fluid volume changes during the lumbar flexion and the extension. A special measuring device was designed and built for the study to investigate this issue under controlled conditions. The measuring apparatus fixed the lumbar spine firmly and allowed only flexion and extension. The dural sac was closed water tight. The in vitro changes of the intrathecal volumes during the motion cycle were determined according to the principle of communicating vessels. Thirteen human cadaver spines from the Institute of Anatomy were examined in a test setting with a continuous adjustment of motion. The diagnosis of the lumbar spinal stenosis was confirmed by a positive computer tomography prior testing. The volume changes during flexion and extension cycles were measured stepwise in a 2 degree distance between 18° flexion and 18° extension. Three complete series of measurements were performed for each cadaver. Two specimens were excluded because of fluid leaks from further investigation. The flexion of the lumbar spine resulted in an intrathecal volume increase. The maximum volume effects were seen in the early flexion positions of 2° and 4°. The spine reclination resulted in a volume reduction. The maximum extension effect was seen between 14° and 16°. According to our results, remarkable volume effects were seen in the early movements of the lumbar spine especially for the flexion. The results support the concept of the spinal stenosis as a dynamic disease and allow a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this

  20. Beach Volume Change Using Uav Photogrammetry Songjung Beach, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, C. I.; Oh, T. S.

    2016-06-01

    Natural beach is controlled by many factors related to wave and tidal forces, wind, sediment, and initial topography. For this reason, if numerous topographic data of beach is accurately collected, coastal erosion/acceleration is able to be assessed and clarified. Generally, however, many studies on coastal erosion have limitation to analyse the whole beach, carried out of partial area as like shoreline (horizontal 2D) and beach profile (vertical 2D) on account of limitation of numerical simulation. This is an important application for prevention of coastal erosion, and UAV photogrammetry is also used to 3D topographic data. This paper analyses the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to 3D map and beach volume change. UAV (Quadcopter) equipped with a non-metric camera was used to acquire images in Songjung beach which is located south-east Korea peninsula. The dynamics of beach topography, its geometric properties and estimates of eroded and deposited sand volumes were determined by combining elevation data with quarterly RTK-VRS measurements. To explore the new possibilities for assessment of coastal change we have developed a methodology for 3D analysis of coastal topography evolution based on existing high resolution elevation data combined with low coast, UAV and on-ground RTK-VRS surveys. DSMs were obtained by stereo-matching using Agisoft Photoscan. Using GCPs the vertical accuracy of the DSMs was found to be 10 cm or better. The resulting datasets were integrated in a local coordinates and the method proved to be a very useful fool for the detection of areas where coastal erosion occurs and for the quantification of beach change. The value of such analysis is illustrated by applications to coastal of South Korea sites that face significant management challenges.

  1. BEACH VOLUME CHANGE USING UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY SONGJUNG BEACH, KOREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. I. Yoo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural beach is controlled by many factors related to wave and tidal forces, wind, sediment, and initial topography. For this reason, if numerous topographic data of beach is accurately collected, coastal erosion/acceleration is able to be assessed and clarified. Generally, however, many studies on coastal erosion have limitation to analyse the whole beach, carried out of partial area as like shoreline (horizontal 2D and beach profile (vertical 2D on account of limitation of numerical simulation. This is an important application for prevention of coastal erosion, and UAV photogrammetry is also used to 3D topographic data. This paper analyses the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV to 3D map and beach volume change. UAV (Quadcopter equipped with a non-metric camera was used to acquire images in Songjung beach which is located south-east Korea peninsula. The dynamics of beach topography, its geometric properties and estimates of eroded and deposited sand volumes were determined by combining elevation data with quarterly RTK-VRS measurements. To explore the new possibilities for assessment of coastal change we have developed a methodology for 3D analysis of coastal topography evolution based on existing high resolution elevation data combined with low coast, UAV and on-ground RTK-VRS surveys. DSMs were obtained by stereo-matching using Agisoft Photoscan. Using GCPs the vertical accuracy of the DSMs was found to be 10 cm or better. The resulting datasets were integrated in a local coordinates and the method proved to be a very useful fool for the detection of areas where coastal erosion occurs and for the quantification of beach change. The value of such analysis is illustrated by applications to coastal of South Korea sites that face significant management challenges.

  2. Simulating ecological changes caused by marine energy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchert, Pia; Elsaesser, Bjoern; Pritchard, Daniel; Kregting, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Marine renewable energy from wave and tidal technology has the potential to contribute significantly globally to energy security for future generations. However common to both tidal and wave energy extraction systems is concern regarding the potential environmental consequences of the deployment of the technology as environmental and ecological effects are so far poorly understood. Ecological surveys and studies to investigate the environmental impacts are time consuming and costly and are generally reactive; a more efficient approach is to develop 2 and 3D linked hydrodynamic-ecological modelling which has the potential to be proactive and to allow forecasting of the effects of array installation. The objective of the study was to explore tools which can help model and evaluate possible far- and near field changes in the environment and ecosystem caused by the introduction of arrays of marine energy devices. Using the commercial software, MIKE by DHI, we can predict and model possible changes in the ecosystem. MIKE21 and ECOLab modelling software provide the opportunity to couple high level hydrodynamic models with process based ecological models and/or agent based models (ABM). The flow solutions of the model were determined in an idealised tidal basin with the dimensions similar to that of Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland, a body of water renowned for the location of the first grid-connected tidal turbine, SeaGen. In the first instance a simple process oriented ecological NPZD model was developed which are used to model marine and freshwater systems describing four state variables, Nutrient, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton and Detritus. The ecological model was run and evaluated under two hydrodynamic scenarios of the idealised basin. This included no tidal turbines (control) and an array of 55 turbines, an extreme scenario. Whilst an array of turbines has an effect on the hydrodynamics of the Lough, it is unlikely to see an extreme effect on the NPZD model

  3. Remote sensing for global change, climate change and atmosphere and ocean forecasting. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume is separated in three sessions. First part is on remote sensing for global change (with global modelling, land cover change on global scale, ocean colour studies of marine biosphere, biological and hydrological interactions and large scale experiments). Second part is on remote sensing for climate change (with earth radiation and clouds, sea ice, global climate research programme). Third part is on remote sensing for atmosphere and ocean forecasting (with temperatures and humidity, winds, data assimilation, cloud imagery, sea surface temperature, ocean waves and topography). (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  4. Secular change of LOD caused by core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, C.; Rybicki, K. R.; Varga, P.

    2003-04-01

    Fossils and tidal deposits suggest that, on the average, the Earth's despinning rate had been five times less in the Proterozoic than in the Phanerozoic. This difference is probably due, for the major part, to the existence of a Proterozoic supercontinent. Nevertheless, core formation and core evolution should have compensated to some extent the effect of tidal friction, by diminishing the Earth's inertia moment. We have investigated quantitatively this contribution of the evolving core to the change of LOD. For the present epoch, we find that the solidification of the inner core causes a relative secular decrease of LOD of approximately 3 μs per century, whereas the macrodiffusion of iron oxides and sulfides from the D" into the outer core across the CMB (inasfar as Majewski's theory holds) leads to a relative secular decrease of LOD by about 15 μs per century. On the other hand, the theory of slow core formation developped by Runcorn in the early 1960s as a by-product of his theory of mantle-wide convection, leads to a relative secular decrease of LOD during most of the Proterozoic of about 0.25 ms per century. Although core formation is now widely assumed to have been a thermal run-away process that occurred shortly after the Earth itself had formed, Runcorn's theory of the growing core would nicely explain the observed palaeo-LOD curve. In any case, formation of the core implies, all in all, a relative decrease of LOD of typically 3 hours.

  5. Modeling key processes causing climate change and variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksson, S.

    2013-09-01

    Greenhouse gas warming, internal climate variability and aerosol climate effects are studied and the importance to understand these key processes and being able to separate their influence on the climate is discussed. Aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM and the COSMOS millennium model consisting of atmospheric, ocean and carbon cycle and land-use models are applied and results compared to measurements. Topics at focus are climate sensitivity, quasiperiodic variability with a period of 50-80 years and variability at other timescales, climate effects due to aerosols over India and climate effects of northern hemisphere mid- and high-latitude volcanic eruptions. The main findings of this work are (1) pointing out the remaining challenges in reducing climate sensitivity uncertainty from observational evidence, (2) estimates for the amplitude of a 50-80 year quasiperiodic oscillation in global mean temperature ranging from 0.03 K to 0.17 K and for its phase progression as well as the synchronising effect of external forcing, (3) identifying a power law shape S(f) {proportional_to} f-{alpha} for the spectrum of global mean temperature with {alpha} {approx} 0.8 between multidecadal and El Nino timescales with a smaller exponent in modelled climate without external forcing, (4) separating aerosol properties and climate effects in India by season and location (5) the more efficient dispersion of secondary sulfate aerosols than primary carbonaceous aerosols in the simulations, (6) an increase in monsoon rainfall in northern India due to aerosol light absorption and a probably larger decrease due to aerosol dimming effects and (7) an estimate of mean maximum cooling of 0.19 K due to larger northern hemisphere mid- and high-latitude volcanic eruptions. The results could be applied or useful in better isolating the human-caused climate change signal, in studying the processes further and in more detail, in decadal climate prediction, in model evaluation and in emission policy

  6. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro-reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationship, of the cardio-pulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venous Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). The results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  7. Theoretical study for volume changes associated with the helix-coil transition of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Harano, Y; Kovalenko, A; Hirata, F

    2001-12-01

    We calculate the partial molar volumes and their changes associated with the coil(extended)-to-helix transition of two types of peptide, glycine-oligomer and glutamic acid-oligomer, in aqueous solutions by using the Kirkwood-Buff solution theory coupled with the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. The volume changes associated with the transition are small and positive. The volume is analyzed by decomposing it into five contributions following the procedure proposed by Chalikian and Breslauer: the ideal volume, the van der Waals volume, the void volume, the thermal volume, and the interaction volume. The ideal volumes and the van der Waals volumes do not change appreciably upon the transition. In the both cases of glycine-peptide and glutamic acid-peptide, the changes in the void volumes are positive, while those in the thermal volumes are negative, and tend to balance those in the void volumes. The change in the interaction volume of glycine-peptide does not significantly contribute, while that of glutamic acid-peptide makes a negative contribution. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers 59: 512-519, 2001

  8. Change in tidal volume during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of inflations during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is to deliver an adequate tidal volume (VT) to facilitate gas exchange. However, no study has examined VT delivery during chest compression (CC) in detail to understand the effect of CC on lung aeration. The aim of the study was to examine VT changes during CC and their effect on lung aeration. Piglets were anaesthetised, instrumented and intubated with zero leak. They were then randomly assigned to CPR using either 3:1 compression:ventilation ratio (C:V) (n=6), continuous CC with asynchronous ventilations (CCaV) (90 CC/min with 30/min asynchronous ventilations) (n=6) or continuous CC superimposed with 30 s sustained inflations (CC+SI) with a CC rate of 120/min (n=5). A respiratory function monitor (NM3, Respironics, Philips, Andover, Massachusetts, USA) was used to continuously measure inspiration tidal volume (VTi) and expirational tidal volume (VTe). ANOVA with Bonferroni post-test were used to compare variables of all three groups. During the inflation in the 3:1 C:V group, the mean (SD) VTi and VTe was 23.5 (5.3) mL/kg and 19.4 (2.7) mL/kg (p=0.16), respectively. During the CC, we observed a significant VT loss in the 3:1 group with VTi and VTe being 4.1 (1.2) mL/kg and 11.1 (3.3) mL/kg (p=0.007), respectively. In the CCaV group, VTe was higher compared with VTi, but this was not significant. In the CC+SI group, a VT gain during each CC with VTi and VTe of 16.3 (3.2) mL/kg and 14 (3) mL/kg (p=0.21), respectively, was observed. VT delivery is improved using CC+SI compared with 3:1 C:V. This improvement in VT delivery may lead to better alveolar oxygen delivery and lung aeration. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Theoretical study of the partial molar volume change associated with the pressure-induced structural transition of ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Ohyama, Shusaku; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2007-09-01

    The partial molar volume (PMV) change associated with the pressure-induced structural transition of ubiquitin is analyzed by the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory of molecular solvation. The theory predicts that the PMV decreases upon the structural transition, which is consistent with the experimental observation. The volume decomposition analysis demonstrates that the PMV reduction is primarily caused by the decrease in the volume of structural voids in the protein, which is partially canceled by the volume expansion due to the hydration effects. It is found from further analysis that the PMV reduction is ascribed substantially to the penetration of water molecules into a specific part of the protein. Based on the thermodynamic relation, this result implies that the water penetration causes the pressure-induced structural transition. It supports the water penetration model of pressure denaturation of proteins proposed earlier.

  10. Longitudinal Changes in Total Brain Volume in Schizophrenia: Relation to Symptom Severity, Cognition and Antipsychotic Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijola, J.; Guo, J.Y.; Moilanen, J.S.; Jaaskelainen, E.; Miettunen, J.; Kyllonen, M.; Haapea, M.; Huhtaniska, S.; Alaraisanen, A.; Maki, P.; Kiviniemi, V.; Nikkinen, J.; Starck, T.; Remes, J.J.; Tanskanen, P.; Tervonen, O.; Wink, A.M.; Kehagia, A.; Suckling, J.; Kobayashi, H.; Barnett, J.H.; Barnes, A.; Koponen, H.J.; Jones, P.B.; Isohanni, M.; Murray, G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Studies show evidence of longitudinal brain volume decreases in schizophrenia. We studied brain volume changes and their relation to symptom severity, level of function, cognition, and antipsychotic medication in participants with schizophrenia and control participants from a general population

  11. Orthostatic leg blood volume changes assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truijen, J; Kim, Y S; Krediet, C T P

    2012-01-01

    posture, volume accumulation in small blood vessels contributes significantly to the total fluid volume accumulated in the legs. Considering that near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) tracks postural blood volume changes within the small blood vessels of the lower leg, we evaluated the NIRS-determined changes......-linear accumulation of blood volume in the small vessels of the leg, with an initial fast phase followed by a more gradual increase at least partly contributing to the relocation of fluid during orthostatic stress....

  12. "Causes" of pesticide safety behavior change in Latino farmworker families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Arcury, Thomas A; Talton, Jennifer W; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Trejo, Grisel; Mirabelli, Maria C; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-07-01

    To identify the source of behavior change resulting from a health education intervention focused on pesticide safety. Data were from the La Familia Sana demonstration project, a promotora-delivered pesticide safety education intervention conducted with immigrant Latinos (N = 610). The La Familia Sana program produced changes in 3 sets of pesticide safety behaviors. Changes in the conceptual targets of the intervention and promotora attributes explained 0.45-6% and 0.5-3% of the changes in pesticide-related behavior, respectively. The conceptual targets of the La Familia Sana program explained the greatest amount of change in pesticide-related behavior. Promotora attributes also contributed to intervention success.

  13. Stratospheric changes caused by geoengineering applications: potential repercussions and uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    , larger injections might be required than previously assumed. Rasch et al. (2008) showed that smaller particles would be advantageous in terms of cooling the surface. However, with a continuous injection of sulphur dioxide into to lower tropical stratosphere aerosol size distributions with mode radii larger than 0.5 microns are likely to form. An additional complication is that the sedimenting particles tend to heat the tropical tropopause region and as a consequence the entry mixing ratio of water vapour increases. For the extreme scenario of 10 Mt/year injection SOCOL predicts an enhancement of the water vapour entry mixing ratio by more than 1 ppmv. This is predicted to have a significant impact on the radiative forcing and the total ozone, because of enhanced heterogeneous reactions and because the increased water vapour intensifies the hydrogen and chlorine catalysed ozone destruction cycles. The intense warming of the lower stratosphere further intensifies the catalytic ozone destruction cycles. Furthermore, the stratospheric circulation is predicted to change due to the strong heating of the lower stratosphere. As a consequence of the intensified meridional temperature gradient the polar vortices are strengthened with enhanced formation of polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion. The ozone loss due to changed stratospheric dynamic is four times larger than the ozone loss caused by the increase of aerosol surface for heterogeneous reactions, which would postpone the recovery of the ozone hole even more as already pointed out by Tilmes et al. [2008]. At the same time the uncertainties involved in the different modelling steps are tremendous. Model validation, by comparing model runs of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption with observations, reveals that the temperature increase in the lower stratosphere and the tropopause region is probably overestimated by SOCOL. Other CCMs show similar behaviour. This lets us conclude that with the present modelling tools we are

  14. Impacts of climate change on rice production in Africa and causes of simulated yield changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oort, Pepijn A J; Zwart, Sander J

    2018-03-01

    This study is the first of its kind to quantify possible effects of climate change on rice production in Africa. We simulated impacts on rice in irrigated systems (dry season and wet season) and rainfed systems (upland and lowland). We simulated the use of rice varieties with a higher temperature sum as adaptation option. We simulated rice yields for 4 RCP climate change scenarios and identified causes of yield declines. Without adaptation, shortening of the growing period due to higher temperatures had a negative impact on yields (-24% in RCP 8.5 in 2070 compared with the baseline year 2000). With varieties that have a high temperature sum, the length of the growing period would remain the same as under the baseline conditions. With this adaptation option rainfed rice yields would increase slightly (+8%) but they remain subject to water availability constraints. Irrigated rice yields in East Africa would increase (+25%) due to more favourable temperatures and due to CO2 fertilization. Wet season irrigated rice yields in West Africa were projected to change by -21% or +7% (without/with adaptation). Without adaptation irrigated rice yields in West Africa in the dry season would decrease by -45% with adaptation they would decrease significantly less (-15%). The main cause of this decline was reduced photosynthesis at extremely high temperatures. Simulated heat sterility hardly increased and was not found a major cause for yield decline. The implications for these findings are as follows. For East Africa to benefit from climate change, improved water and nutrient management will be needed to benefit fully from the more favourable temperatures and increased CO2 concentrations. For West Africa, more research is needed on photosynthesis processes at extreme temperatures and on adaptation options such as shifting sowing dates. © 2017 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Factors influencing liver and spleen volume changes after donor hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ji Hee; Ryeom, Hunku; Song, Jung Hup [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    To define the changes in liver and spleen volumes in the early postoperative period after partial liver donation for living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine factors that influence liver and spleen volume changes. 27 donors who underwent partial hepatectomy for LDLT were included in this study. The rates of liver and spleen volume change, measured with CT volumetry, were correlated with several factors. The analyzed factors included the indocyanine green (ICG) retention rate at 15 minutes after ICG administration, preoperative platelet count, preoperative liver and splenic volumes, resected liver volume, resected-to-whole liver volume ratio (LV{sub R}/LV{sub W}), resected liver volume to the sum of whole liver and spleen volume ratio [LV{sub R}/(LV{sub W} + SV{sub 0})], and pre and post hepatectomy portal venous pressures. In all hepatectomy donors, the volumes of the remnant liver and spleen were increased (increased rates, 59.5 ± 50.5%, 47.9 ± 22.6%). The increment rate of the remnant liver volume revealed a positive correlation with LV{sub R}/LV{sub W} (r = 0.759, p < 0.01). The other analyzed factors showed no correlation with changes in liver and spleen volumes. The spleen and remnant liver volumes were increased at CT volumetry performed 2 weeks after partial liver donation. Among the various analyzed factors, LV{sub R}/LV{sub W} influences the increment rate of the remnant liver volume.

  16. Dynamic volume changes in astrocytes are an intrinsic phenomenon mediated by bicarbonate ion flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M Florence

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the major type of non-neuronal cells in the brain, play an important functional role in extracellular potassium ([K(+](o and pH homeostasis. Pathological brain states that result in [K(+](o and pH dysregulation have been shown to cause astrocyte swelling. However, whether astrocyte volume changes occur under physiological conditions is not known. In this study we used two-photon imaging to visualize real-time astrocyte volume changes in the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus CA1 region. Astrocytes were observed to swell by 19.0±0.9% in response to a small physiological increase in the concentration of [K(+](o (3 mM. Astrocyte swelling was mediated by the influx of bicarbonate (HCO(3- ions as swelling was significantly decreased when the influx of HCO(3- was reduced. We found: 1 in HCO(3- free extracellular solution astrocytes swelled by 5.4±0.7%, 2 when the activity of the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC was blocked the astrocytes swelled by 8.3±0.7%, and 3 in the presence of an extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA inhibitor astrocytes swelled by 11.4±0.6%. Because a significant HCO(3- efflux is known to occur through the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA channel, we performed a series of experiments to determine if astrocytes were capable of HCO(3- mediated volume shrinkage with GABA channel activation. Astrocytes were found to shrink -7.7±0.5% of control in response to the GABA(A channel agonist muscimol. Astrocyte shrinkage from GABA(A channel activation was significantly decreased to -5.0±0.6% of control in the presence of the membrane-permeant CA inhibitor acetazolamide (ACTZ. These dynamic astrocyte volume changes may represent a previously unappreciated yet fundamental mechanism by which astrocytes regulate physiological brain functioning.

  17. Nanoscopic morphological changes in yeast cell surfaces caused by oxidative stress: an atomic force microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M; Adya, Ashok K

    2009-06-01

    Nanoscopic changes in the cell surface morphology of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354), due to their exposure to varying concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (oxidative stress), were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration led to a decrease in cell viabilities and mean cell volumes, and an increase in the surface roughness of the yeasts. In addition, AFM studies revealed that oxidative stress caused cell compression in both S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe cells and an increase in the number of aged yeasts. These results confirmed the importance and usefulness of AFM in investigating the morphology of stressed microbial cells at the nanoscale. The results also provided novel information on the relative oxidative stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe.

  18. Insignificant change in Antarctic snowmelt volume since 1979

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Picard, G.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van Meijgaard, E.

    2012-01-01

    Surface snowmelt is widespread in coastal Antarctica. Satellite-based microwave sensors have been observing melt area and duration for over three decades. However, these observations do not reveal the total volume of meltwater produced on the ice sheet. Here we present an Antarctic melt volume

  19. Volume changes and electrostriction in the primary photoreactions of various photosynthetic systems: estimation of dielectric coefficient in bacterial reaction centers and of the observed volume changes with the Drude-Nernst equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, David; Hou, Jian-Min; Boichenko, Vladimir A

    2002-01-01

    Photoacoustics (PA) allows the determination of enthalpy and volume changes of photoreactions in photosynthetic reaction centers on the 0.1-10 mus time scale. These include the bacterial centers from Rb. sphaeroides, PS I and PS II centers from Synechocystis and in whole cells. In vitro and in vivo PA data on PS I and PS II revealed that both the volume change (-26 A(3)) and reaction enthalpy (-0.4 eV) in PS I are the same as those in the bacterial centers. However the volume change in PS II is small and the enthalpy far larger, -1 eV. Assigning the volume changes to electrostriction allows a coherent explanation of these observations. One can explain the large volume decrease in the bacterial centers with an effective dielectric coefficient of approximately 4. This is a unique approach to this parameter so important in estimation of protein energetics. The value of the volume contraction for PS I can only be explained if the acceptor is the super- cluster (Fe(4)S(4))(Cys(4)) with charge change from -1 to -2. The small volume change in PS II is explained by sub-mus electron transfer from Y(Z) anion to P(680) cation, in which charge is only moved from the Y(Z) anion to the Q(A) with no charge separation or with rapid proton transfer from oxidized Y(Z) to a polar region and thus very little change in electrostriction. At more acid pH equally rapid proton transfer from a neighboring histidine to a polar region may be caused by the electric field of the P(680) cation.

  20. Human choice and climate change. Volume 4: What have we learned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynor, S.; Malone, E.

    1998-01-01

    This book is Volume 4 of a four-volume set which assesses social science research that is relevant to global climate change from a wide-ranging interdisciplinary perspective. Attention is focused on lessons learned as related to climate change. This series is indispensable reading for scientists and engineers wishing to make an effective contribution to the climate change policy debate

  1. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we found that ventilating the normal lung with high peak pressure (45 cmH(2)0) and low positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP of 3 cmH(2)O) did not initially result in altered alveolar mechanics, but alveolar instability developed over time. Anesthetized rats underwent tracheostomy, were placed on pressure control ventilation, and underwent sternotomy. Rats were then assigned to one of three ventilation strategies: control group (n = 3, P control = 14 cmH(2)O, PEEP = 3 cmH(2)O), high pressure/low PEEP group (n = 6, P control = 45 cmH(2)O, PEEP = 3 cmH(2)O), and high pressure/high PEEP group (n = 5, P control = 45 cmH(2)O, PEEP = 10 cmH(2)O). In vivo microscopic footage of subpleural alveolar stability (that is, recruitment/derecruitment) was taken at baseline and than every 15 minutes for 90 minutes following ventilator adjustments. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was determined by measuring the area of individual alveoli at peak inspiration (I) and end expiration (E) by computer image analysis. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was quantified by the percentage change in alveolar area during tidal ventilation (%I - E Delta). Alveoli were stable in the control group for the entire experiment (low %I - E Delta). Alveoli in the high pressure/low PEEP group were initially stable (low %I - E Delta), but with time alveolar recruitment/derecruitment developed. The development of alveolar instability in the high pressure/low PEEP group was associated with histologic lung injury. A large change in

  2. Soil changes in forest ecosystems: evidence for and probable causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D W [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst. Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (US). Dept. of Range, Wildlife and Forestry; Cresser, M S [Aberdeen Univ. (GB). Dept. of Soil Science; Nilsson, S I [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research; Turner, John [New South Wales Forestry Commission, Sydney (AU). Wood Technology and Forest Research Div.; Ulrich, Bernhard [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Bodenkunde und Waldernaehrung; Binkley, Dan [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Forest and Wood Sciences; Cole, D W [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Coll. of Forest Resources

    1990-01-01

    A review of the literature on forest soil change in North America, Central Europe, Sweden, U.K., and Australia reveals that changes are occurring in both polluted and unpolluted sites at a greater rate than previously suspected. Acid deposition has played a major role in recent acidification in some areas of Europe and, to a more limited extent, in Sweden and eastern North America. However, rapid rates of soil acidification are occurring in western North America and Australia due to internal processes such as tree uptake and nitrification associated with excessive nitrogen fixation. The presence of extremely acid soils is not necessarily an indicator of significant acidic deposition, as evidenced by their presence in unpolluted, even pristine forests of the north-western U.S.A. and Alaska. Numerous studies in Sweden, Australia, and North America show the important effects of tree uptake and harvesting upon soil acidification in managed forests. Furthermore, arguments can be presented that harvesting takes a greater toll upon the pools of potentially limiting cations than leaching. The rate at which soils are changing in some instances calls for re-evaluation of the budget analyses used to predict soil change. Specifically, inter-horizon changes due to uptake and recycling by vegetation, the interactions of such changes with naturally-and anthropogenically-produced acids, and the effects of aluminium uptake and recycling need further evaluation and study. (Author).

  3. Bridge deck concrete volume change : final contract report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Concrete structures such as bridge decks, with large surface area relative to volume, shrink and crack, thus reducing service life performance and increasing operation costs. The project evaluated the early, first 24 hours, and long-term, 180 days, s...

  4. Cardiovascular changes in video-game players. Cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinup, G; Haw, T; Elias, A

    1983-12-01

    Video games are one of the most popular recreational activities among Americans of all ages, especially teenaged boys and young men. Studies of the health hazards of video-game playing have linked seizures, psychologic disturbances, and other health problems with the games. The study reported here measured changes in blood pressure and heart rate that occurred in 23 young men when they played a video game. The mean systolic blood pressure for the entire group was considerably higher during play than before or after and was significantly higher in novice players than in more skilled players. Heart rate was also significantly higher during play. In view of these results, other cardiovascular changes might be expected to occur during video-game playing. Although the changes reported here were minor, even minor cardiovascular alterations could potentially prove serious in persons with cardiovascular disease.

  5. Quantitative prediction of respiratory tidal volume based on the external torso volume change: a potential volumetric surrogate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guang; Arora, Naveen C; Xie Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Kaushal, Aradhana; Zach, Leor; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W; Lu Wei; Low, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    An external respiratory surrogate that not only highly correlates with but also quantitatively predicts internal tidal volume should be useful in guiding four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), as well as 4D radiation therapy (4DRT). A volumetric surrogate should have advantages over external fiducial point(s) for monitoring respiration-induced motion of the torso, which deforms in synchronization with a patient-specific breathing pattern. This study establishes a linear relationship between the external torso volume change (TVC) and lung air volume change (AVC) by validating a proposed volume conservation hypothesis (TVC = AVC) throughout the respiratory cycle using 4DCT and spirometry. Fourteen patients' torso 4DCT images and corresponding spirometric tidal volumes were acquired to examine this hypothesis. The 4DCT images were acquired using dual surrogates in cine mode and amplitude-based binning in 12 respiratory stages, minimizing residual motion artifacts. Torso and lung volumes were calculated using threshold-based segmentation algorithms and volume changes were calculated relative to the full-exhalation stage. The TVC and AVC, as functions of respiratory stages, were compared, showing a high correlation (r = 0.992 ± 0.005, p 2 = 0.980) without phase shift. The AVC was also compared to the spirometric tidal volumes, showing a similar linearity (slope = 1.030 ± 0.092, R 2 = 0.947). In contrast, the thoracic and abdominal heights measured from 4DCT showed relatively low correlation (0.28 ± 0.44 and 0.82 ± 0.30, respectively) and location-dependent phase shifts. This novel approach establishes the foundation for developing an external volumetric respiratory surrogate.

  6. Quantitative prediction of respiratory tidal volume based on the external torso volume change: a potential volumetric surrogate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guang; Arora, Naveen C; Xie Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Kaushal, Aradhana; Zach, Leor; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lu Wei; Low, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110 (United States)], E-mail: ligeorge@mail.nih.gov

    2009-04-07

    An external respiratory surrogate that not only highly correlates with but also quantitatively predicts internal tidal volume should be useful in guiding four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), as well as 4D radiation therapy (4DRT). A volumetric surrogate should have advantages over external fiducial point(s) for monitoring respiration-induced motion of the torso, which deforms in synchronization with a patient-specific breathing pattern. This study establishes a linear relationship between the external torso volume change (TVC) and lung air volume change (AVC) by validating a proposed volume conservation hypothesis (TVC = AVC) throughout the respiratory cycle using 4DCT and spirometry. Fourteen patients' torso 4DCT images and corresponding spirometric tidal volumes were acquired to examine this hypothesis. The 4DCT images were acquired using dual surrogates in cine mode and amplitude-based binning in 12 respiratory stages, minimizing residual motion artifacts. Torso and lung volumes were calculated using threshold-based segmentation algorithms and volume changes were calculated relative to the full-exhalation stage. The TVC and AVC, as functions of respiratory stages, were compared, showing a high correlation (r = 0.992 {+-} 0.005, p < 0.0001) as well as a linear relationship (slope = 1.027 {+-} 0.061, R{sup 2} = 0.980) without phase shift. The AVC was also compared to the spirometric tidal volumes, showing a similar linearity (slope = 1.030 {+-} 0.092, R{sup 2} = 0.947). In contrast, the thoracic and abdominal heights measured from 4DCT showed relatively low correlation (0.28 {+-} 0.44 and 0.82 {+-} 0.30, respectively) and location-dependent phase shifts. This novel approach establishes the foundation for developing an external volumetric respiratory surrogate.

  7. Causes of environmental change in the Alligator Rivers region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, J.

    1990-01-01

    Covering some 28,000 square kilometres of the Northern Territory, the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) includes the catchments of the East, South and West Alligator Rivers, and many small abandoned uranium mines. To introduce the problems of human impact on the ARR, the toxicologically significant aspects of the local environment were first examined, then the possible effects on it of mining and other human activities. It was found that the most deleterious impact on the region is not caused by mining but by human settlement, introduction of animals (notably the buffalo) and plants, the use of fire and tourism

  8. Temporal stress changes caused by earthquakes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.; Okada, Tomomi

    2018-01-01

    Earthquakes can change the stress field in the Earth’s lithosphere as they relieve and redistribute stress. Earthquake-induced stress changes have been observed as temporal rotations of the principal stress axes following major earthquakes in a variety of tectonic settings. The stress changes due to the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake were particularly well documented. Earthquake stress rotations can inform our understanding of earthquake physics, most notably addressing the long-standing problem of whether the Earth’s crust at plate boundaries is “strong” or “weak.” Many of the observed stress rotations, including that due to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, indicate near-complete stress drop in the mainshock. This implies low background differential stress, on the order of earthquake stress drop, supporting the weak crust model. Earthquake stress rotations can also be used to address other important geophysical questions, such as the level of crustal stress heterogeneity and the mechanisms of postseismic stress reloading. The quantitative interpretation of stress rotations is evolving from those based on simple analytical methods to those based on more sophisticated numerical modeling that can capture the spatial-temporal complexity of the earthquake stress changes.

  9. Changing weather causes behavioral responses in the lower mesopelagic

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, S; Rø stad, Anders; Aksnes, DL

    2017-01-01

    Mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers at a 700 m deep location in the Red Sea ascended 70 to 80 m during a passing rain storm that reduced light levels at the surface by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The changes in vertical distribution were

  10. Exploring the causes of change in adolescent girls' sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a changing trend in adolescent girls' sexual and reproductive behaviour in Ghana. However, contemporary perspectives on adolescent girls' sexual behaviours are largely missing hence this study. Thematic analysis of data collected through in-depth interviews with adolescent girls and community members as well ...

  11. Frequency of Iatrogenic Changes Caused from Overhang Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boteva E.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Overhangs from different restorations are an iatrogenic error with different results, short and long term consequences related to bone changes and periodontal diseases. Amalgam “tattoos”, idiopathic subgingival hypertrophy, marginal periodontitis and bone reductions in the intradental septum are major problems. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the frequency of traumatic restorations in distal teeth and clinical criteria, related to the x-ray findings. Evaluating criteria, for repairing the overhangs or for replacement of the restorations, is also a goal. Three hundred and sixteen - 316 patients from both sexes, 632 dental x-rays with 948 distal teeth and 632 restorations, at least two radiographs for each patient, were analyzed. Overhangs are classified in three groups: small, middle and large. In the criteria bone changes from the overhangs are analyzed separately from the existing or nonexisting bone changes from a generalized periodontal diseases. The frequency of iatrogenic changes in this cohort group is 10.6% from 632 restored teeth. This is a relatively small number compared with the other published studies. These overhangs are on distal teeth in sound teeth arches which makes them difficult for corrections. The evaluated criteria for replacement based on x-ray findings and clinical experience includes: operative and nonoperative corrections, restoration replacement, perio- and endo-therapy and follow up terms for secondary caries.

  12. Exploring the Causes of Change in Adolescent Girls' Sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    several factors accounting for the changes in adolescent girls' sexual and reproductive behaviour. These factors ... women aged 25-49 as 18.8 years in the urban areas ... tend to experience a long gap between menarche ... The teachers teach us how to use condoms ..... adolescent girls to pay attention to their advice on.

  13. Morphological changes in skin tumors caused by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalik, K G; Lipova, V A; Neyshtadt, E L

    1979-01-01

    Morphological changes induced by treating melanomas, basaloma and flatcell skin cancers with a pulsed neodymium laser at 1060 nm, pulse length 1 msec and energy 250 to 500 J/cm/sup 2/, were studied using impressions and scrapings from the affected area. Nuclear pyknosis, nuclear and cellular elongation, vacuolization, frequent complete loss of cytoplasm, particulaly in the zone of direct irradiation, and loss of cellular structure were seen. These dystrophic changes increased with closeness to the zone of direct irradiation, culminating in necrosis. Formed and decomposed blood elements and melanin accumulated in the intracellular spaces, due to disruption of capillaries and small arteries and veins. Fewer and more aggregated melanoblasts were found after melanoma irradiation. Nuclear chromatin fusion, cytoplasmic changes and altered cell shape were observed. Basaloma cells were clustered and elongated after irradiation, with many fibrous structures and loss of cellular elements. Cytoplasmic vacuolization and lysis, bare nuclei, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and karyopyknosis were seen in corneous flat-cell cancer. In the few cases in which malignant cells were found under the scab from the first treatment the procedure was repeated. The morphological changes induced by pulsed laser irradiation are very similar to electrocoagulation necrosis, but are more localized. The ability of low and middle energy lasers to induce thrombosis and coagulation in vascular walls reduced the probability of hematogenic tumor cell dissemination. Cytological examination is highly effective in determining the degree of radical skin cancer healing due to laser treatment. 12 references, 2 figures.

  14. The effect of γ radiation on a change in the volume of Protozoa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinowska, A.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on the effect of various doses of γ radiation on changes in the volume of Spirostomum ambiguum and on the time of return of the volume of this protozoan to the initial state. It was found that γ rays brought about a decrease in the volume of the animal, depending in a linear relation on the dose, while the return of the volume to the initial state is negatively correlated with the received dose. (author)

  15. Structural and volume changes and their correlation in electron irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavenda, Tadeáš; Gedeon, Ondrej; Jurek, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Volume changes were correlated with both incubation dose and Raman spectra. • Irradiation decreases Si-O-Si angle and increases the amount of three-membered rings. • Levelling of the pits depends on the dose below and above incubation dose. • Restoration of the original structure was limited to low-frequency region. - Abstract: Two binary alkali silicate glasses (15K 2 O·85SiO 2 – denoted as K15 and 15Li 2 O·85SiO 2 – denoted as Li15) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 2.1–15.9 kC/m 2 . Volume changes induced by electron irradiation were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Raman spectra were taken from the irradiated spots to observe structural changes. Volume compaction observed at lower doses was correlated with the increase of the D2 peak. Volume expansion at higher doses was related to migration of alkali ions. Irradiated glasses were annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C for 60 min. After annealing irradiated spots were again examined by AFM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine volume and structural relaxation of radiation induced changes. Annealing at higher temperatures resulted in the levelling of the pits created by irradiation, but only for doses below incubation dose. The pits created by doses above incubation dose were not levelled. Annealing caused decrease of D2 peak and shift of the Si-O-Si vibrations band in direction to original structure. Low-frequency region of annealed Li15 glass was undistinguishable from that of pristine glass, while annealing of K15 glass did not result in the full reversion to the original shape. The differences between glasses were attributed to higher T g of K15 glass. Q-motives bands of both glasses were not completely restored after annealing due to the absence of alkali ions.

  16. Structural and volume changes and their correlation in electron irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavenda, Tadeáš, E-mail: gavendat@vscht.cz [Department of Glass and Ceramics, University of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Gedeon, Ondrej [Department of Glass and Ceramics, University of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Jurek, Karel [Institute of Physics, Academy of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Volume changes were correlated with both incubation dose and Raman spectra. • Irradiation decreases Si-O-Si angle and increases the amount of three-membered rings. • Levelling of the pits depends on the dose below and above incubation dose. • Restoration of the original structure was limited to low-frequency region. - Abstract: Two binary alkali silicate glasses (15K{sub 2}O·85SiO{sub 2} – denoted as K15 and 15Li{sub 2}O·85SiO{sub 2} – denoted as Li15) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 2.1–15.9 kC/m{sup 2}. Volume changes induced by electron irradiation were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Raman spectra were taken from the irradiated spots to observe structural changes. Volume compaction observed at lower doses was correlated with the increase of the D2 peak. Volume expansion at higher doses was related to migration of alkali ions. Irradiated glasses were annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C for 60 min. After annealing irradiated spots were again examined by AFM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine volume and structural relaxation of radiation induced changes. Annealing at higher temperatures resulted in the levelling of the pits created by irradiation, but only for doses below incubation dose. The pits created by doses above incubation dose were not levelled. Annealing caused decrease of D2 peak and shift of the Si-O-Si vibrations band in direction to original structure. Low-frequency region of annealed Li15 glass was undistinguishable from that of pristine glass, while annealing of K15 glass did not result in the full reversion to the original shape. The differences between glasses were attributed to higher T{sub g} of K15 glass. Q-motives bands of both glasses were not completely restored after annealing due to the absence of alkali ions.

  17. Climate change and the causes of dam failures in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of poor dam construction methods in Australia and significant droughts occurring over the past 60 years, there is a danger that mistakes made during previous droughts will be repeated. Dams were often built in soils of very low moisture content to ensure a properly compacted bank. As a result of these poor construction methods, the drought years have produced an unusually high number of dam failures. This paper discussed the causes of dam failures such as dispersive clays and defects in associated structures. The discussion on dispersive clays included cracking, piping, tunneling, and slides. Dispersive clays occur in soils whose clay minerals separate into single grains when placed in contact with water and are associated with high soil erodability and their distribution often coincides with the occurrence of erosion gullying, rilling and piping. Dispersive clays in a dam embankment can result in the leaching out of material from the embankment with consequent erosion and failure. Defects in associated structures that were discussed included spillway blockage and outlet pipe blockage. It was concluded that dam failures are seldom due to one particular cause but rather due to one weakness triggering another. It was concluded that failures are difficult and expensive to remedy. 9 refs., 4 figs

  18. Modic changes, possible causes and relation to low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Hanne Birgit; Kjær, Per; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2007-01-01

    In patients with low back pain (LBP) it is only possible to diagnose a small proportion, (approximately 20%), on a patho-anatomical basis. Therefore, the identification of relevant LBP subgroups, preferably on a patho-anatomical basis, is strongly needed. Signal changes on MRI in the vertebral body......, and type 3 is sclerotic bone. The temporal evolution of MC is uncertain, but the time span is years. Subchondral bone marrow signal changes associated with pain can be observed in different specific infectious, degenerative and immunological diseases such as osseous infections, osteoarthritis, ankylosing...... cannot thrive in the highly aerobic environment of the MC type 1. Perspectives: One or both of the described mechanisms can - if proven - be of significant importance for this specific subgroup of patients with LBP. Hence, it would be possible to give a more precise and relevant diagnosis to 20...

  19. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V.; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-03-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection.

  20. [EEG changes in symptomatic headache caused by bruxism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieselmann, G; Grabmair, W; Logar, C; Permann, R; Moser, F

    1987-02-20

    EEG recordings were carried out on 36 patients with the verified diagnosis of bruxism and unilateral headache. Occlusal splints were applied in the long-term management of these patients. Initial EEG recordings showed pathological changes in 56% of the patients. The EEG recordings were repeated two and six weeks later in these patients and following improvement in the clinical symptomatology pathological EEG patterns were detected in only 22% of all cases. This decrease is of statistical significance.

  1. Present day sea level changes: observation and causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, A.

    2005-11-01

    Whereas sea level has changed little over the last 2000 years, it has risen at a rate of about 2 mm/year during the 20. century. This unexpected sea level rise has been attributed to the anthropogenic global warming, recorded over several decades. Sea level variations have been measured globally and precisely for about 12 years due to satellite altimeter missions Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1. These observations indicate a global mean sea level rise of about 3 mm/year since 1993, a value significantly larger than observed during previous decades. Recent observations have allowed us to quantify the various climatic factors contributing to observed sea level change: thermal expansion of sea water due to ocean warming, melting of mountain glaciers and ice sheets, and changes in the land water reservoirs. A water budget based on these new observations allows us to partly explain the observed sea level rise. In particular, we show that the thermal expansion explains only 25% of the secular sea level rise as recorded by tide-gauges over the last 50 years, while it contributes about 50% of sea level rise observed over the last decade. Meanwhile, recent studies show that glacier and ice sheet melting could contribute the equivalent of 1 mm/year in sea level rise over the last decade. In addition, the high regional variability of sea level trends revealed by satellite altimetry is mainly due to thermal expansion. There is also an important decadal spatio-temporal variability in the ocean thermal expansion over the last 50 years, which seems to be controlled by natural climate fluctuations. We question for the first time the link between the decadal fluctuations in the ocean thermal expansion and in the land reservoirs, and indeed their climatic contribution to sea level change. Finally a preliminary analysis of GRACE spatial gravimetric observations over the oceans allows us to estimate the seasonal variations in mean sea level due to ocean water mass balance variations

  2. Climate Change: Causes, Consequences, and How to Respond

    OpenAIRE

    Liverman, Diana; MacDonald, Glen

    2009-01-01

    Diana Liverman explores the theoretical positions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions including “earth-system management”, cap and trade policies, individual and community behavioral change, political economy of carbon governance (“carbon capitalism”), and government regulation and incentives. She supports a blending of the last three to produce “political ecology”. Liverman is critical of the Kyoto Accords but argues in favor of the Clean Development Mechanism [CDM] with some significant a...

  3. MODEL PERUBAHAN VOLUME KERIPIK BUAH SELAMA PROSES PENGGORENGAN SECARA VAKUM [Model for Volume Changes in Fruit Chips during Vacuum Frying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaluddin1*

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Expansion and puffing are specific characteristics of fried products critical for consumer preferences. To obtain expanded and puffed dried products that fit well with consumer acceptance criteria, it is necessary to pay attention to the process conditions which change the raw material characteristics during frying. The important changes include volume and density ratio of the products during frying. Hypothetically, these changes are due to water vaporization and the decrease dry matter in the products. The objective of this research is to develop a mathematical model of volume and density ratio changes for jack fruit during vacuum frying as a function of water and starch content reductions. Samples were vacuum fried at 70–100OC and pressure of 80-90 kPa for 15–60 min. The parameters observed were volume and density as well as water and starch contents of samples before and after vacuum frying. The results showed that the developed model can be used to predict changes in volume and density ratio of jack fruit during vacuum frying.

  4. Procedures for treating common cause failures in safety and reliability studies: Volume 2, Analytic background and techniques: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosleh, A.; Fleming, K.N.; Parry, G.W.; Paula, H.M.; Worledge, D.H.; Rasmuson, D.M.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents a framework for the inclusion of the impact of common cause failures in risk and reliability evaluations. Common cause failures are defined as that subset of dependent failures for which causes are not explicitly included in the logic model as basic events. The emphasis here is on providing procedures for a practical, systematic approach that can be used to perform and clearly document the analysis. The framework and the methods discussed for performing the different stages of the analysis integrate insights obtained from engineering assessments of the system and the historical evidence from multiple failure events into a systematic, reproducible, and defensible analysis. This document, Volume 2, contains a series of appendices that provide additional background and methodological detail on several important topics discussed in Volume 1

  5. Symptom dimensions are associated with progressive brain volume changes in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collin, G.; Derks, E. M.; van Haren, N. E. M.; Schnack, H. G.; Hulshoff Pol, H. E.; Kahn, R. S.; Cahn, W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is considerable variation in progressive brain volume changes in schizophrenia. Whether this is related to the clinical heterogeneity that characterizes the illness remains to be determined. This study examines the relationship between change in brain volume over time and

  6. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  7. Changing weather causes behavioral responses in the lower mesopelagic

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, S

    2017-05-10

    Mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers at a 700 m deep location in the Red Sea ascended 70 to 80 m during a passing rain storm that reduced light levels at the surface by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The changes in vertical distribution were observed down to the deepest part of the water column and were interpreted as a response to sudden dark weather. However, light measurements suggest that the mesopelagic targets (fish) did not fully compensate for the reduction in ambient light, and the calculated light levels in the scattering layers were similar to 1 order of magnitude lower during the passage of the storm. The results show that fluctuating weather conditions may affect pelagic ecosystems even towards the lower parts of the mesopelagic zone.

  8. Water Discharge and Sediment Load Changes in China: Change Patterns, Causes, and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, monthly hydrological and daily meteorological data were collected across China for the period 1956–2012. Modified Mann–Kendall tests, double mass curve analysis, and correlation statistics were performed to identify the long-term trends and interrelation of the hydrometeorological variables and to examine the influencing factors of streamflow and sediment. The results are as follows: (1 In the last 60 years, the streamflow in northern China has shown different decreasing trends. For the southern rivers, the streamflow presented severe fluctuations, but the declining trend was insignificant. For the streamflow in western China, an increasing trend was shown. (2 In the northern rivers, the streamflow was jointly controlled by the East Asian monsoon and westerlies. In the southern rivers, the runoff was mainly influenced by the Tibet–Qinghai monsoon, the South Asian monsoon, and westerlies. (3 Sediment loads in the LCRB (Lancang River Basin and YZRB (Yarlung Zangbo River Basin did not present significant change trends, although other rivers showed different degrees of gradual reduction, particularly in the 2000s. (4 Underlying surface and precipitation changes jointly influenced the streamflow in eastern rivers. The water consumption for industrial and residential purposes, soil and water conservation engineering, hydraulic engineering, and underlying surface changes induced by other factors were the main causes of streamflow and sediment reduction.

  9. Factors influencing liver and spleen volume changes after donor hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Ji Hee; Ryeom, Hunku; Song, Jung Hup

    2013-01-01

    To define the changes in liver and spleen volumes in the early postoperative period after partial liver donation for living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine factors that influence liver and spleen volume changes. 27 donors who underwent partial hepatectomy for LDLT were included in this study. The rates of liver and spleen volume change, measured with CT volumetry, were correlated with several factors. The analyzed factors included the indocyanine green (ICG) retention rate at 15 minutes after ICG administration, preoperative platelet count, preoperative liver and splenic volumes, resected liver volume, resected-to-whole liver volume ratio (LV R /LV W ), resected liver volume to the sum of whole liver and spleen volume ratio [LV R /(LV W + SV 0 )], and pre and post hepatectomy portal venous pressures. In all hepatectomy donors, the volumes of the remnant liver and spleen were increased (increased rates, 59.5 ± 50.5%, 47.9 ± 22.6%). The increment rate of the remnant liver volume revealed a positive correlation with LV R /LV W (r = 0.759, p R /LV W influences the increment rate of the remnant liver volume.

  10. Fatigue caused by temperature changes in mixing tees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenhoefer, Horst

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected damages at mixing tees in piping systems in the past, one of them in the French NPP Civaux, raised questions concerning the basic cause for these events. Assumptions lead to the postulation of a ''new'' degradation mechanism which was called ''striping'', mainly based on thermal fluctuations in the mixing zone of hot and cold fluid which would be transferred to the internal wall of the pipe resulting in High Cycle Fatigue (HCF). Experiments and CFD simulations have been performed to understand the degradation mechanism behind the damages in order to find adequate measures to control that mechanism in future. The knowledge and assessment of all relevant degradation mechanisms is prerequisite for the application of the Integrity Concept, part of the German KTA 3201.4. In this paper numerous publications concerning striping are reviewed and assessed. The published experiments and simulations are separated into two main groups. The first group should help to understand the details of the mixing fluid flow and the corresponding thermal fluctuations. The second group should verify the damage mechanism of local thermal cycles as a HCF load. Latest simulation results and a detailed assessment of the heat transfer between fluid and structure are explained to understand and describe the degradation mechanism of striping and to define adequate measures for failure prevention. It is shown that if the procedure of monitoring and assessment, including the optimization of operational modes, is applied, which some utilities have been practicing for many years, the ''new'' degradation mechanism of striping is covered as well. Finally the conclusions are validated by transferring them to real damages proving that with the new knowledge the damages can be explained and the Integrity Concept can still be applied if the guidelines are realized in practice. (orig.)

  11. Does apricot seeds consumption cause changes in human urine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Tušimová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural substances, such as amygdalin, used in alternative medicine gained high popularity. Common people as well as patients with different diseases have almost unlimited access to various natural supplements. To protect human health, it is very important to study effect of these substances. Amygdalin is a cyanogenic glucoside derived from seeds of rosaceous plants, for example seeds of bitter almonds (Prunus dulcis, or apricot, cherry, apple, peach, plum, etc. It is a natural product that owns antitumor activity, it has also been used for the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, leprosy and diabetes and produces a kind of antitussive and antiasthmatic effects. The present in vivo study was designed to reveal whether amygdalin in apricot seeds has got an effect on human urine composition, pH value and urine associated health status after six weeks of oral administration. The study group finally consisted of 34 healthy adult volunteers (21 females and 13 males. All participants were asked to consume 60 mg.kg-1 body weight of bitter apricot seeds daily (approximately 3.0 mg.kg-1 of amygdalin during 6 weeks. During the experiment, three urine collections were carried out (first collection - at the beginning of the experiment; second collection - after 21 days; third collection - after 42 days. Quantification of urine calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, phosphorus (P, sodium (Na, potassium (K, chlorides (Cl-, urea and pH value after apricot seeds supplementation was performed. Statistical analysis of variance showed, that consumption of bitter apricot seeds during 42 days had a significant (p <0.01 effect on amount of calcium excreted in urine, though this decrease shifted its level from elevated mean value in control collection into normal physiological range. Significant changes were observed in urea (p <0.05 and phosphorus (p <0.01 levels in urine after apricot seed ingestion, but gender was also considered to be a source of their variation.

  12. Hmong demographic changes in Laos: causes and ecological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireson, W R

    1995-10-01

    This study of the Hmong in Laos is based on ethnographic research conducted during a three week stay in the Nong Het district of Xieng Khouang province. Information was collected on the household agricultural economy, village and household movement, family composition and change, cropping and animal husbandry, and environmental resources. The study area east of the Mekong River and near the Vietnamese border is an infrequently studied area. Findings differ from the ethnographic literature that portrays the Hmong as migrating frequently as swidden fields are exhausted, as living in large extended families, and as polygynous. The Hmong are the second largest minority in Laos (231,000), but are only 0.1% of Thailand's total population (90,000). There are 558,000 Hmong in Vietnam, but 5 million in China. Most rural Hmong in Laos produce opium as a necessary crop for sustaining their household farming economy. Although areas near the study area were involved in major military action during 1960-73, the study area received minimal disruption. Four studies of the Hmong in Laos and Thailand indicated that the Hmong stayed at one residence about 7 years, that residence varied from 6-16 years, and that settlements were short-lived. Household size ranged from 4 to 47 households. The Hmong in this study were more sedentary. In 1990, the villages averaged about 45 households. The population ranged in age from 19 years to 87 years. The Hmong had a high birth rate and a high mortality rate due to poor diet and lack of adequate medical care. 45% of the Nong Het population were aged under 14 years, which suggests a baby boom after the war. The dependency ratio was very high. Polygyny was uncommon. Of the 154 households, the average size was small at 7.40 persons. 71% were nuclear families. Patrilocal residence after marriage was still practiced, but the time spent in the father's home was reduced. The findings suggest that the Hmong are likely to become sedentary due to limits on

  13. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia: the effect of arterial blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether previously reported changes in venous blood volume and composition induced by acute hypoglycaemia in humans are representative for the entire body we measured erythrocyte 51Cr content, haematocrit, plasma volume, intravascular albumin content and transcapillary escape rate...... hypoglycaemia. The magnitude of the changes in arterial and venous blood were not significantly different. These results indicate that the above changes in blood volume and composition are whole-body phenomena: furthermore, the major part of the changes are likely to occur in tissues other than upper extremity...

