WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume approach element

  1. An element-based finite-volume method approach for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcondes, Francisco [Federal University of Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Material Science], e-mail: marcondes@ufc.br; Varavei, Abdoljalil; Sepehrnoori, Kamy [The University of Texas at Austin (United States). Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Dept.], e-mails: varavei@mail.utexas.edu, kamys@mail.utexas.edu

    2010-07-01

    An element-based finite-volume approach in conjunction with unstructured grids for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation is presented. In this approach, both the discrete fracture and the matrix mass balances are taken into account without any additional models to couple the matrix and discrete fractures. The mesh, for two dimensional domains, can be built of triangles, quadrilaterals, or a mix of these elements. However, due to the available mesh generator to handle both matrix and discrete fractures, only results using triangular elements will be presented. The discrete fractures are located along the edges of each element. To obtain the approximated matrix equation, each element is divided into three sub-elements and then the mass balance equations for each component are integrated along each interface of the sub-elements. The finite-volume conservation equations are assembled from the contribution of all the elements that share a vertex, creating a cell vertex approach. The discrete fracture equations are discretized only along the edges of each element and then summed up with the matrix equations in order to obtain a conservative equation for both matrix and discrete fractures. In order to mimic real field simulations, the capillary pressure is included in both matrix and discrete fracture media. In the implemented model, the saturation field in the matrix and discrete fractures can be different, but the potential of each phase in the matrix and discrete fracture interface needs to be the same. The results for several naturally fractured reservoirs are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. (author)

  2. Identifying Structure-Property Relationships Through DREAM.3D Representative Volume Elements and DAMASK Crystal Plasticity Simulations: An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Martin; Groeber, Michael; Haase, Christian; Molodov, Dmitri A.; Roters, Franz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-03-01

    Predicting, understanding, and controlling the mechanical behavior is the most important task when designing structural materials. Modern alloy systems—in which multiple deformation mechanisms, phases, and defects are introduced to overcome the inverse strength-ductility relationship—give raise to multiple possibilities for modifying the deformation behavior, rendering traditional, exclusively experimentally-based alloy development workflows inappropriate. For fast and efficient alloy design, it is therefore desirable to predict the mechanical performance of candidate alloys by simulation studies to replace time- and resource-consuming mechanical tests. Simulation tools suitable for this task need to correctly predict the mechanical behavior in dependence of alloy composition, microstructure, texture, phase fractions, and processing history. Here, an integrated computational materials engineering approach based on the open source software packages DREAM.3D and DAMASK (Düsseldorf Advanced Materials Simulation Kit) that enables such virtual material development is presented. More specific, our approach consists of the following three steps: (1) acquire statistical quantities that describe a microstructure, (2) build a representative volume element based on these quantities employing DREAM.3D, and (3) evaluate the representative volume using a predictive crystal plasticity material model provided by DAMASK. Exemplarily, these steps are here conducted for a high-manganese steel.

  3. Identifying Structure-Property Relationships Through DREAM.3D Representative Volume Elements and DAMASK Crystal Plasticity Simulations: An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Martin; Groeber, Michael; Haase, Christian; Molodov, Dmitri A.; Roters, Franz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-05-01

    Predicting, understanding, and controlling the mechanical behavior is the most important task when designing structural materials. Modern alloy systems—in which multiple deformation mechanisms, phases, and defects are introduced to overcome the inverse strength-ductility relationship—give raise to multiple possibilities for modifying the deformation behavior, rendering traditional, exclusively experimentally-based alloy development workflows inappropriate. For fast and efficient alloy design, it is therefore desirable to predict the mechanical performance of candidate alloys by simulation studies to replace time- and resource-consuming mechanical tests. Simulation tools suitable for this task need to correctly predict the mechanical behavior in dependence of alloy composition, microstructure, texture, phase fractions, and processing history. Here, an integrated computational materials engineering approach based on the open source software packages DREAM.3D and DAMASK (Düsseldorf Advanced Materials Simulation Kit) that enables such virtual material development is presented. More specific, our approach consists of the following three steps: (1) acquire statistical quantities that describe a microstructure, (2) build a representative volume element based on these quantities employing DREAM.3D, and (3) evaluate the representative volume using a predictive crystal plasticity material model provided by DAMASK. Exemplarily, these steps are here conducted for a high-manganese steel.

