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Sample records for volume backscatter coefficient

  1. Retrieval of ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient from space-borne CALIOP lidar measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Liu, Katie; Rodier, Sharon; Zeng, Shan; Lucker, Patricia; Verhappen, Ron; Wilson, Jamie; Audouy, Claude; Ferrier, Christophe; Haouchine, Said; Hunt, Bill; Getzewich, Brian

    2016-12-12

    A new approach has been proposed to determine ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient bbp from CALIOP 30° off-nadir lidar measurements. The new method also provides estimates of the particle volume scattering function at the 180° scattering angle. The CALIOP based layer-integrated lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficients are compared with the results obtained from MODIS ocean color measurements. The comparison analysis shows that ocean subsurface lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficient bbp can be accurately obtained from CALIOP lidar measurements, thereby supporting the use of space-borne lidar measurements for ocean subsurface studies.

  2. Backscatter coefficient estimation using tapers with gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchies, Adam C; Oelze, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    When using the backscatter coefficient (BSC) to estimate quantitative ultrasound parameters such as the effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC), it is necessary to assume that the interrogated medium contains diffuse scatterers. Structures that invalidate this assumption can affect the estimated BSC parameters in terms of increased bias and variance and decrease performance when classifying disease. In this work, a method was developed to mitigate the effects of echoes from structures that invalidate the assumption of diffuse scattering, while preserving as much signal as possible for obtaining diffuse scatterer property estimates. Backscattered signal sections that contained nondiffuse signals were identified and a windowing technique was used to provide BSC estimates for diffuse echoes only. Experiments from physical phantoms were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed BSC estimation methods. Tradeoffs associated with effective mitigation of specular scatterers and bias and variance introduced into the estimates were quantified. Analysis of the results suggested that discrete prolate spheroidal (PR) tapers with gaps provided the best performance for minimizing BSC error. Specifically, the mean square error for BSC between measured and theoretical had an average value of approximately 1.0 and 0.2 when using a Hanning taper and PR taper respectively, with six gaps. The BSC error due to amplitude bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 1) tapers. The BSC error due to shape bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 4) tapers. These results suggest using different taper types for estimating ESD versus EAC. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Interlaboratory comparison of backscatter coefficient estimates for tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janelle J; Herd, Maria-Teresa; King, Michael R; Haak, Alexander; Hafez, Zachary T; Song, Jun; Oelze, Michael L; Madsen, Ernest L; Zagzebski, James A; O'Brien, William D; Hall, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter is useful for characterizing tissues and several groups have reported methods for estimating backscattering properties. Previous interlaboratory comparisons have been made to test the ability to accurately estimate the backscatter coefficient (BSC) by different laboratories around the world. Results of these comparisons showed variability in BSC estimates but were acquired only for a relatively narrow frequency range, and, most importantly, lacked reference to any independent predictions from scattering theory. The goal of this study was to compare Faran-scattering-theory predictions with cooperatively-measured backscatter coefficients for low-attenuating and tissue-like attenuating phantoms containing glass sphere scatterers of different sizes for which BSCs can independently be predicted. Ultrasonic backscatter measurementswere made for frequencies from 1 to 12 MHz. Backscatter coefficients were estimated using two different planar-reflector techniques at two laboratories for two groups of phantoms. Excellent agreement was observed between BSC estimates from both laboratories. In addition, good agreement with the predictions of Faran's theory was obtained, with average fractional (bias) errors ranging from 8-14%. This interlaboratory comparison demonstrates the ability to accurately estimate parameters derived from the BSC, including an effective scatterer size and the acoustic concentration, both of which may prove useful for diagnostic applications of ultrasound tissue characterization.

  4. Inversion of dielectric constant and moisture of bare soil surface from backscattering coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宗谦; 冯孔豫

    1997-01-01

    An inverse method of dielectric constant and moisture of bare wet soil surface from backscattering coefficients is presented, which is based upon the small perturbation model of electromagnetic wave scattering from rough surfaces and the empirical and dielectric mixing models of wet soil. Some sets of curves which describe the relation between the moisture of soil and the ratio of like polarization backscattering coefficients σvv and σhh are obtained, and some principles on how to choose the incident frequencies and the incident angles of the electromagnetic wave are given Analysis and calculation show that the mam advantage of this inverse method is its efficiency and simplicity.

  5. A Parameterized Inversion Model for Soil Moisture and Biomass from Polarimetric Backscattering Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Saatchi, Sassan; Jaruwatanadilok, Sermsak

    2012-01-01

    A semi-empirical algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture, root mean square (RMS) height and biomass from polarimetric SAR data is explained and analyzed in this paper. The algorithm is a simplification of the distorted Born model. It takes into account the physical scattering phenomenon and has three major components: volume, double-bounce and surface. This simplified model uses the three backscattering coefficients ( sigma HH, sigma HV and sigma vv) at low-frequency (P-band). The inversion process uses the Levenberg-Marquardt non-linear least-squares method to estimate the structural parameters. The estimation process is entirely explained in this paper, from initialization of the unknowns to retrievals. A sensitivity analysis is also done where the initial values in the inversion process are varying randomly. The results show that the inversion process is not really sensitive to initial values and a major part of the retrievals has a root-mean-square error lower than 5% for soil moisture, 24 Mg/ha for biomass and 0.49 cm for roughness, considering a soil moisture of 40%, roughness equal to 3cm and biomass varying from 0 to 500 Mg/ha with a mean of 161 Mg/ha

  6. Ceilometer-lidar inter-comparison: backscatter coefficient retrieval and signal-to-noise ratio determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heese

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The potential of a new generation of ceilometer instruments for aerosol monitoring has been studied in the Ceilometer-Lidar Inter- Comparison (CLIC study. The ceilometer is of type CHM15k from Jenoptik, Germany, which uses a solid state laser at the wavelength of 1064 nm and an avalanche photodiode for photon counting detection. The German Meteorological Service is in progress of setting up a ceilometer network for aerosol monitoring in Germany. The intercomparison study was performed to determine whether the ceilometers are capable to deliver quality assured particle backscatter coefficient profiles. For this, the derived ceilometer profiles were compared to simultaneously measured lidar profiles at the same wavelength. The lidar used for this intercomparison was IfTs multi-wavelengths Raman lidar PollyXT. During the EARLINET lidar intercomparison campaign EARLI 09 in Leipzig, Germany, a new type of the Jenoptik ceilometer, the CHM15k-X, took part. This new ceilometer has a new optical setup resulting in a complete overlap at 150 m. The derived particle backscatter profiles were compared to profiles derived from PollyXTs measurements, too. The elastic daytime particle backscatter profiles as well as the less noisy night-time Raman particle backscatter profiles compare well with the ceilometers profiles in atmospheric structures like aerosol layers or the boundary layer top height. The calibration of the ceilometer profiles by an independent measurement of the aerosol optical depth (AOD by a sun photometer is necessary to determine the correct magnitude of the particle backscatter coefficient profiles. A comprehensive signal-to-noise ratio study was carried out to characterize the ceilometers signal performance with increasing altitude.

  7. Ceilometer lidar comparison: backscatter coefficient retrieval and signal-to-noise ratio determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heese

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential of a new generation of ceilometer instruments for aerosol monitoring has been studied in the Ceilometer Lidar Comparison (CLIC study. The used ceilometer was developed by Jenoptik, Germany, and is designed to find both thin cirrus clouds at tropopause level and aerosol layers at close ranges during day and night-time. The comparison study was performed to determine up to which altitude the ceilometers are capable to deliver particle backscatter coefficient profiles. For this, the derived ceilometer profiles are compared to simultaneously measured lidar profiles at the same wavelength. The lidar used for the comparison was the multi-wavelengths Raman lidar PollyXT. To demonstrate the capabilities and limits of ceilometers for the derivation of particle backscatter coefficient profiles from their measurements two examples of the comparison results are shown. Two cases, a daytime case with high background noise and a less noisy night-time case, are chosen. In both cases the ceilometer profiles compare well with the lidar profiles in atmospheric structures like aerosol layers or the boundary layer top height. However, the determination of the correct magnitude of the particle backscatter coefficient needs a calibration of the ceilometer data with an independent measurement of the aerosol optical depth by a sun photometer. To characterizes the ceilometers signal performance with increasing altitude a comprehensive signal-to-noise ratio study was performed. During daytime the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than 1 up to 4–5 km depending on the aerosol content. In our night-time case the SNR is higher than 1 even up to 8.5 km, so that also aerosol layers in the upper troposphere had been detected by the ceilometer.

  8. An optical model for deriving the spectral particulate backscattering coefficients in clear and turbid coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Tiwari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An optical model is developed based on the diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd to estimate particulate backscattering coefficients bbp(λ in clear and turbid coastal waters. A large in-situ data set is used to establish robust relationships between bbp(530 and bbp(555 and Kd(490 using an efficient nonlinear least square method which uses the Trust-Region algorithm with Bisquare weights scheme to adjust the coefficients. These relationships are obtained with good correlation coefficients (R2 = 0.786 and 0.790, low Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 0.00076 and 0.00072 and 95% confidence bounds. The new model is tested with two independent data sets such as the NOMAD SeaWiFS Match-ups and OOXIX IOP algorithm workshop evaluation data set (Version 2.0w APLHA. Results show that the new model makes good retrievals of bbp at all key wavelengths (from 412–683 nm, with statistically significant improvements over other inversion models. Thus, the new model has the potential to improve our knowledge of particulate matters and their optical variability in both clear and turbid coastal waters.

  9. An optical model for deriving the spectral particulate backscattering coefficients in oceanic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. P.; Shanmugam, P.

    2013-11-01

    An optical model is developed based on the diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) to estimate particulate backscattering coefficients bbp(λ) in oceanic waters. A large in situ data set is used to establish robust relationships between bbp(530) and bbp(555) and Kd(490) using an efficient nonlinear least-square method which uses the trust region algorithm with Bisquare weights scheme to adjust the coefficients. These relationships are obtained with good correlation coefficients (R2 = 0.786 and 0.790), low root mean square error (RMSE = 0.00076 and 0.00072) and 95% confidence bounds. The new model is tested with three independent data sets: the NOMAD SeaWiFS Match ups, OOXIX IOP algorithm workshop evaluation data set (Version 2.0w APLHA), and IOCCG simulated data set. Results show that the new model makes good retrievals of bbp at all key wavelengths (from 412-683 nm), with statistically significant improvements over other inversion models. Thus, the new model has the potential to improve our present knowledge of particulate matter and their optical variability in oceanic waters.

  10. Characteristics of aerosol size distribution and vertical backscattering coefficient profile during 2014 APEC in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaoshi; Chen, Zhenyi; Lu, Yihuai; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Wang, Jie; Yu, Tongzhu; Cheng, Yin; Chen, Yong; Ge, Baozhu; Fan, Yu; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference period, Beijing's air quality was greatly improved as a result of a series of tough emission control measures being implemented in Beijing and its surrounding provinces. However, a moderate haze occurred during the period of 4-5 November. In order to evaluate the emission control measures and study the formation mechanism of the haze, a comprehensive field observation based on a supersite and a lidar network was carried out from 25 October 2014 to 20 January 2015. By investigating the variations in aerosol number concentration and mean backscattering coefficient before, during and after the APEC period, it was found that number concentration of accumulation mode and coarse mode particles experienced the most significant decrease by 47% and 68%, and mean backscattering coefficient below 1 km decreased by 34% during the APEC period. Being characterized as "rapidly accumulating and rapidly dispersing", the moderate haze occurred during the APEC period was probably initiated by a wind direction change to south and an increase of wind speed to 4 m/s. Sulfur dioxide involved plume nucleation without growth in size as well as a burst of particles ranging between 100 and 300 nm were observed simultaneously during the haze episode. The elevation of sulfur dioxide concentration and particle number concentration was highly correlated with the southerly wind, signifying the contribution of regional transport. It was observed by the lidar network that the aerosol backscattering coefficient increased in sequence among three sites along the southwest pathway, suggesting that aerosols might be transported from the southwest to the northeast of Beijing with a speed of approximately 17 km/h, which agreed with the movement of air masses modeled by Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT). The dual-wavelength lidar (355 and 532 nm) observation suggested that transportation of fine particles

  11. Variations of temporal, spectral and angular radar backscattering coefficient of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    Results of an experimental program is reviewed which over the past five years has succeeded in documenting the variations of the radar backscattering coefficient of a variety of crop types as a function of time, signal frequency (1-18 GHz), angular range (nadir to 80 deg) and polarization (HH, VV and HV). The systems were the microwave active spectrometers (MAS); one MAS system covers the 1-8 GHz band and the other system covers the 8-18 GHz band. Each MAS system was mounted on a mobile truck-mounted boom and was operated by a computer controller. To date, these two systems have acquired over 3 million data points from agricultural crops, bare ground and trees.

  12. Photon spectrum and polarization for high conversion coefficient in the Compton backscattering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Strokov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    This study looks to simulate the nonlinear Compton backscattering (CBS) process based on the Monte Carlo technique for the conversion coefficient Kc ⩾ 1 , which can be considered as the average number of photons emitted by each electron. The characteristics of the nonlinear CBS process simulated in this work are as follows: the number of absorbed photons of a laser, the distance in the laser pulse in which the electron passes between two collisions, the energy and the polarization of the emitted photon in each collision, and the polarization of the electron before and after collision. The developed approach allows us to find the spectra and polarization characteristics of the final electrons and photons. When Kc > 1 , the spin-flip processes need to be considered for a correct simulation of the polarization of the final photons and electrons for energies typical of a γ- γ collider.

  13. The sensitivity of backscattering coefficients to elastic scattering cross-sections and electron stopping powers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C G H; Matthew, J A D; El-Gomati, M M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of Monte Carlo estimates of backscattering coefficients η to the accuracy of their input data is examined by studying the percentage change in η due to changes of 10% and 20% in the differential elastic scattering cross-section dσ/dΩ and corresponding changes in the stopping power S(E) in the primary energy range 200-10,000 eV. To a good approximation equivalent elastic and inelastic scattering changes produce equal and opposite shifts in η, a result consistent with predictions of transport theory. For medium to high atomic numbers an x% error in the specification of either S(E) or dσ/dΩ produces a percentage change in η significantly less than x%, while at low atomic number Δη/η increases approximately linearly with ln E so that Monte Carlo predictions are then more sensitive to parameter precision at high energy.

  14. Determination of Backscatter-Extinction Coefficient Ratio for LIDAR-Retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth Based on Sunphotometer Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Wai Chan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Backscattered power data from the Doppler LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR systems at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA could be used to obtain the extinction coefficient of the troposphere by combining with the meteorological optical range (MOR data from the nearby forward scatter sensor. The Range-height Indicator (RHI scan of the LIDAR is then utilized to derive the vertical profile of extinction coefficient, which is integrated with height to obtain the aerosol optical depth (AOD. In the retrieval of extinction coefficient profile, there is a power exponent of unknown value relating the backscattered power and the extinction coefficient. This exponent (called the backscatter-extinction coefficient ratio depends on the optical properties of the aerosol in the air, and is normally assumed to be 1. In the present study, the value of this ratio is established by comparing the AOD measurements by a hand-held sunphotometer and the LIDAR-based AOD estimate in one winter (October 2008 to January 2009, which is the season with the largest number of haze episodes, and one summer-winter-spring period of the following year (July 2009 to May 2010 at HKIA. It is found to be about 1.4. The sensitivity of extinction coefficient profile to the value of the ratio is also examined for two cases in the study period, one good visibility day and one hazy day.

  15. Retrieve the soil moisture from radar backscattering coefficient using ALOS/PALSAR polarization (HH/VV) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buho, Hoshino; Ruichen, Jia; Nawata, Hiroshi; Abdelaziz, Karamalla; Yoda, Kiyotsugu; Abdel, Babiker

    Mesquite (Prosopis spp) are ever green leguminous trees or shrubs. These species are native to North and South America. They were introduced to Sudan in 1917 from South Africa and Egypt and planted in Khartoum state in central Sudan (Broun and Massey, 1929). Mesquite was originally favored as sand dunes stabilizer and as fodder for livestock. However, sparse stands will often form impenetrable thickets formations that hinder movement of humans and animals. Many infestations are along waterways, both natural and constructed, however, plants can grow also well in drier areas away from water sites. Even in natural rangelands it is an aggressive competitor and can quickly invade upland country. Mesquite thickets can out-compete other vegetation, interfere with mustering and block access to watering places. The sharp thorns can injure animals and puncture vehicle tyres. Seeds can stay dormant for years, and therefore seedlings can re-appear in areas that have been previously cleared. The main objective of Remote Sensing Method for Mesquite Control (RSMMC) is to identify pattern and extend of mesquite spread along spatial and temporal variations using remote sensing means, as main part of mesquite control. Estimation of soil moisture by inversion of SAR data can be performed using physical or semi-empirical approaches. The physical approach uses backscattering models that are capable of reproducing the radar backscattering coefficient from the sensor configuration (wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle) and soil parameters (soil moisture and surface roughness for bare soils). This study adopted calculation of PALSAR L-band radar backscattering coefficient (dB), to estimate soil moisture distribution area based on TDR soil moisture ground measurement data. To retrieve soil moisture (mv) from a single radar configuration, it is necessary to establish a relationship between the radar backscattering coefficient (dB) and soil moisture (mv) measurement.

  16. Monitoring spatial and temporal variations of the rice backscatter coefficient (σ0) at different phenological stages in Sungai Burong and Sawah Sempadan, Kuala Selangor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishah Mohd Rasit, Siti; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohammed; Razak, Janatul Aziera Abdul; Ghani, Aisyah Afiqah Abdul; Fikri Abdullah, Ahmad; Wayayok, Aimrun

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring rice growth and yield estimation using optical remote sensing data constitutes a big challenge largely due to cloud conditions that are typical of tropical regions. Using Radar remote sensing data helps because it overcomes the cloud issue and distinguishes the behaviour of the radar backscattering of rice crops specifically. This study indicated the temporal change of rice backscatter (σ°) at two different growth stages using HH polarimetric Radarsat-2. The aims of this study are: (1) to identify crop with different life spans based on the backscatter coefficient's values from a single polarisation for understanding the backscatter characteristic of rice over the entire growth cycle, and (2) to understand the advantages and limitations using the RADARSAT-2, C band with HH polarisation. The values of backscattering coefficients have been related to the Malaysia rice crop calendar to get the information of the growth status. The result shows strong backscatter coefficient values on the 21st of May that referred to the reproductive-maturity of rice in the Sawah Sempadan area, and out of season for the Sungai Burong area. While for the August 1st imagery, the result shows weak backscatter values which refers to early vegetative and vegetative-reproductive. The values of backscattering coefficient are found to be much less for early vegetation compare to mature rice crop. In this paper, we have also performed a classification of a rice field using Landsat 8 OLI.

  17. Multibeam volume acoustic backscatter imagery and reverberation measurements in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet, Timothy C.; deMoustier, Christian P.

    2002-08-01

    Multibeam volume acoustic backscatter imagery and reverberation measurements are derived from data collected in 200-m-deep waters in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, with the Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS), a 68-kHz cylindrical sonar operated by the U.S. Navy's Coastal System Station. The TVSS's 360-degree vertical imaging plane allows simultaneous identification of multiple volume scattering sources and their discrimination from backscatter at the sea surface or the seafloor. This imaging capability is used to construct a three-dimensional representation of a pelagic fish school near the bottom. Scattering layers imaged in the mixed layer and upper thermocline are attributed to assemblages of epipelagic zooplankton. The fine scale patchiness of these scatterers is assessed with the two-dimensional variance spectra of vertical volume scattering strength images in the upper and middle water column. Mean volume reverberation levels exhibit a vertical directionality which is attributed to the volume scattering layers. Boundary echo sidelobe interference and reverberation is shown to be the major limitation in obtaining bioacoustic data with the TVSS. Because net tow and trawl samples were not collected with the acoustic data, the analysis presented is based upon comparison to previous biologic surveys in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and reference to the bioacoustic literature. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  18. Applications of interferometrically derived terrain slopes: Normalization of SAR backscatter and the interferometric correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Charles L.; Wegmueller, Urs; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Terrain slopes, which can be measured with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry either from a height map or from the interferometric phase gradient, were used to calculate the local incidence angle and the correct pixel area. Both are required for correct thematic interpretation of SAR data. The interferometric correlation depends on the pixel area projected on a plane perpendicular to the look vector and requires correction for slope effects. Methods for normalization of the backscatter and interferometric correlation for ERS-1 SAR are presented.

  19. Specific absorption and backscatter coefficient signatures in southeastern Atlantic coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Measurements of natural water samples in the field and laboratory of hyperspectral signatures of total absorption and reflectance were obtained using long pathlength absorption systems (50 cm pathlength). Water was sampled in Indian River Lagoon, Banana River and Port Canaveral, Florida. Stations were also occupied in near coastal waters out to the edge of the Gulf Stream in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center, Florida and estuarine waters along Port Royal Sound and along the Beaufort River tidal area in South Carolina. The measurements were utilized to calculate natural water specific absorption, total backscatter and specific backscatter optical signatures. The resulting optical cross section signatures suggest different models are needed for the different water types and that the common linear model may only appropriate for coastal and oceanic water types. Mean particle size estimates based on the optical cross section, suggest as expected, that particle size of oceanic particles are smaller than more turbid water types. The data discussed and presented are necessary for remote sensing applications of sensors as well as for development and inversion of remote sensing algorithms.

  20. In-cell measurements of smoke backscattering coefficients using a CO2 laser system for application to lidar-dial forest fire detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellecci, Carlo; Gaudio, Pasquale; Gelfusa, Michela; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Murari, Andrea; Richetta, Maria; de Leo, Leonerdo

    2010-12-01

    In the lidar-dial method, the amount of the water vapor present in the smoke of the vegetable fuel is detected to reduce the number of false alarms. We report the measurements of the smoke backscattering coefficients for the CO2 laser lines 10R20 and 10R18 as determined in an absorption cell for two different vegetable fuels (eucalyptus and conifer). These experimental backscattering coefficients enable us to determine the error to be associated to the water vapor measurements when the traditional first-order approximation is assumed. We find that this first-order approximation is valid for combustion rates as low as 100 g/s.

  1. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  2. Validation of CALIPSO space-borne-derived attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles using a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece

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    R. E. Mamouri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite- Level 1 attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E. A multi-wavelength ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET, the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 40 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Athens during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground–based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. From the analysis of the ground-based/satellite correlative lidar measurements, a mean bias of the order of 22% for daytime measurements and of 8% for nighttime measurements with respect to the CALIPSO profiles was found for altitudes between 3 and 10 km. The mean bias becomes much larger for altitudes lower that 3 km (of the order of 60% which is attributed to the increase of aerosol horizontal inhomogeneity within the Planetary Boundary Layer, resulting to the observation of possibly different air masses by the two instruments. In cases of aerosol layers underlying Cirrus clouds, comparison results for aerosol tropospheric profiles become worse. This is attributed to the significant multiple scattering effects in Cirrus clouds experienced by CALIPSO which result in an attenuation which is less than that measured by the ground-based lidar.

  3. Study of equatorial regions of Moon with the help of backscattering coefficient obtained from LRO data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O P N Calla; Shubhra Mathur; Monika Jangid

    2014-03-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has a miniature radio-frequency (Mini-RF) payload, i.e., the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) that has provided very fundamental information about the lunar surface and subsurface which was not known inspite of many manned and unmanned missions. Microwave sensors are used for analyzing the equatorial region of the Moon (60°N to 60°S) which is covered with many well-known craters like Kopff, Taylor, Maunder, Descartes, Jackson and Santos Dumont, each having different topography. The LRO data in terms of the scattering coefficient (°LH and °LV) with incidence angle of 49° has been used for computing physical and electrical parameter of lunar surface and to learn more about the impact cratering process. Most of the lunar surface shows small Circular Polarization Ratio (CPR), i.e., the reversal of polarization is normal, but some targets have high CPR. In this paper we have discussed the scattering behaviour of lunar equatorial region where the value of CPR < 1. Studies say that the LV intensity is always greater than LH but from the data obtained from LRO, it is observed that it varies at each pixel depending upon the target properties under radar view.

  4. Decadal Variation in Surface Characteristics over Xinjiang, Western China, from T/P Altimetry Backscatter Coefficients: Evidence of Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The backscatter coefficient, known as sigma0, is an important measurement of satellite radar altimetry and a key parameter for land altimetry because of its close relationship with the physical properties and geometric features of land coverage under global/regional climate change effects. Using the TOPEX/Poseidon GDR-M dataset from January 1993 to December 2004, we study the spatial and temporal distribution of sigma0 at bands Ku and C over Xinjiang, western China. The results show that the sigma0 is influenced by the water distribution over land and the time evolution of sigma0 has clear seasonal changes. River basins or deserts are classified over the spatial distribution based on different sigma0 values. For example, high sigma0 values are found in the Tarim River Basin and low values are found in the Taklimakan Desert. The periodic components of sigma0 time series are determined using the fast Fourier transformation method. The annual variation is the dominating cycle and the semi-annual variation is the secondary signal. The amplitudes of sigma0 time series at bands Ku and C are also given and most areas have quite low amplitudes except for the Tarim River Basin. Several areas including the Tarim River Basin, Tianshan Mountain and Taklimakan Desert are selected for sigma0 time series spacial analysis to discuss the reasons for variations in sigma0. The main factors are precipitation and vegetation growth, which are affected by the global/regional climate change. The correlation between the brightness temperature, which is related to the water-vapor content in the atmosphere measured by TMR at the 21 GHz channel and sigma0 at two bands, is analyzed.

  5. Vertically-resolved profiles of mass concentrations and particle backscatter coefficients of Asian dust plumes derived from lidar observations of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Young J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method to retrieve vertically-resolved profiles of dust mass concentrations by analyzing Raman lidar signals of silicon dioxide (quartz) at 546nm. The observed particle plumes consisted of mixtures of East Asian dust with anthropogenic pollution. Our method for the first time allows for extracting the contribution of the aerosol component "pure dust" contained in the aerosol type "polluted dust". We also propose a method that uses OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) and the mass concentrations profiles of dust in order to derive profiles of backscatter coefficients of pure dust in mixed dust/pollution plumes. The mass concentration of silicon dioxide (quartz) in the atmosphere can be estimated from the backscatter coefficient of quartz. The mass concentration of dust is estimated by the weight percentage (38-77%) of mineral quartz in Asian dust. The retrieved dust mass concentrations are classified into water soluble, nucleation, accumulation, mineral-transported and coarse mode according to OPAC. The mass mixing ratio of 0.018, 0.033, 0.747, 0.130 and 0.072, respectively, is used. Dust extinction coefficients at 550nm were calculated by using OPAC and prescribed number concentrations for each of the 5 components. Dust backscatter coefficients were calculated from the dust extinction coefficients on the basis of a lidar ratio of 45±3sr at 532nm. We present results of quartz-Raman measurements carried out on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (35.10°N, 126.53°E) on 15, 16, and 21 March 2010.

  6. Use of Lidar Derived Optical Extinction and Backscattering Coefficients Near Cloud Base to Explore Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonhgua; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Combination of microwave radiometer (MWR) and mutlifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurement data together with SBDART radiative transfer model to compute cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud droplet effective radius (Reff). Quantify the first aerosol indirect effect using calculated Reff and aerosol extinction from Raman lidar measurement in urban coastal region. Illustrate comparison between ground-based and satellite retrievals. Demonstrate relationship between surface aerosol (PM2.5) loading and Reff. We also explain the sensitivity of aerosol-cloud-index (ACI) depend on the aerosol layer from cloud base height. Potential used of less noisy elastic backscattering to calculate the ACI instead of using Raman extinction. We also present comparison of elastic backscattering and Raman extinction correlation to Reff.

  7. Analysis of the Dielectric constant of saline-alkali soils and the effect on radar backscattering coefficient: a case study of soda alkaline saline soils in Western Jilin Province using RADARSAT-2 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang-yang; Zhao, Kai; Ren, Jian-hua; Ding, Yan-ling; Wu, Li-li

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity is a global problem, especially in developing countries, which affects the environment and productivity of agriculture areas. Salt has a significant effect on the complex dielectric constant of wet soil. However, there is no suitable model to describe the variation in the backscattering coefficient due to changes in soil salinity content. The purpose of this paper is to use backscattering models to understand behaviors of the backscattering coefficient in saline soils based on the analysis of its dielectric constant. The effects of moisture and salinity on the dielectric constant by combined Dobson mixing model and seawater dielectric constant model are analyzed, and the backscattering coefficient is then simulated using the AIEM. Simultaneously, laboratory measurements were performed on ground samples. The frequency effect of the laboratory results was not the same as the simulated results. The frequency dependence of the ionic conductivity of an electrolyte solution is influenced by the ion's components. Finally, the simulated backscattering coefficients measured from the dielectric constant with the AIEM were analyzed using the extracted backscattering coefficient from the RADARSAT-2 image. The results show that RADARSAT-2 is potentially able to measure soil salinity; however, the mixed pixel problem needs to be more thoroughly considered.

  8. Drop by drop backscattered signal of a 50 × 50 × 50 m3 volume: A numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, A.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to analyse the influence of individual drop positions on a backscattered radar signal. This is achieved through a numerical experiment: a 3D rain drop field generator is developed and implemented over a volume of 50 × 50 × 50 m3, and then the sum of the electromagnetic waves backscattered by its hydrometeors is computed. Finally the temporal evolution over 1 s is modelled with simplistic assumptions. For the rainfall generator, the liquid water content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help of a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. Within each 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops, located randomly uniformly according to a pre-defined drop size distribution (DSD). Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops being uniformly distributed over the entire 50 × 50 × 50 m3 volume. Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the size of a rainfall "patch", it appears that, in agreement with the theory, we retrieve an exponential distribution for potential measures on horizontal reflectivity. Much thinner dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable the reproduction of radar observations, and turbulence should be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  9. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H2O and BigBottle RAD-H2O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  10. Analysis of forest backscattering characteristics based on polarization coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to make an inventory of vertical profiles of forest structure parameters in field measurements.However,analysis and understanding of forest backscattering characteristics contribute to estimation and detection of forest vertical structure because of the close relationships between backscattering characteristics and structure parameters.The vertical structure function in the complex interferometric coherence definition,which represents the vertical variation of microwave scattering with the penetration depth at a point in the 2-D radar image and can be used to analyze the forest backscattering characteristics,can be reconstructed from polarization coherence tomography(PCT).Based on PCT,the paper analyzes the forest backscattering characteristics and explores the inherent relationship between the result of PCT and the forest structure parameters from numerical simulation of Random Volume over Ground model(RVoG),Polarimetric SAR interferometry(PolInSAR)simulation of forest scene and PolInSAR data at L-band of the test site Traunstein.Firstly,the effects of the extinction coefficient and surface-to-volume scattering ratio in RVoG model on vertical backscattering characteristics are analyzed by means of numerical simulation.Secondly,by applying PCT to L-band POLInSAR simulations of forest scene,different variations of vertical backscattering due to different extinction coefficients and the ratios of surface-to-volume scattering resulting from different polarizations,forest types and densities are displayed and analyzed.Then a concept of relative average backscattering intensity is presented,and the factors which affect its vertical distribution are also discussed.Preliminary results show that there is high sensitivity of the vertical distribution of forest relative average backscattering intensity to the polarization,forest type and density.Finally,based on repeat pass DLR E-SAR L-band airborne POLInSAR data,the capability of PCT technology for detection

  11. Characterization of the bio-optical anomaly and diurnal variability of the particulate matter, as seen from the scattering and backscattering coefficients, in ultra-oligotrophic eddies of the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Loisel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The variability of the inherent optical properties is investigated in the ultra-oligotrophic waters of the Mediterranean Sea sampled during the BOUM experiment performed during the early summer 2008. Bio-optical relationships found for the ultra-oligotrophic waters of the three anticyclonic gyres sampled significantly depart from the mean standard relationships provided for the global ocean, confirming the particular character of these Mediterranean waters. These optical anomalies are diversely related to the specific biological and environmental conditions occurring in the studied ecosystem. Specifically, the surface specific phytoplankton absorption coefficient exhibits values lower than those expected from the general relationships mainly in relation with a high contribution of relatively large sized phytoplankton. Conversely, the particulate backscattering coefficient, bbp, values are much higher than the mean standard values for a given chlorophyll-a concentration, TChl-a. This feature can presumably be related to the relevant influence of highly refractive submicrometer particles of Saharan origin in the surface layer of the water column. The present measurements also show that the Mediterranean Sea is greener than TChl-a alone indicates, as already stressed in previous studies. This color anomaly is partly explained by the estimated colored dissolved organic matter and submicrometer particles absorption coefficients, and to a greater extent by the high bbp/TChl-a values assuming that these particles backscatter light similarly in the green and blue parts of the visible spectrum. The diel variation of both the particulate matter attenuation and backscattering coefficients were also investigated specifically. Despite some differences in the timing and the magnitude of the daily oscillations found for these optical parameters, potential for the backscattering coefficient daily

  12. Convergence of Cell Based Finite Volume Discretizations for Problems of Control in the Conduction Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evgrafov, Anton; Gregersen, Misha Marie; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2011-01-01

    design, in particular shape and topology optimization, and are most often solved numerically utilizing a finite element approach. Within the FV framework for control in the coefficients problems the main difficulty we face is the need to analyze the convergence of fluxes defined on the faces of cells......We present a convergence analysis of a cell-based finite volume (FV) discretization scheme applied to a problem of control in the coefficients of a generalized Laplace equation modelling, for example, a steady state heat conduction. Such problems arise in applications dealing with geometric optimal...

  13. A finite-volume numerical method to calculate fluid forces and rotordynamic coefficients in seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method to calculate rotordynamic coefficients of seals is presented. The flow in a seal is solved by using a finite-volume formulation of the full Navier-Stokes equations with appropriate turbulence models. The seal rotor is perturbed along a diameter such that the position of the rotor is a sinusoidal function of time. The resulting flow domain changes with time, and the time-dependent flow in the seal is solved using a space conserving moving grid formulation. The time-varying fluid pressure reaction forces are then linked with the rotor center displacement, velocity and acceleration to yield the rotordynamic coefficients. Results for an annular seal are presented, and compared with experimental data and other more simplified numerical methods.

  14. How polarizabilities and C6 coefficients actually vary with atomic volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Tim

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate how atomic C6 coefficients and static dipole polarizabilities α scale with effective volume. We show, using confined atoms covering rows 1-5 of the periodic table, that C 6 / C6 R ≈ ( V / VR ) p Z and α / α R ≈ ( V / VR ) pZ ' (for volume V = ∫ d r /4 π 3 r 3 n ( r ) ), where C6 R , αR, and VR are the reference values and effective volume of the free atom. The scaling exponents pZ and pZ ' vary substantially as a function of element number Z = N, in contrast to the standard "rule of thumb" that pZ = 2 and pZ ' = 1 . Remarkably, we find that the polarizability and C6 exponents p' and p are related by p' ≈ p - 0.615 rather than the expected p' ≈ p/2. Results are largely independent of the form of the confining potential (harmonic, cubic, and quartic potentials are considered) and kernel approximation, justifying this analysis.

  15. How polarizabilities and $C_6$ coefficients actually vary with atomic volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Tim

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate how atomic $C_6$ coefficients and static dipole polarizabilities $\\alpha$ scale with effective volume. We show, using confined atoms covering rows 1-5 of the periodic table, that $C_6/C_6^R\\approx (V/V^R)^{p_Z}$ and $\\alpha/\\alpha^R\\approx (V/V^R)^{p'_Z}$ (for volume $V=\\int dr \\frac{4\\pi}{3}r^3 n(r)$) where $C_6^R$, $\\alpha^R$ and $V^R$ are the reference values and effective volume of the free atom. The scaling exponents $p_Z$ and $p'_Z$ vary substantially as a function of element number $Z=N$, in contrast to the standard "rule of thumb" that $p_Z=2$ and $p'_Z=1$. Remarkably, We find that the polarizability and $C_6$ exponents $p'$ and $p$ are related by $p'\\approx p-0.615$ rather than the expected $p'\\approx p/2$. Results are largely independent of the form of the confining potential (harmonic, cubic and quartic potentials are considered) and kernel approximation, justifying this analysis.

  16. Remote-Sensing Technique for Determination of the Volume Absorption Coefficient of Turbid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Michael; Arnone, Robert A.; Gould, Richard W., Jr.; Terrie, Gregory E.; Ladner, Sherwin D.; Wood, Christoper G.

    1998-07-01

    We use remote-sensing reflectance from particulate R rs to determine the volume absorption coefficient a of turbid water in the 400 700-nm spectral region. The calculated and measured values of a ( ) show good agreement for 0 . 5 a 10 (m 1 ). To determine R rs from a particulate, we needed to make corrections for remote-sensing reflectance owing to surface roughness S rs . We determined the average spectral distribution of S rs from the difference in total remote-sensing reflectance measured with and without polarization. The spectral shape of S rs showed an excellent fit to theoretical formulas for glare based on Rayleigh and aerosol scattering from the atmosphere.