  14. A multi-step dealloying method to produce nanoporous gold with no volume change and minimal cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Ye [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Balk, T. John [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)], E-mail: balk@engr.uky.edu

    2008-05-15

    We report a simple two-step dealloying method for producing bulk nanoporous gold with no volume change and no significant cracking. The galvanostatic dealloying method used here appears superior to potentiostatic methods for fabricating millimeter-scale samples. Care must be taken when imaging the nanoscale, interconnected sponge-like structure with a focused ion beam, as even brief exposure caused immediate and extensive cracking of nanoporous gold, as well as ligament coarsening at the surface00.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of hydrogeological parameters affecting groundwater storage change caused by sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, K.-K.

    2012-04-01

    Sea level rise, which is one of the representative phenomena of climate changes caused by global warming, can affect groundwater system. The rising trend of the sea level caused by the global warming is reported to be about 3 mm/year for the most recent 10 year average (IPCC, 2007). The rate of sea level rise around the Korean peninsula is reported to be 2.30±2.22 mm/yr during the 1960-1999 period (Cho, 2002) and 2.16±1.77 mm/yr (Kim et al., 2009) during the 1968-2007 period. Both of these rates are faster than the 1.8±0.5 mm/yr global average for the similar 1961-2003 period (IPCC, 2007). In this study, we analyzed changes in the groundwater environment affected by the sea level rise by using an analytical methodology. We tried to find the most effective parameters of groundwater amount change in order to estimate the change in fresh water amount in coastal groundwater. A hypothetical island model of a cylindrical shape in considered. The groundwater storage change is bi-directional as the sea level rises according to the natural and hydrogeological conditions. Analysis of the computation results shows that topographic slope and hydraulic conductivity are the most sensitive factors. The contributions of the groundwater recharge rate and the thickness of aquifer below sea level are relatively less effective. In the island with steep seashore slopes larger than 1~2 degrees or so, the storage amount of fresh water in a coastal area increases as sea level rises. On the other hand, when sea level drops, the storage amount decreases. This is because the groundwater level also rises with the rising sea level in steep seashores. For relatively flat seashores, where the slope is smaller than around 1-2 degrees, the storage amount of coastal fresh water decreases when the sea level rises because the area flooded by the rising sea water is increased. The volume of aquifer fresh water in this circumstance is greatly reduced in proportion to the flooded area with the sea

  16. Characterization of Target Volume Changes During Breast Radiotherapy Using Implanted Fiducial Markers and Portal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Yarnold, John R.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Evans, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine target volume changes by using volume and shape analysis for patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery and to compare different methods of automatically identifying changes in target volume, position, size, and shape during radiotherapy for use in adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy had fiducial markers sutured into the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Patients underwent imaging using computed tomography (for planning and at the end of treatment) and during treatment by using portal imaging. A marker volume (MV) was defined by using the measured marker positions. Changes in both individual marker positions and MVs were identified manually and using six automated similarity indices. Comparison of the two types of analysis (manual and automated) was undertaken to establish whether similarity indices can be used to automatically detect changes in target volumes. Results: Manual analysis showed that 3 patients had significant MV reduction. This analysis also showed significant changes between planning computed tomography and the start of treatment for 9 patients, including single and multiple marker movement, deformation (shape change), and rotation. Four of the six similarity indices were shown to be sensitive to the observed changes. Conclusions: Significant changes in size, shape, and position occur to the fiducial marker-defined volume. Four similarity indices can be used to identify these changes, and a protocol for their use in adaptive radiotherapy is suggested

  17. Secondary radiation damage as the main cause for unexpected volume effects: A histopathologic study of the parotid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, Antonius W.T.; Faber, Hette; Cotteleer, Femmy; Vissink, Arjan; Coppes, Rob P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate with a histopathological study the mechanism of region-dependent volume effects in the partly irradiated parotid gland of the rat. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were locally X-irradiated with collimators with conformal radiation portals for 100% volume and 50% cranial/caudal partial volumes. Single doses up to 40 Gy were applied. Parotid saliva samples were collected, and the three lobes of the parotid gland were examined individually on the macro- and micromorphologic level up to 1 year after irradiation. Results: Dose-dependent loss of gland weight was observed 1 year after total or partial X-irradiation. Weight loss of the glands correlated very well with loss of secretory function. Irradiating the cranial 50% volume (implicating a shielded lateral lobe) resulted in substantially more damage in terms of weight loss and loss of secretory function than 50% caudal irradiation (shielding the ventral and dorsal lobe). Histologic examinations of the glands 1 year after irradiation revealed that the shielded lateral lobe was severely affected, in contrast to the shielded ventral and dorsal lobes. Time studies showed that irradiation of the cranial 50% volume caused late development of secondary damage in the shielded lateral lobe, becoming manifest between 240 and 360 days after irradiation. The possible clinical significance of this finding is discussed. Conclusion: It is concluded that the observed region-dependent volume effect for late function loss in the rat parotid gland after partial irradiation is mainly caused by secondary events in the shielded lateral lobe. The most probable first step (primary radiation event) in the development of this secondary damage is radiation exposure to the hilus region (located between the ventral and dorsal lobe). By injuring major excretory ducts and supply routes for blood and nerves in this area, the facility system necessary for proper functioning of the nonexposed lateral lobe is seriously affected

  18. Changes in superior mesenteric artery Doppler waveform during reduction of cardiac stroke volume and hypotension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Perko, Grazyna; Just, S

    1996-01-01

    the hypovolemia. Alterations in pV and pulsatility indices were closely related to changes in stroke volume, and a negative correlation was found between diastolic velocities and stroke volume. regression analysis showed no significant relation between variations in velocity parameters and blood pressure. Results...

  19. Modulation of KCNQ4 channel activity by changes in cell volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Charlotte; Klaerke, Dan A; Hoffmann, Else K

    2004-01-01

    KCNQ4 channels expressed in HEK 293 cells are sensitive to cell volume changes, being activated by swelling and inhibited by shrinkage, respectively. The KCNQ4 channels contribute significantly to the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) process following cell swelling. Under isoosmotic conditions...

  20. Changes in down dead wood volume across a chronosequence of silvicultural openings in southern Indiana forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Jenkins; George R. Parker

    1997-01-01

    The volume and decay stages of down dead wood were evaluated across a chronosequence of 46 silvicultural openings and 10 uncut control stands to determine how down dead wood volume changes with stand development. Openings ranged in age from 8 to 26 years and were divided into three age groups: (1) 16 years. Individual logs...

  1. Adaptation approaches for conserving ecosystems services and biodiversity in dynamic landscapes caused by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald J. Schmitz; Anne M. Trainor

    2014-01-01

    Climate change stands to cause animal species to shift their geographic ranges. This will cause ecosystems to become reorganized across landscapes as species migrate into and out of specific locations with attendant impacts on values and services that ecosystems provide to humans. Conservation in an era of climate change needs to ensure that landscapes are resilient by...

  2. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  3. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change

  4. Volume changes of extremely large and giant intracranial aneurysms after treatment with flow diverter stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Angelo; Byrne, James V. [ohn Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford Neurovascular and Neuroradiology Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); Rane, Neil; Kueker, Wilhelm; Cellerini, Martino; Corkill, Rufus [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    This study assessed volume changes of unruptured large and giant aneurysms (greatest diameter >20 mm) after treatment with flow diverter (FD) stents. Clinical audit of the cases treated in a single institution, over a 5-year period. Demographic and clinical data were retrospectively collected from the hospital records. Aneurysm volumes were measured by manual outlining at sequential slices using computerised tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography data. The audit included eight patients (seven females) with eight aneurysms. Four aneurysms involved the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA), three the supraclinoid ICA and one the basilar artery. Seven patients presented with signs and symptoms of mass effect and one with seizures. All but one aneurysm was treated with a single FD stent; six aneurysms were also coiled (either before or simultaneously with FD placement). Minimum follow-up time was 6 months (mean 20 months). At follow-up, three aneurysms decreased in size, three were unchanged and two increased. Both aneurysms that increased in size showed persistent endosaccular flow at follow-up MR; in one case, failure was attributed to suboptimal position of the stent; in the other case, it was attributed to persistence of a side branch originating from the aneurysm (similar to the endoleak phenomenon of aortic aneurysms). At follow-up, five aneurysms were completely occluded; none of these increased in volume. Complete occlusion of the aneurysms leads, in most cases, to its shrinkage. In cases of late aneurysm growth or regrowth, consideration should be given to possible endoleak as the cause. (orig.)

  5. Functional changes in CSF volume estimated using measurement of water T2 relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piechnik, S.K.; Evans, J.; Bary, L.H.; Wise, R.G.; Jezzard, P.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides hydraulic suspension for the brain. The general concept of bulk CSF production, circulation, and reabsorption is well established, but the mechanisms of momentary CSF volume variation corresponding to vasoreactive changes are far less understood. Nine individuals

  6. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia: the effect of arterial blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bendtsen, Flemming; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether previously reported changes in venous blood volume and composition induced by acute hypoglycaemia in humans are representative for the entire body we measured erythrocyte 51Cr content, haematocrit, plasma volume, intravascular albumin content and transcapillary escape rate...... hypoglycaemia. The magnitude of the changes in arterial and venous blood were not significantly different. These results indicate that the above changes in blood volume and composition are whole-body phenomena: furthermore, the major part of the changes are likely to occur in tissues other than upper extremity...... of albumin in arterial and venous blood in seven healthy subjects before and during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. In both vascular sites blood 51Cr content and the haematocrit increased, plasma volume and intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin increased during...

  7. Prediction of acute cardiac rejection by changes in left ventricular volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.K.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen patients underwent heart transplantation (11 orthotopic, five heterotopic). Monitoring for acute rejection was by both endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) and multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning with technetium 99m-labelled red blood cells. From the scans information was obtained on left ventricular volumes (stroke, end-diastolic, and end-systolic), ejection fraction, and heart rate. Studies (208) were made in the 16 patients. There was a highly significant correlation between the reduction in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume (and a less significant correlation in end-systolic volume) and increasing acute rejection seen on EMB. Heart rate and ejection fraction did not correlate with the development of acute rejection. Correlation of a combination of changes in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume with EMB showed a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 96%. Radionuclide scanning is therefore a useful noninvasive tool for monitoring acute rejection

  8. Dosimetric impact of prostate volume change between CT-based HDR brachytherapy fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-C.; Lessard, Etienne; Vujic, Jasmina; Pouliot, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The objective is to evaluate the prostate volume change and its dosimetric consequences after the insertion of catheters for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: For 13 consecutive patients, a spiral CT scan was acquired before each of the 2 fractions, separated on average by 20 hours. The coordinates of the catheters were obtained on 3 axial CT slices corresponding to apex, mid portion, and base portion of the prostate. A mathematical expansion model was used to evaluate the change of prostate volumes between the 2 fractions. It is based on the difference in the cube of the average distance between the centroid and catheter positions. The variation of implant dose-volume histograms between fractions was computed for plans produced by either inverse planning based on simulated annealing or geometric optimization. Results: The average magnitude of either increase or reduction in prostate volume was 7.8% (range, 2-17%). This volume change corresponds to an average prostate radius change of only 2.5% (range, 0.7-5.4%). For 5 patients, the prostate volume increased on average by 9% (range, 2-17%), whereas a reduction was observed for 8 patients by an average of 7% (range, 2-13%). More variation was observed at the prostate base than at mid or apex gland. The comparison of implant dose-volume histograms showed a small reduction of V100 receiving the prescription dose, with an average of 3.5% (range, 0.5-12%) and 2.2% (range, 1-6%) for inverse planning based on our simulated annealing and geometric optimization plans, respectively. Conclusion: Small volume change was observed between treatment fractions. This translates into small changes in dose delivered to the prostate volume

  9. Responding to Social Change. Community Development Series, Volume 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honikman, Basil, Ed.

    This book presents a spectrum of the environmental design and research issues of today, an introduction to the field as a whole, and an emphasis on the need for changes in attitudes and procedures in the disciplines. Contributions, multidisciplinary in approach, range from a diversity of perspectives, including urban planning, social and…

  10. Cell volume changes affect gluconeogenesis in the perfused liver of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These changes were partly blocked in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that the aniso-osmotic regulations of gluconeogenesis possibly occurs through an inverse regulation of enzyme proteins and/or a regulatory protein synthesis in this catfish. In conclusion, gluconeogenesis appears to play a vital role in C.

  11. Analyzing temporal changes in maximum runoff volume series of the Danube River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halmova, Dana; Pekarova, Pavla; Onderka, Milan; Pekar, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Several hypotheses claim that more extremes in climatic and hydrologic phenomena are anticipated. In order to verify such hypotheses it is inevitable to examine the past periods by thoroughly analyzing historical data. In the present study, the annual maximum runoff volumes with t-day durations were calculated for a 130-year series of mean daily discharge of Danube River at Bratislava gauge (Slovakia). Statistical methods were used to clarify how the maximum runoff volumes of the Danube River changed over two historical periods (1876-1940 and 1941-2005). The conclusion is that the runoff volume regime during floods has not changed significantly during the last 130 years.

  12. Heteromeric Slick/Slack K+ channels show graded sensitivity to cell volume changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Maria A; Hashem, Nadia; Calloe, Kirstine; Klaerke, Dan A

    2017-01-01

    Slick and Slack high-conductance K+ channels are found in the CNS, kidneys, pancreas, among other organs, where they play an important role in cell excitability as well as in ion transport processes. They are both activated by Na+ and Cl- but show a differential regulation by cell volume changes. Slick has been shown to be regulated by cell volume changes, whereas Slack is insensitive. α-subunits of these channels form homomeric as well as heteromeric channels. It is the aim of this work to explore whether the subunit composition of the Slick/Slack heteromeric channel affects the response to osmotic challenges. In order to provide with the adequate water permeability to the cell membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes, mRNA of aquaporin 1 was co-expressed with homomeric or heteromeric Slick and Slack α-subunits. Oocytes were superfused with hypotonic or hypertonic buffers and changes in currents were measured by two-electrode voltage clamp. This work presents the first heteromeric K+ channel with a characteristic graded sensitivity to small and fast changes in cell volume. Our results show that the cell volume sensitivity of Slick/Slack heteromeric channels is dependent on the number of volume sensitive Slick α-subunits in the tetrameric channels, giving rise to graded cell volume sensitivity. Regulation of the subunit composition of a channel may constitute a novel mechanism to determine volume sensitivity of cells.

  13. International Law and the Changing Character of War. Volume 87

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    the way of observable evidence. Yet the prospect of low-intensity CNA is likely to change the calculus of these decisions. With these cheap, anonymous... dental civilian deaths associated with the use of drones, the numbers (as discussed below in the sections on proportionality and military necessity) are...the use of sophisticated persis- tent surveillance, assess with much greater accuracy the anticipated effects of inci- dental loss or damage to civilian

  14. The causes of land-use and land-cover change : moving beyond the myths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambin, E.F.; Turner, B.L.; Geist, H.J.; Agbola, S.B.; Angelsen, A.; Bruce, J.W.; Coomes, O.T.; Dirzo, R.; Fischer, G.; Folke, C.; George, P.S.; Homewood, K.; Imbernon, J.; Leemans, R.; Xiubin Li,; Moran, E.F.; Mortimore, M.; Ramakrishnan, P.S.; Richards, J.F.; Skanes, H.; Steffen, W.; Stone, G.D.; Svedin, U.; Veldkamp, A.; Vogel, C.; Jianchu Xu,

    2001-01-01

    Common understanding of the causes of land-use and land-cover change is dominated by simplifications which, in turn, underlie many environment-development policies. This article tracks some of the major myths on driving forces of land-cover change and proposes alternative pathways of change that are

  15. Impact of the volume change on the ageing effects in Cu-Al-Ni martensite: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosogor, Anna; Xue, Dezhen; Zhou, Yumei; Ding, Xiangdong; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; L'vov, Victor A; Sun, Jun; Ren, Xiaobing

    2013-08-21

    The time evolution of the physical properties of martensite during martensite ageing is traditionally explained by the symmetry-conforming short-range order (SC-SRO) principle, which requires the spatial configuration of crystal defects to follow the symmetry change of the host lattice. In the present study, we show that the volume change of the host lattice also contributes to the ageing effects in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy besides the symmetry change. To substantiate this statement the gradual increase of the storage modulus with time at constant temperature was measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and the experimental results were quantitatively described in the framework of the symmetry-conforming Landau theory of martensitic transformations in a crystal with defects. The comparison of experimental and theoretical results confirmed that the time dependence of the storage modulus is caused by two different physical mechanisms. Evaluations showing that the first mechanism is driven by the spontaneous symmetry change and the second mechanism is caused by the volume change after the martensitic transformation was carried out.

  16. When change causes stress: Effects of self-construal and change consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, B.M.; Sleebos, E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Organizational change can be a major stress factor for employees. We investigate if stress responses can be explained by the extent to which there is a match between employee self-construal (in personal or collective terms) and change consequences (i.e., does the change particularly have

  17. Do Acartia tonsa (Dana) eggs regulate their volume and osmolality as salinity changes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni Winding; Drillet, Guillaume; Pedersen, Morten Foldager

    2012-01-01

    Subitaneous eggs from an euryhaline calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa were challenged by changes in salinity within the range from full strength salinity, down to zero and up to >70 psu. Egg volume changed immediately, increasing from 2.8 × 105 μm3 at full strength salinity (35 psu) to 3.8 × 105 μm3...... at 0 psu and back to its initial volume when gradually being returned to full strength salinity. Egg osmolality followed the molality of the surrounding water when challenged within a salinity range from 2 to 50 psu. Egg respiration was not affected when eggs kept at 35 psu was exposed to low salinity...... (2 psu). These results suggest that eggs are unable to regulate their volume or osmolality when challenged with changes in salinity. Gradual changes in salinity from 35 to 2 psu and back did not harm the eggs (embryos), since the hatching success remained unaffected by such changes in salinity...

  18. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants: 2. Defects on active MRI implants causing hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grönemeyer Dietrich HW

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active magnetic resonance imaging implants, for example stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters, are constructed as wireless inductively coupled transmit and receive coils. They are built as a resonator tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system. The resonator can be added to or incorporated within the implant. This technology can counteract the shielding caused by eddy currents inside the metallic implant structure. This may allow getting diagnostic information of the implant lumen (in stent stenosis or thrombosis for example. The electro magnetic rf-pulses during magnetic resonance imaging induce a current in the circuit path of the resonator. A by material fatigue provoked partial rupture of the circuit path or a broken wire with touching surfaces can set up a relatively high resistance on a very short distance, which may behave as a point-like power source, a hot spot, inside the body part the resonator is implanted to. This local power loss inside a small volume can reach ¼ of the total power loss of the intact resonating circuit, which itself is proportional to the product of the resonator volume and the quality factor and depends as well from the orientation of the resonator with respect to the main magnetic field and the imaging sequence the resonator is exposed to. Methods First an analytical solution of a hot spot for thermal equilibrium is described. This analytical solution with a definite hot spot power loss represents the worst case scenario for thermal equilibrium inside a homogeneous medium without cooling effects. Starting with this worst case assumptions additional conditions are considered in a numerical simulation, which are more realistic and may make the results less critical. The analytical solution as well as the numerical simulations use the experimental experience of the maximum hot spot power loss of implanted resonators with a definite volume during magnetic resonance imaging

  19. Change in brain and lesion volumes after CEE therapies: the WHIMS-MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Laura H; Espeland, Mark A; Hogan, Patricia E; Resnick, Susan M; Bryan, R Nick; Robinson, Jennifer G; Goveas, Joseph S; Davatzikos, Christos; Kuller, Lewis H; Williamson, Jeff D; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Shumaker, Sally A

    2014-02-04

    To determine whether smaller brain volumes in older women who had completed Women's Health Initiative (WHI)-assigned conjugated equine estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT), reported by WHI Memory Study (WHIMS)-MRI, correspond to a continuing increased rate of atrophy an average of 6.1 to 7.7 years later in WHIMS-MRI2. A total of 1,230 WHI participants were contacted: 797 (64.8%) consented, and 729 (59%) were rescanned an average of 4.7 years after the initial MRI scan. Mean annual rates of change in total brain volume, the primary outcome, and rates of change in ischemic lesion volumes, the secondary outcome, were compared between treatment groups using mixed-effect models with adjustment for trial, clinical site, age, intracranial volumes, and time between MRI measures. Total brain volume decreased an average of 3.22 cm(3)/y in the active arm and 3.07 cm(3)/y in the placebo arm (p = 0.53). Total ischemic lesion volumes increased in both arms at a rate of 0.12 cm(3)/y (p = 0.88). Conjugated equine estrogen-based postmenopausal HT, previously assigned at WHI baseline, did not affect rates of decline in brain volumes or increases in brain lesion volumes during the 4.7 years between the initial and follow-up WHIMS-MRI studies. Smaller frontal lobe volumes were observed as persistent group differences among women assigned to active HT compared with placebo. Women with a history of cardiovascular disease treated with active HT, compared with placebo, had higher rates of accumulation in white matter lesion volume and total brain lesion volume. Further study may elucidate mechanisms that explain these findings.

  20. Management Perspectives Pertaining to Root Cause Analyses of Nunn-McCurdy Breaches. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    justification, the Predator Hellfire “is an air-to- ground missile system that provides heavy armor, precision- kill and anti-personnel capability. Laser...Quick-change machine gun barrel Explosive reactive armor Linear demolition charge system Full width, surface mine ploughs On-board vehicle power

  1. Longitudinal changes in total brain volume in schizophrenia: relation to symptom severity, cognition and antipsychotic medication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Veijola

    Full Text Available Studies show evidence of longitudinal brain volume decreases in schizophrenia. We studied brain volume changes and their relation to symptom severity, level of function, cognition, and antipsychotic medication in participants with schizophrenia and control participants from a general population based birth cohort sample in a relatively long follow-up period of almost a decade. All members of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 with any psychotic disorder and a random sample not having psychosis were invited for a MRI brain scan, and clinical and cognitive assessment during 1999-2001 at the age of 33-35 years. A follow-up was conducted 9 years later during 2008-2010. Brain scans at both time points were obtained from 33 participants with schizophrenia and 71 control participants. Regression models were used to examine whether brain volume changes predicted clinical and cognitive changes over time, and whether antipsychotic medication predicted brain volume changes. The mean annual whole brain volume reduction was 0.69% in schizophrenia, and 0.49% in controls (p = 0.003, adjusted for gender, educational level, alcohol use and weight gain. The brain volume reduction in schizophrenia patients was found especially in the temporal lobe and periventricular area. Symptom severity, functioning level, and decline in cognition were not associated with brain volume reduction in schizophrenia. The amount of antipsychotic medication (dose years of equivalent to 100 mg daily chlorpromazine over the follow-up period predicted brain volume loss (p = 0.003 adjusted for symptom level, alcohol use and weight gain. In this population based sample, brain volume reduction continues in schizophrenia patients after the onset of illness, and antipsychotic medications may contribute to these reductions.

  2. Excluded volume effects caused by high concentration addition of acid generators in chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The resolution of lithography used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices has been improved to meet the market demands for highly integrated circuits. With the reduction in feature size, the molecular size becomes non-negligible in the resist material design. In this study, the excluded volume effects caused by adding high-concentration acid generators were investigated for triphenylsulfonium nonaflate. The resist film density was measured by X-ray diffractometry. The dependences of absorption coefficient and protected unit concentration on acid generator weight ratio were calculated from the measured film density. Using these values, the effects on the decomposition yield of acid generators, the protected unit fluctuation, and the line edge roughness (LER) were evaluated by simulation on the basis of sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists. The positive effects of the increase in acid generator weight ratio on LER were predominant below the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3, while the negative effects became equivalent to the positive effects above the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3 owing to the excluded volume effects.

  3. Serial Changes in 3-Dimensional Supraspinatus Muscle Volume After Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Moon, Sung Gyu; Kim, Na Ra; Lee, Ji Whan; Shim, Eungjune; Park, Sehyung; Kim, Youngjun

    2017-08-01

    There is considerable debate on the recovery of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after rotator cuff repair. To evaluate the serial changes in supraspinatus muscle volume after rotator cuff repair by using semiautomatic segmentation software and to determine the relationship with functional outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Seventy-four patients (mean age, 62.8 ± 8.8 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and obtained 3 consecutive (preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and later postoperatively [≥1 year postoperatively]) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans having complete Y-views were included. We generated a 3-dimensional (3D) reconstructed model of the supraspinatus muscle by using in-house semiautomatic segmentation software (ITK-SNAP) and calculated both the 2-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional area and 3D volume of the muscle in 3 different views (Y-view, 1 cm medial to the Y-view [Y+1 view], and 2 cm medial to the Y-view [Y+2 view]) at the 3 time points. The area and volume changes at each time point were evaluated according to repair integrity. Later postoperative volumes were compared with immediately postoperative volumes, and their relationship with various clinical factors and the effect of higher volume increases on range of motion, muscle power, and visual analog scale pain and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores were evaluated. The interrater reliabilities were excellent for all measurements. Areas and volumes increased immediately postoperatively as compared with preoperatively; however, only volumes on the Y+1 view and Y+2 view significantly increased later postoperatively as compared with immediately postoperatively ( P < .05). There were 9 patients with healing failure, and area and volume changes were significantly less later postoperatively compared with immediately postoperatively at all measurement points in these patients ( P < .05). After omitting the patients with healing failure, volume increases

  4. Alkyl PAH in crude oil cause chronic toxicity to early life stages of fish. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodson, P.V.; Khan, C.W.; Saravanabhavan, G.; Clarke, L.; Brown, R.S. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). School of Environmental Studies; Hollebone, B.; Wang, Z. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Short, J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Juneau, AK (United States). Auke Bay Lab; Lee, K.; King, T. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Centre for Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Research

    2007-07-01

    In order to mitigate the risk to fisheries following an offshore oil spill, it is necessary to know the components of crude oil that are toxic. Chronic exposure of early life stages of fish to crude oil causes Blue Sac Disease, a syndrome characterized by induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) enzyme. In this study, effects-driven fractionation of Alaska North Slope Crude was used to identify the classes of compounds that cause CYP1A induction in juvenile rainbow trout and chronic toxicity to developing stages of Japanese medaka. Four fractions of compounds were created by low temperature vacuum distillation. This separated the constituents of oil according to their volatility within defined temperature ranges. The fractions were separated according to their boiling points. With a temperature range of 287-481 degrees C, fraction F3 was the only fraction as toxic as whole oil and induced CYPP1A enzymes of fish. Fractions containing specific classes of alkyl PAH were also collected. For all separations, the performance of the method was evaluated by the extent to which PAH were separated from aliphatics, resins and waxes, as well as by the quantitative recovery of mass in fractions and subfractions. The induction of CYP1A enzymes showed that PAH was present in all fractions that were highly toxic, but the toxicity tests indicated that not all fractions containing PAH were toxic. This research provided a scientific basis for comparing the risks of different crude oils based on chemical analyses that show the different proportions or amounts of PAH present. The results indicate which compounds of concern should be used to determine the extent and success of oil spill remediation, and provide a biological interpretation of chemical fingerprinting used to discriminate the sources of oil pollution. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Evidence for the changes of pituitary volumes in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Ozer, Omer; Korkmaz, Sevda; Taskent, Ismail; Yildirim, Hanefi

    2017-02-28

    In pubertal and postpubertal patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), significantly greater pituitary gland volumes have been reported. Moving from this point, in the present study, we aimed to investigate pituitary gland volumes in patients with PTSD and hypothesized that volumes of the gland would be structurally changed. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland was performed among sixteen patients with PTSD and fifteen healthy control subjects. We found that the mean volume of the pituitary gland was statistically significant and smaller than that of healthy subjects (0.69±0.08cm 3 for patient group and 0.83±0.21 for control subjects). Consequently, in the present study, we found that patients with PTSD had smaller pituitary gland volumes than those of healthy controls like other anxiety disorders. It is important to provide support for this finding in future longitudinal investigations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The Changes of Flow Characteristics Caused by a Stent in Fusiform Aneurysm Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhee, K

    2001-01-01

    .... In order to clarify the hemodynamic changes caused by a stent, the flow fields inside the fusiform aneurysm models were measured using a flow visualization technique incorporating photochomic dye...

  7. Wedged-shaped, segmental changes in the liver caused by occlusion of a single hepatic vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Susumu; Akaki, Shiro; Yasui, Kotaro; Tanaka, Akio; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated wedged-shaped, segmental changes in the liver caused by occlusion of a single hepatic vein in seven patients. The causes of occlusion were due to liver tumors in three patients, metastasis of the right adrenal gland in one, and postoperative changes in three. Changes included low attenuating on unenhanced CT, high attenuation on enhanced CT, low signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI, high signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI, high signal intensity on enhanced MRI, dense hepatogram and retrograde arterioportal shunt on hepatic arteriography. MRI and hepatic arteriography are more sensitive than CT in demonstration of those changes. (author)

  8. Brain Volume Changes After Withdrawal of Atypical Antipsychotics in Patients With First-Episode Schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Geartsje; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Schnack, Hugo G.; Cahn, Wiepke; Burger, Huibert; Boersma, Maria; de Kroon, Bart; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Kahn, Rene S.

    The influence of antipsychotic medication on brain morphology in schizophrenia may confound interpretation of brain changes over time. We aimed to assess the effect of discontinuation of atypical antipsychotic medication on change in brain volume in patients. Sixteen remitted, stable patients with

  9. Changes in apparent molar water volume and DKP solubility yield insights on the Hofmeister effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payumo, Alexander Y; Huijon, R Michael; Mansfield, Deauna D; Belk, Laurel M; Bui, Annie K; Knight, Anne E; Eggers, Daryl K

    2011-12-15

    This study examines the properties of a 4 × 2 matrix of aqueous cations and anions at concentrations up to 8.0 M. The apparent molar water volume, as calculated by subtracting the mass and volume of the ions from the corresponding solution density, was found to exceed the molar volume of ice in many concentrated electrolyte solutions, underscoring the nonideal behavior of these systems. The solvent properties of water were also analyzed by measuring the solubility of diketopiperazine (DKP) in 2.000 M salt solutions prepared from the same ion combinations. Solution rankings for DKP solubility were found to parallel the Hofmeister series for both cations and anions, whereas molar water volume concurred with the cation series only. The results are discussed within the framework of a desolvation energy model that attributes solute-specific changes in equilibria to solute-dependent changes in the free energy of bulk water.

  10. Changes in Apparent Molar Water Volume and DKP Solubility Yield Insights on the Hofmeister Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payumo, Alexander Y.; Huijon, R. Michael; Mansfield, Deauna D.; Belk, Laurel M.; Bui, Annie K.; Knight, Anne E.; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the properties of a 4 × 2 matrix of aqueous cations and anions at concentrations up to 8.0 M. The apparent molar water volume, as calculated by subtracting the mass and volume of the ions from the corresponding solution density, was found to exceed the molar volume of ice in many concentrated electrolyte solutions, underscoring the non-ideal behavior of these systems. The solvent properties of water were also analyzed by measuring the solubility of diketopiperazine (DKP) in 2.000 M salt solutions prepared from the same ion combinations. Solution rankings for DKP solubility were found to parallel the Hofmeister series for both cations and anions, whereas molar water volume concurred with the cation series only. The results are discussed within the framework of a desolvation energy model that attributes solute-specific changes in equilibria to solute-dependent changes in the free energy of bulk water. PMID:22029390

  11. Global and regional changes of cardiopulmonary blood volume under continuous work load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeck, A.; Schuerch, P.; Freundlieb, C.; Vyska, K.; Kunz, N.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Hollmann, W.

    1980-01-01

    The present study describes a method for the continuous determination of global and regional stress-induced alterations of cardiopulmonary blood volumes in normals, trained athletes and patients with latent cardiac insufficiency. In contrast to normals and athletes there is an increase of the total cardiac blood volume in the cardiac patients. There are also significant differences in blood volume changes of the left lung between normals and athletes on the one hand and the cardiac patients on the other. The method is simple and non-hazardous; it permits the observation of the obviously different adaptation of the cardiopulmonary system during exercise in normals, athletes and cardiac patients. (orig.) [de

  12. Graded changes in enamel component volumes resulted from a short tooth bleaching procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Artemisa Fernanda Moura; Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes Ramos; Limeira Júnior, Francisco de Assis; de Moura, Mirella de Fátima Liberato; de Sousa, Frederico Barbosa

    2016-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that changes in enamel component volumes (mineral, organic, and water volumes, and permeability) are graded from outer to inner enamel after a short bleaching procedure. Extracted unerupted human third molars had half of their crowns bleached (single bleaching session, 3 × 15 min), and tooth shade changes in bleached parts were analyzed with a spectrophotometer. Ground sections were prepared, component volumes and permeability were quantified at histological points located at varying distances from the enamel surface (n=10 points/location), representing conditions before and after bleaching. Tooth shade changes were significant (pbleaching, except at the outer layers. Multiple analysis of covariances revealed that most of the variance of the change in enamel composition after bleaching was explained by the combination of the set of types of component volume (in decreasing order of relevance: mineral loss, organic gain, water gain, and decrease in permeability) with the set of distances from the enamel surface (graded from the enamel surface inward) (canonical R(2)=0.97; p99%). Changes in enamel composition after a short bleaching procedure followed a gradient within component volumes (mineral loss>organic gain>water gain>decrease in permeability) and decreased from the enamel surface inward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Associations between volume changes and spatial dose metrics for the urinary bladder during local versus pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Moiseenko, Vitali; Hopper, Austin; Pettersson, Niclas Johan; Thor, Maria; Knopp, Rick; Deasy, Joseph O; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Einck, John

    2017-06-01

    Inter-fractional variation in urinary bladder volumes during the course of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer causes deviations between planned and delivered doses. This study compared planned versus daily cone-beam CT (CBCT)-based spatial bladder dose distributions, for prostate cancer patients receiving local prostate treatment (local treatment) versus prostate including pelvic lymph node irradiation (pelvic treatment). Twenty-seven patients (N = 15 local treatment; N = 12 pelvic treatment) were treated using daily image-guided RT (1.8 Gy@43-45 fx), adhering to a full bladder/empty rectum protocol. For each patient, 9-10 CBCTs were registered to the planning CT, using the clinically applied translations. The urinary bladder was manually segmented on each CBCT, 3 mm inner shells were generated, and semi and quadrant sectors were created using axial/coronal cuts. Planned and delivered DVH metrics were compared across patients and between the two groups of treatment (t-test, p bladder volume variations and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the bladder and its sectors were evaluated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r s ). Bladder volumes varied considerably during RT (coefficient of variation: 16-58%). The population-averaged planned and delivered DVH metrics were not significantly different at any dose level. Larger treatment bladder volumes resulted in increased absolute volume of the posterior/inferior bladder sector receiving intermediate-high doses, in both groups. The superior bladder sector received less dose with larger bladder volumes for local treatments (r s  ± SD: -0.47 ± 0.32), but larger doses for pelvic treatments (r s  ± SD: 0.74 ± 0.24). Substantial bladder volume changes during the treatment course occurred even though patients were treated under a full bladder/daily image-guided protocol. Larger bladder volumes resulted in less bladder wall spared at the posterior-inferior sector, regardless the

  14. Spanish Secondary School Students' Notions on the Causes and Consequences of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punter, Pilar; Ochando-Pardo, Montserrat; Garcia, Javier

    2011-01-01

    This paper is part of an extensive study of secondary school students' preconceived ideas about climate change. Here, we undertake a survey in the province of Valencia (Spain) to ascertain secondary school students' notions of the causes and consequences of climate change. Results show, among other things, that students clearly relate the misuse…

  15. Large-scale geographical variation confirms that climate change causes birds to lay earlier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C; Artemyev, AV; Blaauw, B; Cowie, RJ; Dekhuijzen, AJ; Eeva, T; Enemar, A; Gustafsson, L; Ivankina, EV; Jarvinen, A; Metcalfe, NB; Nyholm, NEI; Potti, J; Ravussin, PA; Sanz, JJ; Silverin, B; Slater, FM; Sokolov, LV; Torok, J; Winkel, W; Wright, J; Zang, H; Visser, ME

    2004-01-01

    Advances in the phenology of organisms are often attributed to climate change, but alternatively, may reflect a publication bias towards advances and may be caused by environmental factors unrelated to climate change. Both factors are investigated using the breeding dates of 25 long-term studied

  16. An emergent disease causes directional changes in forest species composition in coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret Metz; Kerri Frangioso; Allison Wickland; Ross Meentemeyer; David Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    Non-native forest pathogens can cause dramatic and long-lasting changes to the composition of forests, and these changes may have cascading impacts on community interactions and ecosystem functioning. Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of the emergent forest disease sudden oak death (SOD), has a wide host range, but mortality is concentrated in...

  17. Land use/Land Cover Changes and Causes of Deforestation in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to provide the non-existent data on land use/land cover changes in the Wilberforce Island for the purposes of determining the causes of deforestation and changes in the vegetation cover for a 13 – year period. Accordingly, 125 questionnaires were administered in five communities to determine ...

  18. Mechanistic Fluid Transport Model to Estimate Gastrointestinal Fluid Volume and Its Dynamic Change Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alex; Jackson, Trachette; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Koenigsknecht, Mark; Wysocki, Jeffrey; Marciani, Luca; Amidon, Gordon L; Frances, Ann; Baker, Jason R; Hasler, William; Wen, Bo; Pai, Amit; Sun, Duxin

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fluid volume and its dynamic change are integral to study drug disintegration, dissolution, transit, and absorption. However, key questions regarding the local volume and its absorption, secretion, and transit remain unanswered. The dynamic fluid compartment absorption and transit (DFCAT) model is proposed to estimate in vivo GI volume and GI fluid transport based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quantified fluid volume. The model was validated using GI local concentration of phenol red in human GI tract, which was directly measured by human GI intubation study after oral dosing of non-absorbable phenol red. The measured local GI concentration of phenol red ranged from 0.05 to 168 μg/mL (stomach), to 563 μg/mL (duodenum), to 202 μg/mL (proximal jejunum), and to 478 μg/mL (distal jejunum). The DFCAT model characterized observed MRI fluid volume and its dynamic changes from 275 to 46.5 mL in stomach (from 0 to 30 min) with mucus layer volume of 40 mL. The volumes of the 30 small intestine compartments were characterized by a max of 14.98 mL to a min of 0.26 mL (0-120 min) and a mucus layer volume of 5 mL per compartment. Regional fluid volumes over 0 to 120 min ranged from 5.6 to 20.38 mL in the proximal small intestine, 36.4 to 44.08 mL in distal small intestine, and from 42 to 64.46 mL in total small intestine. The DFCAT model can be applied to predict drug dissolution and absorption in the human GI tract with future improvements.

  19. Climate. For a successful change. Volume 1: How to commit one's territory in an adaptation approach. Volume 2: How to implement a territorial project which integrates adaptation. Volume 3: How to understand the complexity of climate change - Scientific issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    The first volume presents the climate issue as a world issue as well as a local issue (historic context of adaptation to climate change effects, legal obligation for local communities, indicators of direct and indirect effects of climate change, economic impacts), and presents adaptation as a way of action at a local level (definition of a strategy, articulation between works on greenhouse gas emissions and those on adaptation, actions to be implemented, action follow-up and adjustment). The second volume describes how to communicate and talk about climate change, and more specifically about the above-mentioned issues (reality of climate change, indirect and direct effects, obligations and responsibilities for local communities, economic impacts). It addresses the issue of climate change in the Rhone-Alpes region: adaptation within the regional scheme on climate, air and energy (SRCAE), role of local communities. It presents an action methodology: to inform and organise, to prepare the mobilisation of actors, to prepare the territory vulnerability diagnosis, to define the adaptation strategy, and to implement, follow-up and assess the action. The third volume proposes a set of sheets containing scientific information and data related to climate change: factors of climate variability, current global warming, greenhouse gases and aerosols, physical-chemical principles involved in greenhouse effect, carbon sinks and carbon sources, effects of land assignment and agriculture, combined effects of mankind actions on the atmosphere, climate change and oceans, climate change and cryo-sphere, climate change and biodiversity, extreme meteorological and climate events and their consequences

  20. Brain putamen volume changes in newly-diagnosed patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by cognitive, motor, autonomic, learning, and affective abnormalities. The putamen serves several of these functions, especially motor and autonomic behaviors, but whether global and specific sub-regions of that structure are damaged is unclear. We assessed global and regional putamen volumes in 43 recently-diagnosed, treatment-naïve OSA (age, 46.4 ± 8.8 years; 31 male and 61 control subjects (47.6 ± 8.8 years; 39 male using high-resolution T1-weighted images collected with a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. Global putamen volumes were calculated, and group differences evaluated with independent samples t-tests, as well as with analysis of covariance (covariates; age, gender, and total intracranial volume. Regional differences between groups were visualized with 3D surface morphometry-based group ratio maps. OSA subjects showed significantly higher global putamen volumes, relative to controls. Regional analyses showed putamen areas with increased and decreased tissue volumes in OSA relative to control subjects, including increases in caudal, mid-dorsal, mid-ventral portions, and ventral regions, while areas with decreased volumes appeared in rostral, mid-dorsal, medial-caudal, and mid-ventral sites. Global putamen volumes were significantly higher in the OSA subjects, but local sites showed both higher and lower volumes. The appearance of localized volume alterations points to differential hypoxic or perfusion action on glia and other tissues within the structure, and may reflect a stage in progression of injury in these newly-diagnosed patients toward the overall volume loss found in patients with chronic OSA. The regional changes may underlie some of the specific deficits in motor, autonomic, and neuropsychologic functions in OSA.

  1. Comparison of doses according to change of bladder volume in treatment of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In the case of radiation therapy for prostate cancer, a balloon infused with a certain amount of air through the anus is used to reduce rectal dose. Because of the reason, radiation therapy for prostate cancer has acquired CBCT for daily image induction. In order to maintain the anatomical structure most similar to the first CT taken before treatment, it is pretreated, but it can not be said to be perfectly consistent. In two actual treatment regimens, the volume of the bladder was measured as 45.82 cc and 63.43 cc, and the equivalent diameter was 4.4 cm and 4.9 cm. As a result of this study, the mean volume of the bladder was estimated to be 56.2 cc, 105.6 cc by 20 CBCT. The mean dose of CBCT was 1.74% and the mean Bladder mean dose was 96.67%. In case B, PTV mean dose was 4.31%, Bladder mean Dose was estimated to be 97.35%. The changes in the volume of the bladder resulted in changes in the dose of PTV and bladder. The correlation coefficient of bladder dose according to the change of bladder volume showed linearity of mean dose R2= -0.94. The correlation coefficient of the PTV dose according to the volume change of the bladder showed linearity of mean dose R2= 0.04. It was found that the dose change of PTV was larger than that of bladder according to the change of bladder volume.

  2. Survey data reflecting popular opinions of the causes and mitigation of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jonathan E

    2017-10-01

    The data presented within this manuscript reports the results of a 20-question opinion survey concerning popular beliefs regarding the causes of and possible mitigation of climate change. The results and opinions from 746 survey respondents are presented. The data reflects certain misconceptions of climate change, and is useful for investigators to begin forming opinions of the public's knowledge regarding the potentially inflammatory topics of climate change, greenhouse gases, and geo-engineering.

  3. Climatic and ecological future of the Amazon: likelihood and causes of change

    OpenAIRE

    B. Cook; N. Zeng; J.-H. Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Some recent climate modeling results suggested a possible dieback of the Amazon rainforest under future climate change, a prediction that raised considerable interest as well as controversy. To determine the likelihood and causes of such changes, we analyzed the output of 15 models from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC/AR4) and a dynamic vegetation model VEGAS driven by these climate output. Our results suggest that the core of the Amazon rainforest...

  4. Survey data reflecting popular opinions of the causes and mitigation of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Jonathan E.

    2017-01-01

    The data presented within this manuscript reports the results of a 20-question opinion survey concerning popular beliefs regarding the causes of and possible mitigation of climate change. The results and opinions from 746 survey respondents are presented. The data reflects certain misconceptions of climate change, and is useful for investigators to begin forming opinions of the public's knowledge regarding the potentially inflammatory topics of climate change, greenhouse gases, and geo-engine...

  5. Impacts of climate change on rice production in Africa and causes of simulated yield changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, Van Pepijn A.J.; Zwart, Sander J.

    2018-01-01

    This study is the first of its kind to quantify possible effects of climate change on rice production in Africa. We simulated impacts on rice in irrigated systems (dry season and wet season) and rainfed systems (upland and lowland). We simulated the use of rice varieties with a higher temperature

  6. Changes in terrestrial near-surface wind speed and their possible causes: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Zha, Jinlin; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Qidong

    2017-11-01

    Changes in terrestrial near-surface wind speed (SWS) are induced by a combination of anthropogenic activities and natural climate changes. Thus, the study of the long-term changes of SWS and their causes is very important for recognizing the effects of these processes. Although the slowdown in SWS has been analyzed in previous studies, to the best of knowledge, no overall comparison or detailed examination of this research has been performed. Similarly, the causes of the decreases in SWS and the best directions of future research have not been discussed in depth. Therefore, we analyzed a series of studies reporting SWS trends spanning the last 30 years from around the world. The changes in SWS differ among different regions. The most significant decreases have occurred in Central Asia and North America, with mean linear trends of - 0.11 m s-1 decade-1; the second most significant decreases have occurred in Europe, East Asia, and South Asia, with mean linear trends of - 0.08 m s-1 decade-1; and the weakest decrease has occurred in Australia. Although the SWS in Africa has decreased, this region lacks long-term observational data. Therefore, the uncertainties in the long-term SWS trend are higher in this region than in other regions. The changes in SWS, caused by a mixture of global-, regional-, and local-scale factors, are mainly due to changes in driving forces and drag forces. The changes in the driving forces are caused by changes in atmospheric circulation, and the changes in the drag forces are caused by changes in the external and internal friction in the atmosphere. Changes in surface friction are mainly caused by changes in the surface roughness due to land use and cover change (LUCC), including urbanization, and changes in internal friction are mainly induced by changes in the boundary layer characteristics. Future studies should compare the spatio-temporal differences in SWS between high and low altitudes and quantify the effects of different factors on

  7. How a change in the interaction potential affects the p-wave scattering volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, M J; Dalgarno, A

    2012-01-01

    We derive a simple expression for the change in the s-wave scattering length in terms of zero-energy wavefunctions, we generalize it to obtain an expression for the change in the p-wave scattering volume and we use both expressions to derive the first order differential equations of variable phase theory that are satisfied by the closely related accumulated scattering length and volume. We provide numerical demonstrations for the example of a pair of hydrogen atoms interacting via the X 1 Σ + g molecular state. (fast track communication)

  8. Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second over time in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Edwards, Lisa D; Scanlon, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    A key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an accelerated rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but data on the variability and determinants of this change in patients who have established disease are scarce.......A key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an accelerated rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but data on the variability and determinants of this change in patients who have established disease are scarce....

  9. Regional brain volumes, diffusivity, and metabolite changes after electroconvulsive therapy for severe depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A.; Magnusson, P.; Hanson, Lars G.

    2016-01-01

    , and metabolite changes in 19 patients receiving ECT for severe depression. Other regions of interest included the amygdala, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), orbitofrontal cortex, and hypothalamus. Patients received a 3T MR scan before ECT (TP1), 1 week (TP2), and 4 weeks (TP3) after ECT. Results......: Hippocampal and amygdala volume increased significantly at TP2 and continued to be increased at TP3. DLPFC exhibited a transient volume reduction at TP2. DTI revealed a reduced anisotropy and diffusivity of the hippocampus at TP2. We found no significant post-ECT changes in brain metabolite concentrations...

  10. Change in volume of lumpectomy cavity during external-beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Geraldine; Betts, Vicki; Smith, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Definition of the lumpectomy cavity is an important component of irradiation of the breast. We use computed tomography (CT)-based planning and contour the lumpectomy volume on the planning CT. We obtained a second CT in the 4th or 5th week of treatment for boost planning and compared the volume change with the first planning-CT scan. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the planning-CT data for 20 patients. In the first CT, images were obtained from the mandible to 2 cm below the breast in 3-mm slices. In the second CT, for the boost, images were obtained from the top to the bottom of the clinically defined breast, in 3-mm slices. Lumpectomy cavities were contoured on both CT scans and volumes compared. Results: Sixteen of the 20 patients (80%) had more than a 20% decrease from the first to the second volume, with a corresponding 95% confidence interval. The mean decrease was 16.13 cc, with a standard deviation of 14.05. The Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.18 did not show a significant correlation between the initial volume and the percent change. Conclusions: During external breast irradiation, many patients will have significant volume reduction in the lumpectomy cavity. Because CT-based definition of the lumpectomy cavity can influence the planning of a boost technique, further study appears warranted

  11. Chronological shifts and changing causes of death after radiotherapy for early-stage oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Rina; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Harata, Naoki; Yuasa-Nakagawa, Keiko; Toda, Kazuma; Hayashi, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    Following recent improvements in the curability of oral cancer, chronological shifts and changes in the causes of death after treatment have been observed. We conducted a review of the post-treatment causes of death following radiotherapy for oral cancers. The medical records of 966 patients with early-stage (stage I and II) oral cancer treated at our institute between 1980 and 2001 were reviewed, and the chronological shifts and changes in the causes of death after radiotherapy were assessed. Of the 966 patients enrolled in this study, 365 have died to date. Two hundred and eleven patients died of their primary malignancy; 193 of these deaths occurred within 5 years of treatment for the primary oral cancer. The second most frequent cause of death was second primary cancer (n = 90). Twenty-three patients with head and neck cancers and 18 patients with esophageal cancers died within 10 years of radiotherapy, and six patients with lung cancers died after more than 10 years. Within the first 5 years following treatment, the major cause of death was the primary oral cancer. After 5-10 years, a second primary cancer, such as head and neck cancer or esophageal cancer, became the leading cause of death. Over a 10-year period, the proportion of deaths from a second primary cancer in the lung was significant. We have demonstrated that there are chronological shifts and changes in the causes of death following treatment for early-stage oral cancer.

  12. EFFECT OF SITTING POSTURE ON THORACIC CONFIGURATION AND CHANGES IN VOLUME OF HEMITHORACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shōbo A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor posture is detrimental to breathing. Our purpose was to investigate the effect of upright and hunchbacked sitting on thoracic configuration and changes in the volume of the thorax during quiet and volitional deep breathing. Methods: The participants were 11 healthy men with a mean age of 21.6 years, mean body mass of 59.8 kg, mean height of 169.7 cm and a body mass index of 20.7 kg/m2. Eighty-four reflective markers were placed on the trunk. Three-dimensional motion analysis measured the volume within the hemithoraces. To calculate upper and lower thoracic volumes, six imaginary hexahedra were visualized using four reflective markers for each on both aspects of the thorax. Each hexahedron was divided into three imaginary triangular pyramids to calculate positional vectors. Finally, the volume for the hexahedra and triangular pyramids was calculated. Upper thoracic volume encompassed a space from the sternal notch to a midpoint on the ventral aspect of the third rib and the lower thoracic volume from the xiphoid process to the midpoint on tenth rib’s dorsal aspect. Results: In hunchbacked sitting during quiet breathing the left lower hemithorax yielded a significantly larger volume (p=0.003, and both breathing patterns during inspiration and expiration yielded a significantly greater change in thoracic configuration (p=0.01, p=0.016. Conclusion: Findings suggested that, in a hunchbacked sitting, there was decreased thoracic asymmetry with re-establishment of thoracic vertebral alignment, consequently stabilizing the sitting position, but breathing was suppressed and tidal volume decreased. Physiotherapy should aim at ensuring correction of hunchbacked posture and maintenance of thoracic symmetry.

  13. Adapting to climate variability and change in Ontario : volume 4 of the Canada country study : climate impacts and adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.; Lavender, B. [Smith and Lavender Envrironmental Consultants, ON (Canada); Auld, H.; Broadhurst, D.; Bullock, T. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Ontario Region

    1998-03-01

    An assessment of how climate change will affect Ontario over the next century, including its social, biological and economic environment, is presented. The most significant impacts are expected to result from changes in precipitation patterns, in soil moisture, and in greater intensity and frequency of extreme weather events. Some of the major impacts of changing climate discussed in this volume include: (1) more pollution episodes, (2) increased heat stress, (3) lowering of average water levels of the Great Lakes, (4) changes in the hydrologic cycle which could result in variability of water supply for hydroelectric power production, (5) warming waters of the Great Lakes which could cause fish species to shift northward, (6) cool temperate, moderate temperate and grassland regions could expand northwards as the boreal forest retreats, (7) longer crop growing seasons, (8) decreased snow loads, and (9) reduced ice on the Great Lakes which would increase the length of the shipping season. The general conclusion is that adapting to changing climate will require a knowledge of how climate changes occur and how the changes are likely to affect the environment, society and economy. Changes in other key variables such as technology, personal preferences and social values will also influence the rate of climate change and Ontario`s ability to adapt to it. refs., tabs., figs.

  14. Distance Based Root Cause Analysis and Change Impact Analysis of Performance Regressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzan Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance regression testing is applied to uncover both performance and functional problems of software releases. A performance problem revealed by performance testing can be high response time, low throughput, or even being out of service. Mature performance testing process helps systematically detect software performance problems. However, it is difficult to identify the root cause and evaluate the potential change impact. In this paper, we present an approach leveraging server side logs for identifying root causes of performance problems. Firstly, server side logs are used to recover call tree of each business transaction. We define a novel distance based metric computed from call trees for root cause analysis and apply inverted index from methods to business transactions for change impact analysis. Empirical studies show that our approach can effectively and efficiently help developers diagnose root cause of performance problems.