  4. A finite volume approach to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element using local analytical solution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, A. [Atomic Energy Authority (AEA), Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center

    2014-11-15

    In this paper we implement the local analytical solution technique to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element. This method has shown to be very accurate in estimating the temperature field for axisymmetric problems even for coarse mesh. It is shown that this method reduces to the analytical solution for unidirectional heat transfer in the radial direction in homogeneous media. The technique is based on finding an analytical expression for the temperature field in the radial direction within each grid cell. This means that the temperature field in each cell is allowed to change in a nonlinear fashion along the radial direction. We compare this technique with the traditional finite volume technique and show that; with only few cells in the radial direction, this technique arrives at the mesh-independent solution quite accurately whereas it required denser mesh to arrive closer to this solution using traditional techniques. This method is proposed to the 1D codes that are currently being used to simulate thermalhydraulic characteristics of reactor systems. Furthermore, we also implement the experimental temperature field algorithm in which the governing equations are approximated for each cell as it would without extra manipulation to the governing equations. This technique is very simple and separates the physics from the solving part.

  5. New Physics From A Dynamical Volume Element

    CERN Document Server

    Kaganovich, A B; Nissimov, E; Pacheva, S; Kaganovich, Alexander; Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2004-01-01

    The use in the action integral of a volume element of the form $\\Phi d^{D}x$ where $\\Phi$ is a metric independent measure can give new interesting results in all types of known generally coordinate invariant theories: (1) 4-D theories of gravity plus matter fields; (2) Reparametrization invariant theories of extended objects; (3) Higher dimensional theories. In the case (1), a large number of new effects appears: under normal particle physics conditions (primordial) fermions split into three families; when matter is highly diluted, neutrinos increase their mass and can contribute both to dark energy and to dark matter. In the case (2), it leads to dynamically induced tension; to string models of non abelian confinement; to the possibility of new Weyl-conformally invariant light-like branes which dynamically adjust themselves to sit at black hole horizons; in the context of higher dimensional theories it can provide examples of massless 4-D particles with nontrivial Kaluza Klein quantum numbers. In the case (3...

  6. Diagonal multi-soliton matrix elements in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Pálmai, T

    2012-01-01

    We consider diagonal matrix elements of local operators between multi-soliton states in finite volume in the sine-Gordon model, and formulate a conjecture regarding their finite size dependence which is valid up to corrections exponential in the volume. This conjecture extends the results of Pozsgay and Tak\\'acs which were only valid for diagonal scattering. In order to test the conjecture we implement a numerical renormalization group improved truncated conformal space approach. The numerical comparisons confirm the conjecture, which is expected to be valid for general integrable field theories. The conjectured formula can be used to evaluate finite temperature one-point and two-point functions using recently developed methods.

  7. Design of Finite Element Tools for Coupled Surface and Volume Meshes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel K(o)ster; Oliver Kriessl; Kunibert G. Siebert

    2008-01-01

    Many problems with underlying variational structure involve a coupling of volume with surface effects. A straight-forward approach in a finite element discretization is to make use of the surface triangulation that is naturally induced by the volume triangulation. In an adaptive method one wants to facilitate "matching" local mesh modifications, i.e., local refinement and/or coarsening, of volume and surface mesh with standard tools such that the surface grid is always induced by the volume grid. We describe the concepts behind this approach for bisectional refinement and describe new tools incorporated in the finite element toolbox ALBERTA. We also present several important applications of the mesh coupling.

  8. Mortar Upwind Finite Volume Element Method with Crouzeix-Raviart Element for Parabolic Convection Diffusion Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element method with the Crouzeix-Raviart element for the parabolic convection diffusion problems.It is proved that the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element approximations derived are convergent in the H1- and L2-norms.

  9. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  10. MORTAR FINITE VOLUME METHOD WITH ADINI ELEMENT FOR BIHARMONIC PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-jia Bi; Li-kang Li

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we construct and analyse a mortar finite volume method for the dis-cretization for the biharmonic problem in R2. This method is based on the mortar-type Adini nonconforming finite element spaces. The optimal order H2-seminorm error estimate between the exact solution and the mortar Adini finite volume solution of the biharmonic equation is established.

  11. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  12. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  13. A FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR THERMAL CONVECTION PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮洪兴

    2004-01-01

    Consider the finite volume element method for the thermal convection problem with the infinite Prandtl number. The author uses a conforming piecewise linear function on a fine triangulation for velocity and temperature, and a piecewise constant function on a coarse triangulation for pressure. For general triangulation the optimal order H1 norm error estimates are given.