  17. Refractive index effects on the scatter volume location and Doppler velocity estimates of ionospheric HF backscatter echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ponomarenko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric E×B plasma drift velocities derived from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN Doppler data exhibit systematically smaller (by 20–30% magnitudes than those measured by the Defence Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP satellites. A part of the disagreement was previously attributed to the change in the E/B ratio due to the altitude difference between the satellite orbit and the location of the effective scatter volume for the radar signals. Another important factor arises from the free-space propagation assumption used in converting the measured Doppler frequency shift into the line-of-sight velocity. In this work, we have applied numerical ray-tracing to identify the location of the effective scattering volume of the ionosphere and to estimate the ionospheric refractive index. The simulations show that the major contribution to the radar echoes should be provided by the Pedersen and/or escaping rays that are scattered in the vicinity of the F-layer maximum. This conclusion is supported by a statistical analysis of the experimental elevation angle data, which have a signature consistent with scattering from the F-region peak. A detailed analysis of the simulations has allowed us to propose a simple velocity correction procedure, which we have successfully tested against the SuperDARN/DMSP comparison data set.

  18. Multi-beam backscatter data to characterize the mound and channel provinces of the Porcupine Seabight - northeast Atlantic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H. W.

    2003-04-01

    Large scale oceanographic explorations are presently continuing around the Porcupine Seabight area, which is located towards the south-west Ireland. This area is an embayment of the north Atlantic continental margins. It's importance due to the dominant hydrocarbon resources are not unknown, and on-going experiments are important due to the involvement of higher order variability (in terms of physical and geological settings) around this area. Multi-beam angular backscatter study to characterize the eastern slope seafloor of the Porcupine Seabight is initiated first time. Backscatter data acquired from twenty-nine locations of the carbonate mounds and associated buried mounds (Belgica province), and channel seafloors like: Kings channel and Gollum channels are analysed in this paper. Processing details of the angular backscatter data was carried out to apply the scattering models to determine seafloor roughness. Employed normalization to the angular backscatter data to obtain shape invariant seafloor indicate distinct grey levels for mound, buried mound, and various channel seafloors (four distinct types of seafloors) within the backscatter dynamic range of 12 dB. The backscatter levels are the highest for the mound areas followed by the buried mounds, channel seafloor, and inter-channel areas. Present study was further substantiated by employing a semi-empirical method to determine the shape aspects of the area backscatter strengths. Estimated three parameters like: predicted 20 degree angular backscatter response, slope and coefficient of variations of the angular backscatter responses are computed to understand general seafloor characteristics of the varying area seafloor. The use of Helmholtz-Kirchhoff's angular backscatter theory which is a functional of the power law are carried out to estimate sea water floor interface roughness parameters. The sediment volume inhomogeneity parameters are also determined by use of curve fitting to the overlaying interface

  19. Dependence of chymosin and pepsin partition coefficient with phase volume and polymer pausidispersity in polyethyleneglycol-phosphate aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelzini, Darío; Picó, Guillemo; Farruggia, Beatriz

    2006-08-01

    The influence of the phase volume ratio and polymer pausidispersity on chymosin and pepsin partition in polyethylenglycol-phosphate aqueous two-phase systems was studied. Both proteins showed a high affinity for the polyethylenglycol rich phase with a partition coefficient from 20 to 100 for chymosin and from 20 to 180 for pepsin, when the polyethyleneglycol molecular mass in the system varied between 1450 and 8000. The partition coefficient of chymosin was not affected by the volume phase ratio, while the pepsin coefficient showed a significant decrease in its partition coefficient with the increase in the top/bottom phase volume ratio.

  20. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Twardowski

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During the BIOSOPE field campaign October–December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over 8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°, was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10-5, 5×10-6, and 2×10-6 m−1 sr−1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the volume scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results:

    – distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature;
    – Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels;
    – accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters; the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994 with a [1+0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974 appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and
    – closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007 within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements.

    This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy:

    –The clearest waters sampled were found at depths between 300 and 350 m, from 23.5° S

  1. Octanol-Water Partition Coefficient from 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Theory of Solvation with Partial Molar Volume Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, WenJuan; Blinov, Nikolay; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-30

    The octanol-water partition coefficient is an important physical-chemical characteristic widely used to describe hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of chemical compounds. The partition coefficient is related to the transfer free energy of a compound from water to octanol. Here, we introduce a new protocol for prediction of the partition coefficient based on the statistical-mechanical, 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation. It was shown recently that with the compound-solvent correlation functions obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation, the free energy functional supplemented with the correction linearly related to the partial molar volume obtained from the Kirkwood-Buff/3D-RISM theory, also called the "universal correction" (UC), provides accurate prediction of the hydration free energy of small compounds, compared to explicit solvent molecular dynamics [ Palmer , D. S. ; J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2010 , 22 , 492101 ]. Here we report that with the UC reparametrized accordingly this theory also provides an excellent agreement with the experimental data for the solvation free energy in nonpolar solvent (1-octanol) and so accurately predicts the octanol-water partition coefficient. The performance of the Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) and Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functionals of the solvation free energy, with and without UC, is tested on a large library of small compounds with diverse functional groups. The best agreement with the experimental data for octanol-water partition coefficients is obtained with the KH-UC solvation free energy functional.

  2. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Twardowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During the BIOSOPE field campaign October–December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over ~8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°, was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10−5, 5×10−6, and 2×10−6 m−1 sr−1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results:

    bbp distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature;
    – Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels;
    – accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters; the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994 with a [1 + 0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974 appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and
    – closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007 within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements.

    This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy:

    – The clearest waters sampled were found at

  3. Effect of baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume on functional outcome in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Gao, Pei-yi; Hu, Qing-mao; Lin, Yan; Jing, Li-na; Xue, Jing; Chen, Zhi-jun; Wang, Yong-jun; Liu, Mei-li; Cai, Ye-feng

    2011-06-01

    We explored the relationship between predicted infarct core, predicted ischemic penumbras and predicted final infarct volumes obtained though apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-based method, as well as other clinical variables, and functional outcome. Patients with acute cerebral ischemic stroke were retrospectively recruited. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was evaluated at baseline and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at day 90. Favorable outcome was defined as an mRS score of 0 to 2, and unfavorable outcome as 3 to 6. Multimodal stroke magnetic resonance imaging was carried out at presentation. The volumes of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) were measured using the regions of interest (ROI) method. The volumes of predicted infarct core, predicted ischemic penumbra and predicted final infarct were obtained by an automated image analysis system based on baseline ADC maps. The association between baseline magnetic resonance imaging volumes, baseline clinical variables, and functional outcome was statistically analyzed. The study included 30 males and 20 females (mean±SD age, 56±10 years). Baseline DWI, PWI and PWI-DWI mismatch volumes were not correlated with day-90 mRS (P>0.05). Predicted infarct core, predicted ischemic penumbra and predicted final infarct through ADC-based method were all correlated with day-90 mRS (PStroke Scale and recanalization also demonstrated a trend toward a favorable outcome. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the area under the curve of predicted final infarct volume and recanalization were higher with statistical significance (PStroke Scale and recanalization may have effect on functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke.

  4. Improved prediction of octanol-water partition coefficients from liquid-solute water solubilities and molar volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Schmedding, D.W.; Manes, M.

    2005-01-01

    A volume-fraction-based solvent-water partition model for dilute solutes, in which the partition coefficient shows a dependence on solute molar volume (V??), is adapted to predict the octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow) from the liquid or supercooled-liquid solute water solubility (Sw), or vice versa. The established correlation is tested for a wide range of industrial compounds and pesticides (e.g., halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, halogenated benzenes, ethers, esters, PAHs, PCBs, organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates, and amidesureas-triazines), which comprise a total of 215 test compounds spanning about 10 orders of magnitude in Sw and 8.5 orders of magnitude in Kow. Except for phenols and alcohols, which require special considerations of the Kow data, the correlation predicts the Kow within 0.1 log units for most compounds, much independent of the compound type or the magnitude in K ow. With reliable Sw and V data for compounds of interest, the correlation provides an effective means for either predicting the unavailable log Kow values or verifying the reliability of the reported log Kow data. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  5. Use of aerosol microphysical measurements to model IR backscatter in support of GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Edward M.; Bowdle, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Data on the concentration and composition of free tropospheric aerosol over the Pacific Ocean, collected during the GAMETAG program in 1977-1978 (Davis, 1980 and Patterson et al., 1980) are used to model values of aerosol optical extinction coefficients (sigma) at two wavelengths (0.55 and 1 micron) and values of volume backscatter coefficients (beta) at four wavelengths (1 micron, 9.11 microns, 9.25 microns, and 10.6 microns) and to investigate the relationship between these parameters. The mass concentrations inferred from the GAMETAG measurements with optical particle spectrometers agreed with the results of simultaneous chemical measurements. The study of the relationships among the optical parameters indicates that visible and near-visible values of beta and sigma may be useful in predicting 9.11- and 10.6-micron backscatter.

  6. Analytical solutions for the coefficient of variation of the volume-averaged solute concentration in heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabala, Z. J.

    1997-08-01

    Under the assumption that local solute dispersion is negligible, a new general formula (in the form of a convolution integral) is found for the arbitrary k-point ensemble moment of the local concentration of a solute convected in arbitrary m spatial dimensions with general sure initial conditions. From this general formula new closed-form solutions in m=2 spatial dimensions are derived for 2-point ensemble moments of the local solute concentration for the impulse (Dirac delta) and Gaussian initial conditions. When integrated over an averaging window, these solutions lead to new closed-form expressions for the first two ensemble moments of the volume-averaged solute concentration and to the corresponding concentration coefficients of variation (CV). Also, for the impulse (Dirac delta) solute concentration initial condition, the second ensemble moment of the solute point concentration in two spatial dimensions and the corresponding CV are demonstrated to be unbound. For impulse initial conditions the CVs for volume-averaged concentrations axe compared with each other for a tracer from the Borden aquifer experiment. The point-concentration CV is unacceptably large in the whole domain, implying that the ensemble mean concentration is inappropriate for predicting the actual concentration values. The volume-averaged concentration CV decreases significantly with an increasing averaging volume. Since local dispersion is neglected, the new solutions should be interpreted as upper limits for the yet to be derived solutions that account for local dispersion; and so should the presented CVs for Borden tracers. The new analytical solutions may be used to test the accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations or other numerical algorithms that deal with the stochastic solute transport. They may also be used to determine the size of the averaging volume needed to make a quasi-sure statement about the solute mass contained in it.

  7. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M., E-mail: mxu@fairfield.edu [Physics Department, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  8. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  9. The aCORN backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. T.; Bateman, F.; Collett, B.; Darius, G.; DeAngelis, C.; Dewey, M. S.; Jones, G. L.; Komives, A.; Laptev, A.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Nico, J. S.; Noid, G.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stern, I.; Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2017-09-01

    Backscatter of electrons from a beta detector, with incomplete energy deposition, can lead to undesirable effects in many types of experiments. We present and discuss the design and operation of a backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer that was developed as part of a program to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient in neutron beta decay (aCORN). An array of backscatter veto detectors surrounds a plastic scintillator beta energy detector. The spectrometer contains an axial magnetic field gradient, so electrons are efficiently admitted but have a low probability for escaping back through the entrance after backscattering. The design, construction, calibration, and performance of the spectrometer are discussed.

  10. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10. 6 micrometers with airborne and ground-based CO sub 2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado high plains. 2. Backscatter structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowdle, D.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville (USA)); Rothermel, J. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Vaughan, J.M. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Worcestershire (England)); Post, M.J. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1991-03-20

    Measurements of tropospheric aerosol volume backscatter coefficients at 10.6-{mu}m wavelength were obtained with airborne continuous wave and ground-based pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidars over the Colorado High Plains during a 20-day period in summer 1982. A persistent 'background' layer was found between 6- and 10-km altitude, with a generally uniform backscatter mixing ratio of {approximately}10{sup {minus}10} m{sup 2} kg{sup {minus}1} sr{sup {minus}1}. The upper boundary of this background layer varied with the tropopause height; the lower boundary varied with the strength and diurnal cycle of convective mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). For quiescent meteorological conditions the transition from the PBL to the background layer was usually very sharp, with backscatter decreases sometimes as large as 3 decades in {approximately}70 m. Sharp gradients were also found at the boundaries of shallow (tens of meters) subvisible cirrus clouds. For less stable conditions, associated with vertical aerosol transport by deep comuliform clouds, backscatter tended to decrease exponentially with altitude.

  11. An Ultrasonic Backscatter Instrument for Cancellous Bone Evaluation in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic backscatter technique has shown promise as a noninvasive cancellous bone assessment tool. A novel ultrasonic backscatter bone diagnostic (UBBD instrument and an in vivo application for neonatal bone evaluation are introduced in this study. The UBBD provides several advantages, including noninvasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, portability, and simplicity. In this study, the backscatter signal could be measured within 5 s using the UBBD. Ultrasonic backscatter measurements were performed on 467 neonates (268 males and 199 females at the left calcaneus. The backscatter signal was measured at a central frequency of 3.5 MHz. The delay (T1 and duration (T2 of the backscatter signal of interest (SOI were varied, and the apparent integrated backscatter (AIB, frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB, zero frequency intercept of apparent backscatter (FIAB, and spectral centroid shift (SCS were calculated. The results showed that the SOI selection had a direct influence on cancellous bone evaluation. The AIB and FIAB were positively correlated with the gestational age (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. Moderate positive correlations (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. The T2 mainly introduced fluctuations in the observed correlation coefficients. The moderate correlations observed with UBBD demonstrate the feasibility of using the backscatter signal to evaluate neonatal bone status. This study also proposes an explicit standard for in vivo SOI selection and neonatal cancellous bone assessment.

  12. Spectral variability of the particulate backscattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, A. L.; Boss, E.; Cowles, T. J.; Pegau, W. S.

    2007-05-01

    The spectral dependency of the particulate backscattering ratio is relevant in the fields of ocean color inversion, light field modeling, and inferring particle properties from optical measurements. Aside from theoretical predictions for spherical, homogeneous particles, we have very limited knowledge of the actual in situ spectral variability of the particulate backscattering ratio. This work presents results from five research cruises that were conducted over a three-year period. Water column profiles of physical and optical properties were conducted across diverse aquatic environments that offered a wide range of particle populations. The main objective of this research was to examine the behavior of the spectral particulate backscattering ratio in situ, both in terms of its absolute magnitude and its variability across visible wavelengths, using over nine thousand 1-meter binned data points for each of five wavelengths of the spectral particulate backscattering ratio. Our analysis reveals no spectral dependence of the particulate backscattering ratio within our measurement certainty, and a geometric mean value of 0.013 for this dataset. This is lower than the commonly used value of 0.0183 from Petzold’s integrated volume scattering data. Within the first optical depth of the water column, the mean particulate backscattering ratio was 0.010.

  13. 夏季加拿大海盆海冰边缘区声体积后向散射强度研究%Study on volume backscattering strength in summer marginal ice zone of Canada Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪宁; 吕连港; 刘娜; 杨光兵; 姜莹; 杨春梅; 刘宗伟; 林丽娜

    2015-01-01

    Volume backscatter strength (Sv)is a key parameter for acoustic transmission.Study on volume back-scattering strength in marginal ice zone (MIZ)in the Arctic plays an important role in the knowledge of the Arctic acoustic environment.Based on the investigation during the Sixth Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in summer 2014,the characteristics of backscatter strength in MIZ are analyzed.The results show that Sv under the open water (ice concentration less than 15%)is significantly higher than that in seawater under the packed ice (ice concentration more than 50%).Ice melt causes increasing of opaque creatures and suspended sediment,and leads to increase of Sv.According to the characteristics of low Sv under the packed ice,the proposal about the parameters of LADCP setting is given.%声信号的体积后向散射强度是声传播过程中一个关键的参数。海冰边缘区的声体积后向散射强度研究对深入认识北极声场环境有着十分重要的意义。本文利用中国第六次北极科学考察获取的数据资料研究了海冰边缘区声体积后向散射强度特性。结果表明:加拿大海盆海冰边缘区是声体积后向散射强度的明显过渡区。无冰海面(海冰密集度小于15%)海洋深层水的声体积后向散射强度明显大于密集海冰区域的海水(海冰密集度大于50%)。讨论了声体积后向散射强度与海冰融化之间的关系,造成融冰区声体积后向散射强度增大的原因是水下悬浮泥沙、浮游生物等悬浮物质增加。根据海冰密集海域的海水后向散射强度弱的特点,对北极下放式声学多普勒测流仪(LADCP)观测的设置提出建议。

  14. Measurement of conversion coefficients between air Kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors for diagnostic X-ray beams; Determinacao experimental dos coeficientes de conversao de Kerma no ar para o equivalente de dose pessoal, Hp(d), e fatores de retroespalhamento em feixes de raios-x diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, Paulo Henrique Goncalves

    2008-07-01

    Two sets of quantities are import in radiological protection: the protection and operational quantities. Both sets can be related to basic physical quantities such as kerma through conversion coefficients. For diagnostic x-ray beams the conversion coefficients and backscatter factors have not been determined yet, those parameters are need for calibrating dosimeters that will be used to determine the personal dose equivalent or the entrance skin dose. Conversion coefficients between air kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic x-ray qualities RQR and RQA recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The air kerma in the phantom and the mean energy of the spectrum were measured for such purpose. Harshaw LiF-100H thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used for measurements after being calibrated against an 180 cm{sup 3} Radcal Corporation ionization chamber traceable to a reference laboratory. A 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab phantom was used for deep-dose measurements. Tl dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at 5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm depth in the phantom upstream the beam direction Another required parameter for determining the conversion coefficients from was the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum. The spectroscopy of x-ray beams was done with a CdTe semiconductor detector that was calibrated with {sup 133} Ba, {sup 241} Am and {sup 57} Co radiation sources. Measurements of the x-ray spectra were carried out for all RQR and RQA IEC qualities. Corrections due to the detector intrinsic efficiency, total energy absorption, escape fraction of the characteristic x-rays, Compton effect and attenuation in the detector were done aiming an the accurate determination of the mean energy. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected with the stripping method by using these response functions. The typical combined standard uncertainties of

  15. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  16. Prediction of subacute infarct lesion volumes by processing apparent diffusion coefficient maps based on apparent diffusion coefficient cut-off values in patients with acute stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭翔

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of prediction of subacute infarct lesion volumes by processing ADC maps based on ADC cut-off values in patients with acute stroke.Methods MRI was performed in 20 patients with clinically diagnosed acute infarct less than 6 h after stroke onset.The MRI included a DWI and conventional MRI.The follow-up MR examinations of all the patients

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Coaxial Electrons Backscattering from Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using the Monte Carlo method, we simulated the trajectories of coaxial backscattering electrons corresponding to a new type of scanning electron microscope. From the calculated results, we obtain a universal expression, which describes with good accuracy the backscattering coefficient versus film thickness under all conditions used. By measuring the coaxial backscattering coefficient and using this universal formula, the thickness of thin films can be determined if the composition is known.

  18. GLOBE backscatter - Climatologies and mission results. [Global Backscatter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) goals require intensive study of the global climatology of atmospheric aerosol backscatter at IR wavelengths. Airborne and ground-based lidars have been developed to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles at CO2 laser wavelengths. Descriptions of the calibration techniques and selected measurement results are presented.

  19. Computer simulation of backscattering spectra from paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.; Silva, T. F.

    2017-09-01

    To study the role of lateral non-homogeneity on backscattering analysis of paintings, a simplified model of paint consisting of randomly distributed spherical pigment particles embedded in oil/binder has been developed. Backscattering spectra for lead white pigment particles in linseed oil have been calculated for 3 MeV H+ at a scattering angle of 165° for pigment volume concentrations ranging from 30 vol.% to 70 vol.% using the program STRUCTNRA. For identical pigment volume concentrations the heights and shapes of the backscattering spectra depend on the diameter of the pigment particles: This is a structural ambiguity for identical mean atomic concentrations but different lateral arrangement of materials. Only for very small pigment particles the resulting spectra are close to spectra calculated supposing atomic mixing and assuming identical concentrations of all elements. Generally, a good fit can be achieved when evaluating spectra from structured materials assuming atomic mixing of all elements and laterally homogeneous depth distributions. However, the derived depth profiles are inaccurate by a factor of up to 3. The depth range affected by this structural ambiguity ranges from the surface to a depth of roughly 0.5-1 pigment particle diameters. Accurate quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra from paintings therefore requires taking the correct microstructure of the paint layer into account.

  20. Impact of carrier heating on backscattering in inversion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, R.; Palestri, P.; Selmi, L.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modeling are used to investigate quasi-ballistic transport in nanometric metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). In particular, we examine how the thermal nature of the distribution functions, which is implicitly assumed in the most common expression for the backscattering coefficient, leads to an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient in high field conditions and erroneous velocity distribution along the channel. An improved analytical model is proposed, which better captures the nonequilibrium nature of the distribution function and its impact on backscattering and by allowing velocity profiles to exceed the thermal limit. The improved model provides additional insights on the impact of several assumptions on backscattering and could serve as the basis for the development of physically based compact models of quasi-ballistic MOSFETs.

  1. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  2. Influence of bioassay volume, water column height, and octanol-water partition coefficient on the toxicity of pesticides to rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinok, Ilhan; Capkin, Erol; Boran, Halis

    2011-06-01

    Effects of water volume and water column height on toxicity of cypermethrin, carbaryl, dichlorvos, tetradifon, maneb, captan, carbosulfan endosulfan and HgCl₂ to juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 3.2 ± 0.7 g) were evaluated in different glass aquaria under static conditions. When fish were exposed to the chemical compounds in 23 cm water column height (25 L), their mortality ranged between 0% and 58%. At the same water volume, but lower water column height (9 cm), mortality of fish increased significantly and was in a range from 60% to 95%. At the same water column height, toxic effects of chemicals were significantly higher in 25 L water volume than that of 8.5 L, water except maneb which has lowest (-0.45) octanol-water partition coefficient value. Mortality rates ratio of 9 and 23 cm water column height ranged between 1.12 and 90 while mortality rates ratio of 9 and 25 L water volume ranged between 1.20 and 4.0. Because actual exposure concentrations were not affected by either water volume or water column height, we propose that increased pesticides' toxicity was related to an increase in bioassay volume, since more pesticide molecules were able to interact with or accumulate the fish. However, there seem to be no relationship between the effects of water volume, water column height and Kow value of chemicals with regard to toxicity in juvenile rainbow trout.

  3. Aerosol Lidar for the Relative Backscatter Amplification Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.; Nadeev, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter amplification presents only in a turbulent atmosphere, when the laser beam is propagates twice through the same inhomogeneities. We proposed technical solution to detect backscatter amplification. An aerosol micro pulse lidar with a beam expansion via receiving telescope was built to study this effect. Our system allows simultaneous detection of two returns from the same scattering volume: exactly on the axis of the laser beam and off the axis.

  4. A Laboratory Investigation into Microwave Backscattering from Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    froze to form saline slush ice. Continued freezing of * the salty water directly beneath the slush ice led to the formation of columnar-textured...significant influence on backscatter from extremely smooth saline ice at C band. We determined that backscatter at C band from moderately smooth desalinated ...that volume scatter from desalinated ice is important at X band and that it is dominant at Ku band at angles of 100 or more from nadir Conclusions

  5. Apparent molar volumes and viscosity B-coefficients of caffeine in aqueous thorium nitrate solutions at T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Biswajit, E-mail: biswachem@gmail.co [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India); Roy, Pran Kumar; Sarkar, Bipul Kumar; Brahman, Dhiraj [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India); Roy, Mahendra Nath, E-mail: mahendraroy2002@yahoo.co.i [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India)

    2010-03-15

    Apparent molar volumes phi{sub V} and viscosity B-coefficients for caffeine in (0.00, 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) mol . dm{sup -3} aqueous thorium nitrate, Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, solutions were determined from solution density and viscosity measurements over the temperature range (298.15 to 318.15) K as function of concentration of caffeine and the relation: phi{sub V}{sup 0}=a{sub 0}+a{sub 1}T+a{sub 2}T{sup 2}, have been used to describe the temperature dependence of the standard partial molar volumes phi{sub V}{sup 0}. These results have been used to deduce the standard volumes of transfer DELTAphi{sub V}{sup 0} and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer DELTAB for caffeine from water to aqueous Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solutions for rationalizing various interactions in the ternary solutions. The structure-making or breaking ability of caffeine has been discussed in terms of the sign of (delta{sup 2}phi{sub V}{sup 0}/deltaT{sup 2}){sub P}. The Friedman-Krishnan co-sphere model was used to explain the transfer volume of caffeine with increasing Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} molarity. The activation parameters of viscous flow for the ternary solutions were also discussed in terms of transition state theory.

  6. SAMPL5: 3D-RISM partition coefficient calculations with partial molar volume corrections and solute conformational sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchko, Tyler; Blinov, Nikolay; Limon, Garrett C.; Joyce, Kevin P.; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-11-01

    Implicit solvent methods for classical molecular modeling are frequently used to provide fast, physics-based hydration free energies of macromolecules. Less commonly considered is the transferability of these methods to other solvents. The Statistical Assessment of Modeling of Proteins and Ligands 5 (SAMPL5) distribution coefficient dataset and the accompanying explicit solvent partition coefficient reference calculations provide a direct test of solvent model transferability. Here we use the 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) statistical-mechanical solvation theory, with a well tested water model and a new united atom cyclohexane model, to calculate partition coefficients for the SAMPL5 dataset. The cyclohexane model performed well in training and testing (R=0.98 for amino acid neutral side chain analogues) but only if a parameterized solvation free energy correction was used. In contrast, the same protocol, using single solute conformations, performed poorly on the SAMPL5 dataset, obtaining R=0.73 compared to the reference partition coefficients, likely due to the much larger solute sizes. Including solute conformational sampling through molecular dynamics coupled with 3D-RISM (MD/3D-RISM) improved agreement with the reference calculation to R=0.93. Since our initial calculations only considered partition coefficients and not distribution coefficients, solute sampling provided little benefit comparing against experiment, where ionized and tautomer states are more important. Applying a simple pK_{ {a}} correction improved agreement with experiment from R=0.54 to R=0.66, despite a small number of outliers. Better agreement is possible by accounting for tautomers and improving the ionization correction.

  7. Hyperpolarized 3He apparent diffusion coefficient MRI of the lung: reproducibility and volume dependency in healthy volunteers and patients with emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz, S.; Casselbrant, I.; Piitulainen, E.;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of hyperpolarized (HP) (3)He gas using diffusion weighted MRI in healthy volunteers and patients with emphysema and examine the reproducibility and volume dependency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of eight healthy volunteers and 16...... days was good in both healthy volunteers and patients (SD range of 0.003-0.013 cm(2)/second and 0.001-0.009 cm(2)/second at 6% and 15% of TLC for healthy volunteers, and a SD range of 0.001-0.041 cm(2)/second and 0.001-0.011 cm(2)/second, respectively, for patients). A minor but significant increase...... in mean ADC with increased inhaled gas volume was observed in both groups. CONCLUSION: Mean ADC and SD of HP (3)He MRI is reproducible and discriminates well between healthy controls and patients with emphysema at the higher gas volume. This method is robust and may be useful to gain new insights...

  8. Investigation of techniques to quantify in vivo lesion volume based on comparison of water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with histology in focal cerebral ischemia of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mark; Silva, Matthew D; Li, Fuhai; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H

    2004-06-01

    Stroke lesion-volume estimates derived from calculated water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide a quantitative surrogate end-point for investigating the efficacy of drug treatment or studying the temporal evolution of cerebral ischemia. Methodology is described for estimating ischemic lesion volumes in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) based on absolute and percent-reduction threshold values of the water ADC at 3 h post-MCAO. Volume estimates derived from average ADC (ADC(av)) maps were compared with those derived from post-mortem histological sections. Optimum ADC thresholds were established as those that provided the best correlation and one-to-one correspondence between ADC- and histologically derived lesion-volume estimates. At 3 h post-MCAO, an absolute-ADC(av) threshold of 47 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s (corresponding to a 33% reduction in ADC(av) based on a contralateral hemisphere comparison) provided the most accurate estimate of percent hemispheric lesion volume (%HLV). Experimental and data analysis issues for improving and validating the usefulness of DWI as a surrogate endpoint for the quantification of ischemic lesion volume are discussed.

  9. Compilation and evaluation of gas phase diffusion coefficients of reactive trace gases in the atmosphere: volume 1. Inorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-09-01

    Diffusion of gas molecules to the surface is the first step for all gas-surface reactions. Gas phase diffusion can influence and sometimes even limit the overall rates of these reactions; however, there is no database of the gas phase diffusion coefficients of atmospheric reactive trace gases. Here we compile and evaluate, for the first time, the diffusivities (pressure-independent diffusion coefficients) of atmospheric inorganic reactive trace gases reported in the literature. The measured diffusivities are then compared with estimated values using a semi-empirical method developed by Fuller et al. (1966). The diffusivities estimated using Fuller's method are typically found to be in good agreement with the measured values within ±30%, and therefore Fuller's method can be used to estimate the diffusivities of trace gases for which experimental data are not available. The two experimental methods used in the atmospheric chemistry community to measure the gas phase diffusion coefficients are also discussed. A different version of this compilation/evaluation, which will be updated when new data become available, is uploaded online (google.com/site/mingjintang/home/diffusion"target="_blank">https://sites.google.com/site/mingjintang/home/diffusion).

  10. Pressure--volume--temperature properties of perfluorocyclobutane: equations of state, virial coefficients, and intermolecular potential energy functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douslin, D.R.; Moore, R.T.; Waddington, G.

    1959-11-01

    Studies of the pressure-volume-temperature properties of perfluorocyclobutane, in the ranges 3-394 atm and 30-350/sup 0/, yielded values of gas compressibility, critical constants, vapor pressure and orthobaric liquid and vapor densities. The results were correlated by the Beattie Bridgeman, Benedict Webb Rubin, and Martin-Hou equations of state and by the Stockmayer and the Kihara intermolecular potential energy functions. The merits of the several correlational methods are discussed.

  11. Backscatter imagery in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1x1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The backscatter values are in relative 8-bit (0 –...

  12. Collective stimulated Brillouin backscatter

    CERN Document Server

    Lushnikov, Pavel M

    2007-01-01

    We develop the statistical theory of the stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) instability of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. Instability is collective because it does not depend on the dynamics of isolated speckles of laser intensity, but rather depends on averaged beam intensity. We identify convective and absolute instability regimes. Well above the incoherent threshold the coherent instability growth rate is recovered. The threshold of convective instability is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF) designs although current NIF bandwidth is not large enough to insure dominance of collective instability and suggests lower instability threshold due to speckle contribution. In contrast, we estimate that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be larg...

  13. Variable volume loading method: a convenient and rapid method for measuring the initial emittable concentration and partition coefficient of formaldehyde and other aldehydes in building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2011-12-01

    The initial emittable formaldehyde and VOC concentration in building materials (C(0)) is a key parameter for characterizing and classifying these materials. Various methods have been developed to measure this parameter, but these generally require a long test time. In this paper we develop a convenient and rapid method, the variable volume loading (VVL) method, to simultaneously measure C(0) and the material/air partition coefficient (K). This method has the following features: (a) it requires a relatively short experimental time (less than 24 h for the cases studied); and (b) is convenient for routine measurement. Using this method, we determined C(0) and K of formaldehyde, propanal and hexanal in one kind of medium density fiberboard, and repeated experiments were performed to reduce measurement error. In addition, an extended-C-history method is proposed to determine the diffusion coefficient and the convective mass transfer coefficient. The VVL method is validated by comparing model predicted results based on the determined parameters with experimental data. The determined C(0) of formaldehyde obtained via this method is less than 10% of the total concentration using the perforator method recommended by the Chinese National Standard, suggesting that the total concentration may not be appropriate to predict emission characteristics, nor for material classification.

  14. Simulation of positron backscattering and implantation profiles using Geant4 code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄世娟; 潘子文; 刘建党; 韩荣典; 叶邦角

    2015-01-01

    For the proper interpretation of the experimental data produced in slow positron beam technique, the positron im-plantation properties are studied carefully using the latest Geant4 code. The simulated backscattering coefficients, the implantation profiles, and the median implantation depths for mono-energetic positrons with energy range from 1 keV to 50 keV normally incident on different crystals are reported. Compared with the previous experimental results, our simula-tion backscattering coefficients are in reasonable agreement, and we think that the accuracy may be related to the structures of the host materials in the Geant4 code. Based on the reasonable simulated backscattering coefficients, the adjustable parameters of the implantation profiles which are dependent on materials and implantation energies are obtained. The most important point is that we calculate the positron backscattering coefficients and median implantation depths in amorphous polymers for the first time and our simulations are in fairly good agreement with the previous experimental results.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tissue water and its relationship to cell volume changes in pathological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotak, Christopher H

    2004-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging (DWI) is sensitive to the random translational motion of water molecules due to Brownian motion. Although the mechanism is still not completely understood, the cellular swelling that accompanies cell membrane depolarization results in a reduction in the net displacement of diffusing water molecules and thus a concomitant reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tissue water. Cerebral regions of reduced ADC appear hyperintense in a DWI and this technique has been used extensively to study acute stroke. In addition to cerebral ischemia, reductions in the ADC of cerebral water have been observed following cortical spreading depression, ischemic depolarizations (IDs), transient ischemic attack (TIA), status epilepticus, and hypoglycemia. Although the mechanism responsible for initiating membrane depolarization varies in each case, the ensuing cell volume changes follow a similar pattern. Water ADC values are also affected by the presence and orientation of barriers to translational motion (such as cell membranes and myelin fibers) and thus NMR measures of anisotropic diffusion are sensitive to more chronic pathological states where the integrity of these structures is modified by disease. Both theoretical prediction and experimental evidence suggest that the ADC of tissue water is related to the volume fraction of the interstitial space via the electrical conductivity of the tissue. The implication is that acute neurological disorders that exhibit electrical conductivity changes should also exhibit ADC changes that are detectable by DWI. A qualitative correlation between electrical conductivity and the ADC of water has been demonstrated in a number of animal model studies and the results indicate that reduced ADC values are associated with reductions in the extracellular volume fraction and increased extracellular tortuosity. The close relationship between ADC changes and cell volume changes in

  16. Detection of Coaxial Backscattered Electrons in SEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We present a coaxial detection of the backscattered electrons in SEM. The lens-aperture has been used to filter in energy and focus the backscattered electrons. This particular geometry allows us to eliminate the iow energy backscattered electrons and collect the backscattered electrons, which are backscattered close to the incident beam orientation. The main advantage of this geometry is adapted to topographic contrast attenuation and atomic number contrast enhancement. Thus this new SEM is very suitable to analyze the material composition.

  17. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  18. Combining angular response classification and backscatter imagery segmentation for benthic biological habitat mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Backscatter information from multibeam echosounders (MBES) have been shown to contain useful information for the characterisation of benthic habitats. Compared to backscatter imagery, angular response of backscatter has shown advantages for feature discrimination. However its low spatial resolution inhibits the generation of fine scale habitat maps. In this study, angular backscatter response was combined with image segmentation of backscatter imagery to characterise benthic biological habitats in Discovery Bay Marine National Park, Victoria, Australia. Angular response of backscatter data from a Reson Seabat 8101 MBES (240 kHz) was integrated with georeferenced underwater video observations for constructing training data. To produce benthic habitat maps, decision tree supervised classification results were combined with mean shift image segmentation for class assignment. The results from mean angular response characteristics show effects of incidence angle at the outer angle for invertebrates (INV) and mixed red and invertebrates (MRI) classes, whilst mixed brown algae (MB) and mixed brown algae and invertebrates (MBI) showed similar responses independent from incidence angle. Automatic segmentation processing produce over segmented results but showed good discrimination between heterogeneous regions. Accuracy assessment from habitat maps produced overall accuracies of 79.6% (Kappa coefficient = 0.66) and 80.2% (Kappa coefficient = 0.67) for biota and substratum classifications respectively. MRI and MBI produced the lowest average accuracy while INV the highest. The ability to combine angular response and backscatter imagery provides an alternative approach for investigating biological information from acoustic backscatter data.

  19. A Backscatter-Suppressed Beta Spectrometer for Neutron Decay Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Wietfeldt, F E; Anderman, R; Bateman, F B; Dewey, M S; Komives, A; Thompson, A K; Balashov, S; Mostovoy, Y; Mostovoy, Yu.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a beta electron spectrometer for use in an upcoming experiment that will measure the beta-antineutrino correlation coefficient (a-coefficient) in neutron beta decay. Electron energy is measured by a thick plastic scintillator detector. A conical array of plastic scintillator veto detectors is used to suppress events where the electron backscattered. A Monte Carlo simulation of this device in the configuration of the a-coefficient experiment is presented. The design, construction, and testing of a full-scale prototype device is described. We discuss the performance of this spectrometer with respect to its suitability for the experiment.

  20. Assessment of treatment response by total tumor volume and global apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with metastatic bone disease: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blackledge

    Full Text Available We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI using a Markov random field (MRF model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC; and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change = +0.18, range = -0.07 to +0.78 × 10(-3 mm2/s after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change = -0.02, range = -0.10 to +0.05 × 10(-3 mm2/s, p = 0.05, Mann-Whitney test, whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change = +26%, range = +3 to +284% compared to responding patients (median change = -50%, range = -85 to +27%, p = 0.02, Mann-Whitney test. Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment.