  15. Stress-induced changes in circadian rhythms of body temperature and activity in rats are not caused by pacemaker changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; vandenHoofdakker, RH; Koolhaas, JM; Daan, S

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that social stress in rats (i.e., defeat by an aggressive male conspecific) causes a variety of behavioral and physiological changes including alterations in the daily rhythms of body temperature and activity. To study the role of the circadian pacemaker in these

  16. Energy losses in the D0 β solenoid cryostat caused by current changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, A.T.

    1993-11-01

    The proposed D0 β solenoid is a superconducting solenoid mounted inside an aluminum tube which supports the solenoid winding over it's full length. This aluminum support tube, also called bobbin, is therefore very tightly coupled to magnetic flux changes caused by solenoid current variations. These current changes in the solenoid, will cause answer currents to flow in the resistive bobbin wall and therefore cause heat losses. The insertion of an external dump resistor in the solenoid current loop reduces energy dissipation inside the cryostat during a quench and will shorten the discharge time constant. This note presents a simple electrical model for the coupled bobbin and solenoid and makes it easier to understand the circuit behavior and losses. Estimates for the maximum allowable rate of solenoid current changes, based on the maximum permissible rate of losses can be made using this model

  17. Ultrasound changes in the relationship between the urethra and bladder neck caused by prolapse repair: feasibility and reliability of measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, J; Lautmann, K

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether intraoperative transperineal ultrasound can be used to assess changes in the relationship between the urethra and bladder caused by a prolapse repair operation. The reliability of the measurements was also assessed. A total of 25 women having an anterior colporrhaphy operation had pre- and post-repair imaging using a standard bladder volume. There was a statistically significant change (p ≤ 0.04) in the posterior urethrovesical angle (PUA) from 115° (SD 37) before surgery, to 135° (SD 30) after surgery. There was no significant change (p = 0.93) in the anterior urethrovesical angle before 73° (SD 14) after surgery 73° (SD 14). Interclass correlation coefficients showed good reproducibility for all measurements. Ultrasound can be used to measure changes in the relationship of the urethra and bladder produced by anterior colporrhaphy. Clinically, the effect of these changes is to reduce the angulation of the urethra in relation to the bladder.

  18. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...

  19. Changes in lung volume and ventilation during surfactant treatment in ventilated preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Veenendaal, Mariëtte B.; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2011-01-01

    The immediate and regional effects of exogenous surfactant in open lung high-frequency oscillatory ventilated (HFOV) preterm infants are unknown. To assess regional changes in lung volume, mechanics, and ventilation during and after surfactant administration in HFOV preterm infants with respiratory

  20. Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second over time in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Edwards, Lisa D; Scanlon, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    A key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an accelerated rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), but data on the variability and determinants of this change in patients who have established disease are scarce....

  1. Future PMP Estimation in Korea under AR5 RCP 8.5 climate change scenarios and its Changes Cause Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Lee, J.; Okjeong, L.; Bogyeong, C.; Park, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation, Korea's probable maximum precipitations (PMPs) which reflects all of the storm data until recently are calculated, and are compared to the existing PMPs which were calculated at 2000. In Korea, abnormal weather phenomena such as typhoon Rusa and Maemi, and the extreme rainfall event occurred on the east coast of the northern region, that can have a significant impact on the PMP estimation, have frequently happened since 2000. After selecting 240 major storm events from 1973 to 2012, new PMPs are proposed with respect to storm areas (25, 100, 225, 400, 900, 2025, 4900, 10000 and 19600 km2) and storm durations (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 hours) using the Korea hydro-meteorological method. After estimating future PMPs using future rainfall and dew point temperature information under the Korea Meteorological Administration AR5 RCP 8.5, changes in the PMPs under climate change will be investigated by comparison with present and future PMPs. By separating the changes in PMPs under climate change into the changes caused by rainfall and dew point temperature, the relative impact of future rainfall and dew point temperature information under climate change on future PMPs is quantified. This research was supported by a grant 'Development of the Evaluation Technology for Complex Causes of Inundation Vulnerability and the Response Plans in Coastal Urban Areas for Adaptation to Climate Change' [MPSS-NH-2015-77] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, Ministry of Public Safety and Security of Korea.

  2. Surprising volume change in PPy(DBS): An atomic force microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smela, E.; Gadegaard, N.

    1999-01-01

    Communication: Conjugated polymers such as polypyrrole (PPy) have potential use as artificial muscles or in microsystems such as valves for micro-fluid handling. One of the most important parameters in such uses is the magnitude of volume change during associated redox processes; however, until now...... estimates have varied greatly. Atomic force microscopy is reported here as allowing direct measurement of the in situ thickness change during oxidation and reduction of thin films of PPy doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate....

  3. Does it matter if people think climate change is human caused?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Hartter

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing consensus that climate is changing, but beliefs about the causal factors vary widely among the general public. Current research shows that such causal beliefs are strongly influenced by cultural, political, and identity-driven views. We examined the influence that local perceptions have on the acceptance of basic facts about climate change. We also examined the connection to wildfire by local people. Two recent telephone surveys found that 37% (in 2011 and 46% (in 2014 of eastern Oregon (USA respondents accept the scientific consensus that human activities are now changing the climate. Although most do not agree with that consensus, large majorities (85–86% do agree that climate is changing, whether by natural or human causes. Acceptance of anthropogenic climate change generally divides along political party lines, but acceptance of climate change more generally, and concerns about wildfire, transcend political divisions. Support for active forest management to reduce wildfire risks is strong in this region, and restoration treatments could be critical to the resilience of both communities and ecosystems. Although these immediate steps involve adaptations to a changing climate, they can be motivated without necessarily invoking human-caused climate change, a divisive concept among local landowners. Keywords: Climate change, Inland West, Public perception, Telephone survey, Wildfire, Working landscapes

  4. Positron Annihilation as a Probe of Free Volume Changes in Polyoxymethylene-copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.F.M.; Abdel-Hady, E.E.; Farid, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime measurements have been carried out to study the free volume properties of polyoxymethylene-copolymer (POM). The effect of temperature changes on free volume hole sizes and hole size distribution has been investigated over the temperature range (5-100 degree C). All PAL spectra were analyzed with LT program, which is a finite term lifetime analysis and by MELT which is a continuous lifetime analysis. The free volume sites probed by o-Ps increase in size with increasing temperature. PALS measurements revealed the glass transition temperature (Tg) at 15 degree C. Below the glass transition temperature the hole size slowly (linearly) increases with temperatures, while the slope is steeper above Tg. The temperature of this transition as measured by PALS has turned out to be somewhat lower than what is obtained with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). At room temperature the results show a narrow distribution, reflecting that the free volume holes are small and of rather equal size. As the temperature is raised, the distribution broadens. The largest change in distribution width will be discussed on the frame of the free volume model

  5. Relationship of carotid arterial functional and structural changes to left atrial volume in untreated hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroch, Joanna; Rzyczkowska, Barbara; Bociąga, Zbigniew; Vriz, Olga; Driussi, Caterina; Loboz-Rudnicka, Maria; Dudek, Krzysztof; Łoboz-Grudzień, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of arterial functional and structural changes to left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction has been the area of recent research. There are some studies on the relationship between arterial stiffness (a.s.) and left atrial (LA) remodelling as a marker of diastolic burden. Little is known about the association of arterial structural changes and LA remodelling in hypertension (H). The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between carotid a.s. and intima-media thickness (IMT) and LA volume in subjects with H. The study included 245 previously untreated hypertensives (166 women and 79 men, mean age 53.7 ± 11.8 years). Each patient was subjected to echocardiography with measurement of LA volume, evaluation of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and LV systolic/diastolic function indices, integrated assessment of carotid IMT and echo-tracking of a.s. and wave reflection parameters. Univariate regression analysis revealed significant correlations between indexed LA volume and selected clinical characteristics, echocardiographic indices of LVH and LV diastolic/systolic function and a.s./wave reflection parameters. The following parameters were identified as independent determinants of indexed LA volume on multivariate regression analysis: diastolic blood pressure (beta = -0.229, P arterial stiffness but not intima-media thickness and LA volume in patients with untreated hypertension.

  6. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  7. Acute changes in forearm venous volume and tone using radionuclide plethysmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manyari, D.E.; Malkinson, T.J.; Robinson, V.; Smith, E.R.; Cooper, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this investigation blood pool scintigraphy was validated as a method to study acute changes in human forearm veins. Changes in regional forearm vascular volume (capacity) and the occluding pressure-volume (P-V) relationship induced by sublingual nifedipine (NIF) and nitroglycerin (GTN) were recorded in 16 patients with simultaneous data collection by the radionuclide and the mercury-in-rubber strain-gauge techniques. The standard error of estimate (Syx) between successive control measurements using the radionuclide method was 3.1% compared with 3.2% for the strain-gauge method. The venous P-V curves were highly reproducible using both techniques. Strain gauge and radionuclide measurements of acute changes in forearm venous volume correlated well (r = 0.86; Syx = 7%, n = 156). After 20 mg of NIF or 0.6 mg of GTN, mean heart rate increased from 71 +/- 10 to 77 +/- 9 and from 68 +/- 10 to 75 +/- 11 beats/min, respectively, and group systolic blood pressure decreased from 128 +/- 22 to 120 +/- 19 and from 136 +/- 18 to 126 +/- 23 mmHg, respectively (P less than 0.05). At venous occluding pressures of 0 and 30 mmHg, the forearm vascular volume did not change after NIF (2 +/- 4 and -1 +/- 4%; P greater than 0.05), whereas it increased after GTN (8 +/- 5 and 12 +/- 7%; P less than 0.001). The forearm venous P-V relationship did not change after NIF, whereas a significant rightward shift (venodilation, with an increase in unstressed volume) occurred after GTN

  8. Whole Prostate Volume and Shape Changes with the Use of an Inflatable and Flexible Endorectal Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, M.; Shebel, H.; Sankineni, S.; Bernardo, M.L.; Daar, D.; Choyke, P.L.; Turkbey, B.; Agarwal, H.K.; Osman, M.; Shebel, H.; Bernardo, M.L.; Wood, P.J.; Pinto, P.A.; Agarwal, H.K.

    2014-01-01

    To determine to what extent an inflatable endorectal coil (ERC) affects whole prostate (WP) volume and shape during prostate MRI. Materials and Methods. 79 consecutive patients underwent T2W MRI at 3T first with a 6-channel surface coil and then with the combination of a 16-channel surface coil and ERC in the same imaging session. WP volume was assessed by manually contouring the prostate in each T2W axial slice. PSA density was also calculated. The maximum anterior-posterior (AP), left-right (LR), and cranio caudal (CC) prostate dimensions were measured. Changes in WP prostate volume, PSA density, and prostate dimensions were then evaluated. Results. In 79 patients, use of an ERC yielded no significant change in whole prostate volume (0.6 ± 5.7 %, Ρ=0.270) and PSA density (-0.2 ±5.6%,Ρ=0.768 ). However, use of an ERC significantly decreased the AP dimension of the prostate by -8.6 ±7.8%(Ρ<0.001), increased LR dimension by 4.5 ± 5.8 %(Ρ<0.001), and increased the CC dimension by 8.8 ±6.9 %( Ρ<0.001). Conclusion. Use of an ERC in prostate MRI results in the shape deformation of the prostate gland with no significant change in the volume of the prostate measured on T2W MRI. Therefore, WP volumes calculated on ERC MRI can be reliably used in clinical work flow.

  9. A lattice Boltzmann coupled to finite volumes method for solving phase change problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ganaoui Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical scheme coupling lattice Boltzmann and finite volumes approaches has been developed and qualified for test cases of phase change problems. In this work, the coupled partial differential equations of momentum conservation equations are solved with a non uniform lattice Boltzmann method. The energy equation is discretized by using a finite volume method. Simulations show the ability of this developed hybrid method to model the effects of convection, and to predict transfers. Benchmarking is operated both for conductive and convective situation dominating solid/liquid transition. Comparisons are achieved with respect to available analytical solutions and experimental results.

  10. Tracking Regional Tissue Volume and Function Change in Lung Using Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the 24-hour redistribution and reabsorption of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid delivered to the lung during a bronchoscopic procedure in normal volunteers. In this work we utilize image-matching procedures to correlate fluid redistribution and reabsorption to changes in regional lung function. Lung CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. Each subject was scanned at four time points before and after BAL procedure. Image registration was performed to align images at different time points and different inflation levels. The resulting dense displacement fields were utilized to track tissue volume changes and reveal deformation patterns of local parenchymal tissue quantitatively. The registration accuracy was assessed by measuring landmark matching errors, which were on the order of 1 mm. The results show that quantitative-assessed fluid volume agreed well with bronchoscopist-reported unretrieved BAL volume in the whole lungs (squared linear correlation coefficient was 0.81. The average difference of lung tissue volume at baseline and after 24 hours was around 2%, which indicates that BAL fluid in the lungs was almost absorbed after 24 hours. Regional lung-function changes correlated with the presence of BAL fluid, and regional function returned to baseline as the fluid was reabsorbed.

  11. Dearomatized white spirit inhalation exposure causes long-lasting neurophysiological changes in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, S. P.; Simonsen, L.; Hass, Ulla

    1996-01-01

    Dearomatized white spirit inhalation exposure causes long-lasting neurophysioloical changes in rats. NEUROTOXICOL TERATOL 18(1), 67-76, 1996. -Exposure for 6 h per day, 5 days per week, during a period of 6 months to the organic solvent dearomatized white spirit (0, 400, and 800 ppm) was studied ...

  12. Structural changes of organic solids caused by irradiation: raman study at very low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hase, Hirotomo; Ishioka, Kunie; Miyatake, Yoko.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we first describe a simple liquid helium cryostat and a device of making and mounting organic solid samples. We then present the Raman spectra for irradiated ethanol crystal that were obtained by using the new cryostat and demonstrate how the Raman method is useful for getting insight into structural changes of organic solids caused by irradiation. (J.P.N.)

  13. Weight change and all-cause mortality in older adults: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This meta-analysis of observational cohort studies examined the association between weight change (weight loss, weight gain, and weight fluctuation) and all-cause mortality among older adults. We used PubMed (MEDLINE), Web of Science, and Cochrane Library to identify prospective studies published in...

  14. Changes in causes of low vision between 1988 and 2009 in a Dutch population of children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, N.; Limburg, H.; Tijmes, N.; van Genderen, M.; Schuil, J.; van Nispen, R.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Causes of low vision in the Netherlands may have changed over time. The purpose of this study is to assess trends over the last two decades. Methods: Socio-demographic and medical data, including ophthalmic diagnosis and inheritance patterns for 2843 children with low vision (0-21 years;

  15. The Younger Dryas climate change: was it caused by an extraterrestrial impact?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoesel, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Younger Dryas is an abrupt cooling event at the end of the last Glacial associated to a change in ocean circulation. According to the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis, however, one or more extraterrestrial airbursts or impacts occuring around 12.8 ka caused the Younger Dryas cooling, extensive

  16. Heteromeric Slick/Slack K+ channels show graded sensitivity to cell volume changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tejada, Maria A; Hashem, Nadia; Callø, Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Slick and Slack high-conductance K+ channels are found in the CNS, kidneys, pancreas, among other organs, where they play an important role in cell excitability as well as in ion transport processes. They are both activated by Na+ and Cl- but show a differential regulation by cell volume changes....... Slick has been shown to be regulated by cell volume changes, whereas Slack is insensitive. α-subunits of these channels form homomeric as well as heteromeric channels. It is the aim of this work to explore whether the subunit composition of the Slick/Slack heteromeric channel affects the response...... to osmotic challenges. In order to provide with the adequate water permeability to the cell membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes, mRNA of aquaporin 1 was co-expressed with homomeric or heteromeric Slick and Slack α-subunits. Oocytes were superfused with hypotonic or hypertonic buffers and changes in currents...

  17. Causes of ischemic electrocardiographic changes in near drowning: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R; Sprenker, Collin; Bosco, Gerardo; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2015-10-01

    Drowning is a main cause of accidental death among children and adolescents worldwide. Ischemic electrocardiographic (ECG) changes are often encountered in victims of near drowning. We reviewed the literature for near drowning cases reporting ischemic ECG changes to study the underlying etiology for these findings. Among the 8 cases included in the analysis, ischemic ECG changes were due to takotsubo cardiomyopathy (in elderly cases especially females); coronary artery spasm (in younger cases); or hypothermia effect on ECG; and, to a lesser extent, myocardial ischemia resulting from occlusive coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A pomegranate-inspired nanoscale design for large-volume-change lithium battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nian; Lu, Zhenda; Zhao, Jie; McDowell, Matthew T.; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Zhao, Wenting; Cui, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Silicon is an attractive material for anodes in energy storage devices, because it has ten times the theoretical capacity of its state-of-the-art carbonaceous counterpart. Silicon anodes can be used both in traditional lithium-ion batteries and in more recent Li-O2 and Li-S batteries as a replacement for the dendrite-forming lithium metal anodes. The main challenges associated with silicon anodes are structural degradation and instability of the solid-electrolyte interphase caused by the large volume change (~300%) during cycling, the occurrence of side reactions with the electrolyte, and the low volumetric capacity when the material size is reduced to a nanometre scale. Here, we propose a hierarchical structured silicon anode that tackles all three of these problems. Our design is inspired by the structure of a pomegranate, where single silicon nanoparticles are encapsulated by a conductive carbon layer that leaves enough room for expansion and contraction following lithiation and delithiation. An ensemble of these hybrid nanoparticles is then encapsulated by a thicker carbon layer in micrometre-size pouches to act as an electrolyte barrier. As a result of this hierarchical arrangement, the solid-electrolyte interphase remains stable and spatially confined, resulting in superior cyclability (97% capacity retention after 1,000 cycles). In addition, the microstructures lower the electrode-electrolyte contact area, resulting in high Coulombic efficiency (99.87%) and volumetric capacity (1,270 mAh cm-3), and the cycling remains stable even when the areal capacity is increased to the level of commercial lithium-ion batteries (3.7 mAh cm-2).

  19. Motion of bones and volume changes in the neurocranium after craniectomy in Crouzon's disease. A roentgen stereometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rune, B; Selvik, G; Kreiborg, S; Sarnäs, K V; Kågström, E

    1979-04-01

    Craniectomy was performed on a boy with Crouzon's disease at 22 months of age. Metallic implants (tantalum balls, 0.5 mm in diameter) were inserted in the calvaria during surgery, and the child was examined postoperatively by roentgen stereometry at intervals of about 100 days (total observation time, 309 days). The thyroid radiation dose was 250 muGy for one examination. The effect of craniectomy was recorded with a high degree of accuracy in terms of motion of bones and volume changes in the calvaria. Expansion occurred almost entirely through motion of free bone flaps in the frontal region, while a linear craniectomy in the region of the sagittal suture caused small changes. The rate of expansion decreased rapidly and stabilization was recorded about 250 days after surgery.

  20. 3D mapping of cerebrospinal fluid local volume changes in patients with hydrocephalus treated by surgery: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodel, Jerome; Besson, Pierre; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier; Rahmouni, Alain; Grandjacques, Benedicte; Luciani, Alain; Petit, Eric; Lebret, Alain; Outteryck, Olivier; Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine; Maraval, Anne; Decq, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    To develop automated deformation modelling for the assessment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) local volume changes in patients with hydrocephalus treated by surgery. Ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volume changes were mapped by calculating the Jacobian determinant of the deformation fields obtained after non-linear registration of pre- and postoperative images. A total of 31 consecutive patients, 15 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH) and 16 with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), were investigated before and after surgery using a 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application optimised contrast using different flip-angle evolution) sequence. Two readers assessed CSF volume changes using 3D colour-encoded maps. The Evans index and postoperative volume changes of the lateral ventricles and sylvian fissures were quantified and statistically compared. Before surgery, sylvian fissure and brain ventricle volume differed significantly between CH and NCH (P = 0.001 and P = 0.025, respectively). After surgery, 3D colour-encoded maps allowed for the visual recognition of the CSF volume changes in all patients. The amounts of ventricle volume loss of CH and NCH patients were not significantly different (P = 0.30), whereas readjustment of the sylvian fissure volume was conflicting in CH and NCH patients (P < 0.001). The Evans index correlated with ventricle volume in NCH patients. 3D mapping of CSF volume changes is feasible providing a quantitative follow-up of patients with hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  1. 3D mapping of cerebrospinal fluid local volume changes in patients with hydrocephalus treated by surgery: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome [Hopital Roger Salengro, Department of Neuroradiology, Lille (France); Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Neuroradiologie, Lille (France); Besson, Pierre; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier [Hopital Roger Salengro, Department of Neuroradiology, Lille (France); Rahmouni, Alain; Grandjacques, Benedicte; Luciani, Alain [Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Radiology, Creteil (France); Petit, Eric; Lebret, Alain [Signals Images and Intelligent Systems Laboratory, Creteil (France); Outteryck, Olivier [Hopital Roger Salengro, Department of Neurology, Lille (France); Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine [Radiation Epidemiology Team, CESP, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health U1018, Villejuif (France); Maraval, Anne [Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Decq, Philippe [Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France)

    2014-01-15

    To develop automated deformation modelling for the assessment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) local volume changes in patients with hydrocephalus treated by surgery. Ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volume changes were mapped by calculating the Jacobian determinant of the deformation fields obtained after non-linear registration of pre- and postoperative images. A total of 31 consecutive patients, 15 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH) and 16 with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), were investigated before and after surgery using a 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application optimised contrast using different flip-angle evolution) sequence. Two readers assessed CSF volume changes using 3D colour-encoded maps. The Evans index and postoperative volume changes of the lateral ventricles and sylvian fissures were quantified and statistically compared. Before surgery, sylvian fissure and brain ventricle volume differed significantly between CH and NCH (P = 0.001 and P = 0.025, respectively). After surgery, 3D colour-encoded maps allowed for the visual recognition of the CSF volume changes in all patients. The amounts of ventricle volume loss of CH and NCH patients were not significantly different (P = 0.30), whereas readjustment of the sylvian fissure volume was conflicting in CH and NCH patients (P < 0.001). The Evans index correlated with ventricle volume in NCH patients. 3D mapping of CSF volume changes is feasible providing a quantitative follow-up of patients with hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  2. Changes in cause-specific mortality among the elderly in Canada, 1979–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier Bergeron-Boucher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of causes of death in Canada has been changing since the onset of the “cardiovascular revolution.” While mortality due to cardiovascular diseases has been declining, mortality due to other causes of death, such as cancers and Alzheimer’s disease has been increasing. Our research investigates how these changes have re-modeled life expectancy at age 65 and age 85, and what specific causes of death are involved. We distinguish between premature and senescent deaths in Canada, using a cause-specific age structure. Our results suggest that although a decline in premature deaths has contributed to increasing life expectancy in recent years, most of the gains in life expectancy at age 65 and 85 have resulted from a decline in senescent deaths. We also find a decline in mortality due to the main causes of death, leading to a greater diversification of causes. Depuis le début de la révolution cardiovasculaire, le Canada a connu d’importants changements dans la distribution des décès selon la cause. La mortalité par maladies cardiovasculaires a connu une importante diminution alors que les taux de mortalité pour les cancers et pour la maladie d’Alzheimer ont augmenté. Cet article examine comment ces changements ont influencé les tendances de l’espérance de vie à 65 et à 85 ans et quelles causes de décès spécifiques furent impliquées. Une distinction entre les décès prématurés et les décès liés à un processus de sénescence est réalisée, se basant sur deux indicateurs de variations par âge des causes de décès. Nos résultats suggèrent que la majorité des gains en espérance de vie à 65 et 85 ans proviennent d’une plus faible mortalité par cause de décès sénescente. De plus, une diminution des principales causes de décès chez les personnes âgées de 65 ans et plus laisse place à une plus grande diversification de causes aux grands âges.

  3. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... to be in accordance with results obtained by other methods. Noncontrast functional MR (fMR) imaging showed signal increases in gray matter, but also inconsistent changes in some white matter regions. CONCLUSION: In this experiment, contrast-enhanced imaging seemed to show a somewhat higher sensitivity towards changes...

  4. Exercise induced pulmonary, hepatic and splenic blood volume changes in diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubashar, M.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise induced blood volume changes in visceral organs were determined by scintillation gamma camera imaging in 11 normal healthy male volunteers and 15 NIDDM male diabetics without clinical signs of neuropathy. After in-vivo labelling of red cells with Technetium-99m, the data was acquired in the supine position at rest and immediately after graded upright ergometer bicycle exercise. From rest to peak exercise, pulmonary blood volume increased 19% and 75% in normal volunteers of less than and more than 40 years of age respectively. A decrease of 18% and 42% was noted in the hepatic and splenic blood volume respectively, regardless of the age, in the normal subjects. In contrast to normals, the diabetic patients showed in response to peak exercise as compared to age-matched controls. A significant difference in the drop in pulmonary blood volume 82.37% and 90% was observed between diabetics of more than and less than 7 years duration respectively. The liver and spleen of the diabetic subjects revealed a lesser decrease of 87.6% and 71.33% respectively in response to peak stress in comparison to the age matched controls. The reduction in the hepatic and splenic blood volume was equally evident in diabetics of more than or less than 50 years of age and it was statistically nonsignificant. This study demonstrates that the normal pattern of redistribution of blood volume in response to maximum exercise in diabetics is altered such that there is restricted pulmonary perfusion and diminished vasoconstriction of the hepato splenic vascular bed and the changes in the pulmonary circulation are related to the duration of the diabetics rather than the age of the patient. (author)

  5. A quantitative analysis of the causes of the global climate change research distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Maya; Strange, Niels

    2013-01-01

    investigates whether the need for knowledge on climate changes in the most vulnerable regions of the world is met by the supply of knowledge measured by scientific research publications from the last decade. A quantitative analysis of more than 15,000 scientific publications from 197 countries investigates...... the poorer, fragile and more vulnerable regions of the world. A quantitative keywords analysis of all publications shows that different knowledge domains and research themes dominate across regions, reflecting the divergent global concerns in relation to climate change. In general, research on climate change...... the distribution of climate change research and the potential causes of this distribution. More than 13 explanatory variables representing vulnerability, geographical, demographical, economical and institutional indicators are included in the analysis. The results show that the supply of climate change knowledge...

  6. Residual limb fluid volume change and volume accommodation: Relationships to activity and self-report outcomes in people with trans-tibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joan E; Youngblood, Robert T; Hafner, Brian J; Ciol, Marcia A; Allyn, Katheryn J; Gardner, David; Cagle, John C; Redd, Christian B; Dietrich, Colin R

    2018-02-01

    Fluctuations in limb volume degrade prosthesis fit and require users to accommodate changes using management strategies, such as donning and doffing prosthetic socks. To examine how activities and self-report outcomes relate to daily changes in residual limb fluid volume and volume accommodation. Standardized, two-part laboratory protocol with an interim observational period. Participants were classified as "accommodators" or "non-accommodators," based on self-report prosthetic sock use. Participants' residual limb fluid volume change was measured using a custom bioimpedance analyzer and a standardized in-laboratory activity protocol. Self-report health outcomes were assessed with the Socket Comfort Score and Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire. Activity was monitored while participants left the laboratory for at least 3 h. They then returned to repeat the bioimpedance test protocol. Twenty-nine people were enrolled. Morning-to-afternoon percent limb fluid volume change per hour was not strongly correlated to percent time weight-bearing or to self-report outcomes. As a group, non-accommodators ( n = 15) spent more time with their prosthesis doffed and reported better outcomes than accommodators. Factors other than time weight-bearing may contribute to morning-to-afternoon limb fluid volume changes and reported satisfaction with the prosthesis among trans-tibial prosthesis users. Temporary doffing may be a more effective and satisfying accommodation method than sock addition. Clinical relevance Practitioners should be mindful that daily limb fluid volume change and prosthesis satisfaction are not dictated exclusively by activity. Temporarily doffing the prosthesis may slow daily limb fluid volume loss and should be investigated as an alternative strategy to sock addition.

  7. Know your tools - concordance of different methods for measuring brain volume change after ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [The University of Melbourne, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid [The University of Melbourne, The Florey Institute of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Longitudinal brain volume changes have been investigated in a number of cerebral disorders as a surrogate marker of clinical outcome. In stroke, unique methodological challenges are posed by dynamic structural changes occurring after onset, particularly those relating to the infarct lesion. We aimed to evaluate agreement between different analysis methods for the measurement of post-stroke brain volume change, and to explore technical challenges inherent to these methods. Fifteen patients with anterior circulation stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 1 week of onset and at 1 and 3 months. Whole-brain as well as grey- and white-matter volume were estimated separately using both an intensity-based and a surface watershed-based algorithm. In the case of the intensity-based algorithm, the analysis was also performed with and without exclusion of the infarct lesion. Due to the effects of peri-infarct edema at the baseline scan, longitudinal volume change was measured as percentage change between the 1 and 3-month scans. Intra-class and concordance correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement between the different analysis methods. Reduced major axis regression was used to inspect the nature of bias between measurements. Overall agreement between methods was modest with strong disagreement between some techniques. Measurements were variably impacted by procedures performed to account for infarct lesions. Improvements in volumetric methods and consensus between methodologies employed in different studies are necessary in order to increase the validity of conclusions derived from post-stroke cerebral volumetric studies. Readers should be aware of the potential impact of different methods on study conclusions. (orig.)

  8. Know your tools - concordance of different methods for measuring brain volume change after ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew; Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M.; Churilov, Leonid; Parsons, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal brain volume changes have been investigated in a number of cerebral disorders as a surrogate marker of clinical outcome. In stroke, unique methodological challenges are posed by dynamic structural changes occurring after onset, particularly those relating to the infarct lesion. We aimed to evaluate agreement between different analysis methods for the measurement of post-stroke brain volume change, and to explore technical challenges inherent to these methods. Fifteen patients with anterior circulation stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 1 week of onset and at 1 and 3 months. Whole-brain as well as grey- and white-matter volume were estimated separately using both an intensity-based and a surface watershed-based algorithm. In the case of the intensity-based algorithm, the analysis was also performed with and without exclusion of the infarct lesion. Due to the effects of peri-infarct edema at the baseline scan, longitudinal volume change was measured as percentage change between the 1 and 3-month scans. Intra-class and concordance correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement between the different analysis methods. Reduced major axis regression was used to inspect the nature of bias between measurements. Overall agreement between methods was modest with strong disagreement between some techniques. Measurements were variably impacted by procedures performed to account for infarct lesions. Improvements in volumetric methods and consensus between methodologies employed in different studies are necessary in order to increase the validity of conclusions derived from post-stroke cerebral volumetric studies. Readers should be aware of the potential impact of different methods on study conclusions. (orig.)

  9. Changes in cause-specific mortality during heat waves in central Spain, 1975-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Isidro Juan; Linares, Cristina; Montero, Juan Carlos; Criado-Alvarez, Juan Jose; Díaz, Julio

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between heat waves and mortality has been widely described, but there are few studies using long daily data on specific-cause mortality. This study is undertaken in central Spain and analysing natural causes, circulatory and respiratory causes of mortality from 1975 to 2008. Time-series analysis was performed using ARIMA models, including data on specific-cause mortality and maximum and mean daily temperature and mean daily air pressure. The length of heat waves and their chronological number were analysed. Data were stratified in three decadal stages: 1975-1985, 1986-1996 and 1997-2008. Heat-related mortality was triggered by a threshold temperature of 37 °C. For each degree that the daily maximum temperature exceeded 37 °C, the percentage increase in mortality due to circulatory causes was 19.3 % (17.3-21.3) in 1975-1985, 30.3 % (28.3-32.3) in 1986-1996 and 7.3 % (6.2-8.4) in 1997-2008. The increase in respiratory cause ranged from 12.4 % (7.8-17.0) in the first period, to 16.3 % (14.1-18.4) in the second and 13.7 % (11.5-15.9) in the last. Each day of heat-wave duration explained 5.3 % (2.6-8.0) increase in respiratory mortality in the first period and 2.3 % (1.6-3.0) in the last. Decadal scale differences exist for specific-causes mortality induced by extreme heat. The impact on heat-related mortality by natural and circulatory causes increases between the first and the second period and falls significantly in the last. For respiratory causes, the increase is no reduced in the last period. These results are of particular importance for the estimation of future impacts of climate change on health.

  10. Volume-of-change cone-beam CT for image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Stayman, J Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Schafer, Sebastian; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Khanna, A Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) can provide intraoperative 3D imaging capability for surgical guidance, but workflow and radiation dose are the significant barriers to broad utilization. One main reason is that each 3D image acquisition requires a complete scan with a full radiation dose to present a completely new 3D image every time. In this paper, we propose to utilize patient-specific CT or CBCT as prior knowledge to accurately reconstruct the aspects of the region that have changed by the surgical procedure from only a sparse set of x-rays. The proposed methods consist of a 3D–2D registration between the prior volume and a sparse set of intraoperative x-rays, creating digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the registered prior volume, computing difference images by subtracting DRRs from the intraoperative x-rays, a penalized likelihood reconstruction of the volume of change (VOC) from the difference images, and finally a fusion of VOC reconstruction with the prior volume to visualize the entire surgical field. When the surgical changes are local and relatively small, the VOC reconstruction involves only a small volume size and a small number of projections, allowing less computation and lower radiation dose than is needed to reconstruct the entire surgical field. We applied this approach to sacroplasty phantom data obtained from a CBCT test bench and vertebroplasty data with a fresh cadaver acquired from a C-arm CBCT system with a flat-panel detector. The VOCs were reconstructed from a varying number of images (10–66 images) and compared to the CBCT ground truth using four different metrics (mean squared error, correlation coefficient, structural similarity index and perceptual difference model). The results show promising reconstruction quality with structural similarity to the ground truth close to 1 even when only 15–20 images were used, allowing dose reduction by the factor of 10–20. (paper)

  11. Improving the clinical correlation of multiple sclerosis black hole volume change by paired-scan analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger C; Traboulsee, Anthony; Riddehough, Andrew; Li, David K B

    2012-01-01

    The change in T 1-hypointense lesion ("black hole") volume is an important marker of pathological progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Black hole boundaries often have low contrast and are difficult to determine accurately and most (semi-)automated segmentation methods first compute the T 2-hyperintense lesions, which are a superset of the black holes and are typically more distinct, to form a search space for the T 1w lesions. Two main potential sources of measurement noise in longitudinal black hole volume computation are partial volume and variability in the T 2w lesion segmentation. A paired analysis approach is proposed herein that uses registration to equalize partial volume and lesion mask processing to combine T 2w lesion segmentations across time. The scans of 247 MS patients are used to compare a selected black hole computation method with an enhanced version incorporating paired analysis, using rank correlation to a clinical variable (MS functional composite) as the primary outcome measure. The comparison is done at nine different levels of intensity as a previous study suggests that darker black holes may yield stronger correlations. The results demonstrate that paired analysis can strongly improve longitudinal correlation (from -0.148 to -0.303 in this sample) and may produce segmentations that are more sensitive to clinically relevant changes.

  12. Elucidation of circulation mechanism on climatic changing vapor caused by water field ecology system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Shigeki; Doi, Taeko; Watanabe, Masataka; Inamori, Yuhei

    1999-01-01

    As climatic change caused by increase of carbon dioxide amounts emitted by industrial development is much anxious, it is well-known that water field ecology system relaxes change of carbon dioxide in atmosphere. Carbon dioxide, which is a climatic changing gas and has a closed relationship to the earth warming, is caught from atmosphere in the water field ecology system to be fixed as organic carbon and constitutes a starting point of food chains thereafter. In this study, in order to examine change of carbon dioxide, which is one of climatic changing gas or greenhouse effect gas caused by water field ecology system, 14-C was added to microcosm, which constructs a water field ecology system model, to measure 14-C amounts in each organism. As a result, it was found that carbon transfer in the system could be examined. And, it was also found that it was possible to understand more precise flow of substances and to elucidate quantitatively absorption of carbon dioxide and flow of carbon thereafter under different conditions, by future attempts on upgrading precision such as changing amounts of adding RI, and so forth. (G.K.)

  13. Early changes in volume and non-enhanced volume of acoustic neurinoma after stereotactic gamma-radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kida, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Takayuki; Mori, Yoshimasa; Iwakoshi, Takayasu; Niwa, Masahiro; Kai, Osamu; Hirose, Mitsuhiko [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    The effectiveness of stereotactic gamma-radiosurgery for treating acoustic neurinoma was evaluated by measuring the volumes of the tumor, non-enhanced tumor, and cerebellar edema in 13 patients with acoustic neurinoma who were followed up for 9 to 15 months (median 12.7 mos) after treatment. The tumor volume and non-enhanced volume tended to reach a maximum after 6 months, and cerebellar edema volume after 9 months, then decreased gradually thereafter. Hearing loss tended to increase gradually, but involvement of the facial nerve was transient. (author).

  14. Stereological brain volume changes in post-weaned socially isolated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Katrine; Helboe, Lone; Steiniger-Brach, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Lister Hooded rats isolated from postnatal day 25 for 15 weeks. We observed the expected gender differences in total brain volume with males having larger brains than females. Further, we found that isolated males had significantly smaller brains than group-housed controls and larger lateral ventricles...... have evaluated the neuroanatomical changes in this animal model in comparison to changes seen in schizophrenia. In this study, we applied stereological volume estimates to evaluate the total brain, the ventricular system, and the pyramidal and granular cell layers of the hippocampus in male and female...... than controls. However, this was not seen in female rats. Isolated males had a significant smaller hippocampus, dentate gyrus and CA2/3 where isolated females had a significant smaller CA1 compared to controls. Thus, our results indicate that long-term isolation of male rats leads to neuroanatomical...

  15. Large electrically induced height and volume changes in poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene) /poly(styrenesulfonate) thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charrier, D.S.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Kemerink, M.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate large, partly reversible height and volume changes of thin films of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) on the anode of interdigitating gold electrodes under ambient conditions by applying an electrical bias. The height and volume changes were monitored

  16. Role of cerebral blood volume changes in brain specific-gravity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picozzi, P.; Todd, N.V.; Crockard, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was calculated in gerbils from specific-gravity (SG) changes between normal and saline-perfused brains. Furthermore, changes in CBV were investigated during ischemia using carbon-14-labeled dextran (MW 70,000) as an intravascular marker. Both data were used to evaluate the possible error due to a change in CBV on the measurement of ischemic brain edema by the SG method. The methodological error found was 0.0004 for a 100% CBV change. This error is insignificant, being less than the standard deviation in the SG measured for the gerbil cortex. Thus, CBV changes are not responsible for the SG variations observed during the first phase of ischemia. These variations are better explained as an increase of brain water content during ischemia

  17. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... in cerebral hemodynamics than noncontrast-enhanced imaging. The results of the deconvolution analysis suggested that perfusion calculation by conventional tracer kinetic methods may be impracticable because of nonlinear effects in contrast-enhanced MR imaging....

  18. The change of volume of each hepatic segment in liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kazunori; Takashima, Tsutomu; Matsui, Osamu; Kadoya, Masumi; Kameyama, Tomiaki; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Gabata, Toshifumi

    1986-01-01

    We studied morphological changes of liver due to liver cirrhosis by evaluating the volume of liver and each hepatic segments (left lateral, left medial, right anterior, right posterior, and caudate lobe) divided using dynamic sequential CT during arterial portography. In liver cirrhosis, left lateral segment and caudate lobe were relatively enlarged, while right lobe and left medial segment showed significant shrinkage. But when posterior inferior right hepatic vein was evident on CT, right posterior segment did not shrink. (author)

  19. Leukocyte-reduction filters and radiation do not cause significant changes in platelet function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagura, Yutaka; Tsuno, Hirokazu; Shibata, Yoichi; Takahashi, Koki

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of radiation and leukocyte-reduction filters on platelet function. Platelet aggregation in response to collagen and ADP were measured prior to and after irradiation and filtration, as were the platelet recovery rate and complement factor C3. Four types of leukocyte-reduction filter were used, namely positively-, negatively-, and non-charged filters (all of polyester composition), as well as a polyurethane filter. Radiation itself did not significantly affect either the platelet recovery rate, platelet function, or C3 value. On the other hand, filtration through polyester leukocyte-reduction filters resulted in a significant reduction in the platelet recovery rate, an effect not observed with the polyurethane filter. However, none of the filters caused significant changes in platelet function or in C3 value. We concluded that radiation and filtration do not cause significant changes in platelet function, but polyurethane filters are superior to polyester filters in relation to platelet recovery. (author)

  20. Between information systems and physical structure of the city: New causes of climate changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlov Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the frequent and significant spatial transformations, an increasing climate change regime in urban areas occurs. In this paper a comprehensive reflection on these changes is analyzed, concerning one of the major causes - the social transformation and the growing use of information, networks and technology, used by city dwellers in everyday life. Advanced communications and the Internet provide urban concentration and decentralization, creating new spatial and geographic network, with a new allocation of space, for manufacturing and services. The consequence may be recognized in increasing individualization and social habits of city dwellers, as well as in modified way of households use, changing neighbourhoods and public spaces, transport systems, as the final outcome is the climate change. In this paper, the interdependence between information networks is emphasized - between virtual and physical environment, as well as changes in the way of life of the city, which ultimately lead to a new trigger for climate change. Users have never been more mobile in the physical space (commuting and tourist travel, while in the virtual space they are associated with the fixed points - everybody can be located, by using email or social network. Unexpectedly, the cause of the problem which is considered in this paper, is increased mobility in the real space, while city dwellers remain in one place, by using their virtual electronic connections. Thus, the role of city dwellers in creating climate change depends upon their spatial distribution and relationship towards information's and network activity. As a result, the drivers in city development are recognized on network nodes. Current crises in the global environment (economic, climate and social indicate the need to develop multi-functional environment and a greater appreciation of natural factors. Therefore, as a decisive factor for the adaptation of urban structure on climate change is the

  1. Structural changes in connective tissues caused by a moderate laser heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N; Bagratashvili, N V; Sviridov, A P; Shakh, G Sh; Ignat'eva, Natalia Yu; Lunin, Valery V; Grokhovskaya, T E; Averkiev, S V

    2002-01-01

    The structural changes in adipose and fibrous tissues caused by 2- and 3-W IR laser irradiation are studied by the methods of IR and Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is shown that heating of fibrous tissue samples to 50 0 C and adipose tissue samples to 75 0 C by IR laser radiation changes the supramolecular structure of their proteins and triacylglycerides, respectively, without the intramolecular bond breaking. Heating of fibrous tissue to 70 0 C and adipose tissue to 90 - 110 0 C leads to a partial reversible denaturation of proteins and to oxidation of fats.

  2. Social Crowding during Development Causes Changes in GnRH1 DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Sebastian G; Lenkov, Kapa; Williams, Blake; Fernald, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Gestational and developmental cues have important consequences for long-term health, behavior and adaptation to the environment. In addition, social stressors cause plastic molecular changes in the brain that underlie unique behavioral phenotypes that also modulate fitness. In the adult African cichlid, Astatotilapia burtoni, growth and social status of males are both directly regulated by social interactions in a dynamic social environment, which causes a suite of plastic changes in circuits, cells and gene transcription in the brain. We hypothesized that a possible mechanism underlying some molecular changes might be DNA methylation, a reversible modification made to cytosine nucleotides that is known to regulate gene function. Here we asked whether changes in DNA methylation of the GnRH1 gene, the central regulator of the reproductive axis, were altered during development of A. burtoni. We measured changes in methylation state of the GnRH1 gene during normal development and following the gestational and developmental stress of social crowding. We found differential DNA methylation within developing juveniles between 14-, 28- and 42-day-old. Following gestational crowding of mouth brooding mothers, we saw differential methylation and transcription of GnRH1 in their offspring. Taken together, our data provides evidence for social control of GnRH1 developmental responses to gestational cues through DNA methylation.

  3. Alternative approaches used to assess structural changes of natural zircon caused by heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, L. T. T.; Thuyet, N. T. M.; Phan, T. L.; Tran, N.; Toan, D. N.; Thang, P. D.; Huy, B. T.

    2018-03-01

    It is known that large changes in the crystal structure of zircon (ZrSiO4) can be assessed through the linewidth of the characteristic Raman mode (Δν3) at 1008 cm-1. However, the use of Δν3 to assess small changes caused by heat treatment at temperatures below its decomposition temperature of 1670 °C is difficult. The present work points out that the combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and photoluminescence (PL) and Raman (RS) measurements with different excitation wavelengths is an effective approach to solve the above problem. In this context, we have selected natural zircon containing some rare-earth (RE) impurities, and then studied the changes in its crystal structure caused by heat treatment at temperatures Tan=400-1600 °C. XRD analyses reveal that small modifications of the unit-cell parameters occur as Tan>600 °C. Taking the intensity ratios of the ν3 mode to RE-related emissions (Iν3/IRE) or the PL intensity ratios between RE-related emissions into consideration, the similar results in good agreement with the XRD analyses are also found. We believe that the small structural changes are related to the migration and redistribution of defects and impurities, and re-crystallization of zircon. This could be further confirmed though the relation between paramagnetic and ferromagnetic signals when Tan changes.

  4. [Facial nerve injuries cause changes in central nervous system microglial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, Jeimmy; Troncoso, Julieta

    2016-12-01

    Our research group has described both morphological and electrophysiological changes in motor cortex pyramidal neurons associated with contralateral facial nerve injury in rats. However, little is known about those neural changes, which occur together with changes in surrounding glial cells. To characterize the effect of the unilateral facial nerve injury on microglial proliferation and activation in the primary motor cortex. We performed immunohistochemical experiments in order to detect microglial cells in brain tissue of rats with unilateral facial nerve lesion sacrificed at different times after the injury. We caused two types of lesions: reversible (by crushing, which allows functional recovery), and irreversible (by section, which produces permanent paralysis). We compared the brain tissues of control animals (without surgical intervention) and sham-operated animals with animals with lesions sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 21 or 35 days after the injury. In primary motor cortex, the microglial cells of irreversibly injured animals showed proliferation and activation between three and seven days post-lesion. The proliferation of microglial cells in reversibly injured animals was significant only three days after the lesion. Facial nerve injury causes changes in microglial cells in the primary motor cortex. These modifications could be involved in the generation of morphological and electrophysiological changes previously described in the pyramidal neurons of primary motor cortex that command facial movements.

  5. Photoplethysmography for blood volumes and oxygenation changes during intermittent vascular occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abay, T Y; Kyriacou, P A

    2018-06-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is an optical technique that measures blood volume variations. The main application of dual-wavelength PPG is pulse oximetry, in which the arterial oxygen saturation (SpO[Formula: see text]) is calculated noninvasively. However, the PPG waveform contains other significant physiological information that can be used in conjunction to SpO[Formula: see text] for the assessment of oxygenation and blood volumes changes. This paper investigates the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) processing techniques for extracting relative concentration changes of oxygenated ([Formula: see text]HbO[Formula: see text]), reduced ([Formula: see text]HHb) and total haemoglobin ([Formula: see text]tHb) from dual-wavelength PPG signals during intermittent pressure-increasing vascular occlusions. A reflectance PPG sensor was attached on the left forearm of nineteen (n = 19) volunteers, along with a reference NIRS sensor positioned on the same forearm, above the left brachioradialis. The investigation protocol consisted of seven intermittent and pressure-increasing vascular occlusions. Relative changes in haemoglobin concentrations were obtained by applying the modified Beer-Lambert law to PPG signals, while oxygenation changes were estimated by the difference between red and infrared attenuations of DC PPGs (A[Formula: see text] = [Formula: see text]A[Formula: see text] - [Formula: see text]A[Formula: see text]) and by the conventional SpO[Formula: see text]. The [Formula: see text]HbO[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]HHb, [Formula: see text]tHb from the PPG signals indicated significant changes in perfusion induced by either partial and complete occlusions (p < 0.05). The trends in the variables extracted from PPG showed good correlation with the same parameters measured by the reference NIRS monitor. Bland and Altman analysis of agreement between PPG and NIRS showed underestimation of the magnitude of changes by the PPG. A[Formula: see text

  6. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we ...

  7. Changes in bone geometry and microarchitecture caused by intermittent administration of PTH. Comparison with those by exercise load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Keiya

    2010-01-01

    There have been several studies showing that periodical intermittent medication with parathyroid hormone (PTH) causes increases in cancellous bone mass. However, there have been almost no reports comparing the effects of periodical intermittent PTH medication on bone microarchitecture with changes caused by physiological stimulation such as exercise load. In this study, we compared the effects of these two interventions on the microarchitecturural deterioration of femoral cancellous bone associated with unloading, using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and the effects of PTH administration and motion loading on improvement of the deteriorated structure. In the study, 32 eight-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group without tail suspension (CON), a control recovery group after suspension (S+C), a suspension/PTH group (S+P), and a suspension/jumping exercise group (S+J). Periodical intermittent human PTH (1-34) was given periodically to the S+P group rats at a dose of 75 μg/kg/day five times a week for five weeks, after two weeks of exercise with suspension of the tail. The rats in the S+J group performed 40 cm-high jumping 10 times/day five times a week for five weeks. After this conditioning, upon examination, bilateral femurs were removed and the right distal metaphysis was scanned using micro-CT to obtain images of the cancellous bone region of the femur. Based on the tomographic data, indices of cancellous bone microarchitecture was the index of trabecular bone structure were determined by using three-dimensional image analysis system. In addition, to examine the geometric properties of the diaphysis, mid-portion images of the bone shaft of the left femur were obtained by micro-CT, and then the mechanical bone strength of the left femur was determined by performing a three-point bending test. Compared to the S+C group, the S+P and S+J groups showed significantly higher bone volume, bone surface mass values, superficial bone

  8. Hippocampal volume changes in healthy subjects at risk of unipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baaré, William F C; Vinberg, Maj; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-01-01

    Unipolar depression is moderately heritable. It is unclear whether structural brain changes associated with unipolar depression are present in healthy persons at risk of the disorder. Here we investigated whether a genetic predisposition to unipolar depression is associated with structural brain...... changes. A priori, hippocampal volume reductions were hypothesized. Using a high-risk study design, magnetic resonance imaging brain scans were obtained from 59 healthy high-risk subjects having a co-twin with unipolar depression, and 53 healthy low-risk subjects without a first-degree family history...

  9. Middle Miocene paleoenvironmental crises in Central Eurasia caused by changes in marine gateway configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palcu, D. V.; Golovina, L. A.; Vernyhorova, Y. V.; Popov, S. V.; Krijgsman, W.

    2017-11-01

    Marine gateways prove to be important factors for changes in the ecology and biochemistry of marginal seas. Changes in gateway configuration played a dominant role in the Middle Miocene paleogeographic evolution of the Paratethys Sea that covered Central Eurasia. Here, we focus on the connection between the Central (CP) and Eastern Paratethys (EP) to understand the paleoenvironmental changes caused by the evolution of this marine gateway. We first construct an integrated magneto-biostratigraphic framework for the late Langhian-Serravallian (Chokrakian-Karaganian-Konkian-Volhynian) sedimentary record of the eastern domain, which allows a correlation to the well-dated successions west of the gateway. The magneto-biostratigraphic results from the Zelensky-Panagia section on the Black Sea coast of Russia show that the Chokrakian/Karaganian boundary has an age of 13.8 Ma, the Karaganian/Konkian boundary is dated at 13.4 Ma, and the Konkian/Volhynian boundary at 12.65 Ma. We identify three major phases on gateway functioning that are reflected in specific environmental changes. During the Karaganian, the EP turned into a lake-sea that supplied a unidirectional flow of low-salinity waters to the west, where the CP sea experienced its Badenian Salinity Crisis. This configuration is remarkably similar to the Mediterranean during its Messinian Salinity Crisis. The second phase is marked by a marine transgression from the west, reinstalling open-marine conditions in the CP and causing marine incursions in the EP during the Konkian. The Volhynian is characterized by a new gateway configuration that allows exchange between CP and EP, creating unified conditions all over the Paratethys. We hypothesize that a density driven pumping mechanism is triggered by the increase in connectivity at the Konkian/Volhynian boundary, which simultaneously caused major paleoenvironmental changes at both sides of the gateway and led to the Badenian-Sarmatian extinction event in the CP.

  10. Changes with age in left ventricular function and volumes at rest and postexercise in postmenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kiyoyasu; Isobe, Satoshi; Hirai, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    In postmenopausal women, it has been reported that the plasma estrogen levels diminish immediately after menopause, and that this phenomenon affects left ventricular (LV) function and volumes. However, the effects of age on LV function and volumes for a relatively short period in the postmenopausal women remain to be established. Electrocardiographically gated-myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has recently provided accurate estimations of perfusion, cardiac systolic and diastolic functions. We investigated the age-related changes in LV function and volumes in postmenopausal women using electrocardiographically gated-myocardial scintigraphy. Twenty-two consecutive healthy postmenopausal women (mean age of 63.8±9.4 years, from 42 to 77 years) without cardiac disease underwent stress/rest technetium-99m tetrofosmin gated-myocardial SPECT with 16 frames per cardiac cycle at baseline and follow-up (1.0±0.3 years later). LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and LV volumes were calculated by quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) software. Fourier series were retained for the analysis of the volume curve. From this volume curve, we derived the following diastolic indices: peak filling rate (PFR) and time to PFR (TPFR). End-systolic volume index (ESVI) significantly decreased at postexercise (p=0.02) and tended to decrease at rest (p=0.06) from the baseline to the follow-up study. LVEF significantly increased at both postexercise (p=0.01) and rest (p=0.03) from the baseline to the follow-up study. The TPFR at rest tended to be prolonged from the baseline to the follow-up study (p=0.07). The absolute increase in LVEF at postexercise tended to decrease with age [4.8% (50s) vs. 3.4% (60s) vs. 1.2% (70s)]. An age-related change in cardiac performance is apparent at an approximately 1 year follow-up in postmenopausal women. In particular, the increase in LV systolic function tends to show the greatest value in the 50s subjects among the 3 generations. (author)

  11. The public's belief in climate change and its human cause are increasing over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milfont, Taciano L; Wilson, Marc S; Sibley, Chris G

    2017-01-01

    Polls examining public opinion on the subject of climate change are now commonplace, and one-off public opinion polls provide a snapshot of citizen's opinions that can inform policy and communication strategies. However, cross-sectional polls do not track opinions over time, thus making it impossible to ascertain whether key climate change beliefs held by the same group of individuals are changing or not. Here we examine the extent to which individual's level of agreement with two key beliefs ("climate change is real" and "climate change is caused by humans") remain stable or increase/decrease over a six-year period in New Zealand using latent growth curve modelling (n = 10,436). Data were drawn from the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study, a probabilistic national panel study, and indicated that levels of agreement to both beliefs have steadily increased over the 2009-2015 period. Given that climate change beliefs and concerns are key predictors of climate change action, our findings suggest that a combination of targeted endeavors, as well as serendipitous events, may successfully convey the emergency of the issue.