  14. Experimental Finite Element Approach for Stress Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Erklig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determining the strain gauge location points in the problems of stress concentration, and it includes both experimental and numerical results. Strain gauges were proposed to be positioned to corresponding locations on beam and blocks to related node of elements of finite element models. Linear and nonlinear cases were studied. Cantilever beam problem was selected as the linear case to approve the approach and conforming contact problem was selected as the nonlinear case. An identical mesh structure was prepared for the finite element and the experimental models. The finite element analysis was carried out with ANSYS. It was shown that the results of the experimental and the numerical studies were in good agreement.

  15. Representative volume element of asphalt pavement for electromagnetic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhi Pellinen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for this study was to investigate the representative volume element (RVE needed to correlate the nondestructive electromagnetic (EM measurements with the conventional destructive asphalt pavement quality control measurements. A large pavement rehabilitation contract was used as the test site for the experiment. Pavement cores were drilled from the same locations where the stationary and continuous Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR measurements were obtained. Laboratory measurements included testing the bulk density of cores using two methods, the surface-saturated dry method and determining bulk density by dimensions. Also, Vector Network Analyzer (VNA and the through specimen transmission configuration were employed at microwave frequencies to measure the reference dielectric constant of cores using two different footprint areas and therefore volume elements. The RVE for EM measurements turns out to be frequency dependent; therefore in addition to being dependent on asphalt mixture type and method of obtaining bulk density, it is dependent on the resolution of the EM method used. Then, although the average bulk property results agreed with theoretical formulations of higher core air void content giving a lower dielectric constant, for the individual cores there was no correlation for the VNA measurements because the volume element seizes deviated. Similarly, GPR technique was unable to capture the spatial variation of pavement air voids measured from the 150-mm drill cores. More research is needed to determine the usable RVE for asphalt.

  16. Finite element modeling for volume phantom in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Rybina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Using surface phantom, "shadows" of currents, which flow below and under surface tomographic lays, include on this lay, that is cause of adding errors in reconstruction image. For processing modeling in studied object volume isotropic finite elements should be used. Cube is chosen for finite element modeling in this work. Cube is modeled as sum of six rectangular (in the base pyramids, each pyramid consists of four triangular pyramids (with rectangular triangle in the base and hypotenuse, which is equal to cube rib to provide its uniformity and electrical definition. In the case of modeling on frequencies higher than 100 kHz biological tissue resistivities are complex. In this case weight coefficient k will be complex in received cube electrical model (inverse conductivity matrix of the cube finite element.

  17. Determining matrix elements and resonance widths from finite volume: the dangerous mu-terms

    CERN Document Server

    Takacs, G

    2011-01-01

    The standard numerical approach to determining matrix elements of local operators and width of resonances uses the finite volume dependence of energy levels and matrix elements. Finite size corrections that decay exponentially in the volume are usually neglected or taken into account using perturbation expansion in effective field theory. Using two-dimensional sine-Gordon field theory as "toy model" it is shown that some exponential finite size effects could be much larger than previously thought, potentially spoiling the determination of matrix elements in frameworks such as lattice QCD. The particular class of finite size corrections considered here are mu-terms arising from bound state poles in the scattering amplitudes. In sine-Gordon model, these can be explicitly evaluated and shown to explain the observed discrepancies to high precision. It is argued that the effects observed are not special to the two-dimensional setting, but rather depend on general field theoretic features that are common with model...

  18. Investigations on Actuator Dynamics through Theoretical and Finite Element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somashekhar S. Hiremath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a new approach for modeling the fluid-structure interaction of servovalve component-actuator. The analyzed valve is a precision flow control valve-jet pipe electrohydraulic servovalve. The positioning of an actuator depends upon the flow rate from control ports, in turn depends on the spool position. Theoretical investigation is made for No-load condition and Load condition for an actuator. These are used in finite element modeling of an actuator. The fluid-structure-interaction (FSI is established between the piston and the fluid cavities at the piston end. The fluid cavities were modeled with special purpose hydrostatic fluid elements while the piston is modeled with brick elements. The finite element method is used to simulate the variation of cavity pressure, cavity volume, mass flow rate, and the actuator velocity. The finite element analysis is extended to study the system's linearized response to harmonic excitation using direct solution steady-state dynamics. It was observed from the analysis that the natural frequency of the actuator depends upon the position of the piston in the cylinder. This is a close match with theoretical and simulation results. The effect of bulk modulus is also presented in the paper.