  1. Ultrasonic backscatter from cancellous bone: the apparent backscatter transfer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Mcpherson, Joseph A; Smathers, Morgan R; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to detect changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis. Many techniques are based on measurements of the apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF), which represents the backscattered power from bone corrected for the frequency response of the measurement system. The ABTF is determined from a portion of the backscatter signal selected by an analysis gate of width τw delayed by an amount τd from the start of the signal. The goal of this study was to characterize the ABTF for a wide range of gate delays (1 μs ≤ τd ≤ 6 μs) and gate widths (1 μs ≤ τw ≤ 6 μs). Measurements were performed on 29 specimens of human cancellous bone in the frequency range 1.5 to 6.0 MHz using a broadband 5-MHz transducer. The ABTF was found to be an approximately linear function of frequency for most choices of τd and τw. Changes in τd and τw caused the frequency-averaged ABTF [quantified by apparent integrated backscatter (AIB)] and the frequency dependence of the ABTF [quantified by frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB)] to change by as much as 24.6 dB and 6.7 dB/MHz, respectively. τd strongly influenced the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of AIB with bone density (-0.95 ≤ R ≤ +0.68). The correlation of FSAB with bone density was influenced less strongly by τd (-0.97 ≤ R ≤ -0.87). τw had a weaker influence than τd on the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of these parameters with bone density.

  2. 3D Backscatter Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. Clark (Inventor); Whitaker, Ross (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for imaging an object using backscattered radiation are described. The imaging system comprises both a radiation source for irradiating an object that is rotationally movable about the object, and a detector for detecting backscattered radiation from the object that can be disposed on substantially the same side of the object as the source and which can be rotationally movable about the object. The detector can be separated into multiple detector segments with each segment having a single line of sight projection through the object and so detects radiation along that line of sight. Thus, each detector segment can isolate the desired component of the backscattered radiation. By moving independently of each other about the object, the source and detector can collect multiple images of the object at different angles of rotation and generate a three dimensional reconstruction of the object. Other embodiments are described.

  3. Controls on ERS altimeter measurements over ice sheets: Footprint-scale topography, backscatter fluctuations, and the dependence of microwave penetration depth on satellite orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthern, R. J.; Wingham, D. J.; Ridout, A. L.

    2001-12-01

    We consider the reliability of radar altimeter measurements of ice sheet elevation and snowpack properties in the presence of surface undulations. We demonstrate that over ice sheets the common practice of averaging echoes by aligning the first return from the surface at the origin can result in a redistribution of power to later times in the average echo, mimicking the effects of microwave penetration into the snowpack. Algorithms that assume the topography affects the radar echo shape in the same way that waves affect altimeter echoes over the ocean will therefore lead to biased estimates of elevation. This assumption will also cause errors in the retrieval of echoshape parameters intended to quantify the penetration of the microwave pulse into the snowpack. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the errors in retrievals of extinction coefficient, surface backscatter, and volume backscatter for various undulating topographies. In the flatter portions of the Antarctic plateau, useful estimates of these parameters may be recovered by averaging altimeter echoes recorded by the European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1). By numerical deconvolution of the average echoes we resolve the depths in the snowpack at which temporal changes and satellite travel-direction effects occur, both of which have the potential to corrupt measurements of ice sheet elevation change. The temporal changes are isolated in the surface-backscatter cross section, while directional effects are confined to the extinction coefficient and are stable from year to year. This allows the removal of the directional effect from measurement of ice-sheet elevation change.

  4. True progression versus pseudoprogression in the treatment of glioblastomas: A comparison study of normalized cerebral blood volume and apparent diffusion coefficient by histogram analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yong Sub; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Chul Kee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to differentiate true progression from pseudoprogression of glioblastomas treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with temozolomide (TMZ) by using histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) maps. Twenty patients with histopathologically proven glioblastoma who had received CCRT with TMZ underwent perfusion-weighted imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (b = 0, 1000 sec/mm{sup 2}). The corresponding nCBV and ADC maps for the newly visible, entirely enhancing lesions were calculated after the completion of CCRT with TMZ. Two observers independently measured the histogram parameters of the nCBV and ADC maps. The histogram parameters between the true progression group (n = 10) and the pseudoprogression group (n = 10) were compared by use of an unpaired Student's t test and subsequent multivariable stepwise logistic regression analysis to determine the best predictors for the differential diagnosis between the two groups. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was employed to determine the best cutoff values for the histogram parameters that proved to be significant predictors for differentiating true progression from pseudoprogression. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to determine the level of inter-observer reliability for the histogram parameters. The 5th percentile value (C5) of the cumulative ADC histograms was a significant predictor for the differential diagnosis between true progression and pseudoprogression (p 0.044 for observer 1; p = 0.011 for observer 2). Optimal cutoff values of 892 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/sec for observer 1 and 907 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/sec for observer 2 could help differentiate between the two groups with a sensitivity of 90% and 80%, respectively, a specificity of 90% and 80%, respectively, and an area under the curve of 0.880 and 0.840, respectively. There was no other significant differentiating parameter on the n

  5. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  6. Fundamentals of Acoustic Backscatter Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    41 6.12 Geocoding ...47 7.6 Errors in Geocoding .............................................................................................................. 47...h = z - R cos6 (39a) and x = rt sin6. (39b) 6.12 Geocoding Acoustic backscatter imagery data are collected by recording the across-track signals

  7. Nodule bottom backscattering study using multibeam echosounder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y.S.N.; Nair, R.R.

    A study is carried out to observe the angular dependence of backscattering strength at nodule area where grab sample and photographic data is available. Theoretical study along with the experimentally observed data shows that the backscattering...

  8. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  9. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  10. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  11. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  12. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  13. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  14. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  15. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  16. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  17. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. Backscatter E [Swath]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  19. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  20. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  1. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  2. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  3. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  4. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  5. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  6. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  8. Laser remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol over Southern Ireland using a backscatter Raman LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Albert A.; Acheson, Karen; Apituley, Arnoud; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Nicolae, Doina; Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Stoyanov, Dimitar; Trickl, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Raman backscatter coefficients, extinction coefficients and lidar ratios were measured with a ground based Raman lidar system at University College Cork, Ireland, during the periods of July 2012 - August 2012, April 2013 - December 2013 and March 2014 - May 2014. Statistical analysis of these parameters in this time provided information about seasonal effects of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer. The mean of the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer over these time periods is 950 ± 302 m. The values are larger in summer, 1206 ± 367 m, than in winter, 735 m. The altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer measured at Cork is lower than most EARLINET stations. Raman backscatter coefficients above and altitude of 2 km are highest in summer and spring where the values are greater than 0.28 Mm-1 sr-1. Winter values of Raman backscatter coefficient are less than 0.06 Mm-1 sr-1. These seasonal effects are consistent with most EARLINET stations. Large aerosol loads were detected in July 2013 due to a Canadian forest fire event. HYSPLIT air-mass back trajectory models were used to trace the origin of the detected aerosol layers. The aerosol forecast model, MACC, was used to further investigate and verify the propagation of the smoke. The Lidar ratio values and Klett and Raman backscatter coefficients at Cork, for the 4th July, the 7th to 9th of July and the 11th July were compared with observations at Cabauw, Minsk, Granada, Bucharest, Sofia and Garmisch. Lidar ratio values for the smoke detected at Cork were determined to be between 33 sr and 62 sr. The poster will discuss the seasonal changes of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer at Cork. An investigation of a Canadian forest fire event measured at Cork will be compared with other data from the EARLINET database.

  9. Hanle effect in coherent backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Labeyrie, G; Müller, C A; Sigwarth, O; Delande, D; Kaiser, R

    2002-01-01

    We study the shape of the coherent backscattering (CBS) cone obtained when resonant light illuminates a thick cloud of laser-cooled rubidium atoms in presence of a homogenous magnetic field. We observe new magnetic field-dependent anisotropies in the CBS signal. We show that the observed behavior is due to the modification of the atomic radiation pattern by the magnetic field (Hanle effect in the excited state).

  10. A comparative study of RADAR Ka-band backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, D.; Pierdicca, N.; Guerriero, L.; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Calleja, Eduardo; Rommen, B.; Giudici, D.; Monti Guarnieri, A.

    2014-10-01

    Ka-band RADAR frequency range has not yet been used for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from space so far, although this technology may lead to important applications for the next generation of SAR space sensors. Therefore, feasibility studies regarding a Ka-band SAR instrument have been started [1][2], for the next generation of SAR space sensors. In spite of this, the lack of trusted references on backscatter at Ka-band revealed to be the main limitation for the investigation of the potentialities of this technology. In the framework of the ESA project "Ka-band SAR backscatter analysis in support of future applications", this paper is aimed at the study of wave interaction at Ka-band for a wide range of targets in order to define a set of well calibrated and reliable Ka-band backscatter coefficients for different kinds of targets. We propose several examples of backscatter data resulting from a critical survey of available datasets at Ka-band, focusing on the most interesting cases and addressing both correspondences and differences. The reliability of the results will be assessed via a preliminary comparison with ElectroMagnetic (EM) theoretical models. Furthermore, in support of future technological applications, we have designed a prototypal software acting as a "library" of earth surface radar response. In our intention, the output of the study shall contribute to answer to the need of a trustworthy Ka-Band backscatter reference. It will be of great value for future technological applications, such as support to instrument analysis, design and requirements' definition (e.g.: Signal to Noise Ratio, Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero).

  11. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  12. The laser-backscattering equations and their application to the study of the atmospheric structure

    CERN Document Server

    Castrejon, R; Castrejon, J; Morales, A

    2002-01-01

    In this work a method for interpreting backscattering signals acquired by a lidar is described. The method is based on the elastic scattering of laser radiation due to gases and particles suspended in the atmosphere (bulk effects). We propose a space-time diagram which helps to evaluate the arguments of the equation that serves to calculate the lidar signal in terms of the backscattering coefficient. We describe how the system detects gradients on this coefficient, along the laser optical path. To illustrate the method, we present some typical lidar results obtained in the neighborhood of Mexico City. (Author)

  13. The backscatter electron signal as an additional tool for phase segmentation in electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, E J; Nolze, G

    2013-08-01

    The advent of simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data collection has vastly improved the phase separation capabilities for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping. A major problem remains, however, in distinguishing between multiple cubic phases in a specimen, especially when the compositions of the phases are similar or their particle sizes are small, because the EDS interaction volume is much larger than that of EBSD and the EDS spectra collected during spatial mapping are generally noisy due to time limitations and the need to minimize sample drift. The backscatter electron (BSE) signal is very sensitive to the local composition due to its atomic number (Z) dependence. BSE imaging is investigated as a complimentary tool to EDS to assist phase segmentation and identification in EBSD through examination of specimens of meteorite, Cu dross, and steel oxidation layers. The results demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of EBSD patterns, EDS spectra, and the BSE signal can provide new potential for advancing multiphase material characterization in the scanning electron microscope.

  14. HAB detection based on absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hui; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Qiankun

    2011-11-01

    The coastal area of East China Sea (ECS) suffers from the harmful algal blooms (HAB) frequently every year in the warm season. The most common causative phytoplankton algal species of HAB in the ECS in recent years are Prorocentrum donghaiense (dinoflagellates), Karenia mikimotoi (dinoflagellates which could produce hemolytic and ichthyotoxins) and Skeletonema costatum (diatom). The discrimination between the dinoflagellates and diatom HAB through ocean color remote sensing approach can add the knowledge of HAB events in ECS and help to the precaution. A series of in-situ measurement consisted of absorption coefficient, total scattering and particulate backscattering coefficient was conducted in the southern coast of Zhejiang Province in May 2009, and the estuary of Changjiang River in August 2009 and December 2010, which encountered two HAB events and a moderate bloom. The Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) of the bloom waters have significant difference between phytoplankton species in absorption and backscattering properties. The chlorophyll a specific absorption coefficient (a*phy(λ)) for the bloom patches (chlorophyll a concentration >6mg m-3) differ greatly from the adjacent normal seawater, with the a*phy(λ) of bloom water lower than 0.03 m2 mg-1 while the a*phy(λ) of the adjacent normal seawater is much higher (even up to 0.06 m2 mg-1). Meanwhile, the backscattering coefficients at 6 wavebands (420, 442, 470, 510, 590 and 700nm) are also remarkably lower for bloom waters ( 0.02 m-1). The backscattering coefficient ratio (Rbp(λ)) is much lower for diatom bloom waters than for dinoflagellates types (0.01079 vs. 0.01227). A discrimination model based on IOPs is established, and several typical dinoflagellates and diatom bloom events including Prorocentrum donghaiense, Karenia mikimotoi and Skeletonema costatum in the ECS are picked out for testing with the MODIS-L2 and L3 ocean color remote sensing products from NASA website. The result proves that the

  15. Monte-Carlo simulation of backscattered electrons in Auger electron spectroscopy. Part 1: Backscattering factor calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholomier, M.; Vicario, E.; Doghmane, N.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of backscattered electrons to Auger electrons yield was studied with a multiple scattering Monte-Carlo simulation. The Auger backscattering factor has been calculated in the 5 keV-60 keV energy range. The dependence of the Auger backscattering factor on the primary energy and the beam incidence angle were determined. Spatial distributions of backscattered electrons and Auger electrons are presented for a point incident beam. Correlations between these distributions are briefly investigated.

  16. Validation Test of Geant4 Simulation of Electron Backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sung Hun; Basaglia, Tullio; Han, Min Cheol; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Saracco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Backscattering is a sensitive probe of the accuracy of electron scattering algorithms implemented in Monte Carlo codes. The capability of the Geant4 toolkit to describe realistically the fraction of electrons backscattered from a target volume is extensively and quantitatively evaluated in comparison with experimental data retrieved from the literature. The validation test covers the energy range between approximately 100 eV and 20 MeV, and concerns a wide set of target elements. Multiple and single electron scattering models implemented in Geant4, as well as preassembled selections of physics models distributed within Geant4, are analyzed with statistical methods. The evaluations concern Geant4 versions from 9.1 to 10.1. Significant evolutions are observed over the range of Geant4 versions, not always in the direction of better compatibility with experiment. Goodness-of-fit tests complemented by categorical analysis tests identify a configuration based on Geant4 Urban multiple scattering model in Geant4 vers...

  17. The potential of computer vision, optical backscattering parameters and artificial neural network modelling in monitoring the shrinkage of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) during drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwude, Daniel I; Hashim, Norhashila; Abdan, Khalina; Janius, Rimfiel; Chen, Guangnan

    2017-07-30

    Drying is a method used to preserve agricultural crops. During the drying of products with high moisture content, structural changes in shape, volume, area, density and porosity occur. These changes could affect the final quality of dried product and also the effective design of drying equipment. Therefore, this study investigated a novel approach in monitoring and predicting the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. Drying experiments were conducted at temperatures of 50-70 °C and samples thicknesses of 2-6 mm. The volume and surface area obtained from camera vision, and the perimeter and illuminated area from backscattered optical images were analysed and used to evaluate the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. The relationship between dimensionless moisture content and shrinkage of sweet potato in terms of volume, surface area, perimeter and illuminated area was found to be linearly correlated. The results also demonstrated that the shrinkage of sweet potato based on computer vision and backscattered optical parameters is affected by the product thickness, drying temperature and drying time. A multilayer perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network with input layer containing three cells, two hidden layers (18 neurons), and five cells for output layer, was used to develop a model that can monitor, control and predict the shrinkage parameters and moisture content of sweet potato slices under different drying conditions. The developed ANN model satisfactorily predicted the shrinkage and dimensionless moisture content of sweet potato with correlation coefficient greater than 0.95. Combined computer vision, laser light backscattering imaging and artificial neural network can be used as a non-destructive, rapid and easily adaptable technique for in-line monitoring, predicting and controlling the shrinkage and moisture changes of food and agricultural crops during drying. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Evaluation of a compact sensor for backscattering and absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Alina Gainusa; Boss, Emmanuel S

    2011-07-20

    Seawater inherent optical properties (IOPs) are key parameters in a wide range of applications in environmental studies and oceanographic research. In particular, the absorption coefficient (a) is the typical IOP used to obtain the concentration of chlorophyll-a in the water-a critical parameter in biological oceanography studies and the backscattering coefficient (b(b)) is used as a measure of turbidity. In this study, we test a novel instrument concept designed to obtain both the absorption and backscattering coefficients. The instrument would emit a collimated monochromatic light beam into the water retrieving the backscattered light intensity as a function of distance from the center of illumination. We use Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation to create an inversion algorithm that translates the signal from such an instrument into values of a and b(b). Our results, based on simulations spanning the bulk of natural values of seawater IOP combinations, indicate that a 6.2 cm diameter instrument with a radial resolution of 1 cm would be capable of predicting b(b) within less than 13.4% relative difference and a within less than 57% relative difference (for 90% of the inverted a values, the relative errors fall below 29.7%). Additionally, these errors could be further reduced by constraining the inversion algorithm with information from concurrent measurements of other IOPs. Such a compact and relatively simple device could have multiple applications for in situ optical measurements, including a and b(b) retrievals from instrumentation mounted on autonomous underwater vehicles. Furthermore, the same methodology could possibly be used for an out-of-water sensor. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Monitoring Everglades freshwater marsh water level using L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lu, Zhong; Jones, John W.; Shum, C.K.; Lee, Hyongki; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The Florida Everglades plays a significant role in controlling floods, improving water quality, supporting ecosystems, and maintaining biodiversity in south Florida. Adaptive restoration and management of the Everglades requires the best information possible regarding wetland hydrology. We developed a new and innovative approach to quantify spatial and temporal variations in wetland water levels within the Everglades, Florida. We observed high correlations between water level measured at in situ gages and L-band SAR backscatter coefficients in the freshwater marsh, though C-band SAR backscatter has no close relationship with water level. Here we illustrate the complementarity of SAR backscatter coefficient differencing and interferometry (InSAR) for improved estimation of high spatial resolution water level variations in the Everglades. This technique has a certain limitation in applying to swamp forests with dense vegetation cover, but we conclude that this new method is promising in future applications to wetland hydrology research.

  20. Simulation Studies of the Backscattering Signal in HSRL Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulou, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    The technique of High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) for atmospheric monitoring allows the determination of the aerosol to molecular ratio and can be used in UHECR Observatories using air fluorescence telescopes. By this technique a more accurate estimate of the Cherenkov radiation superimposed to the fluorescence signal can be achieved. A laboratory setup was developed to determine the backscattering coefficients using microparticles diluted in water and diffusion interfaces. In this setup we used a CW SLM laser at 532 nm and a 250 mm Newtonian telescope. Simulations of the above experimental configuration have been made using Scatlab\\c{opyright}, FINESSE\\c{opyright} 0.99.8 and MATLAB\\c{opyright} and are presented in this work. We compare the simulated 2-dimensional Fabry-Perot fringe images of the backscattering signal recorded in the CCD sensor with that of experimental ones. Additionally, we simulated the backscattering of the laser beam by the atmosphere at a height of 2000 m and we have studied the in...

  1. Energy Filtering and Coaxial Detection of the Backscattered Electrons in Scanning Electron Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-Zhong; P. Morin; N. Rosenberg

    2000-01-01

    A new detection system in scanning electron microscope, which filters in energy and detects the backscattered electrons close to the microscope axis, is described. This technique ameliorates the dependence of the back. scat tering coefficient on atomic number, and suppresses effectively the relief contrast at the same time. Therefore this new method is very suitable to the composition analysis.

  2. Combination of multibeam backscatter and bathymetry: A method to characterize the sea floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H. W.

    2003-04-01

    A high resolution multibeam survey was conducted by the RV "Polarstern" in order to identify and map locations of carbonate mounds in the Porcupine Seabight west of Ireland utilizing the multibeam echo sounder Hydrosweep DS-2. The scientific interest of that area rose due to an expected link between the carbonate mounds and subsurface hydrocarbon resources. In addition to the depths measurements the acoustic intensity of the received echo was recorded for individual measurements. After processing of the echo amplitudes by employing NRGCOR software the backscatter strength of the ensonified seafloor is used to identify areas of similar physical properties. Normalization was applied to the backscatter data to obtain acoustic response information which is independent from the incidence angle of the sonar beam. The mapped grey scale variation of the acoustic response is used to separate different types of seafloor. Four distinct types of seafloor have been depicted which are mounds, buried mounds, channel seafloor and inter channel areas. A semi-empirical method was applied to determine shape aspects of the angular backscatter strength. Three parameters, i.e. predicted 20° angular response, slope and coefficient of variation of the angular backscatter responses were computed to understand varying seafloor characteristics. The combination of backscatter and bathymetric data is another significant aspect of this contribution. Applying 3D visualisation techniques enables the user to link acoustic backscatter response to the seafloor morphology.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Venus Radar Backscatter Data in ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S. M.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing mapping of the Ganiki Planitia (V14) quadrangle of Venus and definition of material units has involved an integrated but qualitative analysis of Magellan radar backscatter images and topography using standard geomorphological mapping techniques. However, such analyses do not take full advantage of the quantitative information contained within the images. Analysis of the backscatter coefficient allows a much more rigorous statistical comparison between mapped units, permitting first order selfsimilarity tests of geographically separated materials assigned identical geomorphological labels. Such analyses cannot be performed directly on pixel (DN) values from Magellan backscatter images, because the pixels are scaled to the Muhleman law for radar echoes on Venus and are not corrected for latitudinal variations in incidence angle. Therefore, DN values must be converted based on pixel latitude back to their backscatter coefficient values before accurate statistical analysis can occur. Here we present a method for performing the conversions and analysis of Magellan backscatter data using commonly available ArcGIS software and illustrate the advantages of the process for geological mapping.

  4. Seafloor classification of the mound and channel provinces of the Porcupine Seabight: an application of the multibeam angular backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas; Chakraborty, Bishwajit; Schenke, Hans Werner

    2007-02-01

    In this study multibeam angular backscatter data acquired in the eastern slope of the Porcupine Seabight are analysed. Processing of the angular backscatter data using the ‘NRGCOR’ software was made for 29 locations comprising different geological provinces like: carbonate mounds, buried mounds, seafloor channels, and inter-channel areas. A detailed methodology is developed to produce a map of angle-invariant (normalized) backscatter data by correcting the local angular backscatter values. The present paper involves detailed processing steps and related technical aspects of the normalization approach. The presented angle-invariant backscatter map possesses 12 dB dynamic range in terms of grey scale. A clear distinction is seen between the mound dominated northern area (Belgica province) and the Gollum channel seafloor at the southern end of the site. Qualitative analyses of the calculated mean backscatter values i.e., grey scale levels, utilizing angle-invariant backscatter data generally indicate backscatter values are highest (lighter grey scale) in the mound areas followed by buried mounds. The backscatter values are lowest in the inter-channel areas (lowest grey scale level). Moderate backscatter values (medium grey level) are observed from the Gollum and Kings channel data, and significant variability within the channel seafloor provinces. The segmentation of the channel seafloor provinces are made based on the computed grey scale levels for further analyses based on the angular backscatter strength. Three major parameters are utilized to classify four different seafloor provinces of the Porcupine Seabight by employing a semi-empirical method to analyse multibeam angular backscatter data. The predicted backscatter response which has been computed at 20° is the highest for the mound areas. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the mean backscatter response is also the highest for the mound areas. Interestingly, the slope value of the buried mound areas are

  5. Bulk media assay using backscattered Pu-Be neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Csikai, J

    1999-01-01

    Spectral yields of elastically backscattered Pu-Be neutrons measured for graphite, water, polyethylene, liquid nitrogen, paraffin oil, SiO sub 2 , Al, Fe, and Pb slabs show a definite correlation with the energy dependence of the elastic scattering cross sections, sigma sub E sub L (E sub n). The C, N and O can be identified by the different structures in their sigma sub E sub L (E sub n) functions. The integrated spectral yields versus thickness exhibit saturation for each sample. The interrogated volume is limited by the presence of hydrogen in the sample. (author)

  6. A real-time measure of cavitation induced tissue disruption by ultrasound imaging backscatter reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-03-01

    A feedback method for obtaining real-time information on the mechanical disruption of tissue through ultrasound cavitation is presented. This method is based on a substantial reduction in ultrasound imaging backscatter from the target volume as the tissue structure is broken down. Ex-vivo samples of porcine liver were exposed to successive high-intensity ultrasound pulses at a low duty cycle to induce mechanical disruption of tissue parenchyma through cavitation (referred to as histotripsy). At the conclusion of treatment, B-scan imaging backscatter was observed to have decreased by 22.4 +/- 2.3 dB in the target location. Treated samples of tissue were found to contain disrupted tissue corresponding to the imaged hypoechoic volume with no remaining discernable structure and a sharp boundary. The observed, substantial backscatter reduction may be an effective feedback mechanism for assessing treatment efficacy in ultrasound surgery using pulsed ultrasound to create cavitation.

  7. Averaging of Backscatter Intensities in Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, John J.; Pingitore, Nicholas E.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Low uncertainty measurements on pure element stable isotope pairs demonstrate that mass has no influence on the backscattering of electrons at typical electron microprobe energies. The traditional prediction of average backscatter intensities in compounds using elemental mass fractions is improperly grounded in mass and thus has no physical basis. We propose an alternative model to mass fraction averaging, based of the number of electrons or protons, termed “electron fraction,” which predicts backscatter yield better than mass fraction averaging. PMID:27446752

  8. Relationship between the fraction of backscattered light and the asymmetry parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Helmuth

    2015-04-01

    The fraction of backscattered light is defined as the ratio of the integral of the volume scattering function over the backward half solid angle divided by the integral of the volume scattering function over the full solid angle. It can be measured with an integrating nephelometer. On the other hand the asymmetry parameter is the integral over the full solid angle of the volume scattering function weighted with the cosine of the scattering angle divided by the integral of the volume scattering function. To determine the asymmetry parameter the measurement of the angular dependence of the volume scattering function is needed, which can be obtained e.g. with a polar nephelometer. The asymmetry parameter is an important input parameter for radiative transfer calculations in order to obtain information of effects of the atmospheric aerosol effects (climate, screening, visibility, and others). Unfortunately measurements of the asymmetry parameter of the atmospheric aerosol are scarce. It is obvious, that a relation between the asymmetry parameter and the backscattered fraction should exist: the smaller the backscattered fraction, the more asymmetric the scattering, thus the larger the asymmetry parameter. A large set of 6500 angular scattering data have been obtained at various locations of the world: Vienna (Austria), Kyoto (Japan), Granada (Spain) and Palencia (Spain). The aerosols in these locations were considerably different, ranging from continental, urban, maritime, to desert dust. The volume scattering function has been measured between 5° and 175° , the values for 0° to 5° and 175° to 180° have been obtained by extrapolation of the shape of the curve, thus the whole range of scattering angles was available for calculating the backscattered fraction and the asymmetry parameter of the aerosol. PIC A summary of all data is shown in figure 1. The majority of the data points suggest an unanimous relation between backscattering and asymmetry parameter. The

  9. Variations in Optical Scattering and Backscattering by Organic and Inorganic Particulates in Chinese Lakes of Taihu, Chaohu and Dianchi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LYU Heng; WANG Qiao; WU Chuanqing; ZHU Li; LI Yunmei; HUANG Jiazhu

    2015-01-01

    This stu dy presents an investigation of the scattering and backscattering properties of the particulates in three Chinese inlandlakes (the Taihu Lake,the Chaohu Lake and the Dianchi Lake) based on in situ measurements taken at 119 sites.We modeled the particulate scattering spectra using a wavelength-dependent power-law function,finding that the power-law exponents in the Taihu Lake and the Chaohu Lake differ from those in the Dianchi Lake but are similar to the values in the U.S.coastal waters.In contrast to the open ocean,the backscattering properties in the three lakes can not be determined only from chlorophyll-a concentration.The backscattering ratio spectra exhibit a wavelength dependence feature in all three lakes,generally decreasing with the increasing wavelength.Analysis results of the correlations between the backscattering ratio and the individual water quality parameters clearly show that there are distinctive relations among the three lakes,attributed primarily to different compositions of optically active materials in the three lakes.Analysis of the mass-specific scattering and backscattering coefficients shows that the coefficients at wavelength 532 nm in the Taihu Lake and Chaohu Lake are similar,but they are apparently different from those in the Dianehi Lake.Lastly,Model I multiple linear regressions were adopted to partition the mass-specific cross-sections for scattering and backscattering into organic and inorganic cross-sections to further interpret the scattering and backscattering properties.The relative contribution of organic and inorganic particulates to scattering and backscattering is clearly different among the three lakes.The scattering and backscattering properties of the particulates in the three inland lakes vary significantly based on our collected data.The results indicated that the existing semi-analytical water quality retrieval models of the Taihu Lake can not be applied perfectly to the Chaohu Lake and the Dianchi Lake.

  10. Dependence of {alpha}-particle backscattering on energy and source backing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timon, A. Fernandez [ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: alfonso.fernandez@urjc.es; Vargas, M. Jurado [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    Measurement of {alpha}-particle sources using 2{pi} counting detectors requires corrections for backscattering, and these depend on the material used as source backing and on the {alpha}-particle energy. This dependence has been analyzed theoretically by some authors, although assuming some simplifying approximations. In this work, we analyze the dependence of the backscattering coefficient B on energy and source backing, but by means of the Monte Carlo simulation code SRIM, thus avoiding the simplifying approximations assumed in the theoretical models. To study the dependence on the backing, we simulated {sup 210}Po point sources deposited on various backing materials with atomic numbers ranging from 4 to 79. The dependence on energy was studied by simulating {alpha}-particle point sources deposited on a platinum backing, with energies between 3 and 8 MeV. We found that the dependence of the backscattering coefficient B on {alpha}-particle energy and also on the mass number A of the backing approximately follows power function laws, in concordance with the theoretical models, although with exponents somewhat different from those established theoretically. In addition, although it was found that the scattering angle distribution is not Gaussian, our results confirm that there is a linear relationship between the backscattering coefficient B and the mean scattering angle {phi}, as suggested by the Crawford theory.

  11. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  12. Emission characteristics and electron kinetic coefficients of the plasma of a transverse volume discharge initiated in a mixture of heavy inert gases with chlorine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Chygin, V. I.; Shimon, L. L.; Shevera, I. V.; Gorun, P. P.; Obukhovskii, R. O.

    2010-05-01

    The results of studying the radiation due to argon, krypton, and xenon monochloride bands, as well as to the bands of chlorine molecules, from the plasma of a transverse Ar-Kr-Xe-Cl2 volume discharge are reported. The working mixture of a pulse radiation source is optimized with regard to its pressure and elemental composition and parameters of an excitation system. By numerically solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation for the electron energy distribution function, the transport characteristics of plasma electrons and discharge power specific losses are found for different values of the reduced electric field strength. The plasma parameters are simulated for the quaternary mixture, which is most appropriate for a multiwave UV-VUV source. Qualitative analysis is conducted for the most important electron processes in the multicomponent plasma that govern the joint formation of argon, krypton, and xenon monochlorides in the transverse discharge.

  13. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 1. Algorithm description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothermel, J. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Bowdle, D.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville (USA)); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Worcestershire (England)); Woodfield, A.A. (Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedfordshire (England))

    1991-03-20

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kingdom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 {mu}m using an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). The heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: Set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  14. Concentration measurement of yeast suspensions using high frequency ultrasound backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Luis; Vera, Pedro; Cañadas, Francisco Jesús; Shukla, Shiva Kant; Montero, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes the use of an ultrasound based technique to measure the concentration of yeasts in liquid suspension. This measurement was achieved by the detection and quantification of ultrasonic echoes backscattered by the cells. More specifically, the technique was applied to the detection and quantification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A theoretical approach was proposed to get the average density and sound speed of the yeasts, which were found to be 1116 kg/m(3) and 1679 m/s, respectively. These parameters were needed to model the waves backscattered by each single cell. A pulse-echo arrangement working around 50 MHz, being able to detect echoes from single yeasts was used to characterize experimentally yeast solutions from 10(2) to 10(7)cells/ml. The Non-negative Matrix Factorization denoising technique was applied for data analysis. This technique required a previous learning of the spectral patterns of the echoes reflected from yeasts in solution and the base noise from the liquid medium. Comparison between pulse correlation (without denoising) and theoretical and experimental pattern learning was made to select the best signal processing. A linear relation between ultrasound output and concentration was obtained with correlation coefficient R(2)=0.996 for the experimental learning. Concentrations from 10(4) to 10(7)cells/ml were detected above the base noise. These results show the viability of using the ultrasound backscattering technique to detect yeasts and measure their concentration in liquid cultures, improving the sensitivity obtained using spectrophotometric methods by one order of magnitude.

  15. Control of collective FSBS and backscatter SRS through plasma composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Harvey; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2005-10-01

    Nominal NIF parameters are near the collective forward SBS (FSBS) threshold (P. M. Lushnikov and H. A. Rose, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255003 (2004), ``L&R''). It will be shown that being on this instability edge can be used as a control lever: a small amount of high Z dopant may lead to qualitative change in FSBS regime at fixed laser intensity, possibly reducing backscatter instability losses (Such results have already been observed, but absent SSD, a key aspect of our theory: R. M. Stevenson et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2709 (2004); L. J. Suter et al., 2738, ib.). Ponderomotive FSBS regimes are determined by the parameter I=F^2( vosc / vosc ve . - ve )^2( ne / ne nc . - nc ) / ( ne / ne nc . - nc ) ν . - ν, with ν the dimensionless ion acoustic damping coefficient and F the optic f/#. Analytical results will be presented which show a decrease of I1pt's threshold value through the addition of high Z dopant to low Z plasma, owing to increased thermal contribution to FSBS. Alternatively, one may raise the threshold by managing the value of νby, e.g., adding He to SiO2. For nominal NIF parameters, a range of He fraction in SiO2 plasma is predicted to suppress backscatter SRS while maintaining control of forward SBS.

  16. Shallow water acoustic backscatter and reverberation measurements using a 68-kHz cylindrical array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet, Timothy Cole

    2001-10-01

    The characterization of high frequency, shallow water acoustic backscatter and reverberation is important because acoustic systems are used in many scientific, commercial, and military applications. The approach taken is to use data collected by the Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS), a 68 kHz multibeam sonar capable of 360° imaging in a vertical plane perpendicular to its direction of travel. With this unique capability, acoustic backscatter imagery of the seafloor, sea surface, and horizontal and vertical planes in the volume are constructed from data obtained in 200m deep waters in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico when the TVSS was towed 78m below the surface, 735m astern of a towship. The processed imagery provide a quasi-synoptic characterization of the spatial and temporal structure of boundary and volume acoustic backscatter and reverberation. Diffraction, element patterns, and high sidelobe levels are shown to be the most serious problems affecting cylindrical arrays such as the TVSS, and an amplitude shading method is presented for reducing the peak sidelobe levels of irregular-line and non-coplanar arrays. Errors in the towfish's attitude and motion sensor, and irregularities in the TVSS's transmitted beampattern produce artifacts in the TVSS-derived bathymetry and seafloor acoustic backscatter imagery. Correction strategies for these problems are described, which are unique in that they use environmental information extracted from both ocean boundaries. Sea surface and volume acoustic backscatter imagery are used to explore and characterize the structure of near-surface bubble clouds, schooling fish, and zooplankton. The simultaneous horizontal and vertical coverage provided by the TVSS is shown to be a primary advantage, motivating further use of multibeam sonars in these applications. Whereas boundary backscatter fluctuations are well described by Weibull, K, and Rayleigh mixture probability distributions, those corresponding to volume backscatter are

  17. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Although the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  18. First observations of SPEAR-induced artificial backscatter from CUTLASS and the EISCAT Svalbard radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Robinson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from the first two active experimental campaigns undertaken by the new SPEAR (Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar high-power system that has recently become operational on Spitzbergen, in the Svalbard archipelago. SPEAR's high-power beam was used to excite artificial enhancements in the backscatter detected by the ESR (EISCAT Svalbard Radar parallel to the geomagnetic field, as well as coherent backscatter detected by both of the CUTLASS (Co-operative UK Twin Located Auroral Sounding System coherent radars, in directions orthogonal to the geomagnetic field. The ESR detected both enhanced ion-lines as well as enhanced plasma-lines, that were sustained for the whole period when SPEAR was transmitting ordinary mode radio waves, at frequencies below the maximum F-region plasma frequency. On a number of occasions, coherent backscatter was also observed in one or in both of the CUTLASS radars, in beams that intersected the heated volume. Although the levels of enhanced backscatter varied considerably in time, it appeared that ion-line, plasma-line and coherent backscatter were all excited simultaneously, in contrast to what has typically been reported at Tromsø, during EISCAT heater operations. A description of the technical and operational aspects of the new SPEAR system is also included.

  19. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  20. Ray-based calculations of laser backscatter in ICF targets

    CERN Document Server

    Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Froula, D H; London, R A; Callahan, D A

    2008-01-01

    A steady-state model for Brillouin and Raman backscatter along a laser ray path is presented. The daughter plasma waves are treated in the strong damping limit, and have amplitudes given by the (linear) kinetic response to the ponderomotive drive. Pump depletion, inverse-bremsstrahlung damping, bremsstrahlung emission, Thomson scattering off density fluctuations, and whole-beam focusing are included. The numerical code Deplete, which implements this model, is described. The model is compared with traditional linear gain calculations, as well as ``plane-wave'' simulations with the paraxial propagation code pF3D. Comparisons with Brillouin-scattering experiments at the Omega Laser Facility show that laser speckles greatly enhance the reflectivity over the Deplete results. An approximate upper bound on this enhancement is given by doubling the Deplete coupling coefficient. Analysis with Deplete of an ignition design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), with a peak radiation temperature of 285 eV, shows enco...