  12. Volume changes in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment: cognitive associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Matthew C.; Barnes, Josephine; Nielsen, Casper; Clegg, Shona L.; Blair, Melanie; Douiri, Abdel; Boyes, Richard G.; Fox, Nick C.; Kim, Lois G.; Leung, Kelvin K.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    To assess the relationship between MRI-derived changes in whole-brain and ventricular volume with change in cognitive scores in Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and control subjects. In total 131 control, 231 MCI and 99 AD subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort with T1-weighted volumetric MRIs from baseline and 12-month follow-up were used to derive volume changes. Mini mental state examination (MMSE), Alzheimer's disease assessment scale (ADAS)-cog and trails test changes were calculated over the same period. Brain atrophy rates and ventricular enlargement differed between subject groups (p < 0.0005) and in MCI and AD were associated with MMSE changes. Both measures were additionally associated with ADAS-cog and trails-B in MCI patients, and ventricular expansion was associated with ADAS-cog in AD patients. Brain atrophy (p < 0.0005) and ventricular expansion rates (p = 0.001) were higher in MCI subjects who progressed to AD within 12 months of follow-up compared with MCI subjects who remained stable. MCI subjects who progressed to AD within 12 months had similar atrophy rates to AD subjects. Whole-brain atrophy rates and ventricular enlargement differed between patient groups and healthy controls, and tracked disease progression and psychological decline, demonstrating their relevance as biomarkers. (orig.)

  13. Variations in gastric compliance induced by acute blood volume changes in anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça J.R.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of acute volume imbalances on gastric volume (GV was studied in anesthetized rats (250-300 g. After cervical and femoral vessel cannulation, a balloon catheter was positioned in the proximal stomach. The opposite end of the catheter was connected to a barostat with an electronic sensor coupled to a plethysmometer. A standard ionic solution was used to fill the balloon (about 3.0 ml and the communicating vessel system, and to raise the reservoir liquid level 4 cm above the animals' xiphoid appendix. Due to constant barostat pressure, GV values were considered to represent the gastric compliance index. All animals were monitored for 90 min. After a basal interval, they were randomly assigned to normovolemic, hypervolemic, hypovolemic or restored protocols. Data were compared by ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's test. Mean arterial pressure (MAP, central venous pressure (CVP and GV values did not change in normovolemic animals (N = 5. Hypervolemic animals (N = 12 were transfused at 0.5 ml/min with a suspension of red blood cells in Ringer-lactate solution with albumin (12.5 ml/kg, which reduced GV values by 11.3% (P0.05. MAP and CVP values increased (P<0.05 after hypervolemia but decreased (P<0.05 with hypovolemia. In conclusion, blood volume level modulates gastric compliance, turning the stomach into an adjustable reservoir, which could be part of the homeostatic process to balance blood volume.

  14. A voxel-based morphometry study of brain volume changes in patients with neuromyelitis optica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yunyun; Liu Yaou; Liang Peipeng; Huang Jing; Ren Zhuoqiong; Ye Jing; Dong Huiqing; Chen Hai; Li Kuncheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To detect changes of regional grey matter and white matter volume in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) by voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and investigate its relationship with clinical variables. Methods: Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and structural three-dimensional MRI were obtained from 20 NMO and 20 sex-and age-matched healthy volunteers. The comparison of grey matter and white matter volume between the two groups was analyzed by VBM tools of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 5. Pearson correlation analysis was used to assess correlations between regional volume decrease and disease duration and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores in NMO patients. Results: Compared with normal controls, NMO patients had grey matter atrophy in several cortical regions, such as right inferior frontal gyrus (cluster size 514), left superior temporal gyrus (282), right middle temporal gyrus (229) and right insula (211) (t=3.58-5.11, AlphaSim corrected, P<0.05). White matter atrophy was found in several subcortical regions in NMO patients, such as right precentral and postcentral gyrus (cluster size 457, 110), left middle frontal gyrus (285), and right inferior parietal lobule (231) (t=2.90-4.25, AlphaSim corrected, P<0.05). Grey matter and white matter volume loss were not significantly correlated with clinical duration or EDSS score in NMO. Conclusion: By means of VBM, regional atrophy of grey matter and white matter is found in NMO patients, which may provide evidence for brain structural abnormality in NMO. (authors)

  15. Significance of breast boost volume changes during radiotherapy in relation to current clinical interobserver variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen; Admiraal, Marjan; Sangen, Maurice van der; Dijkmans, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nowadays, many departments introduce CT images for breast irradiation techniques, aiming to obtain a better accuracy in the definition of the relevant target volumes. However, the definition of the breast boost volume based on CT images requires further investigation, because it may not only vary between observers, but it may also change during the course of treatment. This study aims to quantify the variability of the CT based visible boost volume (VBV) during the course of treatment in relation to the variability between observers. Materials and methods: Ten patients with stage T1-2 invasive breast cancer treated with breast conservative surgery and post surgical radiotherapy were included in this study. In addition to the regular planning CT which is obtained several days prior to radiotherapy, three additional CT scans were acquired 3, 5 and 7 weeks after the planning CT scan. Four radiation oncologists delineated the VBV in all scans. Conformity of the delineations was analysed both between observers, and between scans taken at different periods of the radiotherapy treatment. Results: The VBV averaged over all patients decreased during the course of the treatment from an initial 40 cm 3 to 28 cm 3 , 27 cm 3 and 25 cm 3 after 3, 5 and 7 weeks, respectively. Assuming the VBV to be spherical, this corresponds to a reduction in diameter of 5-6 mm. More detailed analysis revealed that this reduction was more pronounced when radiotherapy started within 30 days after surgery. These boost volume changes over time were found to be significant (p = 0.02) even in the presence of interobserver variations. Moreover, the conformity index (CI) for the volume changes was of the same magnitude as the conformity index for the interobserver variation (0.25 and 0.31, respectively). Conclusions: Breast boost volume variations during a course of radiotherapy are significant in relation to current clinical interobserver variations. This is an important

  16. The influence of peat volume change and vegetation on the hydrology of a kettle-hole wetland in Southern Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Whittington

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Links between local hydrology and vegetation type exist in wetlands, yet it is unclear what role peat volume change plays in these interactions. We measured peat volume change and hydraulic conductivity (Kfield at three contrasting sites located on the quaking vegetation mat of a kettle-hole peatland in southern Ontario. The three sites had visibly different plant communities and were named, according to their dominant vegetation, Sedge (Carex spp., Typha (Typha angustifolia and Carr (Cornus stolonifera. Peat was also collected for laboratory studies of peat volume change, vertical (Kv and horizontal (Kh hydraulic conductivity and the effect of compression on hydraulic conductivity (Kc.In the field, the water table rose throughout the study period, resulting in swelling of the peat. Peat volume change above the -100 cm layer was 11.2%, 6.0% and 3.8% at the Sedge, Typha, and Carr sites respectively. In laboratory samples, a falling water table caused compression of the peat below the structured surface mat, and relative peat volume change between the sites followed the same pattern as in the field. Kfield, Kv and Kh generally decreased with depth from ca. 10-2 to 10-6 cm s-1. In the surface layers (0 to -50cm K trended Carr>Typha>Sedge, whereas the reverse trend was observed in deeper peat. Artificial compression affected K only in the uppermost layers (0 to -15cm. The decline in Kc with compression also trended Sedge>Typha>Carr. Differences in peat volume change and K are probably related to differences in vegetation and soil structure, and may be important for maintaining suitable growing conditions within each community.

  17. Evaluation of morphological changes of the liver caused by heroin abuse in forensic practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A study of morphological lesions in the liver of heroin addicts enables a precise overview of the type and degree of the liver damages caused by intravenous (iv heroin abuse, additive effects of viral infections and alcohol consumption, as well as whether the expressiveness of these lesions depends on the duration of the time period of heroin application. The aim of the study was to investigate histopathological, ultrastructural and morphometric features of the liver of heroin addicts in forensic samples of the liver. Methods. The study involved the autopsy conducted on 40 bodies of iv heroin addicts and 10 control autopsies. The investigated group consisted of liver samples of 36 male subjects and 4 female subjects aged 35-40 years and the control group of 8 male and 2 female cadaveric bodies aged 15-35 years. The liver tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy. Sections of the tissue paraffin blocks 5 μ thick were stained using classical Hematoxylin and Eosin method (H&E, as well as PAS Van Gieson, Gomori, and Congo Red techniques. For investigation purposes of ultrastructural changes, liver tissue was fixed in glutaraldehyde and molded with epon. The analysis was performed using the method of transmission electron microscopy. Morphometric investigation of the liver sinusoidal macrophages was performed by using the M42 test system. Results. In the investigated group of iv heroin addicts, the liver autopsy samples showed degenerative vesicular and fat changes, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, sedimentation of pathologic protein amyloidosis, dysplastic changes, reduction in the amount of glycogen in hepatocytes, as well as the change in the number of Kupfer and endothelial cells. The established changes correlated with the duration of iv heroin abuse, whereas sinusoidal macrophages were activated in cases with active hepatitis, and no significant change in their number was found in hepatocytes with alcohol-related fatty

  18. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  19. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  20. ASSESSING LAND COVER CHANGES CAUSED BY GRANITE QUARRYING USING REMOTE SENSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Moeletsi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dimension stone quarrying in the area between Rustenburg and Brits in the North West Province of South Africa has been in existence for over 70 decades. The unique characteristics of the granite deposits in South Africa resulted in making the country a global producer of the granite rocks. This led to intensified quarrying activities between Rustenburg and Brits town. However, this surface mining method, has a potential to impact the environment in a negative way causing loss in vegetation, depletion of natural resources, loss of scenic beauty and contamination of surface water resources. To assess the land cover changes caused by granite quarrying activities, remotely sensed data in the form of Landsat images between 1998 and 2015 were used. Supervised classification was used to create maps. Accuracy assessment using Google EarthTM as a reference data yielded an overall accuracy of 78 %. The post classification change detection method was used to assess land cover changes within the granite quarries. Granite quarries increased by 1174.86 ha while formation of quarry lakes increased to 5.3 ha over the 17-year period. Vegetation cover decreased by 1308 ha in area while 18.3 ha bare land was lost during the same period. This study demonstrated the utility of remote sensing to detect changes in land cover within granite quarries.

  1. Changes in the Flow-Volume Curve According to the Degree of Stenosis in Patients With Unilateral Main Bronchial Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jung-Geun; Yi, Chin A; Lee, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kwon, O Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The shape of the flow-volume (F-V) curve is known to change to showing a prominent plateau as stenosis progresses in patients with tracheal stenosis. However, no study has evaluated changes in the F-V curve according to the degree of bronchial stenosis in patients with unilateral main bronchial stenosis. Methods We performed an analysis of F-V curves in 29 patients with unilateral bronchial stenosis with the aid of a graphic digitizer between January 2005 and December 2011. Results The primary diseases causing unilateral main bronchial stenosis were endobronchial tuberculosis (86%), followed by benign bronchial tumor (10%), and carcinoid (3%). All unilateral main bronchial stenoses were classified into one of five grades (I, ≤25%; II, 26%-50%; III, 51%-75%; IV, 76%-90%; V, >90% to near-complete obstruction without ipsilateral lung collapse). A monophasic F-V curve was observed in patients with grade I stenosis and biphasic curves were observed for grade II-IV stenosis. Both monophasic (81%) and biphasic shapes (18%) were observed in grade V stenosis. After standardization of the biphasic shape of the F-V curve, the breakpoints of the biphasic curve moved in the direction of high volume (x-axis) and low flow (y-axis) according to the progression of stenosis. Conclusion In unilateral bronchial stenosis, a biphasic F-V curve appeared when bronchial stenosis was >25% and disappeared when obstruction was near complete. In addition, the breakpoint moved in the direction of high volume and low flow with the progression of stenosis. PMID:26045916

  2. Field Test Evaluation of Effect on Cone Resistance Caused by Change in Penetration Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    in the laboratory. A change in the measured cone resistance occurs by lowering the penetration rate. This is caused by the changes in drainage conditions. Compared to the normal penetration rate of 20 mm/s, this paper illustrates that lowering the penetration rate leads to an increase in the cone resistance from 1......This paper presents how a change in cone penetration rate affects the measured cone resistance during cone penetration testing in silty soils. Regardless of soil, type the standard rate of penetration is 20 mm/s and it is generally accepted that undrained penetration occurs in clay while drained...... penetration occurs in sand. In intermediate soils such as silty soils, the standard cone penetration rate may result in drainage conditions varying from undrained to partially or fully drained conditions. Field cone penetrations tests have been conducted with different penetration rates on a test site...

  3. Co-seismic Earth’s rotation change caused by the 2012 Sumatra earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Changyi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes heavily deform the crust in the vicinity of the fault, which leads to mass redistribution in the earth interior. Then it will produce the change of the Earth’s rotation (polar motion and length of day due to the change of Earth inertial moment. This paper adopts the elastic dislocation to compute the co-seismic polar motion and variation in length of day (LOD caused by the 2011 Sumatra earthquake. The Earth’s rotational axis shifted about 1 mas and this earthquake decreased the length of day of 1 μs, indicating the tendency of earthquakes make the Earth rounder and to pull the mass toward the centre of the Earth. The result of variation in length of day is one order of magnitude smaller than the observed results that are available. We also compared the results of three fault models and find the co-seismic change is depended on the fault model.

  4. Changes in porosity of graphite caused by radiolytic gasification by carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdie, Neil; Edwards, I.A.S.; Marsh, Harry

    1986-01-01

    Methods have been developed to study porosity in nuclear grade graphite. The changes induced during the radiolytic gasification of graphite in carbon dioxide have been investigated. Porosity in radiolytically gasified graphite (0-22.8% wt. loss) was examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Each sample was vacuum impregnated with a slow-setting resin containing a fluorescent dye. Optical microscopy was used to study pores >2 μm 2 c.s.a. A semi-automatic image analysis system linked to the optical microscope enabled pore parameter data including cross-sectional areas, perimeters, Feret's diameters and shape factors, to be collected. The results showed that radiolytic gasification produced a large increase in the number of pores 2 c.s.a. New open pores 2 c.s.a. were developed by gasification of existing open porosity into the closed porosity ( 2 c.s.a.) within the binder-coke. Open pores, 2-100 μm 2 c.s.a., which were gasified within the coarse-grained mosaics of the binder-coke. In the gasification process to 22.8% wt. loss, the apparent open pore volume increased from 6.6 to 33.8% and the apparent closed pore volumes decreased from approx. 3% to 0.1%. The increase in apparent open porosity from 6.6% (virgin) to 33.8% resulted from gasification within original open porosity and by the opening and development of closed porosity. There was no evidence for creation of porosity from within the 'bulk' graphite, it being developed from existing fine porosity. The structure of pores > 100 μm 2 c.s.a. showed no change because of the inhibition of oxidation by deposition of carbonaceous species from the CH 4 inhibitor. Such species diffuse to the pore wall and are sacrificially oxidised. (author)

  5. Obesity and the built environment: changes in environmental cues cause energy imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D A

    2008-12-01

    The past 30 years have seen dramatic changes in the food and physical activity environments, both of which contribute to the changes in human behavior that could explain obesity. This paper reviews documented changes in the food environment, changes in the physical activity environment and the mechanisms through which people respond to these environments, often without conscious awareness or control. The most important environmental changes have been increases in food accessibility, food salience and decreases in the cost of food. The increases in food marketing and advertising create food cues that artificially stimulate people to feel hungry. The existence of a metabolic pathway that allows excess energy to be stored as fat suggests that people were designed to overeat. Many internal mechanisms favor neurophysiologic responses to food cues that result in overconsumption. External cues, such as food abundance, food variety and food novelty, cause people to override internal signals of satiety. Other factors, such as conditioning and priming, tie food to other desirable outcomes, and thus increase the frequency that hunger is stimulated by environmental cues. People's natural response to the environmental cues are colored by framing, and judgments are flawed and biased depending on how information is presented. People lack insight into how the food environment affects them, and subsequently are unable to change the factors that are responsible for excessive energy consumption. Understanding the causal pathway for overconsumption will be necessary to interrupt the mechanisms that lead to obesity.

  6. A Model for Estimating Current and Future Timber Volume Loss from Stem Decay Caused by Heterobasidion annosum and Other Fungi in Stands of True Fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory M. Filip

    1989-01-01

    In 1979, an equation was developed to estimate the percentage of current and future timber volume loss due to stem decay caused by Heterobasidion annosum and other fungi in advance regeneration stands of grand and white fir in eastern Oregon and Washington. Methods for using and testing the equation are presented. Extensive testing in 1988 showed the...

  7. Glacier Volume Change Estimation Using Time Series of Improved Aster Dems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Luc; Nuth, Christopher; Kääb, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Volume change data is critical to the understanding of glacier response to climate change. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) system embarked on the Terra (EOS AM-1) satellite has been a unique source of systematic stereoscopic images covering the whole globe at 15m resolution and at a consistent quality for over 15 years. While satellite stereo sensors with significantly improved radiometric and spatial resolution are available to date, the potential of ASTER data lies in its long consistent time series that is unrivaled, though not fully exploited for change analysis due to lack of data accuracy and precision. Here, we developed an improved method for ASTER DEM generation and implemented it in the open source photogrammetric library and software suite MicMac. The method relies on the computation of a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) model and the detection and correction of cross-track sensor jitter in order to compute DEMs. ASTER data are strongly affected by attitude jitter, mainly of approximately 4 km and 30 km wavelength, and improving the generation of ASTER DEMs requires removal of this effect. Our sensor modeling does not require ground control points and allows thus potentially for the automatic processing of large data volumes. As a proof of concept, we chose a set of glaciers with reference DEMs available to assess the quality of our measurements. We use time series of ASTER scenes from which we extracted DEMs with a ground sampling distance of 15m. Our method directly measures and accounts for the cross-track component of jitter so that the resulting DEMs are not contaminated by this process. Since the along-track component of jitter has the same direction as the stereo parallaxes, the two cannot be separated and the elevations extracted are thus contaminated by along-track jitter. Initial tests reveal no clear relation between the cross-track and along-track components so that the latter seems not to be

  8. GLACIER VOLUME CHANGE ESTIMATION USING TIME SERIES OF IMPROVED ASTER DEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Girod

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Volume change data is critical to the understanding of glacier response to climate change. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER system embarked on the Terra (EOS AM-1 satellite has been a unique source of systematic stereoscopic images covering the whole globe at 15m resolution and at a consistent quality for over 15 years. While satellite stereo sensors with significantly improved radiometric and spatial resolution are available to date, the potential of ASTER data lies in its long consistent time series that is unrivaled, though not fully exploited for change analysis due to lack of data accuracy and precision. Here, we developed an improved method for ASTER DEM generation and implemented it in the open source photogrammetric library and software suite MicMac. The method relies on the computation of a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC model and the detection and correction of cross-track sensor jitter in order to compute DEMs. ASTER data are strongly affected by attitude jitter, mainly of approximately 4 km and 30 km wavelength, and improving the generation of ASTER DEMs requires removal of this effect. Our sensor modeling does not require ground control points and allows thus potentially for the automatic processing of large data volumes. As a proof of concept, we chose a set of glaciers with reference DEMs available to assess the quality of our measurements. We use time series of ASTER scenes from which we extracted DEMs with a ground sampling distance of 15m. Our method directly measures and accounts for the cross-track component of jitter so that the resulting DEMs are not contaminated by this process. Since the along-track component of jitter has the same direction as the stereo parallaxes, the two cannot be separated and the elevations extracted are thus contaminated by along-track jitter. Initial tests reveal no clear relation between the cross-track and along-track components so that the latter

  9. Acute extracellular fluid volume changes increase ileocolonic resistance to saline flow in anesthetized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Jr. A.T.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effect of acute extracellular fluid volume changes on saline flow through 4 gut segments (ileocolonic, ileal, ileocolonic sphincter and proximal colon, perfused at constant pressure in anesthetized dogs. Two different experimental protocols were used: hypervolemia (iv saline infusion, 0.9% NaCl, 20 ml/min, volume up to 5% body weight and controlled hemorrhage (up to a 50% drop in mean arterial pressure. Mean ileocolonic flow (N = 6 was gradually and significantly decreased during the expansion (17.1%, P<0.05 and expanded (44.9%, P<0.05 periods while mean ileal flow (N = 7 was significantly decreased only during the expanded period (38%, P<0.05. Mean colonic flow (N = 7 was decreased during expansion (12%, P<0.05 but returned to control levels during the expanded period. Mean ileocolonic sphincter flow (N = 6 was not significantly modified. Mean ileocolonic flow (N = 10 was also decreased after hemorrhage (retracted period by 17% (P<0.05, but saline flow was not modified in the other separate circuits (N = 6, 5 and 4 for ileal, ileocolonic sphincter and colonic groups, respectively. The expansion effect was blocked by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, iv both on the ileocolonic (N = 6 and ileal (N = 5 circuits. Acute extracellular fluid volume retraction and expansion increased the lower gastrointestinal resistances to saline flow. These effects, which could physiologically decrease the liquid volume being supplied to the colon, are possible mechanisms activated to acutely balance liquid volume deficit and excess.

  10. Effect of Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism on age-related gray matter volume changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-En Liu

    Full Text Available The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 gene is a major regulator of neural plasticity and cellular resilience. Recently, the Bcl-2 rs956572 single nucleotide polymorphism was proposed to be a functional allelic variant that modulates cellular vulnerability to apoptosis. Our cross-sectional study investigated the genetic effect of this Bcl-2 polymorphism on age-related decreases in gray matter (GM volume across the adult lifespan. Our sample comprised 330 healthy volunteers (191 male, 139 female with a mean age of 56.2±22.0 years (range: 21-92. Magnetic resonance imaging and genotyping of the Bcl-2 rs956572 were performed for each participant. The differences in regional GM volumes between G homozygotes and A-allele carriers were tested using optimized voxel-based morphometry. The association between the Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism and age was a predictor of regional GM volumes in the right cerebellum, bilateral lingual gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, and right parahippocampal gyrus. We found that the volume of these five regions decreased with increasing age (all P<.001. Moreover, the downward slope was steeper among the Bcl-2 rs956572 A-allele carriers than in the G-homozygous participants. Our data provide convergent evidence for the genetic effect of the Bcl-2 functional allelic variant in brain aging. The rs956572 G-allele, which is associated with significantly higher Bcl-2 protein expression and diminished cellular sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis, conferred a protective effect against age-related changes in brain GM volume, particularly in the cerebellum.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  12. Changes in Prostate Shape and Volume and Their Implications for Radiotherapy After Introduction of Endorectal Balloon as Determined by MRI at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J.; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van; Visser, Andries G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the changes in prostate shape and volume after the introduction of an endorectal coil (ERC) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T. Methods and materials: A total of 44 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent separate MRI examinations at 3T with a body array coil and subsequently with an ERC inflated with 50 mL of fluid. Prospectively, two experienced readers independently evaluated all data sets in random order. The maximal anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal prostate diameters, as well as the total prostate and peripheral zone and central gland volumes were measured before and after ERC introduction. The changes in prostate shape and volume were analyzed using Wilcoxon's test for paired samples. Results: The introduction of the ERC significantly changed the prostate shape in all three directions, with mean changes in the anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal diameters of 15.7% (5.5 mm), 7.7% (3.5 mm), and 6.3% (2.2 mm), respectively. The mean total prostate, peripheral zone, and central gland volume decreased significantly after ERC introduction by 17.9% (8.3 cm 3 ), 21.6% (4.8 cm 3 ), and 14.2% (3.4 cm 3 ), respectively. Conclusion: ERC introduction as observed by 3T MRI changed the prostate shape and volume significantly. The mean anteroposterior diameter was reduced by nearly one-sixth of its original diameter, and the mean total prostate volume was decreased by approximately 18%. This could cause difficulties and should be considered when using ERC-based MRI for MRI-computed tomography fusion and radiotherapy planning.

  13. Sea-level rise caused by climate change and its implications for society

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIMURA, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    Sea-level rise is a major effect of climate change. It has drawn international attention, because higher sea levels in the future would cause serious impacts in various parts of the world. There are questions associated with sea-level rise which science needs to answer. To what extent did climate change contribute to sea-level rise in the past? How much will global mean sea level increase in the future? How serious are the impacts of the anticipated sea-level rise likely to be, and can human society respond to them? This paper aims to answer these questions through a comprehensive review of the relevant literature. First, the present status of observed sea-level rise, analyses of its causes, and future projections are summarized. Then the impacts are examined along with other consequences of climate change, from both global and Japanese perspectives. Finally, responses to adverse impacts will be discussed in order to clarify the implications of the sea-level rise issue for human society. PMID:23883609

  14. Changes in the palatal dimensions of mouth breathing children caused by nasal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiarti, I. S.; Setyanto, D. B.; Kusumaningrum, A.; Budiardjo, S. B.

    2017-08-01

    During children’s growth and development, the breathing process plays an important role in craniofacial growth, especially of the palate. Nose breathing can stimulate the lateral growth of the maxilla, thus making the palate flat. Disturbances in nose breathing caused by nasal obstruction such as allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea can lead to a mouth breathing habit in children. This habit can cause palatal dimension changes such as a narrow V-shaped maxillary arch and a high palatal vault. This study analyzed the relationship between the mouth breathing habit in children who have nasal obstruction and palatal dimension changes. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with a consecutive sampling method on children 7-18 years old with a history of allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea in the Pediatric Respirology and Pediatric Immunology Allergy Outpatient Clinic Kiara Maternal and Child Health Center at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta. The palatal dimensions were measured by the height and transversal width of the hard palate of castings of each child’s upper dental arch using vernier calipers. Palatal dimension changes were found in children with a mouth breathing habit due to nasal obstruction.

  15. Sea-level rise caused by climate change and its implications for society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    Sea-level rise is a major effect of climate change. It has drawn international attention, because higher sea levels in the future would cause serious impacts in various parts of the world. There are questions associated with sea-level rise which science needs to answer. To what extent did climate change contribute to sea-level rise in the past? How much will global mean sea level increase in the future? How serious are the impacts of the anticipated sea-level rise likely to be, and can human society respond to them? This paper aims to answer these questions through a comprehensive review of the relevant literature. First, the present status of observed sea-level rise, analyses of its causes, and future projections are summarized. Then the impacts are examined along with other consequences of climate change, from both global and Japanese perspectives. Finally, responses to adverse impacts will be discussed in order to clarify the implications of the sea-level rise issue for human society.(Communicated by Kiyoshi HORIKAWA, M.J.A.).

  16. Techniques for computing reactivity changes caused by fuel axial expansion in LMR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, H.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the accuracy of methods used to compute reactivity changes caused by axial fuel relocation in fast reactors. Results are presented to demonstrate the validity of assumptions commonly made such as linearity of reactivity with fuel elongation, additivity of local reactivity contributions, and the adequacy of standard perturbation techniques. Accurate prediction of the reactivity loss caused by axial swelling of metallic fuel is shown to require proper representation of the burnup dependence of the expansion reactivity. Some accuracy limitations in the methods used in transient analyses, which are based on the use of fuel worth tables, are identified, and efficient ways to improve accuracy are described. Implementation of these corrections produced expansion reactivity estimates within 5% of higher-order method for a metal-fueled FFTF core representation. 18 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Low-frequency sound exposure causes reversible long-term changes of cochlear transfer characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexl, Markus; Otto, Larissa; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Marquardt, Torsten; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike

    2016-02-01

    Intense, low-frequency sound presented to the mammalian cochlea induces temporary changes of cochlear sensitivity, for which the term 'Bounce' phenomenon has been coined. Typical manifestations are slow oscillations of hearing thresholds or the level of otoacoustic emissions. It has been suggested that these alterations are caused by changes of the mechano-electrical transducer transfer function of outer hair cells (OHCs). Shape estimates of this transfer function can be derived from low-frequency-biased distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Here, we tracked the transfer function estimates before and after triggering a cochlear Bounce. Specifically, cubic DPOAEs, modulated by a low-frequency biasing tone, were followed over time before and after induction of the cochlear Bounce. Most subjects showed slow, biphasic changes of the transfer function estimates after low-frequency sound exposure relative to the preceding control period. Our data show that the operating point changes biphasically on the transfer function with an initial shift away from the inflection point followed by a shift towards the inflection point before returning to baseline values. Changes in transfer function and operating point lasted for about 180 s. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that intense, low-frequency sound disturbs regulatory mechanisms in OHCs. The homeostatic readjustment of these mechanisms after low-frequency offset is reflected in slow oscillations of the estimated transfer functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Collective violence caused by climate change and how it threatens health and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2014-06-14

    The weight of scientific evidence indicates that climate change is causally associated with collective violence. This evidence arises from individual studies over wide ranges of time and geographic location, and from two extensive meta-analyses. Complex pathways that underlie this association are not fully understood; however, increased ambient temperatures and extremes of rainfall, with their resultant adverse impacts on the environment and risk factors for violence, appear to play key roles. Collective violence due to climate change poses serious threats to health and human rights, including by causing morbidity and mortality directly and also indirectly by damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of society, forcing people to migrate from their homes and communities, damaging the environment, and diverting human and financial resources. This paper also briefly addresses issues for future research on the relationship between climate change and collective violence, the prevention of collective violence due to climate change, and States' obligations to protect human rights, to prevent collective violence, and to promote and support measures to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Copyright © 2014 Levy and Sidel. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  19. Present day sea level changes: observation and causes; Les variations actuelles du niveau de la mer: observations et causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard, A

    2005-11-15

    Whereas sea level has changed little over the last 2000 years, it has risen at a rate of about 2 mm/year during the 20. century. This unexpected sea level rise has been attributed to the anthropogenic global warming, recorded over several decades. Sea level variations have been measured globally and precisely for about 12 years due to satellite altimeter missions Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1. These observations indicate a global mean sea level rise of about 3 mm/year since 1993, a value significantly larger than observed during previous decades. Recent observations have allowed us to quantify the various climatic factors contributing to observed sea level change: thermal expansion of sea water due to ocean warming, melting of mountain glaciers and ice sheets, and changes in the land water reservoirs. A water budget based on these new observations allows us to partly explain the observed sea level rise. In particular, we show that the thermal expansion explains only 25% of the secular sea level rise as recorded by tide-gauges over the last 50 years, while it contributes about 50% of sea level rise observed over the last decade. Meanwhile, recent studies show that glacier and ice sheet melting could contribute the equivalent of 1 mm/year in sea level rise over the last decade. In addition, the high regional variability of sea level trends revealed by satellite altimetry is mainly due to thermal expansion. There is also an important decadal spatio-temporal variability in the ocean thermal expansion over the last 50 years, which seems to be controlled by natural climate fluctuations. We question for the first time the link between the decadal fluctuations in the ocean thermal expansion and in the land reservoirs, and indeed their climatic contribution to sea level change. Finally a preliminary analysis of GRACE spatial gravimetric observations over the oceans allows us to estimate the seasonal variations in mean sea level due to ocean water mass balance variations

  20. Association between changes in lifestyle and all-cause mortality: the Health and Lifestyle Survey.

    OpenAIRE

    White, J.; Greene, G.; Kivimaki, M.; Batty, G. D.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine the combined influence of changes in physical activity, diet, smoking and alcohol consumption on all-cause mortality. METHODS: Health behaviours were assessed in 1984/1985 and 1991/1992 in 8123 adults from the UK (4666 women, median age 41.0 years). An unhealthy lifestyle score was calculated, allocating one point for smoking, fruits and vegetables 21 units of alcohol (men) per week. RESULTS: There were 2003 deaths over a median follow-up of 6.6 years (IQR 5.9-7.2) foll...

  1. Changes in insulin and insulin signaling in Alzheimer’s disease: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Molly; Macauley, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), although the causal relationship remains poorly understood. Alterations in insulin signaling (IS) are reported in the AD brain. Moreover, oligomers/fibrils of amyloid-β (Aβ) can lead to neuronal insulin resistance and intranasal insulin is being explored as a potential therapy for AD. Conversely, elevated insulin levels (ins) are found in AD patients and high insulin has been reported to increase Aβ levels and tau phosphorylation, which could exacerbate AD pathology. Herein, we explore whether changes in ins and IS are a cause or consequence of AD. PMID:27432942

  2. More carbon dioxide is a result of climatic change, not a cause. Independent scientists correct KNMI and IPCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voortman, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Attention is paid to opponents of the carbon dioxide hypothesis, supported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climatic Change (IPCC), in which it is stated that climatic change is caused by an increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere [nl

  3. Drug-class-specific changes in the volume and cost of antidiabetic medications in Poland between 2012 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwczyński, Andrzej; Brzozowska, Melania; Jacyna, Andrzej; Iltchev, Petre; Iwańczuk, Tymoteusz; Wierzba, Waldemar; Marczak, Michał; Orlewska, Katarzyna; Szymański, Piotr; Orlewska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    to investigate the drug-class-specific changes in the volume and cost of antidiabetic medications in Poland in 2012-2015. This retrospective analysis was conducted based on the National Health Fund database covering an entire Polish population. The volume of antidiabetic medications is reported according to ATC/DDD methodology, costs-in current international dollars, based on purchasing power parity. During a 4-year observational period the number of patients, consumption of antidiabetic drugs and costs increased by 17%, 21% and 20%, respectively. Biguanides are the basic diabetes medication with a 39% market share. The insulin market is still dominated by human insulins, new antidiabetics (incretins, thiazolidinediones) are practically absent. Insulins had the largest share in diabetes medications expenditures (67% in 2015). The increase in antidiabetic medications costs over the analysed period of time was mainly caused by the increased use of insulin analogues. The observed tendencies correspond to the evidence-based HTA recommendations. The reimbursement status, the ratio of cost to clinical outcomes and data on the long-term safety have a deciding impact on how a drug is used.

  4. Impact of weight change after quitting cigarettes on all-cause and cause-specific mortality in middle-aged male smokers: national health screening cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Kyuwoong Kim; Seulggie Choi; Mi Hee Cho; Ji Hye Jun; Jooyoung Chang; Sung Min Kim; Kiheon Lee; Sang Min Park

    2018-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the association between weight change after smoking cessation and the risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality among middle-aged male smokers. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study using the National Health Insurance Service National Health Screening Cohort (NHIS-HealS) database. Male Participants (n=102,403) without critical conditions aged between 40 and 79 at baseline who underwent biennial health examination ...

  5. Low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes caused by sodium fluoride exposure in rat's developmental brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunyang; Zhang, Shun; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Wang, Zhenglun; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-03-01

    Fluorine, a toxic and reactive element, is widely prevalent throughout the environment and can induce toxicity when absorbed into the body. This study was to explore the possible mechanisms of developmental neurotoxicity in rats treated with different levels of sodium fluoride (NaF). The rats' intelligence, as well as changes in neuronal morphology, glucose absorption, and functional gene expression within the brain were determined using the Morris water maze test, transmission electron microscopy, small-animal magnetic resonance imaging and Positron emission tomography and computed tomography, and Western blotting techniques. We found that NaF treatment-impaired learning and memory in these rats. Furthermore, NaF caused neuronal degeneration, decreased brain glucose utilization, decreased the protein expression of glucose transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat brains. The developmental neurotoxicity of fluoride may be closely associated with low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes.

  6. Measuring gravity change caused by water storage variations: Performance assessment under controlled conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Lund, Sanne; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface water content is an important state variable in hydrological systems. Established methods to measure subsurface water content have a small support scale which causes scaling problems in many applications. Time-lapse relative gravimetry can give an integrated measure of soil water storage...... changes over tens to hundreds of cubic meters. The use of time-lapse gravimetry in hydrology has until recent years been limited by the large efforts required to obtain precise and accurate gravity data at the 1μGal (10−8ms−2) scale. A typical modern relative gravimeter, the Scintrex CG-5, has...... lead to a loss of accuracy. As a performance test of a CG-5 for applications of time-lapse gravity in hydrology, we have measured the change in water storage in an indoor basin. The experiment was designed to resemble a field application, e.g. a pumping test, a forced infiltration experiment...

  7. Evaluation of environmental burdens caused by changes of food waste management systems in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Suk-Hui; Choi, Ki-In; Osako, Masahiro; Dong, Jong-In

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, there have been remarkable changes in food waste management in Korea following a ban on direct landfilling. To evaluate the environmental impacts of food waste management systems, we examined individual treatment systems with the LCA approach - landfill, incineration, composting, and feed manufacturing - and estimated the change from 1997 to 2005. The efficient system was different in each impact category, but it was evaluated that landfill is the main contributor to human toxicity and global warming (based on fossil CO 2 ). In contrast, due to the increase of food waste recycling, acidification, eutrophication, and fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity impact was increased. Especially, the high energy consumption and generated residue in recycling systems caused the large burdens in toxicity categories

  8. Changes in content and composition of sugar in molasses caused by gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, H; Sato, T

    1980-01-01

    The sugar contents in undiluted molasses were found to be stable on ..gamma..-irradiation. The contents of total sugar and direct reducing sugar in cane molasses were completely unaffected by irradiation with doses of less than 3 Mrad. The reduction of total sugar content in beet molasses was 2% at 3 Mrad. On the other hand, in the molasses diluted with water, sugar contents decreased with the dose. Sucrose in molasses was degraded by irradiation, and subsequently glucose and fructose were formed. Raffinose in beet molasses was also degraded by irradiation, but galactose could not be detected. The irradiation temperature ranging from room temperature to 61/sup 0/C, was hardly responsible for the change of sugar contents, but the changes in sugar caused by irradiation were enhanced at pHs of less than 4 and with an excess of oxygen.

  9. Changes in content and composition of sugar in molasses caused by gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, H; Sato, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1980-08-01

    The sugar contents in undiluted molasses were found to be stable on ..gamma..-irradiation. The contents of total sugar and direct reducing sugar in cane molasses were completely unaffected by irradiation with doses of less than 3 Mrad. The reduction of total sugar content in beet molasses was 2% at 3 Mrad. On the other hand, in the molasses diluted with water, sugar contents decreased with the dose. Sucrose in molasses was degraded by irradiation, and subsequently glucose and fructose were formed. Raffinose in beet molasses was also degraded by irradiation, but galactose could not be detected. The irradiation temperature ranging from room temperature to 61/sup 0/C, was hardly responsible for the change of sugar contents, but the changes in sugar caused by irradiation were enhanced at pHs of less than 4 and with an excess of oxygen.

  10. Changes in content and composition of sugar in molasses caused by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Sato, Tomotaro

    1980-01-01

    The sugar contents in undiluted molasses were found to be stable on γ-irradiation. The contents of total sugar and direct reducing sugar in cane molasses were completely unaffected by irradiation with doses of less than 3 Mrad. The reduction of total sugar content in beet molasses was 2% at 3 Mrad. On the other hand, in the molasses diluted with water, sugar contents decreased with the dose. Sucrose in molasses was degraded by irradiation, and subsequently glucose and fructose were formed. Raffinose in beet molasses was also degraded by irradiation, but galactose could not be detected. The irradiation temperature ranging from room temperature to 61 0 C, was hardly responsible for the change of sugar contents, but the changes in sugar caused by irradiation were enhanced at pHs of less than 4 and with an excess of oxygen. (author)

  11. Rates, trends, causes, and consequences of urban land-use change in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, William; Taylor, Janis L.; Hester, Dave J.; Mladinich, Carol S.; Glavac, Sonya

    2006-01-01

    . Other economic and political incentives that shaped the urban environment included Federally backed home loans, credit and tax mechanisms that encouraged new development, and less restrictive municipal ordinances regarding building codes, environmental laws, and zoning regulations.Throughout the past two centuries land use changes associated with increasing urbanization have had impacts that resonate at local, regional, and even national scales. Landscape changes resulting from urbanization can be mapped and studied over time. Understanding these changes requires a study of the causes of change as related to social, economic, and political influences. Understanding these changes also requires analysis of how urbanization physically spreads across the landscape. The knowledge gained from studying urban land-use change can be helpful when it flows into local, regional, and national decisionmaking that relates to land-use decisions that impact the people, the economy, and the environment. Deriving a correlation between physical change and the explanations of the causes of change can help anticipate and mitigate the impacts of future change.Throughout the past two centuries changes to the Nation's urban areas are inextricably linked to population changes. The Nation's population started growing slowly along the eastern seaboard during the 17th and 18th centuries, accelerated in the second half of the 19th century, and then continued steadily spreading westward throughout the next hundred years. Currently, nearly 80 percent of the U.S. population resides in urban areas. Land area dedicated to urban use continues to expand, although differently than it has in the past. Most newly urbanized areas are much less densely populated and less intensively developed than they were 50 to 100 years ago.

  12. Association between the volume of inpatient rehabilitation therapy and the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gwo-Chi; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Yu, Hui-Kung; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Chang, Yu-Ju; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between the volume of inpatient rehabilitation therapy and mortality among patients with acute ischemic stroke, as well as to assess whether the association varies with respect to stroke severity. A retrospective study with a cohort of consecutive patients who had acute ischemic stroke between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2009. Referral medical center. Adults with acute ischemic stroke (N=1277) who were admitted to a tertiary hospital. Not applicable. Stroke-related mortality. During the median follow-up period of 12.3 months (ranging from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009), 163 deaths occurred. Greater volume of rehabilitation therapy was associated with a reduced risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (P for trend rehabilitation volume was associated with a 55% lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], .30-.65) and a 50% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality (HR=.50; 95% CI, .31-.82). The association did not vary with respect to stroke severity (P for interaction = .45 and .73 for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively). The volume of inpatient rehabilitation therapy and mortality were significantly inversely related in the patients with ischemic stroke. Thus, further programs aimed at promoting greater use of rehabilitation services are warranted. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Mattei, Josiemer; Fung, Teresa T; Li, Yanping; Pan, An; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B

    2017-07-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. We used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in diet quality over the preceding 12 years (1986-1998) were assessed with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 score, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. The pooled hazard ratios for all-cause mortality among participants who had the greatest improvement in diet quality (13 to 33% improvement), as compared with those who had a relatively stable diet quality (0 to 3% improvement), in the 12-year period were the following: 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 0.97) according to changes in the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 0.84 (95 CI%, 0.78 to 0.91) according to changes in the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.95) according to changes in the DASH score. A 20-percentile increase in diet scores (indicating an improved quality of diet) was significantly associated with a reduction in total mortality of 8 to 17% with the use of the three diet indexes and a 7 to 15% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet. Among participants who maintained a high-quality diet over a 12-year period, the risk of death from any cause was significantly lower - by 14% (95% CI, 8 to 19) when assessed with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 11% (95% CI, 5 to 18) when assessed with the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 9% (95% CI, 2 to 15) when assessed with the DASH score - than the risk among participants with consistently low diet scores over time. Improved diet quality over 12 years was

  14. Changes in ADC Caused by Tensile Loading of Rabbit Achilles Tendon: Evidence for Water Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S.; Gemmell, S. J.; Helmer, K. G.; Grigg, P.; Wellen, J. W.; Hoffman, A. H.; Sotak, C. H.

    2000-06-01

    Water diffusion measurements were performed on rabbit Achilles tendons during static tensile loading and tendons in an unloaded state. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured along two directions: parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the tendon. Tendons were studied after being prepared in two ways: (a) after being stored frozen in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and (b) freshly isolated. Statistically significant directional anisotropy was observed in the ADC in all tendons. The ADC was significantly greater in the direction parallel to the long axis of the tendon than in the perpendicular direction. The anisotropy is attributed to the greater restrictions seen by the water molecules in the perpendicular direction and is consistent with the known geometry of the tendon. Storage in PBS caused tendons to swell. This increased the ADC measured along both directions and reduced the anisotropy. The existence of anisotropy in the ADC was not related to the orientation of the specimen in the magnet. The ADC increased along both directions following the application of a 5-N tensile load; the increase was greatest along the perpendicular axis of the tendon. In order to determine whether load-related changes in the ADC reflected changes in interfibrilar spacing, we used electron microscopy to measure load-related changes in fibril spacing. Load-related changes in fiber spacing could not account for the observed changes in the ADC. The increase in ADC caused by loading was attributed to the extrusion of tendon water into a bulk phase along the outside surface of the tendon. In PBS-stored samples, enough fluid was extruded that it could be visualized. The transient response of the ADC to a 5-N tensile load was also studied. The absolute ADC in both directions increased with loading and recovered to baseline upon unloading. The transient changes in ADC, for both loading and unloading, had a mean time constant of approximately 15 min. The magnitude of

  15. Changes in sediment volume in Alder Lake, Nisqually River Basin, Washington, 1945-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Gish, Casey C.

    2012-01-01

    The Nisqually River drains the southwest slopes of Mount Rainier, a glaciated stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of western Washington. The Nisqually River was impounded behind Alder Dam when the dam was completed in 1945 and formed Alder Lake. This report quantifies the volume of sediment deposited by the Nisqually and Little Nisqually Rivers in their respective deltas in Alder Lake since 1945. Four digital elevation surfaces were generated from historical contour maps from 1945, 1956, and 1985, and a bathymetric survey from 2011. These surfaces were used to compute changes in sediment volume since 1945. Estimates of the volume of sediment deposited in Alder Lake between 1945 and 2011 were focused in three areas: (1) the Nisqually River delta, (2) the main body of Alder Lake, along a 40-meter wide corridor of the pre-dam Nisqually River, and (3) the Little Nisqually River delta. In each of these areas the net deposition over the 66-year period was 42,000,000 ± 4,000,000 cubic meters (m3), 2,000,000 ± 600,000 m3, and 310,000 ± 110,000 m3, respectively. These volumes correspond to annual rates of accumulation of 630,000 ± 60,000 m3/yr, 33,000 ± 9,000 m3/yr, and 4,700 ± 1,600 m3/yr, respectively. The annual sediment yield of the Nisqually (1,100 ± 100 cubic meters per year per square kilometer [(m3/yr)/km2]) and Little Nisqually River basins [70 ± 24 (m3/yr)/km2] provides insight into the yield of two basins with different land cover and geomorphic processes. These estimates suggest that a basin draining a glaciated stratovolcano yields approximately 15 times more sediment than a basin draining forested uplands in the Cascade Range. Given the cumulative net change in sediment volume in the Nisqually River delta in Alder Lake, the total capacity of Alder Lake since 1945 decreased about 3 percent by 1956, 8 percent by 1985, and 15 percent by 2011.

  16. Contrasting Changes Caused by Drought and Submergence Stresses in Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tiantian; Shi, Haitao; Wang, Yanping; Chan, Zhulong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which bermudagrass withstands the drought and submergence stresses through physiological, proteomic and metabolomic approaches. The results showed that significant physiological changes were observed after drought treatment, while only slight changes after submergence treatment, including compatible solute contents, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities. Proteomics results showed that 81 proteins regulated by drought or submergence treatment were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. Among them, 76 proteins were modulated by drought stress with 46 increased abundance and 30 decreased abundance. Forty-five showed abundance changes after submergence treatment with 10 increased and 35 decreased. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that pathways of amino acid metabolism and mitochondrial electron transport/ATP synthesis were only enriched by drought treatment, while other pathways including photosynthesis, biodegradation of xenobiotics, oxidative pentose phosphate, glycolysis and redox were commonly over-represented after both drought and submergence treatments. Metabolomic analysis indicated that most of the metabolites were up-regulated by drought stress, while 34 of 40 metabolites contents exhibited down-regulation or no significant changes when exposed to submergence stress, including sugars and sugar alcohols. These data indicated that drought stress extensively promoted photosynthesis and redox metabolisms while submergence stress caused declined metabolisms and dormancy in Cynodon dactylon. Taken together, the quiescence strategy with retarded growth might allow bermudagrass to be adaptive to long-term submerged environment, while activation of photosynthesis and redox, and accumulation of compatible solutes and molecular chaperones increased bermudagrass tolerance to drought stress. PMID:26617615

  17. Volume Changes After Stereotactic LINAC Radiotherapy in Vestibular Schwannoma: Control Rate and Growth Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberg, Rick van de; Dohmen, Amy J.C.; Bondt, Bert J. de; Nelemans, Patty J.; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the control rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS) after treatment with linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or radiotherapy (SRT) by using a validated volumetric measuring tool. Volume-based studies on prognosis after LINAC-based SRS or SRT for VS are reported scarcely. In addition, growth patterns and risk factors predicting treatment failure were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 37 VS patients treated with LINAC based SRS or SRT were analyzed. Baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with volume measurements on contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Absence of intervention after radiotherapy was defined as “no additional intervention group, ” absence of radiological growth was defined as “radiological control group. ” Significant growth was defined as a volume change of 19.7% or more, as calculated in a previous study. Results: The cumulative 4-year probability of no additional intervention was 96.4% ± 0.03; the 4-year radiological control probability was 85.4% ± 0.1). The median follow-up was 40 months. Overall, shrinkage was seen in 65%, stable VS in 22%, and growth in 13%. In 54% of all patients, transient swelling was observed. No prognostic factors were found regarding VS growth. Previous treatment and SRS were associated with transient swelling significantly. Conclusions: Good control rates are reported for LINAC based SRS or SRT in VS, in which the lower rate of radiological growth control is attributed to the use of the more sensitive volume measurements. Transient swelling after radiosurgery is a common phenomenon and should not be mistaken for treatment failure. Previous treatment and SRS were significantly associated with transient swelling.

  18. Effect of Visual Angle on the Head Movement Caused by Changing Binocular Disparity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Maekawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that vertical binocular disparity has no or little effect on the perception of visual direction (Banks et al., 2002. On the other hand, our previous study has reported that a continuous change of vertical disparity causes an involuntary sway of the head (Maekawa et al., 2009. We predict that the difference between those results attributes to the dissociation between the processes for perception and action in the brain. The aim of this study is to investigate in more details the condition that influences the process of disparity information. The present experiment particularly varied the visual angle of stimulus presentation and measured the head movement and body sway caused by changing vertical disparity. Results showed that the head movement was greater as the visual angle of the stimulus was smaller. It has been reported that stimulus of only small visual angle affect depth perception (Erklens et al., 1995. Thus, our result suggests that perception and action produced by vertical disparity are consistent as far as the effect of the stimulus size is concerned.

  19. Spatial-temporal changes of maximum and minimum temperatures in the Wei River Basin, China: Changing patterns, causes and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Saiyan; Huang, Shengzhi; Xie, Yangyang; Huang, Qiang; Leng, Guoyong; Hou, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Xiu

    2018-05-01

    Due to the important role of temperature in the global climate system and energy cycles, it is important to investigate the spatial-temporal change patterns, causes and implications of annual maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperatures. In this study, the Cloud model were adopted to fully and accurately analyze the changing patterns of annual Tmax and Tmin from 1958 to 2008 by quantifying their mean, uniformity, and stability in the Wei River Basin (WRB), a typical arid and semi-arid region in China. Additionally, the cross wavelet analysis was applied to explore the correlations among annual Tmax and Tmin and the yearly sunspots number, Arctic Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and soil moisture with an aim to determine possible causes of annual Tmax and Tmin variations. Furthermore, temperature-related impacts on vegetation cover and precipitation extremes were also examined. Results indicated that: (1) the WRB is characterized by increasing trends in annual Tmax and Tmin, with a more evident increasing trend in annual Tmin, which has a higher dispersion degree and is less uniform and stable than annual Tmax; (2) the asymmetric variations of Tmax and Tmin can be generally explained by the stronger effects of solar activity (primarily), large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, and soil moisture on annual Tmin than on annual Tmax; and (3) increasing annual Tmax and Tmin have exerted strong influences on local precipitation extremes, in terms of their duration, intensity, and frequency in the WRB. This study presents new analyses of Tmax and Tmin in the WRB, and the findings may help guide regional agricultural production and water resources management.

  20. Amylase, lipase, and volume of drainage fluid in gastrectomy for the early detection of complications caused by pancreatic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyung Won; Yoon, Ki Young; Lee, Sang Ho; Shin, Yeon Myung; Choi, Kyung Hyun; Hwang, Hyun Yong

    2011-12-01

    Pancreatic leakage is a serious complication of gastrectomy due to stomach cancer. Therefore, we analyzed amylase and lipase concentrations in blood and drainage fluid, and evaluated the volume of drainage fluid to discern their usefulness as markers for the early detection of serious pancreatic leakage requiring reoperation after gastrectomy. From January 2001 to December 2007, we retrospectively analyzed data from 24,072 patient samples. We divided patients into two groups; 1) complications with pancreatic leakage (CG), and 2) no complications associated with pancreatic leakage (NCG). Values of amylase and lipase in the blood and drainage fluid, volume of the drainage fluid, and relationships among the volumes, amylase values, and lipase values in the drainage fluid were evaluated, respectively in the two groups. The mean amylase values of CG were significantly higher than those of NCG in blood and drainage fluid (P < 0.05). For lipase, statistically significant differences were observed in drainage fluid (P < 0.05). The mean volume (standard deviation) of the drained fluid through the tube between CG (n = 22) and NCG (n = 236) on postoperative day 1 were 368.41 (266.25) and 299.26 (300.28), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups (P = 0.298). There was a correlation between the amylase and lipase values in the drainage fluid (r = 0.812, P = 0.000). Among postoperative amylase and lipase values in blood and drainage fluid, and the volume of drainage fluid, the amylase in drainage fluid was better differentiated between CG and NCG than other markers. The volume of the drainage fluid did not differ significantly between groups.

  1. Early age volume changes in concrete due to chemical shrinkage of cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebensperger, L.

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Unrestrained early age volume changes due to chemical shrinkage in cement pastes, mortars and concretes have been determined. The measurements were performed on sealed and unsealed samples which were stored under water. The chemical shrinkage of unsealed specimens represents the amount of absorbed water due to the chemical reaction of the cement It depends only on the cement content of the sample and does not lead to changes of the external dimensions. However the chemical shrinkage of sealed specimens is connected with a real volume change due to self-desiccation and the effect of internal pressures. The shrinkage depends in this case on the restraining effect of coarse aggregates as well as the cement content. The chemical shrinkage measured on sealed concretes was much higher than the one expected to ocurr on concretes, because normally an equalization of pressure takes place to some extent in the interior of the concrete. The use of expansive additives showed that they may compensate the chemical shrinkage, but its dosage is very sensitive and should be defined exactly for each case particularly.

