WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume calibration techniques

  1. RESOLVE Survey Photometry and Volume-limited Calibration of the Photometric Gas Fractions Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, Kathleen D; Stark, David V; Moffett, Amanda J; Norris, Mark A; Snyder, Elaine M; Hoversten, Erik A

    2015-01-01

    We present custom-processed UV, optical, and near-IR photometry for the RESOLVE survey, a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass within two subvolumes of the nearby universe (RESOLVE-A and -B), complete down to baryonic mass ~10^9.1-9.3 Msun. In contrast to standard pipeline photometry (e.g., SDSS), our photometry uses optimal background subtraction, avoids suppressing color gradients, and includes systematic errors. With these improvements, we measure brighter magnitudes, larger radii, bluer colors, and a real increase in scatter around the red sequence. Combining stellar masses from our photometry with the RESOLVE-A HI mass census, we create volume-limited calibrations of the photometric gas fractions (PGF) technique, which predicts gas-to-stellar mass ratios (G/S) from galaxy colors and optional additional parameters. We analyze G/S-color residuals vs. potential third parameters, finding that axial ratio is the best independent and physically meaningful third parameter. We define a "modi...

  2. A Method to Test Model Calibration Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, Ron; Polly, Ben; Neymark, Joel

    2016-08-26

    This paper describes a method for testing model calibration techniques. Calibration is commonly used in conjunction with energy retrofit audit models. An audit is conducted to gather information about the building needed to assemble an input file for a building energy modeling tool. A calibration technique is used to reconcile model predictions with utility data, and then the 'calibrated model' is used to predict energy savings from a variety of retrofit measures and combinations thereof. Current standards and guidelines such as BPI-2400 and ASHRAE-14 set criteria for 'goodness of fit' and assume that if the criteria are met, then the calibration technique is acceptable. While it is logical to use the actual performance data of the building to tune the model, it is not certain that a good fit will result in a model that better predicts post-retrofit energy savings. Therefore, the basic idea here is that the simulation program (intended for use with the calibration technique) is used to generate surrogate utility bill data and retrofit energy savings data against which the calibration technique can be tested. This provides three figures of merit for testing a calibration technique, 1) accuracy of the post-retrofit energy savings prediction, 2) closure on the 'true' input parameter values, and 3) goodness of fit to the utility bill data. The paper will also discuss the pros and cons of using this synthetic surrogate data approach versus trying to use real data sets of actual buildings.

  3. Increased Automation in Stereo Camera Calibration Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi House

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Robotic vision has become a very popular field in recent years due to the numerous promising applications it may enhance. However, errors within the cameras and in their perception of their environment can cause applications in robotics to fail. To help correct these internal and external imperfections, stereo camera calibrations are performed. There are currently many accurate methods of camera calibration available; however, most or all of them are time consuming and labor intensive. This research seeks to automate the most labor intensive aspects of a popular calibration technique developed by Jean-Yves Bouguet. His process requires manual selection of the extreme corners of a checkerboard pattern. The modified process uses embedded LEDs in the checkerboard pattern to act as active fiducials. Images are captured of the checkerboard with the LEDs on and off in rapid succession. The difference of the two images automatically highlights the location of the four extreme corners, and these corner locations take the place of the manual selections. With this modification to the calibration routine, upwards of eighty mouse clicks are eliminated per stereo calibration. Preliminary test results indicate that accuracy is not substantially affected by the modified procedure. Improved automation to camera calibration procedures may finally penetrate the barriers to the use of calibration in practice.

  4. Increased Automation in Stereo Camera Calibration Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi House

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Robotic vision has become a very popular field in recent years due to the numerous promising applications it may enhance. However, errors within the cameras and in their perception of their environment can cause applications in robotics to fail. To help correct these internal and external imperfections, stereo camera calibrations are performed. There are currently many accurate methods of camera calibration available; however, most or all of them are time consuming and labor intensive. This research seeks to automate the most labor intensive aspects of a popular calibration technique developed by Jean-Yves Bouguet. His process requires manual selection of the extreme corners of a checkerboard pattern. The modified process uses embedded LEDs in the checkerboard pattern to act as active fiducials. Images are captured of the checkerboard with the LEDs on and off in rapid succession. The difference of the two images automatically highlights the location of the four extreme corners, and these corner locations take the place of the manual selections. With this modification to the calibration routine, upwards of eighty mouse clicks are eliminated per stereo calibration. Preliminary test results indicate that accuracy is not substantially affected by the modified procedure. Improved automation to camera calibration procedures may finally penetrate the barriers to the use of calibration in practice.

  5. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Haibin; Shi Chenbo; Zhang Xin' ai; Zhang Zun; Cheng Jiao [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-03-15

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 {mu}N s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 {mu}N s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 {mu}N s with 95% credibility.

  6. Calibration Experiments for a Computer Vision Oyster Volume Estimation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. Andy; Kerns, G. Jay; Lee, D. J.; Stanek, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    Calibration is a technique that is commonly used in science and engineering research that requires calibrating measurement tools for obtaining more accurate measurements. It is an important technique in various industries. In many situations, calibration is an application of linear regression, and is a good topic to be included when explaining and…

  7. Calibration Experiments for a Computer Vision Oyster Volume Estimation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. Andy; Kerns, G. Jay; Lee, D. J.; Stanek, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    Calibration is a technique that is commonly used in science and engineering research that requires calibrating measurement tools for obtaining more accurate measurements. It is an important technique in various industries. In many situations, calibration is an application of linear regression, and is a good topic to be included when explaining and…

  8. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  9. A FAST FOREGROUND DIGITAL CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE FOR PIPELINED ADC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu; Yang Haigang; Cheng Xin; Liu Fei; Yin Tao

    2012-01-01

    Digital calibration techniques are widely developed to cancel the non-idealities of the pipelined Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs).This letter presents a fast foreground digital calibration technique based on the analysis of error sources which influence the resolution of pipelined ADCs.This method estimates the gain error of the ADC prototype quickly and calibrates the ADC simultaneously in the operation time.Finally,a 10 bit,100 Ms/s pipelined ADC is implemented and calibrated.The simulation results show that the digital calibration technique has its efficiency with fewem operation cycles.

  10. ASD FieldSpec Calibration Setup and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Dan

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) Fieldspec Calibration Setup and Techniques. The topics include: 1) ASD Fieldspec FR Spectroradiometer; 2) Components of Calibration; 3) Equipment list; 4) Spectral Setup; 5) Spectral Calibration; 6) Radiometric and Linearity Setup; 7) Radiometric setup; 8) Datadets Required; 9) Data files; and 10) Field of View Measurement. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  11. Another look at volume self-calibration: calibration and self-calibration within a pinhole model of Scheimpflug cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornic, Philippe; Illoul, Cédric; Cheminet, Adam; Le Besnerais, Guy; Champagnat, Frédéric; Le Sant, Yves; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    We address calibration and self-calibration of tomographic PIV experiments within a pinhole model of cameras. A complete and explicit pinhole model of a camera equipped with a 2-tilt angles Scheimpflug adapter is presented. It is then used in a calibration procedure based on a freely moving calibration plate. While the resulting calibrations are accurate enough for Tomo-PIV, we confirm, through a simple experiment, that they are not stable in time, and illustrate how the pinhole framework can be used to provide a quantitative evaluation of geometrical drifts in the setup. We propose an original self-calibration method based on global optimization of the extrinsic parameters of the pinhole model. These methods are successfully applied to the tomographic PIV of an air jet experiment. An unexpected by-product of our work is to show that volume self-calibration induces a change in the world frame coordinates. Provided the calibration drift is small, as generally observed in PIV, the bias on the estimated velocity field is negligible but the absolute location cannot be accurately recovered using standard calibration data.

  12. The KamLAND Full-Volume Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KamLAND Collaboration; Berger, B. E.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Decowski, M. P.; Dwyer, D. A.; Elor, G.; Frank, A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Galloway, M.; Gray, F.; Heeger, K. M.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Keefer, G.; Lendvai, C.; McKee, D.; O' Donnell, T.; Piepke, A.; Steiner, H. M.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Ebihara, T.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Owada, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Tamae, K.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Leonard, D. S.; Luk, K.-B.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.

    2009-03-05

    We have successfully built and operated a source deployment system for the KamLAND detector. This system was used to position radioactive sources throughout the delicate 1-kton liquid scintillator volume, while meeting stringent material cleanliness, material compatibility, and safety requirements. The calibration data obtained with this device were used to fully characterize detector position and energy reconstruction biases. As a result, the uncertainty in the size of the detector fiducial volume was reduced by a factor of two. Prior to calibration with this system, the fiducial volume was the largest source of systematic uncertainty in measuring the number of antineutrinos detected by KamLAND. This paper describes the design, operation and performance of this unique calibration system.

  13. Syringe calibration factors and volume correction factors for the NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Tyler, D K

    2002-01-01

    The activity assay of a radiopharmaceutical administration to a patient is normally achieved via the use of a radionuclide calibrator. Because of the different geometries and elemental compositions between plastic syringes and glass vials, the calibration factors for syringes may well be significantly different from those for the glass containers. The magnitude of these differences depends on the energies of the emitted photons. For some radionuclides variations have been observed of 70 %, it is therefore important to recalibrate for syringes or use syringe calibration factors. Calibration factors and volume correction factors have been derived for the NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator, for a variety of commonly used syringes and needles, for the most commonly used medical radionuclide.

  14. Calibrating transport lines using LOCO techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yves Roblin

    2011-09-01

    With the 12GeV upgrade underway at CEBAF, there is a need to re-characterize the beamlines after the modifications made to it to accommodate running at higher energies. We present a linear perturbation approach to calibrating the optics model of transport lines. This method is adapted from the LOCO method in use for storage rings. We consider the effect of quadrupole errors, dipole construction errors as well as beam position monitors and correctors calibrations. The ideal model is expanded to first order in Taylor series of the quadrupole errors. A set of difference orbits obtained by exciting the correctors along the beamline is taken, yielding the measured response matrix. An iterative procedure is invoked and the quadrupole errors as well as beam position monitors and corrector calibration factors are obtained. Here we present details of the method and results of first measurements at CEBAF in early 2011.

  15. A Method to Test Model Calibration Techniques: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, Ron; Polly, Ben; Neymark, Joel

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a method for testing model calibration techniques. Calibration is commonly used in conjunction with energy retrofit audit models. An audit is conducted to gather information about the building needed to assemble an input file for a building energy modeling tool. A calibration technique is used to reconcile model predictions with utility data, and then the 'calibrated model' is used to predict energy savings from a variety of retrofit measures and combinations thereof. Current standards and guidelines such as BPI-2400 and ASHRAE-14 set criteria for 'goodness of fit' and assume that if the criteria are met, then the calibration technique is acceptable. While it is logical to use the actual performance data of the building to tune the model, it is not certain that a good fit will result in a model that better predicts post-retrofit energy savings. Therefore, the basic idea here is that the simulation program (intended for use with the calibration technique) is used to generate surrogate utility bill data and retrofit energy savings data against which the calibration technique can be tested. This provides three figures of merit for testing a calibration technique, 1) accuracy of the post-retrofit energy savings prediction, 2) closure on the 'true' input parameter values, and 3) goodness of fit to the utility bill data. The paper will also discuss the pros and cons of using this synthetic surrogate data approach versus trying to use real data sets of actual buildings.

  16. Technique for Radiometer and Antenna Array Calibration with Two Antenna Noise Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh; Laymon, Charles; Meyer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique to calibrate a microwave radiometer and phased array antenna system. This calibration technique uses a radiated noise source in addition to an injected noise sources for calibration. The plane of reference for this calibration technique is the face of the antenna and therefore can effectively calibration the gain fluctuations in the active phased array antennas. This paper gives the mathematical formulation for the technique and discusses the improvements brought by the method over the existing calibration techniques.

  17. Self consistent, absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avella, A; Brida, G; Degiovanni, I P; Genovese, M; Gramegna, M; Lolli, L; Monticone, E; Portesi, C; Rajteri, M; Rastello, M L; Taralli, E; Traina, P; White, M

    2011-11-07

    Well characterized photon number resolving detectors are a requirement for many applications ranging from quantum information and quantum metrology to the foundations of quantum mechanics. This prompts the necessity for reliable calibration techniques at the single photon level. In this paper we propose an innovative absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors, using a pulsed heralded photon source based on parametric down conversion. The technique, being absolute, does not require reference standards and is independent upon the performances of the heralding detector. The method provides the results of quantum efficiency for the heralded detector as a function of detected photon numbers. Furthermore, we prove its validity by performing the calibration of a Transition Edge Sensor based detector, a real photon number resolving detector that has recently demonstrated its effectiveness in various quantum information protocols.

  18. External calibration technique of millimeter-wave cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zeng-Liang; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Han, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Lin-Da

    2016-10-01

    The millimeter-wave cloud radar can provide a large number of fine and reliable information for the inversion of cloud macro and micro parameters. A key link of using the millimeter-wave cloud radar to detect the cloud is that the radar must be calibrated. Due to the precision components and severe environment of millimeter-wave cloud radar, subtle changes may take place in the operation process of cloud radar, unless the cloud radar is calibrated regularly. Although the calibration system inside the cloud radar can track and monitor the main working parameters and correct the detection results, it fails to consider the characteristics of the antenna and the mutual influence among different components of cloud radar. Therefore, the external calibration for cloud radar system is very important. Combined with the actual situation of cloud radar under domestic onboard platform, this paper builds a complete external calibration technique process of cloud radar based on the calm sea, providing the theoretical support for the external calibration experiments of the airborne and even satellite-borne millimeter-wave cloud radar developed by our country.

  19. Calibration and validation of full-field techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalmann R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We review basic metrological terms related to the use of measurement equipment for verification of numerical model calculations. We address three challenges that are faced when performing measurements in experimental mechanics with optical techniques: the calibration of a measuring instrument that (i measures strain values, (ii provides full-field data, and (iii is dynamic.

  20. NEW VERSATILE CAMERA CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE BASED ON LINEAR RECTIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Feng; Wang Xuanyin

    2004-01-01

    A new versatile camera calibration technique for machine vision using off-the-shelf cameras is described. Aimed at the large distortion of the off-the-shelf cameras, a new camera distortion rectification technology based on line-rectification is proposed. A full-camera-distortion model is introduced and a linear algorithm is provided to obtain the solution. After the camera rectification intrinsic and extrinsic parameters are obtained based on the relationship between the homograph and absolute conic. This technology needs neither a high-accuracy three-dimensional calibration block, nor a complicated translation or rotation platform. Both simulations and experiments show that this method is effective and robust.

  1. Calibration of an optical condensate measurement technique using indirect static headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, P B; Loconto, P R; McGrath, J J

    2001-12-01

    Researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering seek to obtain a means to measure less than 3 mg of H2O that adheres to a metal surface as condensate. The objective is to calibrate optical reflectance measurements of an aluminum surface as a function of the condensate thickness present. Collaboration with the Hazardous Substance Research Center at Michigan State University results in the development of an indirect static headspace gas chromatographic technique capable of measuring H2O in low-milligram quantities. The technique utilizes manual headspace sampling, a megabore capillary column, and a flame ionization detector. A correlation of r2 = 0.999 is obtained for the calibration of the indirect measurement technique. The calibration of the analytical instrument demonstrates adequate precision (calcium carbide to convert the H2O to acetylene. A scaled calibration technique is used to simplify handling trace water volumes. The surface reflectance measurements are found to correlate well (r2 = 0.935) with measurements of the condensate mass. This result facilitates the development of an optical mass-transfer measurement technique. This study focuses on the analytical method and its relationship with engineering research.

  2. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  3. SDSS-IV/MaNGA: Spectrophotometric Calibration Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Renbin; Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Schlegel, David J.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Cherinka, Brian; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Hogg, David W.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2″ fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600-10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Therefore, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. MaNGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. Using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of MaNGA's wavelength range.

  4. SDSS-IV/MaNGA: SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose St., Lexington, KY 40506-0057 (United States); Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Wake, David A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Winsconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Schlegel, David J. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8160 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino el Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Gunn, James E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Sánchez, Sebastian F., E-mail: yanrenbin@uky.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2″ fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600–10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Therefore, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. MaNGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. Using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of MaNGA's wavelength range.

  5. Spatial 3-D nonlinear calibration technique for PSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lifeng; Zhang, Guoxiong; Zheng, Qi; Gong, Qiang; Liu, Wenyao

    2006-11-01

    A 3-D nonlinear calibration technique for Position sensitive detector (PSD) in long distance laser collimating measurement is proposed. An automatic calibration system was developed to measure the nonlinearity of a 2-D PSD in 3-D space. It is mainly composed of a high accurate 2-D motorized translational stage, a high precision distance measuring device, and a computer-based data acquisition and control system. With the aid of the calibration system, the nonlinear characteristic of 2-D PSD is checked in a long collimating distance up to 78 meters. The calibration experiment was carried out for a series of distance, e.g. every 15 meters. The results showed that the nonlinearity of 2-D PSD is different evidently when the PSD element is at different distance from the laser head. One calculating method is defined to evaluate the nonlinear errors. The spatial 3-D mapping relationship between the actual displacements of the incident light and the coordinates of 2-D PSD outputs is established using a multilayer feedforward neural network.

  6. Respiration monitoring by Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) Technique in a group of healthy males. Calibration equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleza, M.; Vargas, M.; Kashina, S.; Huerta, M. R.; Delgadillo, I.; Moreno, G.

    2017-01-01

    Several research groups have proposed the electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in order to analyse lung ventilation. With the use of 16 electrodes, the EIT is capable to obtain a set of transversal section images of thorax. In previous works, we have obtained an alternating signal in terms of impedance corresponding to respiration from EIT images. Then, in order to transform those impedance changes into a measurable volume signal a set of calibration equations has been obtained. However, EIT technique is still expensive to attend outpatients in basics hospitals. For that reason, we propose the use of electrical bioimpedance (EBI) technique to monitor respiration behaviour. The aim of this study was to obtain a set of calibration equations to transform EBI impedance changes determined at 4 different frequencies into a measurable volume signal. In this study a group of 8 healthy males was assessed. From obtained results, a high mathematical adjustment in the group calibrations equations was evidenced. Then, the volume determinations obtained by EBI were compared with those obtained by our gold standard. Therefore, despite EBI does not provide a complete information about impedance vectors of lung compared with EIT, it is possible to monitor the respiration.

  7. Intra-shot MSE Calibration Technique For LHCD Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Jinseok; Scott, Steve; Shiraiwa, Syun' ichi; Greenwald, Martin; Parker, Ronald; Wallace, Gregory

    2009-11-23

    The spurious drift in pitch angle of order several degrees measured by the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak1 over the course of an experimental run day has precluded direct utilization of independent absolute calibrations. Recently, the underlying cause of the drift has been identified as thermal stress-induced birefringence in a set of in-vessel lenses. The shot-to-shot drift can be avoided by using MSE to measure only the change in pitch angle between a reference phase and a phase of physical interest within a single plasma discharge. This intra-shot calibration technique has been applied to the Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) experiments and the measured current profiles qualitatively demonstrate several predictions of LHCD theory such as an inverse dependence of current drive efficiency on the parallel refractive index and the presence of off-axis current drive.

  8. Simple and accurate empirical absolute volume calibration of a multi-sensor fringe projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdeisat, Munther; Qudeisat, Mohammad; AlSa`d, Mohammed; Burton, David; Lilley, Francis; Ammous, Marwan M. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper suggests a novel absolute empirical calibration method for a multi-sensor fringe projection system. The optical setup of the projector-camera sensor can be arbitrary. The term absolute calibration here means that the centre of the three dimensional coordinates in the resultant calibrated volume coincides with a preset centre to the three-dimensional real-world coordinate system. The use of a zero-phase fringe marking spot is proposed to increase depth calibration accuracy, where the spot centre is determined with sub-pixel accuracy. Also, a new method is proposed for transversal calibration. Depth and transversal calibration methods have been tested using both single sensor and three-sensor fringe projection systems. The standard deviation of the error produced by this system is 0.25 mm. The calibrated volume produced by this method is 400 mm×400 mm×140 mm.

  9. Lunar Imaging and Ionospheric Calibration for the Lunar Cherenkov Technique

    CERN Document Server

    McFadden, Rebecca; Mevius, Maaijke

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Cherenkov technique is a promising method for UHE neutrino and cosmic ray detection which aims to detect nanosecond radio pulses produced during particle interactions in the Lunar regolith. For low frequency experiments, such as NuMoon, the frequency dependent dispersive effect of the ionosphere is an important experimental concern as it reduces the pulse amplitude and subsequent chances of detection. We are continuing to investigate a new method to calibrate the dispersive effect of the ionosphere on lunar Cherenkov pulses via Faraday rotation measurements of the Moon's polarised emission combined with geomagnetic field models. We also extend this work to include radio imaging of the Lunar surface, which provides information on the physical and chemical properties of the lunar surface that may affect experimental strategies for the lunar Cherenkov technique.

  10. Mass Spectrometric Calibration of Controlled Fluoroform Leak Rate Devices Technique and Uncertainty Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balsley, S D; Laduca, C A

    2003-01-01

    Controlled leak rate devices of fluoroform on the order of 10 sup - sup 8 atm centre dot cc sec sup - sup 1 at 25 C are used to calibrate QC-1 War Reserve neutron tube exhaust stations for leak detection sensitivity. Close-out calibration of these tritium-contaminated devices is provided by the Gas Dynamics and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Organization 14406, which is a tritium analytical facility. The mass spectrometric technique used for the measurement is discussed, as is the first principals calculation (pressure, volume, temperature and time). The uncertainty of the measurement is largely driven by contributing factors in the determination of P, V and T. The expanded uncertainty of the leak rate measurement is shown to be 4.42%, with a coverage factor of 3 (k=3).

  11. A comparison of radiometric calibration techniques for lunar impact flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, R. M.; Ehlert, S. R.; Moser, D. E.

    2017-09-01

    Video observations of lunar impact flashes have been made by a number of researchers since the late 1990's and the problem of determination of the impact energies has been approached in different ways Bellot Rubio et al. (2000a, b), Yanagisawa et al. (2008), Bouley et al. (2012), Suggs et al. (2014), Rembold and Ryan (2015), Ortiz et al. (2015), Madiedo et al. (2015). The wide spectral response of the unfiltered video cameras in use for all published measurements necessitates color correction for the standard filter magnitudes available for the comparison stars but this is not typically considered. In our approach, the published color of the comparison star and an estimate of the color of the impact flash is used to correct it to the chosen filter bandpass. Magnitudes corrected to standard filters are then used to determine the luminous energy in the filter bandpass according to the stellar atmosphere calibrations of Bessell et al. (1998). In this paper we compare the various photometric calibration techniques and calculation of luminous energy (radiometry) of impact flashes. This issue has significant implications for determination of luminous efficiency, predictions of impact crater sizes for observed flashes, and the determination of the flux of meteoroids in the 10 s of grams to kilograms mass range.

  12. SDSS-IV/MaNGA: Spectrophotometric Calibration Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew A; Law, David R; Schlegel, David J; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A; Blanton, Michael R; Cherinka, Brian; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Gunn, James E; Harding, Paul; Hogg, David W; Sánchez-Gallego, José R; Sánchez, Sebastian F; Wake, David A; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV (SDSS-IV), is an integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2 arcsec fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3,600-10,300A. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate {\\it spectral surface photometry}, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to v...

  13. Comparison of multivariate calibration techniques applied to experimental NIR data sets

    OpenAIRE

    Centner, V; Verdu-Andres, J; Walczak, B; Jouan-Rimbaud, D; Despagne, F; Pasti, L; Poppi, R; Massart, DL; de Noord, OE

    2000-01-01

    The present study compares the performance of different multivariate calibration techniques applied to four near-infrared data sets when test samples are well within the calibration domain. Three types of problems are discussed: the nonlinear calibration, the calibration using heterogeneous data sets, and the calibration in the presence of irrelevant information in the set of predictors. Recommendations are derived from the comparison, which should help to guide a nonchemometrician through th...

  14. Left ventricular volume measurement in mice by conductance catheter: evaluation and optimization of calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Møller; Kristiansen, Steen B; Ringgaard, Steffen;

    2007-01-01

    . The dual-frequency method for estimation of parallel conductance failed to produce V(CC) that correlated with V(MRI). We conclude that selection of the calibration procedure for the CC has significant implications for the accuracy and precision of volume estimation and pressure-volume loop...

  15. Configurations and calibration methods for passive sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Gangfeng; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2007-10-19

    Passive sampling technology has developed very quickly in the past 15 years, and is widely used for the monitoring of pollutants in different environments. The design and quantification of passive sampling devices require an appropriate calibration method. Current calibration methods that exist for passive sampling, including equilibrium extraction, linear uptake, and kinetic calibration, are presented in this review. A number of state-of-the-art passive sampling devices that can be used for aqueous and air monitoring are introduced according to their calibration methods.

  16. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shortis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  17. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  18. A New Technique for CCD Camera Auto-Calibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel feature-round-based coplanar drone for the CCD camera auto-calibration is designed. Based on the ellipse similarity, an ellipse recognition algorithm is proposed. The experiment indicates the calibration error is less than 0.4 pixel.

  19. 40 CFR 86.519-90 - Constant volume sampler calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by EPA for both PDP (Positive Displacement Pump) and CFV (Critical Flow Venturi) are outlined below... establish the flow rate of the constant volume sampler pump. All the parameters related to the pump are simultaneously measured with the parameters related to a flowmeter which is connected in series with the...

  20. Breast density mapping based upon system calibration, x-ray techniques, and FFDM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Smith, Andrew P.; Jing, Zhenxue; Wu, Tao

    2007-03-01

    Clinical studies have correlated a high breast density to a women's risk of breast cancer. A breast density measurement that can quantitatively depict the volume distribution and percentage of dense tissues in breasts would be very useful for risk factor assessment of breast cancer, and might be more predictive of risks than the common but subjective and coarse 4-point BIRADS scale. This paper proposes to use a neural-network mapping to compute the breast density information based upon system calibration data, x-ray techniques, and Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. The mapping consists of four modules, namely, system calibration, generator of beam quality, generator of normalized absorption, and a multi-layer feed-forward neural network. As the core of breast density mapping, the network accepts x-ray target/filter combination, normalized x-ray absorption, pixel-wise breast thickness map, and x-ray beam quality during image acquisition as input elements, and exports a pixel-wise breast density distribution and a single breast density percentage for the imaged breast. Training and testing data sets for the design and verification of the network were formulated from calibrated x-ray beam quality, imaging data with a step wedge phantom under a variety x-ray imaging techniques, and nominal breast densities of tissue equivalent materials. The network was trained using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm based back-propagation learning method. Various thickness and glandular density phantom studies were performed with clinical x-ray techniques. Preliminary results showed that the neural network mapping is promising in accurately computing glandular density distribution and breast density percentage.

  1. Joint Gain/Phase and Mutual Coupling Array Calibration Technique with Single Calibrating Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An iterative-based method for joint gain/phase and mutual coupling array calibration is proposed in this paper. It estimates the array gain/phase and mutual coupling coefficients with a set of simultaneous equations formed by using the beam pattern property of the array. Only one calibrating source with known direction is requiblue to obtain the unique estimate. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated by simulation results and by experimental data collected with an antenna array operating in high-frequency radio band.

  2. Experimental technique of calibration of symmetrical air pollution models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kumar

    2005-10-01

    Based on the inherent property of symmetry of air pollution models,a Symmetrical Air Pollution Model Index (SAPMI)has been developed to calibrate the accuracy of predictions made by such models,where the initial quantity of release at the source is not known.For exact prediction the value of SAPMI should be equal to 1.If the predicted values are overestimating then SAPMI is > 1and if it is underestimating then SAPMI is < 1.Specific design for the layout of receptors has been suggested as a requirement for the calibration experiments.SAPMI is applicable for all variations of symmetrical air pollution dispersion models.

  3. Review of neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques: new needs for emerging fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressier, V

    2014-10-01

    Neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques have been developed since the middle of the 20th century to support research and nuclear power energy development. The technical areas needing reference neutron fields and related instruments were mainly cross section measurements, radiation protection, dosimetry and fission reactors, with energy ranging from a few millielectronvolts to about 20 MeV. The reference neutron fields and calibration techniques developed for these purposes will be presented in this paper. However, in recent years, emerging fields have brought new needs for calibration facilities and monitoring techniques. These new challenges for neutron metrology will be exposed with their technical difficulties.

  4. An improved calibration technique for wind tunnel model attitude sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, John S.; Wong, Douglas T.; Finley, Tom D.; Tcheng, Ping

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic wind tunnel tests at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) require accurate measurement of model attitude. Inertial accelerometer packages have been the primary sensor used to measure model attitude to an accuracy of +/- 0.01 deg as required for aerodynamic research. The calibration parameters of the accelerometer package are currently obtained from a seven-point tumble test using a simplified empirical approximation. The inaccuracy due to the approximation exceeds the accuracy requirement as the misalignment angle between the package axis and the model body axis increases beyond 1.4 deg. This paper presents the exact solution derived from the coordinate transformation to eliminate inaccuracy caused by the approximation. In addition, a new calibration procedure is developed in which the data taken from the seven-point tumble test is fit to the exact solution by means of a least-squares estimation procedure. Validation tests indicate that the new calibration procedure provides +/- 0.005-deg accuracy over large package misalignments, which is not possible with the current procedure.

  5. SU-E-T-470: Importance of HU-Mass Density Calibration Technique in Proton Pencil Beam Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penfold, S; Miller, A [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stoichiometric calibration of Hounsfield Units (HUs) for conversion to proton relative stopping powers (RStPs) is vital for accurate dose calculation in proton therapy. However proton dose distributions are not only dependent on RStP, but also on relative scattering power (RScP) of patient tissues. RScP is approximated from material density but a stoichiometric calibration of HU-density tables is commonly neglected. The purpose of this work was to quantify the difference in calculated dose of a commercial TPS when using HU-density tables based on tissue substitute materials and stoichiometric calibrated ICRU tissues. Methods: Two HU-density calibration tables were generated based on scans of the CIRS electron density phantom. The first table was based directly on measured HU and manufacturer quoted density of tissue substitute materials. The second was based on the same CT scan of the CIRS phantom followed by a stoichiometric calibration of ICRU44 tissue materials. The research version of Pinnacle{sup 3} proton therapy was used to compute dose in a patient CT data set utilizing both HU-density tables. Results: The two HU-density tables showed significant differences for bone tissues; the difference increasing with increasing HU. Differences in density calibration table translated to a difference in calculated RScP of −2.5% for ICRU skeletal muscle and 9.2% for ICRU femur. Dose-volume histogram analysis of a parallel opposed proton therapy prostate plan showed that the difference in calculated dose was negligible when using the two different HU-density calibration tables. Conclusion: The impact of HU-density calibration technique on proton therapy dose calculation was assessed. While differences were found in the calculated RScP of bony tissues, the difference in dose distribution for realistic treatment scenarios was found to be insignificant.

  6. A novel biphasic-current-pulse calibration technique for electrical neural stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maohua Ren; Jinyong Zhang; Lei Wang; Zhenyu Wang

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenge in neural prosthetic device design is to ensure charge-balanced stimulation. This paper presents a new calibration technique to minimize the mismatch between anodic and cathodic current amplitudes. The proposed circuit mainly consists of a digital and an analog calibration, where a successive approximation register (SAR) logic and a comparator are used in digital calibration while a source follower is adopted in analog calibration. With a 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS process, the simulation shows that the maximum current mismatch is 45 nA (<0.05%).

  7. Statistical tools for the calibration of traffic conflicts techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S.

    1982-01-01

    To compare the results of various conflict techniques from different countries, an international experiment took place in Rouen in 1979. The experiment showed that, in general, with each technique the same conclusions were reached with regard to the problems of safety at two intersections in Rouen.

  8. Employing an Incentive Spirometer to Calibrate Tidal Volumes Estimated from a Smartphone Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Bersain A; Reljin, Natasa; Kong, Youngsun; Nam, Yunyoung; Ha, Sangho; Chon, Ki H

    2016-03-18

    A smartphone-based tidal volume (V(T)) estimator was recently introduced by our research group, where an Android application provides a chest movement signal whose peak-to-peak amplitude is highly correlated with reference V(T) measured by a spirometer. We found a Normalized Root Mean Squared Error (NRMSE) of 14.998% ± 5.171% (mean ± SD) when the smartphone measures were calibrated using spirometer data. However, the availability of a spirometer device for calibration is not realistic outside clinical or research environments. In order to be used by the general population on a daily basis, a simple calibration procedure not relying on specialized devices is required. In this study, we propose taking advantage of the linear correlation between smartphone measurements and V(T) to obtain a calibration model using information computed while the subject breathes through a commercially-available incentive spirometer (IS). Experiments were performed on twelve (N = 12) healthy subjects. In addition to corroborating findings from our previous study using a spirometer for calibration, we found that the calibration procedure using an IS resulted in a fixed bias of -0.051 L and a RMSE of 0.189 ± 0.074 L corresponding to 18.559% ± 6.579% when normalized. Although it has a small underestimation and slightly increased error, the proposed calibration procedure using an IS has the advantages of being simple, fast, and affordable. This study supports the feasibility of developing a portable smartphone-based breathing status monitor that provides information about breathing depth, in addition to the more commonly estimated respiratory rate, on a daily basis.

  9. Employing an Incentive Spirometer to Calibrate Tidal Volumes Estimated from a Smartphone Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersain A. Reyes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A smartphone-based tidal volume (VT estimator was recently introduced by our research group, where an Android application provides a chest movement signal whose peak-to-peak amplitude is highly correlated with reference VT measured by a spirometer. We found a Normalized Root Mean Squared Error (NRMSE of 14.998% ± 5.171% (mean ± SD when the smartphone measures were calibrated using spirometer data. However, the availability of a spirometer device for calibration is not realistic outside clinical or research environments. In order to be used by the general population on a daily basis, a simple calibration procedure not relying on specialized devices is required. In this study, we propose taking advantage of the linear correlation between smartphone measurements and VT to obtain a calibration model using information computed while the subject breathes through a commercially-available incentive spirometer (IS. Experiments were performed on twelve (N = 12 healthy subjects. In addition to corroborating findings from our previous study using a spirometer for calibration, we found that the calibration procedure using an IS resulted in a fixed bias of −0.051 L and a RMSE of 0.189 ± 0.074 L corresponding to 18.559% ± 6.579% when normalized. Although it has a small underestimation and slightly increased error, the proposed calibration procedure using an IS has the advantages of being simple, fast, and affordable. This study supports the feasibility of developing a portable smartphone-based breathing status monitor that provides information about breathing depth, in addition to the more commonly estimated respiratory rate, on a daily basis.

  10. Volume calibration for nuclear materials control: ANSI N15.19-1989 and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, A.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since the last IAEA International Safeguards Symposium, a revised standard for volume calibration methodology was issued in the United States. Because the new standard reflects the advent of high-precision volume measurement technology, it is significantly different from the earlier standard which it supersedes. The new standard outlines a unified data standardization model that applies to process tanks equipped with differential pressure measurement systems for determining liquid content. At the heart of the model is an algorithm to determine liquid height from pressure measurements that accounts for the major factors affecting the accuracy of those measurements. The standardization model also contains algorithms that adjust data from volumetric and gravimetric provers to a standard set of reference conditions. A key component of the standardization model is an algorithm to take account of temperature-induced dimensional changes in the tank. Improved methods for the statistical treatment of calibration data have also appeared since the last Safeguards Symposium. A statistical method of alignment has been introduced that employs a least-squares criterion to determine ``optimal`` alignment factors. More importantly, a statistical model has been proposed that yields plausible estimates of the variance of height and volume measurements when significant run-to-run differences are present in the calibration data. The new standardization model and statistical methods described here are being implemented in a portable, user-friendly software program for use by IAEA inspectors and statisticians. Perhaps these methods will eventually find their way into appropriate international standards.

  11. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  12. Hybrid dynamic radioactive particle tracking (RPT) calibration technique for multiphase flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khane, Vaibhav; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2017-04-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique has been utilized to measure three-dimensional hydrodynamic parameters for multiphase flow systems. An analytical solution to the inverse problem of the RPT technique, i.e. finding the instantaneous tracer positions based upon instantaneous counts received in the detectors, is not possible. Therefore, a calibration to obtain a counts-distance map is needed. There are major shortcomings in the conventional RPT calibration method due to which it has limited applicability in practical applications. In this work, the design and development of a novel dynamic RPT calibration technique are carried out to overcome the shortcomings of the conventional RPT calibration method. The dynamic RPT calibration technique has been implemented around a test reactor with 1foot in diameter and 1 foot in height using Cobalt-60 as an isotopes tracer particle. Two sets of experiments have been carried out to test the capability of novel dynamic RPT calibration. In the first set of experiments, a manual calibration apparatus has been used to hold a tracer particle at known static locations. In the second set of experiments, the tracer particle was moved vertically downwards along a straight line path in a controlled manner. The obtained reconstruction results about the tracer particle position were compared with the actual known position and the reconstruction errors were estimated. The obtained results revealed that the dynamic RPT calibration technique is capable of identifying tracer particle positions with a reconstruction error between 1 to 5.9 mm for the conditions studied which could be improved depending on various factors outlined here.

  13. Lunar imaging and ionospheric calibration for the Lunar Cherenkov technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McFadden, R.; Scholten, O.; Mevius, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Cherenkov technique is a promising method for UHE neutrino and cosmic ray detection which aims to detect nanosecond radio pulses produced during particle interactions in the Lunar regolith. For low frequency experiments, such as NuMoon, the frequency dependent dispersive effect of the iono

  14. A robust and simple two-mode digital calibration technique for pipelined ADC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Xiumei; Zhao Nan; Sekedi Bomeh Kobenge; Yang Huazhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a two-mode digital calibration technique for pipelined analog-to-digital converters (ADC).The proposed calibration eliminates the errors of residual difference voltage induced by capacitor mismatch of pseudorandom (PN) sequence injection capacitors at the ADC initialization,while applies digital background calibration to continuously compensate the interstage gain errors in ADC normal operation.The presented technique not only reduces the complexity of analog circuit by eliminating the implementation of PN sequence with accurate amplitude in analog domain,but also improves the performance of digital background calibration by minimizing the sensitivity of calibration accuracy to sub-ADC errors.The use ofopamps with low DC gains in normal operation makes the proposed design more compatible with future nanometer CMOS technology.The prototype of a 12-bit 40-MS/s pipelined ADC with the two-mode digital calibration is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS process.Adopting a simple telescopic opamp with a DC gain of 58-dB in the first stage,the measured SFDR and SNDR within the first Nyquist zone reach 80-dB and 66-dB,respectively.With the calibration,the maximum integral nonlinearity (INL) of the ADC reduces from 4.75-LSB to 0.65-LSB,while the ADC core consumes 82-mW at 3.3-V power supply.

  15. A robust and simple two-mode digital calibration technique for pipelined ADC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Xiumei; Zhao Nan; Sekedi Bomeh Kobenge; Yang Huazhong, E-mail: yxm@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents a two-mode digital calibration technique for pipelined analog-to-digital converters (ADC). The proposed calibration eliminates the errors of residual difference voltage induced by capacitor mismatch of pseudorandom (PN) sequence injection capacitors at the ADC initialization, while applies digital background calibration to continuously compensate the interstage gain errors in ADC normal operation. The presented technique not only reduces the complexity of analog circuit by eliminating the implementation of PN sequence with accurate amplitude in analog domain, but also improves the performance of digital background calibration by minimizing the sensitivity of calibration accuracy to sub-ADC errors. The use of opamps with low DC gains in normal operation makes the proposed design more compatible with future nanometer CMOS technology. The prototype of a 12-bit 40-MS/s pipelined ADC with the two-mode digital calibration is implemented in 0.18-{mu}m CMOS process. Adopting a simple telescopic opamp with a DC gain of 58-dB in the first stage, the measured SFDR and SNDR within the first Nyquist zone reach 80-dB and 66-dB, respectively. With the calibration, the maximum integral nonlinearity (INL) of the ADC reduces from 4.75-LSB to 0.65-LSB, while the ADC core consumes 82-mW at 3.3-V power supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  16. A robust and simple two-mode digital calibration technique for pipelined ADC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiumei, Yin; Nan, Zhao; Bomeh Kobenge, Sekedi; Huazhong, Yang

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a two-mode digital calibration technique for pipelined analog-to-digital converters (ADC). The proposed calibration eliminates the errors of residual difference voltage induced by capacitor mismatch of pseudorandom (PN) sequence injection capacitors at the ADC initialization, while applies digital background calibration to continuously compensate the interstage gain errors in ADC normal operation. The presented technique not only reduces the complexity of analog circuit by eliminating the implementation of PN sequence with accurate amplitude in analog domain, but also improves the performance of digital background calibration by minimizing the sensitivity of calibration accuracy to sub-ADC errors. The use of opamps with low DC gains in normal operation makes the proposed design more compatible with future nanometer CMOS technology. The prototype of a 12-bit 40-MS/s pipelined ADC with the two-mode digital calibration is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS process. Adopting a simple telescopic opamp with a DC gain of 58-dB in the first stage, the measured SFDR and SNDR within the first Nyquist zone reach 80-dB and 66-dB, respectively. With the calibration, the maximum integral nonlinearity (INL) of the ADC reduces from 4.75-LSB to 0.65-LSB, while the ADC core consumes 82-mW at 3.3-V power supply.

  17. Assessment of target volume doses in radiotherapy based on the standard and measured calibration curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Fallah Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In radiation treatments, estimation of the dose distribution in the target volume is one of the main components of the treatment planning procedure. To estimate the dose distribution, the information of electron densities is necessary. The standard curves determined by computed tomography (CT scanner that may be different from that of other oncology centers. In this study, the changes of dose calculation due to the different calibration curves (HU-ρel were investigated. Materials and Methods: Dose values were calculated based on the standard calibration curve that was predefined for the treatment planning system (TPS. The calibration curve was also extracted from the CT images of the phantom, and dose values were calculated based on this curve. The percentage errors of the calculated values were determined. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analyses of the mean differences were performed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for both of the calibration curves. Results and Discussion: The results show no significant difference for both of the measured and standard calibration curves (HU-ρel in 6, 15, and 18 MeV energies. In Wilcoxon ranked sum nonparametric test for independent samples with P < 0.05, the equality of monitor units for both of the curves to transfer 200 cGy doses to reference points was resulted. The percentage errors of the calculated values were lower than 2% and 1.5% in 6 and 15 MeV, respectively. Conclusion: From the results, it could be concluded that the standard calibration curve could be used in TPS dose calculation accurately.

  18. Sandia software guidelines: Volume 5, Tools, techniques, and methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume describes software tools and methodologies available to Sandia personnel for the development of software, and outlines techniques that have proven useful within the Laboratories and elsewhere. References and evaluations by Sandia personnel are included. 6 figs.

  19. Comparison of CT number calibration techniques for CBCT-based dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, Alex [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, Downs Road (United Kingdom); McQuaid, Dualta; Nill, Simeon; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Oelfke, Uwe [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Murray, Julia; Bhide, Shreerang; Harrington, Kevin [The Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, Downs Road (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Poludniowski, Gavin [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Nutting, Christopher [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Newbold, Kate [The Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, Downs Road (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this work was to compare and validate various computed tomography (CT) number calibration techniques with respect to cone beam CT (CBCT) dose calculation accuracy. CBCT dose calculation accuracy was assessed for pelvic, lung, and head and neck (H and N) treatment sites for two approaches: (1) physics-based scatter correction methods (CBCT{sub r}); (2) density override approaches including assigning water density to the entire CBCT (W), assignment of either water or bone density (WB), and assignment of either water or lung density (WL). Methods for CBCT density assignment within a commercially available treatment planning system (RS{sub auto}), where CBCT voxels are binned into six density levels, were assessed and validated. Dose-difference maps and dose-volume statistics were used to compare the CBCT dose distributions with the ground truth of a planning CT acquired the same day as the CBCT. For pelvic cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume deviations below 1.5 %. RS{sub auto} provided larger than average errors for pelvic treatments for patients with large amounts of adipose tissue. For H and N cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume differences below 1.0 % with CBCT{sub r} (0.5 %) and RS{sub auto} (0.6 %) performing best. For lung cases, WL and RS{sub auto} methods generated dose distributions most similar to the ground truth. The RS{sub auto} density override approach is an attractive option for CTN adjustments for a variety of anatomical sites. RS{sub auto} methods were validated, resulting in dose calculations that were consistent with those calculated on diagnostic-quality CT images, for CBCT images acquired of the lung, for patients receiving pelvic RT in cases without excess adipose tissue, and for H and N cases. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Arbeit ist der Vergleich und die Validierung mehrerer CT-Kalibrierungsmethoden zur Dosisberechnung auf der Grundlage von Kegelstrahlcomputertomographie

  20. Adaptive digital calibration techniques for narrow band low-IF receivers with on-chip PLL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Juan; Zhang Huajiang; Zhao Feng; Hong Zhiliang

    2009-01-01

    Digital calibration and control techniques for narrow band integrated low-IF receivers with on-chip frequency synthesizer are presented. The calibration and control system, which is adopted to ensure an achievable signal-to-noise ratio and bit error rate, consists of a digitally controlled, high resolution dB-linear automatic gain control (AGC), an inphase (I) and quadrature (Q) gain and phase mismatch calibration, and an automatic frequency calibration (AFC) of a wideband voltage-controlled oscillator in a PLL based frequency synthesizer. The calibration system has a low design complexity with little power and small die area. Simulation results show that the calibration system can enlarge the dynamic range to 72 dB and minimize the phase and amplitude imbalance between I and Q to 0.08° and 0.024 dB, respectively, which means the image rejection ratio is better than 60 dB. In addition, the calibration time of the AFC is 1.12μs only with a reference clock of 100 MHz.

  1. ITER-relevant calibration technique for soft x-ray spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzadkiewicz, J; Książek, I; Zastrow, K-D; Coffey, I H; Jakubowska, K; Lawson, K D

    2010-10-01

    The ITER-oriented JET research program brings new requirements for the low-Z impurity monitoring, in particular for the Be—the future main wall component of JET and ITER. Monitoring based on Bragg spectroscopy requires an absolute sensitivity calibration, which is challenging for large tokamaks. This paper describes both “component-by-component” and “continua” calibration methods used for the Be IV channel (75.9 Å) of the Bragg rotor spectrometer deployed on JET. The calibration techniques presented here rely on multiorder reflectivity calculations and measurements of continuum radiation emitted from helium plasmas. These offer excellent conditions for the absolute photon flux calibration due to their low level of impurities. It was found that the component-by-component method gives results that are four times higher than those obtained by means of the continua method. A better understanding of this discrepancy requires further investigations.

  2. Computation Techniques for the Volume of a Tetrahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss specific techniques for the computation of the volume of a tetrahedron. A few of them are taught in the undergraduate multivariable calculus courses. Few of them are found in text books on coordinate geometry and synthetic solid geometry. This article gathers many of these techniques so as to constitute a…

  3. Quantitative CT: technique dependence of volume estimation on pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baiyu; Barnhart, Huiman; Richard, Samuel; Colsher, James; Amurao, Maxwell; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-07

    Current estimation of lung nodule size typically relies on uni- or bi-dimensional techniques. While new three-dimensional volume estimation techniques using MDCT have improved size estimation of nodules with irregular shapes, the effect of acquisition and reconstruction parameters on accuracy (bias) and precision (variance) of the new techniques has not been fully investigated. To characterize the volume estimation performance dependence on these parameters, an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing synthetic nodules was scanned and reconstructed with protocols across various acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Nodule volumes were estimated by a clinical lung analysis software package, LungVCAR. Precision and accuracy of the volume assessment were calculated across the nodules and compared between protocols via a generalized estimating equation analysis. Results showed that the precision and accuracy of nodule volume quantifications were dependent on slice thickness, with different dependences for different nodule characteristics. Other parameters including kVp, pitch, and reconstruction kernel had lower impact. Determining these technique dependences enables better volume quantification via protocol optimization and highlights the importance of consistent imaging parameters in sequential examinations.

  4. Effect of collisional lines broadening and calibration functions in the pure rotational Raman lidar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, Vladislav V.; Zuev, Vladimir V.

    2016-10-01

    We present and examine two three-coefficient calibration functions to be used for the tropospheric temperature retrievals via the pure rotational Raman (PRR) lidar technique. These functions are the special cases of the general analytical calibration function in the PRR lidar technique. The general function special cases take into account the collisional (pressure) broadening of all individual atmospheric N2 and O2 PRR lines in varying degrees. We apply these two special cases to real lidar remote sensing data and compare nighttime temperature profiles retrieved using these calibration functions to the profiles retrieved using other known ones. The absolute statistical uncertainties of temperature retrieval are also given in an analytical form. Lidar measurements data, obtained in Tomsk (56.48° N, 85.05° E, Western Siberia, Russia) using the IMCES PRR lidar at λ = 354.67 nm on 1 April 2015, were used for the tropospheric temperature retrievals (3-12 km).

  5. Constraining Direction-Dependent Instrumental Polarisation: A New Technique for Polarisation Angle Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Farnes, J S

    2014-01-01

    Direction-dependent instrumental polarisation introduces wide-field polarimetric aberrations and limits the dynamic range of low-frequency interferometric images. We therefore provide a detailed two-dimensional analysis of the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) primary beam in full-Stokes at 325 MHz and 610 MHz. We find that the directional dependence is essentially independent of the feed and is dominated by the curvature of the dishes reflecting mesh. The developed beam models are used to reduce wide-field instrumental polarisation in 610 MHz observations by subtracting the expected response from the $uv$-data itself. Furthermore, a new technique for polarisation angle calibration is presented that allows for calibration using an unpolarised source and therefore can be implemented at arbitrarily low observational frequencies. This technique has the advantage that it calibrates the polarisation angle independently of ionospheric Faraday rotation and source variability. It also removes the need for known ...

  6. Techniques And Results For The Calibration Of The MST Prototype For The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The next generation instrument for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy will be the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), consisting of approximately 100 telescopes in three sizes, built on two sites with one each in the Northern and Southern Hemi- spheres. Up to 40 of these will be Medium Size Telescopes (MSTs) which will dominate sensitivity in the core energy range. Since 2012, a full size mechanical prototype for the modified 12 m Davies-Cotton design MST has been in operation in Berlin. This doc- ument describes the techniques which have been implemented to calibrate and optimise the mechanical and optical performance of the prototype, and gives the results of over three years of observations and measurements. Pointing calibration techniques will be discussed, along with the development of a bending model, and calibration of the CCD cameras used for pointing measurements. Additionally alignment of mirror segments using the Bokeh method is shown.

  7. Tropospheric temperature measurements with the pure rotational Raman lidar technique using nonlinear calibration functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Gerasimov, Vladislav V.; Pravdin, Vladimir L.; Pavlinskiy, Aleksei V.; Nakhtigalova, Daria P.