  1. Elastic-backscatter-lidar-based characterization of the convective boundary layer and investigation of related statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, S.; Behrendt, A.; Wulfmeyer, V. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (DE). Inst. of Physics and Meteorology (IPM)

    2010-07-01

    We applied a ground-based vertically-pointing aerosol lidar to investigate the evolution of the instantaneous atmospheric boundary layer depth, its growth rate, associated entrainment processes, and turbulence characteristics. We used lidar measurements with range resolution of 3m and time resolution of up to 0.033 s obtained in the course of a sunny day (26 June 2004) over an urban valley (central Stuttgart, 48 47{sup '} N, 9 12{sup '} E, 240m above sea level). The lidar system uses a wavelength of 1064 nm and has a poweraperture product of 2.1 Wm{sup 2}. Three techniques are examined for determining the instantaneous convective boundary layer (CBL) depth from the high-resolution lidar measurements: the logarithm gradient method, the inflection point method, and the Haar wavelet transform method. The Haar wavelet-based approach is found to be the most robust technique for the automated detection of the CBL depth. Two different regimes of the CBL are discussed in detail: a quasi-stationary CBL in the afternoon and a CBL with rapid growth during morning transition in the presence of dust layers atop. Two different growth rates were found: 3-5 m/min for the growing CBL in the morning and 0.5-2 m/min during the quasisteady regime. The mean entrainment zone thickness for the quasi-steady CBL was found to be {proportional_to}75m while the CBL top during the entire day varied between 0.7 km and 2.3 km. A fast Fourier-transform-based spectral analysis of the instantaneous CBL depth time series gave a spectral exponent value of 1.50{+-}0.04, confirming non-stationary CBL behavior in the morning while for the other regime a value of 1.00{+-}0.06 was obtained indicating a quasi-stationary state of the CBL. Assuming that the spatio-temporal variation of the particle backscatter cross-section of the aerosols in the scattering volume is due to number density fluctuations (negligible hygro-scopic growth), the particle backscatter coefficient profiles can be used to

  2. Backscattering and vegetation water content response of paddy crop at C-band using RISAT-1 satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Prasad, Rajendra; Choudhary, Arti; Gupta, Dileep Kumar; Narayan Mishra, Varun; Srivastava, Prashant K.

    2016-04-01

    The study about the temporal behaviour of vegetation water content (VWC) is essential for monitoring the growth of a crop to improve agricultural production. In agriculture, VWC could possibly provide information that can be used to infer water stress for irrigation decisions, vegetation health conditions, aid in yield estimation and assessment of drought conditions (Penuelas et al., 1993). The VWC is an important parameter for soil moisture retrieval in microwave remote sensing (Srivastava et al., 2014). In the present study, the backscattering and VWC response of paddy crop has been investigated using medium resolution (MRS) radar imaging satellite-1 (RISAT-1) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in Varanasi, India. The VWC of paddy crop was measured at its five different growth stages started from 15 July 2013 to 23 October 2013 from the transplanting to maturity stage during Kharif season. The whole life of paddy crop was divided into three different major growth stages like vegetative stage, reproductive stage and ripening stage. During vegetative stage, the backscattering coefficients were found increasing behaviour until the leaves became large and dense due to major contribution of stems and the interaction between the stems and water underneath the paddy crop. During reproductive stage, the backscattering coefficients were found to increase slowly due to random scattering by vertical leaves. The increase in the size of leaves cause to cover most of the spaces between plants resulted to quench the contributions from the stems and the water underneath. At the maturity stage, the backscattering showed its decreasing behaviour. The VWC of paddy crop was found increasing up to vegetative to reproductive stages (28 September 2013) and then started decreasing during the ripening (maturity) stage. Similar behaviour was obtained between backscattering coefficients and VWC that showed an increasing trend from vegetative to reproductive stage and then lowering down at

  3. Three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation lidar for wind profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Radhakrishnan Mylapore, Anand

    2017-03-01

    The development of a three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation (ABC) light detection and ranging (lidar) to measure wind characteristics for wake vortex and plume tracking applications is discussed. This is a direct detection elastic lidar that uses three laser transceivers, operating at 1030-nm wavelength with ˜10-kHz pulse repetition frequency and nanosec class pulse widths, to directly obtain three components of wind velocities. By tracking the motion of aerosol structures along and between three near-parallel laser beams, three-component wind speed profiles along the field-of-view of laser beams are obtained. With three 8-in. transceiver modules, placed in a near-parallel configuration on a two-axis pan-tilt scanner, the lidar measures wind speeds up to 2 km away. Optical flow algorithms have been adapted to obtain the movement of aerosol structures between the beams. Aerosol density fluctuations are cross-correlated between successive scans to obtain the displacements of the aerosol features along the three axes. Using the range resolved elastic backscatter data from each laser beam, which is scanned over the volume of interest, a three-dimensional map of aerosol density can be generated in a short time span. The performance of the ABC wind lidar prototype, validated using sonic anemometer measurements, is discussed.

  4. Study of diffusion of indocyanine green as a photodynamic dye into skin using backscattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2014-07-01

    One of the lines of development of modern medicine is theranostics consisting in simultaneous diagnosis and laser treatment with the use of multifunctional agents such as fluorescent indocyanine green that has photodynamic and photothermal properties. Diffusion of indocyanine green dissolved in water and aqueous solutions of alcohols (glycerol, propylene glycol and ethanol) into the dermis is studied by using backscattering spectroscopy. The coefficients of the dye diffusion into the dermis are obtained for the first time by using these solvents.

  5. Study of diffusion of indocyanine green as a photodynamic dye into skin using backscattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genina, E A; Bashkatov, A N; Tuchin, V V [N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-31

    One of the lines of development of modern medicine is theranostics consisting in simultaneous diagnosis and laser treatment with the use of multifunctional agents such as fluorescent indocyanine green that has photodynamic and photothermal properties. Diffusion of indocyanine green dissolved in water and aqueous solutions of alcohols (glycerol, propylene glycol and ethanol) into the dermis is studied by using backscattering spectroscopy. The coefficients of the dye diffusion into the dermis are obtained for the first time by using these solvents. (laser biophotonics)

  6. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  7. Backscatter nephelometer to calibrate scanning lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle E. Wold; Vladmir A. Kovalev; Wei Min Hao

    2008-01-01

    The general concept of an open-path backscatter nephelometer, its design, principles of calibration and the operational use are discussed. The research-grade instrument, which operates at the wavelength 355 nm, will be co-located with a scanning-lidar at measurement sites near wildfires, and used for the lidar calibration. Such a near-end calibration has significant...

  8. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  9. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  11. Preliminary backscatter results from the hydrosweep multibeam system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hagen, R.A.; Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    of Oceanography to convert the measured electrical energy into acoustic backscatter energy. This conversion includes corrections for the position, slope, and area of the scattering surface. In this paper we present backscatter data from several areas surveyed...

  12. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  15. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  16. BackscatterB [EM300]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  17. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  18. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  19. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. BackscatterB [EM300]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  1. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  2. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  3. Backscatter D [USGS]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  4. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  6. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  7. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. BackscatterA [SWATH]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  9. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  10. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  11. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  12. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  15. Backscatter D [7125]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  16. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  17. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  19. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. Backscatter B [Swath]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  1. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  2. Method for analysis of low energy backscattering spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowicz, V.; Kvitek, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Rez. Ustav Jaderne Fyziky); Pelikan, L. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslavika). Dept. of Microelectronics); Rybka, V.; Krejci, P. (Tesla, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-04-15

    An analytical formula is proposed describing the shape of the energy spectra of particles backscattered from samples implanted with heavy impurities. The method is suitable for quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra measured with low energy ions.

  3. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  4. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  5. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  7. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  9. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  10. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  11. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  12. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  15. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  16. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  17. BackscatterA [SWATH]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  18. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  19. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  2. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  3. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  4. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Contribution of backscattered electrons to the total electron yield produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with tungsten

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Yadav; R Shanker

    2007-03-01

    It is shown experimentally that under energetic electron bombardment the backscattered electrons from solid targets contribute significantly (∼ 80%) to the observed total electron yield, even for targets of high backscattering coefficients. It is further found that for tungsten ( = 74) with a backscattering coefficient of about 0.50, about 20% of the total electron yield is contributed by the total secondary electrons for impact energies in the range of 8–28 keV. The yield of true backscattered electrons at normal incidence (0), total secondary electrons () and the total electron yield (tot) produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with W have been measured and compared with predictions of available theories. The present results indicate that the constant-loss of primary electrons in the target plays a significant role in producing the secondary electrons and that it yields a better fit to the experiment compared to the power-law.

  6. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  7. Multi-Polarization ASAR Backscattering from Herbaceous Wetlands in Poyang Lake Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyong Sang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are one of the most important ecosystems on Earth. There is an urgent need to quantify the biophysical parameters (e.g., plant height, aboveground biomass and map total remaining areas of wetlands in order to evaluate the ecological status of wetlands. In this study, Environmental Satellite/Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT/ASAR dual-polarization C-band data acquired in 2005 is tested to investigate radar backscattering mechanisms with the variation of hydrological conditions during the growing cycle of two types of herbaceous wetland species, which colonize lake borders with different elevation in Poyang Lake region, China. Phragmites communis (L. Trin. is semi-aquatic emergent vegetation with vertical stem and blade-like leaves, and the emergent Carex spp. has rhizome and long leaves. In this study, the potential of ASAR data in HH-, HV-, and VV-polarization in mapping different wetland types is examined, by observing their dynamic variations throughout the whole flooding cycle. The sensitivity of ASAR backscattering coefficients to vegetation parameters of plant height, fresh and dry biomass, and vegetation water content is also analyzed for Phragmites communis (L. Trin. and Carex spp. The research for Phragmites communis (L. Trin. shows that HH polarization is more sensitive to plant height and dry biomass than HV polarization. ASAR backscattering coefficients are relatively less sensitive to fresh biomass, especially in HV polarization. However, both are highly dependent on canopy water content. In contrast, the dependence of HH- and HV- backscattering from Carex community on vegetation parameters is poor, and the radar backscattering mechanism is controlled by ground water level.

  8. Polarized Rayleigh back-scattering from individual semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Duming; Wu Jian; Lu Qiujie; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Eklund, Peter C, E-mail: hur3@psu.edu [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-08-06

    A complete understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is required in order to further develop a new generation of opto-electronic and photonic devices based on these nanosystems. The reduced dimensionality and high aspect ratio of nanofilaments can induce strong polarization dependence of the light absorption, emission and scattering, leading in some cases to the observation of optical antenna effects. In this work we present the first systematic study of polarized Rayleigh back-scattering from individual crystalline semiconductor NWs with known crystalline structure, orientation and diameters. To explain our experimental Rayleigh polar patterns, we propose a simple theory that relies on a secondary calculation of the volume-averaged internal electromagnetic fields inside the NW. These results revealed that the internal and emitted field can be enhanced depending on the polarization with respect to the NW axis; we also show that this effect strongly depends on the NW diameter.

  9. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  10. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II:Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; William Perrie; 赵尚卓; 方贺; 于文金; 何宜军

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface.

  11. Retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction from airborne coherent Doppler wind lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chouza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for calibration and quantitative aerosol optical properties retrieval from Doppler wind lidars (DWL is presented in this work. Due to the strong wavelength dependence of the atmospheric molecular backscatter and the low sensitivity of the coherent detection to spectrally broad signals, calibration methods for aerosol lidars cannot be applied to a coherent DWLs usually operating at wavelengths between 1.5–2 μm. Instead, concurrent measurements of an airborne DWL at 2 μm and the POLIS ground-based aerosol lidar at 532 nm are used in this work, in combination with sun photometer measurements, for the calibration and retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles. The proposed method was applied to measurements from the SALTRACE experiment in June–July 2013, which aimed at quantifying the aerosol transport and change in aerosol properties from the Sahara desert to the Caribbean. The retrieved backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles from the airborne DWL are within 20% of POLIS aerosol lidar and CALIPSO satellite measurements. Thus the proposed method extends the capabilities of coherent DWL to measure profiles of the horizontal and vertical wind towards aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles, which is of high benefit for aerosol transport studies.

  12. Backscattering analysis of high frequency ultrasonic imaging for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Thomas; Akiyama, Takahiro; Lee, Changyang; Martin, Sue E.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2017-03-01

    A new ultrasound-guided breast biopsy technique is proposed. The technique utilizes conventional ultrasound guidance coupled with a high frequency embedded ultrasound array located within the biopsy needle to improve the accuracy in breast cancer diagnosis.1 The array within the needle is intended to be used to detect micro- calcifications indicative of early breast cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Backscattering analysis has the potential to characterize tissues to improve localization of lesions. This paper describes initial results of the application of backscattering analysis of breast biopsy tissue specimens and shows the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound for the new biopsy related technique. Ultrasound echoes of ex-vivo breast biopsy tissue specimens were acquired by using a single-element transducer with a bandwidth from 41 MHz to 88 MHz utilizing a UBM methodology, and the backscattering coefficients were calculated. These values as well as B-mode image data were mapped in 2D and matched with each pathology image for the identification of tissue type for the comparison to the pathology images corresponding to each plane. Microcalcifications were significantly distinguished from normal tissue. Adenocarcinoma was also successfully differentiated from adipose tissue. These results indicate that backscattering analysis is able to quantitatively distinguish tissues into normal and abnormal, which should help radiologists locate abnormal areas during the proposed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy with high frequency ultrasound.

  13. Radar Backscatter Study of Sea Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    in controlling the "state" of the ice ( temperatura and salinity) are shown in Figure 4.3-79. The salinity profile is a typical irregular c-shaped...the University of Kansas to provide well- controlled systematic studies to relate radar backscatter return to sea ice and to pin down some of the...34..,. : . - " ... ,. -.. .... .. .. ... ,,, ... ... _ ., ’.. . . , 72. Profiles of the parameters most important in controlling the "state" of the ice (temperature and salinity

  14. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, K; Pao, H

    2007-01-16

    Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.

  15. Ultrasound characterization of arterial wall structures based on integrated backscatter profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Peder C.; Chakareski, Jacob; Lara-Montalvo, Ruben

    2003-05-01

    Studies suggest that the composition of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries is predictive of stroke risk. The goal of this investigation has been to explore how well the true integrated backscatter (IBS) from plaque regions can be measured non-invasively using ultrasound, based on which plaque composition may be inferred. To obtain the true arterial IBS non-invasively, the scattering and aberrating effect of the intervening tissue layers must be overcome. This is achieved by using the IBS from arterial blood as a reference backscatter, specifically the backscatter from a blood volume along the same scan line as and adjacent to the region of interest. The arterial blood IBS is obtained as an estimated mean of a stochastic process, after clutter removal. We have shown that the variance of the IBS estimate of the blood backscatter signal can be quantified and reduced to a tolerable level. The results are in the form of IBS profiles along the vessel. IBS profiles not normalized with the IBS of the blood-mimicking fluid have been measured for vessels phantom, with and without an intervening inhomogeneous medium; these results are contrasted with the corresponding normalized IBS profiles.

  16. Comparison of Ultrasound Attenuation and Backscatter Estimates in Layered Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms among Three Clinical Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Ghoshal, Goutam; Pawlicki, Alexander D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zagzebski, James A.; O’Brien, William D.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Backscatter and attenuation coefficient estimates are needed in many quantitative ultrasound strategies. In clinical applications, these parameters may not be easily obtained because of variations in scattering by tissues overlying a region of interest (ROI). The goal of this study is to assess the accuracy of backscatter and attenuation estimates for regions distal to nonuniform layers of tissue-mimicking materials. In addition, this work compares results of these estimates for “layered” phantoms scanned using different clinical ultrasound machines. Two tissue-mimicking phantoms were constructed, each exhibiting depth-dependent variations in attenuation or backscatter. The phantoms were scanned with three ultrasound imaging systems, acquiring radio frequency echo data for offline analysis. The attenuation coefficient and the backscatter coefficient (BSC) for sections of the phantoms were estimated using the reference phantom method. Properties of each layer were also measured with laboratory techniques on test samples manufactured during the construction of the phantom. Estimates of the attenuation coefficient versus frequency slope, α0, using backscatter data from the different systems agreed to within 0.24 dB/cm-MHz. Bias in the α0 estimates varied with the location of the ROI. BSC estimates for phantom sections whose locations ranged from 0 to 7 cm from the transducer agreed among the different systems and with theoretical predictions, with a mean bias error of 1.01 dB over the used bandwidths. This study demonstrates that attenuation and BSCs can be accurately estimated in layered inhomogeneous media using pulse-echo data from clinical imaging systems. PMID:23160474

  17. IMPROVED PARAMETERIZATION OF WATER CLOUD MODEL FOR HYBRID-POLARIZED BACKSCATTER SIMULATION USING INTERACTION FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chauhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The prime aim of this study was to assess the potential of semi-empirical water cloud model (WCM in simulating hybrid-polarized SAR backscatter signatures (RH and RV retrieved from RISAT-1 data and integrate the results into a graphical user interface (GUI to facilitate easy comprehension and interpretation. A predominant agricultural wheat growing area was selected in Mathura and Bharatpur districts located in the Indian states of Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan respectively to carry out the study. The three-date datasets were acquired covering the crucial growth stages of the wheat crop. In synchrony, the fieldwork was organized to measure crop/soil parameters. The RH and RV backscattering coefficient images were extracted from the SAR data for all the three dates. The effect of four combinations of vegetation descriptors (V1 and V2 viz., LAI-LAI, LAI-Plant water content (PWC, Leaf water area index (LWAI-LWAI, and LAI-Interaction factor (IF on the total RH and RV backscatter was analyzed. The results revealed that WCM calibrated with LAI and IF as the two vegetation descriptors simulated the total RH and RV backscatter values with highest R2 of 0.90 and 0.85 while the RMSE was lowest among the other tested models (1.18 and 1.25 dB, respectively. The theoretical considerations and interpretations have been discussed and examined in the paper. The novelty of this work emanates from the fact that it is a first step towards the modeling of hybrid-polarized backscatter data using an accurately parameterized semi-empirical approach.

  18. Measurements of aerosol distribution by an elastic-backscatter lidar in summer 2008 in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenyi Chen; Wenqing Liu; Yujun Zhang; Nanjing Zhao; Junfeng He; Jun Ruan

    2009-01-01

    Elastic lidar observations of profiles of the aerosol extinction,backscattering coefficients,and the lidar ratio have been performed in Beijing.The elastic lidar transmitts wavelengths of 532 and 355 nm.The measurement altitude can reach up to 6 km.The similarity of the extinction and backscattering profiles suggests a close relation between the mean transmission and reflection properties.The lidar ratio on July 22,2008 varied from 10 to 30 sr with the mean value of 20 sr.The profiles of the aerosol properties indicate the cirrus at 6-km altitude and a well-mixed boundary layer from July 22 to 24,2008.The detected boundary layer also agrees well with the high and stable ozone concentration obtained from the differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS)system.

  19. Constraining the physical properties of Titan's empty lake basins using nadir and off-nadir Cassini RADAR backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, R. J.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Zebker, H. A.; Farr, T. G.; Malaska, M. J.; Poggiali, V.; Mullen, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We use repeat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and complementary altimetry passes acquired by the Cassini spacecraft to study the scattering properties of Titan's empty lake basins. The best-fit coefficients from fitting SAR data to a quasi-specular plus diffuse backscatter model suggest that the bright basin floors have a higher dielectric constant, but similar facet-scale rms surface facet slopes, to surrounding terrain. Waveform analysis of altimetry returns reveals that nadir backscatter returns from basin floors are greater than nadir backscatter returns from basin surroundings and have narrower pulse widths. This suggests that floor deposits are structurally distinct from their surroundings, consistent with the interpretation that some of these basins may be filled with evaporitic and/or sedimentary deposits. Basin floor deposits also express a larger diffuse component to their backscatter, which is likely due to variations in subsurface structure or an increase in roughness at the wavelength scale (Hayes, A.G. et al. [2008]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 9). We generate a high-resolution altimetry radargram of the T30 altimetry pass over an empty lake basin, with which we place geometric constraints on the basin's slopes, rim heights, and depth. Finally, the importance of these backscatter observations and geometric measurements for basin formation mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  20. Elementary polarization properties in the backscattering configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Oriol; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-10-15

    In the normal incidence backscattering configuration, a polarimetric measurement always preserves the reciprocal symmetry. For a reciprocal Jones matrix, the number of elementary polarization properties is reduced from six to four. In this work, the physical interpretation of these properties is examined and they are compared with the equivalent polarization properties in transmission. It is found that, with the exception of natural optical activity, a polarimetric backreflection experiment can essentially provide the same type of information about the anisotropy of a medium as a transmission analysis, although transmission and backreflection information comes in a completely different form. Experimental examples are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  1. Backscattering Differential Ghost Imaging in Turbid Media

    CERN Document Server

    Bina, M; Molteni, M; Gatti, A; Lugiato, L A; Ferri, F

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present experimental results concerning the retrieval of images of absorbing objects immersed in turbid media via differential ghost imaging (DGI) in a backscattering configuration. The method has been applied, for the first time to our knowledge, to the imaging of small thin black objects located at different depths inside a turbid solution of polystyrene nanospheres and its performances assessed via comparison with standard imaging techniques. A simple theoretical model capable of describing the basic optics of DGI in turbid media is proposed.

  2. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments...... is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fis converted...

  3. Demonstration of zero optical backscattering from single nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Person, Steven; Lapin, Zachary; Saenz, Juan Jose; Wicks, Gary; Novotny, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    We present the first experimental demonstration of zero backscattering from nanoparticles at op- tical frequencies as originally discussed by Kerker et. al. [M. Kerker, D. Wang, and C. Giles, J. Opt. Soc. A 73, 765 (1983)]. GaAs pillars were fabricated on a fused silica substrate and the spectrum of the backscattered radiation was measured in the wavelength range 600-1000 nm. Suppression of backscattering occurred at ~725 nm, agreeing with calculations based on the discrete dipole approximation. Particles with zero backscattering provide new functionality for metamaterials and optical antennas.

  4. CRED Acoustic Backscatter Guam 2003, Imagery Extracted from Gridded Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter extracted from gridded bathymetry of the banktops and shelf environments of Guam, of the Mariana Islands Archipelago.

  5. Sea Floor Analyses Based On Multibeam Backscatter Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.

    Measurements of acoustic backscatter strength can be applied to analyse sea floor coverage on a spatial extent. They provide consistent coverage compared to analy- ses based on only a few surface samples. In particular the spatial validity of surface samples can be determined by analyses based on acoustic backscatter strength and sampling locations representative for the surrounding area can be determined. Dur- ing the cruise ANTXVII/4 of the German RV "Polarstern", a high precision swath bathymetry survey was performed along the European continental margin in the Por- cupine Seabight off southwest Ireland. Within the Porcupine Seabight a number of mound structures have been discovered earlier, most of them being carbonate mounds. The structure and genesis of these mounds are the main objective of recent investiga- tions. The cruise and the subsequent investigations are part of the EU project GEO- MOUND. They focus on the Belgica mound province. Besides the depth measure- ments, the acoustic intensities of the received echos have been recorded. Taking into account the transmitted and received sound level, acoustic beam patterns, and acous- tic attenuation in the water column, the backscatter strength of the ensonified area was calculated. This backscatter information is used to analyse the sea floor cover- age. Based on the data of the systematic survey the spatial variation of the backscatter strength was derived. Regions of equal backscatter characteristic can be combined and functions showing the dependency between backscatter strength and incidence angle of the acoustic wave can be determined. These functions help interpreting sea floor coverage. The mapping of the backscatter strength of the mound area indicates clear changes in backscatter strength. Small and shallow channels show a lower backscat- ter strength than their surroundings. That means the surface coverage of the channels is smooth with respect to the surroundings. One interpretation of this

  6. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 2. Algorithm performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothermel, J. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Bowdle, D.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville (USA)); Vaughan, J.M. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Worcestshire (England))

    1991-03-20

    The performance of an algorithm to calculate aerosol backscatter coefficients, from measurements with an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, is described relative to flight hardware settings and operating characteristics, and theoretical considerations. The algorithm (described in paper 1) is used to analyze measurements by the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS), operated by the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE) and Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), United Kingdom. Under optimum signal conditions, backscatter signals are located unambiguously and the backscatter coefficients are accurately determined. Under marginal or subthreshold conditions, with a degraded system sensitivity, false alarms (mistaking noise for signal) occur. Parametric studies show that the false alarm rate under these conditions depends on the search window size and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) threshold for valid signals. Carefully selected diagnostic parameters are used to estimate the combined sensitivity of the flight hardware system and algorithm. Less than 1% of backscatter measurements for flights over approximately 5 years have been found to be below the measurement sensitivity when the LATAS flight hardware controls were set for optimum sensitivity.

  7. Radar backscatter properties of milo and soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.; Metzler, T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter from fields of milo and soybeans was measured with a ground based radar as a function of frequency (8-18 GHz), polarization (HH and VV) and angle of incidence (0 deg-70 deg) during the summer of 1974. Supporting ground truth was gathered contemporaneously with the backscatter data. At nadir sigma deg of milo correlated highly, r = 0.96, with soil moisture in the milo field at 8.6 GHz but decreased to a value of r = 0.78 at a frequency of 17.0 GHz. Correlation studies of the variations of sigma deg with soil moisture in the soybean fields were not possible due to a lack of a meaningful soil moisture dynamic range. At the larger angles of incidence, however, sigma deg of soybeans did appear to be dependent on precipitation. It is suggested this phenomenon was caused by the rain altering plant geometry. In general sigma deg of both milo and soybeans had a relatively small dynamic range at the higher angles of incidence and showed no significant dependence on the measured crop parameters.

  8. Measurements of wavelength dependent scattering and backscattering coefficients by low-coherence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J.; Leeuwen, van Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of scattering properties are invaluable for optical techniques in medicine. However, noninvasive, quantitative measurements of scattering properties over a large wavelength range remain challenging. We introduce low-coherence spectroscopy as a noninvasive method to locally

  9. Ray-Based Calculations of Backscatter in Laser Fusion Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A; Hinkel, D E; Froula, D H; London, R A; Callahan, D A

    2008-02-26

    A steady-state model for Brillouin and Raman backscatter along a laser ray path is presented. The daughter plasma waves are treated in the strong damping limit, and have amplitudes given by the (linear) kinetic response to the ponderomotive drive. Pump depletion, inverse-bremsstrahlung damping, bremsstrahlung emission, Thomson scattering off density fluctuations, and whole-beam focusing are included. The numerical code deplete, which implements this model, is described. The model is compared with traditional linear gain calculations, as well as 'plane-wave' simulations with the paraxial propagation code pf3d. Comparisons with Brillouin-scattering experiments at the OMEGA Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, p. 495 (1997)] show that laser speckles greatly enhance the reflectivity over the deplete results. An approximate upper bound on this enhancement, motivated by phase conjugation, is given by doubling the deplete coupling coefficient. Analysis with deplete of an ignition design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, p. 755 (1994)], with a peak radiation temperature of 285 eV, shows encouragingly low reflectivity. Doubling the coupling to bound the speckle enhancement suggests a less optimistic picture. Re-absorption of Raman light is seen to be significant in this design.

  10. Evaluation of the Doppler component contribution in the total backscattered flux for noninvasive medical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapitan, Denis; Rogatkin, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    The widespread introduction of laser noninvasive diagnostic techniques in medicine gave rise interest to theoretical description of light propagation in turbid media. One of the purposes for that is a preliminary simulation of incoming radiation for diagnostic spectrophotometry equipment. For complex diagnostic devices combining the Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) and the tissue reflectance oximetry (TRO) it is necessary to know a ratio of signals in each diagnostic channel for a proper choice of the radiation power of laser sources, sensitivity of photodetectors, etc. In LDF the lightbeating backscattered signal mixed from moving red blood cells and static inhomogeneities inside the tissue is the useful signal, while in TRO both signals from static and moving scatterers are registered in the sum. The aim of our study was an estimation of the ratio between flux with the Doppler shifted signal and the total backscattered flux. For this purpose the simple analytical model describing the backscattered radiation for a two-layered tissue with different levels of blood volume in the second layer was under consideration. The physical model was based on the improved Kubelka-Munk approach. This approach involves an additional parameter of the density of scatterers, so it is useful for the Doppler signal intensity calculation as well. To assess the intensity of the Doppler component the single-scattering approximation inside the tissue's second layer was used. It was found that the fraction of the Doppler component in the total backscattered flux can vary in the range of 1-10% for the blood volume of 1-20%.

  11. Direct and indirect methods for the quantification of leg volume: Comparison between water displacement volumetry, the disk model method and the frustum sign model method, using the correlation coefficient and the limits of agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M.K.S. Kaulesar Sukul (D. M K S); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); T. Johannes (Tanja); R. van Dolder (R.); E. Benda (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractVolume changes can be measured either directly by water-displacement volumetry or by various indirect methods in which calculation of the volume is based on circumference measurements. The aim of the present study was to determine the most appropriate indirect method for lower leg volume

  12. Direct and indirect methods for the quantification of leg volume: Comparison between water displacement volumetry, the disk model method and the frustum sign model method, using the correlation coefficient and the limits of agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M.K.S. Kaulesar Sukul (D. M K S); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); T. Johannes (Tanja); R. van Dolder (R.); E. Benda (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractVolume changes can be measured either directly by water-displacement volumetry or by various indirect methods in which calculation of the volume is based on circumference measurements. The aim of the present study was to determine the most appropriate indirect method for lower leg volume

  13. A model for oxygen-dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single red blood cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongrong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The oxygen-dependent absorption of hemoglobin provides the fundamental contrast for all label-free techniques measuring blood oxygenation. When hemoglobin is packaged into red blood cells (RBCs), the structure of the cells creates light scattering which also depends on the absorption based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship. Thus a proper characterization of the optical behaviors of blood has been a key to any accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, particularly at the capillary level where RBCs are dispersed individually in contrast to a densely packed whole blood. Here we provided a theoretical model under Born Approximation to characterize the oxygen dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single RBCs. Using this theoretical model, we conducted simulations on both oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs with different sizes for standard and possible deformed cell geometries in blood flow, all which suggested similar backscattering spectroscopic contrast and were confirmed by Mie Theory and experiments using visible Optical Coherence Tomography (visOCT). As long as the cell size satisfies Gaussian distribution with a coefficient variance (C.V.) large enough, there is clear absorption contrast between the backscattering spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs calculated by this model, so oxygen saturation can then be characterized. Thus, this theoretical model can be extended to extract absorption features of other scattering particles as long as they satisfy Born Approximation.

  14. Effects of Spatial Sampling Interval on Roughness Parameters and Microwave Backscatter over Agricultural Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Ernesto Barber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial sampling interval, as related to the ability to digitize a soil profile with a certain number of features per unit length, depends on the profiling technique itself. From a variety of profiling techniques, roughness parameters are estimated at different sampling intervals. Since soil profiles have continuous spectral components, it is clear that roughness parameters are influenced by the sampling interval of the measurement device employed. In this work, we contributed to answer which sampling interval the profiles needed to be measured at to accurately account for the microwave response of agricultural surfaces. For this purpose, a 2-D laser profiler was built and used to measure surface soil roughness at field scale over agricultural sites in Argentina. Sampling intervals ranged from large (50 mm to small ones (1 mm, with several intermediate values. Large- and intermediate-sampling-interval profiles were synthetically derived from nominal, 1 mm ones. With these data, the effect of sampling-interval-dependent roughness parameters on backscatter response was assessed using the theoretical backscatter model IEM2M. Simulations demonstrated that variations of roughness parameters depended on the working wavelength and was less important at L-band than at C- or X-band. In any case, an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient of about 1-4 dB was observed at larger sampling intervals. As a general rule a sampling interval of 15 mm can be recommended for L-band and 5 mm for C-band.

  15. Backscattering in a 2D topological insulator and the conductivity of a 2D strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    A strip of the 2D HgTe topological insulator is studied. The same-spin edge states in an ideal system propagate in opposite directions on different sides of the strip and do not mix by tunneling. Impurities, edge irregularities, and phonons produce transitions between the counterpropagating edge states on different edges. This backscattering determines the conductivity of an infinitely long strip. The conductivity at finite temperature is determined in the framework of the kinetic equation. It is found that the conductivity exponentially grows with the strip width. In the same approximation the nonlocal resistance coefficients of a four-terminal strip are found.

  16. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xzhang39@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Hayward, Jason P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick’s second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  17. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick's second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  18. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsekeri Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015.

  19. Visualization of biological texture using correlation coefficient images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Alexander P; Ulissi, Zachary; Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Gandjbakhche, Amir H

    2006-01-01

    Subsurface structural features of biological tissue are visualized using polarized light images. The technique of Pearson correlation coefficient analysis is used to reduce blurring of these features by unpolarized backscattered light and to visualize the regions of high statistical similarities within the noisy tissue images. It is shown that under certain conditions, such correlation coefficient maps are determined by the textural character of tissues and not by the chosen region of interest, providing information on tissue structure. As an example, the subsurface texture of a demineralized tooth sample is enhanced from a noisy polarized light image.

  20. Strong Localization in Disordered Media: Analysis of the Backscattering Cone

    KAUST Repository

    Delgado, Edgar

    2012-06-01

    A very interesting effect in light propagation through a disordered system is Anderson localization of light, this phenomenon emerges as the result of multiple scattering of waves by electric inhomogeneities like spatial variations of index of refraction; as the amount of scattering is increased, light propagation is converted from quasi-diffusive to exponentially localized, with photons confined in a limited spatial region characterized by a fundamental quantity known as localization length. Light localization is strongly related to another interference phenomenon emerged from the multiple scattering effect: the coherent backscattering effect. In multiple scattering of waves, in fact, coherence is preserved in the backscattering direction and produces a reinforcement of the field flux originating an observable peak in the backscattered intensity, known as backscattering cone. The study of this peak provide quantitative information about the transport properties of light in the material. In this thesis we report a complete FDTD ab-initio study of light localization and coherent backscattering. In particular, we consider a supercontinuum pulse impinging on a sample composed of randomly positioned scatterers. We study coherent backscattering by averaging over several realizations of the sample properties. We study then the coherent backscattering cone properties as the relative permittivity of the sample is changed, relating the latter with the light localization inside the sample. We demonstrate important relationships between the width of the backscattering cone and the localization length, which shows a linear proportionality in the strong localization regime.

  1. Rutherford backscattering analysis of contaminants in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D. E.; Pfeffer, R. L.; Sadler, G. D.

    1997-05-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to understand the sorption and desorption of organic contaminants in the polymer Poly(ethylene terephthalate), or PET. Samples were exposed to a range of organics to simulate contamination of PET that can take place in the post-consumer waste stream. From RBS analysis, concentration depth profiles were shown to vary from a monolayer regime surface layer to a saturation level, depending on the contaminant. Heat treatments were also applied to contaminated polymer to simulate thermal processing steps in the recycling of PET. Heating caused a dramatic decrease in contaminants and in some cases a complete removal of contamination was achieved to the limit of RBS detectability.

  2. Coherent Backscattering of Ultra-cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jendrzejewski, Fred; Richard, Jérémie; Date, Aditya; Plisson, Thomas; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain; Josse, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We report on the direct observation of coherent backscattering (CBS) of ultra-cold atoms, in a quasi two dimensional configuration. Launching atoms with a well defined momentum in a laser speckle disordered potential, we follow the progressive build up of the momentum scattering pattern, consisting of a ring associated with multiple elastic scattering, and the CBS peak in the backward direction. Monitoring the depletion of the initial momentum component and the formation of the angular ring profile allow us to determine microscopic transport quantities. The time resolved evolution of the CBS peak is studied and is found a fair agreement with predictions, at long times as well as at short times. The observation of CBS can be considered a direct signature of coherence in quantum transport of particles in disordered media. It is responsible for the so called weak localization phenomenon, which is the precursor of Anderson localization.

  3. Electron Backscatter Diffraction in Low Vacuum Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Dasher, B S; Torres, S G

    2008-07-17

    Most current scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) have the ability to analyze samples in a low vacuum mode, whereby a partial pressure of water vapor is introduced into the SEM chamber, allowing the characterization of nonconductive samples without any special preparation. Although the presence of water vapor in the chamber degrades electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns, the potential of this setup for EBSD characterization of nonconductive samples is immense. In this chapter we discuss the requirements, advantages and limitations of low vacuum EBSD (LV-EBSD), and present how this technique can be applied to a two-phase ceramic composite as well as hydrated biominerals as specific examples of when LV-EBSD can be invaluable.