  19. Dynamical Volume Element in Scale-Invariant and Supergravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Pacheva, Svetlana; Vasihoun, Mahary

    2013-01-01

    The use in the action integral of a volume element of the form $\\Phi d^{D}x$, where $\\Phi$ is a metric-independent measure density, can yield new interesting results in all types of known generally coordinate-invariant theories: (1) 4-D theories of gravity plus matter fields; (2) reparametrization invariant theories of extended objects (strings and branes); (3) supergravity theories. In case (1) we obtain interesting insights concerning the cosmological constant problem, inflation and quintessence without the fifth force problem. In case (2) the above formalism leads to dynamically induced tension and to string models of non-abelian confinement. In case (3), we show that the modified-measure supergravity generates an arbitrary dynamically induced cosmological constant.

  20. The element-based finite volume method applied to petroleum reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordazzo, Jonas; Maliska, Clovis R.; Silva, Antonio F.C. da; Hurtado, Fernando S.V. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2004-07-01

    In this work a numerical model for simulating petroleum reservoirs using the Element-based Finite Volume Method (EbFVM) is presented. The method employs unstructured grids using triangular and/or quadrilateral elements, such that complex reservoir geometries can be easily represented. Due to the control-volume approach, local mass conservation is enforced, permitting a direct physical interpretation of the resulting discrete equations. It is demonstrated that this method can deal with the permeability maps without averaging procedures, since this scheme assumes uniform properties inside elements, instead inside of control volumes, avoiding the need of weighting the permeability values at the control volumes interfaces. Moreover, it is easy to include the full permeability tensor in this method, which is an important issue in simulating heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs. Finally, a comparison among the results obtained using the scheme proposed in this work in the EbFVM framework with those obtained employing the scheme commonly used in petroleum reservoir simulation is presented. It is also shown that the scheme proposed is less susceptible to the grid orientation effect with the increasing of the mobility ratio. (author)

  1. A Mixed Finite Volume Element Method for Flow Calculations in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jim E.

    1996-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of flow in porous media is the accurate determination of the velocities that drive the flow. The large scale irregularities of the geology, such as faults, fractures, and layers suggest the use of irregular grids in the simulation. Work has been done in applying the finite volume element (FVE) methodology as developed by McCormick in conjunction with mixed methods which were developed by Raviart and Thomas. The resulting mixed finite volume element discretization scheme has the potential to generate more accurate solutions than standard approaches. The focus of this paper is on a multilevel algorithm for solving the discrete mixed FVE equations. The algorithm uses a standard cell centered finite difference scheme as the 'coarse' level and the more accurate mixed FVE scheme as the 'fine' level. The algorithm appears to have potential as a fast solver for large size simulations of flow in porous media.

  2. An hybrid finite volume finite element method for variable density incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaro, Caterina; Creusé, Emmanuel; Goudon, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of variable density incompressible flows, modeled by the Navier-Stokes system. We introduce an hybrid scheme which combines a finite volume approach for treating the mass conservation equation and a finite element method to deal with the momentum equation and the divergence free constraint. The breakthrough relies on the definition of a suitable footbridge between the two methods, through the design of compatibility condition. In turn, the method is very flexible and allows to deal with unstructured meshes. Several numerical tests are performed to show the scheme capabilities. In particular, the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution is carefully investigated.

  3. A hybrid transfinite element approach for nonlinear transient thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1987-01-01

    A new computational approach for transient nonlinear thermal analysis of structures is proposed. It is a hybrid approach which combines the modeling versatility of contemporary finite elements in conjunction with transform methods and classical Bubnov-Galerkin schemes. The present study is limited to nonlinearities due to temperature-dependent thermophysical properties. Numerical test cases attest to the basic capabilities and therein validate the transfinite element approach by means of comparisons with conventional finite element schemes and/or available solutions.

  4. Parmelia sulcata lichen transplants positioning towards wind direction (Part I): precipitation volumes, total element deposition and lichen element content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, A.P.; Freitas, M.C.; Wolterbeek, H. Th.; Verburg, T.