    2017-01-01

    Among lidar techniques, the pure rotational Raman (PRR) technique is the best suited for tropospheric and lower stratospheric temperature measurements. Calibration functions are required for the PRR technique to retrieve temperature profiles from lidar remote sensing data. Both temperature retrieval accuracy and number of calibration coefficients depend on the selected function. The commonly used calibration function (linear in reciprocal temperature 1/T with two calibration coefficients) ignores all types of broadening of individual PRR lines of atmospheric N2 and O2 molecules. However, the collisional (pressure) broadening dominates over other types of broadening of PRR lines in the troposphere and can differently affect the accuracy of tropospheric temperature measurements depending on the PRR lidar system. We recently derived the calibration function in the general analytical form that takes into account the collisional broadening of all N2 and O2 PRR lines (Gerasimov and Zuev, 2016). This general calibration function represents an infinite series and, therefore, cannot be directly used in the temperature retrieval algorithm. For this reason, its four simplest special cases (calibration functions nonlinear in 1/T with three calibration coefficients), two of which have not been suggested before, were considered and analyzed. All the special cases take the collisional PRR lines broadening into account in varying degrees and the best function among them was determined via simulation. In this paper, we use the special cases to retrieve tropospheric temperature from real PRR lidar data. The calibration function best suited for tropospheric temperature retrievals is determined from the comparative analysis of temperature uncertainties yielded by using these functions. The absolute and relative statistical uncertainties of temperature retrieval are given in an analytical form assuming Poisson statistics of photon counting. The vertical tropospheric temperature

  8. 2D-3D Registration of CT Vertebra Volume to Fluoroscopy Projection: A Calibration Model Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study extends a previous research concerning intervertebral motion registration by means of 2D dynamic fluoroscopy to obtain a more comprehensive 3D description of vertebral kinematics. The problem of estimating the 3D rigid pose of a CT volume of a vertebra from its 2D X-ray fluoroscopy projection is addressed. 2D-3D registration is obtained maximising a measure of similarity between Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (obtained from the CT volume and real fluoroscopic projection. X-ray energy correction was performed. To assess the method a calibration model was realised a sheep dry vertebra was rigidly fixed to a frame of reference including metallic markers. Accurate measurement of 3D orientation was obtained via single-camera calibration of the markers and held as true 3D vertebra position; then, vertebra 3D pose was estimated and results compared. Error analysis revealed accuracy of the order of 0.1 degree for the rotation angles of about 1 mm for displacements parallel to the fluoroscopic plane, and of order of 10 mm for the orthogonal displacement.

  9. Multivariation calibration techniques applied to NIRA (near infrared reflectance analysis) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, C. L.

    1991-02-01

    Multivariate calibration techniques can reduce the time required for routine testing and can provide new methods of analysis. Multivariate calibration is commonly used with near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two feasibility studies were performed to determine the capability of NIRA, using multivariate calibration techniques, to perform analyses on the types of samples that are routinely analyzed at this laboratory. The first study performed included a variety of samples and indicated that NIRA would be well-suited to perform analyses on selected materials properties such as water content and hydroxyl number on polyol samples, epoxy content on epoxy resins, water content of desiccants, and the amine values of various amine cure agents. A second study was performed to assess the capability of NIRA to perform quantitative analysis of hydroxyl numbers and water contents of hydroxyl-containing materials. Hydroxyl number and water content were selected for determination because these tests are frequently run on polyol materials and the hydroxyl number determination is time consuming. This study pointed out the necessity of obtaining calibration standards identical to the samples being analyzed for each type of polyol or other material being analyzed. Multivariate calibration techniques are frequently used with FTIR data to determine the composition of a large variety of complex mixtures. A literature search indicated many applications of multivariate calibration to FTIR data. Areas identified where quantitation by FTIR would provide a new capability are quantitation of components in epoxy and silicone resins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in oils, and additives to polymers.

  10. Performance evaluation of preprocessing techniques utilizing expert information in multivariate calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Goodarzi, Mohammad; Ramon, Herman; Saeys, Wouter

    2014-04-01

    Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression is one of the most used methods for extracting chemical information from Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurements. The success of a PLS calibration relies largely on the representativeness of the calibration data set. This is not trivial, because not only the expected variation in the analyte of interest, but also the variation of other contributing factors (interferents) should be included in the calibration data. This also implies that changes in interferent concentrations not covered in the calibration step can deteriorate the prediction ability of the calibration model. Several researchers have suggested that PLS models can be robustified against changes in the interferent structure by incorporating expert knowledge in the preprocessing step with the aim to efficiently filter out the spectral influence of the spectral interferents. However, these methods have not yet been compared against each other. Therefore, in the present study, various preprocessing techniques exploiting expert knowledge were compared on two experimental data sets. In both data sets, the calibration and test set were designed to have a different interferent concentration range. The performance of these techniques was compared to that of preprocessing techniques which do not use any expert knowledge. Using expert knowledge was found to improve the prediction performance for both data sets. For data set-1, the prediction error improved nearly 32% when pure component spectra of the analyte and the interferents were used in the Extended Multiplicative Signal Correction framework. Similarly, for data set-2, nearly 63% improvement in the prediction error was observed when the interferent information was utilized in Spectral Interferent Subtraction preprocessing.

  11. Volume Measurement in Solid Objects Using Artificial Vision Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova-Fraga, T.; Martinez-Espinosa, J. C.; Bernal, J.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Sosa-Aquino, M.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2004-09-01

    A simple system using artificial vision technique for measuring the volume of solid objects is described. The system is based on the acquisition of an image sequence of the object while it is rotating on an automated mechanism controlled by a PC. Volumes of different objects such as a sphere, a cylinder and also a carrot were measured. The proposed algorithm was developed in environment LabView 6.1. This technique can be very useful when it is applied to measure the human body for evaluating its body composition.

  12. Calibration of Vector Magnetogram with the Nonlinear Least-squares Fitting Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Tao Su; Hong-Qi Zhang

    2004-01-01

    To acquire Stokes profiles from observations of a simple sunspot with the Video Vector Magnetograph at Huairou Solar Observing Station(HSOS),we scanned the FeIλ5324.19 A line over the wavelength interval from 150mA redward of the line center to 150mA blueward,in steps of 10mA.With the technique of analytic inversion of Stokes profiles via nonlinear least-squares,we present the calibration coefficients for the HSOS vector magnetic magnetogram.We obtained the theoretical calibration error with linear expressions derived from the Unno-Becker equation under weak-field approximation.

  13. Calibration techniques for fast-ion D{sub {alpha}} diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Bortolon, A.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ruskov, E. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Grierson, B. A.; Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Fast-ion D{sub {alpha}} measurements are an application of visible charge-exchange recombination (CER) spectroscopy that provide information about the energetic ion population. Like other CER diagnostics, the standard intensity calibration is obtained with an integrating sphere during a vacuum vessel opening. An alternative approach is to create plasmas where the fast-ion population is known, then calculate the expected signals with a synthetic diagnostic code. The two methods sometimes agree well but are discrepant in other cases. Different background subtraction techniques and simultaneous measurements of visible bremsstrahlung and of beam emission provide useful checks on the calibrations and calculations.

  14. An EMG-assisted model calibration technique that does not require MVCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Jonathan S; Marras, William S; Knapik, Gregory G

    2013-06-01

    As personalized biologically-assisted models of the spine have evolved, the normalization of raw electromyographic (EMG) signals has become increasingly important. The traditional method of normalizing myoelectric signals, relative to measured maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs), is susceptible to error and is problematic for evaluating symptomatic low back pain (LBP) patients. Additionally, efforts to circumvent MVCs have not been validated during complex free-dynamic exertions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop an MVC-independent biologically-assisted model calibration technique that overcomes the limitations of previous normalization efforts, and to validate this technique over a variety of complex free-dynamic conditions including symmetrical and asymmetrical lifting. The newly developed technique (non-MVC) eliminates the need to collect MVCs by combining gain (maximum strength per unit area) and MVC into a single muscle property (gain ratio) that can be determined during model calibration. Ten subjects (five male, five female) were evaluated to compare gain ratio prediction variability, spinal load predictions, and model fidelity between the new non-MVC and established MVC-based model calibration techniques. The new non-MVC model calibration technique demonstrated at least as low gain ratio prediction variability, similar spinal loads, and similar model fidelity when compared to the MVC-based technique, indicating that it is a valid alternative to traditional MVC-based EMG normalization. Spinal loading for individuals who are unwilling or unable to produce reliable MVCs can now be evaluated. In particular, this technique will be valuable for evaluating symptomatic LBP patients, which may provide significant insight into the underlying nature of the LBP disorder.

  15. Accurate geometric camera calibration technique using multi-views of a non-metric planar grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingwei, Hui; Gongjian, Wen; Xing, Zhang; Deren, Li

    2013-04-01

    A robust geometric camera calibration technique with a non-metric planar grid is proposed. For each image of the non-metric grid, a projective model of the grid intersections represented by the grid row and column numbers is derived with sixteen physically meaningful parameters. In this model, intrinsic camera parameters and coefficients of lens distortions are involved. After several images of the same gird have been acquired by the camera awaiting calibrations, two broad steps are taken to work out the camera parameters. Firstly, with two reasonable approximations the projective parameters of all view images are solved linearly and analytically by using the properties of the rotation matrix skillfully. Secondly, with the rigorous projective formulations of non-metric grid intersections, a mathematical optimization model is established to obtain the calibration results with least squares errors. The robustness and accuracy are verified by using many real grabbed images.

  16. Progress report on reversal and substitute element technique for thread calibration on CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmignato, Simone; Larsen, Erik; Sobiecki, Rene

    This report is made as a part of the project EASYTRAC, an EU project under the programme Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No. G6RD-CT-2000-00188, coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines. For thi......) - Germany and Tampere University of Technology (TUT) - Finland. The present report describes feasibility and preliminary results of a reversal and substitute element technique application for thread calibration.......This report is made as a part of the project EASYTRAC, an EU project under the programme Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No. G6RD-CT-2000-00188, coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines...

  17. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  18. Extended Calibration Technique of a Four-Hole Probe for Three-Dimensional Flow Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Munivenkatareddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the development and nonnulling calibration technique to calibrate a cantilever type cylindrical four-hole probe of 2.54 mm diameter to measure three-dimensional flows. The probe is calibrated at a probe Reynolds number of 9525. The probe operative angular range is extended using a zonal method by dividing into three zones, namely, center, left, and right zone. Different calibration coefficients are defined for each zone. The attainable angular range achieved using the zonal method is ±60 degrees in the yaw plane and −50 to +30 degrees in the pitch plane. Sensitivity analysis of all the four calibration coefficients shows that probe pitch sensitivity is lower than the yaw sensitivity in the center zone, and extended left and right zones have lower sensitivity than the center zone. In addition, errors due to the data reduction program for the probe are presented. The errors are found to be reasonably small in all the three zones. However, the errors in the extended left and right zones have slightly larger magnitudes compared to those in the center zone.

  19. Obstacle-based self-calibration techniques for the determination of the permittivity of liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rolfes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, different obstacle-based self-calibration techniques for the measurement of the dielectric properties of liquids are investigated at microwave frequencies. The liquid under test is contained inside a waveguide, which is connected to the ports of a vector network analyzer. The permittivity of the liquid is characterized on the basis of the measured scattering parameters.

    In order to extract the material parameters precisely and to eliminate systematic errors of the setup, calibration measurements have to be performed. For this purpose, different self-calibration methods based on the displacement of an obstacle are considered. The presented methods differ in that way, that either transmission and reflection measurements or purely reflection measurements are performed. All these methods have in common that the material parameters are already calculable within a so-called self-calibration procedure. Thus, a full two-port calibration of the whole setup is not necessary. Furthermore, the methods can be realized effectively in a practical setup having the advantage that a rearrangement of the setup is not needed for the material parameter measurements and that the liquid under investigation can pass continuously through the measurement cell. This might be of interest for the application in an industrial process, enabling the continuous flow of the material while the parameter characterization can take place at the same time.

  20. Total Dose Hardness Assurance. Volume I. Identification of Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    under Contract F29601-78-C-0022. The project officer for the Air Force was Mr. Roe J. Maier. The program manager and principal investigator for BDM was...Assurance Techniques," AFWL-TR-73-134, 3 Volumes, January 1974. 44. Bruncke, W. C. et al. " Tecniques for Screening Bipolar Transistor Degradation Due to

  1. Compendium of Practical Astronomy. Volume 1: Instrumentation and Reduction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augensen, H. J.; Heintz, W. D.; Roth, Günter D.

    The Compendium of Practical Astronomy is a revised and enlarged English version of the fourth edition of G. Roth's famous handbook for stargazers. In three volumes 28 carefully edited articles, aimed especially at amateur astronomers and students and teachers of astronomy in high schools and colleges, cover the length and breadth of practical astronomy. Volume 1 contains information on modern instrumentation and reduction techniques, including spherical astronomy, error estimations, telescope mountings, astrophotography, and more. Volume 2 covers the planetary system, with contributions on artificial satellites, comets, the polar aurorae, and the effects of the atmosphere on observational data. Volume 3 is devoted to stellar objects, variable stars and binary stars in particular. An introduction to the astronomical literature and a comprehensive chapter on astronomy education and instructional aids make the Compendium a useful complement to any college library, in addition to its being essential reading for all practical astronomers.

  2. Reproducibility of techniques using Archimedes' principle in measuring cancellous bone volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, L; Bloebaum, R D; Bachus, K N

    1997-01-01

    Researchers have been interested in developing techniques to accurately and reproducibly measure the volume fraction of cancellous bone. Historically bone researchers have used Archimedes' principle with water to measure the volume fraction of cancellous bone. Preliminary results in our lab suggested that the calibrated water technique did not provide reproducible results. Because of this difficulty, it was decided to compare the conventional water method to a water with surfactant and a helium method using a micropycnometer. The water/surfactant and the helium methods were attempts to improve the fluid penetration into the small voids present in the cancellous bone structure. In order to compare the reproducibility of the new methods with the conventional water method, 16 cancellous bone specimens were obtained from femoral condyles of human and greyhound dog femora. The volume fraction measurements on each specimen were repeated three times with all three techniques. The results showed that the helium displacement method was more than an order of magnitudes more reproducible than the two other water methods (p < 0.05). Statistical analysis also showed that the conventional water method produced the lowest reproducibility (p < 0.05). The data from this study indicate that the helium displacement technique is a very useful, rapid and reproducible tool for quantitatively characterizing anisotropic porous tissue structures such as cancellous bone.

  3. NLT and extrapolated DLT:3-D cinematography alternatives for enlarging the volume of calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, R N; McLean, S P

    1995-10-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of the direct linear transformation (DLT) and non-linear transformation (NLT) methods of 3-D cinematography/videography. A comparison of standard DLT, extrapolated DLT, and NLT calibrations showed the standard (non-extrapolated) DLT to be the most accurate, especially when a large number of control points (40-60) were used. The NLT was more accurate than the extrapolated DLT when the level of extrapolation exceeded 100%. The results indicated that when possible one should use the DLT with a control object, sufficiently large as to encompass the entire activity being studied. However, in situations where the activity volume exceeds the size of one's DLT control object, the NLT method should be considered.

  4. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  5. Application of new techniques in the calibration of the TROPOMI-SWIR instrument (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Paul; van Hees, Richard; van Kempen, Tim; Krijger, Matthijs; Cadot, Sidney; Aben, Ilse; Ludewig, Antje; Dingjan, Jos; Persijn, Stefan; Hoogeveen, Ruud

    2016-10-01

    The Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) on-board the Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite is an Earth-observing spectrometer with bands in the ultraviolet, visible, near infrared and short-wave infrared (SWIR). It provides daily global coverage of atmospheric trace gases relevant for tropospheric air quality and climate research. Three new techniques will be presented that are unique for the TROPOMI-SWIR spectrometer. The retrieval of methane and CO columns from the data of the SWIR band requires for each detector pixel an accurate instrument spectral response function (ISRF), i.e. the normalized signal as a function of wavelength. A new determination method for Earth-observing instruments has been used in the on-ground calibration, based on measurements with a SWIR optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that was scanned over the whole TROPOMI-SWIR spectral range. The calibration algorithm derives the ISRF without needing the absolute wavelength during the measurement. The same OPO has also been used to determine the two-dimensional stray-light distribution for each SWIR pixel with a dynamic range of 7 orders. This was achieved by combining measurements at several exposure times and taking saturation into account. The correction algorithm and data are designed to remove the mean stray-light distribution and a reflection that moves relative to the direct image, within the strict constraints of the available time for the L01b processing. A third new technique is an alternative calibration of the SWIR absolute radiance and irradiance using a black body at the temperature of melting silver. Unlike a standard FEL lamp, this source does not have to be calibrated itself, because the temperature is very stable and well known. Measurement methods, data analyses, correction algorithms and limitations of the new techniques will be presented.

  6. Evaluation of a Hopkinson bar fly-away technique for high amplitude shock accelerometer calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togami, T.C.; Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    A split Hopkinson bar technique has been developed to evaluate the performance of accelerometers that measure large amplitude pulses. An evaluation of this technique has been conducted in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to determine its use in the practical calibration of accelerometers. This evaluation consisted of three tasks. First, the quartz crystal was evaluated in a split Hopkinson bar configuration to evaluate the quartz gage`s sensitivity and frequency response at force levels of 18,000, 35,000 and 53,000 N at ambient temperature, {minus}48 C and +74 C. Secondly, the fly away technique was evaluated at shock amplitudes of 50,000, 100,000, 150,000 and 200,000 G (1 G = 9.81 m/s{sup 2}) at ambient temperature, {minus}48 C and +74 C. Lastly, the technique was performed using a NIST calibrated reference accelerometer. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz gage data and the measured acceleration data have shown very good agreement. Based on this evaluation, the authors expect this split Hopkinson fly away technique to be certified by the SNL Primary Standards Laboratory.

  7. Modelling and Calibration Technique of Laser Triangulation Sensors for Integration in Robot Arms and Articulated Arm Coordinate Measuring Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Juan J.; Albajez, José A.; Carlos Cajal; David Guillomía; Jorge Santolaria

    2009-01-01

    A technique for intrinsic and extrinsic calibration of a laser triangulation sensor (LTS) integrated in an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) is presented in this paper. After applying a novel approach to the AACMM kinematic parameter identification problem, by means of a single calibration gauge object, a one-step calibration method to obtain both intrinsic―laser plane, CCD sensor and camera geometry―and extrinsic parameters related to the AACMM main frame has been develope...

  8. Estimation of radon concentrations in coal mines using a hybrid technique calibration curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, K; Ali, S

    2001-01-01

    The results of epidemiological studies in various countries show that radon and its progeny cause carcinogenic effects on mine workers. Therefore, it becomes of paramount importance to monitor radon concentrations and consequently determine the radon dose rates in coal mines for the protection of coal miners. A new calibration curve was obtained for radon concentration estimation using hybrid techniques. A calibration curve was generated using 226Ra activity concentration measured by a HPGe detector-based gamma-ray spectrometer versus alpha-track-density rate due to radon and its progeny on CR-39 track detector. Using the slope of the experimentally determined curve in the units of Becqueral per kilogram (Bq kg-1) per unit alpha-track-density per hour (cm-2 h-1), radon concentrations (Bq m-3) were estimated using coal samples from various coal mines in two provinces of Pakistan, Punjab and Balochistan. Consequently, radon dose rates were computed in the simulated environment of the coal mines. Results of these computations may be considered with a caveat that the method developed in this paper provides only a screening method to indicate the radon dose in coal mines. It has been shown that the actual measurements of radon concentrations in the coal mines are in agreement with the estimated radon concentrations using the hybrid-technique calibration curve.

  9. A Novel Digital Background Calibration Technique for 16 bit SHA-less Multibit Pipelined ADC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swina Narula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high resolution of 16 bit and high speed of 125MS/s, multibit Pipelined ADC with digital background calibration is presented. In order to achieve low power, SHA-less front end is used with multibit stages. The first and second stages are used here as a 3.5 bit and the stages from third to seventh are of 2.5 bit and last stage is of 3-bit flash ADC. After bit alignment and truncation of total 19 bits, 16 bits are used as final digital output. To precise the remove linear gain error of the residue amplifier and capacitor mismatching error, a digital background calibration technique is used, which is a combination of signal dependent dithering (SDD and butterfly shuffler. To improve settling time of residue amplifier, a special circuit of voltage separation is used. With the proposed digital background calibration technique, the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR has been improved to 97.74 dB @30 MHz and 88.9 dB @150 MHz, and the signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SNDR has been improved to 79.77 dB @ 30 MHz, and 73.5 dB @ 150 MHz. The implementation of the Pipelined ADC has been completed with technology parameters of 0.18μm CMOS process with 1.8 V supply. Total power consumption is 300 mW by the proposed ADC.

  10. A Layer Correlation Technique for ATLAS Calorimetry Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, T; Spanò, F; Speckmayer, P

    2008-01-01

    A method for calibrating the response of a segmented calorimeter to hadrons is developed. The ansatz is that information on longitudinal shower fluctuations gained from a principal component analysis of the layer energy depositions can improve energy resolution by correcting for hadronic invisible energy and dead material losses: projections along the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix are used as input for the calibration. The technique is used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the ATLAS calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. Simulated Monte Carlo events are used to derive corrections for invisible energy lost in nuclear reactions and in dead material in front and in between the calorimeters. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the resolution is improved by about 20%.

  11. Estimation of radon concentrations in coal mines using a hybrid technique calibration curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, K.; Ali, S. [PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan). Radiation Physics Division, Environmental Radiation Group

    2001-07-01

    A calibration curve was generated using Ra-226 activity concentration measured by a HPGe detector-based gamma-ray spectrometer versus alpha-track-density rate due to radon and its progeny on CR-39 track detector. Using the slops of the experimentally determined curve in the units of Becquerel per kilogram (Bq kg{sup -1}) per unit alpha -track-density per hour (cm{sup -2}h{sup -1}), radon concentrations (Bq m{sup -3}) were estimated using coal samples from various coal mines in two provinces of Pakistan, Punjab and Balochistan. Consequently, radon dose rates were computed in the simulated environment of the coal mines. These results provide only a screening method to indicate the radon dose in coal mines, It was shown that the actual measurements of radon concentrations in the coal mines are in agreement with the estimated radon concentrations using the hybrid-technique calibration curve.

  12. A new Generation of Spectrometer Calibration Techniques based on Optical Frequency Combs

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Piet O; Kimeswenger, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Typical astronomical spectrographs have a resolution ranging between a few hundred to 200.000. Deconvolution and correlation techniques are being employed with a significance down to 1/1000 th of a pixel. HeAr and ThAr lamps are usually used for calibration in low and high resolution spectroscopy, respectively. Unfortunately, the emitted lines typically cover only a small fraction of the spectrometer's spectral range. Furthermore, their exact position depends strongly on environmental conditions. A problem is the strong intensity variation between different (intensity ratios {>300). In addition, the brightness of the lamps is insufficient to illuminate a spectrograph via an integrating sphere, which in turn is important to calibrate a long-slit spectrograph, as this is the only way to assure a uniform illumination of the spectrograph pupil. Laboratory precision laser spectroscopy has experienced a major advance with the development of optical frequency combs generated by pulsed femto-second lasers. These lase...

  13. A Proxy Calibration Monitoring Technique for the NCAR Airborne W-band Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, Robert; Romatschke, Ulrike; Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Ellis, Scott M.

    2017-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has recently tested and deployed its new 94 GHz HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR). HCR is a scanning W-band system, mounted in an under-wing pod on the National Science Foundation/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER, a Gulfstream-V). In order to ensure operational accuracy of this radar, the technique of Li, et al. (2005) has been reformulated to provide a simple means of estimating reflectivity bias using routine measurements of the ocean surface scattering. The methodology and formulation for reflectivity bias determination will be described, along with bias determination results from the 2015 Cloud Systems Evolution in the Trades (CSET) experiment. The HCR radar system is subjected to extreme changes in its operational environment that can cause changes in component response that affect radar calibration. While engineering efforts have focused on temperature and pressure stabilization of the wing pod, along with internal vessel and component temperature monitoring, it is recognized that some form of independent and ongoing verification of calibration stability is desired. When available, ocean surface scanning, with an assumed knowledge of ocean surface backscatter cross-section, can provide a useful proxy for this calibration. Therefore, during the CSET experiment, special care was taken to collect ocean scanning data during short episodes of stable flight with no clouds present; scans were coordinated with atmospheric profiling through release of dropsondes, and atmospheric attenuation calculated with the use of those data. Downward looking lidar data are also used to verify cloud and haze conditions during sampling. For HCR in CSET, eighteen usable ocean-scanning cases were found. Several of these were discarded due to cloud/haze issues that prevented accurate determination of atmospheric attenuation. Initial results show that a large (but fairly constant) bias

  14. Egg volume prediction using machine vision technique based on pappus theorem and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mahmoud; Omid, Mahmoud; Alimardani, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Egg size is one of the important properties of egg that is judged by customers. Accordingly, in egg sorting and grading, the size of eggs must be considered. In this research, a new method of egg volume prediction was proposed without need to measure weight of egg. An accurate and efficient image processing algorithm was designed and implemented for computing major and minor diameters of eggs. Two methods of egg size modeling were developed. In the first method, a mathematical model was proposed based on Pappus theorem. In second method, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique was used to estimate egg volume. The determined egg volume by these methods was compared statistically with actual values. For mathematical modeling, the R(2), Mean absolute error and maximum absolute error values were obtained as 0.99, 0.59 cm(3) and 1.69 cm(3), respectively. To determine the best ANN, R(2) test and RMSEtest were used as selection criteria. The best ANN topology was 2-28-1 which had the R(2) test and RMSEtest of 0.992 and 0.66, respectively. After system calibration, the proposed models were evaluated. The results which indicated the mathematical modeling yielded more satisfying results. So this technique was selected for egg size determination.

  15. Volume reduction philosophy and techniques in use or planned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Siting and development of nuclear waste disposal facilities is an expensive task. In the private sector, such developments face siting and licensing issues, public intervention, and technology challenges. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) faces similar challenges in the management of waste generated by the research and production facilities. Volume reduction can be used to lengthen the service life of existing facilities. A wide variety of volume reduction techniques are applied to different waste forms. Compressible waste is compacted into drums, cardboard and metal boxes, and the loaded drums are supercompacted into smaller units. Large metallic items are size-reduced and melted for recycle or sent to shallow land burial. Anaerobic digestion is a process that can reduce cellulosic and animal wastes by 80%. Incinerators of all types have been investigated for application to nuclear wastes and a number of installations operate or are constructing units for low-level and transuranic solid and liquid combustibles. Technology may help solve many of the problems in volume reduction, but the human element also has an important part in solving the puzzle. Aggressive educational campaigns at two sites have proved very successful in reducing waste generation. This overview of volume reduction is intended to transfer the current information from many DOE facilities. 44 references, 85 figures, 5 tables.

  16. Utilization of advanced calibration techniques in stochastic rock fall analysis of quarry slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preh, Alexander; Ahmadabadi, Morteza; Kolenprat, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    In order to study rock fall dynamics, a research project was conducted by the Vienna University of Technology and the Austrian Central Labour Inspectorate (Federal Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and Consumer Protection). A part of this project included 277 full-scale drop tests at three different quarries in Austria and recording key parameters of the rock fall trajectories. The tests involved a total of 277 boulders ranging from 0.18 to 1.8 m in diameter and from 0.009 to 8.1 Mg in mass. The geology of these sites included strong rock belonging to igneous, metamorphic and volcanic types. In this paper the results of the tests are used for calibration and validation a new stochastic computer model. It is demonstrated that the error of the model (i.e. the difference between observed and simulated results) has a lognormal distribution. Selecting two parameters, advanced calibration techniques including Markov Chain Monte Carlo Technique, Maximum Likelihood and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) are utilized to minimize the error. Validation of the model based on the cross validation technique reveals that in general, reasonable stochastic approximations of the rock fall trajectories are obtained in all dimensions, including runout, bounce heights and velocities. The approximations are compared to the measured data in terms of median, 95% and maximum values. The results of the comparisons indicate that approximate first-order predictions, using a single set of input parameters, are possible and can be used to aid practical hazard and risk assessment.

  17. Comparative Calibration of Corrosion Measurements Using K-Nearest Neighbour Based Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Yaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Every measuring equipment or inspection tool is known to have its own accuracy, which may affect the reliability of its measurements. This includes oil and gas pipeline corrosion defects measurements. The inspection tolerance occurred in the measurements should be treated carefully for each equipment to prevent misinterpretation of the data which could lead to incorrect assessment. This paper presents a comparison between two K-Nearest Neighbour (KNN interpolation techniques used to calibrate corrosion measurements collected by Magnetic Flux Leakage Intelligent Pig (MFL-IP with the readings of Ultrasonic Testing (UT scan device. The comparison has relied on the position of the interpolators, the weight sequence, and the error in the final enhanced metrics compared to the original measurements. Both techniques have the potential to calibrate and enhance IP measurements, with relative advantage for one technique in reducing over fitting problem. This enhancement will be used to improve the integrity assessment report that depends on the disturbed corrosion metrics of oil and gas pipelines, to decide whether the pipeline is fit for service or needs certain maintenance.

  18. Technique for Calibration of Chassis components based on encoding marks and machine Vision metrology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li-mei; ZHANG Chun-bo; WEI Yi-ying; CHEN Hua-wei

    2011-01-01

    @@ A novel technique for calibrating crucial parameters of chassis components is proposed, which utilizes the machine vision metrology to measure 3D coordinates of the center of a component's hole for assembling in the 3D world coordinate system.In the measurement, encoding marks with special patterns will be assembled on the chassis component associated with cross drone and staff gauge located near the chassis.The geometry and coordinates of the cross drone consist of two planes orthogonal to each other and the staff gauge is in 3D space with high precision.A few images are taken by a highresolution camera in different orientations and perspectives.The 3D coordinates of 5 key points on the encoding marks will be calculated by the machine vision technique and those of the center of the holes to be calibrated will be calculated by the deduced algorithm in this paper.Experimental results show that the algorithm and the technique can satisfy the precision requirement when the components are assembled, and the average measurement precision provided by the algorithm is 0.0174 mm.

  19. Model Calibration of a Groundwater Flow Analysis for an Underground Structure Using Data Assimilation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S.; Honda, M.; Sakurai, H.

    2015-12-01

    Model calibration of groundwater flow analysis is a difficult task, especially in the complicated hydrogeological condition, because available information about hydrogeological properties is very limited. This often causes non-negligible differences between predicted results and real observations. We applied the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), which is a type of data assimilation technique, to groundwater flow simulation in order to obtain a valid model that can reproduce accurately the observations. Unlike conventional manual calibration, this scheme not only makes the calibration work efficient but also provides an objective approach not depending on the skills of engineers.In this study, we focused on estimating hydraulic conductivities of bedrocks and fracture zones around an underground fuel storage facility. Two different kinds of groundwater monitoring data were sequentially assimilated into the unsteady groundwater flow model via the EnKF.Synthetic test results showed that estimated hydraulic conductivities matched their true values and our method works well in groundwater flow analysis. Further, influences of each observation in the state updating process were quantified through sensitivity analysis.To assess the feasibility under practical conditions, the assimilation experiments using real field measurements were performed. The results showed that the identified model was able to approximately simulate the behavior of groundwater flow. On the other hand, it was difficult to reproduce the observation data correctly in a specific local area. This suggests that inaccurate area is included in the assumed hydrogeological conceptual model of this site, and could be useful information for the model validation.

  20. Illumination technique for the relative calibration of the ASTRI SST-2M camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodeghiero, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.rodeghiero@studenti.unipd.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, 35100 PD (Italy); Catalano, Osvaldo; Segreto, Alberto [INAF IASF Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 PA (Italy); De Caprio, Vincenzo [INAF OACN, Salita Moiariello, 16, 80131 Napoli, NA (Italy); Giro, Enrico; Lessio, Luigi [INAF OAPD, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, 35100 PD (Italy); Conconi, Paolo; Canestrari, Rodolfo [INAF OAB, Via E. Bianchi 46, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy)

    2014-11-11

    We present a new illumination technique for the camera relative gain calibration of the ASTRI SST-2M Cherenkov telescope. The camera illumination is achieved by means of an optical fiber that diffuses the light inside a protective PMMA window above the focal plane. We report the encouraging results of the development tests carried out on two PMMA window prototypes illuminated by a standard optical fiber. We checked also the reliability of the method by a series of ray tracing simulations for different scattering models and PMMA window shapes finding good agreement with experimental results.

  1. Modelling and Calibration Technique of Laser Triangulation Sensors for Integration in Robot Arms and Articulated Arm Coordinate Measuring Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Aguilar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A technique for intrinsic and extrinsic calibration of a laser triangulation sensor (LTS integrated in an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM is presented in this paper. After applying a novel approach to the AACMM kinematic parameter identification problem, by means of a single calibration gauge object, a one-step calibration method to obtain both intrinsic―laser plane, CCD sensor and camera geometry―and extrinsic parameters related to the AACMM main frame has been developed. This allows the integration of LTS and AACMM mathematical models without the need of additional optimization methods after the prior sensor calibration, usually done in a coordinate measuring machine (CMM before the assembly of the sensor in the arm. The experimental tests results for accuracy and repeatability show the suitable performance of this technique, resulting in a reliable, quick and friendly calibration method for the AACMM final user. The presented method is also valid for sensor integration in robot arms and CMMs.

  2. Modelling and calibration technique of laser triangulation sensors for integration in robot arms and articulated arm coordinate measuring machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaria, Jorge; Guillomía, David; Cajal, Carlos; Albajez, José A; Aguilar, Juan J

    2009-01-01

    A technique for intrinsic and extrinsic calibration of a laser triangulation sensor (LTS) integrated in an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) is presented in this paper. After applying a novel approach to the AACMM kinematic parameter identification problem, by means of a single calibration gauge object, a one-step calibration method to obtain both intrinsic-laser plane, CCD sensor and camera geometry-and extrinsic parameters related to the AACMM main frame has been developed. This allows the integration of LTS and AACMM mathematical models without the need of additional optimization methods after the prior sensor calibration, usually done in a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) before the assembly of the sensor in the arm. The experimental tests results for accuracy and repeatability show the suitable performance of this technique, resulting in a reliable, quick and friendly calibration method for the AACMM final user. The presented method is also valid for sensor integration in robot arms and CMMs.

  3. Calibrating passive sampling and passive dosing techniques to lipid based concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Annika, A.

    2011-01-01

    external partitioning standards in vegetable or fish oil for the complete calibration of equilibrium sampling techniques without additional steps. Equilibrium in tissue sampling in three different fish yielded lipid based PCB concentrations in good agreement with those determined using total extraction...... and lipid normalization. These results support the validity of the in tissue sampling technique, while at the same time confirming that the fugacity capacity of these lipid-rich fish tissues for PCBs was dominated by the lipid fraction. Equilibrium sampling of PCB contaminated lake sediments with PDMS......Equilibrium sampling into various formats of the silicone polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasingly used to measure the exposure of hydrophobic organic chemicals in environmental matrices, and passive dosing from silicone is increasingly used to control and maintain their exposure in laboratory...

  4. Calibrating passive sampling and passive dosing techniques to lipid based concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Annika, A.;

    2011-01-01

    towards equilibrium partitioning concentrations in lipids (Clipid,partitioning). The first approach proceeds in two steps; (i) the concentration in the PDMS (CPDMS ) is determined and (ii) multiplied with recently determined lipid to PDMS partition ratios (Klipid,PDMS). The second approach applies...... external partitioning standards in vegetable or fish oil for the complete calibration of equilibrium sampling techniques without additional steps. Equilibrium in tissue sampling in three different fish yielded lipid based PCB concentrations in good agreement with those determined using total extraction...... and lipid normalization. These results support the validity of the in tissue sampling technique, while at the same time confirming that the fugacity capacity of these lipid-rich fish tissues for PCBs was dominated by the lipid fraction. Equilibrium sampling of PCB contaminated lake sediments with PDMS...

  5. Nanoimprint Lithography -A Next Generation High Volume Lithography Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Pelzer; P.Lindner; T.Glinsner; B.Vratzov; C.Gourgon; S.Landis; P.Kettner; C.Schaefer

    2004-01-01

    Nanoimprint Lithography has been demonstrated to be one of the most promising next generation techniques for large-area structure replication in the nanometer scale.This fast and low cost method becomes an increasingly important instrument for fabrication of biochemistry,μ-fluidic,μ-TAS and telecommunication devices,as well as for a wide variety of fields in the nm range,like biomedical,nano-fluidics,nano-optical applications,data storage,etc.Due to the restrictions on wavelength and the enormous development works,linked to high process and equipment costs on standard lithography systems,nanoimprint lithography might become a real competitive method in mainstream IC industry.There are no physical limitations encountered with imprinting techniques for much smaller replicated structures,down to the sub-10nm range [1].Among several Nanoimprint lithography techniques results of two promising methods,hot embossing lithography(HEL)and UV-nanoimprinting(UV-NIL)will be presented.Both techniques allow rapid prototyping as well as high volume production of fully patterned substrates for a wide range of materials.This paper will present results on HE and UVNIL,among them full wafer imprints up to 200mm with high-resolution patterns down to nm range.

  6. Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)-Phase I. Volume 3 (Pre-Field Campaign Sensor Calibration)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302 Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law ...calibration exercises were conducted. The first exercise examined the MSA-Phase I dynamic sensors (ultrasonic anemometers); the second assessed the MSA...Phase I thermodynamic sensors (barometers, thermometers, hygrometers, and pyranometers). This report documents the results of a detailed calibration

  7. Indication of BOLD-specific venous flow-volume changes from precisely controlled hyperoxic vs. hypercapnic calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Clarisse I; Pike, G Bruce

    2012-04-01

    Deriving cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals involves a flow-volume parameter (α), reflecting total cerebral blood volume changes, and a calibration constant (M). Traditionally, the former is assumed a fixed value and the latter is measured under alterations in fixed inspired fractional concentrations of carbon dioxide. We recently reported on reductions in M-variability via precise control of end-tidal pressures of both hypercapnic (HC) and hyperoxic (HO) gases. In light of these findings, our aim was to apply the improved calibration alternatives to neuronal activation, making use of their distinct vasoactive natures to evaluate the α-value. Nine healthy volunteers were imaged at 3 T while simultaneously measuring BOLD and arterial spin-labeling signals during controlled, graded, HC, and HO, followed by visual (VC) and sensorimotor cortices (SMC) activation. On the basis of low M- and CMRO(2)-variability, the comparison of these calibration alternatives accurately highlighted a reduced venous flow-volume relationship (α=0.16±0.02, with α(VC)=0.12±0.04, and α(SMC)=0.20±0.02), as appropriate for BOLD modeling.

  8. Detection efficiency calibration of single-photon silicon avalanche photodiodes traceable using double attenuator technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Marco; Hofer, Helmuth; Kück, Stefan

    2015-12-08

    A highly accurate method for the determination of the detection efficiency of a silicon single-photon avalanche diode (Si-SPAD) is presented. This method is based on the comparison of the detected count rate of the Si-SPAD compared to the photon rate determined from a calibrated silicon diode using a modified attenuator technique, in which the total attenuation is measured in two attenuation steps. Furthermore, a validation of this two-step method is performed using attenuators of higher transmittance. The setup is a tabletop one, laser-based, and fully automated. The measurement uncertainty components are determined and analyzed in detail. The obtained standard measurement uncertainty is < 0.5%. Main contributions are the transmission of the neutral density filters used as attenuators and the spectral responsivity of the calibrated analog silicon diode. Furthermore, the dependence of the detection efficiency of the Si-SPAD on the mean photon number of the impinging laser radiation with Poissonian statistics is investigated.

  9. Verification Techniques for Parameter Selection and Bayesian Model Calibration Presented for an HIV Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Mami Tonoe

    Uncertainty quantification plays an important role when making predictive estimates of model responses. In this context, uncertainty quantification is defined as quantifying and reducing uncertainties, and the objective is to quantify uncertainties in parameter, model and measurements, and propagate the uncertainties through the model, so that one can make a predictive estimate with quantified uncertainties. Two of the aspects of uncertainty quantification that must be performed prior to propagating uncertainties are model calibration and parameter selection. There are several efficient techniques for these processes; however, the accuracy of these methods are often not verified. This is the motivation for our work, and in this dissertation, we present and illustrate verification frameworks for model calibration and parameter selection in the context of biological and physical models. First, HIV models, developed and improved by [2, 3, 8], describe the viral infection dynamics of an HIV disease. These are also used to make predictive estimates of viral loads and T-cell counts and to construct an optimal control for drug therapy. Estimating input parameters is an essential step prior to uncertainty quantification. However, not all the parameters are identifiable, implying that they cannot be uniquely determined by the observations. These unidentifiable parameters can be partially removed by performing parameter selection, a process in which parameters that have minimal impacts on the model response are determined. We provide verification techniques for Bayesian model calibration and parameter selection for an HIV model. As an example of a physical model, we employ a heat model with experimental measurements presented in [10]. A steady-state heat model represents a prototypical behavior for heat conduction and diffusion process involved in a thermal-hydraulic model, which is a part of nuclear reactor models. We employ this simple heat model to illustrate verification

  10. Improved calibration technique of the infrared imaging bolometer using ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapiko, E; Peterson, B; Alekseev, A; Seo, D C

    2010-10-01

    The technique used until recently utilizing the Ne-He laser for imaging bolometer foils calibration [B. J. Peterson et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 2, S1018 (2007)] has showed several issues. The method was based on irradiation of 1 cm spaced set of points on a foil by the laser beam moved by set of mirrors. Issues were the nonuniformity of laser power due to the vacuum window transmission nonuniformity and high reflection coefficient for the laser. Also, due to the limited infrared (IR) window size, it was very time consuming. The new methodology uses a compact ultraviolet (uv) light-emitting diodes installed inside the vacuum chamber in a fixed position and the foil itself will be moved in the XY directions by two vacuum feedthroughs. These will help to avoid the above mentioned issues due to lack of a vacuum window, fixed emitters, higher uv power absorption, and a fixed IR camera position.

  11. User's manual for MODCAL: Bounding surface soil plasticity model calibration and prediction code, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennatale, J. S.; Herrmann, L. R.; Defalias, Y. F.

    1983-02-01

    In order to reduce the complexity of the model calibration process, a computer-aided automated procedure has been developed and tested. The computer code employs a Quasi-Newton optimization strategy to locate that set of parameter values which minimizes the discrepancy between the model predictions and the experimental observations included in the calibration data base. Through application to a number of real soils, the automated procedure has been found to be an efficient, reliable and economical means of accomplishing model calibration. Although the code was developed specifically for use with the Bounding Surface plasticity model, it can readily be adapted to other constitutive formulations. Since the code greatly reduces the dependence of calibration success on user expertise, it significantly increases the accessibility and usefulness of sophisticated material models to the general engineering community.

  12. 容积法体积管自动检定装置%Volumetric method volume tube automatic calibration device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周兵

    2014-01-01

    Using standard metal gauge, four-way commutator, PC, PLC as the main hardware, Kingview software development platform, The building Volumetric method volume tube automatic calibration device. According to the verification regulation requirements, To control the flow valve, Device automatically read standard gauge of metal volume value, The automatic temperature and pressure values collected, Automatically calculate the volume tube basic volume, standard error, repeatability, accuracy and repeatability. Realize the visual operation interface, save the test data, print calibration certificate, the notice of verification results, etc.%利用标准金属量器、四通换向器、计算机、PLC 为主要硬件,组态王软件为开发平台,构建容积法体积管自动检定装置。根据检定规程要求,控制流量阀,装置自动读取标准金属量器的容积值、自动采集温度、压力值,自动计算出体积管基本体积、标准误差、重复性、准确度、复现性。实现可视的操作界面、保存检定数据、打印检定证书、检定结果通知书等功能。

  13. A Simple Technique for Fast Digital Background Calibration of A/D Converters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Centurelli, Francesco; Monsurrò, Pietro; Trifiletti, Alessandro

    A modification of the background digital calibration procedure for A/D converters by Li and Moon is proposed, based on a method to improve the speed of convergence and the accuracy of the calibration...

  14. Radio Interferometric Calibration Using a Riemannian Manifold

    CERN Document Server

    Yatawatta, Sarod

    2013-01-01

    In order to cope with the increased data volumes generated by modern radio interferometers such as LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) or SKA (Square Kilometre Array), fast and efficient calibration algorithms are essential. Traditional radio interferometric calibration is performed using nonlinear optimization techniques such as the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in Euclidean space. In this paper, we reformulate radio interferometric calibration as a nonlinear optimization problem on a Riemannian manifold. The reformulated calibration problem is solved using the Riemannian trust-region method. We show that calibration on a Riemannian manifold has faster convergence with reduced computational cost compared to conventional calibration in Euclidean space.

  15. Improvement of the Jet Calibration Techniques for the ATLAS Experiment in LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097636; Di Simone, Andrea; Consorti, Valerio; Rúriková, Zuzana

    Many analyses in particle physics need jets, clustered with different parameters or even with different algorithms. But it is not feasible to provide in-situ correction factors for each case. In this thesis a new calibration method is tested which is called "R-scan calibration". This calibration uses only one fully calibrated jet collection. By building ratios between the fully calibrated jets and partially calibrated jets, it is possible to derive in-situ correction factors for the probe jet. Especially for the new run of the LHC a quick inter-calibration like the R-scan is very useful. Therefore, during this thesis the R-scan method is designed and improved with the data acquired during Run I. After a validation of this method it is applied to the new data format of Run II.

  16. A self-calibrating telemetry system for measurement of ventricular pressure-volume relations in conscious, freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kazunori; Kawada, Toru; Sugimachi, Masaru; Zheng, Can; Kashihara, Koji; Sato, Takayuki; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2004-12-01

    Using Bluetooth wireless technology, we developed an implantable telemetry system for measurement of the left ventricular pressure-volume relation in conscious, freely moving rats. The telemetry system consisted of a pressure-conductance catheter (1.8-Fr) connected to a small (14-g) fully implantable signal transmitter. To make the system fully telemetric, calibrations such as blood resistivity and parallel conductance were also conducted telemetrically. To estimate blood resistivity, we used four electrodes arranged 0.2 mm apart on the pressure-conductance catheter. To estimate parallel conductance, we used a dual-frequency method. We examined the accuracy of calibrations, stroke volume (SV) measurements, and the reproducibility of the telemetry. The blood resistivity estimated telemetrically agreed with that measured using an ex vivo cuvette method (y=1.09x - 11.9, r2= 0.88, n=10). Parallel conductance estimated by the dual-frequency (2 and 20 kHz) method correlated well with that measured by a conventional saline injection method (y=1.59x - 1.77, r2= 0.87, n=13). The telemetric SV closely correlated with the flowmetric SV during inferior vena cava occlusions (y=0.96x + 7.5, r2=0.96, n=4). In six conscious rats, differences between the repeated telemetries on different days (3 days apart on average) were reasonably small: 13% for end-diastolic volume, 20% for end-systolic volume, 28% for end-diastolic pressure, and 6% for end-systolic pressure. We conclude that the developed telemetry system enables us to estimate the pressure-volume relation with reasonable accuracy and reproducibility in conscious, untethered rats.

  17. Measuring glioma volumes: A comparison of linear measurement based formulae with the manual image segmentation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev A Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Manual region of interest-based image segmentation is the standard technique for measuring glioma volumes. For routine clinical use, the simple formula v = abc/2 (or the formula for volume of an ellipsoid could be used as alternatives.

  18. Numerical model calibration with the use of an observed sediment mobility mapping technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javernick, Luke; Redolfi, Marco; Bertoldi, Walter

    2017-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical models' use and accuracy has greatly increased over the last decade partially due ease of topographic data access and acquisition. This is largely due to the surge in survey technologies such as GPS, LiDAR, terrestrial laser scanners (TLS), and Structure-from-Motion (SfM). As many studies have shown, topography is often the greatest influence on a model's predictive accuracy. Recently, studies have shown the use of accurate topographic datasets for numerical modeling yields appreciable accuracies in both depth and inundation patterns when compared to observed data, even in highly complicated planforms such as shallow braided rivers. Model calibration is typically limited by data availability, data quality, and the user's experience. Hydraulic calibrations with a fixed bed mode often focuses purely on depth predictions using gauge data and more rarely spatial depth data, velocity data, and inundation patterns. Morphological models with bed updating and erosion are often calibrated using erosion and deposition patterns and more rarely consider sediment transport acquired field data. Transitioning from a hydraulic to morphological calibration includes a considerable increase in complicated processes, model parameters, assumptions, and sources of errors. With morphological observed data limited to documented topographic changes, a model's 'performance' is merely based on replicating results instead of processes, and thus it is difficult to fully evaluate the model's true ability. With the increase in data acquisition and model usage, there is a need to push numerical model testing beyond traditional performance metrics and toward process evaluations. To address this need, instantaneous morphology processes must be evaluated. Flume experiments of a 24 m x 1.6 m wide channel with 1 mm sediment and a 1% slope were ran to develop a braided river and fully documented with: i) highly accurate Structure-from-Motion derived topography (average errors

  19. A direct comparison between two independently calibrated time transfer techniques: T2L2 and GPS Common-Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovera, G. D.; Abgrall, M.; Courde, C.; Exertier, P.; Fridelance, P.; Guillemot, Ph; Laas-Bourez, M.; Martin, N.; Samain, E.; Sherwood, R.; Torre, J.-M.; Uhrich, P.

    2016-06-01

    We present a direct comparison between two satellite time transfer techniques on independently calibrated links: Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) and Common-Views (CV) of satellites from the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation. The GPS CV and T2L2 links between three European laboratories where independently calibrated against the same reference point of the local timescales. For all the links the mean values of the differences between GPS CV and T2L2 are equal or below 240 ps, with standard deviations below 500 ps, mostly due to GPS CV. Almost all deviations from 0 ns are within the combined uncertainty estimates. Despite the weak number of common points obtained, due to the fact that T2L2 is weather dependent, these results are providing an unprecedented sub-ns consistency between two independently calibrated microwave and optical satellite time transfer techniques.

  20. Calibration and measurement of {sup 210}Pb using two independent techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, M. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion, CITIUS, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4B, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: mvilla@us.es; Hurtado, S. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion, CITIUS, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4B, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Manjon, G.; Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, E.T.S. Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    An experimental procedure has been developed for a rapid and accurate determination of the activity concentration of {sup 210}Pb in sediments by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Additionally, an alternative technique using {gamma}-spectrometry and Monte Carlo simulation has been developed. A radiochemical procedure, based on radium and barium sulphates co-precipitation have been applied to isolate the Pb-isotopes. {sup 210}Pb activity measurements were done in a low background scintillation spectrometer Quantulus 1220. A calibration of the liquid scintillation spectrometer, including its {alpha}/{beta} discrimination system, has been made, in order to minimize background and, additionally, some improvements are suggested for the calculation of the {sup 210}Pb activity concentration, taking into account that {sup 210}Pb counting efficiency cannot be accurately determined. Therefore, the use of an effective radiochemical yield, which can be empirically evaluated, is proposed. {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in riverbed sediments from an area affected by NORM wastes has been determined using both the proposed method. Results using {gamma}-spectrometry and LSC are compared to the results obtained following indirect {alpha}-spectrometry ({sup 210}Po) method.