  4. Electron backscatter diffraction in materials characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Stojakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD is a powerful technique that captures electron diffraction patterns from crystals, constituents of material. Captured patterns can then be used to determine grain morphology, crystallographic orientation and chemistry of present phases, which provide complete characterization of microstructure and strong correlation to both properties and performance of materials. Key milestones related to technological developments of EBSD technique have been outlined along with possible applications using modern EBSD system. Principles of crystal diffraction with description of crystallographic orientation, orientation determination and phase identification have been described. Image quality, resolution and speed, and system calibration have also been discussed. Sample preparation methods were reviewed and EBSD application in conjunction with other characterization techniques on a variety of materials has been presented for several case studies. In summary, an outlook for EBSD technique was provided.

  5. CHANGES OF BACKSCATTERING PARAMETERS DURING CHILLING INJURY IN BANANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORHASHILA HASHIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in backscattering parameters during the appearance of chilling injury in bananas was investigated. Bananas were stored at a chilling temperature for two days and the degrees of the chilling injuries that appeared were measured before, during and after storage using backscattering imaging and visual assessment. Laser lights at 660 nm and 785 nm wavelengths were shot consecutively onto the samples in a dark room and a camera was used to capture the backscattered lights that appeared on the samples. The captured images were analysed and the changes of intensity against pixel count were plotted into graphs. The plotted graph provides useful information of backscattering parameters such as inflection point (IP, slope after inflection point (SA, and full width at half maximum (FWHM and saturation radius (RSAT. Results of statistical analysis indicated that there were significant changes of these backscattering parameters as chilling injury developed.

  6. Wave Reflection Coefficient Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 邵利民; 柳淑学

    2003-01-01

    The wave reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and directional spectrum for concrete face slope breakwaters and rubble mound breakwaters are investigated through physical model tests in the present study. The reflection coefficients of oblique irregular waves are analyzed by the Modified Two-Point Method (MTPM) proposed by the authors. The results show that the wave reflection coefficient decreases with increasing wave frequency and incident angle or decreasing structure slope. The reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and its variation with Iribarren number are given in this paper. The paper also suggests an empirical 3-dimensional reflection coefficient spectrum, i.e. reflection coefficient directional spectrum, which can be used to illustrate quantitatively the variation of reflection coefficient with the incident angle and the Iribarren number for oblique irregular waves.

  7. Range compensation for backscattering measurements in the difference-frequency nearfield of a parametric sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kenneth G

    2012-05-01

    Measurement of acoustic backscattering properties of targets requires removal of the range dependence of echoes. This process is called range compensation. For conventional sonars making measurements in the transducer farfield, the compensation removes effects of geometrical spreading and absorption. For parametric sonars consisting of a parametric acoustic transmitter and a conventional-sonar receiver, two additional range dependences require compensation when making measurements in the nonlinearly generated difference-frequency nearfield: an apparently increasing source level and a changing beamwidth. General expressions are derived for range compensation functions in the difference-frequency nearfield of parametric sonars. These are evaluated numerically for a parametric sonar whose difference-frequency band, effectively 1-6 kHz, is being used to observe Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in situ. Range compensation functions for this sonar are compared with corresponding functions for conventional sonars for the cases of single and multiple scatterers. Dependences of these range compensation functions on the parametric sonar transducer shape, size, acoustic power density, and hydrography are investigated. Parametric range compensation functions, when applied with calibration data, will enable difference-frequency echoes to be expressed in physical units of volume backscattering, and backscattering spectra, including fish-swimbladder-resonances, to be analyzed.

  8. Multiple scattering from Chebyshev particles: Monte Carlo simulations for backscattering in lidar geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoni, A; Flesia, C; Bruscaglioni, P; Ismaelli, A

    1996-12-20

    Lidar measurements are often interpreted on the basis of two fundamental assumptions: absence of multiple scattering and sphericity of the particles that make up the diffusing medium. There are situations in which neither holds true. We focus our interest on multiply-scattered returns from homogeneous layers of monodisperse, randomly oriented, axisymmetric nonspherical particles. T(2) Chebyshev particles have been chosen and their single-scattering properties have been reviewed. A Monte Carlo procedure has been employed to calculate the backscattered signal for several fields of view. Comparisons with the case of scattering from equivalent (equal-volume) spheres have been carried out (narrow polydispersions have been used to smooth the phase functions' oscillations). Our numerical effort highlights a considerable variability in the intensity of the multiply-scattered signal, which is a consequence of the strong dependence of the backscattering cross section on deformation of the particles. Even more striking effects have been noted for depolarization; peculiar behavior was observed at moderate optical depths when particles characterized by a large backscattering depolarization ratio were employed in our simulations. The sensitivity of depolarization to even small departures from sphericity, in spite of random orientation of the particles, has been confirmed. The results obtained with the Monte Carlo codes have been successfully checked with an analytical formula for double scattering.

  9. Comparing surficial sediments maps interpreted by experts with dual-frequency acoustic backscatter on the Scotian Shelf, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Andrew; Anderson, John T.; Devillers, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    Understanding seabed properties is increasingly important to support policy in the marine environment. Such knowledge can be gained from diverse methods, ranging from more traditional expert-interpretations of acoustic and ground-truth data, to maps resulting from fully quantitative analyses of acoustic data. This study directly compares surficial geology maps created through expert-interpretations to near-nadir acoustic backscatter data from two frequencies (38 kHz and 120 kHz) collected using single beam echosounders (SBES) for two 5×1 km study areas on the Scotian Shelf, Canada. Statistical methods were used to analyze and classify both single and dual-frequency acoustic backscatter for comparisons. In particular, spatial scaling of acoustic backscatter responses and acoustic classes created using acoustic seabed classification (ASC) is compared between frequencies and to interpreted sediment units (ISUs) which make up surficial geology maps produced by experts. Seabed morphology layers were included in an ASC approach to reflect the morphological components included in the interpreted geological maps. Results confirmed that higher frequencies and coarser grain sizes generally produced higher backscatter, while more heterogeneous and rougher seabeds produced variable backscatter. Differing acoustic responses within similar substrate units suggest fundamental seabed variations not reflected in the geological interpretations. Spatial scaling of sand and gravel substrates from 38 kHz frequency were closer than the 120 kHz frequency to the spatial scaling of the interpreted geological map. Variable grain size in the sediment volume and surface morphology are both presented as possible reasons for frequency differences. While both frequencies had similar general responses, differences in frequency responses of backscatter occurred at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. Results presented here emphasize the importance of multi-scale seabed mapping and additional

  10. Simulation of radar backscattering from snowpack at X-band and Ku-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Michel; Phan, Xuan-Vu; Ferro-Famil, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a multilayer snowpack electromagnetic backscattering model, based on Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT). This model is capable of simulating the interaction of electromagnetic wave (EMW) at X-band and Ku-band frequencies with multilayer snowpack. The air-snow interface and snow-ground backscattering components are calculated using the Integral Equation Model (IEM) by [1], whereas the volume backscattering component is calculated based on the solution of Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equation at order 1. Case study has been carried out using measurement data from NoSREx project [2], which include SnowScat data in X-band and Ku-band, TerraSAR-X acquisitions and snowpack stratigraphic in-situ measurements. The results of model simulations show good agreement with the radar observations, and therefore allow the DMRT model to be used in various applications, such as data assimilation [3]. [1] A.K. Fung and K.S. Chen, "An update on the iem surface backscattering model," Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, IEEE, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 75 - 77, april 2004. [2] J. Lemmetyinen, A. Kontu, J. Pulliainen, A. Wiesmann, C. Werner, T. Nagler, H. Rott, and M. Heidinger, "Technical assistance for the deployment of an x- to ku-band scatterometer during the nosrex ii experiment," Final Report, ESA ESTEC Contract No. 22671/09/NL/JA., 2011. [3] X. V. Phan, L. Ferro-Famil, M. Gay, Y. Durand, M. Dumont, S. Morin, S. Allain, G. D'Urso, and A. Girard, "3d-var multilayer assimilation of x-band sar data into a detailed snowpack model," The Cryosphere Discussions, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 4881-4912, 2013.

  11. Approach to simultaneously denoise and invert backscatter and extinction from photon-limited atmospheric lidar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Willem J; Holz, Robert E; Hu, Yu Hen; Kuehn, Ralph E; Eloranta, Edwin E; Willett, Rebecca M

    2016-10-10

    Atmospheric lidar observations provide a unique capability to directly observe the vertical column of cloud and aerosol scattering properties. Detector and solar-background noise, however, hinder the ability of lidar systems to provide reliable backscatter and extinction cross-section estimates. Standard methods for solving this inverse problem are most effective with high signal-to-noise ratio observations that are only available at low resolution in uniform scenes. This paper describes a novel method for solving the inverse problem with high-resolution, lower signal-to-noise ratio observations that are effective in non-uniform scenes. The novelty is twofold. First, the inferences of the backscatter and extinction are applied to images, whereas current lidar algorithms only use the information content of single profiles. Hence, the latent spatial and temporal information in noisy images are utilized to infer the cross-sections. Second, the noise associated with photon-counting lidar observations can be modeled using a Poisson distribution, and state-of-the-art tools for solving Poisson inverse problems are adapted to the atmospheric lidar problem. It is demonstrated through photon-counting high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) simulations that the proposed algorithm yields inverted backscatter and extinction cross-sections (per unit volume) with smaller mean squared error values at higher spatial and temporal resolutions, compared to the standard approach. Two case studies of real experimental data are also provided where the proposed algorithm is applied on HSRL observations and the inverted backscatter and extinction cross-sections are compared against the standard approach.

  12. Backscattering characteristics Analyses of winter wheat covered area and Drought Monitoring Based on active microwave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C., Sr.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    The advantage of active microwave remote sensing on the sensitivity of polarization characteristic, backscatter intensity and phase characteristics to soil moisture demonstrates its potential to map and monitor relative soil moisture changes and drought information with high spatial resolution. However, the existence of soil surface condition and vegetation effects confounds the retrieval of soil moisture from active microwave, and therefore limits its applications on soil moisture retrieval and drought monitoring. To research how to reduce the effect of soil roughness and wheat cover with multi- incident angles and multi polarization active microwave remote sensing data, MIMICS and AIEM models were used to simulate the backscattering coefficient of winter wheat covered field. The interaction between winter wheat at main growth stages and microwave was analyzed. The effects of surface roughness and physical parameters of wheat on the backscattering characteristics and the variation of different incident angles and different polarization conditions are simulated and analyzed emphatically. Then scattering coefficient information of winter wheat covered area at different wheat growth stage was measured with a C band ground-based scattering meter. At the same time, biomass, leaf area index and soil rough degree, soil water content and other related parameters are collected. After comparing and analyzing the measured data and the simulated data at different incident angles and different polarization modes, we propose an approach of using multi polarization and multi angle data to eliminate the soil roughness and wheat vegetation effects and performing the inversion of soil moisture. Using the Radarsat2 satellite SAR data and ground-based scatter data gotten at the same period in 2012, soil moisture information of greater area is obtained, and then the drought information is obtained, which is consistent with the measured results.

  13. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel.

  14. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  15. Temporal Stability of Soil Moisture and Radar Backscatter Observed by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Pathe, Carsten; Doubkova, Marcela; Sabel, Daniel; Bartsch, Annett; Hasenauer, Stefan; Blöschl, Günter; Scipal, Klaus; Martínez-Fernández, José; Löw, Alexander

    2008-02-21

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture is the result of atmosphericforcing and redistribution processes related to terrain, soil, and vegetation characteristics.Despite this high variability, many field studies have shown that in the temporal domainsoil moisture measured at specific locations is correlated to the mean soil moisture contentover an area. Since the measurements taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)instruments are very sensitive to soil moisture it is hypothesized that the temporally stablesoil moisture patterns are reflected in the radar backscatter measurements. To verify this hypothesis 73 Wide Swath (WS) images have been acquired by the ENVISAT AdvancedSynthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) over the REMEDHUS soil moisture network located inthe Duero basin, Spain. It is found that a time-invariant linear relationship is well suited forrelating local scale (pixel) and regional scale (50 km) backscatter. The observed linearmodel coefficients can be estimated by considering the scattering properties of the terrainand vegetation and the soil moisture scaling properties. For both linear model coefficients,the relative error between observed and modelled values is less than 5 % and thecoefficient of determination (R²) is 86 %. The results are of relevance for interpreting anddownscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data retrieved from active (METOP ASCAT)and passive (SMOS, AMSR-E) instruments.

  16. Evaluation of the Oh, Dubois and IEM Backscatter Models Using a Large Dataset of SAR Data and Experimental Soil Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Choker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate the most used radar backscattering models (Integral Equation Model “IEM”, Oh, Dubois, and Advanced Integral Equation Model “AIEM” using a wide dataset of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar data and experimental soil measurements. These forward models reproduce the radar backscattering coefficients ( σ 0 from soil surface characteristics (dielectric constant, roughness and SAR sensor parameters (radar wavelength, incidence angle, polarization. The analysis dataset is composed of AIRSAR, SIR-C, JERS-1, PALSAR-1, ESAR, ERS, RADARSAT, ASAR and TerraSAR-X data and in situ measurements (soil moisture and surface roughness. Results show that Oh model version developed in 1992 gives the best fitting of the backscattering coefficients in HH and VV polarizations with RMSE values of 2.6 dB and 2.4 dB, respectively. Simulations performed with the Dubois model show a poor correlation between real data and model simulations in HH polarization (RMSE = 4.0 dB and better correlation with real data in VV polarization (RMSE = 2.9 dB. The IEM and the AIEM simulate the backscattering coefficient with high RMSE when using a Gaussian correlation function. However, better simulations are performed with IEM and AIEM by using an exponential correlation function (slightly better fitting with AIEM than IEM. Good agreement was found between the radar data and the simulations using the calibrated version of the IEM modified by Baghdadi (IEM_B with bias less than 1.0 dB and RMSE less than 2.0 dB. These results confirm that, up to date, the IEM modified by Baghdadi (IEM_B is the most adequate to estimate soil moisture and roughness from SAR data.

  17. Portable fluorescence meter with reference backscattering channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Grishanov, Vladimir N.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Burkov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-09-01

    Methods based on fluorescence and backscattering are intensively used for determination of the advanced glycation end products (AGE) concentration in the biological tissues. There are strong correlation between the AGE concentration and the severity of such diseases like diabetes, coronary heart disease and renal failure. This fact can be used for diagnostic purposes in medical applications. Only few investigations in this area can be useful for development of portable and affordable in vivo AGE meter because the most of them are oriented on using spectrometers. In this study we describe the design and the results of tests on volunteers of portable fluorescence meter based on two photodiodes. One channel of such fluorimeter is used for measurement of the autofluorescence (AF) intensity, another one - for the intensity of elastically scattered radiation, which can be used as a reference. This reference channel is proposed for normalization of the skin autofluorescence signal to the human skin photo type. The fluorimeter, that was developed is relatively compact and does not contain any expensive optical and electronic components. The experimental results prove that proposed tool can be used for the AGE estimation in human skin.

  18. Modified Biserial Correlation Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1981-01-01

    Asymptotic distribution theory of Brogden's form of biserial correlation coefficient is derived and large sample estimates of its standard error obtained. Its relative efficiency to the biserial correlation coefficient is examined. Recommendations for choice of estimator of biserial correlation are presented. (Author/JKS)

  19. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  20. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  1. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  2. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  3. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  4. Detection of buried landmine with X-ray backscatter technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Sunwoo [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: sunwoo@korea.ac.kr; Kim, Kwang Hyun [Chosun University, 375, Seosuk-Dong, Dong-Gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Yun [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-30

    We describe a continuously operating scanning X-ray imaging system developed for landmine detection based on a backscatter X-ray principle, thus detection is done from the same side as the source. The source operates at 120 kV p and 3 mA. To study the physics of Compton X-ray backscattering, the photon transport factor, backscatter factor (BSF) and backscatter probability (BSP) were simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations using the generalized particle transport program MCNP. Based on the Monte-Carlo analyses results, a mine detecting system has been designed. It potentially has a low false alarm rate and a high detection probability, and a direct imaging facility.

  5. An algorithm to determine backscattering ratio and single scattering albedo

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Nayak, S.R.; Naik, P.

    Algorithms to determine the inherent optical properties of water, backscattering probability and single scattering albedo at 490 and 676 nm from the apparent optical property, remote sensing reflectance are presented here. The measured scattering...

  6. Reson 8101 Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  7. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  8. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  9. LIDAR for atmospheric backscatter and temperature measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this effort are to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles and temperature using a zenith looking lidar, designed for a small lander.The lidar...

  10. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  11. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  12. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  13. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  14. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  15. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  16. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore of Ventura map area, California. The raster...

  17. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  18. Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from Galvez Bank.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the Mariana archipelago between the U.S. Territory of Guam and Farallon De Pajaros Island in the...

  19. Moessbauer backscatter spectrometer with full data processing capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, T.; Hartzell, R.; Liebermann, M.

    1976-01-01

    The design and operation of a Moessbauer backscatter spectrometer with full data processing capability is described, and the investigation of the applicability of this technique to a variety of practical metallurgical problems is discussed. (WHK)

  20. Backscatter--Offshore of Refugio Beach Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3319 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3319) of Offshore Refugio Beach map area, California. The raster data...

  1. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  2. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  3. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  4. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  5. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  6. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  7. Optimal Time Allocation in Backscatter Assisted Wireless Powered Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Bin; Yang, Zhen; Gui, Guan; Sari, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a wireless powered communication network (WPCN) assisted by backscatter communication (BackCom). This model consists of a power station, an information receiver and multiple users that can work in either BackCom mode or harvest-then-transmit (HTT) mode. The time block is mainly divided into two parts corresponding to the data backscattering and transmission periods, respectively. The users first backscatter data to the information receiver in time division multiple access (TDMA) during the data backscattering period. When one user works in the BackCom mode, the other users harvest energy from the power station. During the data transmission period, two schemes, i.e., non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and TDMA, are considered. To maximize the system throughput, the optimal time allocation policies are obtained. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model. PMID:28587171

  8. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  9. Assimilation of ASAR Data with a Hydrologic and Semi-empirical Backscattering Coupled Model to Estimate Soil Moisture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qian; WANG Mingyu; ZHAO Yingshi

    2010-01-01

    The most promising approach for studying soil moisture is the assimilation of observation data and computational modeling.However,there is much uncertainty in the assimilation process,which affects the assimilation results.This research developed a one-dimensional soil moisture assimilation scheme based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter(EnKF)and Genetic Algorithm(GA).A two-dimensional hydrologic model-Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model(DHSVM)was coupled with a semi-empirical backscattering model(Oh).The Advanced Synthetic Apertture Radar(ASAR)data were assimilated with this coupled model and the field observation data were used to validate this scheme in the soil moisture assimilation experiment.In order to improve the assimilation results,a cost function was set up based on the distance between the simulated backscattering coefficient from the coupled model and the observed backscattering coefficient from ASAR.The EnKF and GA were used to re-initialize and re-parameterize the simulation process,respectively.The assimilation results were compared with the free-run simulations from hydrologic model and the field observation data.The results obtained indicate that this assimilation scheme is practical and it can improve the accuracy of soil moisture estimation significantly.

  10. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  11. TCR backscattering characterization for microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    A Trihedral Corner Reflector (TCR) is formed by three mutually orthogonal metal plates of various shapes and is a very important scattering structure since it exhibits a high monostatic Radar Cross Section (RCS) over a wide angular range. Moreover it is a handy passive device with low manufacturing costs and robust geometric construction, the maintenance of its efficiency is not difficult and expensive, and it can be used in all weather conditions (i.e., fog, rain, smoke, and dusty environment). These characteristics make it suitable as reference target and radar enhancement device for satellite- and ground-based microwave remote sensing techniques. For instance, TCRs have been recently employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered signal in the case of urban ground deformation monitoring [1] and dynamic survey of civil infrastructures without natural corners as the Musmeci bridge in Basilicata, Italy [2]. The region of interest for the calculation of TCR's monostatic RCS is here confined to the first quadrant containing the boresight direction. The backscattering term is presented in closed form by evaluating the far-field scattering integral involving the contributions related to the direct illumination and the internal bouncing mechanisms. The Geometrical Optics (GO) laws allow one to determine the field incident on each TCR plate and the patch (integration domain) illuminated by it, thus enabling the use of a Physical Optics (PO) approximation for the corresponding surface current densities to consider for integration on each patch. Accordingly, five contributions are associated to each TCR plate: one contribution is due to the direct illumination of the whole internal surface; two contributions originate by the impinging rays that are simply reflected by the other two internal surfaces; and two contributions are related to the impinging rays that undergo two internal reflections. It is useful to note that the six contributions due to the

  12. Effect of intervening tissues on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of bone: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E; Marshall, Peyton L; Viano, Ann M; Lee, Sang-Rok

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to diagnose osteoporosis. Tissues that lie between the transducer and the ultrasonically interrogated region of bone may produce errors in backscatter measurements. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of intervening tissues on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of bone. Measurements were performed on 24 cube shaped specimens of human cancellous bone using a 5 MHz transducer. Measurements were repeated after adding a 1 mm thick plate of cortical bone to simulate the bone cortex and a 3 cm thick phantom to simulate soft tissue at the hip. Signals were analyzed to determine three apparent backscatter parameters (apparent integrated backscatter, frequency slope of apparent backscatter, and frequency intercept of apparent backscatter) and three backscatter difference parameters [normalized mean backscatter difference (nMBD), normalized slope of the backscatter difference, and normalized intercept of the backscatter difference]. The apparent backscatter parameters were impacted significantly by the presence of intervening tissues. In contrast, the backscatter difference parameters were not affected by intervening tissues. However, only one backscatter difference parameter, nMBD, demonstrated a strong correlation with bone mineral density. Thus, among the six parameters tested, nMBD may be the best choice for in vivo backscatter measurements of bone when intervening tissues are present.

  13. Investigating the correlation between radar backscatter and in situ soil property measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Deok; Vahedifard, Farshid; Aanstoos, James V.

    2017-05-01

    Utilizing remote sensing techniques to extract soil properties can facilitate several engineering applications for large-scale monitoring and modeling purposes such as earthen levees monitoring, landslide mapping, and off-road mobility modeling. This study presents results of statistical analyses to investigate potential correlations between multiple polarization radar backscatter and various physical soil properties. The study was conducted on an approximately 3 km long section of earthen levees along the lower Mississippi river as part of the development of remote levee monitoring methods. Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar imagery from UAVSAR was used along with an extensive set of in situ soil properties. The following properties were analyzed from the top 30-50 cm of soil: texture (sand and clay fraction), penetration resistance (sleeve friction and cone tip resistance), saturated hydraulic conductivity, field capacity, permanent wilting point, and porosity. The results showed some correlation between the cross-polarized (HV) radar backscatter coefficients and most of these properties. A few soil properties, like clay fraction, showed similar but weaker correlations with the co-polarized channels (HH and VV). The correlations between the soil properties and radar backscatter were analyzed separately for the river side and land side of the levee. It was found that the magnitude and direction of the correlation for most of the soil properties noticeably differed between the river and the land sides. The findings of this study can be a good starting point for scattering modelers in a pursuit of better models for radar scattering at cross polarizations which would include more diverse set of soil parameters.

  14. Modeling multi-frequency diurnal backscatter from a walnut orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) is used to model scatterometer data that were obtained during the August 1987 EOS (Earth Observing System) synergism study. During this experiment, truck-based scatterometers were used to measure radar backscatter from a walnut orchard in Fresno County, California. Multipolarized L- and X-band data were recorded for orchard plots for which dielectric and evapotranspiration characteristics were monitored. MIMICS is used to model a multiangle data set in which a single orchard plot was observed at varying impedance angles and a series of diurnal measurements in which backscatter from this same plot was measured continuously over several 24-h periods. MIMICS accounts for variations in canopy backscatter driven by changes in canopy state that occur diurnally as well as on longer time scales. L-band backscatter is dependent not only on properties of the vegetation but also on properties of the underlying soil surface. The behavior of the X-band backscatter is dominated by properties of the tree crowns.

  15. A study on the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio with combination of micro-pulse LIDAR and MODIS over Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. S. He

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio is an important parameter for inverting LIDAR signals in the LIDAR equation. It is a complicated function of the aerosol microphysical characteristics. In this paper, a method to retrieve the column-averaged aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio by constraining the aerosol optical depths (AOD from a Micro-pulse LIDAR (MPL by the AOD measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS is presented. Both measurements were taken on cloud free days between 1 May 2003 and 30 June 2004 over Hong Kong, a coastal city in south China. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering coefficients with a forward scattering visibility sensor are compared with the LIDAR retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficients. The data are then analyzed to determine seasonal trends of the aetrosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio. In addition, the relationships between the extinction-to-backscatter ratio and wind conditions as well as other aerosol microphysical parameters are presented. The mean aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio for the whole period was found to be 29.1±5.8 sr, with a minimum of 18 sr in July 2003 and a maximum of 44 sr in March 2004. The ratio is lower in summer because of the dominance of oceanic aerosols in association with the prevailing southwesterly monsoon. In contrast, relatively larger ratios are noted in spring and winter because of the increased impact of local and regional industrial pollutants associated with the northerly monsoon. The extended LIDAR measurements over Hong Kong provide not only a more accurate retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles, but also significant substantial information for air pollution and climate studies in the region.

  16. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  17. L band radar backscatter dependence upon surface wind stress - A summary of new Seasat-1 and aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T. W.; Weissman, D. E.; Gonzalez, F. I.

    1983-01-01

    The wind-scale relationships for L band radar wavelengths near 25 cm and 20 deg angle of incidence and HH polarization are reviewed using a number of aircraft and Seasat-1 SAR observations. The dependence of the L band backscatter coefficient from the ocean upon surface wind speed and direction is stated. The wind speed coefficient is 0.5 + or - 0.1 for a wide range of wind speeds. The wind direction coefficient is near zero for lower winds and stable marine boundary layers, but may be 0.20 + or - 0.05 for moderate wind speeds and an unstable marine boundary layer. These results are interpreted in terms of existing theoretical models for radar scattering from the ocean.

  18. Multidimensional extremal dependence coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Extreme values modeling has attracting the attention of researchers in diverse areas such as the environment, engineering, or finance. Multivariate extreme value distributions are particularly suitable to model the tails of multidimensional phenomena. The analysis of the dependence among multivariate maxima is useful to evaluate risk. Here we present new multivariate extreme value models, as well as, coefficients to assess multivariate extremal dependence.

  19. Measurement of backscatter factor for diagnostic radiology: methodology and uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, P.H.G.; Nogueira, M.D.S.; Squair, P.L.; Da Silva, T.A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnoogia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN) 30123-970, Minas Gerais (Brazil)]. e-mail: phgr@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic X-ray qualities recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for primary beams (RQR). Harshaw LiF-1 100H thermoluminescent dosemeters used for determining the backscatter were calibrated against an ionization chamber traceable to the National Metrology Laboratory. A 300mm x 300mm x 150mm PMMA slab phantom was used for deep-doses measurements. To perform the in-phantom measurements, the dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at five different depths d in the phantom (5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm) upstream the beam direction. The typical combined standard uncertainty of the backscatter factor value was 6%. The main sources of uncertainties were the calibration procedure, the TLD dosimetry and the use of deep-dose curves. (Author)

  20. Backscatter signatures of biological aerosols in the infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Evan; Salciccioli, Nicolas; Brown, David M; Siegrist, Karen; Brown, Andrea M; Thomas, Michael E; Boggs, Nathan; Carter, Christopher C

    2012-04-20

    To develop a deeper understanding of the optical signatures of both biological aerosols and potential interferents, we made field measurements of optical cross sections and compared them to model-based predictions. We measured aerosol cross sections by conducting a hard-target calibration of a light detection and ranging system (LIDAR) based on the Frequency Agile Laser (FAL). The elastic backscatter cross sections are estimated at 19 long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths spanning the range from 9.23 to 10.696 μm. The theoretical modeling of the elastic backscatter cross sections is based on the measured refractive index and size distribution of the aerosols, which are used as inputs into Mie calculations. Both model calculations and experimental measurements show good agreement and also indicate the presence of spectral features based on single particle absorption in the backscatter cross sections that can be used as a basis for discrimination for both standoff and point sensors.

  1. Effects of optical backscattering on silicon photonic hybrid laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacradouni, V.; Klein, J.; Pond, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical results on the effect of backscattering at the junctions of double bus ring resonators in a Vernier ring hybrid laser design. The structure is comprised off a pair of III-V gain media evanescently coupled to a silicon on insulator racetrack comprised of a pair of double bus ring resonators coupled together through straight and flared waveguide sections. We show how the small backscattering at the ring resonator junctions has the effect of splitting and shifting the resonances off the clockwise and counter clockwise propagating modes thereby modifying the feedback spectrum from the ideal case. We then simulate results such as light current (LI) curves, relative intensity noise (RIN) and laser spectrum, and compare the laser performance including backscattering effects with the ideal case.

  2. Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C.

    2006-09-01

    In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO2-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351nm interaction beams at an intensity of ˜1015W /cm2. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO2. The 527nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

  3. Bruce Thompson: Adventures and advances in ultrasonic backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetan, Frank J.

    2012-05-01

    Over the course of his professional career Dr. R. Bruce Thompson published several hundred articles on non-destructive evaluation, the majority dealing with topics in ultrasonics. One longtime research interest of Dr. Thompson, with applications both to microstructure characterization and defect detection, was backscattered grain noise in metals. Over a 20 year period he led a revolving team of staff members and graduate students investigating various aspects of ultrasonic backscatter. As a member of that team I had the privilege of working along side Dr. Thompson for many years, serving as a sort of Dr. Watson to Bruce's Sherlock Holmes. This article discusses Dr. Thompson's general approaches to modeling backscatter, the research topics he chose to explore to systematically elucidate a better understanding of the phenomena, and the many contributions to the field achieved under his leadership. The backscatter work began in earnest around 1990, motivated by a need to improve inspections of aircraft engine components. At that time Dr. Thompson launched two research efforts. The first led to the heuristic Independent Scatterer Model which could be used to estimate the average grain noise level that would be seen in any given ultrasonic inspection. There the contribution from the microstructure was contained in a measureable parameter known as the Figure-of-Merit or FOM. The second research effort, spearheaded by Dr. Jim Rose, led to a formal relationship between FOM and details of the metal microstructure. The combination of the Independent Scattering Model and Rose's formalism provided a powerful tool for investigating backscatter in metals. In this article model developments are briefly reviewed and several illustrative applications are discussed. These include: the determination of grain size and shape from ultrasonic backscatter; grain noise variability in engine-titanium billets and forgings; and the design of ultrasonic inspection systems to improve defect

  4. Estimating deep seafloor interface and volume roughness parameters using the multibeam-hydrosweep system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.; Kodagali, V.N.; Hagen, R.

    composite roughness model, including water-sediment interface roughness and sediment volume roughness parameters the data was modeled. The model effectively uses the near normal incidence angle backscatter to determine the seafloor interface roughness...

  5. Determination of the bulk diffusion coefficient of oxygen in [alpha] zirconium, in the temperature range 500-640 deg C, by nuclear microanalysis. Determination par microanalyse nucleaire du coefficient de diffusion en volume de l'oxygene dans le zirconium [alpha] entre 500 et 640 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viennot, M.; David, D.; Lambertin, M.; Beranger, G. (Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, 60 (France))

    1994-03-17

    The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in [alpha]-zirconium was measured in the temperature range 500-640 deg C, by means of nuclear microanalysis. Measurements were performed without grinding the samples, and then using a computer process applied to the nuclear spectra of emitted protons from the [sup 16]O (d,p)[sup 17] O[sup *] reaction. The results are in good agreement with higher temperature ones, previously measured by some of the authors. They are also in agreement with stress-strain aging results, at lower temperatures. These results are bulk diffusion ones. Nevertheless, they are rather different from a series of others, also at lower temperatures. This is perhaps the effect of a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon. (authors). 9 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Recovering an electromagnetic obstacle by a few phaseless backscattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu; Wang, Yuliang

    2017-03-01

    We consider the electromagnetic scattering from a convex polyhedral PEC or PMC obstacle due to a time-harmonic incident plane wave. It is shown that the modulus of the far-field pattern in the backscattering aperture possesses a certain local maximum behavior. Using the local maximum indicating phenomena, one can determine the exterior unit normal directions, as well as the face areas, of the front faces of the obstacle. Then we propose a recovery scheme of reconstructing the obstacle by phaseless backscattering measurements. This work significantly extends our recent study in Li and Liu (2014 preprint) from two dimensions and acoustic scattering to the more challenging three dimensions and electromagnetic scattering.

  7. Radar altimetry backscattering signatures at Ka, Ku, C, and S bands over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappart, F.; Fatras, C.; Mougin, E.; Marieu, V.; Diepkilé, A. T.; Blarel, F.; Borderies, P.

    This study presents a comprehensive comparison of radar altimetry signatures at Ka-, Ku-, C-, and S-bands using SARAL, ENVISAT and Jason-2 data over the major bioclimatic zones, soil and vegetation types encountered in West-Africa, with an emphasis on the new information at Ka-band provided by the recently launched SARAL-Altika mission. Spatio-temporal variations of the radar altimetry responses were related to changes in surface roughness, land cover and soil wetness. Analysis of time series of backscattering coefficients along the West African bioclimatic gradient shows that radar echoes at nadir incidence are well correlated to soil moisture in semi-arid savannah environments. Radar altimeters are able to detect the presence of water even under a dense canopy cover at all frequencies. But only measurements at Ka-band are able to penetrate underneath the canopy of non-inundated tropical evergreen forests.

  8. Effects of Noise and Absorption on High Frequency Measurements of Acoustic-Backscatter from Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Furusawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative echosounders operating at multiple frequencies (e.g., 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, 333, and 710 kHz are often used to observe fish and zooplankton and identify their species. At frequencies above 100 kHz, the absorption attenuation increases rapidly and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Also, incomplete compensation for the attenuation may result in measurement error. This paper addresses the effects of the attenuation and noise on high frequency measurements of acoustic backscatter from fish. It is shown that measurements of a fish with target strength of −40 dB at 200 m depth are limited by SNR to frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz, absorption coefficients must be matched to local environmental conditions.

  9. Experimental investigation of the dependence of radar backscattering on wind speed, wind stress and wave height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogineni, S. P.; Katsaros, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    During summer 1988, radar measurements were performed in conjunction with detailed environmental observations on Lake Washington at the University of Washington Sand Point field station. Radar data were collected at 5.3 and 10 GHz for incidence angles between 30 and 60 deg with VV-polarization. The environmental measurements included wind speed and direction, large-wave heights, the high-frequency portion of the wave spectrum, humidity, and air and water temperatures. The small-scale wave spectrum was measured using a resistance wire gauge. The results show that backscatter increased with wind speed as expected. However, little difference was observed in the scattering coefficient for upwind and crosswind directions. The results also indicated an increase in the amplitude of small waves with friction velocity.

  10. Prestarlike functions with negative coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Silverman

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available The extreme points for prestarlike functions having negative coefficients are determined. Coefficient, distortion and radii of univalence, starlikeness, and convexity theorems are also obtained.

  11. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5–100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like- and cross-polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoid fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in Matlab and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  12. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5–100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like and cross polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoids fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in MATLAB and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  13. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, M.; Mätzler, C.; Wiesmann, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Schwank, M.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5-100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like- and cross-polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS) is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoid fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in Matlab and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  14. Backscatter and depolarization measurements of aerosolized biological simulants using a chamber lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Santarpia, Josh; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2010-04-01

    To ensure agent optical cross sections are well understood from the UV to the LWIR, volume integrated measurements of aerosolized agent material at a few key wavelengths is required to validate existing simulations. Ultimately these simulations will be used to assess the detection performance of various classes of lidar technology spanning the entire range of the optical spectrum. The present work demonstrates an optical measurement architecture based on lidar allowing the measurement of backscatter and depolarization ratio from biological aerosols released in a refereed, 1-m cubic chamber. During 2009, various upgrades have been made to the chamber LIDAR system, which operates at 1.064 μm with sub nanosecond pulses at a 120 Hz repetition rate. The first build of the system demonstrated a sensitivity of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) on the order of 5×105 ppl with 1 GHz InGaAs detectors. To increase the sensitivity and reduce noise, the InGaAs detectors were replaced with larger-area silicon avalanche photodiodes for the second build of the system. In addition, computer controlled step variable neutral density filters are now incorporated to facilitate calibrating the system for absolute back-scatter measurements. Calibrated hard target measurements will be combined with data from the ground truth instruments for cross-section determination of the material aerosolized in the chamber. Measured results are compared to theoretical simulations of cross-sections.

  15. Gorenstein Hilbert Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Sabine El

    2012-01-01

    We prove upper and lower bounds for all the coefficients in the Hilbert Polynomial of a graded Gorenstein algebra $S=R/I$ with a quasi-pure resolution over $R$. The bounds are in terms of the minimal and the maximal shifts in the resolution of $R$ . These bounds are analogous to the bounds for the multiplicity found in \\cite{S} and are stronger than the bounds for the Cohen Macaulay algebras found in \\cite{HZ}.