    2009-01-01

    Parmelia sulcata transplants were used in three different exposure systems, focused on three different influxes: free influx, horizontal influx and vertical influx. The total element deposition and the precipitation volumes were found to be positively correlated for Fe and Ni only. The element conte

  5. Effect of Fiber Geometry and Representative Volume Element on Elastic and Thermal Properties of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Bhaskara Rao Devireddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present work is focused on the evaluation of elastic and thermal properties of unidirectional fiber-reinforced polymer composites with different volume fractions of fiber up to 0.7 using micromechanical approach. Two ways for calculating the material properties, that is, analytical and numerical approaches, were presented. In numerical approach, finite element analysis was used to evaluate the elastic modulus and thermal conductivity of composite from the constituent material properties. The finite element model based on three-dimensional micromechanical representative volume element (RVE with a square and hexagonal packing geometry was implemented by using finite element code ANSYS. Circular cross section of fiber and square cross section of fiber were considered to develop RVE. The periodic boundary conditions are applied to the RVE to calculate elastic modulus of composite. The steady state heat transfer simulations were performed in thermal analysis to calculate thermal conductivity of composite. In analytical approach, the elastic modulus is calculated by rule of mixture, Halpin-Tsai model, and periodic microstructure. Thermal conductivity is calculated analytically by using rule of mixture, the Chawla model, and the Hashin model. The material properties obtained using finite element techniques were compared with different analytical methods and good agreement was achieved. The results are affected by a number of parameters such as volume fraction of the fibers, geometry of fiber, and RVE.

  6. Study of Automatic Fiber Placement Manipulator’s Robotic Kinematics Manipulability Based on Volume Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Xinfeng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The method is proposed based on volume element in order to measure the manipulator’s robotic kinematics manipulability. Then studied the series redundant automatic fiber placement robotic manipulator’s operation space, draw the conclusion that the greater of the robotic manipulator’s operation space volume, the better of the robotic manipulator’s manipulability, volume element based on redundant robotic manipulator’s kinematics is proposed as an operational performance index. n-DOF serial robotic manipulator’s operation space is n-dimensional Riemannian manifold, the n-dimensional Riemannian manifold volume is calculated using the moving coordinate system and the exterior product definition in differential geometry and get the robotic manipulator’s operation space volume then compared the obtained results with the operation space volume using inner product determinant in the literature, it shows that the volume element as a kinematics operational performance index is feasible.

  7. Multiphase control volume finite element simulations of fractured reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao

    With rapid evolution of hardware and software techniques in energy sector, reservoir simulation has become a powerful tool for field development planning and reservoir management. Many of the widely used commercial simulators were originally designed for structured grids and implemented with finite difference method (FDM). In recent years, technical advances in griding, fluid modeling, linear solver, reservoir and geological modeling, etc. have created new opportunities. At the same time, new reservoir simulation technology is required for solving large-scale heterogeneous problems. A three-dimensional, three-phase black-oil reservoir simulator has been developed using the control volume finite element (CVFE) formulation. Flux-based upstream weighting is employed to ensure flux continuity. The CVFE method is embedded in a fully-implicit formulation. State-of-the-art parallel, linear solvers are used. The implementation takes the advantages of object-oriented programming capabilities of C++ to provide maximum reuse and extensibility for future students. The results from the simulator have excellent agreement with those from commercial simulators. The convergence properties of the new simulator are verified using the method of manufactured solutions. The pressure and saturation solutions are verified to be first-order convergent as expected. The efficiency of the simulators and their capability to handle real large-scale field models are improved by implementing the models in parallel. Another aspect of the work dealt with multiphase flow of fractured reservoirs was performed. The discrete-fracture model is implemented in the simulator. Fractures and faults are represented by lines and planes in two- and three-dimensional spaces, respectively. The difficult task of generating an unstructured mesh for complex domains with fractures and faults is accomplished in this study. Applications of this model for two-phase and three-phase simulations in a variety of fractured

  8. Integral equations and boundary-element solution for static potential in a general piece-wise homogeneous volume conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, Matti

    2016-11-01

    Boundary element methods (BEM) are used for forward computation of bioelectromagnetic fields in multi-compartment volume conductor models. Most BEM approaches assume that each compartment is in contact with at most one external compartment. In this work, I present a general surface integral equation and BEM discretization that remove this limitation and allow BEM modeling of general piecewise-homogeneous medium. The new integral equation allows positioning of field points at junctioned boundary of more than two compartments, enabling the use of linear collocation BEM in such a complex geometry. A modular BEM implementation is presented for linear collocation and Galerkin approaches, starting from the standard formulation. The approach and resulting solver are verified in four ways, including comparisons of volume and surface potentials to those obtained using the finite element method (FEM), and the effect of a hole in skull on electroencephalographic scalp potentials is demonstrated.