    Se han determinado los cambios volumétricos que ocurren en pastas de cemento, morteros y hormigones a edad temprana debido al efecto de la retracción química. Las mediciones se realizaron en probetas selladas y no selladas sumergidas bajo agua. La retracción química en probetas no selladas representa la cantidad de agua absorbida debido a la reacción química del cemento. Depende solamente del contenido de cemento de la probeta y no produce ningún cambio en las dimensiones de la probeta. Por el contrario, la retracción química en probetas selladas está relacionada con un cambio volumétrico real debido al efecto de la autodesecación y presiones internas. La retracción en este caso depende tanto de la restricción que imponen los áridos, como del contenido de cemento. La retracción química medida en hormigones sellados

  2. The causes of epilepsy: changing concepts of etiology of epilepsy over the past 150 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorvon, Simon D

    2011-06-01

    This paper provides a survey of the changing concepts of the etiology of epilepsy from 1860 to 2010, focusing on the first two 50-year periods and outlining more briefly major developments in the past 50 years. Among the concepts reviewed in the first 100 years are: the division between predisposing and exciting causes, idiopathic and genuine epilepsy, organic epilepsy, the concept of "cause" being equivalent to "causal mechanism," Russell Reynolds etiological classification, the neurological taint and theories of degeneration, the self-perpetuating nature of seizures, reflex theories of etiology, autointoxication, heredity and eugenics, epilepsy due to brain disorders, the role of EEG and of hippocampal sclerosis, psychological theories of causation, and the multifactorial view of epilepsy etiology. In the past 50 years, the major advances in studying causation in epilepsy have been: clinical biochemistry, neuroimaging, molecular genetics, studies of mechanisms of epilepsy, better statistical methodologies and classification. A number of general observations can be made: the identification of "cause" is not as simple as it might at first appear; progress in the study of causation has been often erratic and travelled up many cul-de-sacs; theories of causation are heavily influenced by societal influences and fashion, and is also heavily dependent on applied methodologies; the recently explored possibility that the underlying inherited mechanisms of epilepsy are shared with other neuropsychiatric conditions is in effect a reinvention of the concept of the neurological trait, and this has ethical and social implications. Considering and classifying cause in terms of causal mechanism, as was suggested by Hughlings Jackson, is an ultimate goal. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. A case of Z/E-isomers elution order inversion caused by cosolvent percentage change in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiy, Oleg I; Ustinovich, Konstantin B; Usovich, Oleg I; Parenago, Olga O; Lunin, Valeriy V; Ovchinnikov, Denis V; Kosyakov, Dmitry S

    2017-01-06

    A case of elution order inversion caused by cosolvent percentage change in supercritical fluid chromatography was observed and investigated in some detail. Z- and E-isomers of phenylisobutylketone oxime experience an elution order reversal on most columns if the mobile phase consists of CO 2 and alcohol. At lower percentages of alcohol Z-oxime is retained less, somewhere at 2-5% coelution occurs and at larger cosolvent volume elution order reverses - Z-oxime is eluted later than E-oxime. We suppose inversion with CO 2 -ROH phases happens due to a shift in balance between two main interactions governing retention. At low ROH percentages stationary phase surface is only slightly covered by ROH molecules so oximes primarily interact with adsorption sites via hydrogen bond formation. Due to intramolecular sterical hindrance Z-oxime is less able to form hydrogen bonds and consequently is eluted first. At higher percentages alcohols occupy most of strong hydrogen bonding sites on silica surface thus leaving non-specific electrostatic interactions predominantly responsible for Z/E selectivity. Z-oxime has a much larger dipole moment than E-oxime and at these conditions it is eluted later. Additional experimental data with CO 2 -CH 3 CN, hexane-iPrOH and CHF 3 -ROH mobile phases supporting this explanation are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural Changes of the Testis and Changes in Semen Quality Parameters Caused by Intraperitoneal and Peroral Administration of Selenium in Rats

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    Michal Cabaj

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find the structural changes in the testis and semen quality parameters of rat after a singleintraperitoneal and repeated peroral selenium administration. Rats were killed 36 hours following the intraperitonealadministration of selenium selenite (2 mg.kg-1 b.w.; 98% purity and after 90 days of the peroral repeatedadministration of selenium in drinking water (5 mg.l-1. Testis samples were evaluated by histological andmorphometrical methods in light microscopy. Evaluation of semen samples were examined with CASA method. 36hours after the selenium i.p. administration, damage of cellular associations, release of necrotised epithelial cells totubule lumen and fibrotisation and extension of interstitium were observed. Morphometry methods have shown thereduction of seminiferous epithelium volume (P<0.001, extension of interstitium (P<0.001 and increased area ofintraepithelial spaces (P<0.01. In p.o. group similar but more intense changes were noted; in addition, occasionalldegeneration of seminiferous tubuli and rarely total damage in histoarchitecture of seminiferous epithelium wereobserved. CASA analysis revealed significant decrease in all parameters except the concentration of spermatozoa.Additionally, we suppose that p.o. dose 5 mg.l-1 sodium selenite in drinking water is minimum lethal dose level foryoung rats. Selenium after i.p. and p.o. administration causes damage of seminiferous epithelium and interstitium. Itleads to changes in relative proportion of functional tissues of the testis. Reduced spermatogenesis and harmfuleffects in semen parameters are characteristic especially for peroral repeated (subchronic administration. Thesechanges are time- and dose-dependent. In both dosage methods subfertility or infertility can appear.

  5. Changes in gray matter volume after microsurgical lumbar discectomy: A longitudinal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eLuchtmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available People around the world suffer chronic lower back pain. Because spine imaging often does not explain the degree of perceived pain reported by patients, the role of the processing of nociceptor signals in the brain as the basis of pain perception is gaining increased attention. Modern neuroimaging techniques (including functional and morphometric methods have produced results that suggest which brain areas may play a crucial role in the perception of acute and chronic pain. In this study, we examined twelve patients with chronic low back pain and sciatica, both resulting from lumbar disc herniation. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain was performed one day prior to and about four weeks after microsurgical lumbar discectomy. The subsequent MRI revealed an increase in gray matter volume in the basal ganglia but a decrease in volume in the hippocampus, which suggests the complexity of the network that involves movement, pain processing, and aspects of memory. Interestingly, volume changes in the hippocampus were significantly correlated to preoperative pain intensity but not to the duration of chronic pain. Mapping structural changes of the brain that result from lumbar disc herniation has the potential to enhance our understanding of the neuropathology of chronic low back pain and sciatica and therefore may help to optimize the decisions we make about conservative and surgical treatments in the future. The possibility of illuminating more of the details of central pain processing in lumbar disc herniation, as well as the accompanying personal and economic impact of pain relief worldwide, calls for future large-scale clinical studies.

  6. Intra-aortic balloon shape change: effects on volume displacement during inflation and deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khir, Ashraf William; Bruti, Gianpaolo

    2013-07-01

    It has been observed that operating the intra-aortic balloon at an angle to the horizontal resulted in a reduction of the volume displaced toward the coronary arteries and compromised afterload reduction. Therefore, the aim of this work is to examine whether changing the current balloon shape, which has not been altered for 40 years, could compensate for the negative hemodynamic effects due to angulation. We tested two tapered balloons, increasing diameter (TID) and decreasing diameter (TDD), and compared the results with those obtained from a standard cylindrical balloon. The balloons were tested in vitro at 60 beats/min and a static pressure of 90 mm Hg. The balloons were operated at four angles (0°, 20°, 30°, 45°), and the pressure at three locations along the balloon (base, middle, and tip) was also measured. Flow rate upstream of the tip of the balloon was also measured to indicate the flow displaced toward the coronary circulation. The relative volume displaced toward (VUTVi) and suctioned away from (VUTVd) the simulated ascending aorta, during inflation and deflation, respectively, is reduced when a standard cylindrical balloon is operated at an angle to the horizontal. The TDD provided the greatest VUTVi and also produced the largest pulse pressure during deflation. Although the TID provided less VUTVi and VUTVd at smaller angles, it was not markedly affected by the change of angle. According to these results, different balloon shapes analyzed, with comparable volume to that of a cylindrical balloon, produced greater inflation and deflation benefits, at the horizontal and at a range of angles to the horizontal. Further investigations are required to optimize the shape of the tapered balloons to fit into the available physiological space. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

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    Courtney Knaup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR prostate plans to determine the biological effectof dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods: In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determinedusing ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1® to create treatmentplans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. Fromthe pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP were determinedusing the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. Results: The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP andthe mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreasesto the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose.A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined thatpatients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions: The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluatedusing the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volumepost-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  8. Late Frasnian mass extinction: Conodont event stratigraphy, global changes, and possible causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Charles A.; Ziegler, Willi; Dreesen, Roland; Butler, Jamie L.

    1988-01-01

    Several abrupt changes in conodont biofacies are documented to occur synchronously at six primary control sections across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary in Euramerica. These changes occurred within a time-span of only about 100,000 years near the end of the latest Frasnian linguiformis Zone, which is formally named to replace the Uppermost gigas Zone. The conodont-biofacies changes are interpreted to reflect a eustatic rise followed by an abrupt eustatic fall immediately preceding the late Frasnian mass extinction. Two new conodont species are named and described. Ancyrognathus ubiquitus n.sp. is recorded only just below and above the level of late Frasnian extinction and hence is a global marker for that event. Palmatolepispraetriangularis n.sp. is the long-sought Frasnian ancestor of the formerly cryptogenic species, Pa. triangularis, indicator of the earliest Famennian Lower triangularis Zone. The actual extinction event occurred entirely within the Frasnian and is interpreted to have been of brief duration-from as long as 20,000 years to as short as several days. The eustatic rise-and-fall couplet associated with the late Frasnian mass extinction is similar to eustatic couplets associated with the demise of most Frasnian (F2h) reefs worldwide about 1 m.y. earlier and with a latest Famennian mass extinction about 9.5 m.y. later. All these events may be directly or indirectly attributable to extraterrestrial triggering mechanisms. An impact of a small bolide or a near miss of a larger bolide may have caused the earlier demise of Frasnian reefs. An impact of possibly the same larger bolide in the Southern Hemisphere would explain the late Frasnian mass extinction. Global regression during the Famennian probably resulted from Southern-Hemisphere glaciation triggered by the latest Frasnian impact. Glaciation probably was the indirect cause of the latest Famennian mass extinction.

  9. Premature mortality in Belgium in 1993-2009: leading causes, regional disparities and 15 years change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Françoise; Tafforeau, Jean; Deboosere, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Reducing premature mortality is a crucial public health objective. After a long gap in the publication of Belgian mortality statistics, this paper presents the leading causes and the regional disparities in premature mortality in 2008-2009 and the changes since 1993. All deaths occurring in the periods 1993-1999 and 2003-2009, in people aged 1-74 residing in Belgium were included. The cause of death and population data for Belgium were provided by Statistics Belgium , while data for international comparisons were extracted from the WHO mortality database. Age-adjusted mortality rates and Person Year of Life Lost (PYLL) were calculated. The Rate Ratios were computed for regional and international comparisons, using the region or country with the lowest rate as reference; statistical significance was tested assuming a Poisson distribution of the number of deaths. The burden of premature mortality is much higher in men than in women (respectively 42% and 24% of the total number of deaths). The 2008-9 burden of premature mortality in Belgium reaches 6410 and 3440 PYLL per 100,000, respectively in males and females, ranking 4th and 3rd worst within the EU15. The disparities between Belgian regions are substantial: for overall premature mortality, respective excess of 40% and 20% among males, 30% and 20% among females are observed in Wallonia and Brussels as compared to Flanders. Also in cause specific mortality, Wallonia experiences a clear disadvantage compared to Flanders. Brussels shows an intermediate level for natural causes, but ranks differently for external causes, with less road accidents and suicide and more non-transport accidents than in the other regions. Age-adjusted premature mortality rates decreased by 29% among men and by 22% among women over a period of 15 years. Among men, circulatory diseases death rates decreased the fastest (-43.4%), followed by the neoplasms (-26.6%), the other natural causes (-21.0%) and the external causes (-20.8%). The larger

  10. The long view: Causes of climate change over the instrumental period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegerl, G. C.; Schurer, A. P.; Polson, D.; Iles, C. E.; Bronnimann, S.

    2016-12-01

    The period of instrumentally recorded data has seen remarkable changes in climate, with periods of rapid warming, and periods of stagnation or cooling. A recent analysis of the observed temperature change from the instrumental record confirms that most of the warming recorded since the middle of the 20rst century has been caused by human influences, but shows large uncertainty in separating greenhouse gas from aerosol response if accounting for model uncertainty. The contribution by natural forcing and internal variability to the recent warming is estimated to be small, but becomes more important when analysing climate change over earlier or shorter time periods. For example, the enigmatic early 20th century warming was a period of strong climate anomalies, including the US dustbowl drought and exceptional heat waves, and pronounced Arctic warming. Attribution results suggests that about half of the global warming 1901-1950 was forced by greenhouse gases increases, with an anomalously strong contribution by climate variability, and contributions by natural forcing. Long term variations in circulation are important for some regional climate anomalies. Precipitation is important for impacts of climate change and precipitation changes are uncertain in models. Analysis of the instrumental record suggests a human influence on mean and heavy precipitation, and supports climate model estimates of the spatial pattern of precipitation sensitivity to warming. Broadly, and particularly over ocean, wet regions are getting wetter and dry regions are getting drier. In conclusion, the historical record provides evidence for a strong response to external forcings, supports climate models, and raises questions about multi-decadal variability.

  11. Probability of Detection (POD) Analysis for the Advanced Retirement for Cause (RFC)/Engine Structural Integrity Program (ENSIP) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) System-Volume 3: Material Correlation Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berens, Alan

    2000-01-01

    .... Volume 1 presents a description of changes made to the probability of detection (POD) analysis program of Mil-STD-1823 and the statistical evaluation of modifications that were made to version 3 of the Eddy Current Inspection System (ECIS v3...

  12. CryoSat-2 Processing and Model Interpretation of Greenland Ice Sheet Volume Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J.; Gardner, A. S.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.

    2015-12-01

    CryoSat-2 was launched in late 2010 tasked with monitoring the changes of the Earth's land and sea ice. It carries a novel radar altimeter allowing the satellite to monitor changes in highly complex terrain, such as smaller ice caps, glaciers and the marginal areas of the ice sheets. Here we present on the development and validation of an independent elevation retrieval processing chain and respective elevation changes based on ESA's L1B data. Overall we find large improvement in both accuracy and precision over Greenland relative to ESA's L2 product when comparing against both airborne data and crossover analysis. The seasonal component and spatial sampling of the surface elevation changes where also compared against ICESat derived changes from 2003-2009. The comparison showed good agreement between the to product on a local scale. However, a global sampling bias was detected in the seasonal signal due to the clustering of CryoSat-2 data in higher elevation areas. The retrieval processing chain presented here does not correct for changes in surface scattering conditions and appears to be insensitive to the 2012 melt event (Nilsson et al., 2015). This in contrast to the elevation changes derived from ESA's L2 elevation product, which where found to be sensitive to the effects of the melt event. The positive elevation bias created by the event introduced a discrepancy between the two products with a magnitude of roughly 90 km3/year. This difference can directly be attributed to the differences in retracking procedure pointing to the importance of the retracking of the radar waveforms for altimetric volume change studies. Greenland 2012 melt event effects on CryoSat-2 radar altimetry./ Nilsson, Johan; Vallelonga, Paul Travis; Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hvidberg, Christine S.; Kjær, Helle A.; Satow, Kazuhide.

  13. Mucin deficiency causes functional and structural changes of the ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Anne M; Zhou, Xu; Evans, Christopher; Rompala, Olivia J; Zhu, Lingxiang; Wang, Mingwu; Chen, Yin

    2012-01-01

    MUC5AC is the most abundant gel-forming mucin in the ocular system. However, the specific function is unknown. In the present study, a Muc5ac knockout (KO) mouse model was subject to various physiological measurements as compared to its wide-type (WT) control. Interestingly, when KO mice were compared to WT mice, the mean tear break up time (TBUT) values were significantly lower and corneal fluorescein staining scores were significantly higher. But the tear volume was not changed. Despite the lack of Muc5ac expression in the conjunctiva of KO mice, Muc5b expression was significantly increased in these mice. Corneal opacification, varying in location and severity, was found in a few KO mice but not in WT mice. The present results suggest a significant difference in the quality, but not the quantity, of tear fluid in the KO mice compared to WT mice. Dry eye disease is multifactorial and therefore further evaluation of the varying components of the tear film, lacrimal unit and corneal structure of these KO mice may help elucidate the role of mucins in dry eye disease. Because Muc5ac knockout mice have clinical features of dry eye, this mouse model will be extremely useful for further studies regarding the pathophysiology of the ocular surface in dry eye in humans.

  14. Mucin deficiency causes functional and structural changes of the ocular surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Floyd

    Full Text Available MUC5AC is the most abundant gel-forming mucin in the ocular system. However, the specific function is unknown. In the present study, a Muc5ac knockout (KO mouse model was subject to various physiological measurements as compared to its wide-type (WT control. Interestingly, when KO mice were compared to WT mice, the mean tear break up time (TBUT values were significantly lower and corneal fluorescein staining scores were significantly higher. But the tear volume was not changed. Despite the lack of Muc5ac expression in the conjunctiva of KO mice, Muc5b expression was significantly increased in these mice. Corneal opacification, varying in location and severity, was found in a few KO mice but not in WT mice. The present results suggest a significant difference in the quality, but not the quantity, of tear fluid in the KO mice compared to WT mice. Dry eye disease is multifactorial and therefore further evaluation of the varying components of the tear film, lacrimal unit and corneal structure of these KO mice may help elucidate the role of mucins in dry eye disease. Because Muc5ac knockout mice have clinical features of dry eye, this mouse model will be extremely useful for further studies regarding the pathophysiology of the ocular surface in dry eye in humans.

  15. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  16. Cell volume changes regulate slick (Slo2.1), but not slack (Slo2.2) K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Maria A; Stople, Kathleen; Hammami Bomholtz, Sofia; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Poulsen, Asser Nyander; Klaerke, Dan A

    2014-01-01

    Slick (Slo2.1) and Slack (Slo2.2) channels belong to the family of high-conductance K+ channels and have been found widely distributed in the CNS. Both channels are activated by Na+ and Cl- and, in addition, Slick channels are regulated by ATP. Therefore, the roles of these channels in regulation of cell excitability as well as ion transport processes, like regulation of cell volume, have been hypothesized. It is the aim of this work to evaluate the sensitivity of Slick and Slack channels to small, fast changes in cell volume and to explore mechanisms, which may explain this type of regulation. For this purpose Slick and Slack channels were co-expressed with aquaporin 1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and cell volume changes of around 5% were induced by exposure to hypotonic or hypertonic media. Whole-cell currents were measured by two electrode voltage clamp. Our results show that Slick channels are dramatically stimulated (196% of control) by cell swelling and inhibited (57% of control) by a decrease in cell volume. In contrast, Slack channels are totally insensitive to similar cell volume changes. The mechanism underlining the strong volume sensitivity of Slick channels needs to be further explored, however we were able to show that it does not depend on an intact actin cytoskeleton, ATP release or vesicle fusion. In conclusion, Slick channels, in contrast to the similar Slack channels, are the only high-conductance K+ channels strongly sensitive to small changes in cell volume.

  17. Cell volume changes regulate slick (Slo2.1, but not slack (Slo2.2 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Tejada

    Full Text Available Slick (Slo2.1 and Slack (Slo2.2 channels belong to the family of high-conductance K+ channels and have been found widely distributed in the CNS. Both channels are activated by Na+ and Cl- and, in addition, Slick channels are regulated by ATP. Therefore, the roles of these channels in regulation of cell excitability as well as ion transport processes, like regulation of cell volume, have been hypothesized. It is the aim of this work to evaluate the sensitivity of Slick and Slack channels to small, fast changes in cell volume and to explore mechanisms, which may explain this type of regulation. For this purpose Slick and Slack channels were co-expressed with aquaporin 1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and cell volume changes of around 5% were induced by exposure to hypotonic or hypertonic media. Whole-cell currents were measured by two electrode voltage clamp. Our results show that Slick channels are dramatically stimulated (196% of control by cell swelling and inhibited (57% of control by a decrease in cell volume. In contrast, Slack channels are totally insensitive to similar cell volume changes. The mechanism underlining the strong volume sensitivity of Slick channels needs to be further explored, however we were able to show that it does not depend on an intact actin cytoskeleton, ATP release or vesicle fusion. In conclusion, Slick channels, in contrast to the similar Slack channels, are the only high-conductance K+ channels strongly sensitive to small changes in cell volume.

  18. Studying the Variable Refrigerant Volume (VRV) System and Determining the Root Cause of its Problem in Building 37, Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhafizudin Zainal Anuar; Mohamad Suhaimi Yahaya; Jusnan Hasim; Suhilah Mohd Ali; Mohd Khafidz Shamsuddin

    2015-01-01

    Variable Refrigerant Volume (VRV) system is one of the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) type in the building. VRV system is a multi-split type air conditioner that uses variable refrigerant flow control to provide customers with the ability to maintain individual zone control in each room and floor of a building. VRV used in Building 37 is made by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries that was completely installed in 2011 with two pipes system format. The objectives of this study are to understand the Variable Refrigerant Volume (VRV) system and also to study the root cause of its problem in Building 37, Agensi Nuklear Malaysia. The result of the study study suggests poor workmanship during installation process and insufficient electrical grounding are suspected as the causes of on-going and repeating problems occurred. Hence, Bahagian Kejuruteraan (BKJ) has worked out with the service contractor to identify the main problem and leaking area before proceeding with repair and commissioning activities. (author)

  19. Impact of endobronchial coiling on segmental bronchial lumen in treated and untreated lung lobes: Correlation with changes in lung volume, clinical and pulmonary function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, C; Thaiss, W M; Hetzel, J; Ditt, H; Grosse, U; Nikolaou, K; Horger, M

    2016-07-01

    To assess the impact of endobronchial coiling on the segment bronchus cross-sectional area and volumes in patients with lung emphysema using quantitative chest-CT measurements. Thirty patients (female = 15; median age = 65.36 years) received chest-CT before and after endobronchial coiling for lung volume reduction (LVR) between January 2010 and December 2014. Thin-slice (0.6 mm) non-enhanced image data sets were acquired both at end-inspiration and end-expiration using helical technique and 120 kV/100-150 mAs. Clinical response was defined as an increase in the walking distance (Six-minute walk test; 6MWT) after LVR-therapy. Additionally, pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements were used for clinical correlation. In the treated segmental bronchia, the cross-sectional lumen area showed significant reduction (p  0.05). In the ipsilateral lobes, the lumina showed no significant changes. In the contralateral lung, we found tendency towards increased cross-sectional area in inspiration (p = 0.06). Volumes of the treated segments correlated with the treated segmental bronchial lumina in expiration (r = 0.80, p volume of the treated lobe in responders only. Endobronchial coiling causes significant decrease in the cross-sectional area of treated segment bronchi in inspiration and a slight increase in expiration accompanied by a volume reduction. • Endobronchial coiling has indirect impact on cross-sectional area of treated segment bronchi • Volume changes of treated lobes correlate with changes in bronchial cross-sectional area • Coil-induced effects reflect their stabilizing and stiffening impact on lung parenchyma • Endobronchial coiling reduces bronchial collapsing compensating the loss of elasticity.

  20. Changes in brown coal structure caused by coal-solubilizing microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiers, H.; Koepsel, R.; Weber, A.; Winkelhoefer, M.; Grosse, S. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Energieverfahrenstechnik und Chemieingenieurwesen

    1997-12-31

    The phenomenon of coal solubilization caused by microorganisms has been explained by various mechanisms: extraction of non-covalently bonded polar components of the coal substance by biogenic agents (chelating agents, alkaline substances) and enzyme-catalyzed cleavage of covalent bonds by extracellular enzyme systems. For this it is assumed that bond cleavage occurs on the aliphatic carbon (methylene groups, aliphatic bridges or on ester groups). As the coal has usually been treated with oxidizing agents such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or HNO{sub 3} before bioconversion, there is a possibility that the result of bioconversion is overlaid with the effect of the chemical treatment. We therefore studied the structural changes in the organic coal substance during pre-oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, treatment with MnP and conversion using the fungal strains of Trichoderma and Fusarium oxysporum. (orig.)

  1. Humboldtian science, Creole meteorology, and the discovery of human-caused climate change in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Gregory T

    2011-01-01

    The belief that human land use is capable of causing large-scale climatic change lies at the root of modern conservation thought and policy. The origins and popularization of this belief were deeply politicized. Alexander von Humboldt's treatment of the Lake Valencia basin in Venezuela and the desert coast of Peru as natural laboratories for observing the interaction between geophysical and cultural forces was central to this discovery, as was Humboldt's belief that European colonialism was especially destructive to the land. Humboldt's overt cultivation of disciples was critical to building the prestige of this discovery and popularizing the Humboldtian scientific program, which depended fundamentally on local observers, but willfully marginalized chorographic knowledge systems. In creating new, global forms of environmental understanding, Humboldtian science also generated new forms of ignorance.

  2. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Permenter

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  3. Changes in Rational Economic Behavior Model, Caused By the Development of E-Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menzeleev Ilya, A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the author examines the origins of rationality concept and its transformation within the framework of economic science. According to the author, rationality is a fundamental concept both for philosophy and for economics. Changes in rational economic behavior model significantly effect on informal institutes (in short-term perspective and on formal institutes (in long-term period. In the paper it is said about significant changes taking place with humanity right now. Today it becomes more and more difficult to describe human behavior by uniform concept of rationality. Now people live in a world that is developing unprecedentedly fast, with the usage of incredible amount of information, countless tasks and social contacts. The development of the Internet and IT tools facilitate this process. Already since the midtwentieth century advertising and marketing has been influencing people’s lifestyle like politics or news. Media resources brands today are comparable to the resources of some political parties or even TV channels what means that advertising today is one of the main factors affecting consumers ' minds and their behavioral model, main feature of which is the premise of rationality or justification of actions. The author analyzes the changes of models of rationality over time and, above all, the changes caused by the development of Internet marketing and its tools for monitoring user activity and the impact on decision making in the Network. In conclusion a number of recommendations is given, which can help consumers to save an independence in making decisions in the Internet environment.

  4. Changing Epidemiology of Mucoralean Fungi: Chronic Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mucor irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Jagdish; Kaur, Mandeep; Bhalla, Mala; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Singla, Nidhi; Bhola, Kalyani; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Stchigel, Alberto M; Guarro, Josep

    2015-10-01

    The fungi pertaining to order Mucorales usually cause an acute form of clinical disease called mucormycosis. A primary chronic presentation in an immunocompetent patient is a rare form of mucormycosis. Mucor irregularis is known for causing chronic cutaneous infections geographically confined to Asia, mainly in China. We describe a case of primary chronic cutaneous mucormycosis caused by M. irregularis from a new geographical niche in India, highlighting changing aspects of its epidemiology. The patient was a farmer with a history of skin lesions over the lower limb for the past 6 years. The biopsy taken from the lesions showed pauci-septate hyphae with right-angle branching on KOH wet mount as well as special fungal stains. On fungal culture, greyish-white cottony mycelial growth of Mucormycetes was obtained. The strain was finally identified as M. irregularis on macro- and microscopic features on 2 % MEA and DNA sequencing. The antifungal susceptibility was done using EUCAST broth microdilution method and was found to be susceptible to commonly used antifungal agents. The patient was started on oral itraconazole and saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI). While undergoing treatment for 2 months, he was lost to follow-up, however, after a year when he recently visited the hospital; the disease got completely healed with no new crops of skin lesions. Mucoralean fungi should also be suspected in cases with chronic presentation, in immunocompetent host, as there is emergence of such fungi in new endemic areas, particularly located in Asia. The role of other antifungal agents apart from amphotericin B for the treatment of chronic mucormycosis needs to be explored.

  5. Conditional ablation of the choroideremia gene causes age-related changes in mouse retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T; Tolmachova, Tanya; Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; da Silva, Mafalda Lopes; Futter, Clare E; Seabra, Miguel C

    2013-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a pigmented monolayer of cells lying between the photoreceptors and a layer of fenestrated capillaries, the choriocapillaris. Choroideremia (CHM) is an X-linked progressive degeneration of these three layers caused by the loss of function of Rab Escort protein-1 (REP1). REP1 is involved in the prenylation of Rab proteins, key regulators of membrane trafficking. To study the pathological consequences of chronic disruption of membrane traffic in the RPE we used a cell type-specific knock-out mouse model of the disease, where the Chm/Rep1 gene is deleted only in pigmented cells (Chm(Flox), Tyr-Cre+). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to quantitate the melanosome distribution in the RPE and immunofluorescent staining of rhodopsin was used to quantitate phagocytosed rod outer segments in retinal sections. The ultrastructure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane at different ages was characterised by TEM to analyse age-related changes occurring as a result of defects in membrane traffic pathways. Chm/Rep1 gene knockout in RPE cells resulted in reduced numbers of melanosomes in the apical processes and delayed phagosome degradation. In addition, the RPE accumulated pathological changes at 5-6 months of age similar to those observed in 2-year old controls. These included the intracellular accumulation of lipofuscin-containing deposits, disorganised basal infoldings and the extracellular accumulation of basal laminar and basal linear deposits. The phenotype of the Chm(Flox), Tyr-Cre+ mice suggests that loss of the Chm/Rep1 gene causes premature accumulation of features of aging in the RPE. Furthermore, the striking similarities between the present observations and some of the phenotypes reported in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) suggest that membrane traffic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  6. Conditional ablation of the choroideremia gene causes age-related changes in mouse retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silène T Wavre-Shapton

    Full Text Available The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is a pigmented monolayer of cells lying between the photoreceptors and a layer of fenestrated capillaries, the choriocapillaris. Choroideremia (CHM is an X-linked progressive degeneration of these three layers caused by the loss of function of Rab Escort protein-1 (REP1. REP1 is involved in the prenylation of Rab proteins, key regulators of membrane trafficking. To study the pathological consequences of chronic disruption of membrane traffic in the RPE we used a cell type-specific knock-out mouse model of the disease, where the Chm/Rep1 gene is deleted only in pigmented cells (Chm(Flox, Tyr-Cre+. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to quantitate the melanosome distribution in the RPE and immunofluorescent staining of rhodopsin was used to quantitate phagocytosed rod outer segments in retinal sections. The ultrastructure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane at different ages was characterised by TEM to analyse age-related changes occurring as a result of defects in membrane traffic pathways. Chm/Rep1 gene knockout in RPE cells resulted in reduced numbers of melanosomes in the apical processes and delayed phagosome degradation. In addition, the RPE accumulated pathological changes at 5-6 months of age similar to those observed in 2-year old controls. These included the intracellular accumulation of lipofuscin-containing deposits, disorganised basal infoldings and the extracellular accumulation of basal laminar and basal linear deposits. The phenotype of the Chm(Flox, Tyr-Cre+ mice suggests that loss of the Chm/Rep1 gene causes premature accumulation of features of aging in the RPE. Furthermore, the striking similarities between the present observations and some of the phenotypes reported in age-related macular degeneration (AMD suggest that membrane traffic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  7. Gravity measurements in southeastern Alaska reveal negative gravity rate of change caused by glacial isostatic adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Sugano, T.; Freymueller, J.; Kaufman, M.; Larsen, C. F.; Cross, R.; Inazu, D.

    2010-12-01

    For the past 300 years, southeastern Alaska has undergone rapid ice-melting and land uplift attributable to global warming. Corresponding crustal deformation (3 cm/yr) caused by the Little Ice Age retreat is detectable with modern geodetic techniques such as GPS and tidal gauge measurements. Geodetic deformation provides useful information for assessing ice-melting rates, global warming effects, and subcrustal viscosity. Nevertheless, integrated geodetic observations, including gravity measurements, are important. To detect crustal deformation caused by glacial isostatic adjustment and to elucidate the viscosity structure in southeastern Alaska, Japanese and U.S. researchers began a joint 3-year project in 2006 using GPS, Earth tide, and absolute gravity measurements. A new absolute gravity network was established, comprising five sites around Glacier Bay, near Juneau, Alaska. This paper reports the network's gravity measurements during 2006-2008. The bad ocean model in this area hindered ocean loading correction: Large tidal residuals remain in the observations. Accurate tidal correction necessitated on-site tidal observation. Results show high observation precision for all five stations: day ice thickness changes. A gravity bias of about -13.2 ± 0.1 mGal exists between the Potsdam and current FG5 gravity data.

  8. Prolonged phone-call posture causes changes of ulnar motor nerve conduction across elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Luca; Coraci, Daniele; Erra, Carmen; Doneddu, Pietro Emiliano; Granata, Giuseppe; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2016-08-01

    Postures and work-hobby activities may play a role in the origin and progression of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE), whose occurrence appears to be increasing. The time spent on mobile-phone has increased in the last decades leading to an increased time spent with flexed elbow (prolonged-phone-posture, PPP). We aimed to assess the effect of PPP both in patients with symptoms of UNE and in symptom-free subjects. Patients with pure sensory symptoms of UNE and negative neurophysiological tests (MIN-UNE) and symptom-free subjects were enrolled. We evaluated ulnar motor nerve conduction velocity across elbow at baseline and after 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18min of PPP in both groups. Fifty-six symptom-free subjects and fifty-eight patients were enrolled. Globally 186 ulnar nerves from 114 subjects were studied. Conduction velocity of ulnar nerve across the elbow significantly changed over PPP time in patients with MIN-UNE, showing a different evolution between the two groups. PPP causes a modification of ulnar nerve functionality in patients with MIN-UNE. PPP may cause transient stress of ulnar nerve at elbow. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analyses of the radiation-caused characteristics change in SOI MOSFETs using field shield isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Yuuichi; Maeda, Shigeru; Fernandez, Warren; Iwamatsu, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo; Maegawa, Shigeto; Nishimura, Tadashi

    1999-01-01

    Reliability against radiation ia an important issue in silicon on insulator metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (SOI MOSFETs) used in satellites and nuclear power plants and so forth which are severely exposed to radiation. Radiation-caused characteristic change related to the isolation-edge in an irradiated environment was analyzed on SOI MOSFETs. Moreover short channel effects for an irradiated environment were investigated by simulations. It was revealed that the leakage current which was observed in local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) isolated SOI MOSFETs was successfully suppressed by using field shield isolation. Simulated potential indicated that the potential rise at the LOCOS edge can not be seen in the case of field shield isolation edge which does not have physical isolation. Also it was found that the threshold voltage shift caused by radiation in short channel regime is severer than that in long regime channel. In transistors with a channel length of 0.18μm, a potential rise of the body region by radiation-induced trapped holes can be seen in comparison with that of 1.0μm. As a result, we must consider these effects for designing deep submicron devices used in an irradiated environment. (author)

  10. Antarctic glaciation caused ocean circulation changes at the Eocene-Oligocene transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldner, A; Herold, N; Huber, M

    2014-07-31

    Two main hypotheses compete to explain global cooling and the abrupt growth of the Antarctic ice sheet across the Eocene-Oligocene transition about 34 million years ago: thermal isolation of Antarctica due to southern ocean gateway opening, and declining atmospheric CO2 (refs 5, 6). Increases in ocean thermal stratification and circulation in proxies across the Eocene-Oligocene transition have been interpreted as a unique signature of gateway opening, but at present both mechanisms remain possible. Here, using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model, we show that the rise of Antarctic glaciation, rather than altered palaeogeography, is best able to explain the observed oceanographic changes. We find that growth of the Antarctic ice sheet caused enhanced northward transport of Antarctic intermediate water and invigorated the formation of Antarctic bottom water, fundamentally reorganizing ocean circulation. Conversely, gateway openings had much less impact on ocean thermal stratification and circulation. Our results support available evidence that CO2 drawdown--not gateway opening--caused Antarctic ice sheet growth, and further show that these feedbacks in turn altered ocean circulation. The precise timing and rate of glaciation, and thus its impacts on ocean circulation, reflect the balance between potentially positive feedbacks (increases in sea ice extent and enhanced primary productivity) and negative feedbacks (stronger southward heat transport and localized high-latitude warming). The Antarctic ice sheet had a complex, dynamic role in ocean circulation and heat fluxes during its initiation, and these processes are likely to operate in the future.

  11. A Decade in Climate Changes and Marine Fisheries: Assessing the Catchment Volume in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, A. H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Global climate change variations over the past 30 years have produced numerous impacts in the abundance and production performance of marine fish and fisheries worldwide. The consequences in terms of flooding of low-lying estuarine habitats due to over rainfall, fluctuation of temperature, dilution of water parameters, devastation of feeding and breeding habitats, salinity fluctuations and acidification of waters, high siltation in coastal area, changes in the sea water table and breeding triggers have raised serious concerns for the well-being of marine fisheries and their production. This study shows that the overall total catchment of marine fisheries was decreased 38% in 2009 compared to 1998 while considers the fishing gears and vessels number used in Peninsular Malaysia. Registered vessels number was increased up to 92% in 2009 compared to 1998 which eventually increased the total catchment volume of marine fisheries. In 2009, the catching efforts and performance was far low as per vessels compared to 1998. Analysis of climate change variables shows that temperature was decreased as rainfall was increased within the year from 1998 to 2009. However, it is still early to conclude that whether climate change variables could have unpleasant impacts on fish production in the tropical seas like Malaysia. In spite of that it is predicted that the prolong exists of monsoon and increases of rainfall in this area resulting the stresses and sometimes interfering on the habitat, reproductive cycle and their related ecosystems in this coastal marine environment in tropics.

  12. The study of dose variation and change of heart volume using 4D-CT in left breast radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seon Mi; Cheon, Geum Seong; Heo, Gyeong Hun; Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Kwang Seok; Kim, Chang Uk; Kim, Hoi Nam

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the results of changed heart volume and heart dose in the left breast cancer patients while considering the movements of respiration. During the months of March and May in 2012, we designated the 10 patients who had tangential irradiation with left breast cancer in the department of radiation Oncology. With acquired images of free breathing pattern through 3D and 4D CT, we had planed enough treatment filed for covered up the whole left breast. It compares the results of the exposed dose and the volume of heart by DVH (Dose Volume histogram). Although total dose was 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/28 fraction), reirradiated 9 Gy (1.8 Gy/5 Fraction) with PTV (Planning Target Volume) if necessary. It compares the results of heart volume and heart dose with the free breathing in 3D CT and 4D CT. It represents the maximum difference volume of heart is 40.5%. In addition, it indicated the difference volume of maximum and minimum, average are 8.8% and 27.9%, 37.4% in total absorbed dose of heart. In case of tangential irradiation (opposite beam) in left breast cancer patients, it is necessary to consider the changed heart volume by the respiration of patient and the heartbeat of patient

  13. Improving estimation of glacier volume change: a GLIMS case study of Bering Glacier System, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Beedle

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS project has developed tools and methods that can be employed by analysts to create accurate glacier outlines. To illustrate the importance of accurate glacier outlines and the effectiveness of GLIMS standards we conducted a case study on Bering Glacier System (BGS, Alaska. BGS is a complex glacier system aggregated from multiple drainage basins, numerous tributaries, and many accumulation areas. Published measurements of BGS surface area vary from 1740 to 6200 km2, depending on how the boundaries of this system have been defined. Utilizing GLIMS tools and standards we have completed a new outline (3630 km2 and analysis of the area-altitude distribution (hypsometry of BGS using Landsat images from 2000 and 2001 and a US Geological Survey 15-min digital elevation model. We compared this new hypsometry with three different hypsometries to illustrate the errors that result from the widely varying estimates of BGS extent. The use of different BGS hypsometries results in highly variable measures of volume change and net balance (bn. Applying a simple hypsometry-dependent mass-balance model to different hypsometries results in a bn rate range of −1.0 to −3.1 m a−1 water equivalent (W.E., a volume change range of −3.8 to −6.7 km3 a−1 W.E., and a near doubling in contributions to sea level equivalent, 0.011 mm a−1 to 0.019 mm a−1. Current inaccuracies in glacier outlines hinder our ability to correctly quantify glacier change. Understanding of glacier extents can become comprehensive and accurate. Such accuracy is possible with the increasing volume of satellite imagery of glacierized regions, recent advances in tools and standards, and dedication to this important task.

  14. Changes in properties of DNA caused by gamma and ultraviolet radiation. Dependence of conformational changes on the chemical nature of the damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorlickova, M; Palacek, E [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Biofysikalni Ustav

    1978-02-16

    Changes in the pulse-polarographic behaviour and circular dichroism spectra of DNA were investigated after gamma and ultraviolet irradiations and after degradation by DNAase I. It was found that moderate doses of radiation cause local conformational changes in the double helix which are dependent on the chemical nature of the damage. Only the accumulation of structural changes after high doses of the radiations or after extensive enzymic treatment may cause formation of single-standed regions in DNA.

  15. Changes in Snow Albedo Resulting from Snow Darkening Caused by Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, J.; Kloster, S.; Bourgeois, Q.

    2014-12-01

    potential climate impact will be analyzed in terms of the radiative forcing caused by the snow darkening induced changes in surface albedo.

  16. Changes in vegetation and soil seed bank of meadow after waterlogging caused by Castor fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Franczak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil waterlogging is among abiotic stresses that influence species composition and productivity in numerous plant communities. The aim of the study was to find answer to the question of how waterlogging caused by beavers’ activity induces quantitative and qualitative changes of vegetation and soil seed bank levels of variable-moist meadows. An immediate effect of the waterlogging at the level of vegetation was the decline in species richness and a decrease in the values of the biodiversity index. Water stress inhibited growth and development of plants already present and, primarily, impeded recruitment of new individuals of species characteristic of variable-moist meadows, e.g. Cirsium rivulare, Filipendula ulmaria and Lythrum salicaria, which were replaced by Carex acutiformis. Prolonged waterlogging did not induce equally substantial changes in the soil seed bank as in the vegetation. Both in the waterlogged and control patches, slightly decreased species richness and biodiversity index were recorded. After waterlogging withdrawal, the reserves of the soil seed bank were slightly higher than the initial values. The differences were not statistically significant. In the waterlogged patch, the qualitative floristic similarity between taxa identified in the soil seed bank and vegetation cover declined, which was evidenced by the value of Jaccard’s index decreasing from 0.46 to 0.36. A reverse relationship was found in control patch, where the value of the similarity index slightly increased from 0.41 to 0.48.

  17. Long-term weight changes in obese young adult men and subsequent all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, E; Berentzen, T L; Ängquist, Lars Henrik

    2013-01-01

    change and all-cause mortality in a broad range of body mass index (BMI) in young men.METHODS:Among 362200 Danish draftees, examined between 1943 and 1977, all obese (BMI 31.0 kg m(-2); n=1930), and a random 1% sample of the others (n=3601) were identified at a mean age of 20 years (range: 18-25 years......BACKGROUND:Although the expectation is that weight gain increases mortality and weight loss among those overweight reduces mortality, results on weight gain and mortality in young adults are conflicting, and weight loss is less explored. We investigated the association between long-term weight......). All the obese and half the controls were re-examined between 4 and 40 years later (mean age 35 years). Weight changes were defined as: weight loss 0.1 kg m(-2) per year. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox regression.RESULTS:Among the 908 obese and 1073...

  18. Risk for colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis: changes, causes and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter-Laszlo; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2008-07-07

    The risk of colorectal cancer for any patient with ulcerative colitis is known to be elevated, and is estimated to be 2% after 10 years, 8% after 20 years and 18% after 30 years of disease. Risk factors for cancer include extent and duration of ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, a family history of sporadic colorectal cancer, severity of histologic bowel inflammation, and in some studies, young age at onset of colitis. In this review, the authors discuss recent epidemiological trends and causes for the observed changes. Population-based studies published within the past 5 years suggest that this risk has decreased over time, despite the low frequency of colectomies. The crude annual incidence rate of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis ranges from approximately 0.06% to 0.16% with a relative risk of 1.0-2.75. The exact mechanism for this change is unknown; it may partly be explained by the more widespread use of maintenance therapy and surveillance colonoscopy.

  19. The anatomy of the aging face: volume loss and changes in 3-dimensional topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Sydney R; Grover, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    Facial aging reflects the dynamic, cumulative effects of time on the skin, soft tissues, and deep structural components of the face, and is a complex synergy of skin textural changes and loss of facial volume. Many of the facial manifestations of aging reflect the combined effects of gravity, progressive bone resorption, decreased tissue elasticity, and redistribution of subcutaneous fullness. A convenient method for assessing the morphological effects of aging is to divide the face into the upper third (forehead and brows), middle third (midface and nose), and lower third (chin, jawline, and neck). The midface is an important factor in facial aesthetics because perceptions of facial attractiveness are largely founded on the synergy of the eyes, nose, lips, and cheek bones (central facial triangle). For aesthetic purposes, this area should be considered from a 3-dimensional rather than a 2-dimensional perspective, and restoration of a youthful 3-dimensional facial topography should be regarded as the primary goal in facial rejuvenation. Recent years have seen a significant increase in the number of nonsurgical procedures performed for facial rejuvenation. Patients seeking alternatives to surgical procedures include those who require restoration of lost facial volume, those who wish to enhance normal facial features, and those who want to correct facial asymmetry. Important factors in selecting a nonsurgical treatment option include the advantages of an immediate cosmetic result and a short recovery time.

  20. Impacts of future climate change on urban flood volumes in Hohhot in northern China: benefits of climate change mitigation and adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As China becomes increasingly urbanised, flooding has become a regular occurrence in its major cities. Assessing the effects of future climate change on urban flood volumes is crucial to informing better management of such disasters given the severity of the devastating impacts of flooding (e.g. the 2016 flooding events across China. Although recent studies have investigated the impacts of future climate change on urban flooding, the effects of both climate change mitigation and adaptation have rarely been accounted for together in a consistent framework. In this study, we assess the benefits of mitigating climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and locally adapting to climate change by modifying drainage systems to reduce urban flooding under various climate change scenarios through a case study conducted in northern China. The urban drainage model – Storm Water Management Model – was used to simulate urban flood volumes using current and two adapted drainage systems (i.e. pipe enlargement and low-impact development, LID, driven by bias-corrected meteorological forcing from five general circulation models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 archive. Results indicate that urban flood volume is projected to increase by 52 % over 2020–2040 compared to the volume in 1971–2000 under the business-as-usual scenario (i.e. Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP 8.5. The magnitudes of urban flood volumes are found to increase nonlinearly with changes in precipitation intensity. On average, the projected flood volume under RCP 2.6 is 13 % less than that under RCP 8.5, demonstrating the benefits of global-scale climate change mitigation efforts in reducing local urban flood volumes. Comparison of reduced flood volumes between climate change mitigation and local adaptation (by improving drainage systems scenarios suggests that local adaptation is more effective than climate change mitigation in reducing

  1. Impacts of future climate change on urban flood volumes in Hohhot in northern China: benefits of climate change mitigation and adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi

    2018-01-01

    As China becomes increasingly urbanised, flooding has become a regular occurrence in its major cities. Assessing the effects of future climate change on urban flood volumes is crucial to informing better management of such disasters given the severity of the devastating impacts of flooding (e.g. the 2016 flooding events across China). Although recent studies have investigated the impacts of future climate change on urban flooding, the effects of both climate change mitigation and adaptation have rarely been accounted for together in a consistent framework. In this study, we assess the benefits of mitigating climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and locally adapting to climate change by modifying drainage systems to reduce urban flooding under various climate change scenarios through a case study conducted in northern China. The urban drainage model - Storm Water Management Model - was used to simulate urban flood volumes using current and two adapted drainage systems (i.e. pipe enlargement and low-impact development, LID), driven by bias-corrected meteorological forcing from five general circulation models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 archive. Results indicate that urban flood volume is projected to increase by 52 % over 2020-2040 compared to the volume in 1971-2000 under the business-as-usual scenario (i.e. Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5). The magnitudes of urban flood volumes are found to increase nonlinearly with changes in precipitation intensity. On average, the projected flood volume under RCP 2.6 is 13 % less than that under RCP 8.5, demonstrating the benefits of global-scale climate change mitigation efforts in reducing local urban flood volumes. Comparison of reduced flood volumes between climate change mitigation and local adaptation (by improving drainage systems) scenarios suggests that local adaptation is more effective than climate change mitigation in reducing future flood volumes. This has

  2. DNA damage and genetic methylation changes caused by Cd in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoling; Liu, Zhihong; Chen, Ruijuan; Li, Xiaojun; Tai, Peidong; Gong, Zongqiang; Jia, Chunyun; Liu, Wan

    2015-09-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MASP) techniques are sensitive to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and genetic methylation, respectively. Using these 2 techniques, Arabidopsis thaliana cultured with 0 mg/L (control), 0.5 mg/L, 1.5 mg/L, and 5.0 mg/L Cd(2+) for 16 d was used to analyze the DNA damage and methylation changes as a result of cadmium (Cd). The DNA was amplified by 14 AFLP primer pairs and 13 MSAP primer combinations. In the AFLP experiment, 62 polymorphic sites were found in the patterns of 11 primer combinations and a total of 1116 fragments were obtained in these patterns. There were no polymorphic bands in the remaining 3 pairs. The proportions of polymorphic sites in the 0.5-mg/L Cd(2+) and 5.0-mg/L Cd(2+) treatments were significantly different. Seven polymorphic fragments were then separated and successfully sequenced, yielding 6 nucleobase substitutions and 1 nucleobase deletion. Similarly, in the MSAP experiment, the MSAP% and number of demethylated-type bands were unchanged after Cd treatment, but the number of methylated-type bands was increased significantly in the 5.0-mg/L Cd(2+) treatment group, a finding that may be associated with the AFLP results. The polymorphic bands were also sequenced and the functions of their homologous genes were determined. The DNA damage and methylation changes may be the primary cause of certain pathology changes as a result of Cd uptake in plants. © 2015 SETAC.

  3. Testing causes for long-term changes in carbon cycling and climate during the early Paleogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, N.; Zeebe, R. E.; Dickens, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The late Paleocene to the early Eocene (˜58-52 Ma) was marked by significant changes in global climate and carbon cycling. Among the evidence for these changes, stable isotope records reveal a prominent decrease of δ13C and δ18O (in both surface and deep ocean), indicating a reorganization in the long-term global carbon cycle and a long-term warming trend (˜4°C), respectively. Concurrently, deep-sea carbonate records at several sites indicate a deepening of the calcite compensation depth (CCD). Here, we investigate possible causes (e.g., increased volcanic degassing, decreased net organic burial, and accelerated dissociation of gas hydrate) for these observations, but from a new perspective. The basic model employed is a modified version of GEOCARB III. However, we have coupled this well-known geochemical model to LOSCAR, a model that enables simulation of seawater carbonate chemistry, the CCD, and ocean δ13C. We have also added a gas hydrate capacitor that can account for the storage and release of methane from the seafloor over millions of years. We further consider accurate input data (e.g., δ13C of carbonate) on a currently accepted time scale that spans an interval much longer than the perturbation. Several different scenarios are investigated with the goal of consistency amongst inferred changes in temperature, the CCD, and surface ocean and deep ocean δ13C. The results strongly suggest that a decrease in net organic carbon burial drove carbon cycle changes during the late Paleocene and early Eocene, although an increase in volcanic activity might have contributed. Importantly, a drop in net organic carbon burial may represent increased oxidation of previously deposited organic carbon, such as stored in peat or gas hydrates. The model successfully recreates trends in Earth surface warming, as inferred from δ18O records, the CCD, and δ13C. At the moment, however, our coupled modeling effort cannot reproduce the magnitude of change in all these

  4. Climatic and ecological future of the Amazon: likelihood and causes of change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, B.; Zeng, N.; Yoon, J.-H.

    2010-05-01

    Some recent climate modeling results suggested a possible dieback of the Amazon rainforest under future climate change, a prediction that raised considerable interest as well as controversy. To determine the likelihood and causes of such changes, we analyzed the output of 15 models from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC/AR4) and a dynamic vegetation model VEGAS driven by these climate output. Our results suggest that the core of the Amazon rainforest should remain largely stable as rainfall is projected to increase in nearly all models. However, the periphery, notably the southern edge of the Amazon and further south in central Brazil, are in danger of drying out, driven by two main processes. Firstly, a decline in precipitation of 22% in the southern Amazon's dry season (May-September) reduces soil moisture, despite an increase in precipitation during the wet season, due to nonlinear responses in hydrology and ecosystem dynamics. Two dynamical mechanisms may explain the lower dry season rainfall: (1) a general subtropical drying under global warming when the dry season southern Amazon is under the control of the subtropical high pressure; (2) a stronger north-south tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature gradient, and to lesser degree a warmer eastern equatorial Pacific. Secondly, evaporation demand will increase due to the general warming, further reducing soil moisture. In terms of ecosystem response, higher maintenance cost and reduced productivity under warming may also have additional adverse impact. The drying corresponds to a lengthening of the dry season by 11 days. As a consequence, the median of the models projects a reduction of 20% in vegetation carbon stock in the southern Amazon, central Brazil, and parts of the Andean Mountains. Further, VEGAS predicts enhancement of fire risk by 10-15%. The increase in fire is primarily due to the reduction in soil moisture, and the decrease in dry season rainfall, which

  5. Estimation of volume and mass and of changes in volume and mass of selected chat piles in the Picher mining district, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, 2005-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Jerrod

    2013-01-01

    From the 1890s through the 1970s the Picher mining district in northeastern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was the site of mining and processing of lead and zinc ore. When mining ceased in about 1979, as much as 165–300 million tons of mine tailings, locally referred to as “chat,” remained in the Picher mining district. Since 1979, some chat piles have been mined for aggregate materials and have decreased in volume and mass. Currently (2013), the land surface in the Picher mining district is covered by thousands of acres of chat, much of which remains on Indian trust land owned by allottees. The Bureau of Indian Affairs manages these allotted lands and oversees the sale and removal of chat from these properties. To help the Bureau of Indian Affairs better manage the sale and removal of chat, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, estimated the 2005 and 2010 volumes and masses of selected chat piles remaining on allotted lands in the Picher mining district. The U.S. Geological Survey also estimated the changes in volume and mass of these chat piles for the period 2005 through 2010. The 2005 and 2010 chat-pile volume and mass estimates were computed for 34 selected chat piles on 16 properties in the study area. All computations of volume and mass were performed on individual chat piles and on groups of chat piles in the same property. The Sooner property had the greatest estimated volume (4.644 million cubic yards) and mass (5.253 ± 0.473 million tons) of chat in 2010. Five of the selected properties (Sooner, Western, Lawyers, Skelton, and St. Joe) contained estimated chat volumes exceeding 1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses exceeding 1 million tons in 2010. Four of the selected properties (Lucky Bill Humbah, Ta Mee Heh, Bird Dog, and St. Louis No. 6) contained estimated chat volumes of less than 0.1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses of less than 0.1 million tons in 2010. The total volume of all

  6. A reaction-diffusion model for market fluctuations - A relation between price change and traded volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvan, Steven; Bier, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Two decades ago Bak et al. (1997) [3] proposed a reaction-diffusion model to describe market fluctuations. In the model buyers and sellers diffuse from opposite ends of a 1D interval that represents a price range. Trades occur when buyers and sellers meet. We show analytically and numerically that the model well reproduces the square-root relation between traded volumes and price changes that is observed in real-life markets. The result is remarkable as this relation has commonly been explained in terms of more elaborate trader strategies. We furthermore explain why the square-root relation is robust under model modifications and we show how real-life bond market data exhibit the square-root relation.