  1. Energy calibration of CsI(Tl) scintillator in pulse-shape identification technique

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeichikov, V; Golubev, P; Jakobsson, B; Colonna, N

    2003-01-01

    A batch of 16 CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals, supplied by the Bicron Company, has been studied with respect to precise energy calibration in pulse-shape identification technique. The light corresponding to pulse integration within the time interval 1.6-4.5 mu s (long gate) and 0.0-4.5 mu s (extra-long gate) exhibits a power law relation, L(E,Z,A)=a1(Z,A)E sup a sup 2 sup ( sup Z sup , sup A sup ) , for sup 1 sup , sup 2 sup , sup 3 H isotopes in the measured energy range 5-150 MeV. For the time interval 0.0-0.60 mu s (short gate), a significant deviation from the power law relation is observed, for energy greater than approx 30 MeV. The character of the a2(p)-a2(d) and a2(p)-a2(t) correlations for protons, deuterons and tritons, reveals 3 types of crystals in the batch. These subbatches differ in the value of the extracted parameter a2 for protons, and in the value of the spread of a2 for deuterons and tritons. This may be explained by the difference in the energy dependence of the fast decay time component an...

  2. Phase-step calibration technique based on a two-run-times-two-frame phase-shift method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xianghong

    2006-12-10

    A novel phase-step calibration technique is presented on the basis of a two-run-times-two-frame phase-shift method. First the symmetry factor M is defined to describe the distribution property of the distorted phase due to phase-shifter miscalibration; then the phase-step calibration technique, in which two sets of two interferograms with a straight fringe pattern are recorded and the phase step is obtained by calculating M of the wrapped phase map, is developed. With this technique, a good mirror is required, but no uniform illumination is needed and no complex mathematical operation is involved. This technique can be carried out in situ and is applicable to any phase shifter, whether linear or nonlinear.

  3. Calibration of time domain reflectometry technique using undisturbed soil samples from humid tropical soils of volcanic origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, A. M.; Grauel, W. T.; Keller, M.; Veldkamp, E.

    1997-06-01

    Time domain reflectrometry (TDR) is used to measure the apparent dielectric number (Ka) in soils. We studied two soil types (Humitropept and Hapludand) of low bulk density (about 0.7 Mg m-3 at 0.05 m to 0.8 Mg m-3 at 0.3 m depth) and high organic matter content (about 7% at 0.05 m to 4% at 0.3 m depth). Soils are located in a humid tropical environment (average annual soil water content is 0.51 to 0.58 m3 m-3). For calibration, undisturbed soil blocks, with a TDR probe installed in the center, were saturated and then allowed to dry by evaporation. Volumetric water content was calculated from measured Ka values and from gravimetric measurements. Because we used undisturbed soil samples, our calibration accounts for the natural heterogeneity in soils. We tested the suitability of various calibration functions relating Ka to soil water content for our soils. TDR technique underestimated the actual soil water content by 0.05-0.15 m3m-3, when using the widely applied Topp calibration function. A three-phase mixing model with a geometry parameter, α=0.47, fit our data best. We consider mixing models to be a robust approach for calibration of TDR technique on various soils.

  4. The Malmö study : a calibration of traffic conflict techniques. A study organised by ICTCT (The International Committee on Traffic Conflict Techniques).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grayson, G.B. (ed.) Hyden, C. Kraay, J.H. Muhlrad, N. & Oppe, S.

    1984-01-01

    In the summer of 1983 a unique experiment took place in Malmö; a calibration study of eight different conflict techniques. The week before this experiment an international meeting in Copenhagen was organised in order to show a broader audience the detailed information concerning each applied conf

  5. Computed Tomography Colonography Technique: The Role of Intracolonic Gas Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. McLaughlin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Poor distention decreases the sensitivity and specificity of CTC. The total volume of gas administered will vary according to many factors. We aim to determine the relationship between the volume of retained gas at the time of image acquisition and colonic distention and specifically the presence of collapsed bowel segments at CTC. Materials and Methods. All patients who underwent CTC over a 12-month period at a single institution were included in the study. Colonic luminal distention was objectively scored by 2 radiologists using an established 4-point scale. Quantitative analysis of the volume of retained gas at the time of image acquisition was conducted using the threshold 3D region growing function of OsiriX. Results. 108 patients were included for volumetric analysis. Mean retained gas volume was 3.3 L. 35% (38/108 of patients had at least one collapsed colonic segment. Significantly lower gas volumes were observed in the patients with collapsed colonic segments when compared with those with fully distended colons 2.6 L versus 3.5 L (P=0.031. Retained volumes were significantly higher for the 78% of patients with ileocecal reflux at 3.4 L versus 2.6 L without ileocecal reflux (P=0.014. Conclusion. Estimation of intraluminal gas volume at CTC is feasible using image segmentation and thresholding tools. An average of 3.5 L of retained gas was found in diagnostically adequate CTC studies with significantly lower mean gas volume observed in patients with collapsed colonic segments.

  6. A Rapid Calibration Technique for Scanning Line-Structured Laser Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel procedure to calibrate the scanning line-structured laser sensor is presented. A drone composed of two orthogonal planes is designed, with the result that camera parameters and light-plane equation parameters is achieved simultaneously.

  7. A calibration technique to correct sensor drift issues in hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talluru, K. M.; Kulandaivelu, V.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2014-10-01

    Accurate calibration is imperative to obtain reliable flow measurements using hot-wire anemometry. Calibration errors owing to temperature drift, wire degradation, changes in ambient conditions etc can lead to substantial uncertainties in hot-wire measurements. A new calibration procedure is implemented here to account for most forms of drift that are typically encountered during high quality flow measurements using hot-wires. The method involves obtaining single point recalibrations of the hot-wire (in the free-stream) at regular intervals during the course of an actual experiment, and using these during post-processing to correct for any drift encountered. Unlike many other existing schemes, this proposed calibration correction method is not solely restricted to correcting temperature drift.

  8. A comparison of calibration techniques for hot-wires operated in subsonic compressible slip flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. C.; Nagabushana, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper focuses on the correlation of constant temperature anemometer voltages to velocity, density, and total temperature in the transonic slip flow regime. Three different calibration schemes were evaluated. The ultimate use of these hot-wire calibrations is to obtain fluctuations in the flow variables. Without the appropriate mean flow sensitivities of the heated wire, the measurements of these fluctuations cannot be accurately determined.

  9. Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.; Polly, B.; Collis, J.

    2013-09-01

    This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define 'explicit' input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

  10. Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    and Ben Polly, Joseph Robertson [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Polly, Ben [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Collis, Jon [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define "explicit" input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

  11. Comparative technique in measurements of Ge detectors effective volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, E. V.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Vasenko, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and quick procedure was proposed for measurements of large coaxial Ge detectors effective volumes. It included a comparison of background spectra collected with several detectors without any shielding in an underground laboratory. Such measurements were performed in Homestake (USA) and Canfranc (Spain) laboratories with several 1 kg and 2 kg detectors. Monte-Carlo calculations confirmed that ratios of numbers of events in continua of the spectra should be either equal or very close to the ratios of the detectors effective volumes.

  12. A modeling technique for STOVL ejector and volume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, C. K.; Barankiewicz, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    New models for thrust augmenting ejector performance prediction and feeder duct dynamic analysis are presented and applied to a proposed Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft configuration. Central to the analysis is the nontraditional treatment of the time-dependent volume integrals in the otherwise conventional control-volume approach. In the case of the thrust augmenting ejector, the analysis required a new relationship for transfer of kinetic energy from the primary flow to the secondary flow. Extraction of the required empirical corrections from current steady-state experimental data is discussed; a possible approach for modeling insight through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is presented.

  13. Combining EEG and MEG for the reconstruction of epileptic activity using a calibrated realistic volume conductor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and field (SEF data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data.

  14. Bymixer provides on-line calibration of measurement of CO2 volume exhaled per breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, P H; Serina, E R

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of CO2 volume exhaled per breath (VCO2.br) can be determined during anesthesia by the multiplication and integration of tidal flow (V) and PCO2. During side-stream capnometry, PCO2 must be advanced in time by transport delay (TD), the time to suction gas through the sampling tube. During ventilation, TD can vary due to sample line connection internal volume or flow rate changes. To determine correct TD and measure accurate VCO2.br during actual ventilation. TD can be iteratively adjusted (TDADJ) until VCO2-br/tidal volume equals PCO2 measured in a mixed expired gas collection (PECO2) (J Appl. Physiol. 72:2029-2035, 1992). However. PECO2 is difficult to measure during anesthesia because CO2 is absorbed in the circle circuit. Accordingly, we implemented a bypass flow-mixing chamber device (bymixer) that was interposed in the expiration limb of the circle circuit and accurately measured PECO2 over a wide range of conditions of ventilation of a test lung-metabolic chamber (regression slope = 1.01: R2 = 0.99). The bymixer response (time constant) varied from 18.1 +/- 0.03 sec (12.5 l/min ventilation) to 66.7 +/- 0.9 sec (2.5 l/min). Bymixer PECO2 was used to correctly determine TDADJ (without interrupting respiration) to enable accurate measurement of VCO2.br over widely changing expiratory flow patterns.

  15. RF Calibration of On-Chip DfT Chain by DC Stimuli and Statistical Multivariate Regression Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ramzan, Rashad; Dabrowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The problem of parameter variability in RF and analog circuits is escalating with CMOS scaling. Consequently every RF chip produced in nano-meter CMOS technologies needs to be tested. On-chip Design for Testability (DfT) features, which are meant to reduce test time and cost also suffer from parameter variability. Therefore, RF calibration of all on-chip test structures is mandatory. In this paper, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are employed as a multivariate regression technique to archite...

  16. Zero-Effort Camera-Assisted Calibration Techniques for Wearable Motion Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2017-01-01

    Activity recognition using wearable motion sensors plays an important role in pervasive wellness and healthcare monitoring applications. The activity recognition algorithms are often designed to work with a known orientation of sensors on the body. In the case of accidental displacement of the motion sensors, it is important to identify the new sensor location and orientation. This step, often called calibration or recalibration, requires extra effort from the user to either perform a set of known movements, or enter information about the placement of the sensors manually. In this paper, we propose a camera-assisted calibration approach that does not require any extra effort from the user. The calibration is done seamlessly when the user appears in front of the camera (in our case, a Kinect camera) and performs an arbitrary activity of choice (e.g., walking in front of the camera). We provide experimental results supporting the effectiveness of our approach.

  17. Online calibration technique for LDV in SINS/LDV integrated navigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gao, Chunfeng; Wei, Guo; Long, Xingwu

    2017-05-01

    There are the scale factor error of LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) and the misalignment between the SINS (Strapdown inertial navigation system) and the vehicle in a SINS/LDV integrated navigation system. In this paper, the effects of these errors on the attitude, velocity and position of dead reckoning are derived, and a new online calibration method aiming to calibrate the scale factor of LDV and the misalignment between the SINS and the vehicle for the integrated system is put forward. This method, which is utilize the velocity and position of the Global Position System (GPS) as references, use the velocity error and position error of dead reckoning to estimate these errors. Through simulation and experiment, the validity and feasibility of the method are verified. The results show that the scale factor and the misalignment can be calibrated with satisfying accuracy, and the related research can provide technical support for high precision navigation of SINS/LDV integrated navigation systems.

  18. Zero-Effort Camera-Assisted Calibration Techniques for Wearable Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2014-10-01

    Activity recognition using wearable motion sensors plays an important role in pervasive wellness and healthcare monitoring applications. The activity recognition algorithms are often designed to work with a known orientation of sensors on the body. In the case of accidental displacement of the motion sensors, it is important to identify the new sensor location and orientation. This step, often called calibration or recalibration, requires extra effort from the user to either perform a set of known movements, or enter information about the placement of the sensors manually. In this paper, we propose a camera-assisted calibration approach that does not require any extra effort from the user. The calibration is done seamlessly when the user appears in front of the camera (in our case, a Kinect camera) and performs an arbitrary activity of choice (e.g., walking in front of the camera). We provide experimental results supporting the effectiveness of our approach.

  19. Thermal Discrimination Technique for Airborne Measurement of Sulfuric Acid on Atmospheric Aerosol: Calibration and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, O.; Hagen, D. E.; Whitefield, P. D.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal discrimination or volatility technique has been widely used to determine the number fraction of volatile atmospheric aerosol (e.g. Hagen et al., 1998). Here we extend this method to measure both number and volume fraction of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric aerosol with particular concern for the conditions in aircraft and rocket plumes. The volatility method infers the amount of volatile aerosol material from the change in aerosol volume under heated conditions. Accurate measurements require size resolved volatility data, corrected for possible systematic effects due to particle wall losses, incomplete evaporation, and recondensation of evaporated material. A tandem differential mobility analyzer was employed to investigate these effects for mixed H2SO4/H2O aerosol conditioned by a thermal discriminator that had been used by the University of Missouri-Rolla for several field studies in the past including the recent ACCENT mission. For an operating temperature of 300 \\deg C and an aerosol residence time of 0.25 s, we found that complete evaporation of H2SO4/H2O aerosol occurred up to diameters of at least 2 micron. This is consistent with the theoretically estimated upper diameter limit for complete evaporation of about 10 micron. No evidence for recondensation was found for H2SO4 abundances occurring in the atmosphere. We also showed that for a given set of discriminator parameters, wall losses depend only on charge state and particle diameter downstream of the discriminator. Based on these findings an improved volatility method with analytical correction for wall losses is described and its accuracy is tested with mixed H2SO4/H2O-NaCl aerosol of known composition. The observed accuracy is consistent with the estimated accuracy of the system parameters. Finally, some results from atmospheric measurements are presented. Hagen, D., Whitefield, P., Paladino, J., Trueblood, M., and Lilenfeld, H. Particulate Sizing and Emission Indices for a Jet

  20. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

  1. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required.

  2. Free-field reciprocity calibration of laboratory standard (LS) microphones using a time selective technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador

    2006-01-01

    Although the basic principle of reciprocity calibration of microphones in a free field is simple, the practical problems are complicated due to the low signal-to-noise ratio and the influence of cross talk and reflections from the surroundings. The influence of uncorrelated noise can be reduced...

  3. EASYTRAC Project: Work package 6.4 Reversal technique to calibrate gear and thread standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmignato, Simone; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Larsen, Erik

    This report was produced as a part of the project EASYTRAC, an EU project under the programme Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No. G6RD-CT-2000-00188, coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines (CM...

  4. [A progress in the standardization in clinical enzymology using calibrators adapted to several techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourson, J L; Lessinger, J M; Férard, G

    1997-01-01

    Results in enzymology obtained in routine conditions, differ considerably according to the measurement procedures, and the use of conversion factors is not an advisable solution. Some studies show that between-laboratory agreement of results can be improved by using validated enzyme calibrators. The conditions, which are required to define a strategy for the development of such calibrators, are described in a first part. The example of lipase activity, which is measured in routine conditions with important between-method discrepancy, is studied in a second part. This example emphasised the need of an a priori control of the validity of the calibrators. Under these conditions, between-method agreement is in fact considerably improved. With the collaboration of manufacturers for the development of validated enzyme multicalibrators, it will be possible to improve the efficiency of the information transmitted by clinical chemists to clinicians. Thus, enzyme activities measurements could benefit from the same improvement as immunoassay of proteins with the use of CRM 470 by manufacturers to calibrate their standards.

  5. Calibration of the modified Bartlett-Lewis model using global optimization techniques and alternative objective functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Vanhaute

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of rainfall time series for various applications is widespread. However, in many cases historical rainfall records lack in length or quality for certain practical purposes, resulting in a reliance on rainfall models to supply simulated rainfall time series, e.g., in the design of hydraulic structures. One way to obtain such simulations is by means of stochastic point process rainfall models, such as the Bartlett-Lewis type of model. It is widely acknowledged that the calibration of such models suffers from the presence of multiple local minima which local search algorithms usually fail to avoid. To meet this shortcoming, four relatively new global optimization methods are presented and tested for their abilities to calibrate the Modified Bartlett-Lewis Model (MBL. The list of tested methods consists of: the Downhill Simplex Method (DSM, Simplex-Simulated Annealing (SIMPSA, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO and Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA. The parameters of these algorithms are first optimized to ensure optimal performance, after which they are used for calibration of the MBL model. Furthermore, this paper addresses the issue of subjectivity in the choice of weights in the objective function. Three alternative weighing methods are compared to determine whether or not simulation results (obtained after calibration with the best optimization method are influenced by the choice of weights.

  6. Application of multi-step and reversal techniques to calibrate a 100mm ring gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Savio, Enrico; Larsen, Erik

    This report is made as a part of the project Easytrac, an EU project under the programme: Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No: G6RD-CT-2000-00188, coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines...

  7. Feasibility of the reversal and substitute element technique for thread calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik; Carmignato, Simone; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This report is made as a part of the project EASYTRAC, an EU project under the programme Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No. G6RD-CT-2000-00188, coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines. For thi...

  8. Application of advanced shearing techniques to the calibration of autocollimators with small angle generators and investigation of error sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandayan, T; Geckeler, R D; Aksulu, M; Akgoz, S A; Ozgur, B

    2016-05-01

    The application of advanced error-separating shearing techniques to the precise calibration of autocollimators with Small Angle Generators (SAGs) was carried out for the first time. The experimental realization was achieved using the High Precision Small Angle Generator (HPSAG) of TUBITAK UME under classical dimensional metrology laboratory environmental conditions. The standard uncertainty value of 5 mas (24.2 nrad) reached by classical calibration method was improved to the level of 1.38 mas (6.7 nrad). Shearing techniques, which offer a unique opportunity to separate the errors of devices without recourse to any external standard, were first adapted by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to the calibration of autocollimators with angle encoders. It has been demonstrated experimentally in a clean room environment using the primary angle standard of PTB (WMT 220). The application of the technique to a different type of angle measurement system extends the range of the shearing technique further and reveals other advantages. For example, the angular scales of the SAGs are based on linear measurement systems (e.g., capacitive nanosensors for the HPSAG). Therefore, SAGs show different systematic errors when compared to angle encoders. In addition to the error-separation of HPSAG and the autocollimator, detailed investigations on error sources were carried out. Apart from determination of the systematic errors of the capacitive sensor used in the HPSAG, it was also demonstrated that the shearing method enables the unique opportunity to characterize other error sources such as errors due to temperature drift in long term measurements. This proves that the shearing technique is a very powerful method for investigating angle measuring systems, for their improvement, and for specifying precautions to be taken during the measurements.

  9. One way Doppler Extractor. Volume 2: Digital VCO technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossen, E. J.; Starner, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    A feasibility analysis and trade-offs for a one-way Doppler extractor using digital VCO techniques is presented. The method of Doppler measurement involves the use of a digital phase lock loop; once this loop is locked to the incoming signal, the precise frequency and hence the Doppler component can be determined directly from the contents of the digital control register. The only serious error source is due to internally generated noise. Techniques are presented for minimizing this error source and achieving an accuracy of 0.01 Hz in a one second averaging period. A number of digitally controlled oscillators were analyzed from a performance and complexity point of view. The most promising technique uses an arithmetic synthesizer as a digital waveform generator.

  10. One way Doppler extractor. Volume 1: Vernier technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, R. W.; Klein, S.; Nossen, E. J.; Starner, E. R.; Yanosov, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A feasibility analysis, trade-offs, and implementation for a One Way Doppler Extraction system are discussed. A Doppler error analysis shows that quantization error is a primary source of Doppler measurement error. Several competing extraction techniques are compared and a Vernier technique is developed which obtains high Doppler resolution with low speed logic. Parameter trade-offs and sensitivities for the Vernier technique are analyzed, leading to a hardware design configuration. A detailed design, operation, and performance evaluation of the resulting breadboard model is presented which verifies the theoretical performance predictions. Performance tests have verified that the breadboard is capable of extracting Doppler, on an S-band signal, to an accuracy of less than 0.02 Hertz for a one second averaging period. This corresponds to a range rate error of no more than 3 millimeters per second.

  11. Developing novel techniques for readout, calibration and event selection in the NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Ryan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Backhouse, Christopher [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bays, Kirk [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Lozier, Joseph [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Pershey, Daniel [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiment uses a fine-grained, low-Z, fully active detector that offers unprecedented electron neutrino identification capabilities for a detector of its scale. In this award’s proposal, the PI outlined the development and implementation of novel techniques for channel readout, detector calibration, and event reconstruction that make full use of the strengths of the NOvA detector technology. In particular, this included designing custom event reconstruction algorithms that utilize the rich information available in the substructure of hadronic and electromagnetic showers. Exploiting this information provides not only substantial improvement in background rejection for the electron neutrino search but also better shower energy resolution (improving the precision on measured oscillation parameters) and a high-energy electromagnetic calibration source (through neutral pion events). The PI further proposed developing and deploying a new electronics readout scheme compatible with the existing hardware that can reduce near detector event pile-up and can offer powerful timing information to the reconstruction, allowing for cosmic ray muon tagging via track direction determination, among other things. In conjunction with the above, the PI proposed leading the calibration of the NOvA detectors, including characterizing individual electronics channels, correcting for spatial variations across the detector, and establishing absolute event energy scales. All three of these lines of effort have been successfully completed, feeding directly into the NOvA’s recent exciting neutrino oscillation results. The techniques developed under this award are detailed in this final technical report.

  12. Developing novel techniques for readout, calibration and event selection in the NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Ryan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Backhouse, Christopher [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bays, Kirk [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Lozier, Joseph [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Pershey, Daniel [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-10-06

    The NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiment uses a fine-grained, low-Z, fully active detector that offers unprecedented electron neutrino identification capabilities for a detector of its scale. In this award’s proposal, the PI outlined the development and implementation of novel techniques for channel readout, detector calibration, and event reconstruction that make full use of the strengths of the NOvA detector technology. In particular, this included designing custom event reconstruction algorithms that utilize the rich information available in the substructure of hadronic and electromagnetic showers. Exploiting this information provides not only substantial improvement in background rejection for the electron neutrino search but also better shower energy resolution (improving the precision on measured oscillation parameters) and a high-energy electromagnetic calibration source (through neutral pion events). The PI further proposed developing and deploying a new electronics readout scheme compatible with the existing hardware that can reduce near detector event pile-up and can offer powerful timing information to the reconstruction, allowing for cosmic ray muon tagging via track direction determination, among other things. In conjunction with the above, the PI proposed leading the calibration of the NOvA detectors, including characterizing individual electronics channels, correcting for spatial variations across the detector, and establishing absolute event energy scales. All three of these lines of effort have been successfully completed, feeding directly into the NOvA’s recent exciting neutrino oscillation results. The techniques developed under this award are detailed in this final technical report.

  13. Flow Visualization Techniques for CDF using Volume Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawfis, R.A.; Shen, H-W.; Max, N.

    2000-07-10

    As simulations have migrated towards three-dimensions, new tools for examining the resulting complex datasets have been required. Much progress has been achieved in the area of scientific visualization towards this goal. However, most of the research has focused on the representation and understanding of a single scalar field. Some nice results have been achieved for vector or flow fields. This paper reviews several of these techniques, organizes them by their approach and complexity and presents some observations on their benefits and limitations. Several example images are used to highlight the character of these techniques.

  14. An effective technique for calibrating the intrinsic parameters of a vascular C-arm from a planar target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorges, Sébastien; Kerrien, Erwan; Berger, Marie-Odile; Trousset, Yves; Pescatore, Jérémie; Anxionnat, René; Picard, Luc

    2006-03-01

    The real time recovery of the projection geometry is a fundamental issue in interventional navigation applications (e.g. guide wire reconstruction, medical augmented reality). In most works, the intrinsic parameters are supposed to be constant and the extrinsic parameters (C-arm motion) are deduced either from the orientation sensors of the C-arm or from other additional sensors (eg. optical and/or electro-magnetic sensors). However, due to the weight of the X-ray tube and the C-arm, the system is undergoing deformations which induce variations of the intrinsic parameters as a function of the C-arm orientation. In our approach, we propose to measure the effects of the mechanical deformations onto the intrinsic parameters in a calibration procedure. Robust calibration methods exist (the gold standard is the multi-image calibration) but they are time consuming and too tedious to set up in a clinical context. For these reasons, we developed an original and easy to use method, based on a planar calibration target, which aims at measuring with a high level of accuracy the variation of the intrinsic parameters on a vascular C-arm. The precision of the planar-based method was evaluated by the mean of error propagation using techniques described in. 8 It appeared that the precision of the intrinsic parameters are comparable to the one obtained from the multi-image calibration method. The planar-based method was also successfully used to assess to behavior of the C-arm with respect to the C-arm orientations. Results showed a clear variation of the principal point when the LAO/RAO orientation was changed. In contrast, the intrinsic parameters do not change during a cranio-caudal C-arm motion.

  15. Combined left and right ventricular volume determination by radionuclide angiocardiography using double bolus and equilibrium technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, K H; Stubgaard, M; Møgelvang, J;

    1990-01-01

    by indicator dilution. The radionuclide technique comprised four steps: (1) a first-pass study of right ventricle; (2) a bolus study of left ventricle; (3) an equilibrium study of left ventricle; (4) determination of the distribution volume of red blood cells. Absolute volumes of left ventricle were determined......Eighteen patients with ischaemic heart disease were studied. Left and right ventricular volumes including cardiac output (forward flow) were determined by radionuclide angiocardiography using a double bolus and equilibrium technique. As reference, cardiac output was simultaneously measured...... from steps 2 + 3 + 4. Absolute volumes of right ventricle were calculated from stroke volume and right ventricular ejection fraction (EF) which in turn was determined from step 1 by creating composite systolic and composite diastolic images. There was an acceptable agreement between stroke volume...

  16. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Braatz, Brett G.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the status of ongoing research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  17. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2014-04-30

    This report describes research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  18. Calibration and statistical techniques for building an interactive screen for learning of alphabets by children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riby Abraham Boby

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the implementation details of a portable interactive device called Image-projective Desktop Varnamala Trainer. The device uses a projector to produce a virtual display on a flat surface. For enabling interaction, the information about a user’s hand movement is obtained from a single two-dimensional scanning laser range finder in contrast with a camera sensor used in many earlier applications. A generalized calibration process to obtain exact transformation from projected screen coordinate system to sensor coordinate system is proposed in this article and implemented for enabling interaction. This permits production of large interactive displays with minimal cost. Additionally, it makes the entire system portable, that is, display can be produced on any planar surface like floor, tabletop, and so on. The calibration and its performance have been evaluated by varying screen sizes and the number of points used for calibration. The device was successfully calibrated for different screens. A novel learning-based methodology for predicting a user’s behaviour was then realized to improve the system’s performance. This has been experimentally evaluated, and the overall accuracy of prediction was about 96%. An application was then designed for this set-up to improve the learning of alphabets by the children through an interactive audiovisual feedback system. It uses a game-based methodology to help students learn in a fun way. Currently, it has bilingual (Hindi and English user interface to enable learning of alphabets and elementary mathematics. A user survey was conducted after demonstrating it to school children. The survey results are very encouraging. Additionally, a study to ascertain the improvement in the learning outcome of the children was done. The results clearly indicate an improvement in the learning outcome of the children who used the device over those who did not.

  19. Simultaneous diffuse reflectance infrared determination of clavulanic acid and amoxicillin using multivariate calibration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Aline Lima Hermes; Picoloto, Rochele Sogari; Ferrão, Marco Flores; da Silva, Fabiana Ernestina Barcellos; Müller, Edson Irineu; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes

    2012-06-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of clavulanic acid (CA) and amoxicillin (AMO) in commercial tablets was developed using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and multivariate calibration. Twenty-five samples (10 commercial and 15 synthetic) were used as a calibration set and 15 samples (10 commercial and 5 synthetic) were used for a prediction set. Calibration models were developed using partial least squares (PLS), interval PLS (iPLS), and synergy interval PLS (siPLS) algorithms. The best algorithm for CA determination was siPLS model with spectra divided in 30 intervals and combinations of 2 intervals. This model showed a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 5.1 mg g(-1). For AMO determination, the best siPLS model was obtained with spectra divided in 10 intervals and combinations of 4 intervals. This model showed a RMSEP of 22.3 mg g(-1). The proposed method was considered as a suitable for the simultaneous determination of CA and AMO in commercial pharmaceuticals products.

  20. Working-point control technique for the homodyne interferometry in hydrophone calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Xing, Guangzhen

    2015-02-01

    The stabilization of a homodyne type Michelson interferometer for calibrating the high frequency hydrophone is presented in this article. For the detection of the ultrasonic field, a 5 um thickness pellicle was inserted in water moving in sympathy with the ultrasonic wave. To ensure high signal to noise ratio at high frequencies, a 5 MHz focusing transducer was driven by high voltage and harmonics of the shocked ultrasonic field could be activated. Nevertheless, the homodyne interferometer suffered from the drawback of signal fading caused by the low frequency noise in environment, including acoustic noise and water surface agitation. Direct Current Phase Tracking was utilized to maintain the quadrature working point for the interferometer. Most of environmental noises could be effectively compensated while stabilization was maintained. A piezoelectric actuator supporting the reference mirror was utilized as the stabilizing element whose output was frequency independent over the low frequency disturbances, usually below 200 Hz. The ultrasonic signal fading caused by environmental disturbances could be solved while the negative electric feedback loop was operating. The displacement and voltage output of the hydrophone under test were then processed by DFT to derive the fundamental and harmonic components. Under plane wave conditions, the ultrasonic pressure could be derived by the detected displacement with a stabilized homodyne interferometer, and the hydrophone could then be calibrated. Measurement results indicated that the hydrophone calibration system based on the active stabilization of homodyne interferometry was sound in theory and feasible in practice.

  1. A technique for sampling low shrub vegetation, by crown volume classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay R. Bentley; Donald W. Seegrist; David A. Blakeman

    1970-01-01

    The effects of herbicides or other cultural treatments of low shrubs can be sampled by a new technique using crown volume as the key variable. Low shrubs were grouped in 12 crown volume classes with index values based on height times surface area of crown. The number of plants, by species, in each class is counted on quadrats. Many quadrats are needed for highly...

  2. Assessment of organ volume with different techniques using a living liver model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccichenti, Giacomo; Cobelli, Rocco; Pavone, Paolo [Department of Radiology, University of Parma, Via A. Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Department of Radiology, University of Parma, Via A. Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare different techniques for the estimation of liver volume, and to evaluate errors associated with volume estimation techniques based on linear measurements. Fifteen patients with focal liver lesion underwent spiral CTA for preoperative evaluation. The scan protocol was: collimation 3 mm; rotation time 0.75 s; pitch 2; and reconstruction index 1 mm. Reconstructed images were sent to a workstation running on a NT platform equipped with post-processing software allowing 3D reconstructions. Linear measurements and volume estimation through manual segmentation were obtained with preset window and magnification. Volume was calculated from linear measures using different equations. With equations based on linear measurements the right lobe was overestimated (mean=+53%; mean error=14.7%), the second and third segments were underestimated (mean=-47%; mean error=43.3%) and the total volume was underestimated (mean=-86%; mean error=36%). The volume calculated by summing the areas of all the sections and multiplying the result by the increment was not significantly different from the volume estimated using the manual volumetric segmentation technique. Volume estimation obtained through linear measurements is not reliable to appraise the volume of irregular-shaped solids, even assuming the prevalence of a particular morphology. (orig.)

  3. Determination of the analytical performance of a headspace capillary gas chromatographic technique and karl Fischer coulometric titration by system calibration using oil samples containing known amounts of moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, J; Gilbert, R; Tétreault, P

    1999-08-01

    Over the past few years, concerns have been raised in the literature about the accuracy of the Karl Fischer (KF) method for assessing moisture in transformer mineral oils. To better understand this issue, the performance of a static headspace capillary gas chromatographic (HS-CGC) technique was compared to that of KF coulometric titration by analyzing moisture in samples containing known amounts of water and various samples obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Two modes of adding samples into the KF vessel were used:  direct injection and indirect injection via an azeotropic distillation of the moisture with toluene. Under the conditions used for direct injection, the oil matrix was totally dissolved in the anolyte, which allowed the moisture to be titrated in a single-phase solution rather than in a suspension. The results have shown that when HS-CGC and combined azeotropic distillation/KF titration are calibrated with moisture-in-oil standards, a linear relation is observed over 0-60 ppm H(2)O with a correlation coefficient better than 0.9994 (95% confidence), with the regression line crossing through zero. A similar relation can also be observed when calibration is achieved by direct KF addition of standards prepared with octanol-1, but in this case an intercept of 4-5 ppm is noted. The amount of moisture determined by curve interpolation in NIST reference materials by the three calibrated systems ranges from 13.0 to 14.8 ppm for RM 8506 and 42.5 to 46.4 ppm for RM 8507, and in any case, the results were as high as those reported in the literature with volumetric KF titration. However, titration of various dehydrated oil and solvent samples showed that direct KF titration is affected by a small bias when samples contain very little moisture. The source of error after correction for the large sample volume used for the determination (8 mL) is about 6 ppm for Voltesso naphthenic oil and 4 ppm for toluene, revealing a matrix

  4. Failure Analysis Seminar: Techniques and Teams. Seminar Notes. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    and Progress - Evaluate 7* 6 *~ 0 6 9 9 S 9 FAILURE ANALYSIS STRATEGY1 Augustine E. Magistro *. Introduction A primary task of management and systems...by Augustine Magistro , Picatinny Arsenal and Lawrence R. Seggel, U. S. Army Missile Command. The report Is available from the National Technical...to emphasize techniques - Identification and improvement of your leadership styles 2I BIOGRAPHIC SKETCHES: A.E. "Gus" Magistro - Systems Evaluation

  5. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindloe, C.; Arthur, G.; Hall, F.; Tomlinson, S.; Potter, R.; Kar, S.; Green, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Booth, N.; Tolley, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed.

  6. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions - III. Calibration of Measurement Techniques of Star-formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Koepferl, Christine M; Dale, James E

    2016-01-01

    Through an extensive set of realistic synthetic observations (produced in Paper I), we assess in this part of the paper series (Paper III) how the choice of observational techniques affects the measurement of star-formation rates (SFRs) in star-forming regions. We test the accuracy of commonly used techniques and construct new methods to extract the SFR, so that these findings can be applied to measure the SFR in real regions throughout the Milky Way. We investigate diffuse infrared SFR tracers such as those using 24 {\\mu}m, 70 {\\mu}m and total infrared emission, which have been previously calibrated for global galaxy scales. We set up a toy model of a galaxy and show that the infrared emission is consistent with the intrinsic SFR using extra-galactic calibrated laws (although the consistency does not prove their reliability). For local scales, we show that these techniques produce completely unreliable results for single star-forming regions, which are governed by different characteristic timescales. We show...

  7. Development, improvement and calibration of neutronic reaction rate measurements: elaboration of a base of standard techniques; Developpement, amelioration et calibration des mesures de taux de reaction neutroniques: elaboration d`une base de techniques standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudelot, J.P

    1998-06-19

    In order to improve and to validate the neutronic calculation schemes, perfecting integral measurements of neutronic parameters is necessary. This thesis focuses on the conception, the improvement and the development of neutronic reaction rates measurements, and aims at building a base of standard techniques. Two subjects are discussed. The first one deals with direct measurements by fission chambers. A short presentation of the different usual techniques is given. Then, those last ones are applied through the example of doubling time measurements on the EOLE facility during the MISTRAL 1 experimental programme. Two calibration devices of fission chambers are developed: a thermal column located in the central part of the MINERVE facility, and a calibration cell using a pulsed high flux neutron generator and based on the discrimination of the energy of the neutrons with a time-of-flight method. This second device will soon allow to measure the mass of fission chambers with a precision of about 1 %. Finally, the necessity of those calibrations will be shown through spectral indices measurements in core MISTRAL 1 (UO{sub 2}) and MISTRAL 2 (MOX) of the EOLE facility. In each case, the associated calculation schemes, performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code with the ENDF-BV library, will be validated. Concerning the second one, the goal is to develop a method for measuring the modified conversion ratio of {sup 238}U (defined as the ratio of {sup 238}U capture rate to total fission rate) by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods. Within the framework of the MISTRAL 1 and MISTRAL 2 programmes, the measurement device, the experimental results and the spectrometer calibration are described. Furthermore, the MCNP calculations of neutron self-shielding and gamma self-absorption are validated. It is finally shown that measurement uncertainties are better than 1 %. The extension of this technique to future modified conversion ratio measurements for {sup 242}Pu (on MOX rods) and

  8. The effect of fiber orientation on volume measurement using conductance catheter techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaijiam, C; Gale, T J

    2006-01-01

    Estimation of parallel conductance using the impedance electrode technique is usually done assuming isotropic conditions. This may not be the best solution since the myocardium is an anisotropic material. This paper exposes the effect of fiber orientation for volume measurement using a conductor model with asymmetrical source electrodes. Simulation results show calculated volumes between surrounding materials with and without myocardial fiber orientation included in the model. We plan to extend these study results to the real heart for developing conductance catheter techniques for use in blood volume measurements in the right ventricle.

  9. A technique for conditioning and calibrating force-sensing resistors for repeatable and reliable measurement of compressive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rick S; Desmoulin, Geoffrey T; Milner, Theodore E

    2008-12-01

    Miniature sensors that could measure forces applied by the fingers and hand without interfering with manual dexterity or range of motion would have considerable practical value in ergonomics and rehabilitation. In this study, techniques have been developed to use inexpensive pressure-sensing resistors (FSRs) to accurately measure compression force. The FSRs are converted from pressure-sensing to force-sensing devices. The effects of nonlinear response properties and dependence on loading history are compensated by signal conditioning and calibration. A fourth-order polynomial relating the applied force to the current voltage output and a linearly weighted sum of prior outputs corrects for sensor hysteresis and drift. It was found that prolonged (>20h) shear force loading caused sensor gain to change by approximately 100%. Shear loading also had the effect of eliminating shear force effects on sensor output, albeit only in the direction of shear loading. By applying prolonged shear loading in two orthogonal directions, the sensors were converted into pure compression sensors. Such preloading of the sensor is, therefore, required prior to calibration. The error in compression force after prolonged shear loading and calibration was consistently industrial design applications where measurements of finger and hand force are needed.

  10. A novel technique for accurate intensity calibration of area x-ray detectors at almost arbitrary energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, J.P.; Hammersley, A.P.; Svensson, S.O.; Gonzalez, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Brown, K.; Claustre, L.; McSweeney, S. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble (France)

    1996-06-01

    A novel intensity uniformity calibration method for area X-ray detectors is described. In diffraction experiments, amorphous lithium glass plates, containing doping elements chosen for their K edges just below the energy of the main beam, replace the crystallographic samples for the calibration measurement. The fluorescent emission excited by the X-ray beam is almost isotropic. It has exactly the same geometry as the diffracted radiation, and can be obtained at the same wavelength by proper selection of the element and excitation energy. A simple 2{theta} scan allows the emission distribution as a function of angle to be characterized with an accuracy of a fraction of a percent. This allows a flat-field correction to a similar accuracy. The quality of crystallographic data collected with an X-ray image intensifier/CCD detector was significantly improved by flat-field correction using an Sr-doped lithium tetraborate glass. This technique can be applied to X-ray energies from 5 to 50 keV; the calibration sample is small, stable and easily handled. (au) 13 refs.

  11. Evaluation of hippocampal volume based on MRI applying manual and automatic segmentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Thomas M.; Gasparetto, Emerson L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Kubo, Tadeu T.A.; Domingues, Romeu C. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Various segmentation techniques using MR sequences, including manual and automatic protocols, have been developed to optimize the determination of the hippocampal volume. For clinical application, automated methods with high reproducibility and accuracy potentially may be more efficient than manual volumetry. This study aims to compare the hippocampal volumes obtained from manual and automatic segmentation methods (FreeSurfer and FSL). The automatic segmentation method FreeSurfer showed high correlation. Comparing the absolute hippocampal volumes, there is an overestimation by the automated methods. Applying a correction factor to the automatic method, it may be an alternative for the estimation of the absolute hippocampal volume. (author)

  12. MR imaging artifacts and parallel imaging techniques with calibration scanning: a new twist on old problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanasak, Nathan E; Kelly, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The application of parallel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasing as clinicians continue to strive for improved spatial and temporal resolution, benefits that arise from the use of fewer phase encodings during imaging. To reconstruct images, extra information is needed to map the spatial sensitivity of each coil element, which may be accomplished by acquiring a calibration image in one common implementation of parallel MR imaging. Although obtaining a quick calibration image is an efficient method for gathering this information, corruption of the image or disharmony with subsequent images may lead to errors in reconstruction. Although conventional MR imaging sequences may be employed with parallel MR imaging, the altered image reconstruction introduces several new artifacts and changes the appearance of conventional artifacts. The altered appearance of traditional artifacts may obscure the source of the problem, and, in some cases, the severity of artifacts associated with parallel MR imaging may be exacerbated, hindering image interpretation. Several artifacts arise in the context of parallel MR imaging, including both traditional artifacts and those associated with parallel MR imaging.

  13. Target volume definition and target conformal irradiation technique for breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiricuta, I.C.; Gotz, U.; Schwab, F.; Fehn, M.; Neumann, H.H. [St. Vincenz-Hospital, Limburg (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Oncology

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to present the target volume and irradiation technique in the most complex situation where the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics (mammarial internal lymph nodes, axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes) have to be irradiated. The study comprised 125 breast cancer patients treated with curative intent after primary surgery in the last two years at our institute. In 62 cases the target volume included the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics, which were treated using our irradiation technique. The target conformal irradiation technique is a multiple non-opposed beams one isocenter technique developed to protect the heart and lungs. This technique, consisting of several rotation beams modulated with wedge filters and individual lung absorbers as well as additional fixed beams, was used in our study to apply a homogeneous dose of 46 to 56 Gy to the target volume; the irradiation technique was optimized by means of dose-volume histograms. After pre-localization, the patients underwent computerized tomographic scanning, with sections at 1.0 cm intervals. Contouring of target volume and organs at risk was carried out with a MULTIDATA workstation for regions of interest (mammarial internal and/or axillary and/or supraclavicular lymphatics and the breast or chest wall) as well as the organs at risk, such as heart and lung parenchyma. Planning target volume coverage was examined by three-dimensional isodose visualization for all CT axial sections for each patient. To determine the incidence of acute or late side effects on the lung parenchyma, conventional chest x-rays and CT studies were carried out at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that this irradiation technique permits the application of a homogeneous dose to the target volume, conforming to the ICRU norms. The maximum dose applied to the ipsilateral lung parenchyma was less than 50

  14. A bronchoscopic navigation system using bronchoscope center calibration for accurate registration of electromagnetic tracker and CT volume without markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiongbiao, E-mail: xiongbiao.luo@gmail.com [Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Various bronchoscopic navigation systems are developed for diagnosis, staging, and treatment of lung and bronchus cancers. To construct electromagnetically navigated bronchoscopy systems, registration of preoperative images and an electromagnetic tracker must be performed. This paper proposes a new marker-free registration method, which uses the centerlines of the bronchial tree and the center of a bronchoscope tip where an electromagnetic sensor is attached, to align preoperative images and electromagnetic tracker systems. Methods: The chest computed tomography (CT) volume (preoperative images) was segmented to extract the bronchial centerlines. An electromagnetic sensor was fixed at the bronchoscope tip surface. A model was designed and printed using a 3D printer to calibrate the relationship between the fixed sensor and the bronchoscope tip center. For each sensor measurement that includes sensor position and orientation information, its corresponding bronchoscope tip center position was calculated. By minimizing the distance between each bronchoscope tip center position and the bronchial centerlines, the spatial alignment of the electromagnetic tracker system and the CT volume was determined. After obtaining the spatial alignment, an electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy system was established to real-timely track or locate a bronchoscope inside the bronchial tree during bronchoscopic examinations. Results: The electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy system was validated on a dynamic bronchial phantom that can simulate respiratory motion with a breath rate range of 0–10 min{sup −1}. The fiducial and target registration errors of this navigation system were evaluated. The average fiducial registration error was reduced from 8.7 to 6.6 mm. The average target registration error, which indicates all tracked or navigated bronchoscope position accuracy, was much reduced from 6.8 to 4.5 mm compared to previous registration methods. Conclusions: An

  15. A time-selective technique for free-field reciprocity calibration of condenser microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2003-01-01

    of the diffraction of the body of the microphone, and thus, its sensitivity will change. In the two cases, a technique based on the reciprocity theorem can be applied for obtaining the absolute sensitivity either under uniform pressure or free-field conditions. In this paper, signal-processing techniques...

  16. A Layer Correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00433248; Abdallah, J.M.; Addy, T.N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O.K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A.J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H.P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P.J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeans Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M.V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S.A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P.O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T.F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A.I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A.I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O.L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B.C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B.J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K.K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Gottfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M.D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, P.H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr; Hawkings, R.J.; Heinemann, F.E.W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P.D.C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P.T.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T.H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E.B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S.P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Kruger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L.G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C.G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K.F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V.P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K.W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V.A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S.V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S.V.; Moyse, E.W.J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A.V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S.Y.; Newcomer, F.M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S.H.; Oleshko, S.B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S.M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T.C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P.W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M.J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; Rohne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L.P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J.M.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J.E.; Smirnov, S.Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V.V.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S.I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J.A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J.B.; Volpi, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P.S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H.H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2011-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by 11% to 25% compared to the response at the electromagnetic scale.

  17. Techniques and Review of Absolute Flux Calibration from the Ultraviolet to the Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlin, Ralph C; Tremblay, P -E

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of precise absolute fluxes for stellar sources has been pursued with increased vigor since the discovery of the dark energy and the realization that its detailed understanding requires accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of redshifted Ia supernovae in the rest frame. The flux distributions of spectrophotometric standard stars were initially derived from the comparison of stars to laboratory sources of known flux but are now mostly based on calculated model atmospheres. For example, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) models provide the basis for the HST CALSPEC archive of flux standards. The basic equations for quantitative spectrophotometry and photometry are explained in detail. Several historical lab based flux calibrations are reviewed; and the SEDs of stars in the major on-line astronomical databases are compared to the CALSPEC reference standard spectrophotometry. There is good evidence that relative fluxes from the visible to the near-IR wavelength of ~2.5 micron are currently accu...

  18. Calibration of the SST Image Scale Through the Use of Imaging Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Norén, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) offers excellent imaging quality, but it has a comparatively small field of view. This means that while observing the solar photosphere, there has been no convenient way of calibrating the image scale of the telescope. Other telescopes, such as NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)utilize their larger Field of View (FOV) to use the solar disk as a reference in order to measure the image scale. In the past, the image scale of the SST has been determined by measuring the distance between the moons of Jupiter in a captured SST image and comparing it to reference values, as well as with the Venus transit of 2004. Both of these methods have their drawbacks, including needing to open the telescope at night or waiting for the very rare occurrence of a solar transit, which the telescope may not even be in a position to observe. Additionally, assessing the accuracy of these methods can be difficult. The purpose of this thesis is to examine the feasibility of an idea proposed by ...

  19. Photovoltaic devices: Calibration techniques. Tecniche di calibrazione dei dispositivi fotovoltaici: misure effettuate presso i laboratori Fare-Foto durante il Pep Round Robin 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornarini, L.; Abenante, L.; Castello, S.; Di Francia, G.; Gentilin, L.; Zavarese, L.

    1989-12-01

    In view of the necessity to establish common evaluation methods for photovoltaic devices, the Technology, Growth and Employement Working Group initiated, in 1987, a second round-robin calibration of reference solar cells, mini-modules and modules. This calibration included 2 crystallyne Si solar cells, mini-modules and modules, 2 polycrystalline silicon solar cells, mini-modules and modules, 2 amorphous Si solar cells, mini-modules and modules, 1 FZ silicon solar cell and a filtered FZ silicon solar cell to match the spectral response of amorphous silicon. The laboratories involved in the calibration were: JMI(S), JRC(EEC), ENEA(I), RAE(GB), SERI(USA), PTB(FRG) and ISE(FRG). This report presents the results of the calibration and describes details of the calibration techniques used at the ENEA (Italian Commission for Alternative Energy Sources) laboratories.

  20. Calibrating apodizer fabrication techniques for high-contrast coronagraphs on segmented and monolithic space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Smith, Randy J.; Xi, Xiaoxiang; Zimmerman, Neil T.

    2013-09-01

    High contrast imaging can use pupil apodizers to suppress diffracted starlight from a bright source in order to observe its environs. Metallic half-tone dot transmissive apodizers were developed for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and ESO SPHERE coronagraphs for use in the near-IR. Dot sizes on the scale of the wavelength of the light often result in unexpected variations in the optical transmission vs. superficial dot density relation. We measured 5 and 10 micron half-tone microdot screens' transmissions between 550 -1050 nm to prepare to fabricate apodizations that mitigate diffraction by segments gaps and spiders on future large space telescopes. We utilized slow test beams (f/40, f/80) to estimate the on-axis (far-field, or zero-order) transmission of test patches using a Fourier Transform Spectrograph on Beamline U10B at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source (BNL NSLS). We also modified our previous GPI IR characterization hardware and methods for this experiment. Our measurements show an internal consistency of 0.1% in transmission, a factor of 5 better than our near-IR GPI work on the NSLS U4IR beamline. The systematics of the set-up appeared to limit the absolute calibration for our f/40 data on the 50-patch, maximum Optical Density 3 (OD3), sample. Credible measurements of transmissions down to about 3% transmission were achieved for this sample. Future work on apodizers for obstructed and segmented primary mirror coronagraphs will require configurations that mimic the intended diffractive configurations closely in order to tune apodizer fabrication to any particular application, and measure chromatic effects in representative diffractive regimes. Further experimental refinements are needed to measure the densest test patches which possess transmissions less than a few percent. The new NSLS-II should provide much greater spectral stability of its synchrotron beam, which will improve measurement accuracy and reduce systematics.

  1. A Two-Step A/D Conversion and Column Self-Calibration Technique for Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Bae

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a 120 frames per second (fps low noise CMOS Image Sensor (CIS based on a Two-Step Single Slope ADC (TS SS ADC and column self-calibration technique is proposed. The TS SS ADC is suitable for high speed video systems because its conversion speed is much faster (by more than 10 times than that of the Single Slope ADC (SS ADC. However, there exist some mismatching errors between the coarse block and the fine block due to the 2-step operation of the TS SS ADC. In general, this makes it difficult to implement the TS SS ADC beyond a 10-bit resolution. In order to improve such errors, a new 4-input comparator is discussed and a high resolution TS SS ADC is proposed. Further, a feedback circuit that enables column self-calibration to reduce the Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN is also described. The proposed chip has been fabricated with 0.13 μm Samsung CIS technology and the chip satisfies the VGA resolution. The pixel is based on the 4-TR Active Pixel Sensor (APS. The high frame rate of 120 fps is achieved at the VGA resolution. The measured FPN is 0.38 LSB, and measured dynamic range is about 64.6 dB.

  2. Laser-induced incandescence calibration via gravimetric sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M. Y.; Vander Wal, R. L.; Zhou, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Absolute calibration of laser-induced incandescence (LII) is demonstrated via comparison of LII signal intensities with gravimetrically determined soot volume fractions. This calibration technique does not rely upon calculated or measured optical characteristics of soot. The variation of the LII signal with gravimetrically measured soot volume fractions ranging from 0.078 to 1.1 ppm established the linearly of the calibration. With the high spatial and temporal resolution capabilities of laser-induced incandescence (LII), the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the soot field within a gravimetric chimney were characterized. Radial uniformity of the soot volume fraction, f(sub v) was demonstrated with sufficient averaging of the single laser-shot LII images of the soot field thus confirming the validity of the calibration method for imaging applications. As illustration, instantaneous soot volume fractions within a Re = 5000 ethylene/air diffusion flame measured via planar LII were established quantitatively with this calibration.