  9. An approach to elemental task learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmans, P

    1990-01-01

    In this article we deal with the automated learning of tasks by a robotic system through observation of a human operator. Particularly, we explain what is meant by a learning ability in autonomous robots and in teleoperation systems, where several operators and several machines may work in cooperation to perform tasks. We discuss different approaches to learning in these systems and outline the features of the models they are based upon. This leads us to choose an analytical model suited for tasks analysis. We then present the software architecture for our proposed approach and show the first results obtained on sample tests. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Energy-preserving finite volume element method for the improved Boussinesq equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanxiang; Zhang, Zhiyue; Zhang, Xinhua; Zhu, Quanyong

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we design an energy-preserving finite volume element scheme for solving the initial boundary problems of the improved Boussinesq equation. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed numerical schemes can conserve the energy and mass. Numerical experiments are performed to illustrate the efficiency of the scheme and theoretical analysis. While the results demonstrate that the proposed finite volume element scheme is second-order accuracy in space and time. Moreover, the new scheme can conserve mass and energy.

  11. An implicit control-volume finite element method for well-reservoir modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Salinas, Pablo; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Here a novel implicit approach (embodied within the IC-Ferst) is presented for modelling wells with potentially a large number of laterals within reservoirs. IC-Ferst is a conservative and consistent, control-volume finite element method (CV-FEM) model and fully unstructured/geology conforming meshes with anisotropic mesh adaptivity. As far as the wells are concerned, a multi-phase/multi-well approach, where well systems are represented as phases, is taken here. Phase volume fraction conservation equations are solved for in both the reservoir and the wells, in addition, the field within wells is also solved for. A second novel aspect of the work is the combination of modelling and resolving of the motherbore and laterals. In this case wells do not have to be explicitly discretised in space. This combination proves to be accurate (in many situations) as well as computationally efficient. The method is applied to a number of multi-phase reservoir problems in order to gain an insight into the effectiveness, in terms of production rate, of perforated laterals. Model results are compared with semi-analytical solutions for simple cases and industry-standard codes for more complicated cases. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  12. Relationship between sample volumes and modulus of human vertebral trabecular bone in micro-finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin-Xin; Xu, Chao; Zong, Chun-Lin; Feng, Ya-Fei; Ma, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Fa-Qi; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Micro-finite element (μFE) models have been widely used to assess the biomechanical properties of trabecular bone. How to choose a proper sample volume of trabecular bone, which could predict the real bone biomechanical properties and reduce the calculation time, was an interesting problem. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between different sample volumes and apparent elastic modulus (E) calculated from μFE model. 5 Human lumbar vertebral bodies (L1-L5) were scanned by micro-CT. Cubic concentric samples of different lengths were constructed as the experimental groups and the largest possible volumes of interest (VOI) were constructed as the control group. A direct voxel-to-element approach was used to generate μFE models and steel layers were added to the superior and inferior surface to mimic axial compression tests. A 1% axial strain was prescribed to the top surface of the model to obtain the E values. ANOVA tests were performed to compare the E values from the different VOIs against that of the control group. Nonlinear function curve fitting was performed to study the relationship between volumes and E values. The larger cubic VOI included more nodes and elements, and more CPU times were needed for calculations. E values showed a descending tendency as the length of cubic VOI decreased. When the volume of VOI was smaller than (7.34mm(3)), E values were significantly different from the control group. The fit function showed that E values approached an asymptotic values with increasing length of VOI. Our study demonstrated that apparent elastic modulus calculated from μFE models were affected by the sample volumes. There was a descending tendency of E values as the length of cubic VOI decreased. Sample volume which was not smaller than (7.34mm(3)) was efficient enough and timesaving for the calculation of E.

  13. Nonlinear/linear unified thermal stress formulations - Transfinite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1987-01-01

    A new unified computational approach for applicability to nonlinear/linear thermal-structural problems is presented. Basic concepts of the approach including applicability to nonlinear and linear thermal structural mechanics are first described via general formulations. Therein, the approach is demonstrated for thermal stress and thermal-structural dynamic applications. The proposed transfinite element approach focuses on providing a viable hybrid computational methodology by combining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element schemes in conjunction with transform techniques and the classical Bubnov-Galerkin schemes. Comparative samples of numerical test cases highlight the capabilities of the proposed concepts.