  16. Use of acoustic backscatter to estimate continuous suspended sediment and phosphorus concentrations in the Barton River, northern Vermont, 2010-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalie, Laura; Chalmers, Ann T.; Kiah, Richard G.; Copans, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, investigated the use of acoustic backscatter to estimate concentrations of suspended sediment and total phosphorus at the Barton River near Coventry, Vermont. The hypothesis was that acoustic backscatter—the reflection of sound waves off objects back to the source from which they came—measured by an acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP) and recorded as ancillary data for the calculation of discharge, also could be used to generate a continuous concentration record of suspended sediment and phosphorus at the streamgage, thereby deriving added value from the instrument. Suspended-sediment and phosphorus concentrations are of particular interest in Vermont, where impairment of surface waters by suspended sediments and phosphorus is a major concern. Regression models for estimating suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and total phosphorus concentrations evaluated several independent variables: measured backscatter (MB), water-corrected backscatter (WCB), sediment-corrected backscatter (SCB), discharge, fluid-absorption coefficient, sediment-driven acoustic attenuation coefficient, and discharge hysteresis. The best regression equations for estimating SSC used backscatter as the predictor, reflecting the direct relation between acoustic backscatter and SSC. Backscatter was a better predictor of SSC than discharge in part because hysteresis between SSC and backscatter was less than for SSC and discharge. All three backscatter variables—MB, WCB, and SCB—performed equally as predictors of SSC and phosphorus concentrations at the Barton River site. The similar abilities to predict SSC among backscatter terms may partially be attributed to the low values and narrow range of the sediment-driven acoustic attenuation in the Barton River. The regression based on SCB was selected for estimating SSC because it removes potential bias caused by attenuation and temperature

  17. Characteristics of CALIOP attenuated backscatter noise: implication for cloud/aerosol detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Wu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To study cloud/aerosol features in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS with the NASA's A-Train sensors, a research algorithm is developed for a re-gridded CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization Level 1 (L1 backscatter dataset. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the measurement noise of this re-gridded dataset in order to compare the lidar measurements with other collocated measurements (e.g., CloudSat, Microwave Limb Sounder. The re-gridded dataset has a manageable data volume for multi-year analysis. It has a fixed (5 km horizontal resolution, and the measurement error is derived empirically from the background-corrected backscatter profile on a profile-by-profile basis. The 532-nm and 1064-nm measurement noises, determined from the data at altitudes above 19 km, are analyzed and characterized in terms of the mean (μ, standard deviation (σ, and normalized probability density function (PDF. These noises show a larger variance over landmasses and bright surfaces during day, and in regions with enhanced flux of energetic particles during night, where the instrument's ability for feature detection is slightly degraded. An increasing trend in the nighttime 1064-nm σ appears to be significant, which likely causes the increasing differences in cloud occurrence frequency between the 532-nm and 1064-nm channels. Most of the CALIOP backscatter noise distributions exhibit a Gaussian-like behavior but the nighttime 532-nm perpendicular measurements show multi-Gaussian characteristics. We apply σ – based thresholds to detect cloud/aerosol features in the UT/LS from the subset L1 data. The observed morphology is similar to that from the Level 2 (L2 05km_CLAY+05km_ALAY product, but the occurrence frequency obtained in this study is slightly lower than the L2 product due to differences in spatial averaging and detection threshold. In the case where the measurement noises of two data sets are different, the

  18. Influence of Contractility on Myocardial Ultrasonic Integrated Backscatter and Cyclic Variation in Integrated Backscatter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕小军; 邓又斌; 潘敏; 杨好意; 向慧娟; 常青; 黎春雷

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To evaluate the effects of left ventricular contractility on the changes of average image intensity (AII) of the myocardial integrated backscatter (IB) and cyclic variation in IB (CVIB), 7 adult mongrel dogs were studied. The magnitude of AII and CVIB were measured from myocardial IB carves before and after dobutamine or propranolol infusion. Dobutamine or propranolol did not affect the magnitude of AII (13.8±0. 7 vs 14.7±0. 5, P>0. 05 or 14.3±0.5 vs 14.2±0. 4, P>0. 05). However, dobutamine produced a significant increase in the magnitude of CVIB (6.8±0.3 vs 9.5 ± 0. 6, P<0. 001) and propranolol induced significant decrease in the magnitude of CVIB (7.1±0. 2 vs 5.2±0. 3, P<0. 001). The changes of the magnitude of AII and CVIB in the myocardium have been demonstrated to reflect different myocardial physiological and pathological changes respectively. The alteration of contractility did not affect the magnitude of AII but induced significant change in CVIB. The increase of left ventricular contractility resulted in a significant rise of the magnitude of CVIB and the decrease of left ventricular contractility resulted in a significant fall of the magnitude of CVIB.

  19. On the maximum backscattering cross section of passive linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solymar, L.; Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1974-01-01

    The maximum backscattering cross section of an equispaced linear array connected to a reactive network and consisting of isotropic radiators is calculated forn = 2, 3, and 4 elements as a function of the incident angle and of the distance between the elements. On the basis of the results obtained...

  20. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  1. Backscatter C [Fugro]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  2. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  3. Using Back-Scattering to Enhance Efficiency in Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kittelmann, Thomas; Cai, Xiao Xiao; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P; Hall-Wilton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The principle of using strongly scattering materials to recover efficiency in neutron detectors, via back-scattering of unconverted thermal neutrons, is discussed in general. Feasibility of the method is illustrated through Geant4-based simulations of a specific setup involving a moderator-like material placed behind a single layered boron-10 thin film gaseous detector.

  4. Backscatter C [Fugro]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  5. The Growth and Decay of Equatorial Backscatter Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    spatially connected to bottomside backscatter, a feature noted in Jica - marca radar observations that led Woodman and La Hoz (1976) to speculate that...described in Section Ill-B, this pattern of plume growth resembles the "C-shaped" and "fishtail" patterns found in Jica - marca radar RTI displays of 50-MHz

  6. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  7. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  8. Backscatter gauge description for inspection of neutron absorber content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R. A.; Gibbs, K. M.; Couture, A. H.

    2013-01-19

    This paper describes design, calibration, and testing of a dual He-3 detector neutron backscatter gauge for use in the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel project. The gauge is demonstrated to measure boron content and uniformity in concrete slabs used in the facility construction.

  9. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  10. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore of Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  11. Transport properties and superconductivity in presence of backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Mattis, D. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Physics); Rudin, S. (Army Electronics Technology and Devices Lab., Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States))

    1992-04-20

    In this paper, the authors achieve an exact evaluation of the Kubo formula for electrical resistivity, with a model in which random impurity scattering is parametrized by random back-scattering matrix elements. If the alloy is a superconductor, our theory allows us to correlate T{sub c} with the normal-phase resistivity. The results are in nice agreement with experiment.

  12. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    , significantly lower mean frequency of ultrasound backscattered from cirrhotic, compared to normal, liver tissue was noted, Studies of benign and malignant liver tumors (hemangiomas and metastases, respectively) indicated differences in frequency content of these tumors, compared to the adjacent normal liver...

  13. Tracking California seafloor seeps with bathymetry, backscatter and ROVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Daniel L.; Yun, Janet; Maher, Norman; Barry, James; Greene, Gary

    2002-11-01

    The California (USA) margin includes two different tectonic regimes: subduction north of the Mendocino Triple Junction and translation south. Both margins include seeps, and their distribution can be inferred using seafloor bathymetry and backscatter as well as subsurface seismic data. Anomalous bathymetric and backscatter features related to fluid expulsion include headless submarine canyons, fault zones, anticlines, pockmarks, and mud volcanoes. Anomalous backscatter may be caused by authigenic carbonate (related to the bacterial oxidation of methane) or cold seep clams—both have an impedance and roughness that may be higher than the surrounding seafloor. Remote-operated vehicle (ROV) dives to such suspect seep sites document the presence of extensive authigenic carbonate, areally restricted cold seep communities, carpets of chemoautotrophic bacteria, and bubbling gas. Our operations in the Monterey Bay, on the translational California margin, and the Eel River basin, on the convergent margin, indicate that bathymetric and backscatter maps of the seafloor, if sufficiently high resolution, can be used to map seep sites, and that the distribution of such seeps can be used to constrain subsurface conduits of fluid flow. ROVs, due to their combination of visualization, propulsion, manipulation, sonar, and navigation, provide an excellent platform for ground-truthing, mapping, and sampling seafloor seeps.

  14. Source point calibration from an arbitrary electron backscattering pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1999-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the position of the source point is a requirement if electron backscattering patterns (EBSPs) are to be used for crystal orientation measurements or other types of measurements which demand a geometrical analysis of the patterns. Today, possibly the most popular method...

  15. Simulation of multistatic and backscattering cross sections for airborne radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Albert W.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine susceptibilities of airborne radar to electronic countermeasures and electronic counter-countermeasures simulations of multistatic and backscattering cross sections were developed as digital modules in the form of algorithms. Cross section algorithms are described for prolate (cigar shape) and oblate (disk shape) spheroids. Backscattering cross section algorithms are also described for different categories of terrain. Backscattering cross section computer programs were written for terrain categorized as vegetation, sea ice, glacial ice, geological (rocks, sand, hills, etc.), oceans, man-made structures, and water bodies. PROGRAM SIGTERRA is a file for backscattering cross section modules of terrain (TERRA) such as vegetation (AGCROP), oceans (OCEAN), Arctic sea ice (SEAICE), glacial snow (GLASNO), geological structures (GEOL), man-made structures (MAMMAD), or water bodies (WATER). AGCROP describes agricultural crops, trees or forests, prairies or grassland, and shrubs or bush cover. OCEAN has the SLAR or SAR looking downwind, upwind, and crosswind at the ocean surface. SEAICE looks at winter ice and old or polar ice. GLASNO is divided into a glacial ice and snow or snowfields. MANMAD includes buildings, houses, roads, railroad tracks, airfields and hangars, telephone and power lines, barges, trucks, trains, and automobiles. WATER has lakes, rivers, canals, and swamps. PROGRAM SIGAIR is a similar file for airborne targets such as prolate and oblate spheroids.

  16. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  17. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. Characterizing Indian Ocean manganese nodule-bearing seafloor using multi-beam angular backscatter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.

    backscattering in delineating seafloor parameters characteristic of nodule-rich sediments. In this paper, processed Hydrosweep multi-beam backscatter data from 45 spot locations in the CIOB (where nodule samples are available) were analysed to estimate seafloor...

  19. BackscatterA [8210]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  2. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  3. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  4. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter from maize during water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Dunne, S.C.; Judge, J.; van de Giesen, N.C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave backscatter from vegetated surfaces is influenced by vegetation structure and vegetation water content (VWC), which varies with meteorological conditions and moisture in the root zone. Radar backscatter observations are used for many vegetation and soil moisture monitoring applications und

  6. Super-virtual Interferometric Separation and Enhancement of Back-scattered Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-08-19

    Back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect near-surface reflectors with steep dips. A robust surface-wave migration requires the prior separation of the back-scattered surface-wave events from the data. This separation is often difficult to implement because the back-scattered surface waves are masked by the incident surface waves. We mitigate this problem by using a super-virtual interferometric method to enhance and separate the back-scattered surface waves. The key idea is to calculate the virtual back-scattered surface waves by stacking the resulting virtual correlated and convolved traces associated with the incident and back-scattered waves. Stacking the virtual back-scattered surface waves improves their signal-to-noise ratio and separates the back-scattered surface-waves from the incident field. Both synthetic and field data results validate the robustness of this method.

  7. Multibeam Backscatter Data for Selected U.S. Locations in the Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry for selected U.S. locations in the Pacific. The backscatter datasets include data collected using the...

  8. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  9. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  11. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. The Truth About Ballistic Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The ballistic coefficient of a bullet describes how it slows in flight due to air resistance. This article presents experimental determinations of ballistic coefficients showing that the majority of bullets tested have their previously published ballistic coefficients exaggerated from 5-25% by the bullet manufacturers. These exaggerated ballistic coefficients lead to inaccurate predictions of long range bullet drop, retained energy and wind drift.

  14. Simulation of SAR backscatter for forest vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Richa; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most recent imaging technology to study the forest parameters. The invincible characteristics of microwave acquisition in cloudy regions and night imaging makes it a powerful tool to study dense forest regions. A coherent combination of radar polarimetry and interferometry (PolInSAR) enhances the accuracy of retrieved biophysical parameters. This paper attempts to address the issue of estimation of forest structural information caused due to instability of radar platforms through simulation of SAR image. The Terai Central Forest region situated at Haldwani area in Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the study area. The system characteristics of PolInSAR dataset of Radarsat-2 SAR sensor was used for simulation process. Geometric and system specifications like platform altitude, center frequency, mean incidence angle, azimuth and range resolution were taken from metadata. From the field data it was observed that average tree height and forest stand density were 25 m and 300 stems/ha respectively. The obtained simulated results were compared with the sensor acquired master and slave intensity images. It was analyzed that for co-polarized horizontal component (HH), the mean values of simulated and real master image had a difference of 0.3645 with standard deviation of 0.63. Cross-polarized (HV) channel showed better results with mean difference of 0.06 and standard deviation of 0.1 while co-polarized vertical component (VV) did not show similar values. In case of HV polarization, mean variation between simulated and real slave images was found to be the least. Since cross-polarized channel is more sensitive to vegetation feature therefore better simulated results were obtained for this channel. Further the simulated images were processed using PolInSAR inversion modelling approach using three different techniques DEM differencing, Coherence Amplitude Inversion and Random Volume over Ground Inversion. DEM differencing

  15. Laser Backscatter and Propagation in Low-Density Ta2O5 and SiO2 Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, Derek; Patankar, Siddarth; Goyon, Clement; Baker, Kevin; MacLaren, Stephan; Hammer, Jim; Baumann, Ted; Amendt, Peter; Menapace, Joseph; Berger, Robert; Afeyan, Bedros; Tabak, Max; Kim, Sung Ho; Dixit, Sham; Moody, John; Jones, Ogden; LLNL Team; Polymath Research Inc. Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL have investigated the propagation and backscatter of a laser in low-density foams (2-30 mg/cc) comprised of Ta2O5 and SiO2. The foams fill the volume of thin polyimide tubes (2 mm diameter, 0.5-2 mm length), while the laser is directed down the axis of the tubes. Time-resolved Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) spectrum, time-integrated Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) spectrum and power were measured in the focusing cone. In addition Near Backscatter Imaging (NBI) assessed SBS outside the focusing cone while X-ray diagnostics were used to assess laser propagation through the foams. While this experiment uses a 2-omega laser drive, the pulse shape, irradiance, and the ratio ne/nc are scaled to be similar to future tests using Ta2O5 foams at the NIF. Experimental results are directly compared to calculations of laser propagation and backscattered spectra. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, with funding support from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program 15-ERD-073.

  16. Measurements of complex coupling coefficients in a ring resonator of a laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonov, A. S.; Makeev, A. P.; Petrukhin, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    A method is proposed for measuring complex coupling coefficients in a ring optical resonator in the absence of an active gas mixture. A setup is described on which measurements are performed in ring resonators of ring He-Ne lasers with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. A model of backscattering field interference between conservative and dissipative sources is presented. Within the framework of this model, the unusual behaviour of backscattering fields in ring resonators observed in experiments is explained: a significant difference in the moduli of coupling coefficients of counterpropagating waves and variation of the magnitude of the total phase shift in a wide range. It is proposed to use this method as a metrological method when assembling and aligning a ring resonator of a laser gyroscope.

  17. 3D Visualization of Radar Backscattering Diagrams Based on OpenGL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhulina, Yulia V.

    2004-12-01

    A digital method of calculating the radar backscattering diagrams is presented. The method uses a digital model of an arbitrary scattering object in the 3D graphics package "OpenGL" and calculates the backscattered signal in the physical optics approximation. The backscattering diagram is constructed by means of rotating the object model around the radar-target line.

  18. Drivers of ASCAT C band backscatter variability in the dry snow zone of Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraser, Alexander D.; Nigro, Melissa A.; Ligtenberg, Stefan R. M.; Legresy, Benoit; Inoue, Mana; Cassano, John J.; Munneke, Peter Kuipers; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Young, Neal W.; Treverrow, Adam; Van Den Broeke, Michiel; Enomot, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    C band backscatter parameters contain information about the upper snowpack/firn in the dry snow zone. The wide incidence angle diversity of the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) gives unprecedented characterisation of backscatter anisotropy, revealing the backscatter response to climatic forcing. The A

  19. A New Method for Detection of Backscattered Signals from Breast Cancer Tumors: Hypothesis Testing Using an Adaptive Entropy-Based Decision Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Vahab Shojaedini

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In recent years methods based on radio frequency waves have been used for detecting breast cancer. Using theses waves leads to better results in early detection of breast cancer comparing with conventional mammography which has been used during several years. Materials and Methods In this paper, a new method is introduced for detection of backscattered signals which are received by microwave breast radar. In this method, a decision function is constructed based on noise and signal cross-entropy, using hypothesis testing concept. Then noise and signal are separated using the calculated value for the decision function in each time frame. To estimate value of the decision function, discrete wavelet transform and discrete S transform are used. Results Performance of the proposed method was evaluated in two different scenarios, in which the breast was considered homogenous and heterogeneous, respectively. The obtained results showed that the proposed method detected breast backscattered signals 55% and 49% better than existing methods in two above scenarios. Conclusion Performance of S transform was 21% better than discrete wavelet transform in detection of weak backscattered signals. So it can be concluded that hypothesis testing method which uses S coefficients of received wave for construction of its decision function may be a suitable choice for detection of backscattered signals in breast radar.

  20. Theoretical Analysis of Rayleigh Backscattering Noise in Fiber Raman Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new theoretical model for Rayleigh backscattering (RB) analysis of fiber Raman amplifiers is proposed. The model includes all the interactions among the pumps, signals, and all orders of RB. The results show that the higher order RB has a negligible influence on the performance of the amplifier. The co-propagating and counterpropagating RB power of the signal grow quadratically with the net-gain of the amplifier. The signal to double Rayleigh backscattering noise ratio (OSNRDRB ) of backward-pumped FRAs is better than that of the forward-pumped ones at high net-gain level (> 13 dB), while at low net-gain level the OSNRDrb of the forward-pumped FRAs is slightly better than that of the backward-pumped ones.

  1. Control of coherent backscattering by breaking optical reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberg, Y; Popoff, S M; Cao, H

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocity is a universal principle that has a profound impact on many areas of physics. A fundamental phenomenon in condensed-matter physics, optical physics and acoustics, arising from reciprocity, is the constructive interference of quantum or classical waves which propagate along time-reversed paths in disordered media, leading to, for example, weak localization and metal-insulator transition. Previous studies have shown that such coherent effects are suppressed when reciprocity is broken. Here we show that by breaking reciprocity in a controlled manner, we can tune, rather than simply suppress, these phenomena. In particular, we manipulate coherent backscattering of light, also known as weak localization. By utilizing a non-reciprocal magneto-optical effect, we control the interference between time-reversed paths inside a multimode fiber with strong mode mixing, and realize a continuous transition from the well-known peak to a dip in the backscattered intensity. Our results may open new possibilities fo...

  2. Lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio of the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, James H; Sullivan, James M; Twardowski, Michael S

    2014-07-28

    Bio-optical models are used to develop a model of the lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio applicable to oceanographic lidar. The model is based on chlorophyll concentration, and is expected to be valid for Case 1 waters. The limiting cases of narrow- and wide-beam lidars are presented and compared with estimates based on in situ optical measurements. Lidar measurements are also compared with the model using in situ or satellite estimates of chlorophyll concentration. A modified lidar ratio is defined, in which the properties of pure sea water are removed. This modified ratio is shown to be nearly constant for wide-beam lidar operating in low-chlorophyll waters, so accurate inversion to derive extinction and backscattering is possible under these conditions. This ratio can also be used for lidar calibration.

  3. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  4. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  5. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Pete; Finlayson, David; Conrad, Jamie; Cochrane, Guy; Johnson, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) the U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology mapped a nearshore region of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in Southern California (fig 1). The CSMP is a cooperative partnership between Federal and State agencies, Universities, and Industry to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat basemap series to support the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) inititive. The program is supported by the California Ocean Protection Council and the California Coastal Conservancy. The 2008 mapping collected high resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data using a bathymetric side scan system within State waters from about the 10-m isobath out over 3-nautical miles. This Open-File Report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and FGDC metadata.

  6. Coherent inelastic backscattering of laser light from three isotropic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterer, Andreas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav N

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of double and triple scattering contributions on coherent backscattering of laser light from saturated isotropic atoms, in the helicity preserving polarization channel. Using the recently proposed diagrammatic pump-probe approach, we analytically derive single-atom spectral responses to a classical polychromatic driving field, combine them self-consistently to double and triple scattering processes, and numerically deduce the corresponding elastic and inelastic spectra, as well as the total backscattered intensities. We find that account of the triple scattering contribution leads to a faster decay of phase-coherence with increasing saturation of the atomic transition as compared to double scattering alone, and to a better agreement with the experiment on strontium atoms.

  7. Dynamic coherent backscattering of ultrasound in three-dimensional strongly-scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobus, L. A.; Tiggelen, B. A. van; Derode, A.; Page, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    We present measurements of the diffusion coefficient of ultrasound in strongly scattering three-dimensional (3D) disordered media using the dynamic coherent backscattering (CBS) effect. Our experiments measure the CBS of ultrasonic waves using a transducer array placed in the far-field of a 3D slab sample of brazed aluminum beads surrounded by vacuum. We extend to 3D media the general microscopic theory of CBS that was developed initially for acoustic waves in 2D. This theory is valid in the strong scattering, but still diffuse, regime that is realized in our sample, and is evaluated in the diffuse far field limit encountered in our experiments. By comparing our theory with the experimental data, we obtain an accurate measurement of the Boltzmann diffusion coefficient of ultrasound in our sample. We find that the value of DB is quite small, 0.74 ± 0.03 mm2/μs, and comment on the implications of this slow transport for the energy velocity.

  8. Surface effects on the microwave backscatter and emission of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, A. K.; Stiles, W. H.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements were performed with active and passive microwave sensors for both dry and wet snow conditions. A layer of Rayleigh scatterers with irregular surface boundaries is found to be a reasonable model for interpreting passive and active measurements in X- and Ku-bands. It was found that roughness had a significant effect on both backscatter and emission from wet snow; however, only a small effect was noted for dry snow.

  9. Observation of transverse coherent backscattering in disordered photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brake, Sebastian; Leykam, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton; Denz, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental observation of weak localization in an optically induced disordered (2+1)-dimensional photonic structure. Our flexible method of optical induction is applied with a nondiffracting random intensity distribution. We focus on the analysis of a statistical output spectrum for many probe events with variance of the incoming beam's transverse spatial frequency. For particular spatial frequencies we find considerable signatures of transverse coherent backscattering.

  10. Valley-protected backscattering suppression in silicon photonic graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study valley degree of freedom in all dielectric silicon photonic graphene. Photonic band gap opening physics under inversion symmetry breaking is revisited by the viewpoint of nonzero valley Chern number. Bulk valley modes with opposite orbital angular momentum are unveiled by inspecting time-varying electric fields. Topological transition is well illustrated through photonic Dirac Hamiltonian. Valley dependent edge states and the associated valley-protected backscattering suppression around Z-shape bend waveguide have been demonstrated.

  11. Pattern matching approach to pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolze, Gert; Winkelmann, Aimo; Boyle, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to overcome Kikuchi pattern misindexing problems caused by crystallographic pseudosymmetry in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Based on the quantitative comparison of experimentally measured Kikuchi patterns with dynamical electron diffraction simulations, the algorithm identifies the best-fit orientation from a set of pseudosymmetric candidates. Using measurements on framboidal pyrite (FeS2) as an example, we also show the improvement of the orientation precision using this approach.

  12. Reduced Brillouin backscatter in CO2 laser-target interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, A.; Offenberger, A. A.; Karttunen, S. J.

    1981-02-01

    A substantially reduced Brillouin reflection has been found for CO2 laser-irradiated high-density gas targets. In contrast to the high reflectivity (60%) previously observed for underdense hydrogen plasma, total backscatter (stimulated plus specular) is found to peak at 30% for incident intensity 5 times 10 to the twelfth W per square centimeter and decrease thereafter to 18% at 10 to the thirteenth W per square centimeter. The ponderomotive effects are postulated to account for these observations.

  13. Converting Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a sample and non-uniform intensity in the reverberation chambers under test. In this study, conversion methods from Sabine absorption...... coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients are proposed. The overestimations of the Sabine absorption coefficient are investigated theoretically based on Miki's model for porous absorbers backed by a rigid wall or an air cavity, resulting in conversion factors. Additionally, three optimizations...

  14. Backscatter LIDAR signal simulation applied to spacecraft LIDAR instrument design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochesatto, J.; Ristori, P.; Flamant, P.; Machado, M. E.; Singh, U.; Quel, E.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the scientific cooperation between the CEILAP laboratory (Argentina) and IPSL Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (France), devoted to the development of LIDAR techniques for Atmospheric sciences, a new area of scientific research, involving LIDARs, is starting in Argentine space technology. This new research area is under consideration at CEILAP in a joint effort with CONAE, the Argentine space agency, responsible for the development of future space missions. The LIDAR technique is necessary to improve our knowledge of meteorological, dynamic, and radiative processes in the South American region, for the whole troposphere and the lower stratosphere. To study this future mission, a simple model for the prediction of backscatter LIDAR signal from a spacecraft platform has been used to determine dimensions and detection characteristics of the space borne LIDAR instrument. The backscatter signal was retrieved from a modeled atmosphere considering its molecular density profile and taking into account different aerosols and clouds conditions. Signal-to-noise consideration, within the interval of possible dimension of the instrument parameters, allows us to constrain the telescope receiving area and to derive maximum range achievable, integration time and the final spatial and temporal resolutions of backscatter profiles.

  15. Investigation of phonon coherence and backscattering using silicon nanomeshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Woochul; Wehmeyer, Geoff; Dhuey, Scott; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Cabrini, Stefano; Dames, Chris; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Yang, Peidong

    2017-01-01

    Phonons can display both wave-like and particle-like behaviour during thermal transport. While thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes has been previously interpreted by phonon wave effects due to interference with periodic structures, as well as phonon particle effects including backscattering, the dominant mechanism responsible for thermal conductivity reductions below classical predictions still remains unclear. Here we isolate the wave-related coherence effects by comparing periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes, and quantify the backscattering effect by comparing variable-pitch nanomeshes. We measure identical (within 6% uncertainty) thermal conductivities for periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes of the same average pitch, and reduced thermal conductivities for nanomeshes with smaller pitches. Ray tracing simulations support the measurement results. We conclude phonon coherence is unimportant for thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes with periodicities of 100 nm and higher and temperatures above 14 K, and phonon backscattering, as manifested in the classical size effect, is responsible for the thermal conductivity reduction. PMID:28051081

  16. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  17. Retrieving Vegetation Parameters and Soil Reflection Coefficients with P-band SAR Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemohammad, S. H.; Konings, A. G.; Jagdhuber, T.; Entekhabi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic activity of plants is highly dependent on the water available to the plant through its roots. Therefore, measuring the root-zone-soil-moisture across large spatial scales is of great importance for crop monitoring and yield estimation as well as hydrological and ecological modeling. Unlike L-band instruments, which are sensitive to only a few centimeters of the top soil layer, P-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments have a penetration depth that can be used to retrieve soil moisture profiles in depths of several tens of centimeters (depending on soil texture and moisture content). NASA's Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission is designed to study the application of P-band SAR measurements for monitoring root-zone-soil-moisture. In this study, we introduce a new framework to retrieve vegetation parameters and smooth-surface soil reflection coefficients using SAR polarimetry and the fully polarimetric covariance matrix of the backscattering signal from AirMOSS observations. The retrieved soil reflectivities (both horizontally and vertically -polarized) can then be used to estimate the soil moisture profile. The retrieval model takes into account contributions from surface, dihedral and volume scattering coming from the vegetation and soil components, and does not require prior vegetation parameters. This approach reduces the dependency of the retrieval on allometry-based vegetation models with large numbers of uncertain parameters. The performance of this method will be validated using observations from AirMOSS field campaigns in July 2013 over Harvard Forest in Massachusetts, USA. This will enable a quality assessment of the polarimetry-based retrieval of the soil reflectivities and the estimated root-zone-soil-moisture profiles.

  18. Estimating Snow Water Equivalent with Backscattering at X and Ku Band Based on Absorption Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Cui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Snow water equivalent (SWE is a key parameter in the Earth’s energy budget and water cycle. It has been demonstrated that SWE can be retrieved using active microwave remote sensing from space. This necessitates the development of forward models that are capable of simulating the interactions of microwaves and the snow medium. Several proposed models have described snow as a collection of sphere- or ellipsoid-shaped ice particles embedded in air, while the microstructure of snow is, in reality, more complex. Natural snow usually forms a sintered structure following mechanical and thermal metamorphism processes. In this research, the bi-continuous vector radiative transfer (bi-continuous-VRT model, which firstly constructs snow microstructure more similar to real snow and then simulates the snow backscattering signal, is used as the forward model for SWE estimation. Based on this forward model, a parameterization scheme of snow volume backscattering is proposed. A relationship between snow optical thickness and single scattering albedo at X and Ku bands is established by analyzing the database generated from the bi-continuous-VRT model. A cost function with constraints is used to solve effective albedo and optical thickness, while the absorption part of optical thickness is obtained from these two parameters. SWE is estimated after a correction for physical temperature. The estimated SWE is correlated with the measured SWE with an acceptable accuracy. Validation against two-year measurements, using the SnowScat instrument from the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx, shows that the estimated SWE using the presented algorithm has a root mean square error (RMSE of 16.59 mm for the winter of 2009–2010 and 19.70 mm for the winter of 2010–2011.

  19. Analysis of snowpack properties and structure from TerraSAR-X data, based on multilayer backscattering and snow evolution modeling approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Phan, Xuan-Vu; Gay, Michel; Durand, Yves; Dumont, Marie; Allain, Sophie; D'Urso, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Recently launched high precision Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites such as TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SkyMed, etc. present a high potential for better observation and characterization of the cryosphere. This study introduces a new approach using high frequency (X-band) SAR data and an Electromagnetic Backscattering Model (EBM) to constrain the detailed snowpack model Crocus. A snowpack EBM based on radiative transfer theory, previously used for C-band applications, is adapted for the X-band. From measured or simulated snowpack stratigraphic profiles consisting of snow optical grain radius and density, this forward model calculates the backscattering coefficient for different polarimetric channels. The output result is then compared with spaceborne TerraSAR-X acquisitions to evaluate the forward model. Next, from the EBM, the adjoint operator is developed and used in a variational analysis scheme in order to minimize the discrepancies between simulations and SAR observations. A time series of TerraSAR-X acquisi...

  20. Back-scatter analysis based algorithms for increasing transmission through highly-scattering random media using phase-only modulated wavefronts

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Curtis; Michielssen, Eric; Rand, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental advances have shed light on the existence of so-called `perfectly transmitting' wavefronts with transmission coefficients close to 1 in strongly backscattering random media. These perfectly transmitting eigen-wavefronts can be synthesized by spatial amplitude and phase modulation. Here, we consider the problem of transmission enhancement using phase-only modulated wavefronts. We develop physically realizable iterative and non-iterative algorithms for increasing the transmission through such random media using backscatter analysis. We theoretically show that, despite the phase-only modulation constraint, the non-iterative algorithms will achieve at least about 25$\\pi$% or about 78.5% transmission assuming there is at least one perfectly transmitting eigen-wavefront and that the singular vectors of the transmission matrix obey a maximum entropy principle so that they are isotropically random. We numerically analyze the limits of phase-only modulated transmission in 2-D with f...

  1. Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a specimen and non-uniform intensity in the test chamber. In this study, several methods that convert Sabine absorption coefficients...... into random incidence absorption coefficients for porous absorbers are investigated. Two optimization-based conversion methods are suggested: the surface impedance estimation for locally reacting absorbers and the flow resistivity estimation for extendedly reacting absorbers. The suggested conversion methods...

  2. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Bojanov, Borislav

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect from Scratches on Solid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, B. W.; Piatek, J. L.; Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.

    2003-05-01

    Shepard and Arvidson [1] discovered that the solid surfaces of rocks exhibit an opposition effect. We have measured the phase curve of a natural surface of a piece of solid basalt between 0.05 and 5 degrees in circularly polarized light using the JPL long arm goniometer and confirmed that it has an opposition effect. The circular polarization ratio (CPR) increased with decreasing phase angle, consistent with a coherent backscatter opposition effect (CBOE) Recent laboratory investigations of the CBOE in planetary regolith analogs [2,3,4] have revealed that the width of the peak is remarkably insensitive to particle size, in strong contrast to theoretical expectations. We have hypothesized that one of the reasons for this might be that multiple scattering between irregularities, such as scratches, on the surfaces of a particle could cause coherent backscatter, in addition to scattering between particles. To test this hypothesis we ground the surface of a piece of plate glass with 5 micrometer abrasive and measured its phase curve. As the phase angle decreases, the intensity increases and the CPR decreases, consistent with specular reflection. However, near zero phase there is a nonlinear rise about 2 degrees wide superimposed on the linear specular peak accompanied by an increase in CPR, showing that coherent backscatter is occuring. A piece of commercial diffusing glass exhibited the same phenomena. These results support our hypothesis and also provide a possible explanation for the observations of opposition effects from the solid surfaces of rocks. This research was supported by a grant from NASA's PGG Program References cited: [1] Shepard and Arvidson, Icarus, 141, 172-178 (1999). [2] Nelson et al, Icarus, 147, 545-558 (2000). [3] Nelson et al, Planet. Space Sci., 50, 849-856 (2002). [4] Piatek et al, Abstract, DPS Conference (2003).

  4. Quantifying Fish Backscattering using SONAR Instrument and Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manik, Henry M.

    2016-08-01

    Sonar instrument was used to study backscattering from tuna fish. Extraction of target strength, incidence angle, and frequency dependence of the backscattered signal for individual scatterer was important for biological information. For this purpose, acoustic measurement of fish backscatter was conducted in the laboratory. Characteristics and general trends of the target strength of fish with special reference to tuna fish were investigated by using a Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) model. Backscattering strength were calculated for the KRM having typical morphological and physical parameters of actual fish. Those backscattering amplitudes were shown as frequency, body length, backscattering patterns, the density and sound speed dependences, and orientation dependence. These results were compared with experimentally measured target strength data and good agreement was found. Measurement and model showed the target strength from the fish are depend on the presence of swimbladder. Target Strength increase with increasing the frequency and fish length.

  5. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  6. Measuring of heat transfer coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    Subtask 3.4 Measuring of heat transfer coefficient Subtask 3.4.1 Design and setting up of tests to measure heat transfer coefficient Objective: Complementary testing methods together with the relevant experimental equipment are to be designed by the two partners involved in order to measure...... the heat transfer coefficient for a wide range of interface conditions in hot and warm forging processes. Subtask 3.4.2 Measurement of heat transfer coefficient The objective of subtask 3.4.2 is to determine heat transfer values for different interface conditions reflecting those typically operating in hot...

  7. Measuring of heat transfer coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    Subtask 3.4 Measuring of heat transfer coefficient Subtask 3.4.1 Design and setting up of tests to measure heat transfer coefficient Objective: Complementary testing methods together with the relevant experimental equipment are to be designed by the two partners involved in order to measure...... the heat transfer coefficient for a wide range of interface conditions in hot and warm forging processes. Subtask 3.4.2 Measurement of heat transfer coefficient The objective of subtask 3.4.2 is to determine heat transfer values for different interface conditions reflecting those typically operating in hot...

  8. Oscillations in the spectrum of nonlinear Thomson-backscattered radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Brau

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available When an electron beam collides with a high-intensity laser beam, the spectrum of the nonlinear Thomson scattering in the backward direction shows strong oscillations like those in the spectrum of an optical klystron. Laser gain on the backward Thomson scattering is estimated using the Madey theorem, and the results suggest that Thomson-backscatter free-electron lasers are possible at wavelengths extending to the far uv using a terawatt laser beam from a chirped-pulse amplifier and a high-brightness electron beam from a needle cathode.

  9. DUNBID, the Delft University neutron backscattering imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bom, V.R. [Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: vb@iri.tudelft.nl; Eijk, C.W.E. van [Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Ali, M.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Research Center, Reactor and Neutron Physics Department, P.O. Box 13759, Abu Zabal, Cairo (Egypt)

    2005-12-01

    In the search for low-metallic land mines, the neutron backscattering technique may be applied if the soil is sufficiently dry. An advantage of this method is the speed of detection: the scanning speed may be made comparable to that of a metal detector. A two-dimensional position sensitive detector is tested to obtain an image of the back scattered thermal neutron radiation. Results of experiments using a radionuclide neutron source are presented. The on-mine to no-mine signal ratio can be improved by the application of a window on the neutron time-of-flight. Results using a pulsed neutron generator are also presented.

  10. Combined backscatter and transmission method for nuclear density gauge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golgoun Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of nuclear density gauges, due to the ability to work in harsh industrial environments, is very common. In this study, to reduce error related to the ρ of continuous measuring density, the combination of backscatter and transmission are used simultaneously. For this reason, a 137Cs source for Compton scattering dominance and two detectors are simulated by MCNP4C code for measuring the density of 3 materials. Important advantages of this combined radiometric gauge are diminished influence of μ and therefore improving linear regression.