  3. Gemini Planet Imager Observational Calibrations XIV: Polarimetric Contrasts and New Data Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A; Hung, Li-Wei; Fitzgerald, Michael P; Wang, Jason J; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Graham, James R; Bruzzone, Sebastian; Kalas, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) has been designed for the direct detection and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks. GPI is equipped with a dual channel polarimetry mode designed to take advantage of the inherently polarized light scattered off circumstellar material to further suppress the residual seeing halo left uncorrected by the adaptive optics. We explore how recent advances in data reduction techniques reduce systematics and improve the achievable contrast in polarimetry mode. In particular, we consider different flux extraction techniques when constructing datacubes from raw data, division by a polarized flat-field and a method for subtracting instrumental polarization. Using observations of unpolarized standard stars we find that GPI's instrumental polarization is consistent with being wavelength independent within our errors. In addition, we provide polarimetry contrast curves that demonstrate typical performance throughout the GPIES campaign.

  4. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI).

  5. Estimation of Apple Volume and Its Shape Indentation Using Image Processing Technique and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jafarlou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical properties of agricultural products such as volume are the most important parameters influencing grading and packaging systems. They should be measured accurately as they are considered for any good system design. Image processing and neural network techniques are both non-destructive and useful methods which are recently used for such purpose. In this study, the images of apples were captured from a constant distance and then were processed in MATLAB software and the edges of apple images were extracted. The interior area of apple image was divided into some thin trapezoidal elements perpendicular to longitudinal axis. Total volume of apple was estimated by the summation of incremental volumes of these elements revolved around the apple’s longitudinal axis. The picture of half cut apple was also captured in order to obtain the apple shape’s indentation volume, which was subtracted from the previously estimated total volume of apple. The real volume of apples was measured using water displacement method and the relation between the real volume and estimated volume was obtained. The t-test and Bland-Altman indicated that the difference between the real volume and the estimated volume was not significantly different (p>0.05 i.e. the mean difference was 1.52 cm3 and the accuracy of measurement was 92%. Utilizing neural network with input variables of dimension and mass has increased the accuracy up to 97% and the difference between the mean of volumes decreased to 0.7 cm3.

  6. Sonographic Determination of Residual Bladder Volume after Application of Different Cystotomy Closure Techniques in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IU Khan1*, MA Khan2, SG Bokhari2, A Safdar2, M Shoaib1, H Akbar2, S Aslam2, MA Khan2 and A Noor2

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Residual urine volume is measured to diagnose various neurogenic and obstructive disorders of the urinary bladder. However, it is hypothesized that cystotomy closure using inverting patterns decreases intraluminal diameter of urinary bladder which consequently reduce residual bladder volume. This study aimed to investigate the ideal suturing style for cystotomy incision closure which would exert the least effect on residual bladder volume. The effect of various suturing styles on residual bladder volume was studied sonographically. Residual Bladder Volume (RBV was calculated by the formula, i.e. RBV=L×W× (DL+DT/2×0.625, where L=longitudinal diameter, W=transverse diameter, DL= depth at longitudinal diameter, DT=depth at transverse diameter. 24 healthy mongrel dogs were selected and randomly divided into four equal groups A, B, C and D (n=6. In groups A, B and C, the cystotomy incision was subsequently closed by two-layered appositional suturing pattern, two-layered inverting pattern and three layers (using a combination of appositional and inverting styles, respectively. Group-D remained as sham-operated Control. The results clearly showed that the three-layered closure technique using a combination of appositional and inverting patterns (Group-C, significantly reduced the bladder volume (P<0.01. Two-layered inverting patterns (Group B, also reduced the bladder volume but not up to a significant level, whereas, the appositional suturing technique (group-A exerted the least effect on residual bladder volume. Conclusively, it was inferred that a two-layered appositional suturing pattern should be preferred for closure of cystotomy incision to avoid significant changes in residual bladder volume.

  7. Optimal calibration via virtual x-ray imaging for dual-energy techniques: application to glass wool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letang, Jean-Michel; Freud, N.; Peix, Gilles

    2003-04-01

    We present in this paper a technique that makes benefit of a virtual X-ray simulation tool to both assess the optimal spectra and calibrate a dual-energy technique. The proposed method is applied to the selective imaging of glass wool materials. To optimize the choice of energy spectra, a signal-to-noise (SNR) criterion on the materials estimated thickness is derived using a constant absorbed energy constraint in the detector. To study further its reliability, the criterion is related to the measurement quality, expressed by a contrast to noise ratio of the input projections, and to the inversion stability, expressed by a contrast to noise ration of the input projections, and to the inversion stability, expressed by the numerical conditioning of the linear dual-energy attenuation system. Once the choice of energy spectra is settled, apparent thicknesses are modeled as third order polynomials expressed in terms of X-ray attenuation measures. The best polynomial fit and the choice of the degree can again be advantageously assessed using virtual X-ray imaging. A semi-empirical catalog is here used to characterize the X-ray source spectrum, and attenuation coefficients for each corresponding compound substance are obtained from standard databases. After completion of those calibration phases, a glass wool phantom composed of PMMA and glass (combined step wedges) is used to validate using real experimental data the selected dual-energy protocol obtained by virtual X-ray imaging. The worse error on the estimated thickness is about 5% for both the binder and the glass fibers. Quantitative imaging in thickness of glass fibers and binder is finally presented.

  8. A digital calibration technique for an ultra high-speed wide-bandwidth folding and interpolating analog-to-digital converter in 0.18-μm CMOS technology*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jinshan; Zhang Ruitao; Zhang Zhengping; Wang Yonglu; Zhu Can; Zhang Lei; Yu Zhou; Han Yong

    2011-01-01

    A digital calibration technique for an ultra high-speed folding and interpolating analog-to-digital converter in 0.18-μm CMOS technology is presented. The similar digital calibration techniques are taken for high 3-bit flash converter and low 5-bit folding and interpolating converter, which are based on well-designed calibration reference, calibration DAC and comparators. The spice simulation and the measured results show the ADC produces 5.9 ENOB with calibration disabled and 7.2 ENOB with calibration enabled for high-frequency wide-bandwidth analog input.

  9. Techniques in Marriage and Family Counseling, Volume Two. The Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard E., Ed.

    This volume presents a collection of practical strategies for enhancing communication between couples and families. Experts in the field outline proven techniques from cognitive and constructivist/constructionist frameworks, structural and strategic orientations, and couple/family play therapy. Chapters are: (1) "Letter for a Change: Using Letter…

  10. Digital processing techniques and film density calibration for printing image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Pat S.; McSweeney, Joseph A.; Binnie, Douglas R.

    1987-01-01

    Satellite image data that cover a wide range of environments are being used to make prints that represent a map type product. If a wide distribution of these products is desired, they are printed using lithographic rather than photographic procedures to reduce the cost per print. Problems are encountered in the photo lab if the film products to be used for lithographic printing have the same density range and density curve characteristics as the film used for photographic printing. A method is presented that keeps the film densities within the 1.1 range required for lithographic printing, but generates film products with contrast similar to that in photographic film for the majority of data (80 percent). Also, spatial filters can be used to enhance local detail in dark and bright regions, as well as to sharpen the final image product using edge enhancement techniques.

  11. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Calibration for Wood Chemistry: Which Chemometric Technique Is Best for Prediction and Interpretation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Brian K.; Zhou, Chengfeng; Acquah, Gifty; Jiang, Wei; Eckhardt, Lori

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the precision in factor loadings during partial least squares (PLS) and principal components regression (PCR) of wood chemistry content from near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectra. The precision of the loadings is considered important because these estimates are often utilized to interpret chemometric models or selection of meaningful wavenumbers. Standard laboratory chemistry methods were employed on a mixed genus/species hardwood sample set. PLS and PCR, before and after 1st derivative pretreatment, was utilized for model building and loadings investigation. As demonstrated by others, PLS was found to provide better predictive diagnostics. However, PCR exhibited a more precise estimate of loading peaks which makes PCR better for interpretation. Application of the 1st derivative appeared to assist in improving both PCR and PLS loading precision, but due to the small sample size, the two chemometric methods could not be compared statistically. This work is important because to date most research works have committed to PLS because it yields better predictive performance. But this research suggests there is a tradeoff between better prediction and model interpretation. Future work is needed to compare PLS and PCR for a suite of spectral pretreatment techniques. PMID:25068863

  12. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Calibration for Wood Chemistry: Which Chemometric Technique Is Best for Prediction and Interpretation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Via

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the precision in factor loadings during partial least squares (PLS and principal components regression (PCR of wood chemistry content from near infrared reflectance (NIR spectra. The precision of the loadings is considered important because these estimates are often utilized to interpret chemometric models or selection of meaningful wavenumbers. Standard laboratory chemistry methods were employed on a mixed genus/species hardwood sample set. PLS and PCR, before and after 1st derivative pretreatment, was utilized for model building and loadings investigation. As demonstrated by others, PLS was found to provide better predictive diagnostics. However, PCR exhibited a more precise estimate of loading peaks which makes PCR better for interpretation. Application of the 1st derivative appeared to assist in improving both PCR and PLS loading precision, but due to the small sample size, the two chemometric methods could not be compared statistically. This work is important because to date most research works have committed to PLS because it yields better predictive performance. But this research suggests there is a tradeoff between better prediction and model interpretation. Future work is needed to compare PLS and PCR for a suite of spectral pretreatment techniques.

  13. Development and Testing of a Simple Calibration Technique for Long-Term Hydrological Impact Assessment (L-THIA) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukrishnan, S.; Harbor, J.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrological studies are significant part of every engineering, developmental project and geological studies done to assess and understand the interactions between the hydrology and the environment. Such studies are generally conducted before the beginning of the project as well as after the project is completed, such that a comprehensive analysis can be done on the impact of such projects on the local and regional hydrology of the area. A good understanding of the chain of relationships that form the hydro-eco-biological and environmental cycle can be of immense help in maintaining the natural balance as we work towards exploration and exploitation of the natural resources as well as urbanization of undeveloped land. Rainfall-Runoff modeling techniques have been of great use here for decades since they provide fast and efficient means of analyzing vast amount of data that is gathered. Though process based, detailed models are better than the simple models, the later ones are used more often due to their simplicity, ease of use, and easy availability of data needed to run them. The Curve Number (CN) method developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is one of the most widely used hydrologic modeling tools in the US, and has earned worldwide acceptance as a practical method for evaluating the effects of land use changes on the hydrology of an area. The Long-Term Hydrological Impact Assessment (L-THIA) model is a basic, CN-based, user-oriented model that has gained popularity amongst watershed planners because of its reliance on readily available data, and because the model is easy to use (http://www.ecn.purdue.edu/runoff) and produces results geared to the general information needs of planners. The L-THIA model was initially developed to study the relative long-term hydrologic impacts of different land use (past/current/future) scenarios, and it has been successful in meeting this goal. However, one of the weaknesses of L-THIA, as well as other

  14. Boron isotope determinations in waters and other geological materials: analytical techniques and inter-calibration of measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonarini, Sonia; Pennisi, Maddalena; Gonfiantini, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    The (11)B/(10)B ratio exhibits wide variations in nature; thus, boron isotopes have found numerous applications in geochemistry, hydrology, and environmental studies. The main analytical techniques used are as follows: positive thermal ionisation mass spectrometry is the most precise (about 0.2 per thousand of the boron isotope ratio), but requires complex and laborious sample preparation; negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry is less precise (about 0.5 per thousand), but rapid and suitable for water samples, whereas total evaporation-NTIMS allows for identification of the precise boron isotope composition of marine carbonates. It is expected that multi-collection system inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) will eventually combine high precision with simple analytical procedures. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and laser ablation (LA)-MC-ICPMS allow in situ determinations on solid samples, but require the availability of calibration materials which are chemically and mineralogically similar to samples. These features of boron isotope measurement techniques were confirmed by the results of the first inter-laboratory comparison of measurements, organised by the Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse in Pisa. Finally, two examples of boron isotope applications in groundwater investigations are reported.

  15. Uniformity of Dose Distribution in Target Volume in Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast after Mastectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Pashton shayesteh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Radiotherapy has a very special significance in the treatment of cancer. Beam radiation therapy using photons and electrons produced by a linear accelerator is used extensively in the treatment of breast Cancer. In this article, In addition to providing a description of three techniques of radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer, has been Evaluating the effectiveness of this method in the base of uniformity of the dose distribution in the target volume in breast cancer as an important factor in the effectiveness of treatment by radiation.Materials & Methods: Photon, electron and arc Techniques in radiotherapy have been implemented practically using phantom trunk and EDRII films. At the time of practical Techniques, films were placed between the slice of the phantom and were irradiated under selected conditions and the data of these images are analyzed by MATLAB software.Results: Studies show that as a result of using adjacent fields in whole radiotherapy techniques, Parts of the target volume received dose twice or more than the prescribed dose. Meanwhile, by the photon dose technique, rate of receiving dose is more uniform and closer to the prescribed dose.Conclusion: According to scientific studies done by different protocols in breast radiotherapy, tangential photon technique has very less overlap of the field by comparison to other methods and more uniform dose distribution than the prescribed dose .In The base of this research results can be announced the photon techniques in breast cancer treatment was preferred over other methods.

  16. Comprehensive inter-laboratory calibration of reference materials for d18O versus VSMOW using various on-line high-temperature conversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.; Qi, Haiping; Brand, Willi A.; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T.; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Groning, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    "Internationally distributed organic and inorganic oxygen isotopic reference materials have been calibrated by six laboratories carrying out more than 5300 measurements using a variety of high-temperature conversion techniques (HTC) in an evaluation sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). To aid in the calibration of these reference materials, which span more than 125‰, an artificially enriched reference water (d18O of +78.91‰) and two barium sulfates (one depleted and one enriched in 18O) were prepared and calibrated relative to VSMOW2 and SLAP reference waters. These materials were used to calibrate the other isotopic reference materials in this study, which yielded: Reference material d18O and estimated combined uncertainty

  17. Comprehensive inter-laboratory calibration of reference materials for δ18O versus VSMOW using various on-line high-temperature conversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Groning, Manfred; Jansen, Henk G.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.; Qi, Haiping; Soergel, Karin; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Weise, Stephan M.; Werner, Roland A.

    2009-01-01

    Internationally distributed organic and inorganic oxygen isotopic reference materials have been calibrated by six laboratories carrying out more than 5300 measurements using a variety of high-temperature conversion techniques (HTC)a in an evaluation sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). To aid in the calibration of these reference materials, which span more than 125‰, an artificially enriched reference water (δ18O of +78.91‰) and two barium sulfates (one depleted and one enriched in 18O) were prepared and calibrated relative to VSMOW2b and SLAP reference waters. These materials were used to calibrate the other isotopic reference materials in this study, which yielded: Reference materialδ18O and estimated combined uncertainty c IAEA-602 benzoic acid

  18. Fluorescence exclusion: A simple versatile technique to calculate cell volumes and local heights (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-02-01

    Understanding volume regulation during mitosis is technically challenging. Indeed, a very sensitive non invasive imaging over time scales ranging from seconds to hours and over large fields is required. Therefore, Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) would be a perfect tool for such a project. However, because of asymmetric protein segregation during mitosis, an efficient separation of the refractive index and the height in the phase signal is required. Even though many strategies to make such a separation have been developed, they usually are difficult to implement, have poor sensitivity, or cannot be performed in living cells, or in a single shot. In this paper, we will discuss the use of a new technique called fluorescence exclusion to perform volume measurements. By coupling such technique with a simultaneous phase measurement, we were also able to recover the refractive index inside the cells. Fluorescence exclusion is a versatile and powerful technique that allows the volume measurement of many types of cells. A fluorescent dye, which cannot penetrate inside the cells, is mixed with the external medium in a confined environment. Therefore, the fluorescent signal depends on the inverse of the object's height. We could demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that fluorescence exclusion can accurately measure cell volumes, even for cells much higher than the depth of focus of the objective. A local accurate height and RI measurement can also be obtained for smaller cells. We will also discuss the way to optimize the confinement of the observation chamber, either mechanically or optically.

  19. Prediction of volume fractions in three-phase flows using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques Salgado, Cesar [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)], E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br; Brandao, Luis E.B. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil); Schirru, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE-DNC/EE-CT, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21941-972-Caixa Postal 68509 (Brazil); Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil); Silva, Ademir Xavier da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE-DNC/EE-CT, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21941-972-Caixa Postal 68509 (Brazil); Ramos, Robson [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, DIRA/IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, CEP.: 21945-970-Caixa Postal 68550 (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    This work presents methodology based on nuclear technique and artificial neural network for volume fraction predictions in annular, stratified and homogeneous oil-water-gas regimes. Using principles of gamma-ray absorption and scattering together with an appropriate geometry, comprised of three detectors and a dual-energy gamma-ray source, it was possible to obtain data, which could be adequately correlated to the volume fractions of each phase by means of neural network. The MCNP-X code was used in order to provide the training data for the network.

  20. 基于 OpenCV 的双目摄像机标定技术研究%Binocular Camera Calibration Technique Based on OpenCV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王长元; 邢世蒙

    2014-01-01

    摄像机标定技术作为双目立体视觉领域的一个基础性研究课题,具有很大的理论研究价值和实际应用价值。论文围绕双目立体视觉中的双目摄像机标定技术,分析基于OpenCV的双目摄像机标定的方法。基于OpenCV的双目摄像机标定比传统的定标技术更为灵活,并且具有不错的定标精度。%As a foundational research in the field of binocular stereo vision ,camera calibration technique has great theo‐retical value and practical value .This paper focuses on the binocular stereo vision camera calibration technique to analyze the binocular camera calibration method based on OpenCV .OpenCV camera calibration based on binocular is more flexible than traditional scaling techniques ,and has a good calibration accuracy .

  1. [Study on online self-calibration technique for trace gas analyzer based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun-Qing; Liang, Bo

    2010-04-01

    After decades of development, the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) became one of the most promising techniques for online trace gas analyzing in process industry. Limited by its principle, the measurement result of TDLAS system is seriously affected by temperature and gas pressure variation. For this reason, most TDLAS systems employed temperature and pressure sensors, which can provide information for partly correcting the error. Theoretically, the gas absorption theory itself is not perfect enough to give an analytical relation between the measurement error and the temperature & pressure variation. Practically, temperature and pressure sensors are not available in some harsh working condition. To address these problems, an online self-calibration technique with a reference gas cell is proposed to compensate temperature and pressure variation induced measurement error in a TDLAS system. More specifically, a reference gas cell filled with known proportion target gas is placed on site, surrounded by working gas to be measured. The main body of the gas cell is made from a stainless tube, one end is a silica glass window and the other end is a reflector. A pressure bellows is connected to the middle of the stainless tube by a branch conduit. The pressure bellows can adaptively deform to keep the pressure balance between the inside and outside gas. Thereby, the temperature and pressure inside the reference cell are equal to that of the gas outside. To ensure the similarity between the reference gas cell and working gas cell, they share the same laser diode source and signal processing circuit. In one working cycle, the TDLAS system obtains the absorption spectrum of both gas cells synchronously. Then the concentration of the trace gas can be easily obtained by calculating the absorption intensity proportion of both absorption spectra without considering the affection of temperature and pressure. The principle, design, and experiments of this

  2. Blood volume distribution in patients with cirrhosis: aspects of the dual-head gamma-camera technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren;

    2001-01-01

    : The close relation between the estimated blood volume in the thorax region and the central and arterial blood volume, obtained by the dynamic indicator dilution technique (r=0.87, PWhole-body scintigraphy showed altered blood volume distribution in the cirrhotic...

  3. Application of dual volume reconstruction technique in embolization of intracranial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-hai ZHANG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the value of dual volume reconstruction technique in Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysms. Methods Three-dimensional imaging data of 20 patients received GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysms from Jun. 2012 to Apr. 2013 were analyzed for dual volume reconstruction. The value of application of dual volume reconstruction was evaluated by the detection rate of coils bolus, degree of aneurysm occlusion, the length of aneurysm sac and aneurysm neck before and after embolization, and the characteristics and clinical value of the reconstructed images. Results  A total of 20 coil boluses were detected by dual volume reconstruction images, and the detection rate was 100%. Among all of 20 patients, no visualization of contrast medium in the aneurysm was found in 13 patients, while contrast agent was found in the aneurysm sac in 3 patients and in the aneurysm neck in 4 patients. The length of aneurysm neck and sac was somewhat changed before and after embolization with no statistically significant difference (P>0.05. The dual volume reconstruction could reveal coil bolus, vessels, cranium and fusion images, and the aneurysms could be shown by different imaging modes according to the clinical requirement. Conclusion Dual volume reconstruction technique can display the location of coil bolus, degree of occlusion and aneurysm size, and evaluate the embolization effect by multifarious imaging modes, providing a great deal of information for the evaluation of GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysm. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.13

  4. MaterialVis: material visualization tool using direct volume and surface rendering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Visualization of the materials is an indispensable part of their structural analysis. We developed a visualization tool for amorphous as well as crystalline structures, called MaterialVis. Unlike the existing tools, MaterialVis represents material structures as a volume and a surface manifold, in addition to plain atomic coordinates. Both amorphous and crystalline structures exhibit topological features as well as various defects. MaterialVis provides a wide range of functionality to visualize such topological structures and crystal defects interactively. Direct volume rendering techniques are used to visualize the volumetric features of materials, such as crystal defects, which are responsible for the distinct fingerprints of a specific sample. In addition, the tool provides surface visualization to extract hidden topological features within the material. Together with the rich set of parameters and options to control the visualization, MaterialVis allows users to visualize various aspects of materials very efficiently as generated by modern analytical techniques such as the Atom Probe Tomography.

  5. Local tetrahedron modeling of microelectronics using the finite-volume hybrid-grid technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    The finite-volume hybrid-grid (FVHG) technique uses both structured and unstructured grid regions in obtaining a solution to the time-domain Maxwell`s equations. The method is based on explicit time differencing and utilizes rectilinear finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and nonorthogonal finite-volume time-domain (FVTD). The technique directly couples structured FDTD grids with unstructured FVTD grids without the need for spatial interpolation across grid interfaces. In this paper, the FVHG method is applied to simple planar microelectronic devices. Local tetrahedron grids are used to model portions of the device under study, with the remainder of the problem space being modeled with cubical hexahedral cells. The accuracy of propagating microstrip-guided waves from a low-density hexahedron region through a high-density tetrahedron grid is investigated.

  6. Comprehensive inter-laboratory calibration of reference materials for delta O-18 versus VSMOW using various on-line high-temperature conversion techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Gröning, Manfred; Jansen, Henk G.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.; Qi, Haiping; Soergel, Karin; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Weise, Stephan M.; Werner, Roland A.

    2009-01-01

    Internationally distributed organic and inorganic oxygen isotopic reference materials have been calibrated by six laboratories carrying out more than 5300 measurements using a variety of high-temperature conversion techniques (HTC)a in an evaluation sponsored by the International Union of Pure and A

  7. Definitive Drug and Metabolite Screening in Urine by UPLC-MS-MS Using a Novel Calibration Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosano, Thomas G; Ohouo, Patrice Y; LeQue, John J; Freeto, Scott M; Wood, Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Drug screening is an essential analytical tool for detection of therapeutic, illicit and emerging drug use. Presumptive immunoassay screening is widely used, while initial definitive testing by chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry is hampered due to complex pre-analysis steps, long chromatography time and matrix effects. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a definitive test for rapid and threshold accurate screening of 33 drugs or metabolites (analytes) in urine. Sample preparation in a 96-well plate format involves rapid glucuronidase hydrolysis followed by dilution, filtration and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-MS-MS analysis. Chromatographic separation, on an ACQUITY UPLC(®) BEH phenyl column is optimized for a 3-min MS-MS ion acquisition. Matrix effect was normalized by an innovative technique called threshold accurate calibration employing an additional analysis with an analyte spike as an internal standard undergoing the same matrix effect as an analyte in a drug-positive donor specimen. Accuracy and precision, at above and below threshold concentrations, were determined by replicate analysis of control urine pools containing 50, 75, 125 and 150% of threshold concentrations. Accuracy and selectivity were further demonstrated by concordant findings in proficiency and confirmatory testing. The study shows the applicability of definitive testing as an alternative to immunoassay screening and demonstrates a new approach to normalization of matrix effect.

  8. Advanced energy sources and conversion techniques. Proceedings of a seminar. Volume 1. [35 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1958-11-01

    The Seminar was organized as a series of tutorial presentations and round table discussions on a technical level to implement the following: (a) to identify and explore present and projected needs for energy sources and conversion techniques for military applications; (b) to exchange information on current and planned efforts in these fields; (c) to examine the effect of anticipated scientific and technological advances on these efforts; and (d) to present suggested programs aimed at satisfying the military needs for energy sources and conversion techniques. Volume I contains all of the unclassified papers presented at the Seminar. (W.D.M.)

  9. Minimal dead-volume connectors for microfluidics using PDMS casting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chi-Han; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a minimal dead-volume micro-connector fabricated using poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) casting techniques for microfluidic applications. A simple and versatile method of fabricating a micro-connector to have an efficient interconnection to external large-scale fluid equipment was demonstrated. To eliminate the dead volume, a capillary was bridged to a micro-channel via a connection channel, which was formed by the removal of a metal wire after the PDMS casting process. The new method does not require any adhesive, precise drilling, delicate alignment procedure and micromachining processes. It could also effectively prevent blocking of the capillaries which was commonly observed while using adhesives. With this approach, detachable and reusable micro-connectors with a minimal dead volume could be achieved. According to leakage tests, the micro-connector could withstand pressures up to 150 psi and a maximum flow rate of 50 µl min-1. The pull-out tests indicated that the PDMS fitting could provide enough mechanical strength for practical applications. Not only does this micro-connector significantly eliminate the dead volume, but it also increases the detection signal. While compared with more conventional Teflon tubing fitting, the micro-connector could reduce by at least 50% the dilution effect for sample loading analysis due to substantial elimination of the dead volume. Most importantly, this micro-connector has greater versatility for coupling capillaries to various kinds of microfluidic chips made of different materials.

  10. 'Dip-sticks' calibration handles self-attenuation and coincidence effects in large-volume gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wolterbeek, H T

    2000-01-01

    Routine gamma-spectrometric analyses of samples with low-level activities (e.g. food, water, environmental and industrial samples) are often performed in large samples, placed close to the detector. In these geometries, detection sensitivity is improved but large errors are introduced due to self-attenuation and coincidence summing. Current approaches to these problems comprise computational methods and spiked standard materials. However, the first are often regarded as too complex for practical routine use, the latter never fully match real samples. In the present study, we introduce a dip-sticks calibration as a fast and easy practical solution to this quantification problem in a routine analytical setting. In the proposed set-up, calibrations are performed within the sample itself, thus making it a broadly accessible matching-reference approach, which is principally usable for all sample matrices.

  11. Development of Rapid, Continuous Calibration Techniques and Implementation as a Prototype System for Civil Engineering Materials Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M. L.; Gagarin, N.; Mekemson, J. R.; Chintakunta, S. R.

    2011-06-01

    Until recently, civil engineering material calibration data could only be obtained from material sample cores or via time consuming, stationary calibration measurements in a limited number of locations. Calibration data are used to determine material propagation velocities of electromagnetic waves in test materials for use in layer thickness measurements and subsurface imaging. Limitations these calibration methods impose have been a significant impediment to broader use of nondestructive evaluation methods such as ground-penetrating radar (GPR). In 2006, a new rapid, continuous calibration approach was designed using simulation software to address these measurement limitations during a Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) research and development effort. This continuous calibration method combines a digitally-synthesized step-frequency (SF)-GPR array and a data collection protocol sequence for the common midpoint (CMP) method. Modeling and laboratory test results for various data collection protocols and materials are presented in this paper. The continuous-CMP concept was finally implemented for FHWA in a prototype demonstration system called the Advanced Pavement Evaluation (APE) system in 2009. Data from the continuous-CMP protocol is processed using a semblance/coherency analysis to determine material propagation velocities. Continuously calibrated pavement thicknesses measured with the APE system in 2009 are presented. This method is efficient, accurate, and cost-effective.

  12. Comparison of electrostatic fins with piezoelectric impact hammer techniques to extend impulse calibration range of a torsional thrust stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancotti, Anthony P; Gilpin, Matthew; Hilario, Martin S

    2012-03-01

    With the progression of high-power electric propulsion and high thrust-to-power propulsions system, thrust stand diagnostics require high-fidelity calibration systems that are accurate over a large-range of thrust levels. Multi-mode and variable I(sp) propulsion devices also require that a single stand be capable of measuring thrust from 10's of uNs to 100's of mNs. While the torsional thrust stand mechanic and diagnostics are capable of operating over such a large range, current pulsed calibration schemes are typically limited to a few orders of magnitude of dynamic range. In order to develop a stand with enough dynamic range, two separate calibration methods have been examined and compared to create a combined system. Electrostatic fin (ESF) and piezoelectric impact hammer (PIH) calibration systems were simultaneously tested on a large scale torsional thrust stand system. The use of the these two methods allowed the stand to be calibrated over four orders of magnitude, from 0.01 mNs to 750 mNs. The ESF system produced linear results within 0.52% from 0.01 mNs to 20 mNs, while the PIH system extended this calibration range from 10 mNs to 750 mNs with an error of 0.99%. The two calibration methods agreed within 4.51% over their overlapping range of 10-20 mNs.

  13. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanic research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  14. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanics research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  15. Tracer techniques for urine volume determination and urine collection and sampling back-up system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R. V.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility, functionality, and overall accuracy of the use of lithium were investigated as a chemical tracer in urine for providing a means of indirect determination of total urine volume by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. Experiments were conducted to investigate the parameters of instrumentation, tracer concentration, mixing times, and methods for incorporating the tracer material in the urine collection bag, and to refine and optimize the urine tracer technique to comply with the Skylab scheme and operational parameters of + or - 2% of volume error and + or - 1% accuracy of amount of tracer added to each container. In addition, a back-up method for urine collection and sampling system was developed and evaluated. This back-up method incorporates the tracer technique for volume determination in event of failure of the primary urine collection and preservation system. One chemical preservative was selected and evaluated as a contingency chemical preservative for the storage of urine in event of failure of the urine cooling system.

  16. PETPVC: a toolbox for performing partial volume correction techniques in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Benjamin A.; Cuplov, Vesna; Bousse, Alexandre; Mendes, Adriana; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F.; Erlandsson, Kjell

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are degraded by a phenomenon known as the partial volume effect (PVE). Approaches have been developed to reduce PVEs, typically through the utilisation of structural information provided by other imaging modalities such as MRI or CT. These methods, known as partial volume correction (PVC) techniques, reduce PVEs by compensating for the effects of the scanner resolution, thereby improving the quantitative accuracy. The PETPVC toolbox described in this paper comprises a suite of methods, both classic and more recent approaches, for the purposes of applying PVC to PET data. Eight core PVC techniques are available. These core methods can be combined to create a total of 22 different PVC techniques. Simulated brain PET data are used to demonstrate the utility of toolbox in idealised conditions, the effects of applying PVC with mismatched point-spread function (PSF) estimates and the potential of novel hybrid PVC methods to improve the quantification of lesions. All anatomy-based PVC techniques achieve complete recovery of the PET signal in cortical grey matter (GM) when performed in idealised conditions. Applying deconvolution-based approaches results in incomplete recovery due to premature termination of the iterative process. PVC techniques are sensitive to PSF mismatch, causing a bias of up to 16.7% in GM recovery when over-estimating the PSF by 3 mm. The recovery of both GM and a simulated lesion was improved by combining two PVC techniques together. The PETPVC toolbox has been written in C++, supports Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems, is open-source and publicly available.

  17. User’s Manual for MODCAL - Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model Calibration and Prediction Code. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    RSDL , JCOD) C C THIS SUBROUTINE PERFORMS A SINGLE-ELEMENT, C INCREMENTAL...16X,’N’,5X,’EPS-1’,9X,’Q’,9X,’P’,91,’U’, -** 5X,’E-VOL’/16X,’-’,5(5X ...-..1) 920 FORMAT(12X,15,5F10.2) C C INDIVIDUAL TEST LOOP C RSDL =O. 0 WTST=O...615 CONTINUE C C COMPUTE RESIDUALS IF MODEL CALIBRATION IS REQUIRED C ITSTzL 1 * IF(JCOD.EQ.1) Go TO 620 CALL RSDUAL(NJITST, RTST) RSDL

  18. Syringe shape and positioning relative to efficiency volume inside dose calibrators and its role in nuclear medicine quality assurance programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.A.M. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: a.miranda@portugalmail.pt; Carrasco, M.F. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Lencart, J. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Bastos, A.L. [Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    A careful analysis of geometry and source positioning influence in the activity measurement outcome of a nuclear medicine dose calibrator is presented for {sup 99m}Tc. The implementation of a quasi-point source apparent activity curve measurement is proposed for an accurate correction of the activity inside several syringes, and compared with a theoretical geometric efficiency model. Additionally, new geometrical parameters are proposed to test and verify the correct positioning of the syringes as part of acceptance testing and quality control procedures.

  19. Anesthetic management of peripartum cardiomyopathy using "epidural volume extension" technique: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Kumar Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in parturients, occurring in approximately one in 1000 deliveries, manifesting during the last few months or the first 5 months of the postpartum period. It can result in severe ventricular dysfunction during late puerperium. The major concern while managing these patients is to optimize fluid administration and avoid myocardial depression, while maintaining stable intraoperative hemodynamics. We present a case series of five parturients that were posted for elective cesarean section and managed successfully by the epidural volume extension technique.

  20. Large Volume, Optical and Opto-Mechanical Metrology Techniques for ISIM on JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimichael, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The final, flight build of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element of the James Webb Space Telescope is the culmination of years of work across many disciplines and partners. This paper covers the large volume, ambient, optical and opto-mechanical metrology techniques used to verify the mechanical integration of the flight instruments in ISIM, including optical pupil alignment. We present an overview of ISIM's integration and test program, which is in progress, with an emphasis on alignment and optical performance verification. This work is performed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in close collaboration with the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Mid-Infrared Instrument European Consortium.

  1. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume and other quantitative variables in supratentorial brain tumors. Practical technique and use in prognostic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Braendgaard, H; Chistiansen, A O

    1991-01-01

    the practical technique. The continuous variables were correlated with the subjective, qualitative WHO classification of brain tumors, and the prognostic value of the parameters was assessed. Well differentiated astrocytomas (n = 14) had smaller estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume and mean...

  2. Positron Annihilation Techniques as Nondestructive Tool for Probing Nanosized Open-Volume Defects in Materials (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Mona

    2009-04-01

    Since 1950, positron annihilation techniques (PAT) have been well known as very sensitive and nondestructive tools for studying the defect structure in materials. A positron probe in matter loses its kinetic energy and reaches thermal equilibrium with its surroundings quickly compared with its lifetime. During diffusion, the positron is repelled by ion cores and is attracted sensitively to local regions of open-volume lattice defects such as vacancies and their agglomerates, dislocation lines and grain boundaries in metals, as well as free volume in polymers. In semiconductors, charged states of defects add a further aspect, not encountered in the case of metals, and only neutral or negatively charged defects are expected to be efficient positron traps. The ability of a positron to annihilate with an electron from a variety of specific ``free'' and ``bound'' states in solids will yield information on their corresponding electronic environment, as well as the characteristics of defects with atomic size (~3 A˚). The basic theoretical concepts for the application of the positron annihilation lifetime technique in materials characterization are illustrated in metals and polymers.

  3. In situ calibration of the foil detector for an infrared imaging video bolometer using a carbon evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, K.; Peterson, B. J.; Takayama, S.; Sano, R.

    2016-11-01

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a useful diagnostic for the multi-dimensional measurement of plasma radiation profiles. For the application of IRVB measurement to the neutron environment in fusion plasma devices such as the Large Helical Device (LHD), in situ calibration of the thermal characteristics of the foil detector is required. Laser irradiation tests of sample foils show that the reproducibility and uniformity of the carbon coating for the foil were improved using a vacuum evaporation method. Also, the principle of the in situ calibration system was justified.

  4. Volume fraction prediction in biphasic flow using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Cesar M.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The volume fraction is one of the most important parameters used to characterize air-liquid two-phase flows. It is a physical value to determine other parameters, such as the phase's densities and to determine the flow rate of each phase. These parameters are important to predict the flow pattern and to determine a mathematical model for the system. To study, for example, heat transfer and pressure drop. This work presents a methodology for volume fractions prediction in water-gas stratified flow regime using the nuclear technique and artificial intelligence. The volume fractions calculate in biphasic flow systems is complex and the analysis by means of analytical equations becomes very difficult. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means of the artificial neural network. The detection system uses appropriate broad beam geometry, comprised of a ({sup 137}Cs) energy gamma-ray source and a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in order measure transmitted beam whose the counts rates are influenced by the phases composition. These distributions are directly used by the network without any parameterization of the measured signal. The ideal and static theoretical models for stratified regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the network. The detector also was modeled with this code and the results were compared to experimental photopeak efficiency measurements of radiation sources. The proposed network could obtain with satisfactory prediction of the volume fraction in water-gas system, demonstrating to be a promising approach for this purpose. (author)

  5. Final report on BIPM/CIPM key comparison CCM.FF-K4.2.2011: Volume comparison at 100 µL—Calibration of micropipettes (piston pipettes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Elsa; Arias, Roberto; Jintao, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Five fixed micropipettes of 100 µl were tested by eight different National Metrology Institutes from different Regional Metrology Organizations between July 2011 and June 2012. The micropipettes had a stable volume, during the whole comparison, with a maximum standard deviation of 0.06 µl. After a careful analysis of the original results it was decided to make corrections to the standard atmospheric pressure in order to compare results under the same calibration conditions. These corrections led to a decrease of variability within the laboratories. It was also decided to include the stability of the standard and the method variability, determined by the pilot laboratory, in the uncertainty budget of each laboratory. The corrected results (volume and uncertainty) are consistent and overlap with the key comparison reference values for the micropipettes 354828Z, 354853Z and 354864Z. For the other two micropipettes only one result is not consistent with the reference value. Most results also overlap with those of the other laboratories di,j pressure condition and temperature (for example 101.325 kPa and 20 ºC) and this information should be stated in the calibration certificate of the micropipette. Also the standard uncertainty of the method variability and reproducibility values should always be included in the uncertainty budget (around 0.1%) to lead to more realistic uncertainty values. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Volume of sealer in the apical region of teeth filled by different techniques: a micro-CT analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Vanessa Lessa; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Cruz Filho, Antonio Miranda da; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; Silva, Ricardo Gariba, E-mail: vanessalessa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Escola de Odontologia. Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora

    2016-05-01

    The volume of sealer in the apical 1 mm of teeth filled using different techniques was evaluated by micro-commuted tomography (micro-CT). Sixty-four maxillary central incisors were prepared using NiTi rotary instruments. Teeth were randomly distributed into four groups according to root canal sealers (AH Plus, Endofill, Sealapex, and Sealer 26) and subdivided into two subgroups according to the filling techniques (active and passive lateral condensation; n = 8 each). Subsequently, teeth were examined using the 1174 SkyScan micro-CT device. Images were reconstructed using the NRecon software, and the sealer volume (mm{sup 3}) in the apical region was analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). The lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex (0.100 ± 0.009) and Endofill (0.103 ± 0.010). The highest volume was observed in teeth filled with AH Plus (0.112 ± 0.008) and Sealer 26 (0.109 ± 0.018) (p > 0.05). Regarding the filling technique, a lower sealer volume was observed using the active lateral condensation technique compared with that using the passive lateral condensation technique (0.100 ± 0.010 vs. 0.111 ± 0.012) (p < 0.05). Therefore, the lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex and Endofill using the active lateral condensation technique. (author)

  7. Calibration of a micromachined particle velocity microphone in a standing wave tube using a LDA photon-correlation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raangs, R.; Schlicke, Ted; Barham, Richard

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new method of calibrating an acoustic particle velocity sensor using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) is discussed. The results were compared and were in good agreement with the results obtained by conventional methods, where the sensitivity of the microflown is obtained with the use

  8. Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, Ryne A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Vajtai, Petra L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Hopkins, Katharine L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States)

    2014-07-05

    Iterative reconstruction technique has been proposed as a means of reducing patient radiation dose in pediatric CT. Yet, the effect of such reductions on diagnostic accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study compares accuracy of diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis using contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans performed with traditional pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction vs. a filtered back projection/iterative reconstruction technique blend with reduced volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}). Results of pediatric contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans done for pain and/or suspected appendicitis were reviewed in two groups: A, 192 scans performed with the hospital's established weight-based CT protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction; B, 194 scans performed with iterative reconstruction technique and reduced CTDI{sub vol}. Reduced CTDI{sub vol} was achieved primarily by reductions in effective tube current-time product (mAs{sub eff}) and tube peak kilovoltage (kVp). CT interpretation was correlated with clinical follow-up and/or surgical pathology. CTDI{sub vol}, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) and performance characteristics of the two CT techniques were then compared. Between groups A and B, mean CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 45%, and mean SSDE was reduced by 46%. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 97% and 96% in group A vs. 100%, 99% and 99% in group B. Accuracy in diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis was maintained in contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans that incorporated iterative reconstruction technique, despite reductions in mean CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE by nearly half as compared to the hospital's traditional weight-based protocols. (orig.)

  9. Usefulness of Oncoplastic Volume Replacement Techniques after Breast Conserving Surgery in Small to Moderate-sized Breasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dug Yang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn Korean women, many of whom have small to moderate-sized breasts, it is difficult to cover a partial breast defect using oncoplastic volume displacement techniques after removal of an adequate volume of tissue during oncologic surgery. In such cases, oncoplastic volume replacement techniques are more useful.MethodsFrom January 2007 to December 2011, 104 women underwent a total of 107 breast-conserving surgeries with various kinds of oncoplastic volume replacement techniques. We used latissimus dorsi (LD myocutaneous flap for cases in which the resection mass was greater than 150 g. In case with a resection mass less than 150 g, we used regional flaps such as a lateral thoracodorsal flap, a thoracoepigastric flap, or perforator flaps such as an intercostal artery perforator (ICAP flap or a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP flap.ResultsThe mean age was 46.1 years, and the average follow-up interval was 10.3 months. The patients underwent oncoplastic volume replacement techniques with a lateral thoracodorsal flap (n=9, thoracoepigastric flap (n=7, ICAP flap (n=25, TDAP flap (n=12, and LD flap (n=54. There was one case of congestion in an LD flap, and two cases of fat necrosis in an ICAP flap. Most of the patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results.ConclusionsOncoplastic volume replacement techniques can be reliable and useful for the correction of breast deformity after breast-conserving surgery, especially in patients with small to moderate-sized breasts.

  10. Characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions using a novel CT-based volume perfusion (VPCT) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, S., E-mail: sascha.kaufmann@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Horger, T., E-mail: horger@ma.tum.de [Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Oelker, A., E-mail: oelker@ma.tum.de [Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kloth, C., E-mail: christopher.kloth@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Nikolaou, K., E-mail: Konstantin.Nikolaou@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Schulze, M., E-mail: maximilian.schulze@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Horger, M., E-mail: marius.horger@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Quantification of perfusion with VPCT has great potential for functional imaging. • We present our preliminary results of perfusion parameters (Blood Flow, Blood Volume and kk-trans) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in terms of using VPCT and two different calculation methods, compare their results and look for correlation between tumor arterialization and lesion size. • VPCT can measure tumor volume perfusion non-invasively and enables quantification of the degree of HCC arterialization. Results are dependent on the technique used with best inter-method correlation for Blood Flow. • Tumor arterialization did not proved size-dependent. - Abstract: Objective: To characterize hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in terms of perfusion parameters using volume perfusion CT (VPCT) and two different calculation methods, compare their results, look for interobserver agreement of measurements and correlation between tumor arterialization and lesion size. Material and methods: This study was part of a prospective monitoring study in patients with HCC undergoing TACE, which was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. 79 HCC-patients (mean age, 64.7) with liver cirrhosis were enrolled. VPCT was performed for 40 s covering the involved liver (80 kV, 100/120 mAs) using 64 mm × 0.6 mm collimation, 26 consecutive volume measurements, 50 mL iodinated contrast IV and 5 mL/s flow rate. Mean/maximum blood flow (BF; ml/100 mL/min), blood volume (BV) and k-trans were determined both with the maximum slope + Patlak vs. deconvolution method. Additionally, the portal venous liver perfusion (PVP), the arterial liver perfusion (ALP) and the hepatic perfusion index (HPI) were determined for each tumor including size measurements. Interobserver agreement for all perfusion parameters was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results: The max. slope + Patlak method yielded: BFmean/max = 37.8/57 mL/100 g-tissue/′, BVmean/max = 9.8/11.1 mL/100 g

  11. Homogenization via formal multiscale asymptotics and volume averaging: How do the two techniques compare?

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Yohan

    2013-12-01

    A wide variety of techniques have been developed to homogenize transport equations in multiscale and multiphase systems. This has yielded a rich and diverse field, but has also resulted in the emergence of isolated scientific communities and disconnected bodies of literature. Here, our goal is to bridge the gap between formal multiscale asymptotics and the volume averaging theory. We illustrate the methodologies via a simple example application describing a parabolic transport problem and, in so doing, compare their respective advantages/disadvantages from a practical point of view. This paper is also intended as a pedagogical guide and may be viewed as a tutorial for graduate students as we provide historical context, detail subtle points with great care, and reference many fundamental works. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Method for combining fast surface and exact volume visualization techniques in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Haubner, Michael; Foerterer, H. M.; Perzl, W.; Fink, B. K.; Fink, U.

    1994-05-01

    In order to enable the interaction with and manipulation of 3-D data sets in the realm of medical diagnosis and therapy planning we developed a modified Z-merging algorithm that includes transparency and texture mapping features. For this an extended shape based interpolation model creates isotropic grayscale data volume in case of spatial image sequences. Interesting anatomical regions such as soft tissue, organs, and bones are detected by automatic and interactive segmentation procedures. Following that, a fully automatic surface construction algorithm detects the 3-D object boundaries by fitting geometric primitives to the binary data. The surface representations support the user with a fast overview about the structure of the 3D scene. Texture mapping is implemented as the projection of the gray values of the isotropic voxels onto a polygonal surface. Adaptive refinement, Phong's normal interpolation, and transparency are the most important features of this raytracer. The described technique enables the simultaneous display of multimodal 3D image data.

  13. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  14. Wind tunnel test and calibration techniques for the measurement of damping and dynamic cross derivatives due to pitching and yawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanff, E. S.; Orlik-Rueckemann, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper shows how the oscillatory apparatus described previously by Orlik-Rueckemann et al. (1974) for determining cross and cross-coupling moment derivatives due to pitching and yawing oscillation is strengthened, extensively modified, and adapted to permit operation in a large continuous-flow wind tunnel. Particular attention is given to an electromagnetic three-degrees-of-freedom calibrating system developed to verify the validity of the experimental method and the various aspects of data reduction procedure. Typical results from calibration tests and from a series of wind tunnel experiments are presented. The only significant limitation is that the apparatus can only be used for models that are relatively small and have a conically-shaped longitudinal cavity.

  15. Use of KNN technique to improve the efficiency of SCE-UA optimisation method applied to the calibration of HBV Rainfall-Runoff model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakhlaoui, H.; Bargaoui, Z.

    2007-12-01

    The Calibration of Rainfall-Runoff models can be viewed as an optimisation problem involving an objective function that measures the model performance expressed as a distance between observed and calculated discharges. Effectiveness (ability to find the optimum) and efficiency (cost expressed in number of objective function evaluations to reach the optimum) are the main criteria of choose of the optimisation method. SCE-UA is known as one of the most effective and efficient optimisation method. In this work we tried to improve the SCE-UA efficiency, in the case of the calibration of HBV model by using KNN technique to estimate the objective function. In fact after a number of iterations by SCE-UA, when objective function is evaluated by model simulation, a data base of parameter explored and respective objective function values is constituted. Within this data base it is proposed to estimate the objective function in further iterations, by an interpolation using nearest neighbours in a normalised parameter space with weighted Euclidean distance. Weights are chosen proportional to the sensitivity of parameter to objective function that gives more importance to sensitive parameter. Evaluation of model output is done through the objective function RV=R2- w |RD| where R2 is Nash Sutcliffe coefficient related to discharges, w : a weight and RD the relative bias. Applied to theoretical and practical cases in several catchments under different climatic conditions : Rottweil (Germany) and Tessa, Barbra, and Sejnane (Tunisia), the hybrid SCE-UA presents efficiency better then that of initial SCE-UA by about 20 to 30 %. By using other techniques as parameter space transformation and SCE-UA modification (2), we may obtain an algorithm two to three times faster. (1) Avi Ostfeld, Shani Salomons, "A hybrid genetic-instance learning algorithm for CE*QAL-W2 calibration", Journal of Hydrology 310 (2005) 122-125 (2) Nitin Mutil and Shie-Yui Liong, "Improved robustness and Efficiency

  16. Final report on the EURAMET.M.FF-K4.2.2014 volume comparison at 100 μL—calibration of micropipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Elsa; Matus, Michael; Metaxiotou, Zoe; Tudor, Maria; Lenard, Elzbieta; Buker, Oliver; Wennergren, Per; Piluri, Erinda; Miteva, Mariana; Vicarova, Martina; Vospĕlová, Alena; Turnsek, Urska; Micic, Ljiljana; Grue, Lise-Lote; Mihailovic, Mirjana; Sarevska, Anastazija

    2017-01-01

    During the EURAMET TC-F meeting of 2014 and following the finalization of CCM.FF-K4.2.2011 comparison, it was agreed to start a Regional Key Comparison (KC) on volume measurements using two 100 μL micropipettes (piston pipettes) allowing the participating laboratories to assess the agreement of their results and uncertainties. Two 100 μL micropipettes were tested by 15 participants. One participant was not a member or associate member of the BIPM and was be removed from this report. The comparison started in July 2015 and ended in March 2016. The Volume and Flow Laboratory of the Portuguese Institute for Quality (IPQ) was the pilot laboratory and performed the initial and final measurements of the micropipettes. The micropipettes showed a stable volume during the whole comparison, which was confirmed by the results from the pilot laboratory. The original results of all participant NMIs were corrected to the standard atmospheric pressure in order to compare results under the same calibration conditions, and the contribution of the 'process-related handling contribution' was added to the uncertainty budget of each participant. In general the declared CMCs are in accordance with the KCDB. For the micropipette 354828Z, two laboratories had inconsistent results. For micropipette 354853Z, three laboratories had inconsistent results. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Distributed Radio Interferometric Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Yatawatta, Sarod

    2015-01-01

    Increasing data volumes delivered by a new generation of radio interferometers require computationally efficient and robust calibration algorithms. In this paper, we propose distributed calibration as a way of improving both computational cost as well as robustness in calibration. We exploit the data parallelism across frequency that is inherent in radio astronomical observations that are recorded as multiple channels at different frequencies. Moreover, we also exploit the smoothness of the variation of calibration parameters across frequency. Data parallelism enables us to distribute the computing load across a network of compute agents. Smoothness in frequency enables us reformulate calibration as a consensus optimization problem. With this formulation, we enable flow of information between compute agents calibrating data at different frequencies, without actually passing the data, and thereby improving robustness. We present simulation results to show the feasibility as well as the advantages of distribute...