  14. Finite element procedure for stress amplification factor recovering in a representative volume of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar Plaisant Junior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Finite element models are proposed to the micromechanical analysis of a representative volume of composite materials. A detailed description of the meshes, boundary conditions, and loadings are presented. An illustrative application is given to evaluate stress amplification factors within a representative volume of the unidirectional carbon fiber composite plate. The results are discussed and compared to the numerical findings.

  15. P1-NONCONFORMING QUADRILATERAL FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD AND ITS CASCADIC MULTIGRID ALGORITHM FOR ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-ying Man; Zhong-ci Shi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the finite volume element method of P1-nonconforming quadrilateral element for elliptic problems and obtain optimal error estimates for general quadrilateral partition. An optimal cascadic multigrid algorithm is proposed to solve the nonsymmetric large-scale system resulting from such discretization. Numerical experiments are reported to support our theoretical results.

  16. Lattice approach to finite volume form-factors of the Massive Thirring (Sine-Gordon) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Árpád

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, that the light-cone lattice approach for the Massive-Thirring (sine-Gordon) model, through the quantum inverse scattering method, admits an appropriate framework for computing the finite volume form-factors of local operators of the model. In this work we compute the finite volume diagonal matrix elements of the U(1) conserved current in the pure soliton sector of the theory. Based on the systematic large volume expansion of our results, we conjecture an exact expression for the finite volume expectation values of local operators in pure soliton states. At large volume in leading order these expectation values have the same form as in purely elastic scattering theories, but exponentially small corrections differ from previous Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz conjectures of purely elastic scattering theories.

  17. Hybrid Finite Element and Volume Integral Methods for Scattering Using Parametric Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volakis, John L.; Sertel, Kubilay; Jørgensen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    n this paper we address several topics relating to the development and implementation of volume integral and hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetic modeling. Comparisons of volume integral equation formulations with the finite element-boundary integral method are given in terms of accu...... of vanishing divergence within the element but non-zero curl. In addition, a new domain decomposition is introduced for solving array problems involving several million degrees of freedom. Three orders of magnitude CPU reduction is demonstrated for such applications....

  18. On the Approaching Domain Obtained by Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹青松; 李永海

    2002-01-01

    The use of finite element method leads to replacing the initial domain by an approaching domain,Under some appropriate assumptions,we prove that there exists a W1,+∞-diffeomorphism from the original domain to the approaching domain.

  19. B Free Finite Element Approach for Saturated Porous Media: Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Stickle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The B free finite element approach is applied to the governing equations describing the consolidation process in saturated poroelastic medium with intrinsically incompressible solid and fluid phases. Under this approach, where Voigt notation is avoided, the finite element equilibrium equations and the linearization of the coupled governing equations are fully derived using tensor algebra. In order to assess the B free approach for the consolidation equations, direct comparison with analytical solution of the response of a homogeneous and isotropic water-saturated poroelastic finite column under harmonic load is presented. The results illustrate the capability of this finite element approach of reproducing accurately the response of quasistatic phenomena in a saturated porous medium.

  20. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Forward modelling of geophysical survey data using cylindrical elemental volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X.; Lockerbie, N.A. [Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics

    1996-04-01

    A simple model is presented for the gravitational field due to a finite cylinder, and this is elaborated so that (in principle) the gravitational field from a body of any shape may be found in terms of the field of such primitive cylinders. The primitive field is described as a moment-expansion in terms of odd-order Legendre P{sub 2p+1}(cos{theta}),p=0,1,2..., where {theta} is the angle between the field point and the cylinder`s axis, and in terms of the radial distance R of the field point from the centre of mass of the cylinder, such that the parameters describing the shape of the cylinder, and the field point parameters, are separated. This allows gravitational field modelling calculations to be carried out extremely quickly in the space domain for gravitational sources of any shape. Moreover, the form of the solutions-due to the separation mentioned above-allows a clear insight into the underlying physical mechanisms involved in the synthesis of such fields, making such elements suitable in the solution of inverse gravitational problems in the

  2. Integral equations and boundary-element solution for static potential in a general piece-wise homogeneous volume conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Stenroos, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Boundary element methods (BEM) are used for forward computation of bioelectromagnetic fields in multi-compartment volume conductor models. Most BEM approaches assume that each compartment is in contact with at most one external compartment. In this work, I present a general surface integral equation and BEM discretization that remove this limitation and allow BEM modeling of general piecewise-homogeneous medium. The new integral equation allows positioning of field points at junctioned boundary of more than two compartments, enabling the use of linear collocation BEM in such a complex geometry. A modular BEM implementation is presented for linear collocation and Galerkin approaches, starting from standard formulation. The approach and resulting solver are verified in three ways, including comparison to finite element method (FEM). In a two-compartment split-sphere model with two spaced monopoles, the results obtained with high-resolution FEM and the BEMs were almost identical (relative difference < 0.003).