  7. The role of testosterone and estradiol in brain volume changes across adolescence: a longitudinal structural MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Megan M; Gautam, Prapti; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Kan, Eric; Dahl, Ronald E; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2014-11-01

    It has been postulated that pubertal hormones may drive some neuroanatomical changes during adolescence, and may do so differently in girls and boys. Here, we use growth curve modeling to directly assess how sex hormones [testosterone (T) and estradiol (E₂)] relate to changes in subcortical brain volumes utilizing a longitudinal design. 126 adolescents (63 girls), ages 10 to 14, were imaged and restudied ∼2 years later. We show, for the first time, that best-fit growth models are distinctly different when using hormones as compared to a physical proxy of pubertal maturation (Tanner Stage) or age, to predict brain development. Like Tanner Stage, T and E₂ predicted white matter and right amygdala growth across adolescence in both sexes, independent of age. Tanner Stage also explained decreases in both gray matter and caudate volumes, whereas E₂ explained only gray matter decreases and T explained only caudate volume decreases. No pubertal measures were related to hippocampus development. Although specificity was seen, sex hormones had strikingly similar relationships with white matter, gray matter, right amygdala, and bilateral caudate volumes, with larger changes in brain volume seen at early pubertal maturation (as indexed by lower hormone levels), followed by less robust, or even reversals in growth, by late puberty. These novel longitudinal findings on the relationship between hormones and brain volume change represent crucial first steps toward understanding which aspects of puberty influence neurodevelopment. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The molar hydrodynamic volume changes of factor VIIa due to GlycoPEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Bitten; Westh, Peter; Hvidt, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The effects of GlycoPEGylation on the molar hydrodynamic volume of recombinant human rFVIIa were investigated using rFVIIa and two GlycoPEGylated recombinant human FVIIa derivatives, a linear 10 kDa PEG and a branched 40 kDa PEG, respectively. Molar hydrodynamic volumes were determined by capillary......, that the molar hydrodynamic volume of the conjugated protein is not just an addition of the molar hydrodynamic volume of the PEG and the protein. The molar hydrodynamic volume of the GlycoPEGylated protein is larger than the volume of its composites. These results suggest that both the linear and the branched...

  9. Change of hepatic volume after selective bile duct ligation: an experimental study in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye Won; Yoon, Yup; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Rim, Hyeong Teck; Kim, Youn Wha; Lee, Seok Hwan

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the role of bile duct obstuction in the development of atrophy of the liver, using an animal model. Seven rabbits were divided into two groups: group 1(n=3D5), in which there was selective bile duct ligation, and group 2(n=3D2), which underwent a sham operation. Each group was evaluated using CT for changes in hepatic volume after selective bile duct ligation or a sham operation. In group I, the diameter of dilated bile duct was measured 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks after bile duct ligation, while gross and histologic change were evaluated in all cases. In group 1, bile duct dilatation was seen on CT two weeks after selective bile duct ligation, and did not change significantly during follow-up. In four of five cases, CT revealed no evidence of significant atrophy of the involved segment. Pathologic specimens, however, revealed dilatation of the bile duct, periductal fibrosis, infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells, and periportal fibrosis. One of five cases showed segmental liver atrophy after selective bile duct ligation. In addion to the above pathologic findings, there was obstruction of the portal vein by foreign body reaction. In group 2, no evidence of dilated bile duct or liver atrophy was revealed by CT or pathologic specimen after a sham operation. During long-term follow-up of 16 weeks, obstruction of the bile duct did not play a major role in the development of lobar atrophy in the rabbit.=20

  10. Novel diffusion tensor imaging technique reveals developmental streamline volume changes in the corticospinal tract associated with leg motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamson, David O; Juhász, Csaba; Chugani, Harry T; Jeong, Jeong-Won

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has expanded our knowledge of corticospinal tract (CST) anatomy and development. However, previous developmental DTI studies assessed the CST as a whole, overlooking potential differences in development of its components related to control of the upper and lower extremities. The present cross-sectional study investigated age-related changes, side and gender differences in streamline volume of the leg- and hand-related segments of the CST in children. DTI data of 31 children (1-14 years; mean age: 6±4 years; 17 girls) with normal conventional MRI were analyzed. Leg- and hand-related CST streamline volumes were quantified separately, using a recently validated novel tractography approach. CST streamline volumes on both sides were compared between genders and correlated with age. Higher absolute streamline volumes were found in the left leg-related CST compared to the right (p=0.001) without a gender effect (p=0.4), whereas no differences were found in the absolute hand-related CST volumes (p>0.4). CST leg-related streamline volumes, normalized to hemispheric white matter volumes, declined with age in the right hemisphere only (R=-.51; p=0.004). Absolute leg-related CST streamline volumes showed similar, but slightly weaker correlations. Hand-related absolute or normalized CST streamline volumes showed no age-related variations on either side. These results suggest differential development of CST segments controlling hand vs. leg movements. Asymmetric volume changes in the lower limb motor pathway may be secondary to gradually strengthening left hemispheric dominance and is consistent with previous data suggesting that footedness is a better predictor of hemispheric lateralization than handedness. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantification of surface water volume changes in the Mackenzie Delta using satellite multi-mission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normandin, Cassandra; Frappart, Frédéric; Lubac, Bertrand; Bélanger, Simon; Marieu, Vincent; Blarel, Fabien; Robinet, Arthur; Guiastrennec-Faugas, Léa

    2018-02-01

    Quantification of surface water storage in extensive floodplains and their dynamics are crucial for a better understanding of global hydrological and biogeochemical cycles. In this study, we present estimates of both surface water extent and storage combining multi-mission remotely sensed observations and their temporal evolution over more than 15 years in the Mackenzie Delta. The Mackenzie Delta is located in the northwest of Canada and is the second largest delta in the Arctic Ocean. The delta is frozen from October to May and the recurrent ice break-up provokes an increase in the river's flows. Thus, this phenomenon causes intensive floods along the delta every year, with dramatic environmental impacts. In this study, the dynamics of surface water extent and volume are analysed from 2000 to 2015 by combining multi-satellite information from MODIS multispectral images at 500 m spatial resolution and river stages derived from ERS-2 (1995-2003), ENVISAT (2002-2010) and SARAL (since 2013) altimetry data. The surface water extent (permanent water and flooded area) peaked in June with an area of 9600 km2 (±200 km2) on average, representing approximately 70 % of the delta's total surface. Altimetry-based water levels exhibit annual amplitudes ranging from 4 m in the downstream part to more than 10 m in the upstream part of the Mackenzie Delta. A high overall correlation between the satellite-derived and in situ water heights (R > 0.84) is found for the three altimetry missions. Finally, using altimetry-based water levels and MODIS-derived surface water extents, maps of interpolated water heights over the surface water extents are produced. Results indicate a high variability of the water height magnitude that can reach 10 m compared to the lowest water height in the upstream part of the delta during the flood peak in June. Furthermore, the total surface water volume is estimated and shows an annual variation of approximately 8.5 km3 during the whole study period, with

  12. Sway‐dependent changes in standing ankle stiffness caused by muscle thixotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakanaka, Tania E.; Lakie, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Key points The passive stiffness of the calf muscles contributes to standing balance, although the properties of muscle tissue are highly labile.We investigated the effect of sway history upon intrinsic ankle stiffness and demonstrated reductions in stiffness of up to 43% during conditions of increased baseline sway.This sway dependence was most apparent when using low amplitude stiffness‐measuring perturbations, and the short‐range stiffness component was smaller during periods of high sway.These characteristics are consistent with the thixotropic properties of the calf muscles causing the observed changes in ankle stiffness.Periods of increased sway impair the passive stabilization of standing, demanding more active neural control of balance. Abstract Quiet standing is achieved through a combination of active and passive mechanisms, consisting of neural control and intrinsic mechanical stiffness of the ankle joint, respectively. The mechanical stiffness is partly determined by the calf muscles. However, the viscoelastic properties of muscle are highly labile, exhibiting a strong dependence on movement history. By measuring the effect of sway history upon ankle stiffness, the present study determines whether this lability has consequences for the passive stabilization of human standing. Ten subjects stood quietly on a rotating platform whose axis was collinear with the ankle joint. Ankle sway was increased by slowly tilting this platform in a random fashion, or decreased by fixing the body to a board. Ankle stiffness was measured by using the same platform to simultaneously apply small, brief perturbations (ankle stiffness by up to 43% compared to the body‐fixed condition. Normal quiet stance was associated with intermediate values. The effect was most apparent when using smaller perturbation amplitudes to measure stiffness (0.1 vs. 0.6 deg). Furthermore, torque responses exhibited a biphasic pattern, consisting of an initial steep rise followed by a

  13. 640-slice DVCT multi-dimensionally and dynamically presents changes in bladder volume and urine flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yunshan; Fang, Kewei; Mao, Chongwen; Xiang, Shutian; Wang, Jin; Li, Yingwen

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the application of 640-slice dynamic volume computed tomography (DVCT) to excretory cystography and urethrography. A total of 70 healthy subjects were included in the study. Excretory cystography and urethrography using 640-slice DVCT was conducted to continuously record the motions of the bladder and the proximal female and male urethra. The patients' voiding process was divided into early, early to middle, middle, middle to late, and late voiding phases. The subjects were analyzed using DVCT and conventional CT. The cross-sectional areas of various sections of the male and female urethra were evaluated, and the average urine flow rate was calculated. The 640-slice DVCT technique was used to dynamically observe the urine flow rate and changes in bladder volume at all voiding phases. The urine volume detected by 640-slice DVCT exhibited no significant difference compared with the actual volume, and no significant difference compared with that determined using conventional CT. Furthermore, no significant difference in the volume of the bladder at each phase of the voiding process was detected between 640-slice DVCT and conventional CT. The results indicate that 640-slice DVCT can accurately evaluate the status of the male posterior urethra and female urethra. In conclusion, 640-slice DVCT is able to multi-dimensionally and dynamically present changes in bladder volume and urine flow rate, and could obtain similar results to conventional CT in detecting urine volume, as well as the status of the male posterior urethra and female urethra. PMID:29467853

  14. Volume changes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy resins studied by PALS and PVT experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somoza, A. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina) and CICPBA, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)]. E-mail: asomoza@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPMPyMC, Depto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ramos, J. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Mondragon, I. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    A systematic study on changes in the volumes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy systems cured with selected aminic hardeners at different pre-cure temperatures is presented. Free- and macroscopic specific-volumes were measured by PALS and pressure-volume-temperature techniques, respectively. An analysis of the relation existing between macro- and nano-scales of the thermosetting networks developed by the different chemical structures is shown. The result obtained indicates that the structure of the hardeners governs the packing of the molecular chains of the epoxy network.

  15. Evaluating the effect of hydrocephalus cause on the manner of changes in the effective parameters and clinical symptoms of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholampour, Seifollah; Fatouraee, Nasser; Seddighi, Amir Saeed; Seddighi, Afsoun

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the heads of 11 normal subjects and 21 patients affected by hydrocephalus due to three different causes were simulated using fluid-structure interaction (FSI). To validate the results, the calculated diagram of CSF velocity in aqueduct of Sylvius (AS) was compared with the similar velocity diagram measured using Cine PC-MRI for the same subject. After ensuring the agreement of results, other outputs such as CSF pressure were calculated non-invasively using FSI. The intracranial pressure and CSF pressure in AS and behind the optic nerve sheath were in patients 5-5.3 times the value in normal subjects and the ventricular system volume in patients was 10.2-11.1 times the value in normal subjects. However, the difference between the coefficient of variation and the maximum value of pressure and volume in different types of hydrocephalus was small. Furthermore, the difference between CSF stroke volumes in various types of hydrocephalus patients was less than 4.4%. Results showed that the intensity of clinical symptoms was similar in patients with similar CSF pressure and the cause of the hydrocephalus disease didn't have any significant effect on the intensity of patients' clinical symptoms and the manner of changes in effective parameters on disease. It was also found that the relation of CSF pressure and volume was 16.7% greater in patients with non-communicating hydrocephalus than in patients with communicating hydrocephalus. These results enhance the insight into hydrocephalus bio-mechanism and can help to choose the proper treatment method for hydrocephalus patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Biomechanics changes of lumbar spine caused by foraminotomy via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, J; Yu, S S; Liu, J J; Chen, L; Jing, J H

    2018-04-03

    Objective: To analyze the biomechanics changes of lumbar spine caused by foraminotomy via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy using the finite element method. Methods: Three healthy adult males (aged 35.6 to 42.3 years) without spinal diseases were enrolled in this study and 3D-CT scans were carried out to obtain the parameters of lumbar spine. Mimics software was applied to build a 3D finite element model of lumbar spine. Graded resections (1/4, 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4) of the left superior articular process of L(5) were done via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy. Then, the pressure of the L(4/5) right facets, the pressure of the L(4/5) intervertebral disc and the motion of lumbar spine were recorded after simulating the normal flexion and extension, lateral flexion and rotation of the lumbar spine model during different resections. The data were compared among groups with analysis of variance. Results: Comparing with the normal group, after 1/4 resection of the left superior articular process of L(5), the pressure of the L(4/5) right facets showed significant differences during left lateral flexion and rotation of lumbar spine ( q =8.823, 8.248, both P biomechanics and the stability of lumbar spine changed partly after 1/4 resection of the superior articular process and obviously after more than 2/4 is resected. The superior articular process should be paid more attention during foraminotomy via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy.

  17. Long-term oil contamination causes similar changes in microbial communities of two distinct soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jingqiu; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Dalin; Wang, Michael Cai; Huang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Since total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) are toxic and persistent in environments, studying the impact of oil contamination on microbial communities in different soils is vital to oil production engineering, effective soil management and pollution control. This study analyzed the impact of oil contamination on the structure, activity and function in carbon metabolism of microbial communities of Chernozem soil from Daqing oil field and Cinnamon soil from Huabei oil field through both culture-dependent techniques and a culture-independent technique-pyrosequencing. Results revealed that pristine microbial communities in these two soils presented disparate patterns, where Cinnamon soil showed higher abundance of alkane, (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) PAHs and TPH degraders, number of cultivable microbes, bacterial richness, bacterial biodiversity, and stronger microbial activity and function in carbon metabolism than Chernozem soil. It suggested that complicated properties of microbes and soils resulted in the difference in soil microbial patterns. However, the changes of microbial communities caused by oil contamination were similar in respect of two dominant phenomena. Firstly, the microbial community structures were greatly changed, with higher abundance, higher bacterial biodiversity, occurrence of Candidate_division_BRC1 and TAO6, disappearance of BD1-5 and Candidate_division_OD1, dominance of Streptomyces, higher percentage of hydrocarbon-degrading groups, and lower percentage of nitrogen-transforming groups. Secondly, microbial activity and function in carbon metabolism were significantly enhanced. Based on the characteristics of microbial communities in the two soils, appropriate strategy for in situ bioremediation was provided for each oil field. This research underscored the usefulness of combination of culture-dependent techniques and next-generation sequencing techniques both to unravel the microbial patterns and understand the ecological impact of

  18. Microstructural changes of cows’ uterus in an infection caused by Haemophilus somnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danka Šťastná

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reproductive form of Haemophilic infection caused by a microorganism Histophilus somni (Haemophilus somnus is in our conditions practically unknown and undiscovered disease of cow reproductive organs. The aim of this work was based on experimental work to provide a comprehensive view on the patho-histological and submicroscopic changes in the uterus of 60 cows, serological positive, crossbreeds Slovenske strakate x Holstein, aged 3.5 . 4.5 years, serological positive, which were up to 90 days after the parturition sterile. After the hormonal control of the oestrus cycle (PGF2ƒż-Oestrophan SPOFA the cows were inseminated and the non-gravid cows later killed. The reproductive organs of killed animals were pathologically . anatomically dissected with following histological and sub-microscopic study of uterus and cervix tissue. At the beginning of the experiment no clinical changes of the reproductive organs of group 1 animals with the titer of antibodies 1:25-100 were diagnosed and in group 3 with the titer 1:25. At an examination before killing were examined endometritis (EM of grade II. and vaginitis with vestibulitis in these groups. At the rest of animals appeared in every level of the titer of antibodies of EM II. and EM III. EM I. were not clinically diagnosed. Dissecting examination determined EM catarrhalis and cervicis catarrhalis in all groups. The histological examination pointed to EM catarrhalis chronica, EM interstitialis chronica, EM fibrousis and cervicis catarrhalis chronica. The leucocytes gained from a uterus lavage were in a comparison with stroma leucocytes mostly polynuclear (neutrophils and in smaller amount small forms of lymfocytes. At long-term sterility of cows, because of possible H. somnus infection, we regard as priority the serodiagnostics at which is taken into consideration any level of the titer of antibodies.

  19. Effects of fluorotherapy on oral changes caused by a vegan diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, F; Laffranchi, L; Fontana, P; Dalessandri, D; Bonetti, S

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of fluorotherapy on the oral health of subjects who had been following a vegan diet (lacking in meat and animal derivatives) for a long period of time (at least 1 year and 6 months). A preliminary study (t0) evaluated 50 subjects, all from northern Italy and aged 24-60 years (28 male and 22 female) who had been following a vegan diet for a minimum of 18 months to a maximum of 20 years, and compared them with a control group of 50 individuals following a Mediterranean diet. All vegan subjects showed oral changes such as white spots, lesions invisible to the naked eye and decreased salivary pH values (~5-6). In a second study (t1), the 50 vegan subjects were randomly divided into two subgroups of 25. Subgroup SG1 underwent fluorotherapy with sodium fluoride (Elmex fluoride gel® 1.25%) administered once daily for 1 year. Subgroup SG2 served as controls and did not receive fluorotherapy. The following parameters were recorded before the start of fluorotherapy and again after 1 year: salivary pH; Decayed, Missing, Filled teeth Index; presence and location of white spots and lesions not visible to the naked eye; Plaque Index, and Gingival Index. In SG1, larger lesions became smaller in diameter and small lesions disappeared, a statistically significant improvement compared with SG2, despite the persistence of restricted eating habits and the oral hygiene conditions being similar to those at t0. Salivary pH showed no significant change in either subgroup. Daily application of a topical 1.25% fluoride gel is effective in reducing the incidence of white spot lesions caused by a vegan diet.

  20. Changes in the air cell volume of artificially incubated ostrich eggs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 2160 images of candled, incubated ostrich eggs were digitized to determine the percentage of egg volume occupied by the air cell at different stages of incubation. The air cell on average occupied 2.5% of the volume of fresh eggs. For eggs that hatched successfully, this volume increased to an average of 24.4% ...

  1. Volume changes of whole brain gray matter in pediatric patients with Tourette syndrome: evidence from voxel-based morphometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yue; Peng Yun; Gao Peiyi; Nie Binbin; Lu Chuankai; Zhang Liping; Ji Zhiying; Yin Guangheng; Yu Tong; Shan Baoci

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the related abnormalities of gray matter in pediatric patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) by using the optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Methods: Three dimensional T 1 WI was acquired in 31 TS children (28 boys, 3 girts, mean age 8 years, range 4-15 years) and 50 age- and sex-matched controls on a 1.5 Tesla Philips scanner. Images were pre-processed and analyzed using a version of VBM 2 in SPM 2. The whole brain gray matter volume was compared between the study and control group by using t-test. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used for analyzing the correlation between the change of grey matter volume within each brain region (mm 3 ) and YGTSS score and course of disease of TS patients. Statistical analyses were performed by using SPSS 13.0. Results: Using VBM, significant increases in gray matter volumes in left superior parietal lobule, right cerebellar hemisphere and left parahippocampal gyrus were detected in TS patients, and the volume changes were 4059, 2126 and 84 mm 3 (t=3.93, 3.71, 3.58, P<0.05) respectively. Compared to the control group, decreased grey matter volumes were found in medulla and left pons, and the volume changes were 213 and 117 mm 3 (t=3.53, 3.48, P<0.05)respectively. Tic severity was not correlated with any volume changes of gray matter in brain (P>0.05, a small volume correction, KE ≥ 10 voxel). Tic course was negatively correlated with the gray matter volume of left parahippocampal gyrus (Beta =-0.391, P=0.039). Conclusions: Using VBM technique, the gray matter abnormalities can be revealed in TS patients without obvious lesions on conventional MR imaging. The increasing volume of temporal and parietal lobes and cerebellar may be an adaptive anatomical change in response to experiential demand. The gray matter volume of the parahippocampal gyrus may be used as one potential objective index for evaluating the prognosis of TS. (authors)

  2. Changes in causes of death and mortality rates among children in Greenland from 1987 - 91 to 1992 - 99

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen-Larsen, Birger; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2003-01-01

    This study analysed the spontaneous trends in mortality among children in Greenland from 1987 - 91 to 1992 - 99 and describes the changes in the causes of death, mortality rates, and variation between regions.......This study analysed the spontaneous trends in mortality among children in Greenland from 1987 - 91 to 1992 - 99 and describes the changes in the causes of death, mortality rates, and variation between regions....

  3. Thinking about Global Warming: Effect of Policy-Related Documents and Prompts on Learning about Causes of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaum, Dylan; Griffin, Thomas D.; Wiley, Jennifer; Britt, M. Anne

    2017-01-01

    We examined students' understanding of the causes of a scientific phenomenon from a multiple-document-inquiry unit. Students read several documents that each described causal factors that could be integrated to address the given writing task of explaining the causes of change in average global temperature. We manipulated whether the document set…

  4. [Volume changes to the neck lymph node metastases in head-neck tumors. The evaluation of radiotherapeutic treatment success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszka, G; Thalacker, U; Somogyi, A; Németh, G

    1997-08-01

    This work is engaged with the volume change of neck lymph node metastasis of malignant tumors in the head-neck region during radiotherapy. In 54 patients with head and neck tumors, the volume of neck lymph nodes before and after radiation was measured. The volumetry was done with CT planimetry. The total dose was 66 Gy (2 Gy/d) telecobalt from 2 lateral opponated fields. The time of volume change could be defined with measuring of the half-time and the doubling-time by the help of Schwartz formula. After 10 Gy the volume diminution was about 20% and half-time 24 to 26 days. Afterwards the time of volume diminution picked up speed and finally achieved 60 to 72%. Meanwhile the half-time decreased to the half value. The result was independent of the site of primary tumor, the patient's sex and age. In our opinion the effectivity of radiotherapy can best be judged with defining of the volume change of lymph nodes of the neck.

  5. Herpes zoster chronification to postherpetic neuralgia induces brain activity and grey matter volume change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Song; Qin, Bangyong; Zhang, Yi; Yuan, Jie; Fu, Bao; Xie, Peng; Song, Ganjun; Li, Ying; Yu, Tian

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Herpes zoster (HZ) can develop into postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), which is a chronic neuropathic pain (NP). Whether the chronification from HZ to PHN induced brain functional or structural change is unknown and no study compared the changes of the same brains of patients who transited from HZ to PHN. We minimized individual differences and observed whether the chronification of HZ to PHN induces functional and pain duration dependent grey matter volume (GMV) change in HZ-PHN patients. Methods: To minimize individual differences induced error, we enrolled 12 patients with a transition from HZ to PHN. The functional and structural changes of their brains between the two states were identified with resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) technique (i.e., the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and fractional aptitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) method) and the voxel based morphometry (VBM) technology respectively. The correlations between MRI parameters (i.e., ΔReHo, ΔfALFF and ΔVBM) and Δpain duration were analyzed too. Results: Compared with HZ brains, PHN brains exhibited abnormal ReHo, fALFF and VBM values in pain matrix (the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, thalamus, limbic lobe and cerebellum) as well as the occipital lobe and temporal lobe. Nevertheless, the activity of vast area of cerebellum and frontal lobe significantly increased while that of occipital lobe and limbic lobe showed apparent decrease when HZ developed to PHN. In addition, PHN brain showed decreased GMV in the frontal lobe, the parietal lobe and the occipital lobe but increased in the cerebellum and the temporal lobe. Correlation analyses showed that some of the ReHo, fALFF and VBM differential areas (such as the cerebellum posterior lobe, the thalamus extra-nuclear and the middle temporal gyrus) correlated well with Δpain duration. Conclusions: HZ chronification induced functional and structural change in cerebellum, occipital lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe and limbic lobe

  6. Evaluation of Safety Programs with Respect to the Causes of General Aviation Accidents. Volume I. Technical Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    65 Physical Impairment 66 Spatial disorientation. 67 Psychological condition. 71 Misused or failed to use flaps. 74 Left aircraft unattended, engine...ARTS III - (Software) (1975) 203 Weather Radar Display System (ASR - 57) 204 ATARS - Automated Terminal Area Radar Service (1974) 205 Instrument Landing...Generated Trauma, Pathological and Psychological Dysfunction accident causes. Collectively, the distribution of safety programs throughout the fault

  7. Significant Climate Changes Caused by Soot Emitted From Rockets in the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M. J.; Ross, M.; Toohey, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    A new type of hydrocarbon rocket engine with a larger soot emission index than current kerosene rockets is expected to power a fleet of suborbital rockets for commercial and scientific purposes in coming decades. At projected launch rates, emissions from these rockets will create a persistent soot layer in the northern middle stratosphere that would disproportionally affect the Earth’s atmosphere and cryosphere. A global climate model predicts that thermal forcing in the rocket soot layer will cause significant changes in the global atmospheric circulation and distributions of ozone and temperature. Tropical ozone columns decline as much as 1%, while polar ozone columns increase by up to 6%. Polar surface temperatures rise one Kelvin regionally and polar summer sea ice fractions shrink between 5 - 15%. After 20 years of suborbital rocket fleet operation, globally averaged radiative forcing (RF) from rocket soot exceeds the RF from rocket CO_{2} by six orders of magnitude, but remains small, comparable to the global RF from aviation. The response of the climate system is surprising given the small forcing, and should be investigated further with different climate models.

  8. Microclimatic changes caused by different plastic coverings in greenhouses cultivated with cherry tomato in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Holcman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In regions with intense solar radiation it is common the use of aluminated covers in greenhouses, with the aim of reducing the inside temperature. However, the use of these covers reduces photosynthetic active radiation (PAR transmitted into the greenhouse. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different covers on microclimate in greenhouses cultivated with cherry tomato during three growing seasons. The environment I was covered with plastic film anti-UV and with thermo-reflective screen (40% disposed internally. The environment II was covered with diffusive plastic film (55%. The transmitted solar radiation to the interior of covered environments was, on average, 5.5 MJ m-2 day-1 in the environment I and 8.2 MJ m-2 day-1 in environment II. The air temperature in environment II was, on average, 1°C higher than external conditions. The highest difference for the relative humidity (RH was also observed between environment II and the outside conditions, with 10.7% for the minimum RH during the first growing period. Considering all growing periods, the diffusive plastic film provided higher solar energy availability inside the greenhouse than the plastic film with thermo-reflective screen, without causing major changes in air temperature and relative humidity, and promoting greater productivity of tomato grown under this environment for the three periods evaluated.

  9. An experimental study on renal arterial and parenchymal change caused by selective renal infusion of epinephrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Seok Chol; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1981-01-01

    Selective infusion of the epinephrine into the renal artery has been used in the field of the diagnostic and the therapeutic radiology for correct diagnosis and effective treatment, respectively. However, administration of overdose of epinephrine may cause serious complication, renal infarction. The study was undertaken to evaluate the sequential change of renal arterial constrictive effect of selective infusion of epinephrine into renal artery and to determine the critical doses of epinephrine producing irreversible renal infarct. A total of 25 rabbits are used, which are divided into 5 groups. Under the general anesthesia is made the selective infusion of various doses of epinephrine into the right renal artery of the rabbits. At the various time interval during and after the epinephrine infusion, renal angiography was done, and 24 hrs. later, gross and microscopic findings of the kidney were observed. The results are as follows; 1. Vasoconstriction of renal artery occurred within 2 mins. infusion, and maximum effect within 5 mins. 2. It seems that there is correlation between the amount of infused epinephrine and the time taken to recover from constriction of renal artery. 3. When epinephrine is infused into the renal artery in the rate of 1 ug/min., renal infarct is not noticed below the level of 10 mins., but correlation between the amount of infused epinephrine and the frequency of renal infarct occurs above 20 mins. infusion

  10. Cultural differences in rated typicality and perceived causes of memory changes in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiroli, Sara; Cavallini, Elena; Fastame, Maria Chiara; Hertzog, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This study examined cultural differences in stereotypes and attributions regarding aging and memory. Two subcultures belonging to the same country, Italy, were compared on general beliefs about memory. Sardinians live longer than other areas of Italy, which is a publically shared fact that informs stereotypes about that subculture. An innovative instrument evaluating simultaneously aging stereotypes and attributions about memory and memory change in adulthood was administered to 52 Sardinian participants and 52 Milanese individuals divided into three age groups: young (20-30), young-old (60-70), and old-old (71-85) adults. Both Milanese and Sardinians reported that memory decline across the life span is more typical than a pattern of stability or improvement. However, Sardinians viewed stability and improvement in memory as more typical than did the Milanese. Interestingly, cultural differences emerged in attributions about memory improvement. Although all Sardinian age groups rated nutrition and heredity as relevant causes in determining the memory decline, Sardinians' rated typicality of life-span memory improvement correlated strongly with causal attributions to a wide number of factors, including nutrition and heredity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Causes and temporal changes in nationally collected stillbirth audit data in high-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Tom; Manktelow, Bradley N; Smith, Lucy K; Draper, Elizabeth S

    2017-06-01

    Few high-income countries have an active national programme of stillbirth audit. From the three national programmes identified (UK, New Zealand, and the Netherlands) steady declines in annual stillbirth rates have been observed over the audit period between 1993 and 2014. Unexplained stillbirth remains the largest group in the classification of stillbirths, with a decline in intrapartum-related stillbirths, which could represent improvements in intrapartum care. All three national audits of stillbirths suggest that up to half of all reviewed stillbirths have elements of care that failed to follow standards and guidance. Variation in the classification of stillbirth, cause of death and frequency of risk factor groups limit our ability to draw meaningful conclusions as to the true scale of the burden and the changing epidemiology of stillbirths in high-income countries. International standardization of these would facilitate direct comparisons between countries. The observed declines in stillbirth rates over the period of perinatal audit, a possible consequence of recommendations for improved antenatal care, should serve to incentivise other countries to implement similar audit programmes. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of temperature on volume change behaviour of statically compacted kaolin clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileme Ogechi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several soils are subjected to high temperature due to the environment where they are located or activities around them. For instance, upper layer of soils in tropical regions, soils around geothermal structures, clay barriers around nuclear waste repository systems. Numerous studies have pointed out that high temperature affects the hydro-mechanical properties of soils. Notwithstanding already existing studies, the influence of temperature on soils is still a challenge, as most of these studies are soil specific and cannot be inferred as the behaviour of all soils. This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of temperature on the volume change behaviour of statically compacted kaolin clay. Compacted samples were tested at varying temperatures using a suction controlled oedometer cell. The influence of temperature on the magnitude of volumetric strain occurring during mechanical and thermal loading was investigated. The study showed that an increase in temperature increased the magnitude of volumetric strain of the soil on loading. Additionally, the results presented in the light of LC curve showed that an increase in temperature resulted in the contraction and a change in the position of the LC curve.

  13. Implication of volume changes in uranium oxides: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, B.; Szpunar, J.A.; Milman, V.; Goldberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    In severe nuclear accident scenarios (in air environments and high temperatures) UO 2 fuel pellets oxidise to produce uranium oxides with higher oxygen content, e.g., U 4 O 9 or U 3 O 8 . As a first step in investigating the microstructural changes following UO 2 oxidation to hexagonal high temperature phase of U 3 O 8 , density functional quantum mechanical calculations of the structure, elastic properties and electronic structure of U 3 O 8 have been performed. The calculated properties of hexagonal phase of U 3 O 8 are compared to those of the orthorhombic pseudo-hexagonal phase which is stable at room temperature. The total energy technique based on the local density approximation plus Hubbard U as implemented in the CASTEP code is used to investigate changes in the lattice constants. The first-principles calculations predict a 35-42% increase in volume per uranium atom as a result of the transformation from UO 2 to U 3 O 8 , in agreement with experimental data. The implications of this prediction on the linear expansion and fragmentation of fuel are discussed. (authors)

  14. Heat transfer characteristics of UF6 in a container heated from outer surface. Pt. 1. Thermal hydraulic analysis method taking account of phase change and volume expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataru, Masumi; Gomi, Yoshio; Yamakawa, Hidetsugu; Tsumune, Daisuke

    1995-01-01

    Natural UF6 is transported in a steel container from foreign countries to the enrichment plant in Japan. If the container meets fire accident, it is heated by fire (800degC) and rupture of the container may occur. For the safety point of view, it is necessary to know whether rupture occurs or not. Because UF6 has a radiological and chemical hazards, it is difficult to perform a demonstration test with UF6. So thermal calculation method has to be developed. The rupture is caused by UF6 gaseous pressure or volume expansion of liquid UF6. To know time history of internal pressure and temperature distribution in the container, it is important to evaluate thermal phenomena of UF6. When UF6 is heated, it changes from solid to liquid or gas at low temperature (64degC) and then its volume expands little by little. In this study, thermal calculation method has been developed taking phase change and thermal expansion of UF6 into account. In the calculation, a two-dimensional model is adopted and natural convection of liquid UF6 is analyzed. As a result of this study, numerical solutions have been obtained taking phase change and volume expansion into account. (author)

  15. An image-based model of brain volume biomarker changes in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Peter A; Young, Alexandra L; Oxtoby, Neil P; Marinescu, Razvan V; Firth, Nicholas C; Johnson, Eileanoir B; Mohan, Amrita; Sampaio, Cristina; Scahill, Rachael I; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Alexander, Daniel C

    2018-05-01

    Determining the sequence in which Huntington's disease biomarkers become abnormal can provide important insights into the disease progression and a quantitative tool for patient stratification. Here, we construct and present a uniquely fine-grained model of temporal progression of Huntington's disease from premanifest through to manifest stages. We employ a probabilistic event-based model to determine the sequence of appearance of atrophy in brain volumes, learned from structural MRI in the Track-HD study, as well as to estimate the uncertainty in the ordering. We use longitudinal and phenotypic data to demonstrate the utility of the patient staging system that the resulting model provides. The model recovers the following order of detectable changes in brain region volumes: putamen, caudate, pallidum, insula white matter, nonventricular cerebrospinal fluid, amygdala, optic chiasm, third ventricle, posterior insula, and basal forebrain. This ordering is mostly preserved even under cross-validation of the uncertainty in the event sequence. Longitudinal analysis performed using 6 years of follow-up data from baseline confirms efficacy of the model, as subjects consistently move to later stages with time, and significant correlations are observed between the estimated stages and nonimaging phenotypic markers. We used a data-driven method to provide new insight into Huntington's disease progression as well as new power to stage and predict conversion. Our results highlight the potential of disease progression models, such as the event-based model, to provide new insight into Huntington's disease progression and to support fine-grained patient stratification for future precision medicine in Huntington's disease.

  16. Changes in Treatment Volume of Hormonally Treated and Untreated Cancerous Prostate and its Impact on Rectal Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Dale, Einar; Olsen, Dag R.; Gude, Unn; Fossaa, Sophie D.

    2003-01-01

    Late chronic side effects of the rectum constitute one of the principal limiting factors for curative radiation therapy in patients with prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of immediate androgen deprivation (IAD) prior to conformal radiotherapy on rectal volume exposed to high doses, as compared with a deferred treatment strategy (DAD). Twenty-five patients (13 in the IAD group and 12 in the DAD group) with bulky tumours of the prostate, T3pN1-2M0 from the prospective EORTC trial 30846 were analysed. Three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment plans (3D CRT) using a 4-field box technique were generated based on the digitized computed tomographic or magnetic resonance findings acquired during the first 9 months after inclusion in the EORTC trial. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for the prostate and rectum. In the DAD group, there was no obvious alteration in the mean size of the prostate or other evaluated structures. In the IAD patients, a statistically significant reduction of approximately 40% of the gross tumour volume (GTV) was reached after a 6 months' course of hormonal treatment (p<0.001). High-dose rectal volume was correlated with the volume changes of the GTV (p<0.001). Mean rectal volume receiving 95% or more of the target dose was significantly reduced by 20%. Our study confirms the effect of downsizing of locally advanced prostate tumours following AD treatment and demonstrates the interdependence of the high-dose rectal volume with the volume changes of the GTV. However, the mean beneficial sparing of rectal volume was outweighed in some patients by considerable inter-patient variations

  17. Subclinical changes in MRI-determined right ventricular volumes and function in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patscheider, Hannah; Lorbeer, Roberto; Auweter, Sigrid; Schafnitzel, Anina; Bayerl, Christian; Curta, Adrian; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Peters, Annette; Bamberg, Fabian; Hetterich, Holger

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess subclinical changes in right ventricular volumes and function in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes and controls without a history of cardiovascular disease. Data from 400 participants in the KORA FF4 study without self-reported cardiovascular disease who underwent 3-T whole-body MRI were obtained. The right ventricle was evaluated using the short axis and a four-chamber view. Diabetes was defined according to WHO criteria. Associations between glucose tolerance and right ventricular parameters were assessed using multivariable adjusted linear regression models. Data from 337 participants were available for analysis. Of these, 43 (13%) had diabetes, 87 (26%) had prediabetes, and 207 (61%) were normoglycaemic controls. There was a stepwise decrease in right ventricular volumes in men with prediabetes and diabetes in comparison with controls, including right ventricular end-diastolic volume (β = -20.4 and β = -25.6, respectively; p ≤ 0.005), right ventricular end-systolic volume (β = -12.3 and β = -12.7, respectively; p ≤ 0.037) and right ventricular stroke volume (β = -8.1 and β = -13.1, respectively, p ≤ 0.016). We did not observe any association between prediabetes or diabetes and right ventricular volumes in women or between prediabetes or diabetes and right ventricular ejection fraction in men and women. This study points towards early subclinical changes in right ventricular volumes in men with diabetes and prediabetes. • MRI was used to detect subclinical changes in right ventricular parameters. • Diabetes mellitus is associated with right ventricular dysfunction. • Impairment of right ventricular volumes seems to occur predominantly in men.

  18. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  19. On the changing petroleum generation properties of Alum Shale over geological time caused by uranium irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengyu; Schulz, Hans-Martin; Horsfield, Brian; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Noah, Mareike; Panova, Elena; Rothe, Heike; Hahne, Knut

    2018-05-01

    An interdisciplinary study was carried out to unravel organic-inorganic interactions caused by the radiogenic decay of uranium in the immature organic-rich Alum Shale (Middle Cambrian-Lower Ordovician). Based on pyrolysis experiments, uranium content is positively correlated with the gas-oil ratios and the aromaticities of both the free hydrocarbons residing in the rock and the pyrolysis products from its kerogen, indicating that irradiation has had a strong influence on organic matter composition overall and hence on petroleum potential. The Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry data reveal that macro-molecules in the uranium-rich Alum Shale samples are less alkylated than less irradiated counterparts, providing further evidence for structural alteration by α-particle bombardment. In addition, oxygen containing-compounds are enriched in the uranium-rich samples but are not easily degradable into low-molecular-weight products due to irradiation-induced crosslinking. Irradiation has induced changes in organic matter composition throughout the shale's entire ca. 500 Ma history, irrespective of thermal history. This factor has to be taken into account when reconstructing petroleum generation history. The Alum Shale's kerogen underwent catagenesis in the main petroleum kitchen area 420-340 Ma bp. Our calculations suggest the kerogen was much more aliphatic and oil-prone after deposition than that after extensive exposure to radiation. In addition, the gas sorption capacity of the organic matter in the Alum Shale can be assumed to have been less developed during Palaeozoic times, in contrast to results gained by sorption experiments performed at the present day, for the same reason. The kerogen reconstruction method developed here precludes overestimations of gas generation and gas retention in the Alum Shale by taking irradiation exposure into account and can thus significantly mitigate charge risk when applied in the explorations for both

  20. Repeated Predictable Stress Causes Resilience against Colitis-Induced Behavioral Changes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Hassan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of mental disorders and can be exacerbated by stress. In this study which was performed with male 10-week old C57Bl/6N mice, we used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis to evaluate behavioral changes caused by intestinal inflammation, to assess the interaction between repeated psychological stress (water avoidance stress, WAS and colitis in modifying behavior, and to analyze neurochemical correlates of this interaction. A 7-day treatment with DSS (2 % in drinking water decreased locomotion and enhanced anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and reduced social interaction. Repeated exposure to WAS for 7 days had little influence on behavior but prevented the DSS-induced behavioral disturbances in the open field and social interaction tests. In contrast, repeated WAS did not modify colon length, colonic myeloperoxidase content and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, parameters used to assess colitis severity. DSS-induced colitis was associated with an increase in circulating neuropeptide Y (NPY, a rise in the hypothalamic expression of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and a decrease in the hippocampal expression of NPY mRNA, brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA. Repeated WAS significantly decreased the relative expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the hippocampus. The effect of repeated WAS to blunt the DSS-evoked behavioral disturbances was associated with a rise of circulating corticosterone and an increase in the expression of hypothalamic NPY mRNA. These results show that experimental colitis leads to a particular range of behavioral alterations which can be prevented by repeated WAS, a model of predictable chronic stress, while the severity of colitis remains unabated. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying the resilience effect of repeated WAS involves hypothalamic NPY and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  1. The changes of fingernail microcirculation in the patients with hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoquan; Qian Jianjun; Wang Zuofa

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To observe the microcirculation changes in the patients with hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays. Methods: The XOX-1A type microcirculation microscope was used in observation of the microcirculation changes of fingernail, in 22 patients with III-IV degree hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays. Results: A series of abnormal signs were observed in all these patients and it was found that the microcirculation abnormality of the fingernail were the most clinical significant sign. Conclusion: The fingernail microcirculation changes can be used as an indicator for prognosis in the hand skin radiation damage patients

  2. Change of tumor target volume during waiting time for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Yi Junlin; Gao Li; Xu Guozhen; Huang Xiaodong; Zhang Zhong; Luo Jingwei; Li Suyan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of change in tumor target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) while waiting for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: From March 2005 to December 2005, 31 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma received IMRT as the initial treatment at the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academic of Medical Sciences. The original simulation CT scan was acquired before IMRT planning. A second CT scan was acquired before the start of radiotherapy. Wait- ing time was defined as the duration between CT simulation and start of radiotherapy. CT-CT fusion was used to minimize the error of delineation between the first tumor target volume (GTV) and the second tumor target volume (sGTV). Tumor target volume was calculated by treatment planning system. T test was carried out to analyse the difference between GTV and sGTV. Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression was used to analyse the influence factor of the change betweent GTV and sGTV. Results: Median waiting time was 18 days (range, 9-27 days). There were significant differences between GTV and sGTV of both primary tumor (P=0.009) and metastatic lymphoma (P=0.005 ). Both Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression showed that the change of primary tumor target volume had significant correlation with the first tumor target volume but had no significant correlation with the waiting time, sex, age, T stage and N stage (1992 Chinese Fuzhou Staging Classification). Conclusions: Within the range of the waiting time ob- served in our study, large volume primary tumor would have had a significant increase in volume, but whether the therapeutic effect would be influenced or not would need to be proved by study of large number of cases. Patients with large volume tumor should be considered to reduce the influence of waiting time by enlarging gross target volume and clinical targe volume and by neoadjuveant chemotherapy. For avoiding the unnecessary high-dose to normal

  3. Age-related changes in volumes of the ventricles, sulci and periventricular hyperintensity area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kenji; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Ono, Shuichi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Matsui, Hiroshige; Yamada, Susumu; Hishinuma, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    Brain atrophy in 47 subjects without neurologic disturbances, ranging in age from 46 to 82 years, was studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Moreover, the association of the periventricular hyperintensity area (PVH) recognized with MRI, was also investigated. The volume percentages of the brain, the ventricles and sulci to cranial cavity were calculated as indicators of brain atrophy. The brain volume index decreased and the indeces of the ventricles and sulci linearly increased with age, significantly. The volume ratio of the ventricles to sulci significantly increased with increasing age (p < 0.01) and the correlation coefficient was 0.38. This ratio showed negative correlation to the brain volume index. The volume percentage of PVH to the cranial cavity started to increase in the sixties and negatively correlated with the brain volume index. There was positive correlation between the ratio of the ventricles to sulci and the index of PVH. (author)

  4. Effect of structural modifications on the drying kinetics of foods: changes in volume, surface area and product shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio De Michelis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Macro and micro-structural changes take place during food dehydration. Macro-structural changes encompass modifications in shape, area and volume. Studies of such changes are important because dehydration kinetics (essential for calculating industrial dryers may be highly influenced by changes in food shape and dimensions. The overall changes in volume, surface area (“shrinkage” and shape (Heywood factor, with provides a close description of food shape were determined experimentally, and the results were correlated with simple expressions. Hence, although dehydration kinetics can be modeled with simplified overall shrinkage expressions, the possibility of selecting a suitable geometry and predicting the characteristics dimensions will provide higher accuracy. An additional unresolved problem is the lack of a general model that predicts macro-structural changes for various foods and diverse geometries. In this work, based on experimental data of sweet and sour cherries, and rose hip fruits, a simplified general model to predict changes in volume and surface area are proposed. To estimate how the changes in characteristic dimensions affect the kinetic studies, experimental drying curves for the three fruits by means of a diffusional model considered the following variants for the characteristic dimensions: (i The radius of the fresh food, assumed constant; (ii The radius of the partially dehydrated product; (iii The radius predicted by the correlation for structural changes, especially volume, obtained in this work and generalized for the three fruits, and (iv to demonstrate the need to study the macro-structural changes for all dehydrated foods, also be present the case of a restructured food.

  5. Influence of unstable footwear on lower leg muscle activity, volume change and subjective discomfort during prolonged standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Zanyar; Allahyari, Teimour; Azghani, Mahmood Reza; Khalkhali, Hamidreza

    2016-03-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effect of unstable footwear on lower leg muscle activity, volume change and subjective discomfort during prolonged standing. Ten healthy subjects were recruited to stand for 2 h in three footwear conditions: barefoot, flat-bottomed shoe and unstable shoe. During standing, lower leg discomfort and EMG activity of medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were continuously monitored. Changes in lower leg volume over standing time also were measured. Lower leg discomfort rating reduced significantly while subjects standing on unstable shoe compared to the flat-bottomed shoe and barefoot condition. For lower leg volume, less changes also were observed with unstable shoe. The activity level and variation of right MG muscle was greater with unstable shoe compared to the other footwear conditions; however regarding the left MG muscle, significant difference was found between unstable shoe and flat-bottomed shoe only for activity level. Furthermore no significant differences were observed for the activity level and variation of TA muscles (right/left) among all footwear conditions. The findings suggested that prolonged standing with unstable footwear produces changes in lower leg muscles activity and leads to less volume changes. Perceived discomfort also was lower for this type of footwear and this might mean that unstable footwear can be used as ergonomic solution for employees whose work requires prolonged standing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Metopic synostosis: Measuring intracranial volume change following fronto-orbital advancement using three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Steinmacher, Sahra; Bächli, Heidi; Somlo, Elek; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Engel, Michael

    2015-06-01

    There is still disagreement regarding the intracranial volumes of patients with metopic synostosis compared with healthy patients. This study aimed to compare the intracranial volume of children with metopic synostosis before and after surgery to an age- and sex-matched control cohort using three-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry. Eighteen boys with metopic synostosis were operated on using standardized fronto-orbital advancement. Frontal, posterior and total intracranial volumes were measured exactly 1 day pre-operatively and 10 days post-operatively, using 3D photogrammetry. To establish an age- and sex-matched control group, the 3D photogrammetric data of 634 healthy boys between the ages of 3 and 13 months were analyzed. Mean age at surgery was 9 months (SD 1.7). Prior to surgery, boys with metopic synostosis showed significantly reduced frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with the reference group, but similar posterior volumes. After surgery, frontal and total intracranial volumes did not differ statistically from the control group. As children with metopic synostosis showed significantly smaller frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with an age- and sex-matched control group, corrective surgery should aim to achieve volume expansion. Furthermore, 3D photogrammetry provides a valuable alternative to CT scans in the measurement of intracranial volume in children with metopic synostosis, which significantly reduces the amount of radiation exposure to the growing brain. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Changes in circulating blood volume after infusion of hydroxyethyl starch 6% in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Andersson, J; Rasmussen, S E

    2001-01-01

    The cardiovascular response to a volume challenge with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) (200/0.5) 6% depends on the relation between the volume of HES 6% infused and the expansion of the blood volume in critically ill patients. However, only relatively limited data exist on the plasma expanding effect...... of infusion of HES 6% in critically ill patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the variation in the expansion of the circulating blood volume (CBV) in critically ill patients after infusion of 500 ml of colloid (HES (200/0.5) 6%) using the carbon monoxide method....

  8. Groundwater resources in Brazil: a review of possible impacts caused by climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Hirata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater has a strategic role in times of climate change mainly because aquifers can provide water for long periods, even during very long and severe drought. The reduction and/or changes on the precipitation pattern can diminish the recharge mainly in unconfined aquifer, causing available groundwater restriction. The expected impact of long-term climate changes on the Brazilian aquifers for 2050 will lead to a severe reduction in 70% of recharge in the Northeast region aquifers (comparing to 2010 values, varying from 30% to 70% in the North region. Data referring to the South and Southeast regions are more favorable, with an increase in the relative recharge values from 30% to 100%. Another expected impact is the increase in demand and the decrease in the surface water availability that will make the population turn to aquifers as its main source of water for public or private uses in many regions of the country. Thus, an integrated use of surface and groundwater must therefore be considered in the water use planning. The solution of water scarcity is based on three factors: society growth awareness, better knowledge on the characteristics of hydraulic and chemical aquifers and effective management actions.Águas subterrâneas têm um papel estratégico em tempos de mudanças climáticas, principalmente porque os aquíferos podem fornecer água por longos períodos, mesmo durante a seca estiagem muito longa e severa. A redução e / ou alterações no padrão de precipitação pode diminuir a recarga principalmente no aquífero freático, causando restrição de águas subterrâneas disponíveis. O impacto esperado das alterações climáticas de longo prazo sobre os aquíferos brasileiros para 2050 vai levar a uma severa redução em 70% da recarga nos aquíferos da região Nordeste (comparando aos valores de 2010, variando de 30% a 70% na região Norte. Os dados referentes às regiões Sul e Sudeste são mais favoráveis, com um aumento

  9. Brain-volume changes in young and middle-aged smokers: a DARTEL-based voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Wang, Zhenchang; Jiang, Tao; Chu, Shuilian; Wang, Shuangkun; Xiao, Dan

    2017-09-01

    Many studies have reported brain volume changes in smokers. However, the volume differences of grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) in young and middle-aged male smokers with different lifetime tobacco consumption (pack-years) remain uncertain. To examine the brain volume change, especially whether more pack-years smoking would be associated with smaller gray matter and white matter volume in young and middle-aged male smokers. We used a 3T MR scanner and performed Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL)-based voxel-based morphometry on 53 long-term male smokers (30.72 ± 4.19 years) and 53 male healthy non-smokers (30.83 ± 5.18 years). We separated smokers to light and heavy smokers by pack-years and compared brain volume between different smoker groups and non-smokers. And then we did analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) between smokers and non-smokers by setting pack-years as covariates. Light and heavy smokers all displayed smaller GM and WM volume than non-smokers and more obviously in heavy smokers. The main smaller areas in light and heavy smokers were superior temporal gyrus, insula, middle occipital gyrus, posterior cingulate, precuneus in GM and posterior cingulate, thalamus and midbrain in WM, in addition, we also observed more pack-years smoking was associated with some certain smaller GM and WM volumes by ANCOVA. Young and middle-aged male smokers had many smaller brain areas than non-smokers. Some of these areas' volume had negative correlation with pack-years, while some had not. These may due to different pathophysiological role of smokings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of volume change on the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of Sphagnum moss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, V.; Whittington, P.

    2018-04-01

    Due to the non-vascular nature of Sphagnum mosses, the capitula (growing surface) of the moss must rely solely on capillary action to receive water from beneath. Moss subsides and swells in accordance with water table levels, an effect called "mire-breathing", which has been thought to be a self-preservation mechanism, although no systematic studies have been done to demonstrate exactly how volume change affects hydrophysical properties of moss. In this study, the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (Kunsat) and water content of two different species of Sphagnum moss were measured at different compression rates, up to the maximum of 77%. The findings show that the Kunsat increases by up to an order of magnitude (10×) with compression up to a certain bulk density of the moss, after which higher levels of compression result in lowered unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was coupled with an increase in soil water retention with increased compression. The increase of the Kunsat with compression suggests that the mire-breathing effect should be considered a self-preservation mechanism to provide sufficient amount of water to growing moss in times of low water availability.