  18. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 1. Calibration of Air-Data Systems and Flow Direction Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    community. The highest authority within AGARD is the National Delegates Board consisting of officially appointed senior representa*tives from each member...necessary in order to obtain requisite higher values of M, the calibratirn may be made by measuring T gMat a range of values of M and plotting Tps...Instrumentation The instrumentation details given in the following sub-paragraphs are Intended only as a guide . They should not be taken to represent

  19. A Software Module for High-Accuracy Calibration of Rings and Cylinders on CMM using Multi-Orientation Techniques (Multi-Step and Reversal methods)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    . The Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM) at the Technical University of Denmark takes care of free form measurements, in collaboration with DIMEG, University of Padova, Italy. The present report describes a software module, ROUNDCAL, to be used for high-accuracy calibration of rings and cylinders....... The purpose of the software is to calculate the form error and the least square circle of rings and cylinders by mean of average of pontwise measuring results becoming from so-called multi-orientation techniques (both reversal and multi-step methods) in order to eliminate systematic errors of CMM ....

  20. A Software Module for High-Accuracy Calibration of Rings and Cylinders on CMM using Multi-Orientation Techniques (Multi-Step and Reversal methods)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    . The Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM) at the Technical University of Denmark takes care of free form measurements, in collaboration with DIMEG, University of Padova, Italy. The present report describes a software module, ROUNDCAL, to be used for high-accuracy calibration of rings and cylinders....... The purpose of the software is to calculate the form error and the least square circle of rings and cylinders by mean of average of pontwise measuring results becoming from so-called multi-orientation techniques (both reversal and multi-step methods) in order to eliminate systematic errors of CMM ....

  1. PET-guided delineation of radiation therapy treatment volumes: a survey of image segmentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); El Naqa, Issam [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Historically, anatomical CT and MR images were used to delineate the gross tumour volumes (GTVs) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The capabilities offered by modern radiation therapy units and the widespread availability of combined PET/CT scanners stimulated the development of biological PET imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning with the aim to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the tumour. One of the most difficult issues facing PET-based treatment planning is the accurate delineation of target regions from typical blurred and noisy functional images. The major problems encountered are image segmentation and imperfect system response function. Image segmentation is defined as the process of classifying the voxels of an image into a set of distinct classes. The difficulty in PET image segmentation is compounded by the low spatial resolution and high noise characteristics of PET images. Despite the difficulties and known limitations, several image segmentation approaches have been proposed and used in the clinical setting including thresholding, edge detection, region growing, clustering, stochastic models, deformable models, classifiers and several other approaches. A detailed description of the various approaches proposed in the literature is reviewed. Moreover, we also briefly discuss some important considerations and limitations of the widely used techniques to guide practitioners in the field of radiation oncology. The strategies followed for validation and comparative assessment of various PET segmentation approaches are described. Future opportunities and the current challenges facing the adoption of PET-guided delineation of target volumes and its role in basic and clinical research are also addressed. (orig.)

  2. The nuclear resonance scattering calibration technique for the EuroGammaS gamma characterisation system at ELI-NP-GBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegriti, M. G.; Albergo, S.; Adriani, O.; Andreotti, M.; Berto, D.; Borgheresi, R.; Cappello, G.; Cardarelli, P.; Consoli, E.; Di Domenico, G.; Evangelisti, F.; Gambaccini, M.; Graziani, G.; Lenzi, M.; Marziani, M.; Palumbo, L.; Passaleva, G.; Paternò, G.; Serban, A.; Squerzanti, S.; Starodubtsev, O.; Tricomi, A.; Variola, A.; Veltri, M.; Zerbo, B.

    2017-03-01

    A Gamma Beam System (GBS), designed by the EuroGammaS collaboration, will be implemented for the ELI-NP facility in Magurele, Romania. The facility will deliver an intense gamma beam, obtained by collimatio of the emerging radiation from inverse Compton interaction. Gamma beam energy range will span from 0.2 up to 19.5 MeV with unprecedented performances in terms of brilliance, photon flux and energy bandwidth. For the characterisation of the gamma beam during the commissioning and normal operation, a full detection system has been designed to measure energy spectrum, beam intensity, space and time profiles. The gamma-beam characterisation system consists of four elements: a Compton spectrometer, to measure and monitor the photon energy spectrum, in particular the energy bandwidth; a sampling calorimeter, for a fast combined measurement of the beam average energy and its intensity; a nuclear resonant scattering spectrometer, for absolute beam energy calibration and inter-calibration of the other detector elements; and finally a beam profile imager to be used for alignment and diagnostics purposes. In this paper, a general overview of the ELI-NP gamma characterisation system will be given and the NRSS system will be in particular discussed.

  3. Volume changes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy resins studied by PALS and PVT experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somoza, A. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina) and CICPBA, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)]. E-mail: asomoza@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPMPyMC, Depto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ramos, J. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Mondragon, I. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    A systematic study on changes in the volumes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy systems cured with selected aminic hardeners at different pre-cure temperatures is presented. Free- and macroscopic specific-volumes were measured by PALS and pressure-volume-temperature techniques, respectively. An analysis of the relation existing between macro- and nano-scales of the thermosetting networks developed by the different chemical structures is shown. The result obtained indicates that the structure of the hardeners governs the packing of the molecular chains of the epoxy network.

  4. 3D colour visualization of label images using volume rendering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhouten, R; Kottenhoff, R; Grebe, R

    1995-01-01

    Volume rendering methods for the visualization of 3D image data sets have been developed and collected in a C library. The core algorithm consists of a perspective ray casting technique for a natural and realistic view of the 3D scene. New edge operator shading methods are employed for a fast and information preserving representation of surfaces. Control parameters of the algorithm can be tuned to have either smoothed surfaces or a very detailed rendering of the geometrical structure. Different objects can be distinguished by different colours. Shadow ray tracing has been implemented to improve the realistic impression of the 3D image. For a simultaneous representation of objects in different depths, hiding each other, two types of transparency mode are used (wireframe and glass transparency). Single objects or groups of objects can be excluded from the rendering (peeling). Three orthogonal cutting planes or one arbitrarily placed cutting plane can be applied to the rendered objects in order to get additional information about inner structures, contours, and relative positions.

  5. Calibration of a thin metal foil for infrared imaging video bolometer to estimate the spatial variation of thermal diffusivity using a photo-thermal technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Shwetang N; Peterson, Byron J; Sano, Ryuichi; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Drapiko, Evgeny A; Alekseyev, Andrey G; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Itomi, Muneji; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    A thin metal foil is used as a broad band radiation absorber for the InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB), which is a vital diagnostic for studying three-dimensional radiation structures from high temperature plasmas in the Large Helical Device. The two-dimensional (2D) heat diffusion equation of the foil needs to be solved numerically to estimate the radiation falling on the foil through a pinhole geometry. The thermal, physical, and optical properties of the metal foil are among the inputs to the code besides the spatiotemporal variation of temperature, for reliable estimation of the exhaust power from the plasma illuminating the foil. The foil being very thin and of considerable size, non-uniformities in these properties need to be determined by suitable calibration procedures. The graphite spray used for increasing the surface emissivity also contributes to a change in the thermal properties. This paper discusses the application of the thermographic technique for determining the spatial variation of the effective in-plane thermal diffusivity of the thin metal foil and graphite composite. The paper also discusses the advantages of this technique in the light of limitations and drawbacks presented by other calibration techniques being practiced currently. The technique is initially applied to a material of known thickness and thermal properties for validation and finally to thin foils of gold and platinum both with two different thicknesses. It is observed that the effect of the graphite layer on the estimation of the thermal diffusivity becomes more pronounced for thinner foils and the measured values are approximately 2.5-3 times lower than the literature values. It is also observed that the percentage reduction in thermal diffusivity due to the coating is lower for high thermal diffusivity materials such as gold. This fact may also explain, albeit partially, the higher sensitivity of the platinum foil as compared to gold.

  6. Utilizing a Multi-Source Forest Inventory Technique, MODIS Data and Landsat TM Images in the Production of Forest Cover and Volume Maps for the Terai Physiographic Zone in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on the nearest neighbors techniques is presented for producing thematic maps of forest cover (forest/non-forest and total stand volume for the Terai region in southern Nepal. To create the forest cover map, we used a combination of Landsat TM satellite data and visual interpretation data, i.e., a sample grid of visual interpretation plots for which we obtained the land use classification according to the FAO standard. These visual interpretation plots together with the field plots for volume mapping originate from an operative forest inventory project, i.e., the Forest Resource Assessment of Nepal (FRA Nepal project. The field plots were also used in checking the classification accuracy. MODIS satellite data were used as a reference in a local correction approach conducted for the relative calibration of Landsat TM images. This study applied a non-parametric k-nearest neighbor technique (k-NN to the forest cover and volume mapping. A tree height prediction approach based on a nonlinear, mixed-effects (NLME modeling procedure is presented in the Appendix. The MODIS image data performed well as reference data for the calibration approach applied to make the Landsat image mosaic. The agreement between the forest cover map and the field observed values of forest cover was substantial in Western Terai (KHAT 0.745 and strong in Eastern Terai (KHAT 0.825. The forest cover and volume maps that were estimated using the k-NN method and the inventory data from the FRA Nepal project are already appropriate and valuable data for research purposes and for the planning of forthcoming forest inventories. Adaptation of the methods and techniques was carried out using Open Source software tools.

  7. Flight Test Measurement Techniques for Laminar Flow. Volume 23(Les techniques de mesure en vol des ecoulements laminaires)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    aspects of Volume 1 and 2 of the original Flight Test Manual , including the flight testing of aircraft systems. The monographs in this series (with the...N. Alemdaroglu, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, Prof. L.M.B. da Costa Campos, Instituto Superior Tecnico , Lisboa Codex, Portugal...Defence Research Establishment ITALIE Česká republika Ryvangs Allé 1, P.O. Box 2715 Centro di Documentazione DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø Tecnico

  8. New in-situ, non-intrusive calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Heather; Adrian, Ronald; Ding, Liuyang; Prestridge, Kathy

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments require precise and accurate camera calibration. Standard techniques make assumptions about hard-to-measure camera parameters (i.e. optical axis angle, distortions, etc.)-reducing the calibration accuracy. Additionally, vibrations and slight movements after calibration may cause significant errors-particularly for tomographic PIV. These problems are exacerbated when a calibration target cannot be placed within the test section. A new PIV camera calibration method has been developed to permit precise calibration without placing a calibration target inside the test section or scanning the target over a volume. The method is capable of correcting for dynamic calibration changes occurring between PIV laser pulses. A transparent calibration plate with fine marks on both sides is positioned on the test section window. Dual-plane mapping makes it possible to determine a mapping function containing both position and angular direction of central rays from particles. From this information, central rays can be traced into the test section with high accuracy. Image distortion by the lens and refraction at various air-glass-liquid interfaces are accounted for, and no information about the position or angle of the camera(s) is required.

  9. Semipermanent Volumization by an Absorbable Filler: Onlay Injection Technique to the Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanobu Mashiko, MD

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: Semipermanent volumizing effects can be achieved by HA injection if the target area has an underlying bony floor. Periosteal stem cells may be activated by HA injection and may contribute to persistent volumizing effects. This treatment may be a much less invasive alternative to fat or bone grafting.

  10. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Chronic Disease Disabilities. Volume II, Part C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section C of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on six types of chronic disease disabilities--rheumatoid arthritis, coronary heart disease, emphysema, carcinoma of the colon/rectum, kidney…

  11. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Behavioral Disabilities. Volume II, Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section B of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on three types of behavior disabilities--epilepsy, mental retardation, and schizophrenia. Individual chapters on each disability cover the…

  12. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA is an airborne infrared limb imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 High Altitude LOng Range (HALO research aircraft during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3 volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra that are spectrally sampled every 0.625 cm−1. A total of 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line of sight. Simultaneous in situ observations by the Basic Halo Measurement and Sensor System (BAHAMAS, the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH, an ozone detector named Fairo, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large extent be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  13. Technique for bone volume measurement from human femur head samples by classification of micro-CT image histograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Marinozzi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Micro-CT analysis is a powerful technique for a non-invasive evaluation of the morphometric parameters of trabecular bone samples. This elaboration requires a previous binarization of the images. A problem which arises from the binarization process is the partial volume artifact. Voxels at the external surface of the sample can contain both bone and air so thresholding operates an incorrect estimation of volume occupied by the two materials. AIM: The aim of this study is the extraction of bone volumetric information directly from the image histograms, by fitting them with a suitable set of functions. METHODS: Nineteen trabecular bone samples were extracted from femoral heads of eight patients subject to a hip arthroplasty surgery. Trabecular bone samples were acquired using micro-CT Scanner. Hystograms of the acquired images were computed and fitted by Gaussian-like functions accounting for: a gray levels produced by the bone x-ray absorption, b the portions of the image occupied by air and c voxels that contain a mixture of bone and air. This latter contribution can be considered such as an estimation of the partial volume effect. RESULTS: The comparison of the proposed technique to the bone volumes measured by a reference instrument such as by a helium pycnometer show the method as a good way for an accurate bone volume calculation of trabecular bone samples.

  14. Reduction of contrast medium volume in abdominal aorta CTA: Multiphasic injection technique versus a test bolus volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijhof, Wouter H., E-mail: w.h.nijhof@student.utwente.nl [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, P.O. Box 21, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Vos, Charlotte S. van der, E-mail: c.s.vandervos@student.utwente.nl [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, P.O. Box 21, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Anninga, Bauke, E-mail: b.anninga@student.utwente.nl [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, P.O. Box 21, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J., E-mail: g.jager@JBZ.nl [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Henri Dunantstraat 1, 5223 GZ ’s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M., E-mail: mj.rutten@online.nl [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Henri Dunantstraat 1, 5223 GZ ’s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to reduce the administered contrast medium volume in abdominal CTA by using a test bolus injection, with the preservation of adequate quantitative and qualitative vessel enhancement. Study design: For this technical efficacy study 30 patients, who were referred for a CTA examination of the abdominal aorta, were included. Randomly 15 patients were assigned to undergo a multiphasic injection protocol and received 89 mL of contrast medium (Optiray 350) (protocol I). Fifteen patients were assigned to the test bolus injection protocol (protocol II), which implies injection of a 10 mL test bolus of Optiray 350 prior to performing CTA with a 40 mL of contrast medium. Quantitative assessment of vascular enhancement was performed by measuring the amount of Hounsfield Units in the aorta at 30 positions from the celiac trunk to the iliac arteries in both groups. Qualitative assessment was performed by three radiologists who scored the images at a 5-point scale. Results: Quantitative assessment showed that there was no significant difference in vascular enhancement for patients between the two protocols, with mean attenuation values of 280.9 ± 50.84 HU and 258.60 ± 39.28 HU, respectively. The image quality of protocol I was rated 4.31 (range: 3.67/5.00) and of protocol II 4.11 (range: 2.67/5.00). These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: This study showed that by using a test bolus injection and the administration of 50 mL of contrast medium overall, CTA of the abdominal aorta can reliably be performed, with regard to quantitative and qualitative adequate vessel enhancement.

  15. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration unce...

  16. Calibration of Underwater Sound Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R.S. Sastry

    1983-07-01

    Full Text Available The techniques of calibration of underwater sound transducers for farfield, near-field and closed environment conditions are reviewed in this paper .The design of acoustic calibration tank is mentioned. The facilities available at Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory, Cochin for calibration of transducers are also listed.

  17. Automatic anatomy partitioning of the torso region on CT images by using multiple organ localizations with a group-wise calibration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Morita, Syoichi; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes an automatic approach for anatomy partitioning on three-dimensional (3D) computedtomography (CT) images that divide the human torso into several volume-of-interesting (VOI) images based on anatomical definition. The proposed approach combines several individual detections of organ-location with a groupwise organ-location calibration and correction to achieve an automatic and robust multiple-organ localization task. The essence of the proposed method is to jointly detect the 3D minimum bounding box for each type of organ shown on CT images based on intra-organ-image-textures and inter-organ-spatial-relationship in the anatomy. Machine-learning-based template matching and generalized Hough transform-based point-distribution estimation are used in the detection and calibration processes. We apply this approach to the automatic partitioning of a torso region on CT images, which are divided into 35 VOIs presenting major organ regions and tissues required by routine diagnosis in clinical medicine. A database containing 4,300 patient cases of high-resolution 3D torso CT images is used for training and performance evaluations. We confirmed that the proposed method was successful in target organ localization on more than 95% of CT cases. Only two organs (gallbladder and pancreas) showed a lower success rate: 71 and 78% respectively. In addition, we applied this approach to another database that included 287 patient cases of whole-body CT images scanned for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and used for additional performance evaluation. The experimental results showed that no significant difference between the anatomy partitioning results from those two databases except regarding the spleen. All experimental results showed that the proposed approach was efficient and useful in accomplishing localization tasks for major organs and tissues on CT images scanned using different protocols.

  18. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.; Boniaszczuk, J.; Isaacs, S.; Fraser, R.C.; Commerford, P.J.; Uys, C.J.; Rose, A.G.; Smith, J.A.; Barnard, C.N.

    1985-02-01

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts.

  19. Calibration of EBT2 film using a red-channel PDD method in combination with a modified three-channel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liyun, E-mail: liyunc@isu.edu.tw [Departments of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Ho, Sheng-Yow [Department of Nursing, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan 73657, Taiwan and Department of Radiation Oncology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan 73657, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tsair-Fwu [Medical Physics and Informatics Laboratory, Department of Electronics Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung 80778, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Shyh-An [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan and Department of Radiation Oncology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Ding, Hueisch-Jy [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pang-Yu, E-mail: pangyuchen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan 70142, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Ashland Inc. EBT2 and EBT3 films are widely used in quality assurance for radiation therapy; however, there remains a relatively high degree of uncertainty [B. Hartmann, M. Martisikova, and O. Jakel, “Homogeneity of Gafchromic EBT2 film,” Med. Phys. 37, 1753–1756 (2010)]. Micke et al. (2011) recently improved the spatial homogeneity using all color channels of a flatbed scanner; however, van Hoof et al. (2012) pointed out that the corrected nonuniformity still requires further investigation for larger fields. To reduce the calibration errors and the uncertainty, the authors propose a new red-channel percentage-depth-dose method in combination with a modified three-channel technique. Methods: For the ease of comparison, the EBT2 film image used in the authors’ previous study (2012) was reanalyzed using different approaches. Photon beams of 6-MV were delivered to two different films at two different beam on times, resulting in the absorption doses of ranging from approximately 30 to 300 cGy at the vertical midline of the film, which was set to be coincident with the central axis of the beam. The film was tightly sandwiched in a 30{sup 3}-cm{sup 3} polystyrene phantom, and the pixel values for red, green, and blue channels were extracted from 234 points on the central axis of the beam and compared with the corresponding depth doses. The film was first calibrated using the multichannel method proposed by Micke et al. (2010), accounting for nonuniformities in the scanner. After eliminating the scanner and dose-independent nonuniformities, the film was recalibrated via the dose-dependent optical density of the red channel and fitted to a power function. This calibration was verified via comparisons of the dose profiles extracted from the films, where three were exposed to a 60° physical wedge field and three were exposed to composite fields, and all of which were measured in a water phantom. A correction for optical attenuation was implemented, and

  20. Calibration method of the tomographic gamma scan techniques available for accurately characterizing {sup 137}Cs from 110mAg interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sung Yeop [GODO TECH Co. Ltd., Hanam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The Tomographic Gamma Scan (TGS) technique partitions radioactive waste drums into 10 x 10 x 16 voxels and assays both the density and concentration of radioactivity for each voxel thus providing for improved accuracy, when compared to the traditional Non-Destructive Assay(NDA) techniques. It could decrease the degree of precision measurement since there is a trade-off between spatial resolution and precision. This latter drawback is compensated by expanding the Region of Interest (ROI) that differentiates the full energy peaks, which, in turn, results in an optimized degree of precision. The enlarged ROI, however, increases the probability of interference among those nuclides that emit energies in the adjacent spectrum. This study has identified the cause of such interference for the reference nuclide of the TGS technique, {sup 137}Cs (661.66 keV, halflife 30.5 years), to be 110mAg (657.75 keV, half-life 249.76 days). A new calibration method of determining the optimized ROI was developed, and its effectiveness in accurately characterizing {sup 137}Cs and eliminating the interference was further ascertained.

  1. Computer techniques to aid the interpretation of salt bodies and stratigraphy in three-dimensional seismic volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammon, William S., III

    The life cycle of a seismic data volume can be broken into three parts: acquisition, processing, and interpretation. Accomplishing each of these steps requires the application of a different set of skills and techniques to accomplish. Of the three, data acquisition and processing are the most expensive steps to perform. Data acquisition is a time and equipment intensive operation. Processing the seismic data, after acquisition, is a computationally very expensive procedure; usually performed on very large computer clusters. However, the most time consuming of these steps is the interpretation of the seismic data. Arguably, this is also the least optimized part of the volume life cycle, as certain aspects of interpretation are still performed largely by hand. Efficiency gains are ongoing in the fields of seismic acquisition and processing (especially migration). Initial steps have also been made in the semi-automation of interpretation, but much work remains to be done. Semi-automatic interpretation holds the greatest promise for quickly improving the value of the seismic volume acquisition and utilization cycle. This dissertation concentrates on the development of new techniques to aid the human interpreter in their interpretation of 3D seismic volumes. The ability to both accelerate and improve interpretation of geology in a data volume is a significant goal for increasing the value realized from a given data set. Particular attention is given to two of the more intractable problems in seismic data interpretation: salt-body delineation, and the interpretation of stratigraphic features. The difficulties inherent in each task are different, but both tasks are quite time consuming when performed largely by hand. This dissertation is comprised of five parts. Part 1 describes Voxel Density, a novel volume processing technique that can be used to filter, or improve the contrast in a data set. This technique uses the local persistence of features in the data set to

  2. Simultaneous determination of vitamin B12 and its derivatives using some of multivariate calibration 1 (MVC1) techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi-Maybodi, Abdolraouf; Darzi, S. K. Hassani Nejad

    2008-10-01

    Resolution of binary mixtures of vitamin B12, methylcobalamin and B12 coenzyme with minimum sample pre-treatment and without analyte separation has been successfully achieved by methods of partial least squares algorithm with one dependent variable (PLS1), orthogonal signal correction/partial least squares (OSC/PLS), principal component regression (PCR) and hybrid linear analysis (HLA). Data of analysis were obtained from UV-vis spectra. The UV-vis spectra of the vitamin B12, methylcobalamin and B12 coenzyme were recorded in the same spectral conditions. The method of central composite design was used in the ranges of 10-80 mg L -1 for vitamin B12 and methylcobalamin and 20-130 mg L -1 for B12 coenzyme. The models refinement procedure and validation were performed by cross-validation. The minimum root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 2.26 mg L -1 for vitamin B12 with PLS1, 1.33 mg L -1 for methylcobalamin with OSC/PLS and 3.24 mg L -1 for B12 coenzyme with HLA techniques. Figures of merit such as selectivity, sensitivity, analytical sensitivity and LOD were determined for three compounds. The procedure was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of three compounds in synthetic mixtures and in a pharmaceutical formulation.

  3. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pantoja

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network.

  4. Flexible calibration procedure for fringe projection profilometry

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Javier; Quiroga Mellado, Juan Antonio; Terrón López, María José

    2007-01-01

    A novel calibration method for whole field three-dimensional shape measurement by means of fringe projection is presented. Standard calibration techniques, polynomial-and model-based, have practical limitations such as the difficulty of measuring large fields of view, the need to use precise z stages, and bad calibration results due to inaccurate calibration points. The proposed calibration procedure is a mixture of the two main standard techniques, sharing their benefits and avoiding their m...

  5. Relative Determination of Micronutrients of Different Species of Teff (Eragrestis Seeds of Ethiopia Origin by Calibration Free Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dilbetigle Assefa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy techniques has been used to analysis the multi-component of three different species of Teff seeds (Red, White and Sirgegna of Ethiopia origin using a second harmonic (532 nm of a nanosecond Q-switched Nd: YAG laser focused on the surface of the pelletized powder of Teff seeds. Based on the idea of the plasma is homogeneous. The seven essential micronutrients in three species of Teff seeds are identified carbon as a matrix element. Electron density and plasma temperature are calculated applying Saha-Boltzmann equation and Boltzmann plot method. And making use of the semi-quantitative method the three species relative concentrations of (Ca, Mg, Al, Si, Mn, Fe and K are obtained using Calibration Free Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (CF-LIBS technique. The result demonstrated that the relative concentrations of the some elements in the species are different. In Red Teff species Ca is more, but Mg is least. On the contrary Mg is high in Sirgegna and White Teff as compared to Red Teff And High content of Calcium, Magnesium and Iron micronutrients are found in the three species.

  6. Free volumes in bulk nanocrystalline metals studied by the complementary techniques of positron annihilation and dilatometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würschum, Roland; Oberdorfer, Bernd; Steyskal, Eva-Maria; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Puff, Werner; Pikart, Philip; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pippan, Reinhard

    2012-07-15

    Free-volume type defects, such as vacancies, vacancy-agglomerates, dislocations, and grain boundaries represent a key parameter in the properties of ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline materials. Such free-volume type defects are introduced in high excess concentration during the processes of structural refinement by severe plastic deformation. The direct method of time-differential dilatometry is applied in the present work to determine the total amount and the kinetics of free volume by measuring the irreversible length change upon annealing of bulk nanocrystalline metals (Fe, Cu, Ni) prepared by high-pressure torsion (HPT). In the case of HPT-deformed Ni and Cu, distinct substages of the length change upon linear heating occur due to the loss of grain boundaries in the wake of crystallite growth. The data on dilatometric length change can be directly related to the fast annealing of free-volume type defects studied by in situ Doppler broadening measurements performed at the high-intensity positron beam of the FRM II (Garching, Munich, Germany).

  7. Expiratory computed tomographic techniques: a cause of a poor rate of change in lung volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Keiko; Okada, Fumito; Mori, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Ninety-nine patients (29 males and 70 females; mean age, 57.1 years; range, 22-81 years) were included in this study to evaluate the factors affecting smaller lung volume changes in expiratory high-resolution computed tomography performed to depict air trapping. All patients underwent inspiratory and expiratory chest thin-section CT examinations and pulmonary function tests. Air trapping on CT images was graded subjectively. All variables (age, sex, diagnosis, pulmonary function index, and air trapping score) were compared with the degree of change in lung volume between the inspiratory and expiratory CT examinations. The variables affecting a lower degree of volume change were vital capacity, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1.0), and the FEV1.0/FVC ratio. Bronchiolitis obliterans was the dominant diagnosis in patients with insufficient degrees of breath holding and in patients with negative air trapping scores despite an abnormal air trapping index. An insufficient degree of lung changes between inspiration and expiration on CT examinations represented bronchiolitis obliterans, which resulted in low FEV1.0 and FEV1.0/FVC values. Changes in the time gap from the announcement of exhalation and breath holding to the start of scanning most effectively indicated air trapping in patients with bronchiolar disorders.

  8. A σ-coordinate model for 3D free-surface flows using an unstructured finite-volume technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uh Zapata, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a numerical solution of three-dimensional free-surface flows using a σ-coordinate model, a projection method and an unstructured finite-volume technique. The coordinate transformation is used in order to overcome difficulties arising from free surface elevation and irregular geometry. The projection method consists to combine the momentum and continuity equations in order to establish a Poisson-type equation for the non-hydrostatic pressure. A cell-centered finite volume method with a triangular mesh in the horizontal direction is used to simulate the flows with free-surfaces, in which the average values of conserved variables are stored at the centre of each element. A parallel algorithm is also presented for the finite volume discretization of the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The proposed parallel method is formulated by using a multi-color SOR method, a block domain decomposition and interprocessor data communication techniques with Message Passing Interface. The model has been validated by several benchmarks which numerical simulations are in good agreement with the corresponding analytical and existing experimental results.

  9. Validation of a New Method for Stroke Volume Variation Assessment: a Comparaison with the PiCCO Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Papelier, Yves; Cottin, François; Van De Louw, Andry

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel, simple and minimally invasive method for stroke volume variation assessment using arterial blood pressure measurements. The arterial blood pressure signal is reconstructed using a semi-classical signal analysis method allowing the computation of a parameter, called the first systolic invariant INVS1. We show that INVS1 is linearly related to stroke volume. To validate this approach, a statistical comparaison between INVS1 and stroke volume measured with the PiCCO technique was performed during a 15-mn recording in 21 mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care. In 94% of the whole recordings, a strong correlation was estimated by cross-correlation analysis (mean coefficient=0.9) and linear regression (mean coefficient=0.89). Once the linear relation had been verified, a Bland-Altman test showed the very good agreement between the two approaches and their interchangeability. For the remaining 6%, INVS1 and the PiCCO stroke volume were not correlated at all, and this discrepa...

  10. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 1: Techniques, Procedures and Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, J. O. (Editor); Schiffman, Y. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Topics dealing with the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information system for application in energy resources management are discussed. Associated remote sensing and image analysis techniques are also addressed.

  11. Automatic segmentation of airway tree based on local intensity filter and machine learning technique in 3D chest CT volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qier; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Ueno, Junji; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-02-01

    Airway segmentation plays an important role in analyzing chest computed tomography (CT) volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite a challenging task. Several researchers have proposed automated airway segmentation algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However, these methods fail to detect the peripheral bronchial branches, which results in a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach for more accurate extraction of the complex airway tree. This proposed segmentation method is composed of three steps. First, Hessian analysis is utilized to enhance the tube-like structure in CT volumes; then, an adaptive multiscale cavity enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure with different radii. In the second step, support vector machine learning will be utilized to remove the false positive (FP) regions from the result obtained in the previous step. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is used to refine the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. A test dataset including 50 standard-dose chest CT volumes was used for evaluating our proposed method. The average extraction rate was about 79.1 % with the significantly decreased FP rate. A new method of airway segmentation based on local intensity structure and machine learning technique was developed. The method was shown to be feasible for airway segmentation in a computer-aided diagnosis system for a lung and bronchoscope guidance system.

  12. SPOTS Calibration Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented using the procedure outlined by the Standardisation Project for Optical Techniques of Strain measurement to calibrate a digital image correlation system. The process involves comparing the experimental data obtained with the optical measurement system to the theoretical values for a specially designed specimen. The standard states the criteria which must be met in order to achieve successful calibration, in addition to quantifying the measurement uncertainty in the system. The system was evaluated at three different displacement load levels, generating strain ranges from 289 µstrain to 2110 µstrain. At the 289 µstrain range, the calibration uncertainty was found to be 14.1 µstrain, and at the 2110 µstrain range it was found to be 28.9 µstrain. This calibration procedure was performed without painting a speckle pattern on the surface of the metal. Instead, the specimen surface was prepared using different grades of grit paper to produce the desired texture.

  13. Internet-based calibration of a multifunction calibrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-04-17

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multifunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  14. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, Barbara, E-mail: nickel.ba@gmail.com [US Teleradiology and Quantum Medical Radiology Group (United States); McClure, Timothy, E-mail: tmcclure@gmail.com; Moriarty, John, E-mail: jmoriarty@mednet.ucla.edu [UCLA Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.

  15. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 1: Techniques, Procedures and Data Bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, J.O.; Schiffman, Y.M.

    1982-01-01

    Topics dealing with the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information system for application in energy resources management are discussed. Associated remote sensing and image analysis techniques are also addressed. For individual titles, see N83-26156 through N83-26175.

  16. Remote-Sensing Technique for Determination of the Volume Absorption Coefficient of Turbid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Michael; Arnone, Robert A.; Gould, Richard W., Jr.; Terrie, Gregory E.; Ladner, Sherwin D.; Wood, Christoper G.

    1998-07-01

    We use remote-sensing reflectance from particulate R rs to determine the volume absorption coefficient a of turbid water in the 400 700-nm spectral region. The calculated and measured values of a ( ) show good agreement for 0 . 5 a 10 (m 1 ). To determine R rs from a particulate, we needed to make corrections for remote-sensing reflectance owing to surface roughness S rs . We determined the average spectral distribution of S rs from the difference in total remote-sensing reflectance measured with and without polarization. The spectral shape of S rs showed an excellent fit to theoretical formulas for glare based on Rayleigh and aerosol scattering from the atmosphere.

  17. Respiratory-gated electrical impedance tomography: a potential technique for quantifying stroke volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Saaid H.; Murphy, Ethan K.; Halter, Ryan J.

    2016-03-01

    Telemonitoring is becoming increasingly important as the proportion of the population living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) increases. Currently used health parameters in the suite of telemonitoring tools lack the sensitivity and specificity to accurately predict heart failure events, forcing physicians to play a reactive versus proactive role in patient care. A novel cardiac output (CO) monitoring device is proposed that leverages a custom smart phone application and a wearable electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system. The purpose of this work is to explore the potential of using respiratory-gated EIT to quantify stroke volume (SV) and assess its feasibility using real data. Simulations were carried out using the 4D XCAT model to create anatomically realistic meshes and electrical conductivity profiles representing the human thorax and the intrathoracic tissue. A single 5-second period respiration cycle with chest/lung expansion was modeled with end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart volumes to evaluate how effective EIT-based conductivity changes represent clinically significant differences in SV. After establishing a correlation between conductivity changes and SV, the applicability of the respiratory-gated EIT was refined using data from the PhysioNet database to estimate the number of useful end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart events attained over a 3.3 minute period. The area associated with conductivity changes was found to correlate to SV with a correlation coefficient of 0.92. A window of 12.5% around peak exhalation was found to be the optimal phase of the respiratory cycle from which to record EIT data. Within this window, ~47 useable ED and ES were found with a standard deviation of 28 using 3.3 minutes of data for 20 patients.

  18. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamal, S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (Vf) in DAM-ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ3 and Vf increases while I3 slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ3, Vf and I3 are higher in CR-39 than DAM-ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently Vf increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and Vf in the polymer. A relationship between Vf and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  19. Association between Fellowship Training, Surgical Volume, and Laparoscopic Suturing Techniques among Members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. To compare surgical volume and techniques including laparoscopic suturing among members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL according to fellowship training status. Design. A web-based survey was designed using Qualtrics and sent to AAGL members. Results. Minimally invasive gynecologic surgery (FMIGS trained surgeons were more likely to perform more than 8 major conventional laparoscopic cases per month (63% versus 38%, P<0.001, OR [95% CI] = 2.78 [1.54–5.06] and were more likely to perform laparoscopic suturing during these cases (32% versus 16%, P<0.004, OR [95% CI] = 2.44 [1.25–4.71]. The non-fellowship trained (NFT surgeons in private practice were less likely to perform over 8 conventional laparoscopic cases (34% versus 51%, P=0.03, OR [95% CI] = 0.50 [0.25–0.99] and laparoscopic suturing during these cases (13% versus 27%, P=0.01, OR [95% CI] = 0.39 [0.17–0.92] compared to NFT surgeons in academic practice. Conclusion. The surgical volume and utilization of laparoscopic suturing of FMIGS trained surgeons are significantly increased compared to NFT surgeons. Academic practice setting had a positive impact on surgical volume of NFT surgeons but not on FMIGS trained surgeons.

  20. Association between Fellowship Training, Surgical Volume, and Laparoscopic Suturing Techniques among Members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Emad; Scott, Lauren; Miladinovic, Branko; Imudia, Anthony N; Hart, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective. To compare surgical volume and techniques including laparoscopic suturing among members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL) according to fellowship training status. Design. A web-based survey was designed using Qualtrics and sent to AAGL members. Results. Minimally invasive gynecologic surgery (FMIGS) trained surgeons were more likely to perform more than 8 major conventional laparoscopic cases per month (63% versus 38%, P < 0.001, OR [95% CI] = 2.78 [1.54-5.06]) and were more likely to perform laparoscopic suturing during these cases (32% versus 16%, P < 0.004, OR [95% CI] = 2.44 [1.25-4.71]). The non-fellowship trained (NFT) surgeons in private practice were less likely to perform over 8 conventional laparoscopic cases (34% versus 51%, P = 0.03, OR [95% CI] = 0.50 [0.25-0.99]) and laparoscopic suturing during these cases (13% versus 27%, P = 0.01, OR [95% CI] = 0.39 [0.17-0.92]) compared to NFT surgeons in academic practice. Conclusion. The surgical volume and utilization of laparoscopic suturing of FMIGS trained surgeons are significantly increased compared to NFT surgeons. Academic practice setting had a positive impact on surgical volume of NFT surgeons but not on FMIGS trained surgeons.

  1. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, 11711 Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering, Najran University, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Hady, E.E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, BO 61519, Minia (Egypt)

    2015-09-15

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (V{sub f}) in DAM–ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ{sub 3} and V{sub f} increases while I{sub 3} slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ{sub 3}, V{sub f} and I{sub 3} are higher in CR-39 than DAM–ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently V{sub f} increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and V{sub f} in the polymer. A relationship between V{sub f} and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  2. A shock-fitting technique for cell-centered finite volume methods on unstructured dynamic meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dongyang; Xu, Chunguang; Dong, Haibo; Liu, Jun

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the shock-fitting technique is further developed on unstructured dynamic meshes. The shock wave is fitted and regarded as a special boundary, whose boundary conditions and boundary speed (shock speed) are determined by solving Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The fitted shock splits the entire computational region into subregions, in which the flows are free from shocks and flow states are solved by a shock-capturing code based on arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian algorithm. Along with the motion of the fitted shock, an unstructured dynamic meshes algorithm is used to update the internal node's position to maintain the high quality of computational meshes. The successful applications prove the present shock-fitting to be a valid technique.

  3. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  4. Low level waste management: a compilation of models and monitoring techniques. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosier, J.E.; Fowler, J.R.; Barton, C.J. (comps.)

    1980-04-01

    In support of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Science Applications, Inc., conducted a survey of models and monitoring techniques associated with the transport of radionuclides and other chemical species from LLW burial sites. As a result of this survey, approximately 350 models were identified. For each model the purpose and a brief description are presented. To the extent possible, a point of contact and reference material are identified. The models are organized into six technical categories: atmospheric transport, dosimetry, food chain, groundwater transport, soil transport, and surface water transport. About 4% of the models identified covered other aspects of LLW management and are placed in a miscellaneous category. A preliminary assessment of all these models was performed to determine their ability to analyze the transport of other chemical species. The models that appeared to be applicable are identified. A brief survey of the state-of-the-art techniques employed to monitor LLW burial sites is also presented, along with a very brief discussion of up-to-date burial techniques.

  5. Tree Climbing Techniques and Volume Equations for Eschweilera (Matá-Matá, a Hyperdominant Genus in the Amazon Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno O. Gimenez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Eschweilera genus has great ecological and economic importance due to its wide abundance in the Amazon basin. One potential use for the Eschweilera genus is in forest management, where just a few trees are removed per hectare. In order to improve the forest management in the Amazon, this study assessed two critical issues: volume equations fitted for a single genus and the development of a non-destructive method using climbing techniques. The equipment used to measure the sample trees included: climbing rope, ascenders, descenders, and carabiners. To carry out the objectives of this study, 64 trees with diameter at breast height (DBH ≥ 10 cm were selected and measured in ZF-2 Tropical Forestry Station near the city of Manaus, Brazil. Four single input models with DBH and four dual input models with DBH and merchantable height (H were tested. The Husch model (V = a × DBHb presented the best performance (R2 = 0.97. This model does not require the merchantable height, which is an important advantage, because of the difficulty in measuring this variable in tropical forests. When the merchantable height data are collected using accurate methods, the Schumacher and Hall model (V = a × DBHb × Hc is the most appropriated. Tree climbing techniques with the use of ropes, as a non-destructive method, is a good alternative to measure the merchantable height, the diameter along the stem, and also estimate the tree volume (m3 of the Eschweilera genus in the Amazon basin.

  6. Internal Water Vapor Photoacoustic Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor absorption is ubiquitous in the infrared wavelength range where photoacoustic trace gas detectors operate. This technique allows for discontinuous wavelength tuning by temperature-jumping a laser diode from one range to another within a time span suitable for photoacoustic calibration. The use of an internal calibration eliminates the need for external calibrated reference gases. Commercial applications include an improvement of photoacoustic spectrometers in all fields of use.

  7. Practical gamma spectroscopy assay techniques for large volume low-level waste boxes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S. C. (Steven C.); Gruetzmacher, K. M. (Kathleen M.); Scheffing, C. C. (Candice C.); Gallegos, L. E. (Lucas E.); Bustos, R. M. (Roland M.)

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the performance of the SNAPrM (Spectral Nondestructive Assay Platform) analytical software for measurements of known standards in large metal waste boxes (2.5 m' volume). The trials were designed to test the accuracy and variance of the analytical results for low-density combustible matrices and higher-density metal matrices at two discrete gamma-ray energies: 121.78 keV and 411.12 keV. For both matrix types the measurement method that produced the most accurate results with the lowest associated standard deviation involved combining four individual measurements taken at the geometric center of each of the box's four vertical sides. With this method the overall bias and the standard deviation amongst 24 individual results for the 121.78 keV and 411.12 keV gamma rays were as follows: 3.38% (k 20.19%) and 3.68% (k 15.47%) for the combustible matrix and 37,88% (k 67.64%) and 9.38% (k 33.15%) for the metal matrix. The persistent positive bias from measurements of the metal box is believed to be a result of a nonhomogenously distributed matrix.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION DEBRIS FLOW VOLUME MAPPING WITH UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS AND PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Adams

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows cause an average € 30 million damages and 1-2 fatalities every year in Austria. Detailed documentation of their extent and magnitude is essential for understanding, preventing and mitigating these natural hazard events. The recent development of unmanned aerial systems (UAS has provided a new possibility for on-demand high-resolution monitoring and mapping. Here, we present a study, where the spatial extent and volume of a large debris flow event were mapped with different UAS, fitted with commercial off-the-shelf sensors. Orthophotos and digital terrain models (DTM were calculated using structure-from-motion photogrammetry software. Terrain height differences caused by the debris flow in the catchment and valley floor were derived by subtracting the pre-event airborne laser scanning (ALS DTM from a post-event UAS-DTM. The analysis of the volumetric sediment budget showed, that approximately 265,000 m³ material was mobilised in the catchment, of which 45,000 m³ settled there; of the material, which reached the valley floor, 120,000 m³ was deposited, while another 10,000 m³ was eroded from there. The UAS-results were validated against ALS data and imagery from a traditional manned-aircraft photogrammetry campaign. In conclusion, the UAS-data can reach an accuracy and precision comparable to manned aircraft data, but with the added benefits of higher flexibility, easier repeatability, less operational constraints and higher spatial resolution.

  9. Region-Based Partial Volume Correction Techniques for PET Imaging: Sinogram Implementation and Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Sattarivand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose. Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET requires partial volume correction (PVC. Region-based PVC methods are based on geometric transfer matrix implemented either in image-space (GTM or sinogram-space (GTMo, both with similar performance. Although GTMo is slower, it more closely simulates the 3D PET image acquisition, accounts for local variations of point spread function, and can be implemented for iterative reconstructions. A recent image-based symmetric GTM (sGTM has shown improvement in noise characteristics and robustness to misregistration over GTM. This study implements the sGTM method in sinogram space (sGTMo, validates it, and evaluates its performance. Methods. Two 3D sphere and brain digital phantoms and a physical sphere phantom were used. All four region-based PVC methods (GTM, GTMo, sGTM, and sGTMo were implemented and their performance was evaluated. Results. All four PVC methods had similar accuracies. Both noise propagation and robustness of the sGTMo method were similar to those of sGTM method while they were better than those of GTMo method especially for smaller objects. Conclusion. The sGTMo was implemented and validated. The performance of the sGTMo in terms of noise characteristics and robustness to misregistration is similar to that of the sGTM method and improved compared to the GTMo method.

  10. SeaWiFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 5; The SeaWiFS Solar Radiation-Based Calibration and the Transfer-to-Orbit Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Slater, Philip N.; Holmes, Alan W.

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation-based calibration (SRBC) of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) was performed on 1 November 1993. Measurements were made outdoors in the courtyard of the instrument manufacturer. SeaWiFS viewed the solar irradiance reflected from the sensor's diffuser in the same manner as viewed on orbit. The calibration included measurements using a solar radiometer designed to determine the transmittances of principal atmospheric constituents. The primary uncertainties in the outdoor measurements are the transmission of the atmosphere and the reflectance of the diffuser. Their combined uncertainty is about 5 or 6%. The SRBC also requires knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum. Four solar models are used. When averaged over the responses of the SeaWiFS bands, the irradiance models agree at the 3.6% level, with the greatest difference for SeaWiFS band 8. The calibration coefficients from the SRBC are lower than those from the laboratory calibration of the instrument in 1997. For a representative solar model, the ratios of the SRBC coefficients to laboratory values average 0.962 with a standard deviation of 0.012. The greatest relative difference is 0.946 for band 8. These values are within the estimated uncertainties of the calibration measurements. For the transfer-to-orbit experiment, the measurements in the manufacturer's courtyard are used to predict the digital counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit (August 1, 1997). This experiment requires an estimate of the relative change in the diffuser response for the period between the launch of the instrument and its first solar measurements on orbit (September 9, 1997). In relative terms, the counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit averaged 1.3% higher than predicted, with a standard deviation of 1.2% and a greatest difference of 2.4% or band 7. The estimated uncertainty for the transfer-to-orbit experiment is about 3 or 4%.

  11. Amorphous silicon EPID calibration for dosimetric applications: comparison of a method based on Monte Carlo prediction of response with existing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, L [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Fielding, A L [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Dance, D R [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Seco, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Evans, P M [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-21

    For EPID dosimetry, the calibration should ensure that all pixels have a similar response to a given irradiation. A calibration method (MC), using an analytical fit of a Monte Carlo simulated flood field EPID image to correct for the flood field image pixel intensity shape, was proposed. It was compared with the standard flood field calibration (FF), with the use of a water slab placed in the beam to flatten the flood field (WS) and with a multiple field calibration where the EPID was irradiated with a fixed 10 x 10 field for 16 different positions (MF). The EPID was used in its normal configuration (clinical setup) and with an additional 3 mm copper slab (modified setup). Beam asymmetry measured with a diode array was taken into account in MC and WS methods. For both setups, the MC method provided pixel sensitivity values within 3% of those obtained with the MF and WS methods (mean difference <1%, standard deviation <2%). The difference of pixel sensitivity between MC and FF methods was up to 12.2% (clinical setup) and 11.8% (modified setup). MC calibration provided images of open fields (5 x 5 to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}) and IMRT fields to within 3% of that obtained with WS and MF calibrations while differences with images calibrated with the FF method for fields larger than 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} were up to 8%. MC, WS and MF methods all provided a major improvement on the FF method. Advantages and drawbacks of each method were reviewed.

  12. Development of Calibration-Free Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy based techniques for deposited layers diagnostics on ITER-like tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantoni, Roberta [ENEA, UTAPRAD, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Almaviva, Salvatore, E-mail: salvatore.almaviva@enea.it [ENEA, UTAPRAD, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco [ENEA, UTAPRAD, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Popov, Andrey M. [Chemistry Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maddaluno, Giorgio [Assoc. ENEA-EURATOM sulla Fusione, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2013-09-01

    High temperature plasma in hydrogen isotopes is peculiar of thermonuclear fusion devices. The study of plasma–wall interaction is of paramount importance for avoiding both damage of plasma facing components (PFCs) and pollution of the plasma. To assure continuous and fault-free operation a strict control must be exerted on the amount of impurities deposited on, and of the fuel retained in the PFCs. This requirement makes Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy (LIBS) an ideal candidate for on-line quantitative monitoring of the walls of the current as well as of the next generation fusion devices like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). An experimental setup has been designed and realized in order to optimize the characteristics of a LIBS system working at low pressure and remotely, and it has been utilized in combination with calibration free procedures for quantitative analysis. In this work, a partial calibration free method has been developed for single shot analysis of hydrogen isotopes retention at the PFCs-like surfaces, based on the acquisition of high resolution spectra in a narrow wavelength range. Results of calibration free and partial calibration free have been obtained on suitably deuterated samples; preliminary spectroscopic considerations on tritium detection are also presented. - Highlights: • LIBS system “in situ” and remote for new generation fusion machines • Atomic composition of plasma facing component samples in fusion machines • Calibration free method for a qualitative/quantitative analysis is discussed. • Description of a new simplified calibration free method (partial calibration free) • LIBS for screening erosion/redeposition during operation of fusion machines.

  13. Self-calibration technique for structured light vision guided welding robot system%结构光视觉引导的焊接机器人系统自标定技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭新年; 白瑞林; 王秀平; 刘子腾

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the structured light vision guided welding robot system calibration, and solve the problem of complex, and difficult to make target in the existing calibration methods, a new self-calibration technique based on active vision is proposed. This self-calibration technique calibrates the camera inner parameter, rotating section of hand-eye matrix by controlling the robot 5 pure translational motions. And it calibrates the translation section of hand-eye matrix and the equa-tion of the light plane by controlling the robot 2 motions with revolving with three feature points in the scene without a specific target. The actual test results in the structured light vision guided welding robot system based on Denso robot show that the calibration approach is stable, and can reach the precision of ±0.93 mm. This self-calibration method to the structured light vision guided welding robot system with easy feature selection is simple, and has significance to the actual use in the field of industry.%为实现结构光视觉引导的焊接机器人系统的标定,解决现有标定方法复杂,标定靶标制作要求高等缺点,提出一种基于主动视觉的自标定方法。该标定方法对场景中3个特征点取像,通过精确控制焊接机器人进行5次平移运动,标定摄像机内参数和手眼矩阵旋转部分;通过进行2次带旋转运动,结合激光条在特征点平面的参数方程,标定手眼矩阵平移部分和结构光平面在摄像机坐标系下的平面方程;并针对不同焊枪长度进行修正。在以Denso机器人为主体构建的结构光视觉引导的焊接机器人系统上的测试结果稳定,定位精度可达到±0.93 mm。该标定方法简单,特征选取容易,对焊接机器人系统在实际工业现场的使用有重要意义。

  14. Novel calibration method for structured-light system with an out-of-focus projector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beiwen; Karpinsky, Nikolaus; Zhang, Song

    2014-06-01

    A structured-light system with a binary defocusing technique has the potential to have more extensive application due to its high speeds, gamma-calibration-free nature, and lack of rigid synchronization requirements between the camera and projector. However, the existing calibration methods fail to achieve high accuracy for a structured-light system with an out-of-focus projector. This paper proposes a method that can accurately calibrate a structured-light system even when the projector is not in focus, making it possible for high-accuracy and high-speed measurement with the binary defocusing method. Experiments demonstrate that our calibration approach performs consistently under different defocusing degrees, and a root-mean-square error of about 73 μm can be achieved with a calibration volume of 150(H) mm×250(W) mm×200(D)mm.