  11. High resolution backscattering studies of nanostructured magnetic and semiconducting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, A. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: afonseca@itn.pt; Franco, N. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Alves, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Leitao, J.P. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Sobolev, N.A. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Banhart, D.F. [Z. E. Elektronenmikroskopie, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Presting, H. [Daimler-Chrysler Forschungszentrum, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Ulyanov, V.V. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nikiforov, A.I. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-12-15

    Low dimension structures raises inevitably new technological challenges in materials science. The new structures must fulfill stringent requirements in composition, crystalline quality and interface sharpness among others. We present and discuss the results of Si/Ge quantum structures and FePt/C multilayer structures deposited at different temperatures by ion beam sputtering. Evidence for the presence of FePt nanoparticles embedded in the C matrix and Ge islands in Ge/Si multilayers structures was found. Size and stoichiometry of the nanoparticles and the multilayer periodicity was obtained using Rutherford backscattering at grazing angles of incidence. The strain state of the single crystalline layers was determined by tilt axis channelling.

  12. Photoneutron production with the Laser-Compton backscattered photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Sugiyama, Suguru; Mikado, Tomohisa; Yamada, Kawakatsu; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Sei, Norihiro; Chiwaki, Mitsukuni [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    A method to produce quasi-monoenergetic photoneutrons for detector calibration was examined. The photoneutrons were produced with a photo-induced neutron emission of a {sup 9}Be using the Laser-Compton backscattered photons. Because the photon energy is continuously tunable, neutrons with various energies are obtained. Yield of the neutrons was measured with a liquid scintillation detector at the photon energies from 1651 keV to 3019 keV. Neutron yield at around the threshold energy for the {sup 9}Be ({gamma}, n) reaction was measured by changing the photon energy in a 10 keV step. (author)

  13. Anisotropy in Thermo-Optic Coefficient of Different Polymer Systems by Attenuated Total Reflection Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang; CAO Zhuang-Qi; SHEN Qi-Shun; MENG Qing-Hua; HUANG De-Ying; GUO Kun-Peng; QIU Ling; SHEN Yu-Quan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Thermo-optic coefficient dn/dT as well as volume expansion coefficients β of different polymer systems are measured for both TE and TM polarizations in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. Experimental results indicate that cross-linked polymer systems exhibit the thermal expansion coefficients smaller than those of the original side-chain systems. Moreover, the anisotropies in thermo-optic coefficients of the polymer systems with small birefringence exhibit linear relationship with the anisotropies in volume expansion coefficients, but the polymer systems with larger birefringence exhibit more complicated relationship.

  14. 3D Visualization of Radar Backscattering Diagrams Based on OpenGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia V. Zhulina

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A digital method of calculating the radar backscattering diagrams is presented. The method uses a digital model of an arbitrary scattering object in the 3D graphics package “OpenGL” and calculates the backscattered signal in the physical optics approximation. The backscattering diagram is constructed by means of rotating the object model around the radar-target line.

  15. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscatter

    OpenAIRE

    Vossen, R.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of sea-surface back-scattering strength are needed for sonar performance modelling. Such predictions are hampered by two problems. First, measurements of surface back-scattering are not available at small grazing angles. These are of special interest to low-frequency active sonar since they mainly contribute to long range propagation. Second, existing theoretical models based on a bubble-free interface underestimate the surface back-scattering strength at larger grazing angles. We...

  16. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Ismail, Syed; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, and CALIPSO observations during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA). The NAMMA field experiment was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. Using this method, we found dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa ratios at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile.

  17. Semi-Empirical Calibration of the Integral Equation Model for Co-Polarized L-Band Backscattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Baghdadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to extend the semi-empirical calibration of the backscattering Integral Equation Model (IEM initially proposed for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data at C- and X-bands to SAR data at L-band. A large dataset of radar signal and in situ measurements (soil moisture and surface roughness over bare soil surfaces were used. This dataset was collected over numerous agricultural study sites in France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Germany and Italy using various SAR sensors (AIRSAR, SIR-C, JERS-1, PALSAR-1, ESAR. Results showed slightly better simulations with exponential autocorrelation function than with Gaussian function and with HH than with VV. Using the exponential autocorrelation function, the mean difference between experimental data and Integral Equation Model (IEM simulations is +0.4 dB in HH and −1.2 dB in VV with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE about 3.5 dB. In order to improve the modeling results of the IEM for a better use in the inversion of SAR data, a semi-empirical calibration of the IEM was performed at L-band in replacing the correlation length derived from field experiments by a fitting parameter. Better agreement was observed between the backscattering coefficient provided by the SAR and that simulated by the calibrated version of the IEM (RMSE about 2.2 dB.

  18. Observations of 2D Doppler backscattering on MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D A; Freethy, S J; Huang, B K; Shevchenko, V F; Vann, R G L

    2015-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D Doppler backscattering (DBS) experiments on MAST. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (+-40 degrees vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-35.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24 degrees FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is an entirely novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial measurements of phenomena observed on conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch an...

  19. Investigation of sheared liquids by neutron backscattering and reflectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, M; Hock, R; Frick, B; Zabel, H

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated by neutron scattering structural and dynamical properties of water solutions of the triblock copolymer P85 under shear. To this end a shear cell that suits the requirements for neutron backscattering and another for reflectivity experiments have been built. In reflectivity measurements we find the polymer concentration (nominal concentration of 33% by weight) to vary right at the surface between 12% and 52% for hydrophilic or hydrophobic coated silicon wavers, for temperatures between 18 C and 73 C and for shear rates up to 2500 s sup - sup 1. Additional structural changes deeper in the bulk are also observed. On the backscattering instrument (IN10 at ILL) we find that the liquid appears to stick to the plates of the shear cell, implying an unusual macroscopic velocity distribution that differs from that found earlier for lubrication oils. We report further on changes of the quasielastic line width in the direction of the shear gradient for different temperatures and shear rates. (orig.)

  20. Study of sporadic-E clouds by backscatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Houminer

    Full Text Available It is shown that swept-frequency backscatter ionograms covering a range of azimuths can be used to study the dynamics of sporadic-E clouds. A simple technique based on analytic ray tracing can be used to simulate the observed narrow traces associated with Es patches. This enables the location and extent of the sporadic-E clouds to be determined. The motion of clouds can then be determined from a time sequence of records. In order to demonstrate the method, results are presented from an initial study of 5 days of backscatter ionograms from the Jindalee Stage B data base obtained during March-April 1990. Usually 2–3 clouds were observed each day, mainly during the evening and up to midnight. The clouds lasted from 1–4 h and extended between 30°–80° in azimuth and 150-800 km in range. The clouds were mostly stationary or drifted generally westward with velocities of up to 80 m s–1. Only one cloud was observed moving eastward.

  1. Dynamical electron backscatter diffraction patterns. Part I: pattern simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; De Graef, Marc

    2013-10-01

    A new approach for the simulation of dynamic electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns is introduced. The computational approach merges deterministic dynamic electron-scattering computations based on Bloch waves with a stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the energy, depth, and directional distributions of the backscattered electrons (BSEs). An efficient numerical scheme is introduced, based on a modified Lambert projection, for the computation of the scintillator electron count as a function of the position and orientation of the EBSD detector; the approach allows for the rapid computation of an individual EBSD pattern by bi-linear interpolation of a master EBSD pattern. The master pattern stores the BSE yield as a function of the electron exit direction and exit energy and is used along with weight factors extracted from the MC simulation to obtain energy-weighted simulated EBSD patterns. Example simulations for nickel yield realistic patterns and energy-dependent trends in pattern blurring versus filter window energies are in agreement with experimental energy-filtered EBSD observations reported in the literature.

  2. Variation of backscatter as an indicator of boundary layer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M. [UMIST, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hunter, G.C. [National Power, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    In this work we have developed software to display cross-sections of the variance of backscatter over a given sampling period in addition to its absolute mean. We have analyzed a series of Lidar cross-sections of elevated plumes dispersing into a convective BL and have then derived profiles both of the mean backscatter, , as a function of height and of its relative, shot-to-shot, variation, {radical} /. The latter is a measure of the homogeneity of the aerosol. There is no cheap device for measuring BL depths so we were interested in comparing depths estimated using our Lidar with those predicted by the current ADMS atmospheric dispersion model. This is based on integrating an energy budget to predict the BL development and as such relies on values for the initial lapse rate and for the surface sensible heat flux. A major shortcoming of the model appears to be that, in the absence of measurements, it must assume a default value for the former; the latter may be estimated from surface measurements but is very sensitive to the assumed availability of surface moisture. (LN)

  3. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  4. Backscattering measuring system for optimization of intravenous laser irradiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Tatyana V.; Popov, V. D.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous laser blood irradiation as an effective method of biostimulation and physiotherapy becomes a more popular procedure. Optimal irradiation conditions for each patient are needed to be established individually. A fiber optics feedback system combined with conventional intravenous laser irradiation system was developed to control of irradiation process. The system consists of He-Ne laser, fiber optics probe and signal analyzer. Intravenous blood irradiation was performed in 7 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with different diseases. Measurements in vivo were related to in vitro blood irradiation which was performed in the same conditions with force-circulated venous blood. Comparison of temporal variations of backscattered light during all irradiation procedures has shown a strong discrepancy on optical properties of blood in patients with various health disorders since second procedure. The best cure effect was achieved when intensity of backscattered light was constant during at least five minutes. As a result, the optical irradiation does was considered to be equal 20 minutes' exposure of 3 mW He-Ne laser light at the end of fourth procedure.

  5. Discriminant classification of different fish-species backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Feng; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Chun

    2012-11-01

    The complex structure of fish and multispecies composition complicate the analysis of acoustic data. Consequently, it is difficult to obtain a highly accurate rate of classification by using current approaches. This paper introduces two discriminating methods: the adaptive segmentation temporal centroid method and the wavelet packet multi-scale information entropy method. To verify and compare these two methods, an ex situ experiment has been performed with three kinds of fish: Crucian carp (Carassius auratus), Yellow-headed catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Bluntnose black bream (Megalobrama amblycephale). The backscattering signals of these fishes are obtained. Then the temporal centroid in the divided sub-segmentation of the backscattering envelope is calculated, and the multi-scale information entropy of the wavelet packet decomposition in different frequency bands is extracted. Finally, three kinds of fish are successfully classified by using a BP neural network. The result shows that the adaptive segmentation temporal centroid method is 4% more accurate than the wavelet packet multi-scale information entropy method.

  6. ILC beam energy measurement by means of laser Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchnoi, N. [Budker Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Schreiber, H.J.; Viti, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of 10{sup -4} or better on a bunch-to-bunch basis while the electron and positron beams are in collision. (orig.)

  7. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  8. Subgrid-scale backscatter after the shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livescu, Daniel; Li, Zhaorui

    2017-01-01

    The statistics of the subgrid scales (SGS) are studied in the context of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of turbulence after the interaction with a nominally normal shock wave. In general, in practical applications, the shock wave width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J. Fluid Mech., 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). By using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock wave, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number ≈ 180 are used for an analysis of the SGS backscatter properties. In particular, it is shown that the interaction with the shock wave decreases the asymmetry of the SGS dissipation Probability Density Function (PDF) as the shock Mach number increases, with a significant enhancement in size of the regions and magnitude of backscatter.

  9. Temporal and spatial variability of ADCP backscatter on a continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindlinger, Laurie R.; Biggs, Douglas C.; DiMarco, Steven F.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research has shown that acoustic volume backscatter intensity (ABI) from an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be a proxy for zooplankton and micronekton biomass over time or space. As part of NOAA's Sperm Whale and Acoustic Monitoring Program (SWAMP) and a follow-on ichthyoplankton survey (SEAMAP), a ship-mounted 300-kHz broadband ADCP collected current velocity and ABI data from July to September 2001 in the northeast Gulf of Mexico. The present study sought to compare/contrast the variability in ABI both spatially and temporally using the data obtained from the SWAMP and SEAMAP cruises. The ADCP data were averaged over 2 min and 4 m vertical bins from 16 to 56 m below sea surface. Usually, ABI in this epipelagic realm averaged 3 dB higher at night than during the day because of diel vertical migration of zooplankton and micronekton into these near surface waters, while in a region having cyclonic circulation along the continental margin of the northeast Gulf, ABI averaged 6 dB higher than in an anticyclonic warm filament there. Wet displacement volumes (WDV) were measured using Bongo net tows to estimate that a 6 dB increase in ABI was equivalent to an increase from 9 to 10.5 ml WDV of plankton+micronekton per 100 m 3. Sperm whale abundance has been shown to be positively correlated with regions of locally high ABI, and sperm whale sightings during SWAMP were also compared to our ABI measurements. Spectral and Empirical Orthogonal Function analyses were performed on subsets of the ABI data for which 10-14 day time series were available and showed 2-3 day periodicity near-surface, corresponding to spatial scales of 10 1-10 2 km. During summer 2001, the mesoscale circulation along the subtropical continental margin in the northeastern Gulf was found to be the principal forcing factor for low frequency ABI variation. Increased backscatter observations are also correlated with offshore flow from the continental margin to the deep ocean

  10. The contribution of bubbles to high-frequency sea surface backscatter: a 24-h time series of field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Peter H

    2003-02-01

    Measurements of acoustic sea surface backscattering, wind speed, and surface wave spectra were made continually over a 24-h period in an experiment conducted in 26 m of water near the Dry Tortugus collection of islands off south Florida in February 1995. The backscattering measurements were made at a frequency of 30 kHz and a sea surface grazing angle of 20 degrees; a time series of the decibel equivalent of this variable, called SS20, was studied in terms of its dependence on environmental variables. On occasion reliable estimates of scattering in the grazing range 15 degrees-27 degrees were also obtained during the 24 hours. The scattering data exhibited evidence, in terms of scattering level and grazing angle dependence, of scattering from near-surface bubbles rather than scattering from the rough air-sea interface. The scattering data were compared with a model for sigma(b), the apparent backscattering cross section per unit area due to bubble scattering, that is driven by a parameter, beta1, equal to the depth-integrated extinction cross section per unit volume. Using an empirical model for beta1 based on data from a 1977 experiment conducted in pelagic waters, model predictions agreed reasonably well with the 1995 measurements presented here. Additional model-data comparisons were made using four measurements from a 1992 experiment conducted in pelagic waters. Finally, the 24-h time series of acoustic scattering exhibited a hysteresis effect, wherein for a given wind speed, there was a tendency for the scattering level to be higher if prior winds had been falling. A better understanding of this effect is essential to reduce uncertainty in model predictions.

  11. Ray-Based Calculations with DEPLETE of Laser Backscatter in ICF Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E; Hinkel, D; Froula, D; London, R; Callahan, D

    2008-05-19

    A steady-state model for Brillouin and Raman backscatter along a laser ray path is presented. The daughter plasma waves are treated in the strong damping limit, and have amplitudes given by the (linear) kinetic response to the ponderomotive drive. Pump depletion, inverse-bremsstrahlung damping, bremsstrahlung emission, Thomson scattering off density fluctuations, and whole-beam focusing are included. The numerical code Deplete, which implements this model, is described. The model is compared with traditional linear gain calculations, as well as 'plane-wave' simulations with the paraxial propagation code pF3D. Comparisons with Brillouin-scattering experiments at the Omega Laser Facility show that laser speckles greatly enhance the reflectivity over the Deplete results. An approximate upper bound on this enhancement is given by doubling the Deplete coupling coefficient. Analysis with Deplete of an ignition design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), with a peak radiation temperature of 285 eV, shows encouragingly low reflectivity. Doubling the coupling to bracket speckle effects suggests a less optimistic picture. Re-absorption of Raman light is seen to be significant in this design.

  12. A new method for retrieval of the extinction coefficient of water clouds by using the tail of the CALIOP signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A method is developed based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO level 1 attenuated backscatter profile data for deriving the mean extinction coefficient of water droplets close to cloud top. The method is applicable to low level (cloud top < 2 km, opaque water clouds in which the lidar signal is completely attenuated beyond about 100 m of penetration into the cloud. The photo multiplier tubes (PMTs of 532 nm detectors (parallel and perpendicular polarizations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP both exhibit a non-ideal recovery of the lidar signal after striking a strongly backscattering target (such as water cloud or surface. Therefore, the effects of any transient responses of CALIOP on the attenuated backscatter profile of the water cloud must first be removed in order to obtain a reliable (validated attenuated backscatter profile. Then, the slope of the exponential decay of the validated water cloud attenuated backscatter profile, and the multiple scattering factor are used for deriving the mean extinction coefficient of low-level water cloud droplets close to cloud top. This novel method was evaluated and compared with the previous method by combining the cloud effective radius (3.7 μm reported by MODIS with the lidar depolarization ratios measured by CALIPSO to estimate the mean extinction coefficient. Statistical results show that the extinction coefficients derived by the new method based on CALIOP alone agree reasonably well with those obtained in the previous study using combined CALIOP and MODIS data. Their mean absolute relative difference in extinction coefficient is about 13.4%. An important advantage of the new method is that it can be used to derive the extinction coefficient also during night time, and it is also applicable when multi-layered clouds are present. Overall, the global mean cloud water extinction coefficients during different seasons range from 26

  13. Relationship between Ballistic Coefficient and Static Mechanical Properties for Armor Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the ballistic coefficient and the static mechanical properties of armor materials was studied. The results show that the ballistic coefficient is determined by the strength, hardness and the toughness of materials. According to the Martel rule, the equation of the relationship between ballistic coefficient and static mechanical properties satisfies the following formula: . From the mixture law of composite, the prerequisite, for which ballistic coefficient has maximum to reinforcement volume fraction, is obtained by the following equation: .

  14. Iterative, backscatter-analysis algorithms for increasing transmission and focusing light through highly-scattering random media

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Curtis; Michielssen, Eric; Rand, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Scattering hinders the passage of light through random media and consequently limits the usefulness of optical techniques for sensing and imaging. Thus, methods for increasing the transmission of light through such random media are of interest. Against this backdrop, Dorokhov, Pendry and others theoretically predicted the existence of a few highly transmitting eigen-wavefronts with transmission coefficients close to one in strongly backscattering random media. The breakthrough experiments of Vellekoop and Mosk confirmed the existence of these highly transmitting eigen-wavefronts and demonstrated that they could be discovered by using information from the far side of the scattering medium. Here, we numerically analyze this phenomenon in 2-D with fully spectrally accurate simulators and provide rigorous numerical evidence confirming the existence of these highly transmitting eigen-wavefronts in random media composed of hundreds of thousands of non-absorbing scatterers. We then develop physically realizable algo...

  15. Data analysis of backscattering LIDAR system correlated with meteorological data; Analise de dados de sistema LIDAR de retroespalhamento correlacionada com dados meteorologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Sandro Toshio

    2009-07-01

    In these last years, we had an increase in the interest in the monitoring of the effect of the human activity being on the atmosphere and the climate in the planet. The remote sensing techniques has been used in many studies, also related the global changes. A backscattering LIDAR system, the first of this kind in Brazil, has been used to provide the vertical profile of the aerosol backscatter coefficient at 532 nm up to an altitude of 4-6 km above sea level. In this study, data has was collected in the year of 2005. These data had been correlated with data of solar photometer CIMEL and also with meteorological data. The main results had indicated to exist a standard in the behavior of these meteorological data and the vertical distribution of the extinction coefficient gotten through LIDAR. In favorable periods of atmospheric dispersion, that is, rise of the temperature of associated air the fall of relative humidity, increase of the atmospheric pressure and low ventilation tax, was possible to determine with good precision the height of the Planetary Boundary Layer, as much through the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient how much through the technique of the vertical profile of the potential temperature. The technique LIDAR showed to be an important tool in the determination of the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere, assisting to characterize the evolution of the CLP throughout the day, which had its good space and secular resolution. (author)

  16. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  17. Study of MPLNET-Derived Aerosol Climatology over Kanpur, India, and Validation of CALIPSO Level 2 Version 3 Backscatter and Extinction Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Amit; Tripathi, S. N.; Kaul, D. S.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2012-01-01

    The level 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) at Kanpur, India, have been studied from May 2009 to September 2010. Monthly averaged extinction profiles from MPLNET shows high extinction values near the surface during October March. Higher extinction values at altitudes of 24 km are observed from April to June, a period marked by frequent dust episodes. Version 3 level 2 Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol profile products have been compared with corresponding data from MPLNET over Kanpur for the above-mentioned period. Out of the available backscatter profiles, the16 profiles used in this study have time differences less than 3 h and distances less than 130 km. Among these profiles, four cases show good comparison above 400 m with R2 greater than 0.7. Comparison with AERONET data shows that the aerosol type is properly identified by the CALIOP algorithm. Cloud contamination is a possible source of error in the remaining cases of poor comparison. Another source of error is the improper backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which further affects the accuracy of extinction coefficient retrieval.

  18. Using multi-beam echo sounder backscatter data for sediment classification in very shallow water environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amiri-Simkooei, A.R.; Snellen, M.; Simons, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    In a recent work described in Ref. [1], an angle-independent methodology was developed to use the multi-beam echo sounder backscatter (MBES) data for the seabed sediment classification. The method employs the backscatter data at a certain angle to obtain the number of sediment classes and to discrim

  19. Simulation-guided optimization of small-angle analyzer geometry in the neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Joachim; Zamponi, Michaela

    2013-11-01

    The resolution of neutron backscattering spectrometers deteriorates at small scattering angles where analyzers deviate from exact backscattering. By reducing the azimuth angle range of the analyzers, the resolution can be improved with little loss of peak intensity. Measurements at the spectrometer SPHERES are in excellent agreement with simulations, which proves the dominance of geometric effects.

  20. Simulation-guided optimization of small-angle analyzer geometry in the neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuttke, Joachim; Zamponi, Michaela [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    The resolution of neutron backscattering spectrometers deteriorates at small scattering angles where analyzers deviate from exact backscattering. By reducing the azimuth angle range of the analyzers, the resolution can be improved with little loss of peak intensity. Measurements at the spectrometer SPHERES are in excellent agreement with simulations, which proves the dominance of geometric effects.

  1. A Multivariate Correlation Analysis of High- Frequency Bottom Backscattering Strength Measurements With Geotechnical Parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.G.; Snellen, M.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Sound backscattered from the seabed has been measured in a 10x10-nmi2 region of the North Sea, characterized by a variety of bottom types, including mud, sand, and gravel. The backscattering strength measurements are made by a forward- looking sonar, operating at 100 kHz and tilted at an angle of 30

  2. A multivariate correlation analysis of high-frequency bottom backscattering strength measurements with geotechnical parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.G.; Snellen, M.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Sound backscattered from the seabed has been measured in a 10 × 10-nmi2 region of the North Sea, characterized by a variety of bottom types, including mud, sand, and gravel. The backscattering strength measurements are made by a forward-looking sonar, operating at 100 kHz and tilted at an angle of 3

  3. Effect of the cortex on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of cancellous bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Holt, Andrew P [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN (United States); Kaste, Sue C, E-mail: hoffmeister@rhodes.edu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2011-10-07

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques offer a promising new approach for detecting changes in bone caused by osteoporosis. However, several challenges impede clinical implementation of backscatter techniques. This study examines how the dense outer surface of bone (the cortex) affects backscatter measurements of interior regions of porous (cancellous) bone tissue. Fifty-two specimens of bone were prepared from 13 human femoral heads so that the same region of cancellous bone could be ultrasonically interrogated through the cortex or along directions that avoided the cortex. Backscatter signals were analyzed over a frequency range of 0.8-3.0 MHz to determine two ultrasonic parameters: apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) and frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB). The term 'apparent' means that the parameters are sensitive to the frequency-dependent effects of diffraction and attenuation. Significant (p < 0.001) changes in AIB and FSAB indicated that measurements through the cortex decreased the apparent backscattered power and increased the frequency dependence of the power. However, the cortex did not affect the correlation of AIB and FSAB with the x-ray bone mineral density of the specimens. This suggests that results from many previous in vitro backscatter studies of specimens of purely cancellous bone may be extrapolated with greater confidence to in vivo conditions.

  4. Identification of major backscattering sources in trees and shrubs at 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoughi, R.; Wu, L. K.; Moore, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    A short-range very-fine-resolution FM-CW radar scatterometer has been used to identify the primary contributors to 10-GHz radar backscatter from pine, pin oak, American sycamore and sugar maple trees, and from creeping juniper shrubs. This system provided a range resolution of 11 cm and gave a 16-cm diameter illumination area at the target range of about 4 m. For a pine tree, the needles caused the strongest backscatter as well as the strongest attenuation in the radar signal. Cones, although insignificant contributors to the total backscatter, were more important for backscattering than for attenuation. For the rest of the trees, leaves were the strongest cause of backscattering and attenuation. However, in the absence of leaves, the petioles, small twigs, and branches gave relatively strong backscatter. For American sycamore and sugar maple trees, the fruits did not affect the total backscatter unless they were packed in clusters. For creeping juniper the backscattered energy and attenuation in the radar signal were mainly due to the top two layers of the evergreen scales. The contribution of the tree trunks was not determined.

  5. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscattering at 940 Hz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Ainslie, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable predictions of sea-surface backscattering strength are required for sonar performance modeling. These are, however, difficult to obtain as measurements of sea-surface backscattering are not available at small grazing angles relevant to low-frequency active sonar (1-3 kHz). Accurate theoreti

  6. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscatter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Ainslie, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of sea-surface back-scattering strength are needed for sonar performance modelling. Such predictions are hampered by two problems. First, measurements of surface back-scattering are not available at small grazing angles. These are of special interest to low-frequency active sonar since t

  7. n-Alcohol/Water Partition Coefficients for Decachlorobiphenyl (PCB 209)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow) for highly hydrophobic chemicals are extremely difficult and are rarely made, in part due to the large volumes of water typically needed to quantify these compounds in the aqueous phase. An extrapolation approach using ...

  8. n-Alcohol/Water Partition Coefficients for Decachlorobiphenyl (PCB 209)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow) for highly hydrophobic chemicals are extremely difficult and are rarely made, in part due to the large volumes of water typically needed to quantify these compounds in the aqueous phase. An extrapolation approach using ...

  9. The Kauffman Constraint Coefficients Kw

    CERN Document Server

    Griggs, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    The Kauffman Constraint Coefficients Kw and their corresponding Elementals Ew are presented as solutions to the construction of the (beta)-derivative of Kauffman's Theta-function. Additionally, a new recursion relation is provided to construct the (beta)-derivative of Theta that requires only operational substitutions and summations; this algorithmically simplifies Kauffman's original technique. To demonstrate Kw, we generate the 30 Kw Coefficients from the corresponding Elementals Ew for the (9)-derivative of Theta and find that our results are in complete agreement with Kauffman's Mathematica\\texttrademark solutions. We further present a calculation of two coefficients for the (12)-derivative of Theta and invite readers to use Mathematica\\texttrademark or any other means to calculate and verify our results. Finally, we present a challenging calculation for a coefficient of the (40)-derivative of Theta; owing to the vast numbers of permutations involved, a Mathematica\\texttrademark approach may require subst...

  10. Kappa Coefficients for Circular Classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrens, Matthijs J.; Pratiwi, Bunga C.

    2016-01-01

    Circular classifications are classification scales with categories that exhibit a certain periodicity. Since linear scales have endpoints, the standard weighted kappas used for linear scales are not appropriate for analyzing agreement between two circular classifications. A family of kappa coefficie

  11. Properties of Traffic Risk Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Tie-Qiao; HUANG Hai-Jun; SHANG Hua-Yan; XUE Yu

    2009-01-01

    We use the model with the consideration of the traffic interruption probability (Physica A 387(2008)6845) to study the relationship between the traffic risk coefficient and the traffic interruption probability.The analytical and numerical results show that the traffic interruption probability will reduce the traffic risk coefficient and that the reduction is related to the density, which shows that this model can improve traffic security.

  12. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  13. Results from the Daresbury Compton backscattering X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laundy, D. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Priebe, G. [Max Born Institute, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, 12489 Berlin, DE (Germany); Jamison, S.P. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Graham, D.M. [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Phillips, P.J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smith, S.L.; Saveliev, Y. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Vassilev, S. [The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Seddon, E.A., E-mail: elaine.seddon@stfc.ac.uk [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-11

    The Daresbury Compton Backscattering X-ray Source uses a high power Ti Sapphire laser interacting in head on geometry with electron bunches in the ALICE energy recovery linear accelerator. X-ray photons with peak energy of 21 keV were generated with the accelerator operating at an energy of 29.6 MeV. The spatial profile of the X-rays emitted near the electron beam axis was measured. The characteristics of the X-ray yield measured as a function of relative timing between the laser pulse and the interacting electron bunch was found to be consistent with the modelled intensity behaviour using measured electron and laser beam parameters.

  14. Many-beam dynamical simulation of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, Aimo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany)], E-mail: winkelm@mpi-halle.mpg.de; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Sweeney, Francis [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Day, Austin P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Dixton Rd., Monmouth, Gwent, NP25 3PP (United Kingdom); Parbrook, Peter [EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    We present an approach for the simulation of complete electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns where the relative intensity distributions in the patterns are accurately reproduced. The Bloch wave theory is applied to describe the electron diffraction process. For the simulation of experimental patterns with a large field of view, a large number of reflecting planes has to be taken into account. This is made possible by the Bethe perturbation of weak reflections. Very good agreement is obtained for simulated and experimental patterns of gallium nitride GaN{l_brace}0001{r_brace} at 20 kV electron energy. Experimental features like zone-axis fine structure and higher-order Laue zone rings are accurately reproduced. We discuss the influence of the diffraction of the incident beam in our experiment.

  15. Remote identification of a shipwreck site from MBES backscatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetti, Giuseppe; Calder, Brian

    2012-11-30

    The method described attempts to remotely identify the shape of an anthropogenic object, such as a wreck of a modern vessel, using reflectivity data from Multi-Beam Echosounder (MBES) systems. In the beam domain, the backscatter strength values - geometrically and radiometrically corrected - are used to extract a large number of Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) features with different input parameters. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is applied in order to achieve dimensionality reduction whilst a K-means algorithm clusters as "shipwreck site" a large number of beams for each line. After the geo-referencing process, a K-nearest-neighbors (K-NN) technique is applied as a filter for possible misclassifications. Finally, the shape of the shipwreck site is defined from the georeferenced beams using the α-shape method, constructing an output compatible with Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of landmine detection using neutron backscattering imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datema, Cor P. E-mail: c.datema@iri.tudelft.nl; Bom, Victor R.; Eijk, Carel W.E. van

    2003-11-01

    Neutron backscattering is a technique that has successfully been applied to the detection of non-metallic landmines. Most of the effort in this field has concentrated on single detectors that are scanned across the soil. Here, two new approaches are presented in which a two-dimensional image of the hydrogen distribution in the soil is made. The first method uses an array of position-sensitive {sup 3}He-tubes that is placed in close proximity of the soil. The second method is based on coded aperture imaging. Here, thermal neutrons from the soil are projected onto a detector which is typically placed one to several meters above the soil. Both methods use a pulsed D/D neutron source. The Monte Carlo simulation package GEANT 4 was used to investigate the performance of both imaging systems.

  17. Spectral characteristics of Compton backscattering sources. Linear and nonlinear modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potylitsyn, A.P., E-mail: potylitsyn@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolchuzhkin, A.M. [Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, 127994 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Compton backscattering (CBS) of laser photons by relativistic electrons is widely used to design X-ray and gamma sources with a bandwidth better than 1% using a tight collimation. In order to obtain a reasonable intensity of the resulting beam one has to increase power of a laser pulse simultaneously with narrowing of the waist in the interaction point. It can lead to nonlinearity of CBS process which is affected on spectral characteristics of the collimated gamma beam (so-called “red-shift” of the spectral line, emission of “soft” photons with energy much less than the spectral line energy). In this paper we have analyzed such an influence using Monte-Carlo technique and have shown that even weak nonlinearity should be taken into account if the gamma beam is formed by a narrow aperture.

  18. Diffuse Backscattering Mueller Matrices Patterns from Turbid Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian-Shun; ZHU Chen; WANG Zhi-Ping; ZHANG Jing

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental measurements and theory of the diffusely backscattered Mueller matrix patterns that arise from illuminating a turbid medium with a polarized laser beam. Our technique employs polarized light from a He-Ne laser (λ= 632.8 nm) focused onto the surface of the scattering medium. A surface area of approximately 2×2 cm2 centred on the light input point is imaged through polarization analysis optics onto a CCD camera. The Mueller matrix is reconstructed by 49 intensity measurements with various orientations of polarizer and analyser. The measured Mueller matrix of polystyrene spheres is compared with the theory result of incoherent scattering of light by spheres. It shows that the azimuthal patterns of the Mueller matrix are determined by the symmetry of the turbid media and the shape of scattering particles. The result is further proved by experiments with polystyrene spheres of different concentrations in de-ionized water.

  19. Backscattering reduction of corner reflectors using SCS technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaikumar, V.; Jose, K. A.; Aanandan, C. K.; Mohanan, P.; Nair, K. G.

    1992-10-01

    The paper reports the use of a simulated corrugated surface (SCS) to reduce radar cross section of dihedral corner reflectors. The focus is on 90-deg corner reflectors, since they are involved in many targets and normally show an enhancement in RCS. The backscattering cross section of the dihedral corner reflector, which is large due to the mutual perpendicularity of the two flat surfaces, is found to be greatly reduced for TE polarization. This simple method is determined to be very effective in reducing the RCS of corner reflectors for any corner angle by suitably selecting the parameters of SCS. This may find potential use in strategic RCS reduction of targets in defense and space applications.

  20. Substrate-mediated zero backscattering from dielectric metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Mihail; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Belov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study optical properties of all-dielectric metasurfaces on top of the high-index substrate. We show that matching the magnitudes and setting the {\\pi}-phase difference of the electric and magnetic dipole moments in nanoparticles, one can obtain a suppression of reflection from the substrate coated with metasurface. In contrast to homogeneous environment, where zero backscattering, or Kerker effect, is observed when electric and magnetic moments are in-phase, the blooming of the substrate occurs when the out-of-phase condition is satisfied, i.e. for the wavelength between the resonances of electric and magnetic dipole moments. We perform numerical simulations of spherical and disk nanoparticle arrays for different permittivities of the substrate, and confirm our model by numerically separating the contributions into the total reflection from nanoparticle arrays and bare substrate. The influence of high-index substrate is crucial for designing optical metasurfaces and photovoltaic elements with...

  1. Control of light backscattering in blood during intravenous laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Popov, V. D.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1997-02-01

    One of the most important problems in modern laser medicine is the determination of system response on laser treatment. Reaction of living system is significant during many kinds of laser procedures like surgery, therapy and biostimulation. Our study was aimed to optimize laser exposure using feed-back fiber system for intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). This system consisted of helium-neon laser (633 nm, 5 mW) with coupled fiber unit, photodetector and PC interface. Photodetector signals produced due to light backscattering were storaged and processed during all blood irradiation procedure. Significant time-dependent variations were observed within 9-15 min after beginning of treatment procedure and were correlated with number of trials, stage and character of disease. The designed feed-back system allows us to register a human blood response on laser irradiation to achieve better cure effect.

  2. Determination of RF source power in WPSN using modulated backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Sreedhar, K

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network (WSN) is a wireless network consisting of spatially distributed autonomous devices using sensors to cooperatively monitor physical or environmental conditions, such as temperature, sound, vibration, pressure, motion or pollutants, at different locations. During RF transmission energy consumed by critically energy-constrained sensor nodes in a WSN is related to the life time system, but the life time of the system is inversely proportional to the energy consumed by sensor nodes. In that regard, modulated backscattering (MB) is a promising design choice, in which sensor nodes send their data just by switching their antenna impedance and reflecting the incident signal coming from an RF source. Hence wireless passive sensor networks (WPSN) designed to operate using MB do not have the lifetime constraints. In this we are going to investigate the system analytically. To obtain interference-free communication connectivity with the WPSN nodes number of RF sources is determined and analyzed i...

  3. THE LOW BACKSCATTERING TARGETS CLASSIFICATION IN URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Shi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Polarimetric and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POLINSAR is widely used in urban area nowadays. Because of the physical and geometric sensitivity, the POLINSAR is suitable for the city classification, power-lines detection, building extraction, etc. As the new X-band POLINSAR radar, the china prototype airborne system, XSAR works with high spatial resolution in azimuth (0.1 m and slant range (0.4 m. In land applications, SAR image classification is a useful tool to distinguish the interesting area and obtain the target information. The bare soil, the cement road, the water and the building shadow are common scenes in the urban area. As it always exists low backscattering sign objects (LBO with the similar scattering mechanism (all odd bounce except for shadow in the XSAR images, classes are usually confused in Wishart-H-Alpha and Freeman-Durden methods. It is very hard to distinguish those targets only using the general information. To overcome the shortage, this paper explores an improved algorithm for LBO refined classification based on the Pre-Classification in urban areas. Firstly, the Pre-Classification is applied in the polarimetric datum and the mixture class is marked which contains LBO. Then, the polarimetric covariance matrix C3 is re-estimated on the Pre-Classification results to get more reliable results. Finally, the occurrence space which combining the entropy and the phase-diff standard deviation between HH and VV channel is used to refine the Pre-Classification results. The XSAR airborne experiments show the improved method is potential to distinguish the mixture classes in the low backscattering objects.

  4. Statistics of vertical backscatter profile of cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veglio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A nearly global statistical analysis of vertical backscatter and extinction profiles of cirrus clouds collected by the CALIOP lidar, on-board of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation, is presented.