  11. Investigating the pore-water chemistry effects on the volume change behaviour of Boom clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. F.; Cui, Y. J.; Tang, A. M.; Nguyen, X. P.; Li, X. L.; Van Geet, M.

    The Essen site has been chosen as an alternative site for nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. The soil formation involved at this site is the same as at Mol site: Boom clay. However, owing to its geographical situation closer to the sea, Boom clay at Essen presents a pore water salinity 4-5 times higher than Boom clay at Mol. This study aims at studying the effects of pore water salinity on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay. Specific oedometer cells were used allowing “flushing” the pore water in soil specimen by synthetic pore water or distilled water. The synthetic pore water used was prepared with the chemistry as that for the site water: 5.037 g/L for core Ess83 and 5.578 g/L for core Ess96. Mechanical loading was then carried out on the soil specimen after flushing. The results show that water salinity effect on the liquid limit is negligible. The saturation or pore water replacement under the in situ effective stress of 2.4 MPa does not induce significant volume change. For Ess83, hydro-mechanical behaviour was found to be slightly influenced by the water salinity; on the contrary, no obvious effect was identified on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Ess96. This can be attributed to the higher smectite content in Ess83 than in Ess96.

  12. Volume changes upon heating of aerosol particles from biomass burning using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Kouji [Meteorological Research Inst., Tsukuba (Japan). Atmospheric Environment and Applied Meteorology Research Dept.; Sedlacek, Arthur J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Climate Sciences; Kleinman, Lawrence [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Climate Sciences; Chand, Duli [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division; Hubbe, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division; Buseck, Peter R. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration and School of Molecular Sciences

    2017-09-26

    The responses of aerosol particles to heating are important for measurements of their chemical, physical, and optical properties, classification, and determination of origin. However, the thermal behavior of organic aerosol particles is largely unknown. We provide a method to analyze such thermal behavior through heating from room temperature to >600°C by using a heating holder within a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Here we describe in-situ shape and size changes and variations in the compositions of individual particles before and after heating. We use ambient samples from wildland and agricultural biomass fires in North America collected during the 2013 Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP). The results indicate that individual tar balls (TB; spherical organic material) from biomass burning retained, on average, up to 30% of their volume when heated to 600°C. Chemical analysis reveals that K and Na remain in the residues, whereas S and O were lost. In contrast to bulk sample measurements of carbonaceous particles using thermal/optical carbon analyzers, our single-particle results imply that many individual organic particles consist of multiple types of organic matter having different thermal stabilities. Beyond TBs, our results suggest that because of their thermal stability some organic particles may not be detectable by using aerosol mass spectrometry or thermal/optical carbon analyzers. This result can lead to an underestimate of the abundance of TBs and other organic particles, and therefore biomass burning may have more influence than currently recognized in regional and global climate models.

  13. Investigations into the free-volume changes within starch/plasticizer/nanoclay systems using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huihua, E-mail: h.liu@federation.edu.au [School of Health Sciences, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Vic (Australia); Chaudhary, Deeptangshu, E-mail: deepc@ers.com.au [ERS Environmental Risk Solutions PTY LTD, Perth, WA (Australia); Campbell, Colin, E-mail: colin.campbell@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Antimatter-Matter Studies (CAMS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Roberts, Jason, E-mail: jxr107@physics.anu.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Antimatter-Matter Studies (CAMS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Buckman, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.buckman@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Antimatter-Matter Studies (CAMS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Sullivan, James, E-mail: james.sullivan@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Antimatter-Matter Studies (CAMS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2014-11-14

    The free-volume of a matrix is a fundamental parameter that relates to its molecular and bulk characteristics, such as crystalline change and glass transition behavior. In starch-based bionanocomposite, we investigated the effect of the addition of montmorillonite nanoclay (MMT) and food plasticizers (glycerol and sorbitol) on changes of molecular pore size (including pore volume and pore distribution) using the Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) method. The results demonstrated counter-intuitive impact of MMT on the total free-volume where the total free-volume increased within the polymeric matrix. When compared to the pure matrix free-volume, the addition of MMT also resulted in the appearance of a broader distribution of the void sizes. The plasticizers, on the other hand, apparently occupied the void spaces, and therefore decreased the free-volume of the matrix. Further, together with the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis, we concluded that this is a result of interplay between the plasticizer-plasticizer interactions and the polymer–plasticizer interactions. For example, in the starch/glycerol/MMT system, the pore radii slightly decrease upon the increasing of glycerol amount (OG210 = O.27 nm and OG220 = 0.26 nm), but the relative weight did increase with the increasing glycerol concentration. However, increasing the sorbitol amount increased the pore size from 0.23 nm(OS210) to 0.28 nm(OS220). Furthermore, the addition MMT in the OS010 system, promote the emergence of a new dateable pore radius(0.90 nm), and the total weight significantly increased from 13.70 (OS010) to 19.5% (OS210). We suggest that the pore variation (size and distribution) due to the MMT and plasticizers are reflected in the polymer glass transition and crystallinity because ultimately, the, total free-volume is a reflection of level of interactions existing within the bulk of these nanocomposites. - Highlights: • PALS is applied to explore the

  14. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and volume estimates of the Tasmantid Seamounts: Support for a change in the motion of the Australian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossingham, Tracey J.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Cunningham, Toby; Knesel, Kurt M.

    2017-09-01

    New volume estimates and 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Tasmantid Seamounts are reported to investigate the origin of volcanism and potential links between volcanism and changes in the speed and direction of migration of the Australian plate during the Cenozoic. The results show that the average extrusive volume of individual volcanoes along the seamount chain is 2587 ± 3078 km3 (1 s), and that volumes generally increase towards the south. An exception, the Britannia Guyot, located in the middle of the seamount chain, is the most voluminous (11,374 km3). Nineteen new 40Ar/39Ar ages, from Wreck to Gascoyne, show that the emplacement of the Tasmantid Seamounts occurred between 33.2 ± 1.5 and 6.5 ± 0.6 Ma. A single linear regression applied to the age versus latitude data, assuming volcanism to be caused by plate migration over a stationary hotspot, reveals a plate migration rate of 62 ± 2 kmMa- 1 (R2 = 0.97; n = 27) between 33 and 6 Ma. However, the bend in the seamount track, corresponding with the period of largest eruptive volumes, suggests three distinct segments in the Tasmantid age versus latitude data. The northern segment is consistent with a plate migration rate of 75 ± 10 kmMa- 1 (R2 = 0.88; n = 10) and the southern segment reveals a plate migration rate of 64 ± 4 kmMa- 1 (R2 = 0.94; n = 17). The period between these two segments, from 25 to 19 Ma, overlaps with the period of slow migration and change in the direction of the Australian plate derived from the age versus latitude distribution of continental central volcanoes. The new Tasmantid Seamount results support the interpretation that there were changes in the velocity and direction to Australia's northward trajectory, possibly resulting from a series of collisional events.

  15. Free volume changes in mechanically milled PS and PC studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther-Schade, K.; Castricum, H.L.; Ziegler, H.J.; Bakker, H.; Faupel, F.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of mechanical milling on free volume was studied by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) in polystyrene (PS) as a typical brittle polymer and in polycarbonate (PC) as a tough representative. Long-time milling increases the free volume, while a decrease is observed

  16. Postprandial hepatic volume change: spiral CT evaluation in case of liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Kwang Suk; Moon, Jang Il; Ko, Myong Kwan; Byun, Joo Nam; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Young Chol; Oh, Jae Hee

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of evaluating liver cirrhosis through the measurement of liver volume. In a control group(20 normal subjects) and 20 cirrhotic patients, variations in liver volume before and after a meal were obtained. A case-control study was conducted between the two groups. In the control group, the range of increased liver volume after the meal was 67-186ml. Mean increased liver volume was 119.3ml, the range of percentage increase was 6-12.4% and the mean percentage increase was 9.89%. In cirrhotic patients, the range of increased liver volume after the meal was 1-20ml. Mean increase liver volume was 6.9ml, the range of percentage increase was 0-1.9% and the mean percentage increase was 0.65%. Compared with the control group, cirrhotic patients showed a much smaller increase in liver volume(p<0.01). Difference in variation of liver volume between a control group and cirrhotic patients before and after a meal can be used for the evaluation of liver cirrhosis

  17. Numerical investigation on critical heat flux and coolant volume required for transpiration cooling with phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Fei; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Five states during the transpiration cooling are discussed. • A suit of applicable program is developed. • The variations of the thickness of two-phase region and the pressure are analyzed. • The relationship between heat flux and coolant mass flow rate is presented. • An approach is given to define the desired case of transpiration cooling. - Abstract: The mechanism of transpiration cooling with liquid phase change is numerically investigated to protect the thermal structure exposed to extremely high heat flux. According to the results of theoretical analysis, there is a lower critical and an upper critical external heat flux corresponding a certain coolant mass flow rate, between the two critical values, the phase change of liquid coolant occurs within porous structure. A strongly applicable self-edit program is developed to solve the states of fluid flow and heat transfer probably occurring during the phase change procedure. The distributions of temperature and saturation in these states are presented. The variations of the thickness of two-phase region and the pressure including capillary are analyzed, and capillary pressure is found to be the main factor causing pressure change. From the relationships between the external heat flux and coolant mass flow rate obtained at different cooling cases, an approach is given to estimate the maximal heat flux afforded and the minimal coolant consumption required by the desired case of transpiration cooling. Thus the pressure and coolant consumption required in a certain thermal circumstance can be determined, which are important in the practical application of transpiration cooling

  18. Has Anthropogenic Forcing Caused a Discernible Change in Atlantic Hurricane Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, T. R.; Vecchi, G. A.

    2007-12-01

    the time series and ends with the recent high activity, perhaps exaggerating the significance of the trend. The trend beginning from 1878 is weakly positive, and not statistically significant with p=0.3. The uncertainty in the late 1800s is larger than that during the 1900s--an important caveat on the results using the earlier start date. Tropical cyclone occurrence rates appear to have decreased in the western part of the basin (consistent with declining U.S. landfalling hurricane counts) but may have increased slightly in the central and eastern basin, suggesting a structural change such as shifts in storm tracks. Important assumptions of our methodology, such as that all landfalling storms since 1878 were detected and reported, require further investigation. In an attempt to reconcile the past observations with models, we have developed a regional modeling framework for downscaling Atlantic hurricane activity. Given observed large-scale atmospheric conditions and SSTs from reanalyses, the model reproduces several aspects of past Atlantic hurricane behavior (1980-2006). However, much further work is needed to produce simulations where hurricane activity changes can be confidently attributed, using such models, to various anthropogenic forcings or natural processes. Based on available evidence, we cannot yet conclude with high confidence that anthropogenic forcing has caused a discernible anthropogenic influence on hurricane activity to date.

  19. Decomposition and N cycling changes in redwood forests caused by sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Cobb; David M. Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum is an emergent pathogen in redwood forests which causes the disease sudden oak death. Although the disease does not kill coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), extensive and rapid mortality of tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) has removed this...

  20. Changes in causes of death among persons with AIDS: San Francisco, California, 1996-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Sandra K; Vu, Annie; Hsu, Ling Chin; Hessol, Nancy A

    2014-10-01

    The increased life expectancy among HIV-infected persons treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), risk behaviors, and co-morbidities associated with ART place HIV-infected persons at risk for non-HIV-related causes of death. We used the San Francisco HIV/AIDS registry to identify deaths that occurred from January 1996 through December 2011. Temporal trends in AIDS- and non-AIDS-related mortality rates, the proportion of underlying and contributory causes of death, and the ratio of observed deaths in the study population to expected number of deaths among California men aged 20-79 (standardized mortality ratio [SMR]) of underlying causes of death were examined. A total of 5338 deaths were identified. The annual AIDS-related death rate (per 100 deaths) declined from 10.8 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (pdeath rate from non-AIDS-related causes declined from 2.1 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (pdeaths due to all types of heart disease combined, all non-AIDS cancers combined, mental disorders resulting from substance abuse, drug overdose, suicide and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased significantly over time. The SMRs for liver diseased decreased significantly over time but remained elevated. Our data highlight the importance of age-related causes of death as well as deaths from causes that are, at least in part, preventable.

  1. Longitudinal volume changes of the pituitary gland in patients with schizotypal disorder and first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Zhou, Shi-Yu; Nakamura, Kazue; Tanino, Ryoichiro; Furuichi, Atsushi; Kido, Mikio; Kawasaki, Yasuhiro; Noguchi, Kyo; Seto, Hikaru; Kurachi, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Michio

    2011-01-15

    An enlarged volume of the pituitary gland has been reported in the schizophrenia spectrum, possibly reflecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity. However, it remains largely unknown whether the pituitary size longitudinally changes in the course of the spectrum disorders. In the present study, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were obtained from 18 patients with first-episode schizophrenia, 13 patients with schizotypal disorder, and 20 healthy controls. The pituitary volume was measured at baseline and follow-up (mean, 2.7 years) scans and was compared across groups. The pituitary volume was larger in the schizophrenia patients than controls at baseline, and both patient groups had significantly larger pituitary volume than controls at follow-up. In a longitudinal comparison, both schizophrenia (3.6%/year) and schizotypal (2.7%/year) patients showed significant pituitary enlargement compared with controls (-1.8%/year). In the schizophrenia patients, greater pituitary enlargement over time was associated with less improvement of delusions and higher scores for thought disorders at the follow-up. These findings suggest that the pituitary gland exhibits ongoing volume changes during the early course of the schizophrenia spectrum as a possible marker of state-related impairments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early changes of parotid density and volume predict modifications at the end of therapy and intensity of acute xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Broggi, Sara; Scalco, Elisa; Rizzo, Giovanna; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Fiorino, Claudio; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Dinapoli, Nicola; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ricchetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the predictive power of early variations of parotid gland volume and density on final changes at the end of therapy and, possibly, on acute xerostomia during IMRT for head-neck cancer. Data of 92 parotids (46 patients) were available. Kinetics of the changes during treatment were described by the daily rate of density (rΔρ) and volume (rΔvol) variation based on weekly diagnostic kVCT images. Correlation between early and final changes was investigated as well as the correlation with prospective toxicity data (CTCAEv3.0) collected weekly during treatment for 24/46 patients. A higher rΔρ was observed during the first compared to last week of treatment (-0,50 vs -0,05HU, p-value = 0.0001). Based on early variations, a good estimation of the final changes may be obtained (Δρ: AUC = 0.82, p = 0.0001; Δvol: AUC = 0.77, p = 0.0001). Both early rΔρ and rΔvol predict a higher ''mean'' acute xerostomia score (≥ median value, 1.57; p-value = 0.01). Median early density rate changes for patients with mean xerostomia score ≥ / 3 /day for rΔρ and rΔvol respectively. Further studies are necessary to definitively assess the potential of early density/volume changes in identifying more sensitive patients at higher risk of experiencing xerostomia. (orig.) [de

  3. Change of mean platelet volume values in asthmatic children as an inflammatory marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, T; Uysal, P; Hocaoglu, A B; Erge, D O; Karaman, O; Uzuner, N

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood in industrialised countries. T helper-2 (Th-2) cells, mast cells and eosinophils have a role in inflammation of asthma. Recently it was shown that platelets also play a role in asthma. Mean platelet volume shows platelet size and reflects platelet activation. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate levels of mean platelet volume in asthmatic patients during asymptomatic periods and exacerbations compared with healthy controls. The study consisted of 100 asthmatic patients (male/female: 55/45, mean age: 8.2±3.3) and 49 age and sex matched healthy children as a control group. Mean platelet volume values of asthmatic patients during asymptomatic period were 7.7±0.8fL while mean platelet volume values in asthmatics during exacerbation were 7.8±0.9fL. Comparison of mean platelet volume values of asthmatic patients and healthy controls both in acute asthmatic attack and asymptomatic period showed no difference (p>0.05). Comparison of mean platelet volume values at asthmatic attack and asymptomatic period also had no difference (p>0.05). The presence of atopy, infection, eosinophilia, elevated immunoglobulin E, and severity of acute asthmatic attack did not influence mean platelet volume values. The results of our study suggest that mean platelet volume values may not be used as a marker in bronchial asthma, although prospective studies with larger number of patients are needed to evaluate the role of mean platelet volume in asthma. Copyright © 2011 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermal Volume Changes and Creep in the Callovo-Oxfordian Claystone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmokhtar, Malik; Delage, Pierre; Ghabezloo, Siavash; Conil, Nathalie

    2017-09-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) claystone is considered as a potential host rock for high-level radioactive waste disposal at great depth in France. Given the exothermic nature of radioactive wastes, a temperature elevation planned to be smaller than 100 °C will affect the host rock around the disposal cells. To gain better understanding of the thermal volumetric response of the COx claystone, a new thermal isotropic compression cell was developed with particular attention devoted to monitoring axial and radial strains. To do so, a high-precision LVDTs system ensuring direct contact between the LVDT stem and the claystone sample through the membrane was developed. A short drainage length (10 mm) was also ensured so as to allow full saturation of the sample under stress conditions close to in situ, and fully drained conditions during compression. High-precision strain monitoring allowed to observe a volumetric creep under stress conditions close to in situ. A drained heating test under constant stress carried out afterwards up to 80 °C exhibited a thermoelastic expansion up to a temperature of 48 °C, followed by thermoplastic contraction at higher temperature. Creep volume changes, that appeared to be enhanced by temperature, were modelled by using a simple Kelvin-Voigt model, so as to estimate the instantaneous response of the COx claystone and to determine its thermal expansion coefficient. The temperature at which the transition between thermal expansion and contraction appeared is close to the maximum burial temperature of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, estimated at 50 °C. This is in agreement with what has been already observed on the Opalinus Clay by Monfared et al. (2012) that was interpreted as a thermal hardening phenomenon, showing that the material kept the memory of the highest temperature supported during its geological history.

  5. Assessment of bronchodilator response through changes in lung volumes in chronic airflow obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Figueroa-Casas

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Although FEV1 improvement is routinely used to define bronchodilator (BD response, it correlates poorly with clinical effects. Changes in lung volumes (LV have shown better correlation with exercise tolerance and might be more sensitive to detect BD effects. We assessed the additional contribution of measuring LV before and after BD to detect acute improvement in lung function not demonstrated by FEV1, and the influence of the response criteria selected on this contribution. We analyzed 98 spirometries and plethismographies performed pre and post BD in patients with airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC 10% of baseline (D>5 anD>15% were also analyzed. FEV1 identified as responders 32% of patients. Greater proportions were uncovered by slow vital capacity (51%, p5 anD>15%. Mean change and proportions of responders for each LV varied significantly (pSi bien el aumento del VEF1 es habitualmente utilizado para definir respuesta a broncodilatadores (BD, su correlación con efectos clínicos es pobre. Los cambios en volúmenes pulmonares (VP han demostrado mejor correlación con tolerancia al ejercicio y podrían ser más sensibles para detectar efectos de los BD. Nosotros evaluamos la contribución adicional de medir VP antes y después de BD para detectar mejoría funcional aguda no demostrada por cambios del VEF1, y la influencia del criterio de respuesta seleccionado en esta contribución. Se analizaron 98 espirometrías y pletismografías realizadas pre y post BD en pacientes con obstrucción al flujo aéreo (VEF1/CVF 10% del basal (D>5 y 15% fueron también analizados. El VEF1 identificó como respondedores a 32% de los pacientes. Proporciones mayores fueron identificadas por capacidad vital lenta (51%, p5 y 15%. El cambio promedio y las proporciones de respondedores para cada VP variaron significativamente (p<0.05 según que el cambio fuese expresado como porcentaje del basal o del valor predicho. Una proporción considerable de pacientes con obstrucci

  6. Modeling forest mortality caused by drought stress: implications for climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J Gustafson; Brian R. Sturtevant

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect forest landscape dynamics in many ways, but it is possible that the most important direct impact of climate change will be drought stress. We combined data from weather stations and forest inventory plots (FIA) across the upper Great Lakes region (USA) to study the relationship between measures of drought stress and mortality for...

  7. Variations in gastric emptying of liquid elicited by acute blood volume changes in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondim F. de-A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We have observed that acute blood volume expansion increases the gastroduodenal resistance to the flow of liquid in anesthetized dogs, while retraction decreases it (Santos et al. (1991 Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, 143: 261-269. This study evaluates the effect of blood volume expansion and retraction on the gastric emptying of liquid in awake rats using a modification of the technique of Scarpignato (1980 (Archives Internationales de Pharmacodynamie et de Therapie, 246: 286-294. Male Wistar rats (180-200 g were fasted for 16 h with water ad libitum and 1.5 ml of the test meal (0.5 mg/ml phenol red solution in 5% glucose was delivered to the stomach immediately after random submission to one of the following protocols: 1 normovolemic control (N = 22, 2 expansion (N = 72 by intravenous infusion (1 ml/min of Ringer-bicarbonate solution, volumes of 1, 2, 3 or 5% body weight, or 3 retraction (N = 22 by controlled bleeding (1.5 ml/100 g. Gastric emptying of liquid was inhibited by 19-51.2% (P<0.05 after blood volume expansion (volumes of 1, 2, 3 or 5% body weight. Blood volume expansion produced a sustained increase in central venous pressure while mean arterial pressure was transiently increased during expansion (P<0.05. Blood volume retraction increased gastric emptying by 28.5-49.9% (P<0.05 and decreased central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05. Infusion of the shed blood 10 min after bleeding reversed the effect of retraction on gastric emptying. These findings suggest that gastric emptying of liquid is subject to modulation by the blood volume.

  8. Areal changes of lentic water bodies within an agricultural basin of the Argentinean pampas. Disentangling land management from climatic causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booman, Gisel Carolina; Calandroni, Mirta; Laterra, Pedro; Cabria, Fabián; Iribarne, Oscar; Vázquez, Pablo

    2012-12-01

    Wetland loss is a frequent concern for the environmental management of rural landscapes, but poor disentanglement between climatic and land management causes frequently constrains both proper diagnoses and planning. The aim of this study is to address areal changes induced by non-climatic factors on lentic water bodies (LWB) within an agricultural basin of the Argentinean Pampas, and the human activities that might be involved. The LWB of the Mar Chiquita basin (Buenos Aires province, Argentina) were mapped using Landsat images from 1998-2008 and then corrected for precipitation variability by considering the regional hydrological status on each date. LWB areal changes were statistically and spatially analyzed in relation to land use changes, channelization of streams, and drainage of small SWB in the catchment areas. We found that 12 % of the total LWB in the basin had changed (P climatic causes. During the evaluated decade, 30 % of the LWB that changed size had decreased while 70 % showed steady increases in area. The number of altered LWB within watersheds lineally increased or decreased according to the proportion of grasslands replaced by sown pastures, or the proportion of sown pastures replaced by crop fields, respectively. Drainage and channelization do not appear to be related to the alteration of LWB; however some of these hydrologic modifications may predate 1998, and thus earlier effects cannot be discarded. This study shows that large-scale changes in land cover (e.g., grasslands reduction) can cause a noticeable loss of hydrologic regulation at the catchment scale within a decade.

  9. Age dependent white matter lesions and brain volume changes in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    The brain of 142 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 80 years were investigated using MR imaging. The number and size of the white matter hyperintensity lesions (WMHL) in the cerebral hemispheres were determined. Furthermore, the volume of the cerebral hemispheres and of the lateral ventricles was meas......The brain of 142 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 80 years were investigated using MR imaging. The number and size of the white matter hyperintensity lesions (WMHL) in the cerebral hemispheres were determined. Furthermore, the volume of the cerebral hemispheres and of the lateral ventricles...... was measured. An almost linear increase in the number of volunteers with WMHL was seen with aging for males and females. With aging a significant decrease in the volume of the cerebral hemispheres was found for males, and a significant increase in the volume of the lateral ventricles was seen for both males...... and females. Our results suggest that with aging central atrophy increases more (relatively) than cortical atrophy. No correlation was found between the decreasing volume of the cerebral hemispheres and the increasing number and size of WMHL, nor between the increasing volume of the lateral ventricles...

  10. Changing Fortunes: How China’s Boom Caused the Financial Crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Mees (Heleen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation includes five academic papers that – one way or the other – all relate to China. The first paper delivers proof for the central thesis of this thesis, which is that China’s boom caused the 2008 financial crisis and ensuing recession. As much as I hoped from the outset

  11. Changes in nectar supply: A possible cause of widespread butterfly decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallis de Vries, M.F.; Swaay, van C.A.M.; Plate, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have documented declining trends of various groups of flower-visiting insects, even common butterfly species. Causes of these declines are still unclear but the loss of habitat quality across the wider countryside is thought to be a major factor. Nectar supply constitutes one of the

  12. Changes in the timing of spawning of Baltic cod : possible causes and implications for recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Jarre, Astrid; Horbowa, K.

    2000-01-01

    caused progressively delayed spawning since the early 1990s. Late spawning involves several processes that are detrimental to the survival of the early lire stages. Recruitment in the mid-1990s was below what could be expected from spawning stock biomass and favourable hydrographic conditions...

  13. Hydrostatic Pressure Does Not Cause Detectable Changes in Survival of Human Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Andrew; Aldarwesh, Amal; Rhodes, Jeremy D.; Broadway, David C.; Everitt, Claire; Sanderson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP). The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in the human retina was investigated. Methods A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating). Accurate pressure control (10-100mmHg) was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) from donor eyes (pressure for 24 or 48h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1) or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) for 15, 30, 60 and 90min durations, whereas OGD (3h) increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90min post-OGD. Conclusions Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina. PMID:25635827

  14. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onukwufor, John O.; Kibenge, Fred; Stevens, Don; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q 10 values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and intensifying

  15. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onukwufor, John O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q{sub 10} values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and

  16. Radionuclide-determined changes in pulmonary blood volume and thallium lung uptake in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.A.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Exercise-induced increases in radionuclide-determined pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and thallium lung uptake have been described in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and have been shown to correlate with transient exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction. To compare these 2 techniques in the same patients, 74 patients (59 with and 15 without significant CAD) underwent supine bicycle exercise twice on the same day--first for thallium myocardial and lung imaging and then for technetium-99m gated blood pool imaging for the PBV ratio determination. Thallium activity of lung and myocardium was determined to calculate thallium lung/heart ratio. Relative changes in PBV from rest to exercise were expressed as a ratio of pulmonary counts (exercise/rest). Previously reported normal ranges for thallium lung/heart ratio and PBV ratio were used. The PBV ratio and thallium lung/heart ratio were abnormal in 71 and 36%, respectively, of patients with CAD (p less than 0.01). Both ratios were normal in all patients without CAD. Although the resting ejection fractions did not differ significantly in patients with normal versus those with abnormal PBV ratios or thallium lung/heart ratios, abnormal PBV ratios and thallium lung/heart ratios were associated with an exercise-induced decrease in ejection fraction. Propranolol use was significantly higher in patients with abnormal than in those with normal thallium lung/heart ratios (p less than 0.01). No significant difference in propranolol use was present in patients with abnormal or normal PBV ratios. In conclusion: (1) the prevalence of an abnormal thallium lung/heart ratio is less than that of the PBV ratio in patients with CAD; (2) both tests are normal in normal control subjects; (3) propranolol does not cause abnormal results in normal control subjects; however, propranolol may influence lung thallium uptake in patients with CAD; and (4) when both tests are abnormal, there is a high likelihood of multivessel disease

  17. Causes and impacts of changes in the stratospheric meridional circulation in a chemistry-climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Hella

    2011-05-13

    The stratospheric meridional circulation is projected to be subject to changes due to enhanced greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere. This study aims to diagnose and explain long-term changes in the stratospheric meridional circulation using the chemistry-climate model E39CA. The diagnosed strengthening of the circulation is found to be driven by increases in tropical sea surface temperatures which lead to a strengthening and upward shift of the subtropical jets. This enables enhanced vertical propagation of large scale waves into the lower stratosphere, and therefore stronger local wave forcing of the meridional circulation in the tropical lower stratosphere. The impact of changes in transport on the ozone layer is analysed using a newly developed method that allows the separation of the effects of transport and chemistry changes on ozone. It is found that future changes of mean stratospheric ozone concentrations are largely determined by changes in chemistry, while changes in transport of ozone play a minor role. (orig.)

  18. Cancer as the cause of changes in work situation (a NOCWO study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbohm, M-L; Kuosma, E; Taskila, T; Hietanen, P; Carlsen, K; Gudbergsson, S; Gunnarsdottir, H

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the frequency of changes in work situation due to cancer and to analyze the association of physically demanding work, social support from supervisors, colleagues or occupational health services, and disease-related factors, with changing employers due to cancer. Working-aged patients with breast, testicular or prostate cancer, or lymphoma with a good prognosis between 1997 and 2002 were identified from a hospital or cancer registry in four Nordic countries. The registers provided data on the disease-related factors. Information on changes in work situation, received support, and other work-related factors was collected using a questionnaire (response rate 72%). The frequency of changes in work situation was evaluated among a total of 2030 survivors. Further analyses were carried out among 688 survivors using a multivariable logistic regression model, to investigate factors affecting the risk of changing employers due to cancer. Altogether, 5-10% of cancer survivors had changed employers, occupations or work tasks, 5% had been unemployed, and 9% had retired due to cancer. The physical demands of previous work were the most important reason behind changing employers after cancer. Among women, weak support from supervisors and occupational health personnel increased the risk of changing employers because of cancer. A minority of cancer survivors changed employers, occupations, or work tasks because of cancer. Supervisors' support in the form of lightening physically demanding jobs and taking illness into consideration when planning work tasks, and health-care workers' advice on coping at work may help survivors to maintain their jobs. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Climate change: evidence of human causes and arguments for emissions reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Seth D; Haqq-Misra, Jacob D; Karmosky, Chris

    2012-06-01

    In a recent editorial, Raymond Spier expresses skepticism over claims that climate change is driven by human actions and that humanity should act to avoid climate change. This paper responds to this skepticism as part of a broader review of the science and ethics of climate change. While much remains uncertain about the climate, research indicates that observed temperature increases are human-driven. Although opinions vary regarding what should be done, prominent arguments against action are based on dubious factual and ethical positions. Thus, the skepticisms in the recent editorial are unwarranted. This does not diminish the general merits of skeptical intellectual inquiry.

  20. The character and causes of flash flood occurrence changes in mountainous small basins of Southern California under projected climatic change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Modrick

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Study region: Small watersheds (O[25 km2] in the mountain regions of southern California comprise the study region. Study focus: This paper examines changes in flash flood occurrence in southern California resulting from projected climatic change. The methodology synthesizes elements of meteorological modeling, hydrology and geomorphology into an integrated modeling approach to define flash flood occurrence in a systematic and consistent way on a regional basis with high spatial and temporal resolution appropriate for flash flooding. A single climate model with three-dimensional atmospheric detail was used as input to drive simulations for historical and future periods. New hydrological insights for the region: Results indicate an increase in flash flood occurrence for the study region. For two distributed hydrologic models employed, the increase in flash flood occurrence frequency is on average between 30% and 40%. Regional flash flood occurrence is characterized by near saturation of the upper soil layer, and wider ranges in lower soil layer saturation and in precipitation. Overall, a decrease in the total number of precipitation events was found, although with increased precipitation intensity, increased event duration, and higher soil saturation conditions for the 21st century. This combination could signify more hazardous conditions, with fewer precipitation events but higher rainfall intensity and over soils with higher initial soil moisture saturation, leading to more frequent occurrence of flash floods. Keywords: Flash flooding, Climate change, Soil moisture, Precipitation, Distributed hydrologic modeling

  1. Wildlife conservation and animal temperament: causes and consequences of evolutionary change for captive, reintroduced, and wild populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDougall, P.T.; Réale, D.; Sol, D.; Reader, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    We argue that animal temperament is an important concept for wildlife conservation science and review causes and consequences of evolutionary changes in temperament traits that may occur in captive-breeding programmes. An evolutionary perspective is valid because temperament traits are heritable,

  2. Linking sediment-charcoal records and ecological modeling to understand causes of fire-regime change in boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda B. Brubaker; Philip E. Higuera; T. Scott Rupp; Mark A. Olson; Patricia M. Anderson; Feng Sheng. Hu

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between vegetation and fire have the potential to overshadow direct effects of climate change on fire regimes in boreal forests of North America. We develop methods to compare sediment-charcoal records with fire regimes simulated by an ecological model, ALFRESCO (Alaskan Frame-based Ecosystem Code) and apply these methods to evaluate potential causes of a...

  3. TU-G-BRA-05: Predicting Volume Change of the Tumor and Critical Structures Throughout Radiation Therapy by CT-CBCT Registration with Local Intensity Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Robinson, A; Kiess, A; Quon, H; Wong, J; Lee, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Plishker, W [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, R [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an accurate and effective technique to predict and monitor volume changes of the tumor and organs at risk (OARs) from daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Methods: While CBCT is typically used to minimize the patient setup error, its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of daily anatomical changes in radiotherapy. Reconstruction artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors in registration-based contour propagation from the planning CT, a conventional way to estimate anatomical changes. To improve the registration and segmentation accuracy, we developed a new deformable image registration (DIR) that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities using slice-based histogram matching during the registration process. Three popular DIR algorithms (hierarchical B-spline, demons, optical flow) augmented by the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation, and their performances were evaluated on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Four trained scientists manually contoured nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs for each case, to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial software, VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). Results: Manual contouring showed significant variations, [-76, +141]% from the mean of all four sets of contours. The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average manual segmentation and four automatic segmentations are 3.70±2.30(B-spline), 1.25±1.78(demons), 0.93±1.14(optical flow), and 4.39±3.86 (VelocityAI). In comparison to the average volume of the manual segmentations, the proposed approach significantly reduced the estimation error by 9%(B-spline), 38%(demons), and 51%(optical flow) over the conventional mutual information based method (VelocityAI). Conclusion: The proposed CT-CBCT registration with local CBCT intensity correction

  4. Rapid climate change did not cause population collapse at the end of the European Bronze Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armit, Ian; Swindles, Graeme T; Becker, Katharina; Plunkett, Gill; Blaauw, Maarten

    2014-12-02

    The impact of rapid climate change on contemporary human populations is of global concern. To contextualize our understanding of human responses to rapid climate change it is necessary to examine the archeological record during past climate transitions. One episode of abrupt climate change has been correlated with societal collapse at the end of the northwestern European Bronze Age. We apply new methods to interrogate archeological and paleoclimate data for this transition in Ireland at a higher level of precision than has previously been possible. We analyze archeological (14)C dates to demonstrate dramatic population collapse and present high-precision proxy climate data, analyzed through Bayesian methods, to provide evidence for a rapid climatic transition at ca. 750 calibrated years B.C. Our results demonstrate that this climatic downturn did not initiate population collapse and highlight the nondeterministic nature of human responses to past climate change.

  5. Advanced Behavioral Analyses Show that the Presence of Food Causes Subtle Changes in C. elegans Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Angstman, Nicholas B.; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    As a widely used and studied model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans worms offer the ability to investigate implications of behavioral change. Although, investigation of C. elegans behavioral traits has been shown, analysis is often narrowed down to measurements based off a single point, and thus cannot pick up on subtle behavioral and morphological changes. In the present study videos were captured of four different C. elegans strains grown in liquid cultures and transferred to NGM-agar plate...

  6. Climate Change and Its Causes, A Discussion About Some Key Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the limits of the Anthropogenic Global Warming Theory advocated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. A phenomenological theory of climate change based on the physical properties of the data themselves is proposed. At least 60% of the warming of the Earth observed since 1970 appears to be induced by natural cycles which are present in the solar system. A climatic stabilization or cooling until 2030-2040 is forecast by the phenomenological model.

  7. Changes in flavonoid content of grapefruit juice caused by thermal treatment and storage

    OpenAIRE

    Igual Ramo, Marta; García Martínez, Eva María; Camacho Vidal, Mª Mar; Martínez Navarrete, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    The effect of conventional and microwave pasteurization on the main flavonoids present in grapefruit juice and their stability throughout 2 months of refrigerated and frozen storage was evaluated. Individual flavonoids were analyzed by HPLC. The results showed that naringin, narirutin, quercetin and naringenin were the most abundant flavonoids in grapefruit juice. In general, although every pasteurization treatment caused a significant reduction in the content of all the studied flavonoids, t...

  8. Dynamics in Protected Areas and Domesticated Landscapes Caused by Climate Change and Anthropogenic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartter, J.; Ryan, S.; Stampone, M.; Chapman, C.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change, a key factor of concern for conservation, has important biological and social implications. Africa’s Albertine Rift is an area of extremely high endemic biodiversity and is classed as a world conservation priority. However, natural areas are represented by a chain of protected forest areas in a matrix of intensive smallholder agriculture and dense human settlements. Kibale National Park in western Uganda has become an island of forest surrounded by intensive small-scale agriculture and is the only remaining large area of mid-altitude forest remaining in Albertine Rift Region and East Africa. Increased temperature and precipitation over recent decades has been observed by scientists and local farmers, however, to date, rigorous analysis of local climate data and the impact of climate change on local resources does not exist. Moreover, local farmers report that some crops die or ripen too early because of increased precipitation. Conservation biologists and park managers are concerned that changes in tree phenology and primary productivity will alter wildlife feeding preferences and ranges leading to more human-wildlife conflict. Understanding the impact of local and regional climate change and variation within the social, conservation, and geographic context is necessary to construct informed management plans and to maintain positive park-people relationships. This paper describes our first attempt to fully integrate multiple temporal and spatial datasets, and our progress in developing an interdisciplinary framework to study social and ecological relationships in the Kibale landscape. We examine historical in situ climate data and proxy climate information derived from remotely sensed satellite-borne imagery in our preliminary analyses. Our goal is to link these data with both pre-existing imagery analyses and tree community composition and phenology data from 39 years of ongoing research to identify the pattern, trajectory, and drivers of local

  9. Estimating changes in lichen mat volume through time and related effects on barren ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickbeil, Gregory J M; Hermosilla, Txomin; Coops, Nicholas C; White, Joanne C; Wulder, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Lichens form a critical portion of barren ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) diets, especially during winter months. Here, we assess lichen mat volume across five herd ranges in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, Canada, using newly developed composite Landsat imagery. The lichen volume estimator (LVE) was adapted for use across 700 000 km2 of barren ground caribou habitat annually from 1984-2012. We subsequently assessed how LVE changed temporally throughout the time series for each pixel using Theil-Sen's slopes, and spatially by assessing whether slope values were centered in local clusters of similar values. Additionally, we assessed how LVE estimates resulted in changes in barren ground caribou movement rates using an extensive telemetry data set from 2006-2011. The Ahiak/Beverly herd had the largest overall increase in LVE (median = 0.033), while the more western herds had the least (median slopes below zero in all cases). LVE slope pixels were arranged in significant clusters across the study area, with the Cape Bathurst, Bathurst, and Bluenose East herds having the most significant clusters of negative slopes (more than 20% of vegetated land in each case). The Ahiak/Beverly and Bluenose West had the most significant positive clusters (16.3% and 18.5% of vegetated land respectively). Barren ground caribou displayed complex reactions to changing lichen conditions depending on season; the majority of detected associations with movement data agreed with current understanding of barren ground caribou foraging behavior (the exception was an increase in movement velocity at high lichen volume estimates in Fall). The temporal assessment of LVE identified areas where shifts in ecological conditions may have resulted in changing lichen mat conditions, while assessing the slope estimates for clustering identified zones beyond the pixel scale where forage conditions may be changing. Lichen volume estimates associated with barren ground caribou

  10. Estimating changes in lichen mat volume through time and related effects on barren ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosilla, Txomin; Coops, Nicholas C.; White, Joanne C.; Wulder, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Lichens form a critical portion of barren ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) diets, especially during winter months. Here, we assess lichen mat volume across five herd ranges in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, Canada, using newly developed composite Landsat imagery. The lichen volume estimator (LVE) was adapted for use across 700 000 km2 of barren ground caribou habitat annually from 1984–2012. We subsequently assessed how LVE changed temporally throughout the time series for each pixel using Theil-Sen’s slopes, and spatially by assessing whether slope values were centered in local clusters of similar values. Additionally, we assessed how LVE estimates resulted in changes in barren ground caribou movement rates using an extensive telemetry data set from 2006–2011. The Ahiak/Beverly herd had the largest overall increase in LVE (median = 0.033), while the more western herds had the least (median slopes below zero in all cases). LVE slope pixels were arranged in significant clusters across the study area, with the Cape Bathurst, Bathurst, and Bluenose East herds having the most significant clusters of negative slopes (more than 20% of vegetated land in each case). The Ahiak/Beverly and Bluenose West had the most significant positive clusters (16.3% and 18.5% of vegetated land respectively). Barren ground caribou displayed complex reactions to changing lichen conditions depending on season; the majority of detected associations with movement data agreed with current understanding of barren ground caribou foraging behavior (the exception was an increase in movement velocity at high lichen volume estimates in Fall). The temporal assessment of LVE identified areas where shifts in ecological conditions may have resulted in changing lichen mat conditions, while assessing the slope estimates for clustering identified zones beyond the pixel scale where forage conditions may be changing. Lichen volume estimates associated with barren ground caribou

  11. MACULAR CHOROIDAL VOLUME CHANGES AFTER INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB FOR EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkovits, Stefan; Seidel, Gerald; Pertl, Laura; Malle, Eva M; Hausberger, Silke; Makk, Johanna; Singer, Christoph; Osterholt, Julia; Herzog, Sereina A; Haas, Anton; Weger, Martin

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on the macular choroidal volume and the subfoveal choroidal thickness in treatment naïve eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration. The macular choroidal volume and the subfoveal choroidal thickness were measured using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. After a screening examination, each patient received 3 monthly intravitreal injections of 1.25 mg bevacizumab. One month after the third injection was a final assessment. Forty-seven patients with a mean age of 80 ± 6.4 years were included. The macular choroidal volume decreased significantly from median 4.1 mm (interquartile range 3.4-5.9) to median 3.9 mm (interquartile range 3.1-5.6) between the baseline and final examination (difference -0.46 mm, 95% confidence interval: -0.57 to 0.35, P macular choroidal volume at baseline and subfoveal choroidal thickness at baseline were not associated with the response to treatment. The macular choroidal volume and the subfoveal choroidal thickness decreased significantly after 3 monthly bevacizumab injections for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  12. Increasing temperature causes flowering onset time changes of alpine ginger Roscoea in the Central Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmalingam Mohandass

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent herbarium-based phenology assessments of many plant species have found significant responses to global climate change over the previous century. In this study, we investigate how the flowering phenology of three alpine ginger Roscoea species responses to climate change over the century from 1913 to 2011, by comparing between herbarium-based phenology records and direct flowering observations. According to the observations, flowering onset of the three alpine ginger species occurred either 22 days earlier or was delayed by 8–30 days when comparing the mean peak flowering date between herbarium-based phenology records and direct flowering observations. It is likely that this significant change in flowering onset is due to increased annual minimum and maximum temperatures and mean annual temperature by about 0.053°C per year. Our results also show that flowering time changes occurred due to an increasing winter–spring minimum temperature and monsoon minimum temperature, suggesting that these Roscoea species respond greatly to climate warming resulting in changes on flowering times.

  13. QUANTITATIVE AND STRUCTURAL CHANGES OF TESTIS AND SEMEN QUALITY PARAMETERS CHANGES CAUSED BY PERORAL ADMINISTRATION OF DIAZINON IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svätoslav Hluchý

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find the quantitative and structural changes in the rat testis and changes of semen quality after a diazinon administration. METHODS: Rats received diazinon (99% purity in thier drinking water (40 mg.l-1 with free access. Age of rats at the beginning of the experiment was 30 days and experiment lasted for next 90 days. The histological samples were evaluated by histological and morphometric methods in light microscopy and the samples of semen were evaluated with CASA method. RESULTS: Disintergation of cellular associations in the seminiferous epithelium, germ cells evacuation into the tubule lumen and thier necrosis were mostly observed. Rarely vacuolisation and cracks of epithelium and fibrotisation of interstitial tissue were noted. Morphometric methods have shown extension of epithelium (P subcellular structures and their functions may be damaged which can lead to subfertility. Further investigation of diazinon is needed for verification of our hypothesis.doi:10.5219/188

  14. Bony changes in cows affected with chronic fluorine poisoning caused by industrial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasarov, E; Tatarov, B; Dimitrov, G; Kantschev, L; Kovatschev, K

    1972-01-01

    Cows affected with chronic fluorine poisoning were thoroughly examined and the findings ff clinical, anatomical-pathological, x-ray, chemical and histological examinations are reported with particular reference to changes of skeletal bones. The most significant bony changes were periosteal hyperostosis on metacarpal and metatarsal bones, local resorption of the compact substance which appeared to have a sponge-like pattern, and a destructive process in the areas surrounding Havers' and Volkmann's canals. Changes of the trabecular pattern were observed in the spongy substance of the above mentioned bones. Trabeculae showed signs of atrophy - they were thinned or coarsely thickened - and their contours were well contrasted. Regularly shaped osteons were not frequently found in the spongy substance. Marked narrowing of the medullary canal was seen.

  15. PS-109 Barriers and facilitators to implementing drug changes caused by drug tenders and shortages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishøj, Rikke Mie; Christrup, Lona Louring; Clemmensen, Marianne H

    2015-01-01

    . Purpose To identify barriers and facilitators for implementing drug changes due to drug tenders and shortages in Danish public hospitals. Material and methods Six focus group interviews were conducted at three hospitals in different regions of the country. At each hospital two focus group interviews were...... thematically through content analysis. Results Barriers Identified included: frequent changes of labelling, packages and drug names. Furthermore, implementing drug changes requires extra resources and finance. Technologies such as computerised physician order entry and barcode scanning systems were perceived...... as potential facilitators, but also as barriers in cases where the quality and implementation of the systems were not adequate. Facilitators included: hospital pharmacy services and lower drug prices. Furthermore recommendations on generic prescription, optimisation of the tendering process and support...

  16. Methodological Challenges of Identifying Ultimate Land Use Changes Caused by Biofuel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Kløverpris, Jesper; Nielsen, Per Henning

    2007-01-01

    that is only poorly dealt with by LCA methods. Even though the use of land, or change of land cover and its eco-systems, is acknowledged to be a very important impact of human activities, a methodology for assessing this impact category has not yet  been properly developed within LCA. Some LCA scientists have...... looked into methods for assessing the impacts of given changes of land use, i.e. the impact assessment component of the LCA, but very few have looked into how to actually do the inventory modelling, i.e. how to identify which land is ultimately affected by the decision and system under study. State...... in the systems being studied. The aims of this paper is to analyse the mechanisms influencing the long-term land use consequences of changes in crop demand and propose a methodological framework for identifying these consequences within a global scope. The outset of the paper is the principles of consequential...

  17. Macrosegregation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification through Cross-Section Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, M.; Lauer, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R..; Grugel, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Al-7 wt% Si and Pb-6 wt% Sb alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS), with liquid above and solid below and gravity pointing down, in cylindrical graphite crucibles through an abrupt cross-section change. Fraction eutectic distribution in the microstructure, primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameters have been measured in the DS samples in the vicinity of section change in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal factors and solidification shrinkage. It is observed that convection not only produces extensive radial and axial macrosegregation near cross-section change, it also affects the dendritic array morphology. Primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameter, both, are influenced by this convection. In addition to the experimental results, preliminary results from a numerical model which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone in its analysis will also be presented

  18. Orthostatic changes in the blood volumes of the lower extremities in practically healthy humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, V K; Koshkin, V M; Karalkin, A V [Vtoroj Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR)

    1979-07-01

    The method and the results of measuring the blood volumes in the lower extremities in the horizontal and vertical position of the body are given. A combination of a single-sensor counter of the whole body and a gamma-chamber with the use of two nondiffuse active radioindicators, erythrocytes labelled with /sup 51/Cr and albumin-sup(99m)Tc in certain sequence, is found to be the most optimal for quantitative evaluation of the regional volumes of the blood. To raise the informativeness of the studies the authors recommend distinguishing ''rapid'' and ''slow'' fractions of the blood volume progressive growth in the crus since the correlation of these fractions reflect the specific features of an individual orthostatic reaction for each examinee.

  19. Changes in liver and spleen volume in various types of compensated liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Hiroshi; Tarao, Kazuo; Ito, Yoshihiko

    1988-01-01

    Liver and spleen volume were measured by computed tomography in 8 healthy voluneteers and in 21 patients of various types of compensated liver cirrhosis. Patients were divided into 3 groups (8 of viral group, 6 of alcoholic group and 6 of combined group) according to the histopathological findings of the liver and also according to the history of blood transfusion, HBs-Ag and alcohol drinking habit. Each volume was calculated by adding together the area measurements obtained from successive transverse abdominal scans. In the liver volume (mean±S.E.) alcoholic group (1381±86cm 3 ) was significantly larger than the healthy volunteers (1027±27cm 3 ) (p 3 ) (p 3 ) (p 3 ) was significantly larger than the healthy volunteers (84±4.7cm 3 ) (p 3 ) was significantly larger than the viral group (302±10um 2 ) (p 2 ) was also significantly larger than viral group (p<0.04). (author)

  20. The molar hydrodynamic volume changes of factor VIIa due to GlycoPEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesner, Bitten; Westh, Peter; Hvidt, Søren; Nielsen, Anders D

    2011-06-01

    The effects of GlycoPEGylation on the molar hydrodynamic volume of recombinant human rFVIIa were investigated using rFVIIa and two GlycoPEGylated recombinant human FVIIa derivatives, a linear 10kDa PEG and a branched 40kDa PEG, respectively. Molar hydrodynamic volumes were determined by capillary viscometry and mass spectrometry. The intrinsic viscosities of rFVIIa, its two GlycoPEGylated compounds, and of linear 8kDa, 10kDa, 20kDa and branched 40kDa PEG polymers were determined. The measured intrinsic viscosity of rFVIIa is 6.0mL/g, while the intrinsic viscosities of 10kDa PEG-rFVIIa and 40kDa PEG-rFVIIa are 29.5mL/g and 79.0mL/g, respectively. The intrinsic viscosities of the linear PEG polymers are 20, 22.6 and 41.4mL/g for 8, 10, and 20kDa, respectively, and 61.1mL/g for the branched 40kDa PEG. From the results of the intrinsic viscosity and MALDI-TOF measurements it is evident, that the molar hydrodynamic volume of the conjugated protein is not just an addition of the molar hydrodynamic volume of the PEG and the protein. The molar hydrodynamic volume of the GlycoPEGylated protein is larger than the volume of its composites. These results suggest that both the linear and the branched PEG are not wrapped around the surface of rFVIIa but are chains that are significantly stretched out when attached to the protein. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tree mortality in the eastern Mediterranean, causes and implications under climatic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Dimitrios; Iacovou, Valentina; Hoch, Guenter; Vennetier, Michel; Siegwolf, Rolf; Christodoulakis, Dimitrios; Koerner, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The eastern Mediterranean has experienced repeated incidents of forest mortality related to drought in recent decades. Such events may become more frequent in the future as drought conditions are projected to further intensify due to global warming. We have been investigating the causes behind such forest mortality events in Pinus halepensis, (the most drought tolerant pine in the Mediterranean). We cored tree stems and sampled various tissue types from dry habitats close to sea level and explored growth responses, stable isotope signals and non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations. Under intense drought that coincided with pine desiccation events in natural populations our result indicate a significant reduction in tree growth, the most significant in more than a century despite the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations in recent decades. This has been accompanied by a lengthening in the integration periods of rainfall needed for pine growth, reaching even 5-6 years before and including the year of mortality occurrence. Oxygen stable isotopes indicate that these signals were associated with a shift in tree water utilization from deeper moisture pools related to past rainfall events. Furthermore, where the driest conditions occur, pine carbon reserves were found to increase in stem tissue, indicating that mortality in these pines cannot be explained by carbon starvation. Our findings suggest that for pine populations that are already water limited (i) a further atmospheric CO2 increase will not compensate for the reduction in growth because of a drier climate, (ii) hydraulic failure appears as the most likely cause of pine desiccation, as no shortage occurs in tree carbon reserves, (iii) a further increase in mortality events may cause these systems to become carbon sources.

  2. Hydrostatic pressure does not cause detectable changes in survival of human retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Osborne

    Full Text Available Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP. The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC survival in the human retina was investigated.A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating. Accurate pressure control (10-100 mmHg was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs from donor eyes (<24 h post mortem were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD. Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1 and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN. Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot.Exposure of HORCs to constant (60 mmHg or fluctuating (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min pressure for 24 or 48 h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1 or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24 h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min for 15, 30, 60 and 90 min durations, whereas OGD (3 h increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90 min post-OGD.Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina.

  3. Changes in cause-specific mortality among the elderly in Canada, 1979–2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron Boucher, Marie-Pier; Bourbeau, Robert; Légáre, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    examine comment ces changements ont influencé les tendances de l’espérance de vie à 65 et à 85 ans et quelles causes de décès spécifiques furent impliquées. Une distinction entre les décès prématurés et les décès liés à un processus de sénescence est réalisée, se basant sur deux indicateurs de variations...

  4. Changes in Average Annual Precipitation in Argentina’s Pampa Region and Their Possible Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pérez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in annual rainfall in five sub-regions of the Argentine Pampa Region (Rolling, Central, Mesopotamian, Flooding and Southern were examined for the period 1941 to 2010 using data from representative locations in each sub-region. Dubious series were adjusted by means of a homogeneity test and changes in mean value were evaluated using a hydrometeorological time series segmentation method. In addition, an association was sought between shifts in mean annual rainfall and changes in large-scale atmospheric pressure systems, as measured by the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI. The results indicate that the Western Pampas (Central and Southern are more vulnerable to abrupt changes in average annual rainfall than the Eastern Pampas (Mesopotamian, Rolling and Flooding. Their vulnerability is further increased by their having the lowest average rainfall. The AMO showed significant negative correlations with all sub-regions, while the PDO and SOI showed significant positive and negative correlations respectively with the Central, Flooding and Southern Pampa. The fact that the PDO and AMO are going through the phases of their cycles that tend to reduce rainfall in much of the Pampas helps explain the lower rainfall recorded in the Western Pampas sub-regions in recent years. This has had a significant impact on agriculture and the environment.