  15. TARGETLESS CAMERA CALIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In photogrammetry a camera is considered calibrated if its interior orientation parameters are known. These encompass the principal distance, the principal point position and some Additional Parameters used to model possible systematic errors. The current state of the art for automated camera calibration relies on the use of coded targets to accurately determine the image correspondences. This paper presents a new methodology for the efficient and rigorous photogrammetric calibration of digital cameras which does not require any longer the use of targets. A set of images depicting a scene with a good texture are sufficient for the extraction of natural corresponding image points. These are automatically matched with feature-based approaches and robust estimation techniques. The successive photogrammetric bundle adjustment retrieves the unknown camera parameters and their theoretical accuracies. Examples, considerations and comparisons with real data and different case studies are illustrated to show the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  16. Robust volume assessment of brain tissues for 3-dimensional fourier transformation MRI via a novel multispectral technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Wen Chai

    Full Text Available A new TRIO algorithm method integrating three different algorithms is proposed to perform brain MRI segmentation in the native coordinate space, with no need of transformation to a standard coordinate space or the probability maps for segmentation. The method is a simple voxel-based algorithm, derived from multispectral remote sensing techniques, and only requires minimal operator input to depict GM, WM, and CSF tissue clusters to complete classification of a 3D high-resolution multislice-multispectral MRI data. Results showed very high accuracy and reproducibility in classification of GM, WM, and CSF in multislice-multispectral synthetic MRI data. The similarity indexes, expressing overlap between classification results and the ground truth, were 0.951, 0.962, and 0.956 for GM, WM, and CSF classifications in the image data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity. The method particularly allows for classification of CSF with 0.994, 0.961 and 0.996 of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in images data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity, which had seldom performed well in previous studies. As for clinical MRI data, the quantitative data of brain tissue volumes aligned closely with the brain morphometrics in three different study groups of young adults, elderly volunteers, and dementia patients. The results also showed very low rates of the intra- and extra-operator variability in measurements of the absolute volumes and volume fractions of cerebral GM, WM, and CSF in three different study groups. The mean coefficients of variation of GM, WM, and CSF volume measurements were in the range of 0.03% to 0.30% of intra-operator measurements and 0.06% to 0.45% of inter-operator measurements. In conclusion, the TRIO algorithm exhibits a remarkable ability in robust classification of multislice-multispectral brain MR images, which would be potentially applicable for clinical brain volumetric analysis and explicitly promising

  17. HAWC Timing Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Huentemeyer, Petra; Dingus, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Experiment is a second-generation highsensitivity gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector that builds on the experience and technology of the Milagro observatory. Like Milagro, HAWC utilizes the water Cherenkov technique to measure extensive air showers. Instead of a pond filled with water (as in Milagro) an array of closely packed water tanks is used. The event direction will be reconstructed using the times when the PMTs in each tank are triggered. Therefore, the timing calibration will be crucial for reaching an angular resolution as low as 0.25 degrees.We propose to use a laser calibration system, patterned after the calibration system in Milagro. Like Milagro, the HAWC optical calibration system will use ~1 ns laser light pulses. Unlike Milagro, the PMTs are optically isolated and require their own optical fiber calibration. For HAWC the laser light pulses will be directed through a series of optical fan-outs and fibers to illuminate the PMTs in approximately one half o...

  18. On the calibration of polarimetric Thomson scattering by Raman polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-12-01

    Polarimetric Thomson scattering (TS) is an alternative method for the analysis of Thomson scattering spectra in which the plasma temperature T e is determined from the depolarization of the TS radiation. This is a relativistic effect and therefore the technique is suitable only for very hot plasmas (T e  >  10 keV) such as those of ITER. The practical implementation of polarimetric TS requires a method to calibrate the polarimetric response of the collection optics carrying the TS light to the detection system, and in particular to measure the additional depolarization of the TS radiation introduced by the plasma-exposed first mirror. Rotational Raman scattering of laser light from diatomic gases such as H2, D2, N2 and O2 can provide a radiation source of predictable intensity and polarization state from a well-defined volume inside the vacuum vessel and is therefore suitable for these calibrations. In this paper we discuss Raman polarimetry as a technique for the calibration of a hypothetical polarimetric TS system operating in the same conditions of the ITER core TS system and suggest two calibration methods for the measurement of the additional depolarization introduced by the plasma-exposed first mirror, and in general for calibrating the polarimetric response of the detection system.

  19. LOFAR facet calibration

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Hardcastle, M J; Shimwell, T W; Rafferty, D A; Sabater, J; Heald, G; Sridhar, S S; Dijkema, T J; Brunetti, G; Brüggen, M; Andrade-Santos, F; Ogrean, G A; Röttgering, H J A; Dawson, W A; Forman, W R; de Gasperin, F; Jones, C; Miley, G K; Rudnick, L; Sarazin, C L; Bonafede, A; Best, P N; Bîrzan, L; Cassano, R; Chyży, K T; Croston, J H; Ensslin, T; Ferrari, C; Hoeft, M; Horellou, C; Jarvis, M J; Kraft, R P; Mevius, M; Intema, H T; Murray, S S; Orrú, E; Pizzo, R; Simionescu, A; Stroe, A; van der Tol, S; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    LOFAR, the Low-Frequency Array, is a powerful new radio telescope operating between 10 and 240 MHz. LOFAR allows detailed sensitive high-resolution studies of the low-frequency radio sky. At the same time LOFAR also provides excellent short baseline coverage to map diffuse extended emission. However, producing high-quality deep images is challenging due to the presence of direction dependent calibration errors, caused by imperfect knowledge of the station beam shapes and the ionosphere. Furthermore, the large data volume and presence of station clock errors present additional difficulties. In this paper we present a new calibration scheme, which we name facet calibration, to obtain deep high-resolution LOFAR High Band Antenna images using the Dutch part of the array. This scheme solves and corrects the direction dependent errors in a number of facets that cover the observed field of view. Facet calibration provides close to thermal noise limited images for a typical 8 hr observing run at $\\sim$ 5arcsec resolu...

  20. 浅谈全自动凯氏定氮仪的的校准及维护%The Calibration Technique and Maintaining for Automatic Kjeldahl Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施江焕; 王维峰; 余善成

    2012-01-01

    旨在统一全自动凯氏定氮仪的校准方法,本文从仪器的工作原理及结构入手,对该类仪器提出了检测限、测量线性、回收率、精密度等性能评价参数,规范了校准方法,分析了仪器常见的故障及排除方法,校准及维护方法科学合理且可操作性强,有力保证了测量数据的准确性、溯源性,对计量检定机构开展校准工作及今后规程的制定提供了参考。%For unifying the calibration method of automatic Kjeldahl analyzer,combining with the working principle and structure of the instrument,this paper proposes performance evaluation parameters including the detection limit,measuring linearity,recovery,precision and standardized calibration method,and analysis common faults and troubleshooting.The calibration and maintenance method is scientifically feasible which could provide some guidance on the measurement of calibration and formulation of verification regulation for Metrological verification institutions to effectively ensure the accuracy and traceability of the measurement data.

  1. Application of Multivariate Calibration Techniques to Simultaneous Spectrophotometric Determination of Copper and Iron Using 1-(2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphthol in AOT Micellar Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KARIM-NEZHAD Ghasem; SAGHATFOROUSH Lotfali; ERSHAD Sohrab; BAHRAMI Kokab

    2008-01-01

    Multivariate calibration models(PCR and PLS)were developed for simultaneous determination of Fe(Ⅲand Cu(Ⅱ)with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and AOT as chromogenic reagent and micellizing agent,respectively.In the presence of AOT the spectrum of Fe(Ⅲ)-PAN complex was shifted to higher wavelength and the overlapping with Cu-PAN spectrum decreased.It seems that this anionic surfactant enters the structure of the Fe-PAN complex to cause a shift in the absorption spectrum of it.The parameters controlling behavior of the systems were investigated and optimum conditions were selected.Sixteen ternary mixtures were selected as the calibration set.To select the number of factors in PCR and PLS algorithms,a cross validation method,leaving out one sample at a time,was employed.The calibration models were validated with 8 synthetic mixtures containing the metal ions in different proportions that were randomly designed.The best calibration model was obtained by using PLS regression.The method was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of copper and iron in biological samples.

  2. Application of the digital volume correlation technique for the measurement of displacement and strain fields in bone: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bryant C; Perilli, Egon; Reynolds, Karen J

    2014-03-21

    Digital volume correlation (DVC) provides experimental measurements of displacements and strains throughout the interior of porous materials such as trabecular bone. It can provide full-field continuum- and tissue-level measurements, desirable for validation of finite element models, by comparing image volumes from subsequent µCT scans of a sample in unloaded and loaded states. Since the first application of DVC for measurement of strain in bone tissue, subsequent reports of its application to trabecular bone cores up to whole bones have appeared within the literature. An "optimal" set of procedures capable of precise and accurate measurements of strain, however, still remains unclear, and a systematic review focussing explicitly on the increasing number of DVC algorithms applied to bone or structurally similar materials is currently unavailable. This review investigates the effects of individual parameters reported within individual studies, allowing to make recommendations for suggesting algorithms capable of achieving high accuracy and precision in displacement and strain measurements. These recommendations suggest use of subsets that are sufficiently large to encompass unique datasets (e.g. subsets of 500 µm edge length when applied to human trabecular bone cores, such as cores 10mm in height and 5mm in diameter, scanned at 15 µm voxel size), a shape function that uses full affine transformations (translation, rotation, normal strain and shear strain), the robust normalized cross-correlation coefficient objective function, and high-order interpolation schemes. As these employ computationally burdensome algorithms, researchers need to determine whether they have the necessary computational resources or time to adopt such strategies. As each algorithm is suitable for parallel programming however, the adoption of high precision techniques may become more prevalent in the future.

  3. Radio Interferometric Calibration Using The SAGE Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, S; Zaroubi, S; de Bruyn, A G; Koopmans, L V E; Noordam, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the new generation of radio synthesis arrays such as LOFAR and SKA is to achieve much higher sensitivity, resolution and frequency coverage than what is available now. To accomplish this goal, the accuracy of the calibration techniques used is of considerable importance. Moreover, since these telescopes produce huge amounts of data, speed of convergence of calibration is a major bottleneck. The errors in calibration are due to system noise (sky and instrumental) as well as the estimation errors introduced by the calibration technique itself, which we call "solver noise". We define solver noise as the "distance" between the optimal solution, the true value of the unknowns corrupted by the system noise, and the solution obtained by calibration. We present the Space Alternating Generalized Expectation Maximization (SAGE) calibration technique, which is a modification of the Expectation Maximization algorithm, and compare its performance with the traditional Least Squares calibration based on the level...

  4. Non-linear calibration models for near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Wangdong; Nørgaard, Lars; Mørup, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Different calibration techniques are available for spectroscopic applications that show nonlinear behavior. This comprehensive comparative study presents a comparison of different nonlinear calibration techniques: kernel PLS (KPLS), support vector machines (SVM), least-squares SVM (LS-SVM), relev...

  5. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  6. Assessing high altitude glacier thickness, volume and area changes using field, GIS and remote sensing techniques: the case of Nevado Coropuna (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Peduzzi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Higher temperatures and changes in precipitation patterns have induced an acute decrease in Andean glaciers, thus leading to additional stress on water supply. To adapt to climate changes, local governments need information on the rate of glacier area and volume losses and on current ice thickness. Remote sensing analyses of Coropuna glacier (Peru delineate an acute glaciated area decline between 1955 and 2008. We tested how volume changes can be estimated with remote sensing and GIS techniques using digital elevation models derived from both topographic maps and satellite images. Ice thickness was measured in 2004 using a Ground Penetrating Radar coupled with a Ground Positioning System during a field expedition. It provided profiles of ice thickness on different slopes, orientations and altitudes. These were used to model the current glacier volume using Geographical Information System and statistical multiple regression techniques. The results revealed a significant glacier volume loss; however the uncertainty is higher than the measured volume loss. We also provided an estimate of the remaining volume. The field study provided the scientific evidence needed by COPASA, a local Peruvian NGO, and GTZ, the German international cooperation agency, in order to alert local governments and communities and guide them in adopting new climate change adaptation policies.

  7. Tectonic calibrations in molecular dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ullasa KODANDARAMAIAH

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dating techniques require the use of calibrations, which are usually fossil or geological vicariance-based.Fossil calibrations have been criticised because they result only in minimum age estimates. Based on a historical biogeographic perspective, Ⅰ suggest that vicariance-based calibrations are more dangerous. Almost all analytical methods in historical biogeography are strongly biased towards inferring vicariance, hence vicariance identified through such methods is unreliable. Other studies, especially of groups found on Gondwanan fragments, have simply assumed vicariance. Although it was previously believed that vicariance was the predominant mode of speciation, mounting evidence now indicates that speciation by dispersal is common, dominating vicariance in several groups. Moreover, the possibility of speciation having occurred before the said geological event cannot be precluded. Thus, geological calibrations can under- or overestimate times, whereas fossil calibrations always result in minimum estimates. Another major drawback of vicariant calibrations is the problem of circular reasoning when the resulting estimates are used to infer ages of biogeographic events. Ⅰ argue that fossil-based dating is a superior alternative to vicariance, primarily because the strongest assumption in the latter, that speciation was caused by the said geological process, is more often than not the most tenuous. When authors prefer to use a combination of fossil and vicariant calibrations, one suggestion is to report results both with and without inclusion of the geological constraints. Relying solely on vicariant calibrations should be strictly avoided.

  8. Beam Imaging and Luminosity Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Klute, Markus; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a method to reconstruct two-dimensional proton bunch densities using vertex distributions accumulated during LHC beam-beam scans. The $x$-$y$ correlations in the beam shapes are studied and an alternative luminosity calibration technique is introduced. We demonstrate the method on simulated beam-beam scans and estimate the uncertainty on the luminosity calibration associated to the beam-shape reconstruction to be below 1\\%.

  9. DebrisInterMixing-2.3: a finite volume solver for three-dimensional debris-flow simulations with two calibration parameters - Part 1: Model description

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Boetticher, Albrecht; Turowski, Jens M.; McArdell, Brian W.; Rickenmann, Dieter; Kirchner, James W.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we present a three-dimensional fluid dynamic solver that simulates debris flows as a mixture of two fluids (a Coulomb viscoplastic model of the gravel mixed with a Herschel-Bulkley representation of the fine material suspension) in combination with an additional unmixed phase representing the air and the free surface. We link all rheological parameters to the material composition, i.e., to water content, clay content, and mineral composition, content of sand and gravel, and the gravel's friction angle; the user must specify only two free model parameters. The volume-of-fluid (VoF) approach is used to combine the mixed phase and the air phase into a single cell-averaged Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible flow, based on code adapted from standard solvers of the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. This effectively single-phase mixture VoF method saves computational costs compared to the more sophisticated drag-force-based multiphase models. Thus, complex three-dimensional flow structures can be simulated while accounting for the pressure- and shear-rate-dependent rheology.

  10. Revision, calibration, and application of the volume method to evaluate the geothermal potential of some recent volcanic areas of Latium, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doveri, Marco; Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella [Institute of Geosciences and Georesources, CNR, Area della Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Marini, Luigi [Laboratory of Geochemistry, Dip.Te.Ris., University of Genova, Corso Europa 26, I-16132 Genova (Italy); Institute of Geosciences and Georesources, CNR, Area della Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    The volume method is used to evaluate the productive potential of unexploited and minimally exploited geothermal fields. The distribution of P{sub CO2} in shallow groundwaters delimits the geothermal fields. This approach is substantiated by the good correspondence between zones of high CO{sub 2} flux, and the areal extension of explored geothermal systems of high enthalpy (Monte Amiata and Latera), medium enthalpy (Torre Alfina) and low enthalpy (Viterbo). Based on the data available for geothermal fields either under exploitation or investigated by long-term production tests, a specific productivity of 40 t h{sup -1} km{sup -3} is assumed. The total potential productivity for the recent volcanic areas of Latium is about 28 x 10{sup 3} t h{sup -1}, with 75% from low-enthalpy geothermal fields, 17% from medium-enthalpy systems, and 8% from high-enthalpy reservoirs. The total extractable thermal power is estimated to be 2220-2920 MW, 49-53% from low-enthalpy geothermal fields, 28-32% from medium-enthalpy systems, and 19-20% from high-enthalpy reservoirs. (author)

  11. The Compositional Legacy : Significant, contemporary, compositional techniques as lateral drivers to new creativity, evidenced within a substantial portfolio of original compositions : Volume 1 of 2 volumes

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The thesis cites the identification of significant, contemporary, compositional techniques and their use as lateral drivers in developing new creativity. The process involves the preliminary definition of a position of contributory perspective and thus, of a standpoint and outlook which guides the subsequent re-interpretations, transformations, fusions and manipulations of the selected techniques. The consequent explorations, shaped by new developments, current context, practic...

  12. The measurement of peripheral blood volume reactions to tilt test by the electrical impedance technique after exercise in athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Popov, S. G.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Vikulov, A. D.

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated the distribution of peripheral blood volumes in different regions of the body in response to the tilt-test in endurance trained athletes after aerobic exercise. Distribution of peripheral blood volumes (ml/beat) simultaneously in six regions of the body (two legs, two hands, abdomen, neck and ECG) was assessed in response to the tilt-test using the impedance method (the impedance change rate (dZ/dT). Before and after exercise session cardiac stroke (CSV) and blood volumes in legs, arms and neck were higher in athletes both in lying and standing positions. Before exercise the increase of heart rate and the decrease of a neck blood volume in response to tilting was lower (p blood volumes was higher (pblood volumes were similar. Also, the neck blood volumes as percentage of CSV (%/CSV) did not change in the control but increased in athletes (p exercise (mean HR = 156±8 beat/min, duration 30 min) blood volumes in neck and arms in response to the tilting were reduced equally, but abdomen (pblood volumes (p blood flow (%/CSV) did not change in athletes but decreased in control (pexercise. The data demonstrate greater orthostatic tolerance in athletes both before and after exercise during fatigue which is due to effective distribution of blood flows aimed at maintaining cerebral blood flow.

  13. Cross-Wire Calibration for Freehand 3D Ultrasonography: Measurement and Numerical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D freehand ultrasound is an imaging technique, which is graduallyfinding clinical applications. A position sensor is attached to aconventional ultrasound probe, so that B-scans are acquired along withtheir relative locations. This allows the B-scans to be inserted into a3D regular voxel array, which can then be visualized usingarbitrary-plane slicing, and volume or surface rendering. A keyrequirement for correct reconstruction is the calibration: determiningthe position and orientation of the B-scans with respect to theposition sensor's receiver. Following calibration, interpolation in theset of irregularly spaced B-scans is required to reconstruct aregular-voxel array. This text describes a freehand measurement of 2Dultrasonic data, an approach to the calibration problem and severalnumerical issues concerned with the calibration and reconstruction.

  14. Respiratory inductance plethysmography in healthy infants: a comparison of three calibration methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, K A; Thompson, J R; Hallinan, H M; Beardsmore, C S

    2000-12-01

    Respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) measures respiration from body surface movements. Various techniques have been proposed for calibration in order that RIP may be used quantitatively. These include calculation of the proportionality constant of ribcage to abdominal volume change (K). The aims of this study were to 1) establish whether a fixed value of K could be used for calibration, and 2) compare this technique with multiple linear regression (MLR) and qualitative diagnostic calibration (QDC) in normal healthy infants. Recordings of pneumotachograph (PNT) flow and RIP were made during quiet (QS) and active sleep (AS) in 12 infants. The first 5 min in a sleep state were used to calculate calibration factors, which were applied to subsequent validation data. The absolute percentage error between RIP and PNT tidal volumes was calculated. The percentage error was similar over a wide range of K during QS. However, K became more critical when breathing was out of phase. A standard for K of 0.5 was chosen. There was good agreement between calibration methods during QS and AS. In the first minute following calibration during QS, the mean absolute errors were 3.5, 4.1 and 5.3% for MLR, QDC and fixed K respectively. The equivalent errors in AS were 11.5, 13.1 and 13.7% respectively. The simple fixed ratio method can be used to measure tidal volume with similar accuracy to multiple linear regression and qualitative diagnostic calibration in healthy unsedated sleeping infants, although it remains to be validated in other groups of infants, such as those with respiratory disease.

  15. Calibration of the SNO+ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneira, J.; Falk, E.; Leming, E.; Peeters, S.; SNO+ collaboration.

    2017-09-01

    The main goal of the SNO+ experiment is to perform a low-background and high-isotope-mass search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, employing 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator loaded with tellurium, in its initial phase at 0.5% by mass for a total mass of 1330 kg of 130Te. The SNO+ physics program includes also measurements of geo- and reactor neutrinos, supernova and solar neutrinos. Calibrations are an essential component of the SNO+ data-taking and analysis plan. The achievement of the physics goals requires both an extensive and regular calibration. This serves several goals: the measurement of several detector parameters, the validation of the simulation model and the constraint of systematic uncertainties on the reconstruction and particle identification algorithms. SNO+ faces stringent radiopurity requirements which, in turn, largely determine the materials selection, sealing and overall design of both the sources and deployment systems. In fact, to avoid frequent access to the inner volume of the detector, several permanent optical calibration systems have been developed and installed outside that volume. At the same time, the calibration source internal deployment system was re-designed as a fully sealed system, with more stringent material selection, but following the same working principle as the system used in SNO. This poster described the overall SNO+ calibration strategy, discussed the several new and innovative sources, both optical and radioactive, and covered the developments on source deployment systems.

  16. Inter-laboratory calibration of natural gas round robins for δ2H and δ13C using off-line and on-line techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jinxing; Xia, Xinyu; Li, Zhisheng; Coleman, Dennis D.; Dias, Robert F.; Gao, Ling; Li, Jian; Deev, Andrei; Li, Jin; Dessort, Daniel; Duclerc, Dominique; Li, Liwu; Liu, Jinzhong; Schloemer, Stefan; Zhang, Wenlong; Ni, Yunyan; Hu, Guoyi; Wang, Xiaobo; Tang, Yongchun

    2012-01-01

    Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of three natural gas round robins were calibrated by ten laboratories carrying out more than 800 measurements including both on-line and off-line methods. Two-point calibrations were performed with international measurement standards for hydrogen isotope ratios (VSMOW and SLAP) and carbon isotope ratios (NBS 19 and L-SVEC CO2). The consensus δ13C values and uncertainties were derived from the Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) based on off-line measurements; the consensus δ2H values and uncertainties were derived from MLE of both off-line and on-line measurements, taking the bias of on-line measurements into account. The calibrated consensus values in ‰ relative to VSMOW and VPDB are: NG1 (coal-related gas): Methane: δ2HVSMOW = − 185.1‰ ± 1.2‰, δ13CVPDB = − 34.18‰ ± 0.10‰ Ethane: δ2HVSMOW = − 156.3‰ ± 1.8‰, δ13CVPDB = − 24.66‰ ± 0.11‰ Propane: δ2HVSMOW = − 143.6‰ ± 3.3‰, δ13CVPDB = − 22.21‰ ± 0.11‰ i-Butane: δ13CVPDB = − 21.62‰ ± 0.12‰ n-Butane: δ13CVPDB = − 21.74‰ ± 0.13‰ CO2: δ13CVPDB = − 5.00‰ ± 0.12‰ NG2 (biogas): Methane: δ2HVSMOW = − 237.0‰ ± 1.2‰, δ13CVPDB = − 68.89‰ ± 0.12‰ NG3 (oil-related gas): Methane: δ2HVSMOW = − 167.6‰ ± 1.0‰, δ13CVPDB = − 43.61‰ ± 0.09‰ Ethane: δ2HVSMOW = − 164.1‰ ± 2.4‰, δ13CVPDB = − 40.24‰ ± 0.10‰ Propane: δ2HVSMOW = − 138.4‰ ± 3.0‰, δ13CVPDB = − 33.79‰ ± 0.09‰ All of the assigned values are traceable to the international carbon isotope standard of VPDB and hydrogen isotope standard of VSMOW.

  17. Clustered Calibration: An Improvement to Radio Interferometric Direction Dependent Self-Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, Sanaz; Zaroubi, Saleem

    2013-01-01

    The new generation of radio synthesis arrays, such as LOFAR and SKA, have been designed to surpass existing arrays in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution and frequency coverage. This evolution has led to the development of advanced calibration techniques that ensure the delivery of accurate results at the lowest possible computational cost. However, the performance of such calibration techniques is still limited by the compact, bright sources in the sky, used as calibrators. It is important to have a bright enough source that is well distinguished from the background noise level in order to achieve satisfactory results in calibration. We present "clustered calibration" as a modification to traditional radio interferometric calibration, in order to accommodate faint sources that are almost below the background noise level into the calibration process. The main idea is to employ the information of the bright sources' measured signals as an aid to calibrate fainter sources that are nearby the bright sources...

  18. Photometric Calibrations for the SIRTF Infrared Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, P W; Herter, T L; Armus, L; Houck, J; Sloan, G

    2002-01-01

    The SIRTF InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) is faced with many of the same calibration challenges that were experienced in the ISO SWS calibration program, owing to similar wavelength coverage and overlapping spectral resolutions of the two instruments. Although the IRS is up to ~300 times more sensitive and without moving parts, imposing unique calibration challenges on their own, an overlap in photometric sensitivities of the high-resolution modules with the SWS grating sections allows lessons, resources, and certain techniques from the SWS calibration programs to be exploited. We explain where these apply in an overview of the IRS photometric calibration planning.

  19. Joint international study for the calibration of traffic conflict techniques : background paper ICTCT-Meeting, Copenhagen, 25-27 May 1983.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S.

    1983-01-01

    Conflict observation is a way of looking at the insecurity in traffic of particular locations or situations in traffic. The use of traffic conflicts techniques in safety analysis is completely different from the use of the techniques as a surrogate measure of the amount of the traffic safety.

  20. Validation of automatic target volume definition as demonstrated for 11C-choline PET/CT of human prostate cancer using multi-modality fusion techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R; Wood, David; Khan, Asra; Shah, Rajal; Hussain, Hero; Siddiqui, Javed; Seo, Jongbum; Chenevert, Thomas; Piert, Morand

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is actively investigated to aid in target volume definition for radiation therapy. The objectives of this study were to apply an automatic computer algorithm to compute target volumes and to validate the algorithm using histologic data from real human prostate cancer. Various modalities for prostate imaging were performed. In vivo imaging included T2 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and (11)C-choline PET. Ex vivo imaging included 3-T magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and block face photos of the prostate specimen. A novel registration method based on mutual information and thin-plate splines was applied to all modalities. Once PET is registered with histology, a voxel-by-voxel comparison between PET and histology is possible. A thresholding technique based on various fractions of the maximum standardized uptake value in the tumor was applied, and the respective computed threshold volume on PET was compared with histologic truth. Sixteen patients whose primary tumor volumes ranged from 1.2 to 12.6 cm(3) were tested. PET has low spatial resolution, so only tumors > 4 cm(3) were considered. Four cases met this criterion. A threshold value of 60% of the (11)C-choline maximum standardized uptake value resulted in the highest volume overlap between threshold volume on PET and histology. Medial axis distances between threshold volume on PET and histology showed a mean error of 7.7 +/- 5.2 mm. This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating for the first time that histology-guided thresholding on PET can delineate tumor volumes in real human prostate cancer. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Is your system calibrated? MRI gradient system calibration for pre-clinical, high-resolution imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O'Callaghan

    Full Text Available High-field, pre-clinical MRI systems are widely used to characterise tissue structure and volume in small animals, using high resolution imaging. Both applications rely heavily on the consistent, accurate calibration of imaging gradients, yet such calibrations are typically only performed during maintenance sessions by equipment manufacturers, and potentially with acceptance limits that are inadequate for phenotyping. To overcome this difficulty, we present a protocol for gradient calibration quality assurance testing, based on a 3D-printed, open source, structural phantom that can be customised to the dimensions of individual scanners and RF coils. In trials on a 9.4 T system, the gradient scaling errors were reduced by an order of magnitude, and displacements of greater than 100 µm, caused by gradient non-linearity, were corrected using a post-processing technique. The step-by-step protocol can be integrated into routine pre-clinical MRI quality assurance to measure and correct for these errors. We suggest that this type of quality assurance is essential for robust pre-clinical MRI experiments that rely on accurate imaging gradients, including small animal phenotyping and diffusion MR.

  2. TOF PET offset calibration from clinical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, M. E.; Karp, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a timing calibration technique for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) that eliminates the need for a specialized data acquisition. By eliminating the acquisition, the process becomes fully automated, and can be performed with any clinical data set and whenever computing resources are available. It also can be applied retroactively to datasets for which a TOF offset calibration is missing or suboptimal. Since the method can use an arbitrary data set to perform a calibration prior to a TOF reconstruction, possibly of the same data set, one also can view this as reconstruction from uncalibrated data. We present a performance comparison with existing calibration techniques.

  3. Cross-calibration of interferometric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Generation of digital elevation models from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is a well established technique. Achieving a high geometric fidelity calls for a calibration accounting for inaccurate navigation data and system parameters as well as system imperfections. Fully......, but not necessarily from map to map. It is based on natural distributed targets for which no a priori knowledge is needed. In particular, no DEM is required as in calibration techniques based on dedicated calibration scenes. To achieve absolute calibration, i.e. elimination of a constant elevation offset, a single...

  4. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  5. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  6. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  7. Mass flow-rate control unit to calibrate hot-wire sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, F.; Uensal, B. [FMP Technology GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Haddad, K. [FMP Technology GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM-Erlangen, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Erlangen (Germany); Al-Salaymeh, A.; Eid, Shadi [University of Jordan, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Amman (Jordan)

    2008-02-15

    Hot-wire anemometry is a measuring technique that is widely employed in fluid mechanics research to study the velocity fields of gas flows. It is general practice to calibrate hot-wire sensors against velocity. Calibrations are usually carried out under atmospheric pressure conditions and these suggest that the wire is sensitive to the instantaneous local volume flow rate. It is pointed out, however, that hot wires are sensitive to the instantaneous local mass flow rate and, of course, also to the gas heat conductivity. To calibrate hot wires with respect to mass flow rates per unit area, i.e., with respect to ({rho}U), requires special calibration test rigs. Such a device is described and its application is summarized within the ({rho}U) range 0.1-25 kg/m{sup 2} s. Calibrations are shown to yield the same hot-wire response curves for density variations in the range 1-7 kg/m{sup 3}. The application of the calibrated wires to measure pulsating mass flows is demonstrated, and suggestions are made for carrying out extensive calibrations to yield the ({rho}U) wire response as a basis for advanced fluid mechanics research on ({rho}U) data in density-varying flows. (orig.)

  8. Resolution by polarographic techniques of the ternary mixture of captan, captafol and folpet by using PLS calibration and artificial neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberteau, A; Galeano, T; Mora, N; Salinas, F; Ortíz, J M; Viré, J C

    2001-09-01

    The simultaneous polarographic determination of the ternary mixture of captan-captafol and folpet is studied. The polarographic signals of these compounds in their mixture show a high overlapping. For this reason different chemometric methods such as PLS, PCR and artificial neuronal network (ANN) have been utilized for the simultaneous determination of these compounds in mixtures. The calibration model is built from solutions containing river water of known pesticide concentrations and the signals obtained by Sampled DC and DPP (differential pulse polarography) have been used. The analysis of both synthetic and real samples (river water) has been carried out by PLS with satisfactory results in most cases. It is possible to determine 0.25 ppm of each pesticide in river water samples after a preconcentration step by extraction into diethyl ether. ANN has also been applied to improve the results obtained by the PLS tool when the sampled DC current is recorded or when liquid-solid extraction with C18 cartridges is performed.

  9. Application of Imaging Techniques to Mechanics of Materials and Structures, Volume 4 : Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This the fourth volume of six from the Annual Conference of the Society for Experimental Mechanics, 2010, brings together 58 chapters on Application of Imaging Techniques to Mechanics of Materials and Structure. It presents findings from experimental and computational investigations involving a range of imaging techniques including Recovery of 3D Stress Intensity Factors From Surface Full-field Measurements, Identification of Cohesive-zone Laws From Crack-tip Deformation Fields, Application of High Speed Digital Image Correlation for Vibration Mode Shape Analysis, Characterization of Aluminum Alloys Using a 3D Full Field Measurement, and Low Strain Rate Measurements on Explosives Using DIC.

  10. Assessing high altitude glacier volume change and remaining thickness using cost-efficient scientific techniques: the case of Nevado Coropuna (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Peduzzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Higher temperature and change in precipitation patterns have induced an acute decrease in Andean glaciers, thus leading to an additional stress on water supply. To adapt to climate changes, local governments need information on the rate of glacier volume losses and on current ice thickness. We show how volume changes can be accurately estimated in remote areas using readily available low-cost digital elevation models derived from both topographic maps and satellite images. They were used for estimating the volume changes over the Coropuna glacier (Peru from 1955 to 2002. Ice thickness was measured in 2004 using a georadar coupled with Ground Positioning System during a field expedition. It provided profiles of ice thickness on different slopes, orientations and altitudes. These were used to model the current glacier volume using Geographical Information System and statistical multiple regressions techniques. Computers were modified to resists to high altitude (6500 m temperatures and low pressure conditions. The results delineated a significant glacier volume loss and provided an estimate of the remaining ice. It provided the scientific evidence needed by local Peruvian NGO, COPASA, and the German Cooperation Program in order to alert local governments and communities and for enforcing new climate change adaptation policies.

  11. Calibration of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Gaug, Markus; Berge, David; Reyes, Raquel de los; Doro, Michele; Foerster, Andreas; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Parsons, Dan; van Eldik, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The construction of the Cherenkov Telescope Array is expected to start soon. We will present the baseline methods and their extensions currently foreseen to calibrate the observatory. These are bound to achieve the strong requirements on allowed systematic uncertainties for the reconstructed gamma-ray energy and flux scales, as well as on the pointing resolution, and on the overall duty cycle of the observatory. Onsite calibration activities are designed to include a robust and efficient calibration of the telescope cameras, and various methods and instruments to achieve calibration of the overall optical throughput of each telescope, leading to both inter-telescope calibration and an absolute calibration of the entire observatory. One important aspect of the onsite calibration is a correct understanding of the atmosphere above the telescopes, which constitutes the calorimeter of this detection technique. It is planned to be constantly monitored with state-of-the-art instruments to obtain a full molecular and...

  12. Surgeons’ Volume-Outcome Relationship for Lobectomies and Wedge Resections for Cancer Using Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy David

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of surgeons’ volume on outcomes in lung surgery: lobectomies and wedge resections. Additionally, the effect of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS on cost, utilization, and adverse events was analyzed. The Premier Hospital Database was the data source for this analysis. Eligible patients were those of any age undergoing lobectomy or wedge resection using VATS for cancer treatment. Volume was represented by the aggregate experience level of the surgeon in a six-month window before each surgery. A positive volume-outcome relationship was found with some notable features. The relationship is stronger for cost and utilization outcomes than for adverse events; for thoracic surgeons as opposed to other surgeons; for VATS lobectomies rather than VATS wedge resections. While there was a reduction in cost and resource utilization with greater experience in VATS, these outcomes were not associated with greater experience in open procedures.

  13. Intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A M D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a working standard for intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in most of nuclear medicine facilities for the determination of the activity of radionuclides administered to patients in specific examinations or therapeutic procedures. A commercial dose calibrator, a set of standard radioactive sources, and syringes, vials and ampoules with radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine were utilized in this work. The commercial dose calibrator was calibrated for radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as linearity response and variation response with the source volume at a constant source activity concentration were performed. This instrument may be used as a reference system for intercomparison and calibration of other activity meters, as a method of quality control of dose calibrators utilized in nuclear medicine facilities.

  14. A new technique for measuring the leakage current in Silicon Drift Detector based X-ray spectrometer—implications for on-board calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, M.; Acharya, Y. B.; Vadawale, S. V.; Mazumdar, H. S.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we report a new technique of measuring the leakage current in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) and propose to use this technique as a tool for on-board estimation of the radiation damage to the SDD employed in space-borne X-ray spectrometers. The leakage current of a silicon based detector varies with the detector operating temperature and increases with the radiation dose encountered by the detector in the space environment. The proposed technique to measure detector leakage current involves measurement of the reset frequency of the reset type charge sensitive pre-amplifier when the feedback capacitor is charged only due to the detector leakage current. Using this technique, the leakage current is measured for large samples of SDDs having two different active areas of 40 mm2 and 109 mm2 with 450 micron thick silicon. These measurements are carried out in the temperature range of -50°C to 20°C. At each step energy resolution is measured for all SDDs using Fe-55 X-ray source and shown that the energy resolution varies systematically with the leakage current irrespective of the difference among the detectors of the same as well as different sizes. Thus by measuring the leakage current on-board, it would be possible to estimate the time dependent performance degradation of the SDD based X-ray spectrometer. This can be particularly useful in case where large numbers of SDD are used.

  15. Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome associated with hypovolemic shock and compartment syndrome. Use of transpulmonary thermodilution technique for volume management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS is a rare disorder characterized by increased capillary hyperpermeability leading to hypovolemic shock due to a markedly increased shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. Hemoconcentration, hypoalbuminemia and a monoclonal gammopathy are characteristic laboratory findings. Here we present a patient who suffered from SCLS with hypovolemic shock and compartment syndrome of both lower legs and thighs. Volume and catecholamine management was guided using transpulmonary thermodilution. Extended hemodynamic monitoring for volume and catecholamine management as well as monitoring of muscle compartment pressure is of crucial importance in SCLS patients.

  16. Proposed low-energy absolute calibration of nuclear recoils in a dual-phase noble element TPC using D-D neutron scattering kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbus, J. R.; Rhyne, C. A.; Malling, D. C.; Genecov, M.; Ghosh, S.; Moskowitz, A. G.; Chan, S.; Chapman, J. J.; de Viveiros, L.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Huang, D. Q.; Pangilinan, M.; Taylor, W. C.; Gaitskell, R. J.

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new technique for the calibration of nuclear recoils in large noble element dual-phase time projection chambers used to search for WIMP dark matter in the local galactic halo. This technique provides an in situ measurement of the low-energy nuclear recoil response of the target media using the measured scattering angle between multiple neutron interactions within the detector volume. The low-energy reach and reduced systematics of this calibration have particular significance for the low-mass WIMP sensitivity of several leading dark matter experiments. Multiple strategies for improving this calibration technique are discussed, including the creation of a new type of quasi-monoenergetic neutron source with a minimum possible peak energy of 272 keV. We report results from a time-of-flight-based measurement of the neutron energy spectrum produced by an Adelphi Technology, Inc. DD108 neutron generator, confirming its suitability for the proposed nuclear recoil calibration.

  17. Proposed low-energy absolute calibration of nuclear recoils in a dual-phase noble element TPC using D-D neutron scattering kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Verbus, J R; Malling, D C; Genecov, M; Ghosh, S; Moskowitz, A G; Chan, S; Chapman, J J; de Viveiros, L; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Huang, D Q; Pangilinan, M; Taylor, W C; Gaitskell, R J

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new technique for the calibration of nuclear recoils in large noble element dual-phase time projection chambers used to search for WIMP dark matter in the local galactic halo. This technique provides an $\\textit{in situ}$ measurement of the low-energy nuclear recoil response of the target media using the measured scattering angle between multiple neutron interactions within the detector volume. The low-energy reach and reduced systematics of this calibration have particular significance for the low-mass WIMP sensitivity of several leading dark matter experiments. Multiple strategies for improving this calibration technique are discussed, including the creation of a new type of quasi-monoenergetic 272 keV neutron source. We report results from a time-of-flight based measurement of the neutron energy spectrum produced by an Adelphi Technology, Inc. DD108 neutron generator, confirming its suitability for the proposed nuclear recoil calibration.

  18. 重度肺气肿的内镜下肺减容治疗技术%Application of endoscopic lung volume reduction technique in severe emphysema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟晶; 郭述良; 贾晋伟; 李一诗

    2013-01-01

    慢性阻塞性肺病(chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases,COPD)在世界范围的发病率和死亡率占主要因素.COPD发展至重度肺气肿阶段时严重影响患者生活质量.内镜肺减容术(endoscopic lung volume reduction,ELVR)是通过支气管镜技术使过度充气的肺叶产生不张,疗效较传统的内科治疗更为确切,与外科肺减容术相比,ELVR以其微创,操作相对简单,并发症和死亡率降低等优点,引起了世界医学界的广泛研究.目前国内外研究较多的内镜下肺减容技术主要包括支气管内单向活瓣技术(one-way endobronchial valves,EBV)、气道旁路支架(airway bypass stents,ABS)、聚合物肺减容术(polymeric lung volume reduction,PLVR)、经支气管镜热蒸汽消融术(bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation,BTVA)和肺减容弹簧圈(lung volume reduction coil,LVRC)等5种.本文将就上述内镜肺减容技术作一综述.%Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.Once the disease develops into severe emphysema,it seriously affects the patients' life quality.Endoscopic lung volume reduction(ELVR) with bronchoscopic techniques to bring about atelectasis of the hyperinflated lobe has been developed and studied widely over the past decade,because it has a better clinical effect than the traditional medicine treatment.The techniques have the advantages of minimally invasive and simple with less complications and lower mortality compared to the open surgical approach.Nowadays the most commonly used ELVR techniques include one-way endobronchial valves (EBV),airway bypass stents (ABS),polymeric lung volume reduction (PLVR),bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation (BTVA) and lung volume reduction coil (LVRC).In this paper the ELVR techniques are reviewed.

  19. Proton Treatment Techniques for Posterior Fossa Tumors: Consequences for Linear Energy Transfer and Dose-Volume Parameters for the Brainstem and Organs at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M; Paganetti, Harald

    2017-02-01

    In proton therapy of posterior fossa tumors, at least partial inclusion of the brainstem in the target is necessary because of its proximity to the tumor and required margins. Additionally, the preferred beam geometry results in directing the field distal edge toward this critical structure, raising concerns for brainstem toxicity. Some treatment techniques place the beam's distal edge within the brainstem (dose-sparing techniques), and others avoid elevated linear energy transfer (LET) of the proton field by placing the distal edge beyond it (LET-sparing techniques). Hybrid approaches are also being used. We examine the dosimetric efficacy of these techniques, accounting for LET-dependent and dose-dependent variable relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) distributions. Six techniques were applied in ependymoma cases: (a) 3-field dose-sparing; (b) 3-field LET-sparing; (c) 2-field dose-sparing, wide angles; (d) 2-field LET-sparing, wide angles; (e) 2-field LET-sparing, steep angles; and (f) 2-field LET-sparing with feathered distal end. Monte Carlo calculated dose, LET, and RBE-weighted dose distributions were compared. Decreased LET values in the brainstem by LET-sparing techniques were accompanied by higher, not statistically significant, median dose: 53.6 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE), and 54.3 Gy(RBE) for techniques (b), (d), and (e) versus 52.1 Gy(RBE) for technique (a). Accounting for variable RBE distributions, the brainstem volume receiving at least 55 Gy(RBE) increased from 72.5% for technique (a) to 80.3% for (b) (Ptechnique (c) to 77.6% for (d) (Ptechniques compared with the corresponding dose-sparing (P=.03 and .004). Extending the proton range beyond the brainstem to reduce LET results in clinically comparable maximum radiobiologic effective dose to this sensitive structure. However this method significantly increasing the brainstem volume receiving RBE-weighted dose higher than 55 Gy(RBE) with possible consequences based on known dose-volume parameters

  20. AGARD Flight Test Technique Series. Volume 15. Introduction to Avionics Flight Test (Introduction aux Essais des Systemes D’armes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    features and thus angular. As a simplistic example, a the signal to noise characteristics of picket fence could be modeled with a the sensor can be...Volume Plans, by Anon., 1992. 12, 1980. 66. U. S. Navy Report No. 533, 54. Smith, Sidney L. and Mosier, Jane Anthropometry of Naval Aviators, N

  1. Calibration of radionuclides with decay trough beta emission or electron capture by liquid scintillation technique; Calibracao de radionuclideos que decaem por emissao beta ou por captura eletronica pela tecnica de cintilacao liquida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Jamir dos Santos

    2000-02-01

    In this work is reported a methodology a methodology for pure beta and electron capture radionuclides standardization, suing liquid scintillation technique. In this sense the CIEMAT/NIST method, recently utilized by international laboratories, was implemented and the lack in the Laboratorio Nacional das Radiacoes Ionizantes - LNMRI, of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, for adequate methodology to standardize this kind if radionuclides was filled, fact that was not present with alpha and gamma radionuclides. The implementation procedure evaluation was provided by concentration activity determination of the following radionuclides: {sup 14} C and {sup 90} Sr, pure beta emitters; {sup 55} Fe, electron capture decay; {sup 204} Tl, electron capture and beta decay and {sup 60} Co, beta-gamma emitter. In this way, a careful analysis of the implementation procedure with these radionuclides types, ranging on a broad energy spectral, was possible. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. Besides this intercomparisons, one was provided with a {sup 204} Tl solution, utilized in the international comparison recently promoted by BIPM, and another one with a {sup 60} C solution calibrated in LNMRI/CNEN previously by a relative calibration system, with a well type pressurized ionization chamber, and an absolute beta-gamma coincidence system, with a pill-box type proportional counter 4 {pi} geometry, coupled with a scintillator system with a sodium iodide cristal of 4x4 inches. The comparisons among LNMRI/CNEN results and the reference values, showed a small deviation of 1,32% for {sup 14} C, 0,40% for {sup 60} Co, 1,12% for {sup 55} Fe, 0,10% for {sup 90} Sr and 0,73% for {sup

  2. Spectral calibration for convex grating imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring target accurate spectrum. There are two spectral calibration types in essence, the wavelength scanning and characteristic line sampling. Only the calibrated pixel is used for the wavelength scanning methods and he spectral response function (SRF) is constructed by the calibrated pixel itself. The different wavelength can be generated by the monochromator. The SRF is constructed by adjacent pixels of the calibrated one for the characteristic line sampling methods. And the pixels are illuminated by the narrow spectrum line and the center wavelength of the spectral line is exactly known. The calibration result comes from scanning method is precise, but it takes much time and data to deal with. The wavelength scanning method cannot be used in field or space environment. The characteristic line sampling method is simple, but the calibration precision is not easy to confirm. The standard spectroscopic lamp is used to calibrate our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer which has Offner concentric structure and can supply high resolution and uniform spectral signal. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine the center position and the Full-Width-Half-Maximum(FWHM)of the characteristic spectrum line. The central wavelengths and FWHMs of spectral pixels are calibrated by cubic polynomial fitting. By setting a fitting error thresh hold and abandoning the maximum deviation point, an optimization calculation is achieved. The integrated calibration experiment equipment for spectral calibration is developed to enhance calibration efficiency. The spectral calibration result comes from spectral lamp method are verified by monochromator wavelength scanning calibration technique. The result shows that spectral calibration uncertainty of FWHM and center wavelength are both less than 0.08nm, or 5.2% of spectral FWHM.

  3. A finite volume approach to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element using local analytical solution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, A. [Atomic Energy Authority (AEA), Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center

    2014-11-15

    In this paper we implement the local analytical solution technique to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element. This method has shown to be very accurate in estimating the temperature field for axisymmetric problems even for coarse mesh. It is shown that this method reduces to the analytical solution for unidirectional heat transfer in the radial direction in homogeneous media. The technique is based on finding an analytical expression for the temperature field in the radial direction within each grid cell. This means that the temperature field in each cell is allowed to change in a nonlinear fashion along the radial direction. We compare this technique with the traditional finite volume technique and show that; with only few cells in the radial direction, this technique arrives at the mesh-independent solution quite accurately whereas it required denser mesh to arrive closer to this solution using traditional techniques. This method is proposed to the 1D codes that are currently being used to simulate thermalhydraulic characteristics of reactor systems. Furthermore, we also implement the experimental temperature field algorithm in which the governing equations are approximated for each cell as it would without extra manipulation to the governing equations. This technique is very simple and separates the physics from the solving part.

  4. Calibração da técnica de moiré aplicada a perfilometria de protótipos mecânicos Calibration method applied to a moiré technique in experiments of mechanical archetypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Seabra Gomes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A perfilometria é uma técnica amplamente utilizada na construção de mapas e gráficos de relevos aplicados a uma vasta área do conhecimento. Frente às necessidades de suprir a demanda da indústria e da área de desenvolvimento de protótipos quanto a técnicas não invasivas na investigação da superfície de materiais em geral, o presente trabalho buscou propor uma metodologia de calibração aplicada à técnica de moiré para investigações perfilométricas em protótipos mecânicos buscando baixos custos e flexibilidade. A técnica de moiré consiste na comparação de dois retículos periódicos, onde um segue o comportamento da superfície do objeto (retículo modelo - Rm e outro não está deformado, seguindo o comportamento de um plano de referência, (retículo de referência - Rr. A luz que passa entre os retículos se sobrepõe formando padrões de moiré ou franjas de moiré que se comportam como ondas senoidais. Nos ensaios de calibração, usou-se um cone de relevo conhecido para a determinação de uma constante de correção de mapas gerados digitalmente. Os ensaios realizados aplicaram a metodologia para a determinação do perfil de um mouse de computador e para a determinação da deformação de uma chapa metálica. A metodologia proposta para a calibração da técnica de moiré mostrouse capaz de realizar os mapeamentos, com resolução máxima na ordem de centésimos de milímetros, podendo então ser usada em aplicações com níveis de precisão inferiores a essa ordem.Profilometry is a measurement technique widely used in map and relief graphic construction, being applied to vast areas of knowledge. The aim of the present investigation was to introduce a calibration method applied to a moiré technique in experiments of mechanical archetypes, with low cost and flexibility, due to the need for supplying demands from both industry and mechanical archetype development for non-invasive techniques. The moir

  5. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; Schelfhout, J.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  6. Optical Tweezer Assembly and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    An Optical Tweezer, as the name implies, is a useful tool for precision manipulation of micro and nano scale objects. Using the principle of electromagnetic radiation pressure, an optical tweezer employs a tightly focused laser beam to trap and position objects of various shapes and sizes. These devices can trap micrometer and nanometer sized objects. An exciting possibility for optical tweezers is its future potential to manipulate and assemble micro and nano sized sensors. A typical optical tweezer makes use of the following components: laser, mirrors, lenses, a high quality microscope, stage, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, TV monitor and Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs). The laser wavelength employed is typically in the visible or infrared spectrum. The laser beam is directed via mirrors and lenses into the microscope. It is then tightly focused by a high magnification, high numerical aperture microscope objective into the sample slide, which is mounted on a translating stage. The sample slide contains a sealed, small volume of fluid that the objects are suspended in. The most common objects trapped by optical tweezers are dielectric spheres. When trapped, a sphere will literally snap into and center itself in the laser beam. The PSD s are mounted in such a way to receive the backscatter after the beam has passed through the trap. PSD s used with the Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) technique provide highly precise data. Most optical tweezers employ lasers with power levels ranging from 10 to 100 miliwatts. Typical forces exerted on trapped objects are in the pico-newton range. When PSDs are employed, object movement can be resolved on a nanometer scale in a time range of milliseconds. Such accuracy, however, can only by utilized by calibrating the optical tweezer. Fortunately, an optical tweezer can be modeled accurately as a simple spring. This allows Hook s Law to be used. My goal this summer at NASA Glenn Research Center is the assembly and

  7. Calibrating the MINERvA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, Joel [University of Florida, Gainesville FL, 32611 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The MINERvA experiment, located at Fermilab, will use the NuMI beam line for measuring neutrino-nucleus interaction rates with very high precision. In order to obtain the unprecedented precision MINERvA is capable of, sophisticated calibration techniques are applied both prior to installation and in situ.Calibration of PMT gains and scintillator response is discussed.