    Statistics on frequency of occurrence and distributions of bulk properties of cirrus clouds in general and, for the first time, of horizontally homogeneous (on a 5-km field of view cirrus clouds only are provided. Annual and seasonal backscatter profiles (BSP are computed for the horizontally homogeneous cirri. Differences found in the day/night cases and for midlatitudes and tropics are studied in terms of the mean physical parameters of the clouds from which they are derived.

    The relation between cloud physical parameters (optical depth, geometrical thickness and temperature and the shape of the BSP is investigated. It is found that cloud geometrical thickness is the main parameter affecting the shape of the mean CALIOP BSP. Specifically, cirrus clouds with small geometrical thicknesses show a maximum in mean BSP curve placed near cloud top. As the cloud geometrical thickness increases the BSP maximum shifts towards cloud base. Cloud optical depth and temperature have smaller effect on the shape of the CALIOP BSPs. In general a slight increase in the BSP maximum is observed as cloud temperature and optical depth increase.

    In order to fit mean BSPs, as functions of geometrical thickness and position within the cloud layer, polynomial functions are provided. The impact on satellite radiative transfer simulations in the infrared spectrum when using either a constant ice-content (IWC along the cloud vertical dimension or an IWC profile derived from the BSP fitting functions is evaluated. It is, in fact, demonstrated that, under realistic hypotheses, the mean BSP is linearly proportional to the IWC profile.

  5. Feasibility of using backscattered muons for archeological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Use of nondestructive methods to accurately locate and characterize underground objects such as rooms and tools found at archeological sites is ideal to preserve these historic sites. High-energy cosmic ray muons are very sensitive to density variation and have been used to image volcanoes and archeological sites such as the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids. Muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere that penetrate the earth's crust up to few kilometers. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale making it useful for this type of work. However, the muon detector must be placed below the target of interest. For imaging volcanoes, the upper portion is imaged when the detector is placed on the earth's surface at the volcano's base. For sites of interest beneath the ground surface, the muon detector would need to be placed below the site in a tunnel or borehole. Placing the detector underground can be costly and may disturb the historical site. We will assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upward traveling muons, to eliminate the current constraint of positioning the detector below the target. This work consists of three parts 1) determine the backscattered flux rate from theory, 2) distinguish backscattered from forward scattered muons at the detector, and 3) validate the theoretical results with field experimentation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Statistics of vertical backscatter profiles of cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veglio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A nearly global statistical analysis of vertical backscatter and extinction profiles of cirrus clouds collected by the CALIOP lidar, on-board of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation, is presented.

    Statistics on frequency of occurrence and distribution of bulk properties of cirrus clouds in general and, for the first time, of horizontally homogeneous (on a 5-km field of view cirrus clouds only are provided. Annual and seasonal backscatter profiles (BSP are computed for the horizontally homogeneous cirri. Differences found in the day/night cases and for midlatitudes and tropics are studied in terms of the mean physical parameters of the clouds from which they are derived.

    The relationship between cloud physical parameters (optical depth, geometrical thickness and temperature and the shape of the BSP is investigated. It is found that cloud geometrical thickness is the main parameter affecting the shape of the mean CALIOP BSP. Specifically, cirrus clouds with small geometrical thicknesses show a maximum in mean BSP curve located near cloud top. As the cloud geometrical thickness increases the BSP maximum shifts towards cloud base. Cloud optical depth and temperature have smaller effects on the shape of the CALIOP BSPs. In general a slight increase in the BSP maximum is observed as cloud temperature and optical depth increase.

    In order to fit mean BSPs, as functions of geometrical thickness and position within the cloud layer, polynomial functions are provided. The impact on satellite radiative transfer simulations in the infrared spectrum when using either a constant ice-content (IWC along the cloud vertical dimension or an IWC profile derived from the BSP fitting functions is evaluated. It is, in fact, demonstrated that, under realistic hypotheses, the mean BSP is linearly proportional to the IWC profile.

  7. Measurements and modeling of the volume scattering function in the coastal northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Jean-François; Shybanov, Eugeny; Lee, Michael E.-G.; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2007-08-01

    We performed measurements of the volume scattering function (VSF) between 0.5° and 179° with an angular resolution of 0.3° in the northern Adriatic Sea onboard an oceanographic platform during three different seasons, using the multispectral volume scattering meter (MVSM) instrument. We observed important differences with respect to Petzold's commonly used functions, whereas the Fournier-Forand's analytical formulation provided a rather good description of the measured VSF. The comparison of the derived scattering, bp(λ) and backscattering, bbp(λ) coefficients for particles with the measurements performed with the classical AC-9 and Hydroscat-6 showed agreement to within 20%. The use of an empirical relationship for the derivation of bb(λ) from β(ψ,λ) at ψ=140° was validated for this coastal site although ψ=118° was confirmed to be the most appropriate angle. The low value of the factor used to convert β(ψ,λ) into bb(λ) within the Hydroscat-6 processing partially contributed to the underestimation of bb(λ) with respect to the MVSM. Finally, use of the Kopelevich model together with a measurement of bp(λ) at λ=555 nm allowed us to reconstruct the VSF with average rms percent differences between 8 and 15%.

  8. Milli-electronvolt monochromatization of hard X-rays with a sapphire backscattering monochromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergueev, I.; Wille, H.-C.; Hermann, R. P.; Bessas, D.; Shvyd’ko, Yu. V.; Zając, M.; Rüffer, R.

    2011-01-01

    A sapphire backscattering monochromator with 1.1 (1) meV bandwidth for hard X-rays (20–40 keV) is reported. The optical quality of several sapphire crystals has been studied and the best crystal was chosen to work as the monochromator. The small energy bandwidth has been obtained by decreasing the crystal volume impinged upon by the beam and by choosing the crystal part with the best quality. The monochromator was tested at the energies of the nuclear resonances of 121Sb at 37.13 keV, 125Te at 35.49 keV, 119Sn at 23.88 keV, 149Sm at 22.50 keV and 151Eu at 21.54 keV. For each energy, specific reflections with sapphire temperatures in the 150–300 K region were chosen. Applications to nuclear inelastic scattering with these isotopes are demonstrated. PMID:21862862

  9. Three-dimensional electron backscattered diffraction analysis of deformation in MgO micropillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, S., E-mail: sandra.korte@cantab.net [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Ritter, M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Jiao, C. [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Midgley, P.A.; Clegg, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Small-scale testing is extensively used to study the effects of size on plasticity or characterise plastic deformation of brittle materials, where cracking is suppressed on the microscale. Geometrical and experimental constraints have been shown to affect small-scale deformation and efforts are underway to understand these better. However, current analytical techniques tend to possess high resolution in only one or two dimensions, impeding a detailed analysis of the entire deformed volume. Here electron backscattered diffraction in three dimensions is presented as a way of characterising three-dimensional (3-D) deformation at high spatial resolution. It is shown that, by reconstruction of compressed and then successively sliced and indexed MgO micropillars, this 3-D technique yields information complementary to {mu}-Laue diffraction or electron microscopy, allowing a correlation of experimental artefacts and the distribution of plasticity. In addition, deformation features which are difficult to visualise by standard scanning electron microscopy are easily detected, for example where only small surface traces are produced or minimal plastic strain can be introduced before failure in brittle materials.

  10. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  11. Quantitative analysis of martensite and bainite microstructures using electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhe; Hua, Jiajie; Kong, Mingguang; Zeng, Yi; Liu, Junliang; Liu, Ziwei

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, ultra-high-strength steels with multiphase microstructures containing martensite and bainite were prepared by controlling the cooling rate. A new approach was proposed for quantitatively statistical phase analysis using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) based on the band contrast which correlates to the quality and intensity of the diffraction patterns. This approach takes advantage of the inherently greater lattice imperfections of martensite, such as dislocations and low-angle grain boundaries, relative to that of bainite. These can reduce the intensity and quality of the EBSD patterns of martensite, which decrease the band contrast. Thus, combined with morphological observations, Gaussian two-peak fitting was employed to analyze the band contrast profile and confirm the ranges of band contrast for the two phases. The volume fractions of bainite and martensite in different samples were determined successfully. In addition, the results show that increased cooling rates improve the proportion of martensite and the ratio of martensite to bainite. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:814-819, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Particle optical backscattering along a chlorophyll gradient in the upper layer of the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Huot

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The particulate scattering, bp, and backscattering, bbp, coefficients are determined by the concentration and physical properties of suspended particles in the ocean. They provide a simple description of the influence of these particles on the scattering of light within the water column. For the remote observation of ocean color, bbp along with the total absorption coefficient govern the amount and spectral qualities of light leaving the sea surface. However, for the construction and validation of ocean color models measurements of bbp are still lacking, especially at low chlorophyll a concentrations ([Chl]. Here, we examine the relationships between spectral bbp and bp vs. [Chl] along an 8000 km transect crossing the Case 1 waters of the eastern South Pacific Gyre. In these waters, over the entire range of [Chl] encountered (~0.02–2 mg m−3, both bbp and bp can be related to [Chl] by power functions (i.e. bp or bbp=α[Chl]β Regression analyses are carried out to provide the parameters α and β for several wavelengths throughout the visible for both bbp and bp. When applied to the data, these functions retrieve the same fraction of variability in bbp and bp (determination coefficients between 0.82 and 0.88. The bbp coefficient fall within the bounds of previous measurements at intermediate and high [Chl] recently published. Its dependence on [Chl] below ~0.1 mg m−3 is described for the first time with in situ data. At these low and decreasing [Chl] a continuous trend with data at higher [Chl] is observed, i.e. a decrease in bbp. The backscattering ratio (i.e. bbp/bp with values

  13. Transport coefficients of heavy baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the transport coefficients (drag and momentum diffusion) of the low-lying heavy baryons Λc and Λb in a medium of light mesons formed at the later stages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ the Fokker-Planck approach to obtain the transport coefficients from unitarized baryon-meson interactions based on effective field theories that respect chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. We provide the transport coefficients as a function of temperature and heavy-baryon momentum, and analyze the applicability of certain nonrelativistic estimates. Moreover we compare our outcome for the spatial diffusion coefficient to the one coming from the solution of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation, and we find a very good agreement between both calculations. The transport coefficients for Λc and Λb in a thermal bath will be used in a subsequent publication as input in a Langevin evolution code for the generation and propagation of heavy particles in heavy-ion collisions at LHC and RHIC energies.

  14. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  15. The impact of absorption coefficient on polarimetric determination of Berry phase based depth resolved characterization of biomedical scattering samples: a polarized Monte Carlo investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Koju, Vijay [ORNL; John, Dwayne O [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the state of polarization of photons due to scatter generates associated geometric phase that is being investigated as a means for decreasing the degree of uncertainty in back-projecting the paths traversed by photons detected in backscattered geometry. In our previous work, we established that polarimetrically detected Berry phase correlates with the mean photon penetration depth of the backscattered photons collected for image formation. In this work, we report on the impact of state-of-linear-polarization (SOLP) filtering on both the magnitude and population distributions of image forming detected photons as a function of the absorption coefficient of the scattering sample. The results, based on Berry phase tracking implemented Polarized Monte Carlo Code, indicate that sample absorption plays a significant role in the mean depth attained by the image forming backscattered detected photons.

  16. Harmonic functions with varying coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dziok

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex-valued harmonic functions that are univalent and sense preserving in the open unit disk can be written in the form f = h + g ‾ $f=h+\\overline{g}$ , where h and g are analytic. In this paper we investigate some classes of univalent harmonic functions with varying coefficients related to Janowski functions. By using the extreme points theory we obtain necessary and sufficient convolution conditions, coefficients estimates, distortion theorems, and integral mean inequalities for these classes of functions. The radii of starlikeness and convexity for these classes are also determined.

  17. Validation of automated supervised segmentation of multibeam backscatter data from the Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Jess I. T.; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Pallentin, Arne; Pecher, Ingo A.; Gorman, Andrew R.; Schneider von Deimling, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Using automated supervised segmentation of multibeam backscatter data to delineate seafloor substrates is a relatively novel technique. Low-frequency multibeam echosounders (MBES), such as the 12-kHz EM120, present particular difficulties since the signal can penetrate several metres into the seafloor, depending on substrate type. We present a case study illustrating how a non-targeted dataset may be used to derive information from multibeam backscatter data regarding distribution of substrate types. The results allow us to assess limitations associated with low frequency MBES where sub-bottom layering is present, and test the accuracy of automated supervised segmentation performed using SonarScope® software. This is done through comparison of predicted and observed substrate from backscatter facies-derived classes and substrate data, reinforced using quantitative statistical analysis based on a confusion matrix. We use sediment samples, video transects and sub-bottom profiles acquired on the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand. Inferences on the substrate types are made using the Generic Seafloor Acoustic Backscatter (GSAB) model, and the extents of the backscatter classes are delineated by automated supervised segmentation. Correlating substrate data to backscatter classes revealed that backscatter amplitude may correspond to lithologies up to 4 m below the seafloor. Our results emphasise several issues related to substrate characterisation using backscatter classification, primarily because the GSAB model does not only relate to grain size and roughness properties of substrate, but also accounts for other parameters that influence backscatter. Better understanding these limitations allows us to derive first-order interpretations of sediment properties from automated supervised segmentation.

  18. Intercomparisons of Lidar Backscatter Measurements and In-situ Data from GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudamani, S.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) took place during Nov. 1989 and May - Jun. 1990 and involved flight surveys of the Pacific region by the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The experimental instruments were lidars operating at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the thermal infrared and various optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. The primary motivation for GLOBE was the development of spaceborne wind sensing lidar. This paper will concern a comparison of direct backscatter measurements and backscatter calculated from particle counter data. Of special interest is that the particle measurements provided data on composition, and thus refractive index variation may be included in the analysis.

  19. Backscattering factor measurements of gamma rays of the different thickness of pure concrete

    OpenAIRE

    B.A. Almayahi

    2015-01-01

    Backscattering peak is one of the main features of the pulse height spectrum from a gamma ray detector. This arises mainly from materials outside like source baking, photomultiplier tube housing, shielding etc. The effect of source backing on the relative importance of the backscattered peak for gamma ray using a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector is measured. Gamma energies in the range from 0.088 MeV to 1.253 MeV are used. Backscattering factor (Fb) measurements have been carried out (2 > Fb ≥...

  20. A Multivariate Correlation Analysis of High- Frequency Bottom Backscattering Strength Measurements With Geotechnical Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Sound backscattered from the seabed has been measured in a 10x10-nmi2 region of the North Sea, characterized by a variety of bottom types, including mud, sand, and gravel. The backscattering strength measurements are made by a forward- looking sonar, operating at 100 kHz and tilted at an angle of 30 from the horizontal. Fifty bottom-grab samples, representative of the uppermost 20 cm, were taken and analyzed for gravel content, shell content, and grain-size distribution. The backscatter measu...

  1. Diffuse optical microscopy for quantification of depth-dependent epithelial backscattering in the cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Lam, Sylvia; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Miller, Dianne M.; McAlpine, Jessica N.; Lee, Marette; Kienle, Alwin; MacAulay, Calum

    2016-06-01

    A fiber optic imaging approach is presented using structured illumination for quantification of almost pure epithelial backscattering. We employ multiple spatially modulated projection patterns and camera-based reflectance capture to image depth-dependent epithelial scattering. The potential diagnostic value of our approach is investigated on cervical ex vivo tissue specimens. Our study indicates a strong backscattering increase in the upper part of the cervical epithelium caused by dysplastic microstructural changes. Quantization of relative depth-dependent backscattering is confirmed as a potentially useful diagnostic feature for detection of precancerous lesions in cervical squamous epithelium.

  2. Irrational "Coefficients" in Renaissance Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Argument From the time of al-Khwārizmī in the ninth century to the beginning of the sixteenth century algebraists did not allow irrational numbers to serve as coefficients. To multiply by x, for instance, the result was expressed as the rhetorical equivalent of . The reason for this practice has to do with the premodern concept of a monomial. The coefficient, or "number," of a term was thought of as how many of that term are present, and not as the scalar multiple that we work with today. Then, in sixteenth-century Europe, a few algebraists began to allow for irrational coefficients in their notation. Christoff Rudolff (1525) was the first to admit them in special cases, and subsequently they appear more liberally in Cardano (1539), Scheubel (1550), Bombelli (1572), and others, though most algebraists continued to ban them. We survey this development by examining the texts that show irrational coefficients and those that argue against them. We show that the debate took place entirely in the conceptual context of premodern, "cossic" algebra, and persisted in the sixteenth century independent of the development of the new algebra of Viète, Decartes, and Fermat. This was a formal innovation violating prevailing concepts that we propose could only be introduced because of the growing autonomy of notation from rhetorical text.

  3. Frequency dependence of backscatter from thin, oblique, finite-length cylinders measured with a focused transducer-with applications in cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Keith A; Harris, Gerald R

    2008-11-01

    A model is presented for the echo from a thin, oblique, finite-length cylinder. The echo is calculated from the line integral of the transducer directivity pattern along the cylinder axis. The model was validated with broadband pulse-echo measurements from (1) a perpendicular (to the ultrasound beam) nylon wire as a function of lateral displacement from the beam center, (2) a tilted nylon wire as a function of the angle of inclination relative to the ultrasound beam, and (3) a quasi-parallel-nylon-wire phantom, which mimicked the scattering properties of cancellous bone. The transducer directivity pattern (as a function of position and frequency) was measured with a membrane hydrophone. The model predicts an approximately cubic frequency dependence of backscatter coefficient from the phantom, as has been observed experimentally in cancellous bone. The model also predicts the relationship between the cylinder length and the exponent of a power law fit to backscatter coefficient versus frequency, which is 4 for very short (compared to a wavelength) cylinders and asymptotically approaches 3 for very long cylinders.

  4. How much information do extinction and backscattering measurements contain about the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnert, Michael; Andersson, Emma

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the problem of assimilating multiwavelength lidar observations of extinction and backscattering coefficients of aerosols into a chemical transport model. More specifically, we consider the inverse problem of determining the chemical composition of aerosols from these observations. The main questions are how much information the observations contain to determine the particles' chemical composition, and how one can optimize a chemical data assimilation system to make maximum use of the available information. We first quantify the information content of the measurements by computing the singular values of the scaled observation operator. From the singular values we can compute the number of signal degrees of freedom, Ns, and the reduction in Shannon entropy, H. As expected, the information content as expressed by either Ns or H grows as one increases the number of observational parameters and/or wavelengths. However, the information content is strongly sensitive to the observation error. The larger the observation error variance, the lower the growth rate of Ns or H with increasing number of observations. The right singular vectors of the scaled observation operator can be employed to transform the model variables into a new basis in which the components of the state vector can be partitioned into signal-related and noise-related components. We incorporate these results in a chemical data assimilation algorithm by introducing weak constraints that restrict the assimilation algorithm to acting on the signal-related model variables only. This ensures that the information contained in the measurements is fully exploited, but not overused. Numerical tests show that the constrained data assimilation algorithm provides a solution to the inverse problem that is considerably less noisy than the corresponding unconstrained algorithm. This suggests that the restriction of the algorithm to the signal-related model variables suppresses

  5. Calculation of self-diffusion coefficients in iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of available P-V-T equation of state of iron, the temperature and pressure dependence of self-diffusion coefficients in iron polymorphs (α, δ, γ and ɛ phases have been successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data by means of a thermodynamical model that interconnects point defects parameters with bulk properties. The calculated diffusion parameters, such as self-diffusion coefficient, activation energy and activation volume over a broad temperature range (500-2500 K and pressure range (0-100 GPa, compare favorably well with experimental or theoretical ones when the uncertainties are considered.

  6. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Zhang, Y.; Velisa, G.; Wang, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop here a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  7. Electron backscattering in a cavity: Ballistic and coherent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikov, A. A.; Weinmann, D.; Rössler, C.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-11-01

    Numerous experimental and theoretical studies have focused on low-dimensional systems locally perturbed by the biased tip of a scanning force microscope. In all cases either open or closed weakly gate-tunable nanostructures have been investigated, such as quantum point contacts, open or closed quantum dots, etc. We study the behavior of the conductance of a quantum point contact with a gradually forming adjacent cavity in series under the influence of a scanning gate. Here, an initially open quantum point contact system gradually turns into a closed cavity system. We observe branches and interference fringes known from quantum point contacts coexisting with irregular conductance fluctuations. Unlike the branches, the fluctuations cover the entire area of the cavity. In contrast to previous studies, we observe and investigate branches under the influence of the confining stadium potential, which is gradually built up. We find that the branches exist only in the area surrounded by cavity top gates. As the stadium shrinks, regular fringes originate from tip-induced constrictions leading to quantized conduction. In addition, we observe arclike areas reminiscent of classical electron trajectories in a chaotic cavity. We also argue that electrons emanating from the quantum point contact spread out like a fan leaving branchlike regions of enhanced backscattering.

  8. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  9. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2017-02-20

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local analysis. In this study, lattice constants of cubic STN and cubic YSZ in the pure materials and in co-sintered composites were measured from their EBSPs acquired at 10 kV using a silicon single crystal as a calibration reference. The EBSP distortion was corrected by spherical back projection and Kikuchi band analysis was made using in-house software. The error of the lattice constant measurement was determined to be in the range of 0.09-1.12% compared to values determined by XRD and from literature. The confidence level of the method is indicated by the standard deviation of the measurement, which is approximately 0.04 Å. Studying Kikuchi band size dependence of the measurement precision shows that the measurement error decays with increasing band size (i.e. decreasing lattice constant). However, in practice, the sharpness of wide bands tends to be low due to their low intensity, thus limiting the measurement precision. Possible methods to improve measurement precision are suggested.

  10. Automated twin identification technique for use with electron backscatter diffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrie, B. L. (Benjamin Lyman); Mason, T. A. (Thomas A.); Bingert, J. F. (John F.)

    2004-01-01

    Historically, twinning information has been obtained by optical microscopy, TEM, and neutron diffraction. Recent research has shown that automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) can be used to extract reliable twinning statistics. An automated twin identification technique for use with EBSD has facilitated a greater understanding of deformation twinning in materials. The key features of this automated framework are the use of the crystallographic definition of twin relationships, the inclination of the common K, plane at a twin boundary, and the correct identification of the parent orientation in a parent/twin pair. The complex nature of the parent/twin interactions required the use of a voting scheme to correctly identify parent orientations. In those few cases were the voting scheme was unable to determine parent orientation (< 2 pct) the algorithm allows for manual selection. Twin area fractions are categorized by operative twin systems along with secondary and tertiary twinning. These statistics are reported for {alpha}-zirconium and 316L stainless steel. These improved twin statistics can help quantify deformation processes as well as provide validation of plasticity models for materials that exhibit deformation twinning.

  11. Temperature dependence of erythrocyte aggregation in vitro by backscattering nephelometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirko, Igor V.; Firsov, Nikolai N.; Ryaboshapka, Olga M.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.

    1997-05-01

    We apply backscattering nephelometry technique to register the alterations of the scattering signal from a whole blood sample due to appearance or disappearance of different types of erythrocyte aggregates in stasis and under controlled shear stress. The measured parameters are: the characteristic times of linear and 3D aggregates formation, and the strength of aggregates of different types. These parameters depend on the sample temperature in the range of 2 divided by 50 degrees C. Temporal parameters of the aggregation process strongly increase at temperature 45 degrees C. For samples of normal blood the aggregates strength parameters do not significantly depend on the sample temperature, whereas for blood samples from patients suffering Sjogren syndrome we observe high increase of the strength of 3D and linear aggregates and decrease of time of linear aggregates formation at low temperature of the sample. This combination of parameters is opposite to that observed in the samples of pathological blood at room temperature. Possible reasons of this behavior of aggregation state of blood and explanation of the observed effects will be discussed.

  12. Doppler backscatter properties of a blood-mimicking fluid for Doppler performance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarine, K V; Hoskins, P R; Routh, H F; Davidson, F

    1999-01-01

    The Doppler backscatter properties of a blood-mimickig fluid (BMF) were studied to evaluate its suitability for use in a Doppler flow test object. Measurements were performed using a flow rig with C-flex tubing and BMF flow produced by a roller pump or a gear pump. A SciMed Doppler system was used to measure the backscattered Doppler power with a root-mean-square power meter connected to the audio output. Studies investigated the dependence of the backscattered Doppler power of the BMF with: circulation time; batch and operator preparations; storage; sieve size; flow speed; and pump type. A comparison was made with human red blood cells resuspended in saline. The backscatter properties are stable and within International Electrotechnical Commission requirements. The BMF is suitable for use in a test object for Doppler performance assessment.

  13. Characterizing biogenous sediments using multibeam echosounder backscatter data - Estimating power law parameter utilizing various models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.

    In this paper, Helmholtz-Kirchhoff (H-K) roughness model is employed to characterize seafloor sediment and roughness parameters from the eastern sector of the Southern Oceans The multibeam- Hydroswcep system's angular-backscatter data, which...

  14. Landmine detection method combined with backscattering neutrons and capture {gamma}-rays from hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: ytaka@rri.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Shiroya, Seiji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokashou, Uji-shi, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    The usefulness of the measurements of the backscattering neutron and 2.22 MeV capture {gamma}-ray from hydrogen in the landmine detection method is described in this paper. When the soil moisture content is increased, the reaction rates of both the neutron scattering reaction and capture reaction are increased. However, the backscattering neutrons are more influenced than the capture {gamma}-rays by the soil moisture before the reaction with the detector. The facts that the backscattering neutron method is useful in the dry soil case and that the capture {gamma}-ray method is effective in well-wet soil case are confirmed by the experiments and the calculations. The landmine detection efficiency is improved in various soil moisture conditions by combining the backscattering neutron method together with the capture {gamma}-ray method. The effectiveness of the pulse mode operation was confirmed numerically.

  15. Landmine detection method combined with backscattering neutrons and capture γ-rays from hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Shiroya, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi

    2011-07-01

    The usefulness of the measurements of the backscattering neutron and 2.22MeV capture γ-ray from hydrogen in the landmine detection method is described in this paper. When the soil moisture content is increased, the reaction rates of both the neutron scattering reaction and capture reaction are increased. However, the backscattering neutrons are more influenced than the capture γ-rays by the soil moisture before the reaction with the detector. The facts that the backscattering neutron method is useful in the dry soil case and that the capture γ-ray method is effective in well-wet soil case are confirmed by the experiments and the calculations. The landmine detection efficiency is improved in various soil moisture conditions by combining the backscattering neutron method together with the capture γ-ray method. The effectiveness of the pulse mode operation was confirmed numerically.

  16. Seabottom characterization using multibeam echosounder angular backscatter: An application of the composite roughness theory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.; Kodagali, V.N.; Hagen, R.

    Composite roughness theory is used to characterize Southern Ocean bottom backscatter (multibeam) data. Spectral parameters based on Helmholtz-Kirchhof's theory (1) are determined from measured near-normal incidence values. A splicing technique using...

  17. Simrad em3002d Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  18. Sea Floor Topography and Backscatter Intensity of the Historic Area Remediation Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes topography and backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS), located offshore of New York and New...

  19. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from the islands and banks in the Mariana archipelago, 2007.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the Mariana archipelago between the U.S. Territory of Guam and Uracas Island in the Commonwealth...

  20. CRED 1 meter resolution Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Wake Island, West Central Pacific, 2007.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.These data provide coverage between 0 and 200m meters. The...

  1. Backscatter 0.5m TIFF Mosaic of St. Croix (Buck Island), US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore of Buck Island, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography...

  2. Backscatter 0.5m TIFF Mosaic of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team and...

  3. High-resolution multibeam backscatter data - northern Channel Islands region, southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release presents data for 5-m resolution acoustic-backscatter data of the northern Channel Islands region, southern California. The raster data files are...

  4. Backscattering Light Model of Seawater for Modulated Lidar Based on the Stationarity of Light Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hang; MA Yong; LIANG Kun; WANG Hong-yuan

    2007-01-01

    The backscattering signal, which arises from the pulsed laser traveling through water, has limited the lidar system sensitivity and underwater target contrast. The transmitted optical carrier is modulated to be ultrashort pulsed laser and i t is effective to suppress the backscattering to adopt the coherent detection technology by identifying the modulation envelope. A nonstationary light field is formed in seawater by the ultrashort pulsed laser. The inherent relationship between the nonstationary light field formed by modulated lidar and the stationary light field formed by conventional lidar was discussed and the backscattering light model of the stationary light field for the ultrashort pulsed laser was proposed. The backscattering signal in modulated lidar system was processed and analyzed in the frequency domain on the basis of the model.

  5. Brillouin backscattering from a double-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser incident on planar targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decoste, R.; Lavigne, P.; Pepin, H.; Mitchel, G.R.; Kieffer, J.

    1982-05-01

    The Brillouin backscattering instability is studied for a range of preformed plasma conditions and using a CO/sub 2/ laser in the 10/sup 12/--10/sup 13/ W/cm/sup 2/ regime. A short prepulse is incident on a planar target ahead of the main-pulse to produce the preformed plasma. The instability appears in a short burst of back-reflected light. Saturation of the backscatter level is observed for an individual increase of the prepulse energy, main-pulse intensity, and prepulse-to-main-pulse delay. Ion Landau damping is strong and average back-reflected intensities are limited to less than 30% of incident. Backscattered light spectra suggest that the critical surface is involved in the backscatter process when the laser beam is at best focus onto the target surface. Otherwise, the spectral signature is similar to those obtained from underdense plasmas.

  6. Atmospheric aerosol load morphological classification and retrieved visibility based on lidar backscatter measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the tropospheric aerosol load morphological classification and its impact on temporal variation of visibility are investigated using a continuous 23-hour single channel CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR backscatter measurement. The trajectory...

  7. A Compact In Situ Sensor for Measurement of Absorption and Backscattering in Natural Waters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an active sensor for in situ measurement of the inherent optical properties (IOPs) absorption and backscattering at multiple wavelengths....

  8. Influence of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscatter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. H.; Liu, A. D., E-mail: lad@ustc.edu.cn; Zhou, C.; Hu, J. Q.; Wang, M. Y.; Yu, C. X.; Liu, W. D.; Li, H.; Lan, T.; Xie, J. L. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents the first investigation of the effect of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscattering. A liquid lithium limiter has been applied in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), and a Doppler backscattering has been installed in the EAST. A parabolic mirror and a flat mirror located in the vacuum vessel are polluted by lithium. An identical optical system of the Doppler backscattering is set up in laboratory. The power distributions of the emission beam after the two mirrors with and without lithium coating (cleaned before and after), are measured at three different distances under four incident frequencies. The results demonstrate that the influence of the lithium coating on the power distributions are very slight, and the Doppler backscattering can work normally under the dosage of lithium during the 2014 EAST campaign.

  9. High-resolution multibeam backscatter data - northern Channel Islands region, southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release presents data for 5-m resolution acoustic-backscatter data of the northern Channel Islands region, southern California. The raster data files are...

  10. Fine scale analyses of a coralline bank mapped using multi-beam backscatter data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, A.A.A.; Naik, M.; Fernandes, W.A.; Haris, K.; Chakraborty, B.; Estiberio, S.; Lohani, R.B.

    unsupervised self-organizing maps (SOM) architecture is used to determine the existence of six classes. Thereafter, 55 segments were identified for data segmentation, employing six profiles selected from the backscatter maps, using the fuzzy c-means (FCM...

  11. NOAA TIFF Graphic- 0.5m Backscatter Mosaic of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team and...

  12. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  13. Clustering Coefficients in Multiplex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzo, Emanuele; De Domenico, Manlio; Solé, Albert; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio; Porter, Mason A; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of complex networked systems has highlighted that our interconnected world is made of networks that are coupled together through different layers that each stand for one type of interaction or system. Despite this situation, it is traditional to aggregate multiplex data into a single weighted network in order take advantage of existing tools. This is admittedly convenient, but it is also extremely problematic. In this paper, we generalize the concept of clustering coefficients for multiplex networks. We show how the layered structure of multiplex networks introduces a new degree of freedom that has a fundamental effect on transitivity. We compute our new multiplex clustering coefficients for several real multiplex networks and illustrate why generalizing monoplex concepts to multiplex networks must be done with great care.

  14. Calibration of ultrasound backscatter temperature imaging for high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Ter Haar, Gail; Morris, Hugh; Coussios, Constantin; Friend, Peter; Bamber, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is rapidly gaining acceptance as a non-invasive method for soft tissue tumor ablation, but improvements in the methods of treatment delivery, planning and monitoring are still required. Backscatter temperature imaging (BTI) uses ultrasound to visualize heating-induced echo strain and may be used to indicate the position of the HIFU focal region using low-power "sub-lesioning" exposure. The technique may also provide a quantitative tool for assessing the efficacy of treatment delivery if apparent strain measurements can be related to the underlying temperature rise. To obtain temperature estimates from strain measurements, the relationship between these variables has to be either measured or otherwise assumed from previous calibrations in similar tissues. This article describes experimental measurements aimed at deriving the relationship between temperature rise and apparent strain in the laboratory environment using both ex vivo bovine liver tissue samples and normothermically perfused porcine livers. A BTI algorithm was applied to radiofrequency ultrasound echo data acquired from a clinical ultrasound scanner (Z.One, Zonare Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA, USA) where the imaging probe was aligned with the focal region of a HIFU transducer. Temperature measurements were obtained using needle thermocouples implanted in the liver tissue. A series of "non-ablative" HIFU exposures giving peak temperatures below 10°C were made in three separate ex vivo bovine livers, yielding an average strain/temperature coefficient of 0.126 ± 0.088 percentage strain per degree Celsius. In the perfused porcine livers at a starting temperature of 38°C (normal body temperature) the strain/temperature coefficients were found to be 0.040 ± 0.029 percentage strain per degree Celsius. The uncertainty in these results is directly linked to the precision of the strain measurement, as well as the naturally occurring variance between different

  15. Nonlinear frequency shift in Raman backscattering and its implications for plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, D.; Hafizi, B.; Palastro, J. P.; Ting, A.; Helle, M. H.; Chen, Y.-H.; Jones, T. G.; Gordon, D. F.

    2016-12-01

    Raman backscattered radiation of intense laser pulses in plasmas is investigated for a wide range of intensities relevant to laser wakefield acceleration. The weakly nonlinear dispersion relation for Raman backscattering predicts an intensity and density dependent frequency shift that is opposite to that suggested by a simple relativistic consideration. This observation has been benchmarked against experimental results, providing a novel diagnostic for laser-plasma interactions.

  16. Nonlinear Frequency Shift in Raman Backscattering and its Implications for Plasma Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaganovich, D; Palastro, J P; Ting, A; Helle, M H; Chen, Y -H; Jones, T G; Gordon, D F

    2016-01-01

    Raman backscattered radiation of intense laser pulses in plasma is investigated for a wide range of intensities relevant to laser wakefield acceleration. The weakly nonlinear dispersion relation for Raman backscattering predicts an intensity and density dependent frequency shift that is opposite to that suggested by a simple relativistic consideration. This observation has been benchmarked against experimental results, providing a novel diagnostic for laser-plasma interactions.

  17. MEASURING THE PARTICULATE BACKSCATTERING OF INLAND WATERS: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Campbell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine whether the standard particulate backscattering IOP (Inherent Optical Properties measurement method could be simplified. IOP measurements are essential for parameterising several forms of algorithms used to estimate water quality parameters from airborne and satellite images. Field measurements of the backscattering IOPs are more difficult to make than absorption measurements as correction of the raw Hydroscat-6 backscattering sensor observations is required to allow for the systematic errors associated with the water and water quality parameter absorption. The standard approach involves making simultaneous measurement of the absorption and attenuation of the water with an absorption and attenuation meter (ac-9 or making assumptions about the particulate backscattering probability. Recently, a number of papers have been published that use an alternative method to retrieve the particulate backscattering spectrum by using laboratory measured absorption values and in situ spectroradiometric observations. The alternative method inverts a model of reflectance iteratively using non-linear least squares fitting to solve for the particulate backscattering at 532 nm (bbp0(532 and the particulate backscattering spectral slope (γ. In this paper, eleven observations made at Burdekin Falls Dam, Australia are used to compare the alternative reflectance method to the conventional corrected Hydroscat-6 observations. Assessment of the alternative reflectance method showed that the result of the inversions were highly dependent on the starting conditions. To overcome this limitation, Particle Swarm Optimisation, a stochastic search technique which includes a random element in the search approach, was used. It was found that when compared to the conventionally corrected Hydroscat-6 observations, the alternative reflectance method underestimated bbp0(532 by approximately 50% and overestimated γ by approximately 40

  18. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozaimi Che Hasan

    Full Text Available Multibeam echosounders (MBES are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with

  19. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam echosounders (MBES) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF) machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with their derivatives

  20. Multi-beam backscatter image data processing techniques employed to EM 1002 system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, W.A.; Chakraborty, B.

    algorithm applies to raw backscatter intensities during normalization process. More detail study of the software is demonstrated using a flow diagram flowed by the stage by stage discussion in subsequent sections (Figure 1). III. DATA EXTRACTION... contribution no.xxxx. - 9 - REFERENCES: [1] Hughes Clarke JE (1993) The potential for seabed classification using backscatter from shallow water multibeam sonars. Proc Inst Acoustics 15(part2):381–387. [2] Chakraborty B and Kodagali, V Baracho J...