  5. Soil bulk density changes caused by mechanized harvesting: A case study in central Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux; Pam Edwards; Mark Jones; Mark Jones

    2005-01-01

    A mechanized harvesting system consisting of a feller-buncher and a grapple skidder was examined to quantify soil bulk density changes in a central Appalachian hardwood forest site. Soil bulk density was measured using a nuclear gauge pre-harvest and post-harvest systematically across the harvest unit and on transects across skid trails. Bulk density also was measured...

  6. Linguistic Mechanisms Cause Rapid Behavior Change. Part Two: How Linguistic Frames Affect Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Joseph; Sommer, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Written and spoken language contains inherent mechanisms driving motivation. Accessing and modifying psycholinguistic mechanisms, links language frames to changes in behavior within the context of motivational profiling. For example, holding an object like an imported apple feels safe until one is informed it was grown in a toxic waste dump.…

  7. Causes of Climate and Environmental Changes: The Need for Environmental-Friendly Education Policy in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwoala, H. N. L.

    2015-01-01

    Man cannot naturally be detached from his environment. From time to time, changes in climate and environmental conditions occur as a result of natural and human factors. Obviously, the natural factors are almost beyond human control. But, the human factors are to a very large extent under human control. Thus, this paper tried to discover natural…

  8. Major episodes of geologic change - Correlations, time structure and possible causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Caldeira, Ken

    1993-01-01

    Published data sets of major geologic events of the past about 250 Myr (extinction events, sea-level lows, continental flood-basalt eruptions, mountain-building events, abrupt changes in sea-floor spreading, ocean-anoxic and blackshale events and the largest evaporite deposits) have been synthesized (with estimated errors). These events show evidence for a statistically significant periodic component with an underlying periodicity, formally equal to 26.6 Myr, and a recent maximum, close to the present time. The cycle may not be strictly periodic, but a periodicity of about 30 Myr is robust to probable errors in dating of the geologic events. The intervals of geologic change seem to involve jumps in sea-floor spreading associated with episodic continental rifting, volcanism, enhanced orogeny, global sea-level changes and fluctuations in climate. The period may represent a purely internal earth-pulsation, but evidence of planetesimal impacts at several extinction boundaries, and a possible underlying cycle of 28-36 Myr in crater ages, suggests that highly energetic impacts may be affecting global tectonics. A cyclic increase in the flux of planetesimals might result from the passage of the Solar System through the central plane of the Milky Way Galaxy - an event with a periodicity and mean phasing similar to that detected in the geologic changes.

  9. Dynamics of inner ear pressure change caused by intracranial pressure manipulation in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thalen, EO; Wit, HP; Segenhout, JM; Albers, FWJ

    Previous studies have shown that pressure changes in the cerebrospinal fluid compartment are transmitted to the inner ear. The main route for pressure transfer is the cochlear aqueduct, about which little is known with regard to its dynamic properties. In the present study, sudden intracranial

  10. Quantifying soil profile change caused by land use in central Missouri loess hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel J. Indorante; John M. Kabrick; Brad D. Lee; Jon M. Maatta

    2014-01-01

    Three major challenges are present when studying anthropogenic impacts on soil profile properties: (i) site selection; (ii) sampling and modeling native and cultivated soil-landscape relationships; and (iii) graphically and statistically comparing native and cultivated sites to model soil profile changes. This study addressed those challenges by measuring and modeling...

  11. [Social change in the physician's role and medical practice caused by managed care in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, P C; Denz, M D

    2000-03-01

    Switzerland is the first European country where health maintenance organizations (HMOs) characterised by capitation (per capita lumpsum) and gatekeeping were implemented according to the HMO staff model known in the USA. The development of managed health care in Switzerland relies on the belief that adequate economic incentives and competition result in cost reduction and high quality health care. Whether this is true or not--in any case the deregulation of legally accepted forms of health insurance and managed care result in profound changes in the Swiss health care system. Observations are made by using expert interviews and analysis of documents. The implementation of managed care induces socio-cultural changes of the medical profession which are as profound as the induced economic changes. We discuss conflicts of interests among physicians using four main dimensions of conflict: (1) control, (2) monopolization, (3) valuation, and (4) specialization. In the HMOs we observe pronounced conflicts of the physicians' role. The changes of the physicians' role in HMOs is on the one hand the result of new duties. On the other hand it expresses strategies of coping with the role conflict between the main clinical duties and the new obligation to control cost and to monitor treatment via gatekeeping. In HMOs the teamwork of doctors and the quality control of care promotes the satisfaction of physicians with their work, however, it can also have dysfunctional effects.

  12. Impact of body composition changes on risk of all-cause mortality in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, Christophe E; Herrmann, François R; Spoerri, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluates the relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) changes and mortality in persons ≥65 years. METHODS: Adults ≥65 years with at least two body composition measurements (BCM) between 1990 and 2011 were included. We......: FFMI loss is related to increased mortality in older persons....

  13. Quantifying streamflow change caused by forest disturbance at a large spatial scale: A single watershed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Mingfang

    2010-12-01

    Climatic variability and forest disturbance are commonly recognized as two major drivers influencing streamflow change in large-scale forested watersheds. The greatest challenge in evaluating quantitative hydrological effects of forest disturbance is the removal of climatic effect on hydrology. In this paper, a method was designed to quantify respective contributions of large-scale forest disturbance and climatic variability on streamflow using the Willow River watershed (2860 km2) located in the central part of British Columbia, Canada. Long-term (>50 years) data on hydrology, climate, and timber harvesting history represented by equivalent clear-cutting area (ECA) were available to discern climatic and forestry influences on streamflow by three steps. First, effective precipitation, an integrated climatic index, was generated by subtracting evapotranspiration from precipitation. Second, modified double mass curves were developed by plotting accumulated annual streamflow against annual effective precipitation, which presented a much clearer picture of the cumulative effects of forest disturbance on streamflow following removal of climatic influence. The average annual streamflow changes that were attributed to forest disturbances and climatic variability were then estimated to be +58.7 and -72.4 mm, respectively. The positive (increasing) and negative (decreasing) values in streamflow change indicated opposite change directions, which suggest an offsetting effect between forest disturbance and climatic variability in the study watershed. Finally, a multivariate Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model was generated to establish quantitative relationships between accumulated annual streamflow deviation attributed to forest disturbances and annual ECA. The model was then used to project streamflow change under various timber harvesting scenarios. The methodology can be effectively applied to any large-scale single watershed where long-term data (>50

  14. Long-term global and regional brain volume changes following severe traumatic brain injury: A longitudinal study with clinical correlates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidaros, Annette; Skimminge, Arnold Jesper Møller; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2009-01-01

    with percent brain volume change (%BVC) ranging between − 0.6% and − 9.4% (mean − 4.0%). %BVC correlated significantly with injury severity, functional status at both scans, and with 1-year outcome. Moreover, %BVC improved prediction of long-term functional status over and above what could be predicted using......Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in neurodegenerative changes that progress for months, perhaps even years post-injury. However, there is little information on the spatial distribution and the clinical significance of this late atrophy. In 24 patients who had sustained severe TBI we acquired 3D...... scan time point using SIENAX. Regional distribution of atrophy was evaluated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). At the first scan time point, brain parenchymal volume was reduced by mean 8.4% in patients as compared to controls. During the scan interval, patients exhibited continued atrophy...

  15. Changes in the volume and circumference of the torso, leg and arm after cycling in the heat determined using 3D whole body scanners : conference paper, Lugano, Switzerland,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, Daanen; Vonk, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Whole body volume changes due to sweat loss after exercise in the heat are well documented, but little is known about the relative contribution of the torso and extremities to these volume changes. It is the purpose of this study to quantify these effects. Therefore, seven healthy male subjects were

  16. EYS Mutations Causing Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa: Changes of Retinal Structure and Function with Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. McGuigan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the EYS (eyes shut homolog gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive (ar retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Without a mammalian model of human EYS disease, there is limited understanding of details of disease expression and rates of progression of the retinal degeneration. We studied clinically and with chromatic static perimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, and en face autofluoresence imaging, a cohort of 15 patients (ages 12–51 at first visit, some of whom had longitudinal data of function and structure. Rod sensitivity was able to be measured by chromatic perimetry in most patients at their earliest visits and some patients retained patchy rod function into the fifth decade of life. As expected from RP, cone sensitivity persisted after rod function was no longer measurable. The photoreceptor nuclear layer of the central retina was abnormal except at the fovea in most patients at first visit. Perifoveal disease measured over a period of years indicated that photoreceptor structural loss was followed by dysmorphology of the inner retina and loss of retinal pigment epithelial integrity. Although there could be variability in severity, preliminary analyses of the rates of vision loss suggested that EYS is a more rapidly progressive disease than other ciliopathies causing arRP, such as USH2A and MAK.

  17. False predictions about the detectability of visual changes: the role of beliefs about attention, memory, and the continuity of attended objects in causing change blindness blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Daniel T; Drivdahl, Sarah B; Momen, Nausheen; Beck, Melissa R

    2002-12-01

    Recently, a number of experiments have emphasized the degree to which subjects fail to detect large changes in visual scenes. This finding, referred to as "change blindness," is often considered surprising because many people have the intuition that such changes should be easy to detect. documented this intuition by showing that the majority of subjects believe they would notice changes that are actually very rarely detected. Thus subjects exhibit a metacognitive error we refer to as "change blindness blindness." Here, we test whether CBB is caused by a misestimation of the perceptual experience associated with visual changes and show that it persists even when the pre- and postchange views are separated by long delays. In addition, subjects overestimate their change detection ability both when the relevant changes are illustrated by still pictures, and when they are illustrated using videos showing the changes occurring in real time. We conclude that CBB is a robust phenomenon that cannot be accounted for by failure to understand the specific perceptual experience associated with a change. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  18. Changes in hippocampal volume and neuron number co-occur with memory decline in old homing pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Vincent J; Kanyok, Nate; Schreiber, Austin J; Flaim, Mary E; Bingman, Verner P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian hippocampus is particularly susceptible to age-related structural changes, which have been used to explain, in part, age-related memory decline. These changes are generally characterized by atrophy (e.g., a decrease in volume and number of synaptic contacts). Recent studies have reported age-related spatial memory deficits in older pigeons similar to those seen in older mammals. However, to date, little is known about any co-occurring changes in the aging avian hippocampal formation (HF). In the current study, it was found that the HF of older pigeons was actually larger and contained more neurons than the HF of younger pigeons, a finding that suggests that the pattern of structural changes during aging in the avian HF is different from that seen in the mammalian hippocampus. A working hypothesis for relating the observed structural changes with spatial-cognitive decline is offered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biofuels that cause land-use change may have much larger non-GHG air quality emissions than fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C-C; Campbell, J E; Mena-Carrasco, M; Spak, S N; Carmichael, G R; Chen, Y

    2012-10-02

    Although biofuels present an opportunity for renewable energy production, significant land-use change resulting from biofuels may contribute to negative environmental, economic, and social impacts. Here we examined non-GHG air pollution impacts from both indirect and direct land-use change caused by the anticipated expansion of Brazilian biofuels production. We synthesized information on fuel loading, combustion completeness, and emission factors, and developed a spatially explicit approach with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to estimate air pollution emissions. The land-use change emissions, ranging from 6.7 to 26.4 Tg PM(2.5), were dominated by deforestation burning practices associated with indirect land-use change. We also found Brazilian sugar cane ethanol and soybean biodiesel including direct and indirect land-use change effects have much larger life-cycle emissions than conventional fossil fuels for six regulated air pollutants. The emissions magnitude and uncertainty decrease with longer life-cycle integration periods. Results are conditional to the single LUC scenario employed here. After LUC uncertainty, the largest source of uncertainty in LUC emissions stems from the combustion completeness during deforestation. While current biofuels cropland burning policies in Brazil seek to reduce life-cycle emissions, these policies do not address the large emissions caused by indirect land-use change.

  20. Predicting Binding Free Energy Change Caused by Point Mutations with Knowledge-Modified MM/PBSA Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marharyta Petukh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology termed Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE was developed to predict the changes of the binding free energy caused by mutations. The method utilizes 3D structures of the corresponding protein-protein complexes and takes advantage of both approaches: sequence- and structure-based methods. The method has two components: a MM/PBSA-based component, and an additional set of statistical terms delivered from statistical investigation of physico-chemical properties of protein complexes. While the approach is rigid body approach and does not explicitly consider plausible conformational changes caused by the binding, the effect of conformational changes, including changes away from binding interface, on electrostatics are mimicked with amino acid specific dielectric constants. This provides significant improvement of SAAMBE predictions as indicated by better match against experimentally determined binding free energy changes over 1300 mutations in 43 proteins. The final benchmarking resulted in a very good agreement with experimental data (correlation coefficient 0.624 while the algorithm being fast enough to allow for large-scale calculations (the average time is less than a minute per mutation.

  1. Free volume and elastic properties changes in Cu-Zr-Ti-Pd bulk glassy alloy on heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Yavari, Alain Reza; Fukuhara, Mikio; Ota, Katsumi; Xie, Guoqiang; Vaughan, Gavin; Inoue, Akihisa

    2007-01-01

    The variation of free volume and elastic properties of the Cu 55 Zr 30 Ti 10 Pd 5 glassy alloy on heating was studied. The structure changes on heating were studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, differential scanning and isothermal calorimetries. The studied glassy alloy shows a rather high Poisson's ratio exceeding 0.42 which is maintained after the structure relaxation and primary devitrification. Young's and Shear modules decrease upon primary devitrification while Bulk modulus exhibits a maximum after structural relaxation

  2. Gray-Matter Volume Estimate Score: A Novel Semi-Automatic Method Measuring Early Ischemic Change on CT

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Dongbeom; Lee, Kijeong; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Jinkwon; Song, Tae-Jin; Ahn, Sung Soo; Nam, Hyo Suk; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We developed a novel method named Gray-matter Volume Estimate Score (GRAVES), measuring early ischemic changes on Computed Tomography (CT) semi-automatically by computer software. This study aimed to compare GRAVES and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) with regards to outcome prediction and inter-rater agreement. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study. Among consecutive patients with ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation who received intra-art...

  3. Analysis of transient permeation behavior of hydrogen isotope caused by abrupt temperature change of first wall and blanket wall material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamawaki, Michio; Tanaka, Satoru; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa

    1989-01-01

    To obtain further information on the transient permeation behavior of hydrogen isotopes as caused by an abrupt temperature change, numerical calculations were carried out for two typical metals, nickel and vanadium. Deuterium permeation through nickel is analyzed as a typical case of bulk-diffusion-limited permeation. Its transient behavior changed dramatically according to the specimen thickness. The transient behavior, in general, is separated into two parts, initial and latter period behaviors. Conditions which cause such a separation were evaluated. Evaluation of the hydrogen diffusivity and solubility by an analysis of transient curves of hydrogen permeation was carried out. The transient behavior of simultaneous gas- and ion-driven hydrogen permeation through vanadium was also analyzed. Overshooting of the hydrogen permeation rate appears with an abrupt temperature increase. Increasing the impinging ion flux causes the overshooting peak to become sharper, and also reduces the change of the steady-state permeation rate to be attained after the temperature change compared with the initial value. (orig.)

  4. Changes in permeability caused by transient stresses: field observations, experiments, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Michael; Beresnev, Igor; Brodsky, Emily E.; Elkhoury, Jean E.; Elsworth, Derek; Ingebritsen, Steve E.; Mays, David C.; Wang, Chi-Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Oscillations in stress, such as those created by earthquakes, can increase permeability and fluid mobility in geologic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes as small as 10–6 can increase discharge in streams and springs, change the water level in wells, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated values over a period of months to years. Mechanisms that can change permeability at such small stresses include unblocking pores, either by breaking up permeability-limiting colloidal deposits or by mobilizing droplets and bubbles trapped in pores by capillary forces. The recovery time over which permeability returns to the prestimulated value is governed by the time to reblock pores, or for geochemical processes to seal pores. Monitoring permeability in geothermal systems where there is abundant seismicity, and the response of flow to local and regional earthquakes, would help test some of the proposed mechanisms and identify controls on permeability and its evolution.

  5. Characterization of Streptomyces isolates causing colour changes of mural paintings in ancient Egyptian tombs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Haliem, M E F; Sakr, A A; Ali, M F; Ghaly, M F; Sohlenkamp, C

    2013-08-25

    Paintings in ancient Egyptian tombs often suffer colour changes due to microbial growth and colonization. Streptomyces strains were isolated from mural paintings of Tell Basta and Tanis tombs (East of Nile Delta, Egypt) and were identified using biochemical and molecular methods. The16S rDNA sequences data indicated that isolated strains were closely related to S. coelicolor, S. albidofuscus, S. ambofaciens, S. canarius, S. parvullus, S. corchorusii, S. albidofuscus and S. nigrifaciens. It could be shown that Streptomyces strains are involved on a large scale in the colour changes of paintings and stone support by producing a wide range of metabolites such as acids (oxalic, citric and sulphuric acids), biopigments of melanin, carotenoids, and hydrogen sulphide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Late morphological and functional changes caused by ionizing radiation in eggs of Japanese quail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, J; Grom, A; Csuka, J; Stasko, J; Kindlova, L [Vyskumny Ustav Chovu a Slachtenia Hydiny, Ivanka pri Dunaji (Czechoslovakia)

    1976-01-01

    Eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were irradiated before incubation with doses of 300, 500, 800, 1500, 2000 and 2500 R of /sup 60/Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 187 R/min. The parameters of hatchability, embryonic morphology in the last phases of development, growth changes, viability, sex ratio and production of eggs in the control and experimental groups were followed. Embryonic mortality was proportional to the dose, irradiation weakened the embryos, at doses of 800 R and more the radiation evoked various teratogenic changes and slightly lengthened the incubation period. For the period of embryonic development, LD/sub 50/ approximately equal to 800 R and LD/sub 100/=2500 R was determined. Radiation slightly suppressed growth, viability in the postembryonic stage was influenced very slightly. Irradiation of eggs did not influence the sex ratio; the production of eggs was significantly reduced only at a dose of 1500 R and more.

  7. Changes in the microstructure of compacted bentonite caused by heating and hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two twin 40-cm long columns of compacted FEBEX bentonite were tested in Teflon cells; water was supplied through the top surface of the columns and in one of them a heater was placed at the base and set to 100°C. The purpose of these tests was to simulate the behaviour of an engineered barrier in a radioactive waste repository and investigate the effect of the thermal gradient on saturation. In particular, changes in the pore size distribution and interlayer size have been investigated in this work. The thermal gradient had a strong influence on the water intake and distribution. Water content and dry density gradients persisted in the two columns after 12 years of testing. These changes gave place to the modification of the bentonite microstructure, overall increasing the microstructural void ratio and the proportion of adsorbed, interlayer water.

  8. Late morphological and functional changes caused by ionizing radiation in eggs of Japanese quail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.; Grom, A.; Csuka, J.; Stasko, J.; Kindlova, L.

    1976-01-01

    Eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were irradiated before incubation with doses of 300, 500, 800, 1500, 2000 and 2500 R of 60 Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 187 R/min. The parameters of hatchability, embryonic morphology in the last phases of development, growth changes, viability, sex ratio and production of eggs in the control and experimental groups were followed. Embryonic mortality was proportional to the dose, irradiation weakened the embryos, at doses of 800 R and more the radiation evoked various teratogenic changes and slightly lengthened the incubation period. For the period of embryonic development, LD 50 approximately equal to 800 R and LD 100 =2500 R was determined. Radiation slightly suppressed growth, viability in the postembryonic stage was influenced very slightly. Irradiation of eggs did not influence the sex ratio; the production of eggs was significantly reduced only at a dose of 1500 R and more. (author)

  9. Changes in physical activity and all-cause mortality in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaes, Anouk W; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Marott, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    -up was associated with an increased mortality risk in subjects with and without COPD. These observational data suggest that it is important to assess and encourage physical activity in the earliest stages of COPD in order to maintain a physical activity level that is as high as possible, as this is associated......Little is known about changes in physical activity in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its impact on mortality. Therefore, we aimed to study changes in physical activity in subjects with and without COPD and the impact of physical activity on mortality risk. Subjects......, respectively) were included. COPD subjects with moderate or high baseline physical activity who reported low physical activity level at follow-up had the highest hazard ratios of mortality (1.73 and 2.35, respectively; both pphysical activity, no differences were...

  10. Evaluation of the Free Volume Theory to Predict Moisture Transport and Quality Changes During Broccoli Drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, X.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Moisture diffusion in porous broccoli florets and stalks is modeled using the free volume and Maxwell-Eucken theories. These theories are based on the mobility of water and concern the variation of the effective diffusion coefficient for a wide range of temperature and moisture content during

  11. Evaluation of the free volume theory to predict moisture transport and quality changes during broccoli drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, X.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Moisture diffusion in porous broccoli florets and stalks is modeled by using the free volume and Maxwell-Eucken theories. These theories are based on the mobility of water and show the variation of the effective diffusion coefficient for a wide range of temperatures and moisture content of

  12. Cell volume change through water efflux impacts cell stiffness and stem cell fate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Ming; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Mao, Angelo; Zhou, Enhua H.; Arany, Praveen R.; Han, Yulong; Burnette, Dylan T.; Jensen, Mikkel H.; Kasza, Karen E.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Mackintosh, Frederick C.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Mooney, David J.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Weitz, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Cells alter their mechanical properties in response to their local microenvironment; this plays a role in determining cell function and can even influence stem cell fate. Here, we identify a robust and unified relationship between cell stiffness and cell volume. As a cell spreads on a substrate, its

  13. [Atrial fibrillation as consequence and cause of structural changes of atria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparina, O P; Chikhireva, L N; Stukalova, O V; Mironova, N A; Kashtanova, S Iu; Ternovoĭ, S K; Golitsyn, S P

    2014-01-01

    Changes of atrial structure and function are the contributors of atrial fibrillation clinical course, complications and treatment effectiveness. Effects of inflammation and mechanical stretch on atrial structural remodeling leading to atrial fibrillation are reviewed in the article. Contemporary invasive and non-invasive methods of evaluation (including late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with atrial structural remodeling in atrial fibrillation are also described.

  14. Predicting crystalline lens fall caused by accommodation from changes in wavefront error

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lin; Applegate, Raymond A.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To illustrate and develop a method for estimating crystalline lens decentration as a function of accommodative response using changes in wavefront error and show the method and limitations using previously published data (2004) from 2 iridectomized monkey eyes so that clinicians understand how spherical aberration can induce coma, in particular in intraocular lens surgery. SETTINGS College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, USA. DESIGN Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology. METHODS Lens decentration was estimated by displacing downward the wavefront error of the lens with respect to the limiting aperture (7.0 mm) and ocular first surface wavefront error for each accommodative response (0.00 to 11.00 diopters) until measured values of vertical coma matched previously published experimental data (2007). Lens decentration was also calculated using an approximation formula that only included spherical aberration and vertical coma. RESULTS The change in calculated vertical coma was consistent with downward lens decentration. Calculated downward lens decentration peaked at approximately 0.48 mm of vertical decentration in the right eye and approximately 0.31 mm of decentration in the left eye using all Zernike modes through the 7th radial order. Calculated lens decentration using only coma and spherical aberration formulas was peaked at approximately 0.45 mm in the right eye and approximately 0.23 mm in the left eye. CONCLUSIONS Lens fall as a function of accommodation was quantified noninvasively using changes in vertical coma driven principally by the accommodation-induced changes in spherical aberration. The newly developed method was valid for a large pupil only. PMID:21700108

  15. Portfolio Sensitivity Model for Analyzing Credit Risk Caused by Structural and Macroeconomic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Klepac

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new model for portfolio sensitivity analysis. The model is suitable for decision support in financial institutions, specifically for portfolio planning and portfolio management. The basic advantage of the model is the ability to create simulations for credit risk predictions in cases when we virtually change portfolio structure and/or macroeconomic factors. The model takes a holistic approach to portfolio management consolidating all organizational segments in the process such as marketing, retail and risk.

  16. Mapping of the Land Cover Spatiotemporal Characteristics in Northern Russia Caused by Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panidi, E.; Tsepelev, V.; Torlopova, N.; Bobkov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The study is devoted to the investigation of regional climate change in Northern Russia. Due to sparseness of the meteorological observation network in northern regions, we investigate the application capabilities of remotely sensed vegetation cover as indicator of climate change at the regional scale. In previous studies, we identified statistically significant relationship between the increase of surface air temperature and increase of the shrub vegetation productivity. We verified this relationship using ground observation data collected at the meteorological stations and Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data produced from Terra/MODIS satellite imagery. Additionally, we designed the technique of growing seasons separation for detailed investigation of the land cover (shrub cover) dynamics. Growing seasons are the periods when the temperature exceeds +5°C and +10°C. These periods determine the vegetation productivity conditions (i.e., conditions that allow growth of the phytomass). We have discovered that the trend signs for the surface air temperature and NDVI coincide on planes and river floodplains. On the current stage of the study, we are working on the automated mapping technique, which allows to estimate the direction and magnitude of the climate change in Northern Russia. This technique will make it possible to extrapolate identified relationship between land cover and climate onto territories with sparse network of meteorological stations. We have produced the gridded maps of NDVI and NDWI for the test area in European part of Northern Russia covered with the shrub vegetation. Basing on these maps, we may determine the frames of growing seasons for each grid cell. It will help us to obtain gridded maps of the NDVI linear trend for growing seasons on cell-by-cell basis. The trend maps can be used as indicative maps for estimation of the climate change on the studied areas.

  17. Plasticity in learning causes immediate and trans-generational changes in allocation of resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Davidowitz, Goggy; Papaj, Daniel R

    2013-08-01

    Plasticity in the development and expression of behavior may allow organisms to cope with novel and rapidly changing environments. However, plasticity itself may depend on the developmental experiences of an individual. For instance, individuals reared in complex, enriched environments develop enhanced cognitive abilities as a result of increased synaptic connections and neurogenesis. This suggests that costs associated with behavioral plasticity-in particular, increased investment in "self" at the expense of reproduction-may also be flexible. Using butterflies as a system, this work tests whether allocation of resources changes as a result of experiences in "difficult" environments that require more investment in learning. We contrast allocation of resources among butterflies with experience in environments that vary in the need for learning. Butterflies with experience searching for novel (i.e., red) hosts, or searching in complex non-host environments, allocate more resources (protein and carbohydrate reserves) to their own flight muscle. In addition, butterflies with experience in these more difficult environments allocate more resources per individual offspring (i.e., egg size and/or lipid reserves). This results in a mother's experience having significant effects on the growth of her offspring (i.e., dry mass and wing length). A separate study showed this re-allocation of resources comes at the expense of lifetime fecundity. These results suggest that investment in learning, and associated changes in life history, can be adjusted depending on an individual's current need, and their offspring's future needs, for learning.

  18. Understanding the causes of changing grassland use and productivity in Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Gao, L.; Qiao, G.; Chen, J.

    2012-12-01

    Some dramatic changes of grassland use and productivity have been taking place in Inner Mongolia in the past half century. While the changes are apparently driven by both socio-economic factors and climate, their contribution and interaction are largely unknown. We hypothesize that population growth is an important driving force behind the loss and degradation of the grassland, the market forces and institutional factors such as de-collectivization are become more important factors as the economy is moving from planned economy to market economy. This paper assesses the effects of socio-economic, demographic, institutional and climate factors on grassland use and productivity using a panel data set. The panel data compose the years from 1970s to 2000s and all prefectures in Inner Mongolia. A generalized least squares estimation method, allowing individual effects for prefecture level are applied to the examination. The effect of climate change is tested as well and the coupled socio-economic system and the natural system are investigated.

  19. Psychological stress exposure to aged mice causes abnormal feeding patterns with changes in the bout number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chihiro; Mogami, Sachiko; Hattori, Tomohisa

    2017-11-09

    Stress responses are affected by aging. However, studies on stress-related changes in feeding patterns with aging subject are minimal. We investigated feeding patterns induced by two psychological stress models, revealing characteristics of stress-induced feeding patterns as "meal" and "bout" (defined as the minimum feeding behavior parameters) in aged mice. Feeding behaviors of C57BL/6J mice were monitored for 24 h by an automatic monitoring device. Novelty stress reduced the meal amount over the 24 h in both young and aged mice, but as a result of a time course study it was persistent in aged mice. In addition, the decreased bout number was more pronounced in aged mice than in young mice. The 24-h meal and bout parameters did not change in either the young or aged mice following water avoidance stress (WAS). However, the meal amount and bout number increased in aged mice for 0-6 h after WAS exposure but remained unchanged in young mice. Our findings suggest that changes in bout number may lead to abnormal stress-related feeding patterns and may be one tool for evaluating eating abnormality in aged mice.

  20. Advanced Behavioral Analyses Show that the Presence of Food Causes Subtle Changes in C. elegans Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstman, Nicholas B; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    As a widely used and studied model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans worms offer the ability to investigate implications of behavioral change. Although, investigation of C. elegans behavioral traits has been shown, analysis is often narrowed down to measurements based off a single point, and thus cannot pick up on subtle behavioral and morphological changes. In the present study videos were captured of four different C. elegans strains grown in liquid cultures and transferred to NGM-agar plates with an E. coli lawn or with no lawn. Using an advanced software, WormLab, the full skeleton and outline of worms were tracked to determine whether the presence of food affects behavioral traits. In all seven investigated parameters, statistically significant differences were found in worm behavior between those moving on NGM-agar plates with an E. coli lawn and NGM-agar plates with no lawn. Furthermore, multiple test groups showed differences in interaction between variables as the parameters that significantly correlated statistically with speed of locomotion varied. In the present study, we demonstrate the validity of a model to analyze C. elegans behavior beyond simple speed of locomotion. The need to account for a nested design while performing statistical analyses in similar studies is also demonstrated. With extended analyses, C. elegans behavioral change can be investigated with greater sensitivity, which could have wide utility in fields such as, but not limited to, toxicology, drug discovery, and RNAi screening.

  1. Advanced behavioral analyses show that the presence of food causes subtle changes in C. elegans movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eAngstman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As a widely used and studied model organism, C. elegans worms offer the ability to investigate implications of behavioral change. Although investigation of C. elegans behavioral traits has been shown, analysis is often narrowed down to measurements based off a single point, and thus cannot pick up on subtle behavioral and morphological changes. In the present study videos were captured of four different C. elegans strains grown in liquid cultures and transferred to NGM-agar plates with an E. coli lawn or with no lawn. Using an advanced software, WormLab, the full skeleton and outline of worms were tracked to determine whether the presence of food affects behavioral traits. In all seven investigated parameters, statistically significant differences were found in worm behavior between those moving on NGM-agar plates with an E. coli lawn and NGM-agar plates with no lawn. Furthermore, multiple test groups showed differences in interaction between variables as the parameters that significantly correlated statistically with speed of locomotion varied. In the present study, we demonstrate the validity of a model to analyze C. elegans behavior beyond simple speed of locomotion. The need to account for a nested design while performing statistical analyses in similar studies is also demonstrated. With extended analyses, C. elegans behavioral change can be investigated with greater sensitivity, which could have wide utility in fields such as, but not limited to, toxicology, drug discovery, and RNAi screening.

  2. Climate effect of ozone changes caused by present and future air traffic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponater, M.; Sausen, R.; Feneberg, B. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Roeckner, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    The potential of aircraft-induced ozone changes to significantly enhance the climate impact of air traffic due to CO{sub 2}-emissions is investigated by means of simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model, coupled to a mixed layer ocean model. Results from several numerical experiments are presented, based on ozone increase patterns for 1992 aviation and on a future scenario for the year 2015. The climate signal is statistically significant for both time slices. Its strength is of comparable magnitude to that arising from aircraft CO{sub 2} emissions, thus meaning a nonnegligible contribution to the total effect. There are indications of a characteristic signature of the aircraft ozone related temperature response pattern, distinctly different from that typically associated with the increase of a well-mixed greenhouse gas. Likewise, the climate sensitivity to nonuniform ozone changes including a strong concentration perturbation at the tropopause appears to he higher than the climate sensitivity to uniform changes of a greenhouse gas. In a hierarchy of experiments based on an aircraft-related ozone perturbation with fixed structure (but increasing amplitude), the climate signal depends in a nonlinear way from the radiative forcing. (orig.) 44 refs.

  3. Historical Carbon Dioxide Emissions Caused by Land-Use Changes are Possibly Larger than Assumed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, A.; Sitch, S.; Pongratz, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Ciais, P.; Poulter, B.; Bayer, A. D.; Bondeau, A.; Calle, L.; Chini, L. P.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere absorbs about 20% of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. The overall magnitude of this sink is constrained by the difference between emissions, the rate of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and the ocean sink. However, the land sink is actually composed of two largely counteracting fluxes that are poorly quantified: fluxes from land-use change andCO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. Dynamic global vegetation model simulations suggest that CO2 emissions from land-use change have been substantially underestimated because processes such as tree harvesting and land clearing from shifting cultivation have not been considered. As the overall terrestrial sink is constrained, a larger net flux as a result of land-use change implies that terrestrial uptake of CO2 is also larger, and that terrestrial ecosystems might have greater potential to sequester carbon in the future. Consequently, reforestation projects and efforts to avoid further deforestation could represent important mitigation pathways, with co-benefits for biodiversity. It is unclear whether a larger land carbon sink can be reconciled with our current understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. Our possible underestimation of the historical residual terrestrial carbon sink adds further uncertainty to our capacity to predict the future of terrestrial carbon uptake and losses.

  4. Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts)—communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface—are fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover. While there has been long-standing concern over impacts of 5 physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is also increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, USA, we examined the effects of 10 years of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrust communities, and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical 10 disturbance (>10 years of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increased cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects 15 on lichens. While the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, our results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. This is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed by the climate treatments used in our study.

  5. Contemplating Catastrophe: conveying the causes, effects, risks of and responses to global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, M.; Berbeco, M.; Lahsen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Humans are changing nature and undermining the life supporting systems of the planet to an unprecedented extent, eroding more soil than all natural processes combined, fixing more nitrogen than all the bacteria on the planet, and substantially altering the land cover and chemistry of the atmosphere and waters. Yet, especially in the United States but also elsewhere, environmental awareness and policy action has been lackluster and hesitant due to a range of factors, including manufactured doubt and denial, psychological, cultural and economic investments in maintenance of status quo, and - when concern does exist - lack of knowledge about how to foster effective change. This paper will examine how recent research findings on human impacts on the planet are being conveyed to non-technical audiences and discuss challenges and opportunities to provide the public with the relevant knowledge and knowhow to address the risks of, and responses to global change. It will argue that a second-wave scientific literacy consisting in deeper understanding of the scientific process must be nurtured as part of a process to capacitate populations, especially youths, to navigate conflicting evidence and claims that surround many environmental threats. Such literacy must be fostered through 'learning conversations,' community and capacity-building, and integrated education, communication and outreach infusing science and solutions to foster a more effective approach to confronting potential catastrophe. 25 February 2013 at 16:30 Pacific Time

  6. Quantification of Tumor Volume Changes During Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Jana; Ford, Eric; Redmond, Kristin; Zhou, Jessica; Wong, John; Song, Danny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for lung cancer is limited by normal tissue toxicity. We evaluated sequential computed tomography (CT) scans to assess the possibility of adaptively reducing treatment volumes by quantifying the tumor volume reduction occurring during a course of radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients underwent RT for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer with conventional fractionation; 15 received concurrent chemotherapy. Two repeat CT scans were performed at a nominal dose of 30 Gy and 50 Gy. Respiration-correlated four-dimensional CT scans were used for evaluation of respiratory effects in 17 patients. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on simulation and all individual phases of the repeat CT scans. Parenchymal tumor was evaluated unless the nodal volume was larger or was the primary. Subsequent image sets were spatially co-registered with the simulation data for evaluation. Results: The median GTV reduction was 24.7% (range, -0.3% to 61.7%; p 100 cm 3 vs. 3 , and hilar and/or mediastinal involvement vs. purely parenchymal or pleural lesions. A tendency toward a greater volume reduction with increasing dose was seen, although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated significant alterations in the GTV seen on repeat CT scans during RT. These observations raise the possibility of using an adaptive approach toward RT of non-small-cell lung cancer to minimize the dose to normal structures and more safely increase the dose directed at the target tissues.

  7. Altered gravity causes the changes in the proteins NoA100 in plant cell nucleoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Margarita A.; Gonzalez-Camacho, Fernando; Kordyum, Elizabeth L.; Medina, Francisco Javier

    2005-08-01

    A nucleolar protein homologous to the mammalian nucleolin and to the onion nucleolin-like protein NopA100 was detected in nuclear soluble protein fraction from Lepidium sativum root meristematic cells, using the specific silver staining method and the cross-reaction with the anti-NopA100 antibody. In 2D Western blots of soluble nuclear fraction, NopA100 was revealed as a smear extending through a certain range of pI. In extracts obtained from seedlings grown under clinorotation, the extension of the pI range was shorter than in the stationary control indicating a lower phosphorylation of the protein. This suggests that altered gravity causes a decrease in the rate of nucleolar activity.

  8. Early changes of parotid density and volume predict modifications at the end of therapy and intensity of acute xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Scalco, Elisa; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Fiorino, Claudio; Broggi, Sara; Dinapoli, Nicola; Ricchetti, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Giovanna; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro

    2014-10-01

    To quantitatively assess the predictive power of early variations of parotid gland volume and density on final changes at the end of therapy and, possibly, on acute xerostomia during IMRT for head-neck cancer. Data of 92 parotids (46 patients) were available. Kinetics of the changes during treatment were described by the daily rate of density (rΔρ) and volume (rΔvol) variation based on weekly diagnostic kVCT images. Correlation between early and final changes was investigated as well as the correlation with prospective toxicity data (CTCAEv3.0) collected weekly during treatment for 24/46 patients. A higher rΔρ was observed during the first compared to last week of treatment (-0,50 vs -0,05HU, p-value = 0.0001). Based on early variations, a good estimation of the final changes may be obtained (Δρ: AUC = 0.82, p = 0.0001; Δvol: AUC = 0.77, p = 0.0001). Both early rΔρ and rΔvol predict a higher "mean" acute xerostomia score (≥ median value, 1.57; p-value = 0.01). Median early density rate changes for patients with mean xerostomia score ≥ / xerostomia is well predicted by higher rΔρ and rΔvol in the first two weeks of treatment: best cut-off values were -0.50 HU/day and -380 mm(3)/day for rΔρ and rΔvol respectively. Further studies are necessary to definitively assess the potential of early density/volume changes in identifying more sensitive patients at higher risk of experiencing xerostomia.

  9. Power distribution changes caused by subcooled nucleate boiling at Callaway Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konya, M.J.; Bryant, K.R.; Hopkins, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an evaluation undertaken by Union Electric (UE) and Westinghouse to explain anomalous behavior of the core axial power distribution at the Callaway Nuclear Power Plant. The behavior was characterized by a gradual unexpected power shift toward the bottom of the core and was first detected during cycle 4 at a core average burnup of approximately 7,000 MWD/MTU. Once started, the power shift continued until burnup effects became dominant and caused power to shift back to the top of the core at the end of the cycle. In addition to the anomalous power distribution, UE observed that estimated critical control rod position (ECP) deviations increased to over 500 pcm (0.5%Δk/k) during Cycles 4 and 5. ECPs for plant restarts that occurred early in each cycle agreed well with measured critical conditions. However, this agreement disappeared for restarts that occurred later in core life. After analyzing relevant data, performing scoping calculations and reviewing industry experience, the authors concluded that the power distribution anomaly was most likely caused by subcooled nucleate boiling. Crud deposition on the fuel was believed to enhance the subcooled boiling. The ECP deviations were a secondary effect of the power shift, since void fraction, axial burnup and xenon distributions departed design predictions during a substantial portion of the fuel cycles. Significant evidence supporting these conclusions include incore detector indications of flux depressions between intermediate flow mixing (IFM) and structural grids. In addition, visual exam results show the presence of crud deposits on fuel pins

  10. Predictive and prognostic value of tumor volume and its changes during radical radiotherapy of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaesmann, Lukas; Niyazi, Maximilian; Fleischmann, Daniel; Blanck, Oliver; Baumann, Rene; Baues, Christian; Klook, Lisa; Rosenbrock, Johannes; Trommer-Nestler, Maike; Dobiasch, Sophie; Eze, Chukwuka; Gauer, Tobias; Goy, Yvonne; Giordano, Frank A.; Sautter, Lisa; Hausmann, Jan; Henkenberens, Christoph; Kaul, David; Thieme, Alexander H.; Krug, David; Schmitt, Daniela; Maeurer, Matthias; Panje, Cedric M.; Suess, Christoph; Ziegler, Sonia; Ebert, Nadja; Medenwald, Daniel; Ostheimer, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes heterogeneous presentation of the disease including lymph node involvement and large tumour volumes with infiltration of the mediastinum, heart or spine. In the treatment of stage III NSCLC an interdisciplinary approach including radiotherapy is considered standard of care with acceptable toxicity and improved clinical outcome concerning local control. Furthermore, gross tumour volume (GTV) changes during definitive radiotherapy would allow for adaptive replanning which offers normal tissue sparing and dose escalation. A literature review was conducted to describe the predictive value of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy especially focussing on overall survival. The literature search was conducted in a two-step review process using PubMed registered /Medline registered with the key words ''stage III non-small cell lung cancer'' and ''radiotherapy'' and ''tumour volume'' and ''prognostic factors''. After final consideration 17, 14 and 9 studies with a total of 2516, 784 and 639 patients on predictive impact of GTV, GTV changes and its impact on overall survival, respectively, for definitive radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC were included in this review. Initial GTV is an important prognostic factor for overall survival in several studies, but the time of evaluation and the value of histology need to be further investigated. GTV changes during RT differ widely, optimal timing for re-evaluation of GTV and their predictive value for prognosis needs to be clarified. The prognostic value of GTV changes is unclear due to varying study qualities, re-evaluation time and conflicting results. The main findings were that the clinical impact of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy is still unclear due to heterogeneous study designs with varying quality

  11. Understanding Global Change: A New Conceptual Framework To Guide Teaching About Planetary Systems And Both The Causes And Effects Of Changes In Those Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J.; Bean, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Goals of the Next Generation Science Standards include understanding climate change and learning about ways to moderate the causes and mitigate the consequences of planetary-scale anthropogenic activities that interact synergistically to affect ecosystems and societies. The sheer number and scale of both causes and effects of global change can be daunting for teachers, and the lack of a clear conceptual framework for presenting this material usually leads educators (and textbooks) to present these phenomenon as a disjointed "laundry list." But an alternative approach is in the works. The Understanding Global Change web resource, currently under development at the UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology, will provide educators with a conceptual framework, graphic models, lessons, and assessment templates for teaching NGSS-aligned, interdisciplinary, global change curricula. The core of this resource is an original informational graphic that presents and relates Earth's global systems, human and non-human factors that produce changes in those systems, and the effects of those changes that scientists can measure.

  12. Persistent changes in neuronal structure and synaptic plasticity caused by proton irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Vipan K; Pasha, Junaid; Tran, Katherine K; Craver, Brianna M; Acharya, Munjal M; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-03-01

    Cranial radiotherapy is used routinely to control the growth of primary and secondary brain tumors, but often results in serious and debilitating cognitive dysfunction. In part due to the beneficial dose depth distributions that may spare normal tissue damage, the use of protons to treat CNS and other tumor types is rapidly gaining popularity. Astronauts exposed to lower doses of protons in the space radiation environment are also at risk for developing adverse CNS complications. To explore the consequences of whole body proton irradiation, mice were subjected to 0.1 and 1 Gy and analyzed for morphometric changes in hippocampal neurons 10 and 30 days following exposure. Significant dose-dependent reductions (~33 %) in dendritic complexity were found, when dendritic length, branching and area were analyzed 30 days after exposure. At equivalent doses and times, significant reductions in the number (~30 %) and density (50-75 %) of dendritic spines along hippocampal neurons of the dentate gyrus were also observed. Immature spines (filopodia, long) exhibited the greatest sensitivity (1.5- to 3-fold) to irradiation, while more mature spines (mushroom) were more resistant to changes over a 1-month post-irradiation timeframe. Irradiated granule cell neurons spanning the subfields of the dentate gyrus showed significant and dose-responsive reductions in synaptophysin expression, while the expression of postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95) was increased significantly. These findings corroborate our past work using photon irradiation, and demonstrate for the first time, dose-responsive changes in dendritic complexity, spine density and morphology and synaptic protein levels following exposure to low-dose whole body proton irradiation.

  13. A case of necrotizing sialomataplasia: consideration on cause, bone change, and incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a rare, benign, self-limiting lesion, but it mimics carcinoma both clinically and histologically. Authors present a case of NS on the right posterior hard palate in a 16-year-old boy. This case showed underlying erosive bone change on CT images. We supposed this lesion resulted from the local anesthesia for dental treatment. Presented NS is the only one case from approximately 1,500 oral and maxillofacial biopsies (0.07%) at Chonnam National University Hospital during the period from 1999 to 2004.

  14. A case of necrotizing sialomataplasia: consideration on cause, bone change, and incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a rare, benign, self-limiting lesion, but it mimics carcinoma both clinically and histologically. Authors present a case of NS on the right posterior hard palate in a 16-year-old boy. This case showed underlying erosive bone change on CT images. We supposed this lesion resulted from the local anesthesia for dental treatment. Presented NS is the only one case from approximately 1,500 oral and maxillofacial biopsies (0.07%) at Chonnam National University Hospital during the period from 1999 to 2004.

  15. An experimental verification of the compensation of length change of line scales caused by ambient air pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akira; Miwa, Nobuharu

    2010-01-01

    Line scales are used as a working standard of length for the calibration of optical measuring instruments such as profile projectors, measuring microscopes and video measuring systems. The authors have developed a one-dimensional calibration system for line scales to obtain a lower uncertainty of measurement. The scale calibration system, named Standard Scale Calibrator SSC-05, employs a vacuum interferometer system for length measurement, a 633 nm iodine-stabilized He–Ne laser to calibrate the oscillating frequency of the interferometer laser light source and an Abbe's error compensation structure. To reduce the uncertainty of measurement, the uncertainty factors of the line scale and ambient conditions should not be neglected. Using the length calibration system, the expansion and contraction of a line scale due to changes in ambient air pressure were observed and the measured scale length was corrected into the length under standard atmospheric pressure, 1013.25 hPa. Utilizing a natural rapid change in the air pressure caused by a tropical storm (typhoon), we carried out an experiment on the length measurement of a 1000 mm long line scale made of glass ceramic with a low coefficient of thermal expansion. Using a compensation formula for the length change caused by changes in ambient air pressure, the length change of the 1000 mm long line scale was compensated with a standard deviation of less than 1 nm

  16. Imatinib treatment causes substantial transcriptional changes in adult Schistosoma mansoni in vitro exhibiting pleiotropic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Buro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. For decades Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely used for controlling schistosomiasis. The absence of a vaccine and fear of PZQ resistance have motivated the search for alternatives. Studies on protein kinases (PKs demonstrated their importance for diverse physiological processes in schistosomes. Among others two Abl tyrosine kinases, SmAbl1 and SmAbl2, were identified in Schistosoma mansoni and shown to be transcribed in the gonads and the gastrodermis. SmAbl1 activity was blocked by Imatinib, a known Abl-TK inhibitor used in human cancer therapy (Gleevec/Glivec. Imatinib exhibited dramatic effects on the morphology and physiology of adult schistosomes in vitro causing the death of the parasites.Here we show modeling data supporting the targeting of SmAbl1/2 by Imatinib. A biochemical assay confirmed that SmAbl2 activity is also inhibited by Imatinib. Microarray analyses and qRT-PCR experiments were done to unravel transcriptional processes influenced by Imatinib in adult schistosomes in vitro demonstrating a wide influence on worm physiology. Surface-, muscle-, gut and gonad-associated processes were affected as evidenced by the differential transcription of e.g. the gynecophoral canal protein gene GCP, paramyosin, titin, hemoglobinase, and cathepsins. Furthermore, transcript levels of VAL-7 and egg formation-associated genes such as tyrosinase 1, p14, and fs800-like were affected as well as those of signaling genes including a ribosomal protein S6 kinase and a glutamate receptor. Finally, a comparative in silico analysis of the obtained microarray data sets and previous data analyzing the effect of a TGFβR1 inhibitor on transcription provided first evidence for an association of TGFβ and Abl kinase signaling. Among others GCP and egg formation-associated genes were identified as common targets.The data affirm broad negative effects of

  17. Elevated CO2 causes changes in the photosynthetic apparatus of a toxic cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangelini, Mattia; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Orr, Philip T; Beardall, John

    2014-07-15

    We studied the physiological acclimation of growth, photosynthesis and CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii exposed to low (present day; L-CO2) and high (1300ppm; H-CO2) pCO2. Results showed that under H-CO2 the cell specific division rate (μc) was higher and the CO2- and light-saturated photosynthetic rates (Vmax and Pmax) doubled. The cells' photosynthetic affinity for CO2 (K0.5CO2) was halved compared to L-CO2 cultures. However, no significant differences were found in dark respiration rates (Rd), pigment composition and light harvesting efficiency (α). In H-CO2 cells, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), associated with state transitions of the electron transport chain (ETC), was negligible. Simultaneously, a reorganisation of PSII features including antenna connectivity (JconPSIIα), heterogeneity (PSIIα/β) and effective absorption cross sectional area (σPSIIα/β) was observed. In relation to different activities of the CCM, our findings suggest that for cells grown under H-CO2: (1) there is down-regulation of CCM activity; (2) the ability of cells to use the harvested light energy is altered; (3) the occurrence of state transitions is likely to be associated with changes of electron flow (cyclic vs linear) through the ETC; (4) changes in PSII characteristics are important in regulating state transitions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in cloudiness over the Amazon rainforests during the last two decades: diagnostic and potential causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola A. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Geological Sciences, Austin, TX (United States); Universidad de Antioquia, Grupo de Ingenieria y Gestion Ambiental (GIGA), Medellin (Colombia); Jackson School of Geosciences, Geology Foundation, PO Box B, Austin, TX (United States); Fu, Rong [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Geological Sciences, Austin, TX (United States); Hoyos, Carlos D. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Li, Wenhong [Duke University, Division of Earth and Oceanic Sciences, Nicholas School of the Environment, Durham, NC (United States); Zhou, Liming [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); National Science Foundation, Climate and Large Scale Dynamics Program, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    This study shows a decrease of seasonal mean convection, cloudiness and an increase of surface shortwave down-welling radiation during 1984-2007 over the Amazon rainforests based on the analysis of satellite-retrieved clouds and surface radiative flux data. These changes are consistent with an increase in surface temperature, increased atmospheric stability, and reduction of moisture transport to the Amazon based on in situ surface and upper air meteorological data and reanalysis data. These changes appear to link to the expansion of the western Pacific warm pool during the December-February season, to the positive phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and increase of SST over the eastern Pacific SST during the March-May season, and to an increase of the tropical Atlantic meridional SST gradient and an expansion of the western Pacific warm pool during September-November season. The resultant increase of surface solar radiation during all but the dry season in the Amazon could contribute to the observed increases in rainforest growth during recent decades. (orig.)

  19. Bone changes occurring spontaneously and caused by estrogen in early postmenopausal women: a local generalized phenomenon?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, C.; Gotfredsen, A.; Riis, B.J.; Hassager, C.

    1986-01-01

    Regional values of bone mineral content and bone mineral density were calculated from total body dual photon absorptiometry scans of 52 early postmenopausal women treated with estrogen for one year and of 52 similar women treated with placebo. The six regions were head, arms, chest, spine, pelvis, and legs. In addition, bone mineral density of the spine was calculated by dual photon absorptiometry and bone mineral content of the forearm by single photon absorptiometry, using separate special purpose scanners. All regions were unchanged after one year of treatment with estrogen, excluding the lumbar spine, for which values rose. Values for all regions except the lumbar spine fell significantly in the placebo group. The rates of loss ranged from 2 to 8%, with no significant differences between the regions. It is concluded that loss of bone in the early menopause is a generalized phenomenon, affecting all parts of the skeleton. Furthermore, estrogen prophylaxis for loss of bone is effective in all parts of the skeleton. Finally, it is suggested that the measurement of bone mineral content in the forearm be used for clinical follow up of bone changes, as this method is superior to others in the ratio of change to precision

  20. Climate Change Predominantly Caused U.S. Soil Water Storage Decline from 2003 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Ma, C.; Song, X.; Gao, L.; Liu, M.; Xu, X.

    2016-12-01

    The water storage in soils is a fundamental resource for natural ecosystems and human society, while it is highly variable due to its complicated controlling factors in a changing climate; therefore, understanding water storage variation and its controlling factors is essential for sustaining human society, which relies on water resources. Although we are confident for water availability at global scale, the regional-scale water storage and its controlling factors are not fully understood. A number of researchers have reported that water resources are expected to diminish as climate continues warming in the 21stcentury, which will further influence human and ecological systems. However, few studies to date have fully quantitatively examined the water balances and its individual controlling mechanisms in the conterminous US. In this study, we integrated the time-series data of water storage and evapotranspiration derived from satellite imageries, regional meteorological data, and social-economic water consumption, to quantify water storage dynamics and its controlling factors across the conterminous US from 2003 to 2014. The water storage decline was found in majority of conterminous US, with the largest decline in southwestern US. Net atmospheric water input, which is difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration, could explain more than 50% of the inter-annual variation of water storage variation in majority of US with minor contributions from human water consumption. Climate change, expressed as precipitation decreases and warming, made dominant contribution to the water storage decline in the conterminous U.S. from 2003 to 2014.

  1. Protein expression changes caused by spaceflight as measured for 18 Russian cosmonauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Larina, Irina; Percy, Andrew J; Yang, Juncong; Borchers, Christoph H; M Nosovsky, Andrei; I Grigoriev, Anatoli; N Nikolaev, Evgeny

    2017-08-15

    The effects of spaceflight on human physiology is an increasingly studied field, yet the molecular mechanisms driving physiological changes remain unknown. With that in mind, this study was performed to obtain a deeper understanding of changes to the human proteome during space travel, by quantitating a panel of 125 proteins in the blood plasma of 18 Russian cosmonauts who had conducted long-duration missions to the International Space Station. The panel of labeled prototypic tryptic peptides from these proteins covered a concentration range of more than 5 orders of magnitude in human plasma. Quantitation was achieved by a well-established and highly-regarded targeted mass spectrom