  8. Method for calibration of asymmetric jaws in hemi fields techniques and effects in clinical practice; Metodo para la calibracion de las mandibulas asimetricas en tecnicas de hemicampos y efectos en la practica clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Masgrau, V.; Sempau Roma, J.; Abella Cereigido, R.; Lopez Sanchez, M.; Perez Fernandez, M.; Gonzalez Leyba, M.; Artigues Pedrola, M.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a method improved very significantly the accuracy of calibration, providing a good homogeneity of the dose distribution in the area of union of fields. Also evaluates the effect that has this new calibration in clinical practice. (Author)

  9. Development of a community energy conservation program. Volume II. Energy saving techniques for use by local governments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-26

    This volume contains technical material related to community energy conservation programs, and supplements the organizational material in Volume I. It is in looseleaf format so that sections related to specific topics can be easily copied or transferred to individuals responsible for various sorts of conservation, such as carpooling programs, building improvements, and community outreach. Three technical chapters are included, discussing topics in the areas of: internal city and county operations; community powers and regulations, and outreach programs. In the first, the concern is with what the community can do to reduce energy use in its own operations, an effective first step in promoting comprehensive energy conservation. The second chapter analyzes ways that the police power and fiscal powers of the community can be used for energy conservation, through building codes, zoning, and similar measures. In the final chapter, ways to promote energy conservation in the community are discussed: programs include outreach to households and firms, carpool promotion, waste oil recycling, etc.

  10. The effects of section thickness on the estimation of liver volume by the Cavalieri principle using computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emirzeoglu, Mehmet [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey); Sahin, Bunyamin [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey)]. E-mail: bsahin@omu.edu.tr; Selcuk, Mustafa B. [Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey); Kaplan, Suleyman [Department of Histology and Embryology, Medical School, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun 55139 (Turkey)

    2005-12-15

    Estimation of liver volume using routine CT scans has been described previously. We have, however, not found a gold standard study which analyzes the effect of section thickness on the estimation of liver volume using CT images. In the present study, five normal livers obtained from cadavers were scanned using a Spiral CT Scanner (Xpress/GX Toshiba, Tocigi-Ken) in the horizontal plane. Consecutive sections at a thickness of 10, 5 and 1 mm were used to estimate the total volume of the livers by means of the Cavalieri principle. With a view to evaluating inter-observer differences, liver volume was estimated by three observers. The estimated volume using the classical volume estimation formula did not concur with the actual volume of the livers obtained by the fluid displacement technique. The section thickness has an over- or under-projection effect on the estimated volume. The obtained volume estimation results were, therefore, calibrated using three different approaches. The volume obtained by the calibration formulae did not differ statistically from actual liver volumes (P < 0.05). There were also no significant differences between the performers' estimates (P > 0.05). Results showed that the effect of section thickness on the volume estimates could not be omitted and the obtained values could be calibrated using the proposed approaches presented in this study.

  11. Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U. S. Volume 3. Techniques for controlling emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, H.W. (comp.)

    1976-06-14

    Technological, social, economic and political techniques for controlling emission are summarized for environmental pollutants introduced into air, water and land resources. Chemical, radiological and physical factors are discussed. (PCS)

  12. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; /Buenos Aires, IAFE; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  13. Hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and megaplasmid-deficient mutant M5 evaluated using a large headspace volume technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang-Eun [Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Kangwon-do (Korea); Zuo, Yi; Zhang, Husen [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Guiltinan, Mark J. [Department of Horticulture, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hydrogen Energy (H2E) Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Logan, Bruce E.; Regan, John M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hydrogen Energy (H2E) Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Biohydrogen production is measured using a variety of techniques, ranging from low cost intermittent gas release methods where yields are usually reduced due to high partial pressures of hydrogen, to expensive respirometers that can eliminate pressure buildup. A new large headspace volume technique was developed that reduces the potential for hydrogen gas inhibition without the need for a respirometer. We tested this method with two strains of clostridia, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and its mutant M5 that lacks a megaplasmid responsible for butanol and acetone production, and a mixed culture (heat-treated sludge). The hydrogen yield using M5 (2.64 mol-H{sub 2}/mol-glucose) was 47% higher than that of the parent strain (1.79 mol-H{sub 2}/mol-glucose), and 118% larger than that obtained in tests with the sludge inoculum (1.21 mol-H{sub 2}/mol-glucose). The increased yield for M5 was primarily due to a decrease in biomass synthesis (38%) compared to the parent strain. Hydrogen yields measured using this new method were on average 14% higher than those obtained using a conventional respirometric method. These findings indicate enhanced biohydrogen production from the megaplasmid-deficient mutant of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824, and that an intermittent gas-sampling technique can effectively measure high hydrogen gas by using a large headspace volume. (author)

  14. Identification of variables for site calibration and power curve assessment in complex terrain. Task 8, a literature survey on theory and practice of parameter identification, specification and estimation (ISE) techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoef, J.P.; Leendertse, G.P. [ECN Wind, Petten (Netherlands)

    2001-04-01

    This document presents the literature survey results on Identification, Specification and Estimation (ISE) techniques for variables within the SiteParIden project. Besides an overview of the different general techniques also an overview is given on EU funded wind energy projects where some of these techniques have been applied more specifically. The main problem in applications like power performance assessment and site calibration is to establish an appropriate model for predicting the considered dependent variable with the aid of measured independent (explanatory) variables. In these applications detailed knowledge on what the relevant variables are and how their precise appearance in the model would be is typically missing. Therefore, the identification (of variables) and the specification (of the model relation) are important steps in the model building phase. For the determination of the parameters in the model a reliable variable estimation technique is required. In EU funded wind energy projects the linear regression technique is the most commonly applied tool for the estimation step. The linear regression technique may fail in finding reliable parameter estimates when the model variables are strongly correlated, either due to the experimental set-up or because of their particular appearance in the model. This situation of multicollinearity sometimes results in unrealistic parameter values, e.g. with the wrong algebraic sign. It is concluded that different approaches, like multi-binning can provide a better way of identifying the relevant variables. However further research in these applications is needed and it is recommended that alternative methods (neural networks, singular value decomposition etc.) should also be tested on their usefulness in a succeeding project. Increased interest in complex terrains, as feasible locations for wind farms, has also emphasised the need for adequate models. A common standard procedure to prescribe the statistical

  15. Large-volume constant-concentration sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for rapid on-site gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Zhan, Yisen; Huang, Yichun; Li, Gongke

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a portable large-volume constant-concentration (LVCC) sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for the rapid on-site gas analysis based on suitable derivatization methods. LVCC sampling technique mainly consisted of a specially designed sampling cell including the rigid sample container and flexible sampling bag, and an absorption-derivatization module with a portable pump and a gas flowmeter. LVCC sampling technique allowed large, alterable and well-controlled sampling volume, which kept the concentration of gas target in headspace phase constant during the entire sampling process and made the sampling result more representative. Moreover, absorption and derivatization of gas target during LVCC sampling process were efficiently merged in one step using bromine-thiourea and OPA-NH4+ strategy for ethylene and SO2 respectively, which made LVCC sampling technique conveniently adapted to consequent SERS analysis. Finally, a new LVCC sampling-SERS method was developed and successfully applied for rapid analysis of trace ethylene and SO2 from fruits. It was satisfied that trace ethylene and SO2 from real fruit samples could be actually and accurately quantified by this method. The minor concentration fluctuations of ethylene and SO2 during the entire LVCC sampling process were proved to be samples were achieved in range of 95.0-101% and 97.0-104% respectively. It is expected that portable LVCC sampling technique would pave the way for rapid on-site analysis of accurate concentrations of trace gas targets from real samples by SERS.

  16. Large-volume constant-concentration sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for rapid on-site gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Zhan, Yisen; Huang, Yichun; Li, Gongke

    2017-08-05

    In this work, a portable large-volume constant-concentration (LVCC) sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for the rapid on-site gas analysis based on suitable derivatization methods. LVCC sampling technique mainly consisted of a specially designed sampling cell including the rigid sample container and flexible sampling bag, and an absorption-derivatization module with a portable pump and a gas flowmeter. LVCC sampling technique allowed large, alterable and well-controlled sampling volume, which kept the concentration of gas target in headspace phase constant during the entire sampling process and made the sampling result more representative. Moreover, absorption and derivatization of gas target during LVCC sampling process were efficiently merged in one step using bromine-thiourea and OPA-NH4(+) strategy for ethylene and SO2 respectively, which made LVCC sampling technique conveniently adapted to consequent SERS analysis. Finally, a new LVCC sampling-SERS method was developed and successfully applied for rapid analysis of trace ethylene and SO2 from fruits. It was satisfied that trace ethylene and SO2 from real fruit samples could be actually and accurately quantified by this method. The minor concentration fluctuations of ethylene and SO2 during the entire LVCC sampling process were proved to be samples were achieved in range of 95.0-101% and 97.0-104% respectively. It is expected that portable LVCC sampling technique would pave the way for rapid on-site analysis of accurate concentrations of trace gas targets from real samples by SERS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cross-calibration of interferometric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Generation of digital elevation models from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is a well established technique. Achieving a high geometric fidelity calls for a calibration accounting for inaccurate navigation data and system parameters as well as system imperfections. Fully...

  18. An oversampling technique for the multiscale finite volume method to simulate electromagnetic responses in the frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Mata, Luz Angelica Caudillo; Schwarzbach, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the computational cost of the simulation of electromagnetic responses in geophysical settings that involve highly heterogeneous media, we develop a multiscale finite volume method with oversampling for the quasi-static Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain. We assume a coarse mesh nested within a fine mesh that accurately discretizes the problem. For each coarse cell, we independently solve a local version of the original Maxwell's system subject to linear boundary conditions on an extended domain, which includes the coarse cell and a neighborhood of fine cells around it. The local Maxwell's system is solved using the fine mesh contained in the extended domain and the mimetic finite volume method. Next, these local solutions (basis functions) together with a weak-continuity condition are used to construct a coarse-mesh version of the global problem. The basis functions can be used to obtain the fine-mesh details from the solution of the coarse-mesh problem. Our approach leads to a sig...

  19. Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration with $\\pi^{0}$

    CERN Multimedia

    Puig Navarro, A

    2009-01-01

    Several methods can be used in order to achieve precise calibration of the LHCb Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) once reasonable cell equalization has been reached. At low transverse energy, the standard calibration procedure is an iterative method based on the fit of the $\\gamma\\gamma$ invariant mass distribution for each cell of the decay $\\pi^{0}\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ with resolved photons. A new technique for generating the combinatorial background of such decays directly from data has been developed. Knowledge of the background could allow an alternative calibration method based on a event by event fit of the same $\\gamma\\gamma$ invariant mass distribution where contributions from groups of cells are considered in a single fit. The background generation procedure and this possible new calibration method are presented in this poster, in addition to an overview of the LHCb Calorimetry system and ECAL calibration techniques.

  20. Trinocular Calibration Method Based on Binocular Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAO Dan-Dan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the self-occlusion problem in plane-based multi-camera calibration system and expand the measurement range, a tri-camera vision system based on binocular calibration is proposed. The three cameras are grouped into two pairs, while the public camera is taken as the reference to build the global coordinate. By calibration of the measured absolute distance and the true absolute distance, global calibration is realized. The MRE (mean relative error of the global calibration of the two camera pairs in the experiments can be as low as 0.277% and 0.328% respectively. Experiment results show that this method is feasible, simple and effective, and has high precision.

  1. Postoperative volume increase of facial soft tissue after percutaneous versus endonasal osteotomy technique in rhinoplasty using 3D stereophotogrammetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, B. van; Heerbeek, N. van; Maal, T.J.J.; Borstlap, W.A.; Ingels, K.J.A.O.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Berge, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When lateral osteotomies are performed as part of a rhinoplasty, the nose and paranasal region invariably change in three dimensions. The PURPOSE of this study is to compare the effect of the percutaneous perforating and endonasal continuous osteotomy techniques concerning the degree of

  2. Generalization techniques to reduce the number of volume elements for terrain effect calculations in fully analytical gravitational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Judit; Papp, Gabor; Kalmár, János; Szűcs, Eszter

    2017-04-01

    The available volumetric models of the crust of the Alps - Pannonian basin - Carpathians region and the 30 m x 30 m resolution DTM of Hungary contain several million and hundred million volume elements, respectively. Either rectangular prisms or polyhedrons can be used to discretize the density distribution inside these 3D structures. The calculation of the closed formulae given for the gravitational potential and its higher order derivatives, however, needs twice more runtime than that of the rectangular prism computations. Although the more detailed the better principle is generally accepted (or assumed) it is basically true only for errorless data. As soon as errors are present any calculation from the model is only a possible realization of the true gravitational field at the significance level determined by the errors. So if one really considers the reliability of input data (e.g. Moho depths, topographic heights) used in the calculations then sometimes the "less" can be equivalent to the "more" in statistical sense. As a consequence, the computational time can be significantly reduced by the optimization of the number of volume elements based on the accuracy estimates of the input data. New algorithms are proposed to minimize the number of model elements defined both in local and global coordinate systems. Common gravity field modeling programs generate optimized models for every computation points (dynamic approach), whereas the static approach provides only one optimized model for all computational points. The number of volume elements depends on a threshold value pre-defined by the error statistics of the input data. It represents the maximum difference allowed along the vertical direction Z between the initial and optimized model. Based on the static approach two different algorithms were developed. The grid-based algorithm starts with the maximum resolution polyhedral model defined on a uniform grid and generates a new polyhedral surface. The other

  3. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Grassi, G. [AREVA NC, 1 place Jean-Millier, 92084 Paris-La-Defense cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ({sup 3}He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the {sup 239}Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and {sup 235}U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the

  4. Transseptal Leftventricular Endocardial Pacing is an Alternative Technique in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy. One Year Experience in a High Volume Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhoff I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, failure rate to implant the left ventricular (LV lead by the traditional trans-venous approach is 4-8%. Surgical epicardial implantation is considered as an alternative, but this technique is not without morbidity. Evidence from case documentation and from small trial batches demonstrated the viability of endocardial LV lead implantation where surgical epicardial lead placement is not applicable.

  5. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, Reggio, 42100 Emilia (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, 20089 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, 6504 Bellinzona (Switzerland); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. Methods: A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. Results: In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1{+-}4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. Conclusions: A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  6. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  7. Advancement of gamma-spectroscopic measuring systems of BfS and adaptation of measuring and evaluation techniques to the requirements of emergency response. Final report; Weiterentwicklung der aero-gammaspektrometrischen Messsysteme des BfS und Anpassung der Mess- und Auswerteverfahren an die Anforderungen des Notfallschutzes. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Rainer; Mameghani, Raphael; Stuchels, Regina; Hummel, Lothar (comps.)

    2015-08-15

    The final report on advancement of gamma-spectroscopic measuring systems of BfS and adaptation of measuring and evaluation techniques to the requirements of emergency response covers the following issues: results of literature search, calculation of geometric factors, calibration for the helicopter, combination of geometric factors and calibration, measuring flights, detection limit and performance optimization, identification of activities in the air volume.

  8. Inflight Radiometric Calibration of New Horizons' Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Howett, C J A; Olkin, C B; Reuter, D C; Ennico, K; Grundy, W M; Graps, A L; Harrison, K P; Throop, H B; Buie, M W; Lovering, J R; Porter, S B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A; Stern, S A; Beyer, R A; Binzell, R P; Buratti, B J; Cheng, A F; Cook, J C; Cruikshank, D P; Ore, C M Dalle; Earle, A M; Jennings, D E; Linscott, I R; Lunsford, A W; Parker, J Wm; Phillippe, S; Protopapa, S; Quirico, E; Schenk, P M; Schmitt, B; Singer, K N; Spencer, J R; Stansberry, J A; Tsang, C C C; Weigle, G E; Verbiscer, A J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two semi-independent calibration techniques used to determine the in-flight radiometric calibration for the New Horizons' Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). The first calibration technique compares the observed stellar flux to modeled values. The difference between the two provides a calibration factor that allows the observed flux to be adjusted to the expected levels for all observations, for each detector. The second calibration technique is a channel-wise relative radiometric calibration for MVIC's blue, near-infrared and methane color channels using observations of Charon and scaling from the red channel stellar calibration. Both calibration techniques produce very similar results (better than 7% agreement), providing strong validation for the techniques used. Since the stellar calibration can be performed without a color target in the field of view and covers all of MVIC's detectors, this calibration was used to provide the radiometric keywords delivered by the New Horizons project...

  9. Signal inference with unknown response: calibration uncertainty renormalized estimator

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, Sebastian; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco; Böhm, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    The calibration of a measurement device is crucial for every scientific experiment, where a signal has to be inferred from data. We present CURE, the calibration uncertainty renormalized estimator, to reconstruct a signal and simultaneously the instrument's calibration from the same data without knowing the exact calibration, but its covariance structure. The idea of CURE is starting with an assumed calibration to successively include more and more portions of calibration uncertainty into the signal inference equations and to absorb the resulting corrections into renormalized signal (and calibration) solutions. Thereby, the signal inference and calibration problem turns into solving a single system of ordinary differential equations and can be identified with common resummation techniques used in field theories. We verify CURE by applying it to a simplistic toy example and compare it against existent self-calibration schemes, Wiener filter solutions, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. We conclude that the...

  10. The calibration of PIXIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Kogut, Alan; Mirel, Paul; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    The FIRAS instrument demonstrated the use of an external calibrator to compare the sky to an instrumented blackbody. The PIXIE calibrator is improved from -35 dB to -65 dB. Another significant improvement is the ability to insert the calibrator into either input of the FTS. This allows detection and correction of additional errors, reduces the effective calibration noise by a factor of 2, eliminates an entire class of systematics and allows continuous observations. This paper presents the design and use of the PIXIE calibrator.

  11. A novel partial volume effects correction technique integrating deconvolution associated with denoising within an iterative PET image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlin, Thibaut, E-mail: thibaut.merlin@telecom-bretagne.eu [Université Bordeaux INCIA, CNRS UMR 5287, Hôpital de Bordeaux , Bordeaux 33 33076 (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest 29 29609 (France); Fernandez, Philippe; Lamare, Frederic [Université Bordeaux INCIA, CNRS UMR 5287, Hôpital de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33 33076 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Partial volume effect (PVE) plays an important role in both qualitative and quantitative PET image accuracy, especially for small structures. A previously proposed voxelwise PVE correction method applied on PET reconstructed images involves the use of Lucy–Richardson deconvolution incorporating wavelet-based denoising to limit the associated propagation of noise. The aim of this study is to incorporate the deconvolution, coupled with the denoising step, directly inside the iterative reconstruction process to further improve PVE correction. Methods: The list-mode ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm has been modified accordingly with the application of the Lucy–Richardson deconvolution algorithm to the current estimation of the image, at each reconstruction iteration. Acquisitions of the NEMA NU2-2001 IQ phantom were performed on a GE DRX PET/CT system to study the impact of incorporating the deconvolution inside the reconstruction [with and without the point spread function (PSF) model] in comparison to its application postreconstruction and to standard iterative reconstruction incorporating the PSF model. The impact of the denoising step was also evaluated. Images were semiquantitatively assessed by studying the trade-off between the intensity recovery and the noise level in the background estimated as relative standard deviation. Qualitative assessments of the developed methods were additionally performed on clinical cases. Results: Incorporating the deconvolution without denoising within the reconstruction achieved superior intensity recovery in comparison to both standard OSEM reconstruction integrating a PSF model and application of the deconvolution algorithm in a postreconstruction process. The addition of the denoising step permitted to limit the SNR degradation while preserving the intensity recovery. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating the Lucy–Richardson deconvolution associated with a

  12. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  13. Modeling Approach for Estimating Co-Produced Water Volumes and Saltwater Disposal Volumes in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Management of produced fluids has become an important issue in Oklahoma because large volumes of saltwater are co-produced with oil and gas, and disposed into saltwater disposal wells at high rates. Petroleum production increased from 2009-2015, especially in central and north-central Oklahoma where the Mississippian and Hunton zones were redeveloped using horizontal wells and dewatering techniques that have led to a disproportional increase in produced water volumes. Improved management of co-produced water, including desalination for beneficial reuse and decreased saltwater disposal volumes, is only possible if spatial and temporal trends can be defined and related to the producing zones. It is challenging to quantify the volumes of co-produced water by region or production zone because co-produced water volumes are generally not reported. Therefore, the goal of this research is to estimate co-produced water volumes for 2008-present with an approach that can be replicated as petroleum production shifts to other regions. Oil and gas production rates from subsurface zones were multiplied by ratios of H2O:oil and H2O:gas for the respective zones. Initial H2O:oil and H2O:gas ratios were adjusted/calibrated, by zone, to maximize correlation of county-scale produced H2O estimates versus saltwater disposal volumes from 2013-2015. These calibrated ratios were then used to compute saltwater disposal volumes from 2008-2012 because of apparent data gaps in reported saltwater disposal volumes during that timeframe. This research can be used to identify regions that have the greatest need for produced water treatment systems. The next step in management of produced fluids is to explore optimal energy-efficient strategies that reduce deleterious effects.

  14. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program. Volume 1, Literature review: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  15. Optimum Experimental Design applied to MEMS accelerometer calibration for 9-parameter auto-calibration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Su, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Optimum Experimental Design (OED) is an information gathering technique used to estimate parameters, which aims to minimize the variance of parameter estimation and prediction. In this paper, we further investigate an OED for MEMS accelerometer calibration of the 9-parameter auto-calibration model. Based on a linearized 9-parameter accelerometer model, we show the proposed OED is both G-optimal and rotatable, which are the desired properties for the calibration of wearable sensors for which only simple calibration devices are available. The experimental design is carried out with a newly developed wearable health monitoring device and desired experimental results have been achieved.

  16. A general analysis of calibrated BOLD methodology for measuring CMRO2 responses: comparison of a new approach with existing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockley, Nicholas P; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Buxton, Richard B

    2012-03-01

    The amplitude of the BOLD response to a stimulus is not only determined by changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)), but also by baseline physiological parameters such as haematocrit, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and blood volume. The calibrated BOLD approach aims to account for this physiological variation by performing an additional calibration scan. This calibration typically consists of a hypercapnia or hyperoxia respiratory challenge, although we propose that a measurement of the reversible transverse relaxation rate, R(2)', might also be used. A detailed model of the BOLD effect was used to simulate each of the calibration experiments, as well as the activation experiment, whilst varying a number of physiological parameters associated with the baseline state and response to activation. The effectiveness of the different calibration methods was considered by testing whether the BOLD response to activation scaled by the calibration parameter combined with the measured CBF provides sufficient information to reliably distinguish different levels of CMRO(2) response despite underlying physiological variability. In addition the effect of inaccuracies in the underlying assumptions of each technique were tested, e.g. isometabolism during hypercapnia. The three primary findings of the study were: 1) The new calibration method based on R(2)' worked reasonably well, although not as well as the ideal hypercapnia method; 2) The hyperoxia calibration method was significantly worse because baseline haematocrit and OEF must be assumed, and these physiological parameters have a significant effect on the measurements; and 3) the venous blood volume change with activation is an important confounding variable for all of the methods, with the hypercapnia method being the most robust when this is uncertain.

  17. Generation of linear and nonlinear waves in numerical wave tank using clustering technique-volume of fluid method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.SAGHI; M.J.KETABDARI; S.BOOSHI

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) numerical model is developed for the wave simulation and propagation in a wave flume.The fluid flow is assumed to be viscous and incompressible,and the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations are used as the governing equations.The standard κ-ε model is used to model the turbulent flow.The NavierStokes equations are discretized using the staggered grid finite difference method and solved by the simplified marker and cell (SMAC) method. Waves are generated and propagated using a piston type wave maker. An open boundary condition is used at the end of the numerical flume.Some standard tests,such as the lid-driven cavity,the constant unidirectional velocity field,the shearing flow,and the dam-break on the dry bed,are performed to valid the model.To demonstrate the capability and accuracy of the present method,the results of generated waves are compared with available wave theories.Finally,the clustering technique (CT) is used for the mesh generation,and the best condition is suggested.

  18. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATION OF ERROR IN THE REFERENCE VALUE OF THE DOSE DURING THE LINEAR ACCELERATOR RADIATION OUTPUT CALIBRATION PROCEDURE. Part 2. Dependence on the characteristics of collimator, optical sourse-distance indicator, treatment field, lasers and treatment couch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Tsitovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure the safety of radiation oncology patients needed to provide consistent functional characteristics of the medical linear accelerators, which affect the accuracy of dose delivery. To this end, their quality control procedures, which include the calibration of radiation output of the linac, the error in determining the dose reference value during which must not exceed 2 %, is provided. The aim is to develop a methodology for determining the error (difference between a measured value of quantity and its true value in determining this value, depending on the characteristics of the collimator, the source to surface distance pointer, lasers, radiation field and treatment table. To achieve the objectives have been carried out dosimetric measurements of Trilogy S/N 3567 linac dose distributions, on the basis of which dose errors depending on the accuracy setting the zero position of the collimator, the deviation of the collimator rotation isocenter, the sourcesurface distance pointer accuracy, field size accuracy, the accuracy of lasers and treatment table positioning were obtained. It was found that the greatest impact on the value of the error has the error in the optical SSD indication and the error in the lasers position in the plane perpendicular to the plane of incidence of the radiation beam (up to 3.64 % for the energy of 6 MV. Dose errors caused by error in the field size were different for two photon energies, and reached 2.54 % for 6 MeV and 1.33% for 18 MeV. Errors caused by the rest of the characteristic do not exceed 1 %. Thus, it is possible to express the results of periodic quality control of these devices integrated in linac in terms of dose and use them to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the possibility of clinical use of a linear accelerator for oncology patients irradiation on the basis of the calibration of radiation output in case of development of techniques that allow to analyze the influence dosimetric

  19. Examination of forensic entomology evidence using computed tomography scanning: case studies and refinement of techniques for estimating maggot mass volumes in bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aidan; Archer, Melanie; Leigh-Shaw, Lyndie; Pais, Mike; O'Donnell, Chris; Wallman, James

    2012-09-01

    A new technique has recently been developed for estimating the volume of maggot masses on deceased persons using post-mortem CT scans. This allows volume to be measured non-invasively and factored into maggot mass temperature calculations for both casework and research. Examination of admission scans also allows exploration of entomological evidence in anatomical areas not usually exposed by autopsy (e.g. nasal cavities and facial sinuses), and before autopsy disrupts the maggot distribution on a body. This paper expands on work already completed by providing the x-ray attenuation coefficient by way of Hounsfield unit (HU) values for various maggot species, maggot masses and human tissue adjacent to masses. Specifically, this study looked at the HU values for four forensically important blowfly larvae: Lucilia cuprina, L. sericata, Calliphora stygia and C. vicina. The Calliphora species had significantly lower HU values than the Lucilia species. This might be explained by histological analysis, which revealed a non-significant trend, suggesting that Calliphora maggots have a higher fat content than the Lucilia maggots. It is apparent that the variation in the x-ray attenuation coefficient usually precludes its use as a tool for delineating the maggot mass from human tissue and that morphology is the dominant method for delineating a mass. This paper also includes three case studies, which reveal different applications for interpreting entomological evidence using post-mortem CT scans.

  20. Establishment of an open database of realistic simulated data for evaluation of partial volume correction techniques in brain PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Ana [Instituto de Biofísica e Engenharia Biomédica, FC-UL, Lisboa (Portugal); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Cuplov, Vesna [Instituto de Biofísica e Engenharia Biomédica, FC-UL, Lisboa (Portugal); Schott, Jonathan; Hutton, Brian; Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Drobnjak, Ivana [Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Dickson, John [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Bert, Julien [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, CHRU de Brest, Brest (France); Burgos, Ninon; Cardoso, Jorge; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien [Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Erlandsson, Kjell [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-18

    The Partial Volume (PV) effect in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging leads to loss in quantification accuracy, which manifests in PV effects (small objects occupy partially the sensitive volume of the imaging instrument, resulting in blurred images). Simultaneous acquisition of PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) produces concurrent metabolic and anatomical information. The latter has proved to be very helpful for the correction of PV effects. Currently, there are several techniques used for PV correction. They can be applied directly during the reconstruction process or as a post-processing step after image reconstruction. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the different PV correction techniques in brain- PET, we are constructing a database of simulated data. Here we present the framework and steps involved in constructing this database. Static 18F-FDG epilepsy and 18F-Florbetapir amyloid dementia PET/MR were selected because of their very different characteristics. The methodology followed was based on four main steps: Image pre-processing, Ground Truth (GT) generation, MRI and PET data simulation and reconstruction. All steps used Open Source software and can therefore be repeated at any centre. The framework as well as the database will be freely accessible. Tools used included GIF, FSL, POSSUM, GATE and STIR. The final data obtained after simulation, involving raw or reconstructed PET data together with corresponding MRI datasets, were close to the original patient data. Besides, there is the advantage that data can be compared with the GT. We indicate several parameters that can be improved and optimized.

  1. Building X-ray Diffraction Calibration Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lande, Joshua; /Marlboro Coll.

    2007-10-31

    X-ray diffraction is a technique used to analyze the structure of crystals. It records the interference pattern created when x-rays travel through a crystal. Three dimensional structure can be inferred from these two dimensional diffraction patterns. Before the patterns can be analyzed, diffraction data must be precisely calibrated. Calibration is used to determine the experimental parameters of the particular experiment. This is done by fitting the experimental parameters to the diffraction pattern of a well understood crystal. Fit2D is a software package commonly used to do this calibration but it leaves much to be desired. In particular, it does not give very much control over the calibration of the data, requires a significant amount of manual input, does not allow for the calibration of highly tilted geometries, does not properly explain the assumptions that it is making, and cannot be modified. We build code to do this calibration while at the same time overcoming the limitations of Fit2D. This paper describes the development of the calibration software and the assumptions that are made in doing the calibration.

  2. Structured light system calibration method with optimal fringe angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beiwen; Zhang, Song

    2014-11-20

    For structured light system calibration, one popular approach is to treat the projector as an inverse camera. This is usually performed by projecting horizontal and vertical sequences of patterns to establish one-to-one mapping between camera points and projector points. However, for a well-designed system, either horizontal or vertical fringe images are not sensitive to depth variation and thus yield inaccurate mapping. As a result, the calibration accuracy is jeopardized if a conventional calibration method is used. To address this limitation, this paper proposes a novel calibration method based on optimal fringe angle determination. Experiments demonstrate that our calibration approach can increase the measurement accuracy up to 38% compared to the conventional calibration method with a calibration volume of 300(H)  mm×250(W)  mm×500(D)  mm.

  3. The Science of Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the many issues involved in calibrating astronomical data, covering the full electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays, and considering both ground-based and space-based missions. These issues include the science drivers for absolute and relative calibration, the physics behind calibration and the mechanisms used to transfer it from the laboratory to an astronomical source, the need for networks of calibrated astronomical standards, and some of the challenges faced by large surveys and missions.

  4. Sensor modelling and camera calibration for close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Thomas; Fraser, Clive; Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2016-05-01

    Metric calibration is a critical prerequisite to the application of modern, mostly consumer-grade digital cameras for close-range photogrammetric measurement. This paper reviews aspects of sensor modelling and photogrammetric calibration, with attention being focussed on techniques of automated self-calibration. Following an initial overview of the history and the state of the art, selected topics of current interest within calibration for close-range photogrammetry are addressed. These include sensor modelling, with standard, extended and generic calibration models being summarised, along with non-traditional camera systems. Self-calibration via both targeted planar arrays and targetless scenes amenable to SfM-based exterior orientation are then discussed, after which aspects of calibration and measurement accuracy are covered. Whereas camera self-calibration is largely a mature technology, there is always scope for additional research to enhance the models and processes employed with the many camera systems nowadays utilised in close-range photogrammetry.

  5. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATION OF ERROR IN THE REFERENCE VALUE OF THE DOSE DURING THE LINEAR ACCELERATOR RADIATION OUTPUT CALIBRATION PROCEDURE. PART 1. DEPENDANCE OF THE MECHANICAL PARAMETERS OF LINAC’S GANTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Tsitovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure the safety of radiation oncology patients needed to provide a consistent functional characteristics of the medical linear electron accelerators, which affect the accuracy of dose delivery. To this end, their quality control procedures, which include the calibration of radiation output of the linear accelerator, the error in determining the dose reference value during which must not exceed 2 %, is provided. The aim is to develop a methodology for determining the error in determining this value, depending on the mechanical charachteristics of the linac’s gantry. To achieve the objectives have been carried out dosimetric measurements of Trilogy S/N 3567 linac dose distributions, on the basis of which dose errors depending on the accuracy setting the zero position of the gantry and the deviation of the gantry rotation isocenter were obtained. It was found that the greatest impact on the value of the error has gantry rotation isocenter deviation in a plane perpendicular to the plane of incidence of the radiation beam (up to 3,64% for the energy of 6 MeV. Dose errors caused by tilting the gantry and its isocenter deviation in the plane of incidence of the beam were highest for 18 MeV energy and reached –0,7 % and –0,9 % respectively. Thus, it is possible to express the results of periodic quality control of the linear accelerator ganty in terms of dose and use them to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the possibility of clinical use of a linear accelerator for oncology patients irradiation in case of development of techniques that allow to analyze the influence of the rest of its technical and dosimetric parameters for error in dose.

  6. A compact array calibrator to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardid M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos was proposed already in 1950s: when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water, the resulting particle cascade produces a pressure pulse that has a bipolar temporal structure and propagates within a flat disk-like volume. A telescope that consists of thousands of acoustic sensors deployed in the deep sea can monitor hundreds of cubic kilometres of water looking for these signals and discriminating them from acoustic noise. To study the feasibility of the technique it is critical to have a calibrator able to mimic the neutrino “signature” that can be operated from a vessel. Due to the axial-symmetry of the signal, their very directive short bipolar shape and the constraints of operating at sea, the development of such a calibrator is very challenging. Once the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was validated with the first compact array calibrator prototype, in this paper we describe the new design for such a calibrator composed of an array of piezo ceramic tube transducers emitting in axial direction.

  7. A compact array calibrator to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardid, M.; Camarena, F.; Felis, I.; Herrero, A.; Llorens, C. D.; Martínez-Mora, J.; Saldaña, M.

    2016-04-01

    Underwater acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos was proposed already in 1950s: when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water, the resulting particle cascade produces a pressure pulse that has a bipolar temporal structure and propagates within a flat disk-like volume. A telescope that consists of thousands of acoustic sensors deployed in the deep sea can monitor hundreds of cubic kilometres of water looking for these signals and discriminating them from acoustic noise. To study the feasibility of the technique it is critical to have a calibrator able to mimic the neutrino "signature" that can be operated from a vessel. Due to the axial-symmetry of the signal, their very directive short bipolar shape and the constraints of operating at sea, the development of such a calibrator is very challenging. Once the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was validated with the first compact array calibrator prototype, in this paper we describe the new design for such a calibrator composed of an array of piezo ceramic tube transducers emitting in axial direction.

  8. Mathematical calibration procedure of a capacitive sensor-based indexed metrology platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau-Avila, A.; Santolaria, J.; Acero, R.; Valenzuela-Galvan, M.; Herrera-Jimenez, V. M.; Aguilar, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    The demand for faster and more reliable measuring tasks for the control and quality assurance of modern production systems has created new challenges for the field of coordinate metrology. Thus, the search for new solutions in coordinate metrology systems and the need for the development of existing ones still persists. One example of such a system is the portable coordinate measuring machine (PCMM), the use of which in industry has considerably increased in recent years, mostly due to its flexibility for accomplishing in-line measuring tasks as well as its reduced cost and operational advantages compared to traditional coordinate measuring machines. Nevertheless, PCMMs have a significant drawback derived from the techniques applied in the verification and optimization procedures of their kinematic parameters. These techniques are based on the capture of data with the measuring instrument from a calibrated gauge object, fixed successively in various positions so that most of the instrument measuring volume is covered, which results in time-consuming, tedious and expensive verification and optimization procedures. In this work the mathematical calibration procedure of a capacitive sensor-based indexed metrology platform (IMP) is presented. This calibration procedure is based on the readings and geometric features of six capacitive sensors and their targets with nanometer resolution. The final goal of the IMP calibration procedure is to optimize the geometric features of the capacitive sensors and their targets in order to use the optimized data in the verification procedures of PCMMs.

  9. Expiratory Reserve Volume During Slow Expiration With Glottis Opened in Infralateral Decubitus Position (ELTGOL) in Chronic Pulmonary Disease: Technique Description and Reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Fernanda C; Alves, Cintia Santos; dos Santos, Roberta Loures; de Camargo, Anderson Alves; Dal Corso, Simone

    2015-03-01

    There has not been a detailed description of expiratory reserve volume (ERV) during slow expiration with glottis open in infralateral decubitus position (ELTGOL, for Expiration Lente Totale Glotte Ouverte en infraLatéral) and its reproducibility. The aim of this study was to determine ERV during ELTGOL and to evaluate ERV intra-observer and inter-observer reliability. In this prospective study, subjects were 30-70 y of age with chronic lung disease. ELTGOL (an active-passive or active physiotherapy technique) was applied in random order by 3 observers: 2 trained physiotherapists (PT 1 and PT 2) and the subject him/herself. Two ELTGOL compressions (A and B) were applied by PT 1, PT 2, and the subject. Thirty-two subjects were evaluated with moderate lung obstruction, FEV1: 47.7 ± 15.4, and ERV: 61.7 ± 29.4. The mean value of ERV for PT 1 was 51.4 ± 24.8%; for PT 2, it was 54.3 ± 31.8%; and for the subject, it was 53.5 ± 26.2% (P = .49). Considering the mean value of ERV, the ELTGOL mobilized more than 80% of ERV. There was good reliability intra-PT: PT 1, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.85 (0.70-0.93), P ELTGOL mobilized more than 80% of ERV in subjects with moderate airway obstruction; there is no difference in ERV exhaled during the technique applied by a physiotherapist or by the subject. ELTGOL is a reproducible technique, determined by inter- and intra-observer testing. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 2001). Volume 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterman, Thomas H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2001-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April–June 2001, features ''A Self-Calibrating, Multichannel Streak Camera for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications'' by Dr. W. R. Donaldson, R. Boni, R. L. Keck, and P. A. Jaanimagi. This article (p. 109) describes the 60-beam streak camera system used on OMEGA and focuses on the hardware and software calibration techniques that maximize its utility. The system can diagnose each of the beams on every target shot and can measure beam energies with 8% accuracy and timing at 7 ps rms. Beam-to-beam power variations of less than 5% can be detected. Other articles in this volume are: Evolution of Shell Nonuniformities Near Peak Compression of a Spherical Implosion; Multibeam Stimulated Brillouin Scattering from Hot Solid-Target Plasmas; Hot-Electron Effect in Superconductors and Is Applications for Radiation Sensors; and, Scaling Law for Marginal Ignition.

  11. Handheld temperature calibrator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martella, Melanie

    2003-01-01

    ... you sign on. What are you waiting for? JOFRA ETC Series dry-block calibrators from AMETEK Test & Calibration Instruments, Largo, FL, are small enough to be handheld and feature easy-to-read displays, multiple bore blocks, programmable test setup, RS-232 communications, and software. Two versions are available: the ETC 125A that ranges from -10[degrees]C to 125[d...

  12. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  13. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation; Obtencao de volumes tumorais em pilhas de imagens PET usando tecnicas de segmentacao de imagens coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE) Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F., E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Cordeiro, Landerson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments.

  14. WFPC2 Polarization Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biretta, J.; McMaster, M.

    1997-12-01

    We derive a detailed calibration for WFPC2 polarization data which is accurate to about 1.5%. We begin by computing polarizer flats, and show how they are applied to data. A physical model for the polarization effects of the WFPC2 optics is then created using Mueller matricies. This model includes corrections for the instrumental polarization (diattenuation and phase retardance) of the pick-off mirror, as well as the high cross-polarization transmission of the polarizer filter. We compare this model against the on-orbit observations of polarization calibrators, and show it predicts relative counts in the different polarizer/aperture settings to 1.5% RMS accuracy. We then show how this model can be used to calibrate GO data, and present two WWW tools which allow observers to easily calibrate their data. Detailed examples are given illustrationg the calibration and display of WFPC2 polarization data. In closing we describe future plans and possible improvements.

  15. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  16. Effect of intra-abdominal volume increment technique for the treatment of intra-abdominal hypertension on the liver after resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock in pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-gang WANG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD assisted intra-abdominal volume increment (IAVI technique on the liver in the treatment of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH following hemorrhagic shock resuscitation in pigs. Methods  Twelve healthy mini-pigs (Bama, Guangxi were selected for bloodletting from the femoral artery to reproduce hemorrhagic shock model (mean arterial blood pressure, 50mmHg, 1h, and IAH model was successfully reproduced in eight pigs by partial occlusion of portal vein. The eight pigs were randomly divided into the intra-abdominal volume increment treatment (IT group (n=4 and sham operation control (SC group (n=4. Vesical pressure (VP and inferior vena cava pressure (IVCP were observed before shock, 2h after IAH, and 22h after IAVI treatment. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT were measured. In addition, the ratio of the abdominal anteroposterior diameter to the transverse diameter was assessed, and the liver CT values were measured after enhanced CT scanning. The pigs were sacrificed 26h after operation. Liver specimens were collected to measure the ratio of wet weight to dry weight and pathological examination. Results  The VP in 8 IAH pigs was 21.16±4.63mmHg. The ratio of abdominal anteroposterior diameter to the transverse diameter increased remarkably 2h after IAH compared with that before shock (1.22±1.41 vs 0.96±0.08, PPvs 42.73±4.92HU, PPPvs 5.14±0.71, PConclusions  The established model could better reproduce the symptoms of IAH after hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation, accompanied by liver damage. IAVI helps to relieve liver functional disturbance after IAH, which is related to decreased intra-abdominal pressure and hypoxia-ischemia of the liver.

  17. Estimating Digital Terrain Model in forest areas from TanDEM-X and Stereo-photogrammetric technique by means of Random Volume over Ground model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. K.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lagomasino, D.; Osmanoglu, B.; Feliciano, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Terrain Model (DTM) in forest areas is invaluable information for various environmental, hydrological and ecological studies, for example, watershed delineation, vegetation canopy height, water dynamic modeling, forest biomass and carbon estimations. There are few solutions to extract bare-earth Digital Elevation Model information. Airborne lidar systems are widely and successfully used for estimating bare-earth DEMs with centimeter-order accuracy and high spatial resolution. However, expensive cost of operation and small image coverage prevent the use of airborne lidar sensors for large- or global-scale. Although IceSAT/GLAS (Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite/Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) lidar data sets have been available for global DTM estimate with relatively lower cost, the large footprint size of 70 m and the interval of 172 m are insufficient for various applications. In this study we propose to extract higher resolution bare-earth DEM over vegetated areas from the combination of interferometric complex coherence from single-pass TanDEM-X (TDX) data at HH polarization and Digital Surface Model (DSM) derived from high-resolution WorldView (WV) images by means of random volume over ground (RVoG) model. The RVoG model is a widely and successfully used model for polarimetric SAR interferometry (Pol-InSAR) forest canopy height inversion. The bare-earth DEM is obtained by complex volume decorrelation in the RVoG model with the DSM estimated by stereo-photogrammetric technique. Forest canopy height can be estimated by subtracting the estimated bare-earth model from the DSM. Finally, the DTM from airborne lidar system was used to validate the bare-earth DEM and forest canopy height estimates.

  18. Segment Based Camera Calibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马颂德; 魏国庆; 等

    1993-01-01

    The basic idea of calibrating a camera system in previous approaches is to determine camera parmeters by using a set of known 3D points as calibration reference.In this paper,we present a method of camera calibration in whih camera parameters are determined by a set of 3D lines.A set of constraints is derived on camea parameters in terms of perspective line mapping.Form these constraints,the same perspective transformation matrix as that for point mapping can be computed linearly.The minimum number of calibration lines is 6.This result generalizes that of Liu,Huang and Faugeras[12] for camera location determination in which at least 8 line correspondences are required for linear computation of camera location.Since line segments in an image can be located easily and more accurately than points,the use of lines as calibration reference tends to ease the computation in inage preprocessing and to improve calibration accuracy.Experimental results on the calibration along with stereo reconstruction are reported.

  19. Calibration of the solar neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caccianiga, Barbara; Re, Alessandra Carlotta [Universita degli Studi Milano (Italy); INFN, Milano (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Calibrations have been crucial for the success of solar neutrino experiments. In this contribution we review the calibration strategies adopted by different solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we will emphasize their common critical aspects and their main differences. In order to do so, we will schematically divide the solar neutrino experiments in two groups: those based on radiochemical techniques, i.e. Homestake, Gallex/GNO, SAGE and those based on real-time techniques i.e. Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, Borexino and KamLAND. (orig.)

  20. Site Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Vesth, Allan

    This report describes the site calibration carried out at Østerild, during a given period. The site calibration was performed with two Windcube WLS7 (v1) lidars at ten measurements heights. The lidar is not a sensor approved by the current version of the IEC 61400-12-1 [1] and therefore the site...... calibration with lidars does not comply with the standard. However, the measurements are carried out following the guidelines of IEC 61400-12-1 where possible, but with some deviations presented in the following chapters....

  1. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  2. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  3. Flat-Panel Detector—Based Volume Computed Tomography: A Novel 3D Imaging Technique to Monitor Osteolytic Bone Lesions in a Mouse Tumor Metastasis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is an important cause of mortality in patients with breast cancer. Hence, animal models, in combination with various imaging techniques, are in high demand for preclinical assessment of novel therapies. We evaluated the applicability of flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT to noninvasive detection of osteolytic bone metastases that develop in severe immunodeficient mice after intracardial injection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A single fpVCT scan at 200-wm isotropic resolution was employed to detect osteolysis within the entire skeleton. Osteolytic lesions identified by fpVCT correlated with Faxitron X-ray analysis and were subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination. Isotropic three-dimensional image data sets obtained by fpVCT were the basis for the precise visualization of the extent of the lesion within the cortical bone and for the measurement of bone loss. Furthermore, fpVCT imaging allows continuous monitoring of growth kinetics for each metastatic site and visualization of lesions in more complex regions of the skeleton, such as the skull. Our findings suggest that fpVCT is a powerful tool that can be used to monitor the occurrence and progression of osteolytic lesions in vivo and can be further developed to monitor responses to antimetastatic therapies over the course of the disease.

  4. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Rogalla, Patrik [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Hilbig, Andreas [Charite - University Medicine, Medical Clinic III - Hematology and Oncology, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences. (orig.)

  5. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  6. INTRODUCING NOVEL GENERATION OF HIGH ACCURACY CAMERA OPTICAL-TESTING AND CALIBRATION TEST-STANDS FEASIBLE FOR SERIES PRODUCTION OF CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nekouei Shahraki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in the field of computer-vision have opened the doors of many opportunities for taking advantage of these techniques and technologies in many fields and applications. Having a high demand for these systems in today and future vehicles implies a high production volume of video cameras. The above criterions imply that it is critical to design test systems which deliver fast and accurate calibration and optical-testing capabilities. In this paper we introduce new generation of test-stands delivering high calibration quality in single-shot calibration of fisheye surround-view cameras. This incorporates important geometric features from bundle-block calibration, delivers very high (sub-pixel calibration accuracy, makes possible a very fast calibration procedure (few seconds, and realizes autonomous calibration via machines. We have used the geometrical shape of a Spherical Helix (Type: 3D Spherical Spiral with special geometrical characteristics, having a uniform radius which corresponds to the uniform motion. This geometrical feature was mechanically realized using three dimensional truncated icosahedrons which practically allow the implementation of a spherical helix on multiple surfaces. Furthermore the test-stand enables us to perform many other important optical tests such as stray-light testing, enabling us to evaluate the certain qualities of the camera optical module.

  7. Range imaging observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar: Phase calibration and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Fernandez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel phase calibration technique for use with the multiple-frequency Range IMaging (RIM technique is introduced based on genetic algorithms. The method is used on data collected with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT VHF radar during a 2002 experiment with the goal of characterizing the vertical structure of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE over northern Norway. For typical Doppler measurements, the initial phases of the transmitter and receiver are not required to be the same. The EISCAT receiver systems exploit this fact, allowing a multi-static configuration. However, the RIM method relies on the small phase differences between closely spaced frequencies. As a result, the high-resolution images produced by the RIM method can be significantly degraded if not properly calibrated. Using an enhanced numerical radar simulator, in which data from multiple sampling volumes are simultaneously generated, the proposed calibration method is validated. Subsequently, the method is applied to preliminary data from the EISCAT radar, providing first results of RIM images of PMSE. Data using conventional analysis techniques, and confirmed by RIM, reveal an often-observed double-layer structure with higher stability in the lower layer. Moreover, vertical velocity oscillations exhibit a clear correlation with the apparent motion of the layers shown in the echo power plots.

  8. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report...... presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated...... a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam...

  9. SRHA calibration curve

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — an UV calibration curve for SRHA quantitation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Chang, X., and D. Bouchard. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled...

  10. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  11. Calibrated Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  12. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina; Webb, Craig

    2016-05-02

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the progress on the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations for all shortwave and longwave radiometers that are deployed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program.

  13. The Effect of Halo Assembly Bias on Self Calibration in Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Wechsler, Risa H

    2008-01-01

    Self-calibration techniques for analyzing cluster counts rely on using the abundance and the clustering amplitude of clusters to simultaneously constrain cosmological parameters and the relation between halo mass and its observable mass tracer. It was recently discovered that the clustering amplitude of halos depends not only on halo mass, but also on various secondary variables such as halo formation time and concentration; these dependences are collectively termed ``assembly bias.'' Using a modified Fisher matrix formalism, we explore whether these secondary variables have a significant impact on studying the properties of dark energy with self calibration in current (SDSS) and near future (DES, SPT, and LSST) cluster surveys. We find that for an SDSS-like survey, secondary dependences of halo bias are insignificant given the expected large statistical uncertainties in dark energy parameters. For SPT- or DES-like survey volumes, we find that the dependence of halo bias on secondary variables is not a signif...

  14. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail.The first of these is a line of sight...

  15. Scanner calibration revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhitkov, Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2.) reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  16. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  17. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    box calibrator with unknown but constant total delay during a calibration tour Total Delay: The total electrical delay from the antenna phase center...to the UTCp including all the devices/cables that the satellite and clock signals pass through. It numerically equals the sum of all the sub-delays...PTB. To average out the dimnal effects and measurement noise , 5-7 days of continuous measurements is required. 3 Setups at the Lab(k) The setup

  18. Approximation Behooves Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Ribeiro, André Manuel; Poulsen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Calibration based on an expansion approximation for option prices in the Heston stochastic volatility model gives stable, accurate, and fast results for S&P500-index option data over the period 2005–2009.......Calibration based on an expansion approximation for option prices in the Heston stochastic volatility model gives stable, accurate, and fast results for S&P500-index option data over the period 2005–2009....

  19. Comparison of different multi-objective calibration criteria of a conceptual rainfall-runoff model of flood events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chahinian

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual lumped rainfall-runoff flood event model was developed and applied on the Gardon catchment located in southern France and various mono-objective and multi-objective functions were used for its calibration. The model was calibrated on 15 events and validated on 14 others. The results of both the calibration and validation phases are compared on the basis of their performance with regards to six criteria, three global criteria and three relative criteria representing volume, peakflow, and the root mean square error. The first type of criteria gives more weight to strong events whereas the second considers all events to be of equal weight. The results show that the calibrated parameter values are dependent on the type of criteria used. Significant trade-offs are observed between the different objectives: no unique set of parameter is able to satisfy all objectives simultaneously. Instead, the solution to the calibration problem is given by a set of Pareto optimal solutions. From this set of optimal solutions, a balanced aggregated objective function is proposed, as a compromise between up to three objective functions. The mono-objective and multi-objective calibration strategies are compared both in terms of parameter variation bounds and simulation quality. The results of this study indicate that two well chosen and non-redundant objective functions are sufficient to calibrate the model and that the use of three objective functions does not necessarily yield different results. The problems of non-uniqueness in model calibration, and the choice of the adequate objective functions for flood event models, emphasise the importance of the modeller's intervention. The recent advances in automatic optimisation techniques do not minimise the user's responsibility, who has to chose multiple criteria based on the aims of the study, his appreciation on the errors induced by data and model structure and his knowledge of the catchment

  20. Comparison of different multi-objective calibration criteria using a conceptual rainfall-runoff model of flood events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Moussa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual lumped rainfall-runoff flood event model was developed and applied on the Gardon catchment located in Southern France and various single-objective and multi-objective functions were used for its calibration. The model was calibrated on 15 events and validated on 14 others. The results of both the calibration and validation phases are compared on the basis of their performance with regards to six criteria, three global criteria and three relative criteria representing volume, peakflow, and the root mean square error. The first type of criteria gives more weight to large events whereas the second considers all events to be of equal weight. The results show that the calibrated parameter values are dependent on the type of criteria used. Significant trade-offs are observed between the different objectives: no unique set of parameters is able to satisfy all objectives simultaneously. Instead, the solution to the calibration problem is given by a set of Pareto optimal solutions. From this set of optimal solutions, a balanced aggregated objective function is proposed, as a compromise between up to three objective functions. The single-objective and multi-objective calibration strategies are compared both in terms of parameter variation bounds and simulation quality. The results of this study indicate that two well chosen and non-redundant objective functions are sufficient to calibrate the model and that the use of three objective functions does not necessarily yield different results. The problems of non-uniqueness in model calibration, and the choice of the adequate objective functions for flood event models, emphasise the importance of the modeller's intervention. The recent advances in automatic optimisation techniques do not minimise the user's responsibility, who has to choose multiple criteria based on the aims of the study, his appreciation on the errors induced by data and model structure and his knowledge of the

  1. Energy calibration via correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241 Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be le...

  2. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, M.

    2013-01-15

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated by accurately aligning the beam to pass close to a reference wind speed sensor. A testing procedure is presented, reporting requirements outlined and the uncertainty of the method analysed. It is seen that the main limitation of the line of sight calibration method is the time required to obtain a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam inclination introduces extra uncertainties. A procedure for conducting such a calibration is presented and initial indications of the uncertainties given. A discussion of the merits and weaknesses of the two methods is given together with some proposals for the next important steps to be taken in this work. (Author)

  3. Estimation of beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume from arterial pressure: A comparison of two pressure wave analysis techniques during head- up tilt testing in young, healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, W.T.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Oosting, H.; Wesseling, K.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume (SV) estimated by two different pressure wave analysis techniques during orthostatic stress testing: pulse contour analysis and Modelflow, ie, simulation of a three-element model of aortic input impedance. Methods:

  4. Artificial calibration source for ALMA radio interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Hills, Richard; Whyborn, Nicholas D.; Asayama, Shinichiro; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Iguchi, Satoru; Corder, Stuartt A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) radio interferometer has some different types of antennas which have a variation of gain and leakages across the primary beam of an individual antenna. We have been developing an artificial calibration source which is used for compensation of individual difference of antennas. In a high-frequency antenna, using astronomical sources to do calibration measurement would be extremely time consuming, whereas with the artificial calibration source becomes a realistic possibility. Photonic techniques are considered to be superior to conventional techniques based on electronic devices in terms of wide bandwidth and high-frequency signals. Conversion from an optical signal to a millimeter/sub-millimeter wave signal is done by a photo-mixer.

  5. Accurate assessment of breast volume: a study comparing the volumetric gold standard (direct water displacement measurement of mastectomy specimen) with a 3D laser scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Jia Miin; Mouratova, Naila; Jeffery, Rebecca M; Veitch, Daisy E; Woodman, Richard J; Dean, Nicola R

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative assessment of breast volume could contribute significantly to the planning of breast-related procedures. The availability of 3D scanning technology provides us with an innovative method for doing this. We performed this study to compare measurements by this technology with breast volume measurement by water displacement. A total of 30 patients undergoing 39 mastectomies were recruited from our center. The volume of each patient's breast(s) was determined with a preoperative 3D laser scan. The volume of the mastectomy specimen was then measured in the operating theater by water displacement. There was a strong linear association between breast volumes measured using the 2 different methods when using a Pearson correlation (r = 0.95, P Scanner as a tool for assessment of breast volume.

  6. Calibration Techniques for Triple Quadrupole Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer%三重四级杆气相色谱-串联质谱联用仪的校准

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵迎晨; 冯帅博; 李琛; 李佳

    2016-01-01

    The calibration method of GC–MS/MS instrument was discussed. The calibration items such as resolution, qualitative and quantitative repeatability, detection limit, quality accuracy and spectral library search were proposed referring to JJF1164 –2006 Calibration Specification for Bench Top Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometers. The method was used to calibrate GC–MS/MS and it is proved that the method is reasonable.%参考JJF 1164–2006《台式气相色谱–质谱联用仪校准规范》,探讨了三重四级杆气相色谱–串联质谱联用仪的校准方法,提出了以分辨力、定性定量重复性、检出限、质量准确性与谱库检索等5项作为相关校准项目。经验证,用该校准方法对三重四级杆气相色谱–串联质谱联用仪进行校准是可行的。

  7. Calibration of a {sup 19} {sup 2}Ir source for high dose brachytherapy using various techniques; Calibracion de una fuente de {sup 192} Ir para braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis mediante diversas tecnicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montilla Prieto, Tedicel C., E-mail: tcdicel@gmaiLcam [Instituto de Oncologia Dr. Miguel Perez Carreno, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Departamento de Fisica y Dosimetria; Padron Rivero, Alvaro D., E-mail: alvarodpadronr@yahoo.com.ve [Universidad de Carabobo, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2013-10-01

    In this research we studied three experimental procedures for calibration of a source of {sup 192}Ir to high dose rate for clinical brachytherapy use, and thus were compared and analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each. For this study we quantified the value of the current kerma rate reference in air by three procedures: source calibration using a well chamber, with an cylindrical ionization chamber in air, and a cylindrical ionization chamber on a phantom, and this magnitude was compared with the value provided by the manufacturer of the source and thereby obtaining the deviation corresponding . Thus, it was found that the deviation corresponding to the source calibration making use of a well chamber, remained within tolerance, while the cylindrical ionization chamber in air and on phantom exceeded the standards established in some documents. However, although both the measurement in air and in the phantom are the procedures for the final calibration source, these can be used to verify that the delivered dose are in tolerance.

  8. Accurate and Simple Calibration of DLP Projector Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Much work has been devoted to the calibration of optical cameras, and accurate and simple methods are now available which require only a small number of calibration targets. The problem of obtaining these parameters for light projectors has not been studied as extensively and most current methods require a camera and involve feature extraction from a known projected pattern. In this work we present a novel calibration technique for DLP Projector systems based on phase shifting profilometry pr...

  9. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G. Jackson, E-mail: williams270@llnl.gov; Maddox, Brian R.; Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kojima, Sadaoki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka, 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Millecchia, Matthew [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system.

  10. Multi-Instrument Inter-Calibration (MIIC System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Currey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to have confidence in the long-term records of atmospheric and surface properties derived from satellite measurements it is important to know the stability and accuracy of the actual radiance or reflectance measurements. Climate quality measurements require accurate calibration of space-borne instruments. Inter-calibration is the process that ties the calibration of a target instrument to a more accurate, preferably SI-traceable, reference instrument by matching measurements in time, space, wavelength, and view angles. A major challenge for any inter-calibration study is to find and acquire matched samples from within the large data volumes distributed across Earth science data centers. Typically less than 0.1% of the instrument data are required for inter-calibration analysis. Software tools and networking middleware are necessary for intelligent selection and retrieval of matched samples from multiple instruments on separate spacecraft.  This paper discusses the Multi-Instrument Inter-Calibration (MIIC system, a web-based software framework used by the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO Pathfinder mission to simplify the data management mechanics of inter-calibration. MIIC provides three main services: (1 inter-calibration event prediction; (2 data acquisition; and (3 data analysis. The combination of event prediction and powerful server-side functions reduces the data volume required for inter-calibration studies by several orders of magnitude, dramatically reducing network bandwidth and disk storage needs. MIIC provides generic retrospective analysis services capable of sifting through large data volumes of existing instrument data. The MIIC tiered design deployed at large institutional data centers can help international organizations, such as Global Space Based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS, more efficiently acquire matched data from multiple data centers. In this paper we describe the MIIC

  11. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Luo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT and its multiplanar reformation (MPR, volume rendering (VR and virtual bronchoscopy (VB postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors.Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology.Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6, tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16, extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm-56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1, longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm-68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1, morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1 and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10, and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n = 1; low density

  12. Bayesian calibration of car-following models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hinsbergen, C.P.IJ.; Van Lint, H.W.C.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Van Zuylen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that there exist large inter-driver differences in car-following behavior such that different car-following models may apply to different drivers. This study applies Bayesian techniques to the calibration of car-following models, where prior distributions on each model p

  13. Phase calibration scheme for a ``T'' array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.; Subramanian, K. R.; Sastry, Ch. V.

    1999-10-01

    A calibration scheme based on closure and redundancy techniques is described for correcting the phase errors in the complex visibilities observed with a T-shaped radio interferometer array. Practical details of the scheme are illustrated with reference to the Gauribidanur radioheliograph (GRH).

  14. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  15. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  16. Modal and Wave Load Identification by ARMA Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Kristian Jehrbo; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    In this paper modal parameter as well as wave load identification by calibration of ARMA models is considered for a simple offshore structure. The theory of identification by ARMA calibration is presented as an identification technique in the time domain which can be applied for white noise excited...

  17. Modal and Wave Load Identification by ARMA Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Kristian Jehrbo; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    1992-01-01

    In this note, modal parameter and wave load identification by calibration of ARMA models are considered for a simple offshore structure. The theory of identification by ARMA calibration is introduced as an identification technique in the time domain, which can be applied for white noise...

  18. Calibration Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  19. Ibis ground calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, A.J.; Barlow, E.J.; Tikkanen, T. [Southampton Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica - IASF/CNR, Roma (Italy); Blondel, C.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F. [CEA Saclay - Sap, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Di Cocco, G.; Malaguti, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Bologna - IASF/CNR (Italy); Gabriele, M.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- IASF/CNR, Palermo (Italy); Quadrini, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Cosmica, EASF/CNR, Milano (Italy); Volkmer, R. [Institut fur Astronomie und Astrophysik, Tubingen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    We present an overview of results obtained from IBIS ground calibrations. The spectral and spatial characteristics of the detector planes and surrounding passive materials have been determined through a series of calibration campaigns. Measurements of pixel gain, energy resolution, detection uniformity, efficiency and imaging capability are presented. The key results obtained from the ground calibration have been: - optimization of the instrument tunable parameters, - determination of energy linearity for all detection modes, - determination of energy resolution as a function of energy through the range 20 keV - 3 MeV, - demonstration of imaging capability in each mode, - measurement of intrinsic detector non-uniformity and understanding of the effects of passive materials surrounding the detector plane, and - discovery (and closure) of various leakage paths through the passive shielding system.

  20. Calibrating Legal Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Schauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the notion and essence of legal judgments calibration the possibilities of using it in the lawenforcement activity to explore the expenses and advantages of using it. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena which enables to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of objective and subjective factors it determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparative legal sociological methods of cognitive psychology and philosophy. Results In ordinary life people who assess other peoplersaquos judgments typically take into account the other judgments of those they are assessing in order to calibrate the judgment presently being assessed. The restaurant and hotel rating website TripAdvisor is exemplary because it facilitates calibration by providing access to a raterrsaquos previous ratings. Such information allows a user to see whether a particular rating comes from a rater who is enthusiastic about every place she patronizes or instead from someone who is incessantly hard to please. And even when less systematized as in assessing a letter of recommendation or college transcript calibration by recourse to the decisional history of those whose judgments are being assessed is ubiquitous. Yet despite the ubiquity and utility of such calibration the legal system seems perversely to reject it. Appellate courts do not openly adjust their standard of review based on the previous judgments of the judge whose decision they are reviewing nor do judges in reviewing legislative or administrative decisions magistrates in evaluating search warrant representations or jurors in assessing witness perception. In most legal domains calibration by reference to the prior decisions of the reviewee is invisible either because it does not exist or because reviewing bodies are unwilling to admit using what they in fact know and employ. Scientific novelty for the first

  1. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  2. Calibrating ground-based microwave radiometers: Uncertainty and drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, N.; Turner, D. D.; Löhnert, U.; Crewell, S.

    2016-04-01

    The quality of microwave radiometer (MWR) calibrations, including both the absolute radiometric accuracy and the spectral consistency, determines the accuracy of geophysical retrievals. The Microwave Radiometer Calibration Experiment (MiRaCalE) was conducted to evaluate the performance of MWR calibration techniques, especially of the so-called Tipping Curve Calibrations (TCC) and Liquid Nitrogen Calibrations (LN2cal), by repeatedly calibrating a fourth-generation Humidity and Temperature Profiler (HATPRO-G4) that measures downwelling radiance between 20 GHz and 60 GHz. MiRaCalE revealed two major points to improve MWR calibrations: (i) the necessary repetition frequency for MWR calibration techniques to correct drifts, which ensures stable long-term measurements; and (ii) the spectral consistency of control measurements of a well known reference is useful to estimate calibration accuracy. Besides, we determined the accuracy of the HATPRO's liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody's temperature. TCCs and LN2cals were found to agree within 0.5 K when observing the liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody with a physical temperature of 77 K. This agreement of two different calibration techniques suggests that the brightness temperature of the LN2 cooled blackbody is accurate within at least 0.5 K, which is a significant reduction of the uncertainties that have been assumed to vary between 0.6 K and 1.5 K when calibrating the HATPRO-G4. The error propagation of both techniques was found to behave almost linearly, leading to maximum uncertainties of 0.7 K when observing a scene that is associated with a brightness temperature of 15 K.

  3. CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR PRECISE CALIBRATION OF TEMPERATURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Solovyev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A calibration technique for cryogenic temperature sensors is proposed and implemented. The experimental setup is based on the helium cryogenerator, providing calibration of the temperature sensors of various types in wide temperature range, including cryogenic band (25-100K. A condensation thermometer with hydrogen, neon, argon and xenon as working gases is used as a reference sensor. The experimental setup was successfully used for precise (0.1K precision calibration of platinum resistive temperature detectors (Pt-100 for international nuclear physics experiments MuSun and PolFusion. The setup can also be used for calibration of temperature sensors of the other types.

  4. Monitoring the stability of wavelength calibration of spectrophotometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzun, W J; Miller, W G

    1986-01-01

    The difference in absorbance (delta A) between equimolar acid and alkaline solutions of methyl red, at a wavelength near the isosbestic point of the indicator, is reproducible. Furthermore, this delta A is sensitive to changes in the wavelength calibration of the instrument used to make the measurement. The delta A of methyl red can be used to monitor wavelength accuracy in both manual and automated spectrophotometric instruments. Although this measurement does not establish wavelength calibration, it is useful for monitoring the wavelength accuracy of previously calibrated, automated spectrophotometers that do not easily lend themselves to calibration checks by conventional techniques.

  5. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  6. Comparison of different calibration methods suited for calibration problems with many variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and compares different kinds of statistical methods proposed in the literature as suited for solving calibration problems with many variables. These are: principal component regression, partial least-squares, and ridge regression. The statistical techniques themselves do...... not provide robust results in the spirit of calibration equations which can last for long periods. A way of obtaining this property is by smoothing and differentiating the data. These techniques are considered, and it is shown how they fit into the treated description....

  7. Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2016-09-01

    Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement should have large calibration volume and be flexible in the actual measurement field. In this paper, we present a high-precision calibration method. Instead of using a large 3D pattern, we use a small planar pattern and a precalibrated matrix camera to obtain plenty of points with a suitable distribution, which would ensure the precision of the calibration results. The matrix camera removes the necessity of precise adjustment and movement and links the line-scan camera to the world easily, both of which enhance flexibility in the measurement field. The method has been verified by experiments. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method gives a practical solution to calibrate line scan cameras for precision measurement.

  8. Simple laser vision sensor calibration for surface profiling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; ElSoussi, Adnane O.; Al Alami, Abed ElRahman K.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the relatively large structures in the Oil and Gas industry, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have been implementing custom-designed laser vision sensor (LVS) surface profiling systems as part of quality control in their manufacturing processes. The rough manufacturing environment and the continuous movement and misalignment of these custom-designed tools adversely affect the accuracy of laser-based vision surface profiling applications. Accordingly, Oil and Gas businesses have been raising the demand from the OEMs to implement practical and robust LVS calibration techniques prior to running any visual inspections. This effort introduces an LVS calibration technique representing a simplified version of two known calibration techniques, which are commonly implemented to obtain a calibrated LVS system for surface profiling applications. Both calibration techniques are implemented virtually and experimentally to scan simulated and three-dimensional (3D) printed features of known profiles, respectively. Scanned data is transformed from the camera frame to points in the world coordinate system and compared with the input profiles to validate the introduced calibration technique capability against the more complex approach and preliminarily assess the measurement technique for weld profiling applications. Moreover, the sensitivity to stand-off distances is analyzed to illustrate the practicality of the presented technique.

  9. Smart Calibration of Excavators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Marie; Døring, Kasper; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Excavators dig holes. But where is the bucket? The purpose of this report is to treat four different problems concerning calibrations of position indicators for excavators in operation at concrete construction sites. All four problems are related to the question of how to determine the precise ge...

  10. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    is suggested to cope with the singular design matrix most often seen in chemometric calibration. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm may be generalized to all convex norms like Sigma/beta (j)/(gamma) where gamma greater than or equal to 1, i.e. a method that continuously varies from ridge regression...

  11. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  12. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  13. CALIBRATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEEGTE, HKW; KOLDENHOF, EE; BOONSTRA, AL; WILSCHUT, HW

    1992-01-01

    Two important aspects for the calibration of phoswich detector arrays have been investigated. It is shown that common gate ADCs can be used: The loss in particle identification due to fluctuations in the gate timing in multi-hit events can be corrected for by a simple procedure using the measured ti

  14. Measurement System & Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A major part of the sensors has been installed by others (see [1]) the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this report...

  15. Entropic calibration revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brody, Dorje C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: d.brody@imperial.ac.uk; Buckley, Ian R.C. [Centre for Quantitative Finance, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Constantinou, Irene C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Meister, Bernhard K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-11

    The entropic calibration of the risk-neutral density function is effective in recovering the strike dependence of options, but encounters difficulties in determining the relevant greeks. By use of put-call reversal we apply the entropic method to the time reversed economy, which allows us to obtain the spot price dependence of options and the relevant greeks.

  16. Investigation of techniques to quantify in vivo lesion volume based on comparison of water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with histology in focal cerebral ischemia of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mark; Silva, Matthew D; Li, Fuhai; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H

    2004-06-01

    Stroke lesion-volume estimates derived from calculated water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide a quantitative surrogate end-point for investigating the efficacy of drug treatment or studying the temporal evolution of cerebral ischemia. Methodology is described for estimating ischemic lesion volumes in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) based on absolute and percent-reduction threshold values of the water ADC at 3 h post-MCAO. Volume estimates derived from average ADC (ADC(av)) maps were compared with those derived from post-mortem histological sections. Optimum ADC thresholds were established as those that provided the best correlation and one-to-one correspondence between ADC- and histologically derived lesion-volume estimates. At 3 h post-MCAO, an absolute-ADC(av) threshold of 47 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s (corresponding to a 33% reduction in ADC(av) based on a contralateral hemisphere comparison) provided the most accurate estimate of percent hemispheric lesion volume (%HLV). Experimental and data analysis issues for improving and validating the usefulness of DWI as a surrogate endpoint for the quantification of ischemic lesion volume are discussed.

  17. Effective Calibration and Evaluation of Multi-Camera Robotic Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Kocmanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with appropriate calibration of multispectral vision systems and evaluation of the calibration and data-fusion quality in real-world indoor and outdoor conditions. Checkerboard calibration pattern developed by our team for multispectral calibration of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters is described in detail. The circular object for multispectral fusion evaluation is described as well. The objects were used by our team for calibration and evaluation of advanced visual system of Orpheus-X3 robot that is taken as a demonstrator, but their use is much wider, and authors suggest to use them as testbed for visual measurement systems of mobile robots. To make the calibration easy and straightforward, the authors developed MultiSensCalib program in Matlab, containing all the described techniques. The software is provided as publicly available, including source code and testing images.

  18. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  19. Marine X-band Weather Radar Data Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of weather radar data in urban hydrology is evolving and radar data is now applied for both modelling, analysis, and real time control purposes. In these contexts, it is allimportant that the radar data is well calibrated and adjusted in order to obtain valid quantitative precipitation...... estimates. This paper presents some of the challenges in small marine X-band radar calibration by comparing three calibration procedures for assessing the relationship between radar and rain gauge data. Validation shows similar results for precipitation volumes but more diverse results on peak rain...

  20. Marine X-band Weather Radar Data Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of weather radar data in urban hydrology is evolving and radar data is now applied for both modelling, analysis, and real time control purposes. In these contexts, it is allimportant that the radar data is well calibrated and adjusted in order to obtain valid quantitative precipitation...... estimates. This paper presents some of the challenges in small marine X-band radar calibration by comparing three calibration procedures for assessing the relationship between radar and rain gauge data. Validation shows similar results for precipitation volumes but more diverse results on peak rain...

  1. Kinematic calibration of orthoglide-type mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Wenger, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The paper proposes a novel calibration approach for the Orthoglide-type mechanisms based on observations of the manipulator leg parallelism during mo-tions between the prespecified test postures. It employs a low-cost measuring system composed of standard comparator indicators attached to the universal magnetic stands. They are sequentially used for measuring the deviation of the relevant leg location while the manipulator moves the TCP along the Cartesian axes. Using the measured differences, the developed algorithm estimates the joint offsets that are treated as the most essential parameters to be adjusted. The sensitivity of the meas-urement methods and the calibration accuracy are also studied. Experimental re-sults are presented that demonstrate validity of the proposed calibration technique

  2. Colorimetric calibration of coupled infrared simulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Fei, Jindong; Gao, Yang; Du, Jian

    2015-10-01

    In order to test 2-color infrared sensors, a coupled infrared simulation system can generate radiometric outputs with wavelengths that range from less than 3 microns to more than 12 microns. There are two channels in the coupled simulation system, optically combined by a diachronic beam combiner. Each channel has an infrared blackbody, a filter, a diaphragm, and diaphragm-motors. The system is projected to the sensor under testing by a collimator. This makes it difficult to calibrate the system with only one-band thermal imager. Errors will be caused in the radiance levels measured by the narrow band thermal imager. This paper describes colorimetric temperature measurement techniques that have been developed to perform radiometric calibrations of these infrared simulation systems above. The calibration system consists of two infrared thermal imagers; one is operated at the wavelength range of MW-IR, and the other at the range of LW-IR.

  3. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten

    2007-01-01

    A field calibration method and results are described along with the experience gained with the method. The cup anemometers to be calibrated are mounted in a row on a 10-m high rig and calibrated in the free wind against a reference cup anemometer. The method has been reported [1] to improve...... the statistical bias on the data relative to calibrations carried out in a wind tunnel. The methodology is sufficiently accurate for calibration of cup anemometers used for wind resource assessments and provides a simple, reliable and cost-effective solution to cup anemometer calibration, especially suited...

  4. Microhotplate Temperature Sensor Calibration and BIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, M; Montgomery, C; Cooper-Balis, E; Semancik, S; Kreider, K G; Geist, J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel long-term microhotplate temperature sensor calibration technique suitable for Built-In Self Test (BIST). The microhotplate thermal resistance (thermal efficiency) and the thermal voltage from an integrated platinum-rhodium thermocouple were calibrated against a freshly calibrated four-wire polysilicon microhotplate-heater temperature sensor (heater) that is not stable over long periods of time when exposed to higher temperatures. To stress the microhotplate, its temperature was raised to around 400 °C and held there for days. The heater was then recalibrated as a temperature sensor, and microhotplate temperature measurements were made based on the fresh calibration of the heater, the first calibration of the heater, the microhotplate thermal resistance, and the thermocouple voltage. This procedure was repeated 10 times over a period of 80 days. The results show that the heater calibration drifted substantially during the period of the test while the microhotplate thermal resistance and the thermocouple-voltage remained stable to within about plus or minus 1 °C over the same period. Therefore, the combination of a microhotplate heater-temperature sensor and either the microhotplate thermal resistance or an integrated thin film platinum-rhodium thermocouple can be used to provide a stable, calibrated, microhotplate-temperature sensor, and the combination of the three sensor is suitable for implementing BIST functionality. Alternatively, if a stable microhotplate-heater temperature sensor is available, such as a properly annealed platinum heater-temperature sensor, then the thermal resistance of the microhotplate and the electrical resistance of the platinum heater will be sufficient to implement BIST. It is also shown that aluminum- and polysilicon-based temperature sensors, which are not stable enough for measuring high microhotplate temperatures (>220 °C) without impractically frequent recalibration, can be used to measure the

  5. Calibration Of U-Tube Manometer Using Frequency Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Roshan Elizabeth Daniel; Anitha Mary.X; R. Jegan; RAJASEKARAN, K.

    2013-01-01

    U-Tube Manometer is used to measure pressure. It is calibrated using the variation in capacitance. In U-tube manometer, the relation between the level of mercury and the capacitance developed across thecopper plates of the manometer is found to be highly non-linear. Due to its non-predictive nature and nonlinear relationship, artificial intelligence techniques are used to calibrate the system. The artificial intelligence technique used here is Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). Th...

  6. 光学标校技术在舰炮武器系统中的应用研究%Application of optical alignment calibration technique in naval gun weapon system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李子明

    2012-01-01

    In order to solve the problem that the alignment calibration method of aiming at stars in naval gun weapon system is easily influenced by the weather, an optical alignment calibration method with need of reference object for the integrated weapon system of radar (photoelectricity) and naval gun is proposed. The gun barrel axis is led out by the laser beam and translated parallel to the radar (photoelectricity) receiving window through the alignment optical module, then the angle difference between the radar axis and barrel gun axis is obtained to be calibrated. Test and experiment results show that the method is characterized by simple operation, high efficiency and real time, it has the alignment calibration error no more than 0. 5 mrad. This method is impacted less by the weather and environment conditions compared with the method of aiming at stars, and has a significant role to give full play to the operational effectiveness of gun weapon system.%为了解决舰炮武器系统瞄星标校受天气影响较大的问题,针对雷达(光电)与舰炮一体化的武器系统,提出了一种不需要参照物的光学标校方法.该方法用激光束将炮管轴线引出,通过不失调光学组件进行平行移动并进入雷达(光电)接收窗口,从而获得雷达(光电系统)轴线与炮管轴线的角度差并进行标校.测试与试验结果表明,该方法具有操作简便、效率高、适时性强、标校误差不大于0.5 mrad等特点,与描星方法标校相比,受天气、环境因素影响较小,对充分发挥舰炮武器系统的作战效能具有显著作用.

  7. 时间交叉存取逐次逼近型ADC中的电容自校准技术%Capacitor self-calibration technique used in time-interleaved successive approximation ADC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷勤; 戚韬; 吴光林; 吴建辉

    2006-01-01

    A capacitor self-calibration circuit used in a successive approximation analog-to-digital converter(SA-ADC) is presented. This capacitor self-calibration circuit can calibrate erroneous data and work with the ADC by adding an additional clock period. This circuit is used in a 10 bit 32 Msample/s time-interleaved SAADC. The chip is implemented with Chart 0. 25 μm 2. 5 V process and totally occupies an area of 1.4 mm × 1.3mm. After calibration, the simulated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 59. 586 1 dB and the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) is 70. 246 dB at 32 MHz. The measured signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SINAD) is 44. 82 dB and the SFDR is 63. 760 4 dB when the ADC samples a 5.8 MHz sinusoid wave.%设计了一种用于逐次逼近型ADC中的电容自校准电路.通过增加一个校准周期,该电容自校准结构即可与原电路并行工作,并可校准电路工作时产生的误差.采用该电路设计了一个用于多通道逐次逼近型结构的10 bit 32 Msample/s模数转换器单元,该芯片在Chart 0.25 μm 2.5 V工艺上实现,总的芯片面积为1.4 mm×1.3 mm.在32 MHz工作时,通过校准后的信噪比仿真结果为59.586 1 dB,无杂散动态范围为70.246 dB.芯片实测,输入频率5.8 MHz时,信噪失真比为44.82dB,无杂散动态范围为63.760 4 dB.

  8. Mercury Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  9. Adaptable Multivariate Calibration Models for Spectral Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    1999-12-20

    Multivariate calibration techniques have been used in a wide variety of spectroscopic situations. In many of these situations spectral variation can be partitioned into meaningful classes. For example, suppose that multiple spectra are obtained from each of a number of different objects wherein the level of the analyte of interest varies within each object over time. In such situations the total spectral variation observed across all measurements has two distinct general sources of variation: intra-object and inter-object. One might want to develop a global multivariate calibration model that predicts the analyte of interest accurately both within and across objects, including new objects not involved in developing the calibration model. However, this goal might be hard to realize if the inter-object spectral variation is complex and difficult to model. If the intra-object spectral variation is consistent across objects, an effective alternative approach might be to develop a generic intra-object model that can be adapted to each object separately. This paper contains recommendations for experimental protocols and data analysis in such situations. The approach is illustrated with an example involving the noninvasive measurement of glucose using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Extensions to calibration maintenance and calibration transfer are discussed.

  10. Two methods for absolute calibration of dynamic pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, G. W.; Migliori, A.; Garrett, S. L.; Wheatley, J. C.

    1982-12-01

    Two techniques are described for absolute calibration of a dynamic pressure transducer from 0 to 400 Hz in 1-MPa helium gas. One technique is based on a comparison to a mercury manometer; the other is based on the principle of reciprocity. The two techniques agree within the instrumental uncertainties of 1%.

  11. A liquid crystal thermography calibration with true color image processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Rao; Shusheng Zang; Minghai Huang

    2009-01-01

    Liquid crystal thermography is a high-resolution,non-intrusive optical technique for full-field temperature measurement.We present the detailed calibration data for the thermochromic liquid crystal(TLC)with a usefill range of 41-60 ℃.The calibration is done with true color image processing by using an isothermal calibrator.The hue-temperature curve of the TLC is obtained,and the measurement uncertainty is analyzed.Combined with the image noise reduction technique of a 5×5 median filter,the measurement accuracy of the liquid crystal thermography can be significantly improved by approximately 57.1%.

  12. Measurement Error Analysis and Calibration Technique of NTC- Based Body Temperature Sensor%一种基于NTC的体温传感器测量误差分析及校准技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓迟; 胡巍; 刁盛锡; 林福江; 钱大宏

    2015-01-01

    A NTC thermistor-based wearable body temperature sensor was designed. This paper described the design principles and realization method of the NTC-based body temperature sensor. In this paper the temperature measurement error sources of the body temperature sensor were analyzed in detail. The automatic measurement and calibration method of ADC error was given. The results showed that the measurement accuracy of calibrated body temperature sensor is better than±0.04oC. The temperature sensor has high accuracy, smal size and low power consumption advantages.%该文设计了一款基于NTC热敏电阻的可穿戴式体温传感器,阐述了基于NTC的体温传感器的设计原理及实现方法。文中对体温传感器的温度测量误差来源进行了详细分析,给出了ADC误差自动测量和校准的方法。实验结果表明,经校准后的体温传感器其测量精度误差小于±0.04 oC。该体温传感器具有精度高、体积小和功耗低的优点。

  13. The Calibration Reference Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, P.; Miller, T.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a software architecture and implementation for using rules to determine which calibration files are appropriate for calibrating a given observation. This new system, the Calibration Reference Data System (CRDS), replaces what had been previously used for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) calibration pipelines, the Calibration Database System (CDBS). CRDS will be used for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) calibration pipelines, and is currently being used for HST calibration pipelines. CRDS can be easily generalized for use in similar applications that need a rules-based system for selecting the appropriate item for a given dataset; we give some examples of such generalizations that will likely be used for JWST. The core functionality of the Calibration Reference Data System is available under an Open Source license. CRDS is briefly contrasted with a sampling of other similar systems used at other observatories.

  14. Lidar calibration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.; Streicher, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of atmospheric aerosol diffusion experiments combined with lidar detection was conducted to evaluate and calibrate an existing retrieval algorithm for aerosol backscatter lidar systems. The calibration experiments made use of two (almost) identical mini-lidar systems for aerosol cloud...... detection to test the reproducibility and uncertainty of lidars. Lidar data were obtained from both single-ended and double-ended Lidar configurations. A backstop was introduced in one of the experiments and a new method was developed where information obtained from the backstop can be used in the inversion...... algorithm. Independent in-situ aerosol plume concentrations were obtained from a simultaneous tracer gas experiment with SF6, and comparisons with the two lidars were made. The study shows that the reproducibility of the lidars is within 15%, including measurements from both sides of a plume...

  15. HIRDLS monochromator calibration equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepplewhite, Christopher L.; Barnett, John J.; Djotni, Karim; Whitney, John G.; Bracken, Justain N.; Wolfenden, Roger; Row, Frederick; Palmer, Christopher W. P.; Watkins, Robert E. J.; Knight, Rodney J.; Gray, Peter F.; Hammond, Geoffory

    2003-11-01

    A specially designed and built monochromator was developed for the spectral calibration of the HIRDLS instrument. The High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) is a precision infra-red remote sensing instrument with very tight requirements on the knowledge of the response to received radiation. A high performance, vacuum compatible monochromator, was developed with a wavelength range from 4 to 20 microns to encompass that of the HIRDLS instrument. The monochromator is integrated into a collimating system which is shared with a set of tiny broad band sources used for independent spatial response measurements (reported elsewhere). This paper describes the design and implementation of the monochromator and the performance obtained during the period of calibration of the HIRDLS instrument at Oxford University in 2002.

  16. Optical tweezers absolute calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Dutra, R S; Neto, P A Maia; Nussenzveig, H M

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past fifteen years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spo...

  17. Calibration of the Milagro Cosmic Ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    The Milagro detector is an air shower array which uses the water Cherenkov technique and is capable of continuously monitoring the sky at energies near 1 TeV. The detector consists of 20000 metric tons of pure water instrumented with 723 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs are arranged in a two-layer structure on a lattice of 3 m spacing covering 5000 $m^2$ area. The direction of the shower is determined from the relative timing of the PMT signals, necessitating a common time reference and amplitude slewing corrections to improve the time resolution. The calibration system to provide these consists of a pulsed laser driving 30 diffusing light sources deployed in the pond to allow cross-calibration of the PMTs. The system is capable of calibrating times and the pulse-heights from the PMTs using the time-over-threshold technique. The absolute energy scale is provided using single muons passing through the detector. The description of the calibration system of the Milagro detector and its prototype Milagrito...

  18. Calibration Facilities for NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, T.S.

    2000-06-15

    The calibration facilities will be dynamic and will change to meet the needs of experiments. Small sources, such as the Manson Source should be available to everyone at any time. Carrying out experiments at Omega is providing ample opportunity for practice in pre-shot preparation. Hopefully, the needs that are demonstrated in these experiments will assure the development of (or keep in service) facilities at each of the laboratories that will be essential for in-house preparation for experiments at NIF.

  19. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  20. Astrid-2 SSC ASUMagnetic Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz

    1997-01-01

    Report of the inter calibration between the starcamera and the fluxgate magnetometer onboard the ASTRID-2 satellite. This calibration was performed in the night between the 15. and 16. May 1997 at the Lovö magnetic observatory.......Report of the inter calibration between the starcamera and the fluxgate magnetometer onboard the ASTRID-2 satellite. This calibration was performed in the night between the 15. and 16. May 1997 at the Lovö magnetic observatory....

  1. Sensor Pointing Calibration Strategy Using Doppler Centroid Estimates over Stationary Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, A.; Giudici, D.; Miranda, N.; Monti Guarnieri, A.

    2016-08-01

    A technique for the calibration of the pointing of a SAR sensor from the Doppler Centroid estimates over still land is presented. The technique is validated over real Sentine-1 data and results of the sensor calibration are provided. Finally a possible application of the technique to geophysical parameters retrieval is described.

  2. Calibration and intercomparison methods of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities; Metodos de calibracao e de intercomparacao de calibradores de dose utilizados em servicos de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Alessandro Martins da

    1999-07-01

    Dose calibrators are used in most of the nuclear medicine facilities to determine the amount of radioactivity administered to a patient in a particular investigation or therapeutic procedure. It is therefore of vital importance that the equipment used presents good performance and is regular;y calibrated at a authorized laboratory. This occurs of adequate quality assurance procedures are carried out. Such quality control tests should be performed daily, other biannually or yearly, testing, for example, its accuracy and precision, the reproducibility and response linearity. In this work a commercial dose calibrator was calibrated with solution of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as response linearity and the response variation of the source volume increase at a constant source activity concentration, were performed. This instrument can now be used as a working standard for calibration of other dose calibrators/ An intercomparison procedure was proposed as a method of quality control of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities. (author)

  3. “High Frequency/Small Tidal Volume Differential Lung Ventilation”: A Technique of Ventilating the Nondependent Lung of One Lung Ventilation for Robotically Assisted Thoracic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Shoman, Bassam M.; Hany O. Ragab; Ammar Mustafa; Rashid Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of new techniques and advances in the thoracic surgery fields, challenges to the anesthesia techniques had became increasingly exponential. One of the great improvements that took place in the thoracic surgical field was the use of the robotically assisted thoracic surgical procedure and minimally invasive endoscopic thoracic surgery. One lung ventilation technique represents the core anesthetic management for the success of those surgical procedures. Even with the use o...

  4. Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    We examine the accuracy of a modified finite volume method compared to analytical and Monte Carlo solutions for solving the radiative transfer equation. The model is used for predicting light propagation within a two-dimensional absorbing and highly forward-scattering medium such as biological tissue subjected to a collimated light beam. Numerical simulations for the spatially resolved reflectance and transmittance are presented considering refractive index mismatch with Fresnel reflection at the interface, homogeneous and two-layered media. Time-dependent as well as steady-state cases are considered. In the steady state, it is found that the modified finite volume method is in good agreement with the other two methods. The relative differences between the solutions are found to decrease with spatial mesh refinement applied for the modified finite volume method obtaining method is used for the time semi-discretization of the radiative transfer equation. An agreement among the modified finite volume method, Runge-Kutta method, and Monte Carlo solutions are shown, but with relative differences higher than in the steady state.

  5. Clustered calibration : An improvement to radio interferometric direction-dependent self-calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazemi, S.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.

    2013-01-01

    The new generation of radio synthesis arrays, such as Low Frequency Array and Square Kilometre Array, have been designed to surpass existing arrays in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution and frequency coverage. This evolution has led to the development of advanced calibration techniques that en

  6. Clustered calibration: an improvement to radio interferometric direction-dependent self-calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazemi, S.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.

    2013-01-01

    The new generation of radio synthesis arrays, such as Low Frequency Array and Square Kilometre Array, have been designed to surpass existing arrays in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution and frequency coverage. This evolution has led to the development of advanced calibration techniques that en

  7. Validity and repeatability of a depth camera-based surface imaging system for thigh volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullas, Alice M; Choppin, Simon; Heller, Ben; Wheat, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Complex anthropometrics such as area and volume, can identify changes in body size and shape that are not detectable with traditional anthropometrics of lengths, breadths, skinfolds and girths. However, taking these complex with manual techniques (tape measurement and water displacement) is often unsuitable. Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging systems are quick and accurate alternatives to manual techniques but their use is restricted by cost, complexity and limited access. We have developed a novel low-cost, accessible and portable 3D surface imaging system based on consumer depth cameras. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and repeatability of the system in the measurement of thigh volume. The thigh volumes of 36 participants were measured with the depth camera system and a high precision commercially available 3D surface imaging system (3dMD). The depth camera system used within this study is highly repeatable (technical error of measurement (TEM) of <1.0% intra-calibration and ~2.0% inter-calibration) but systematically overestimates (~6%) thigh volume when compared to the 3dMD system. This suggests poor agreement yet a close relationship, which once corrected can yield a usable thigh volume measurement.

  8. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager Radiometric Calibration and Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Markham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI was radiometrically calibrated prior to launch in terms of spectral radiance, using an integrating sphere source traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST standards of spectral irradiance. It was calibrated on-orbit in terms of reflectance using diffusers characterized prior to launch using NIST traceable standards. The radiance calibration was performed with an uncertainty of ~3%; the reflectance calibration to an uncertainty of ~2%. On-orbit, multiple calibration techniques indicate that the sensor has been stable to better than 0.3% to date, with the exception of the shortest wavelength band, which has degraded about 1.0%. A transfer to orbit experiment conducted using the OLI’s heliostat-illuminated diffuser suggests that some bands increased in sensitivity on transition to orbit by as much as 5%, with an uncertainty of ~2.5%. On-orbit comparisons to other instruments and vicarious calibration techniques show the radiance (without a transfer to orbit adjustment, and reflectance calibrations generally agree with other instruments and ground measurements to within the uncertainties. Calibration coefficients are provided with the data products to convert to either radiance or reflectance units.

  9. In situ ``artificial plasma'' calibration of tokamak magnetic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, D.; Levesque, J. P.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; DeBono, B. A.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; Rath, N.

    2013-06-01

    A unique in situ calibration technique has been used to spatially calibrate and characterize the extensive new magnetic diagnostic set and close-fitting conducting wall of the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) experiment. A new set of 216 Mirnov coils has recently been installed inside the vacuum chamber of the device for high-resolution measurements of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena including the effects of eddy currents in the nearby conducting wall. The spatial positions of these sensors are calibrated by energizing several large in situ calibration coils in turn, and using measurements of the magnetic fields produced by the various coils to solve for each sensor's position. Since the calibration coils are built near the nominal location of the plasma current centroid, the technique is referred to as an "artificial plasma" calibration. The fitting procedure for the sensor positions is described, and results of the spatial calibration are compared with those based on metrology. The time response of the sensors is compared with the evolution of the artificial plasma current to deduce the eddy current contribution to each signal. This is compared with simulations using the VALEN electromagnetic code, and the modeled copper thickness profiles of the HBT-EP conducting wall are adjusted to better match experimental measurements of the eddy current decay. Finally, the multiple coils of the artificial plasma system are also used to directly calibrate a non-uniformly wound Fourier Rogowski coil on HBT-EP.

  10. Calibration of three-dimensional ultrasound images for image-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, Lionel G. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). E-mail: bouchet at neurosurgery.ufl.edu; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Goodchild, Gordon [Medtronic Surgical Navigation Technologies, Broomfield, CO (United States)

    2001-02-01

    A new technique of patient positioning for radiotherapy/radiosurgery of extracranial tumours using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound images has been developed. The ultrasound probe position is tracked within the treatment room via infrared light emitting diodes (IRLEDs) attached to the probe. In order to retrieve the corresponding room position of the ultrasound image, we developed an initial ultrasound probe calibration technique for both 2D and 3D ultrasound systems. This technique is based on knowledge of points in both room and image coordinates. We first tested the performance of three algorithms in retrieving geometrical transformations using synthetic data with different noise levels. Closed form solution algorithms (singular value decomposition and Horn's quaternion algorithms) were shown to outperform the Hooke and Jeeves iterative algorithm in both speed and accuracy. Furthermore, these simulations show that for a random noise level of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 mm, the number of points required for a transformation accuracy better than 1 mm is 25, 100, 200 and 500 points respectively. Finally, we verified the tracking accuracy of this system using a specially designed ultrasound phantom. Since ultrasound images have a high noise level, we designed an ultrasound phantom that provides a large number of points for the calibration. This tissue equivalent phantom is made of nylon wires, and its room position is optically tracked using IRLEDs. By obtaining multiple images through the nylon wires, the calibration technique uses an average of 300 points for 3D ultrasound volumes and 200 for 2D ultrasound images, and its stability is very good for both rotation (standard deviation: 0.4 deg.) and translation (standard deviation: 0.3 mm) transformations. After this initial calibration procedure, the position of any voxel in the ultrasound image volume can be determined in world space, thereby allowing real-time image guidance of therapeutic procedures. Finally, the

  11. Calibration of {sup 133}Ba by Sum-Peak Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.L. da; Delgado, J.U.; Poledna, R.; Trindade, O.L.; Veras, E.V. de; Santos, A.; Rangel, J., E-mail: ronaldo@ird.gov.br, E-mail: delgado@ird.gov.br, E-mail: poledna@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, M.C.M, E-mail: marcandida@yahoo.com.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A calibration laboratory should have several methods of measurement in order to ensure robustness on the values applied. The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation, (LNMRI IRD), provides gamma sources of radionuclide in various geometries and standardized in activity with reduced uncertainties. Some absolute and relative methods of calibrations could be used routinely. Relative methods require standards to determine the activity of sample to be calibrated, while the absolute methods do not need, simply make the counting and the calculation of the activity is obtained directly. The great advantage of calibrations of radionuclides by absolute method is the accuracy and low uncertainties. {sup 133}Ba is a radionuclide enough used in research laboratories and calibration of detectors for environmental analysis and, according to the scheme, it decays 100% by electron capture and emits about 14 energy gamma and X-ray lines, forming several coincidences. However, the classical methods of absolute measurement, as coincidence 4 πβ-γ have difficulty to calibrate {sup 133}Ba due to its complex decay scheme. The sum-peak method, developed by Brickman, could allow this calibration. It is used for radionuclide calibration that emits at least two photons in coincidence. Therefore, it was developed a methodology that combines gamma spectrometry technique with sum-peak method to standardize {sup 133}Ba samples. Activity results obtained proved compatible, with uncertainties of less than 1%, and, when compared with other methods of calibration, sum-peak demonstrated the feasibility of this methodology, particularly, for simplicity and effectiveness. (author)

  12. Quality of the neutron probe calibration curve; Qualidade da curva de calibracao da sonda de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libardi, Paulo Leonel; Moraes, Sergio Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Fisica e Meteorologia. E-mail: pllibardi@mandi.esalq.usp.br; somoraes@mandi.esalq.usp.br

    1997-07-01

    An experiment of neutron probe calibration has been performed, involving various volume size samples and collected at various distances from the access tubes. The experiment aimed to give some answers to questions such as suitable sample physical volume, always use of the same volume and sample distance from the neutron probe access tube.

  13. Influence of camera calibration conditions on the accuracy of 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin-Girard, Anne-Sophie; Thibault, Simon; Laurendeau, Denis

    2016-02-01

    For stereoscopic systems designed for metrology applications, the accuracy of camera calibration dictates the precision of the 3D reconstruction. In this paper, the impact of various calibration conditions on the reconstruction quality is studied using a virtual camera calibration technique and the design file of a commercially available lens. This technique enables the study of the statistical behavior of the reconstruction task in selected calibration conditions. The data show that the mean reprojection error should not always be used to evaluate the performance of the calibration process and that a low quality of feature detection does not always lead to a high mean reconstruction error.

  14. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  15. Analysis of radiometer calibration effects with TOUCHSTONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, William D.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave circuit analysis program TOUCHSTONE is used to study two effects of importance in radiometer calibration. The two effects are impedance mismatches at the antenna-air and cold load-air interfaces and dissipatives losses, which radiate thermal noise into the system. The results predicted by TOUCHSTONE are shown to be in very close agreement with earlier results obtained by purely analytical methods. The techniques used in establishing the circuit models and in processing the resulting data are described in detail.

  16. Precision Calibration of Infrared Synchrotron Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, A A; Maslova, M V

    2003-01-01

    The technique of calibration of synchrotron radiation precision detectors on a tungsten source based on similarity (close similarity) of character of spectral distributions of synchrotron and thermal radiations is given. The characteristics of various commonly used lamps, used as "standard" ones, are given. The errors of measurements are analyzed. The detectors are intended for absolute measurements of the number of electrons in a ring-shaped bunch.

  17. ASTRA Spectrophotometer: Reduction and Flux Calibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Smalley, B; Adelman, S J; Smalley, Barry; Gulliver, Austin F.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2006-01-01

    The ASTRA Cassegrain Spectrophotometer and its automated 0.5-m telescope at Fairborn Observatory in Arizona will produce a large quantity of high precision stellar flux distributions. A separate paper (Adelman et al. 2007) presented a review of the design criteria for the system and an overview of its operation. This paper discusses the techniques used in the data reduction to final flux calibrations.

  18. Simultaneous Hand-Eye-Workspace and Camera Calibration using Laser Beam Projection

    OpenAIRE

    Jwu-Sheng Hu; Yung-Jung Chang

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel calibration technique capable of simultaneously calibrating a camera’s intrinsic parameters and hand-eye-workspace relations. In addition to relaxing the requirement of a precise calibration reference to achieve manipulator accuracy, the proposed method functions when the hand is not in the view field of the eye. The calibration method uses a laser pointer mounted on the hand to project laser beams onto a planar object, which serves as the working plane. Collected l...

  19. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  20. CALIBRATED HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezar Gülbaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The land development and increase in urbanization in a watershed affect water quantityand water quality. On one hand, urbanization provokes the adjustment of geomorphicstructure of the streams, ultimately raises peak flow rate which causes flood; on theother hand, it diminishes water quality which results in an increase in Total SuspendedSolid (TSS. Consequently, sediment accumulation in downstream of urban areas isobserved which is not preferred for longer life of dams. In order to overcome thesediment accumulation problem in dams, the amount of TSS in streams and inwatersheds should be taken under control. Low Impact Development (LID is a BestManagement Practice (BMP which may be used for this purpose. It is a land planningand engineering design method which is applied in managing storm water runoff inorder to reduce flooding as well as simultaneously improve water quality. LID includestechniques to predict suspended solid loads in surface runoff generated over imperviousurban surfaces. In this study, the impact of LID-BMPs on surface runoff and TSS isinvestigated by employing a calibrated hydrodynamic model for Sazlidere Watershedwhich is located in Istanbul, Turkey. For this purpose, a calibrated hydrodynamicmodel was developed by using Environmental Protection Agency Storm WaterManagement Model (EPA SWMM. For model calibration and validation, we set up arain gauge and a flow meter into the field and obtain rainfall and flow rate data. Andthen, we select several LID types such as retention basins, vegetative swales andpermeable pavement and we obtain their influence on peak flow rate and pollutantbuildup and washoff for TSS. Consequently, we observe the possible effects ofLID on surface runoff and TSS in Sazlidere Watershed.