  3. Finite volume element method for analysis of unsteady reaction-diffusion problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sutthisak Phongthanapanich; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2009-01-01

    A finite volume element method is developed for analyzing unsteady scalar reaction--diffusion problems in two dimensions. The method combines the concepts that are employed in the finite volume and the finite element method together. The finite volume method is used to discretize the unsteady reaction--diffusion equation, while the finite element method is applied to estimate the gradient quantities at cell faces. Robustness and efficiency of the combined method have been evaluated on uniform rectangular grids by using available numerical solutions of the two-dimensional reaction-diffusion problems. The numerical solutions demonstrate that the combined method is stable and can provide accurate solution without spurious oscillation along the highgradient boundary layers.

  4. Control of the necrosed tissue volume during noninvasive ultrasound surgery using a 16-element phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X; Hynynen, K

    1995-03-01

    Focused high-power ultrasound beams are well suited for noninvasive local destruction of deep target volumes. In order to avoid cavitation and to utilize only thermal tissue damage, high frequencies (1-5 MHz) are used in ultrasonic surgery. However, the focal spots generated by sharply focused transducers become so small that only small tumors can be treated in a reasonable time. Phased array ultrasound transducers can be employed to electronically scan a focal spot or to produce multiple foci in the desired region to increase the treated volume. In this article, theoretical and experimental studies of spherically curved square-element phased arrays for use in ultrasonic surgery were performed. The simulation results were compared with experimental results from a 16-element array. It was shown that the phased array could control the necrosed tissue volume by using closely spaced multiple foci. The phased array can also be used to enlarge a necrosed tissue volume in only one direction at a time, i.e., lateral or longitudinal. The spherically curved 16 square-element phased array can produce useful results by varying the phase and amplitude setting. Four focal points can be easily generated with a distance of two or four wavelengths between the two closest peaks. The maximum necrosed tissue volume generated by the array can be up to sixteen times the volume induced by a similar spherical transducer. Therefore the treatment time could be reduced compared with single transducer treatment.

  5. FLUID-BASED SIMULATION APPROACH FOR HIGH VOLUME CONVEYOR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying WANG; Chen ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    High volume conveyor systems in distribution centers have very large footprint and can handle large volumes and hold thousands of items. Traditional discrete-event cell-based approach to simulate such networks becomes computationally challenging. An alternative approach, in which the traffic is represented by segments of fluid flow of different density instead of individual packages, is presented in this paper to address this challenge. The proposed fluid-based simulation approach is developed using a Hybrid Petri Nets framework. The underlying model is a combination of an extension of a Batches Petri Nets (BPN) and a Stochastic Petri Nets (SPN). The extensions are in the inclusion of random elements and relaxation of certain structural constraints. Some adaptations are also made to fit the target system modeling. The approach is presented with an example.

  6. A Geometrical Approach to the Boundary Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B; Rjasanow, S

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a geometric formulation of the boundary element method (BEM), using concepts of the discrete electromagnetic theory. Geometric BEM is closely related to Galerkin-BEM and to the generalized collocation scheme. It is easy to implement, accurate, and computationally efficient. We validate our approach with 2-D examples and give an outlook to 3-D results.

  7. Footbridge between finite volumes and finite elements with applications to CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Frédéric; Ghidaglia, Jean-Michel

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new algorithm for the discretization of second-order elliptic operators in the context of finite volume schemes on unstructured meshes. We are strongly motivated by partial differential equations (PDEs) arising in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), like the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Our technique consists of matching up a finite volume discretization based on a given mesh with a finite element representation on the same mesh. An inverse operator is also built, which has the desirable property that in the absence of diffusion, one recovers exactly the finite volume solution. Numerical results are also provided. Copyright

  8. A Dual Super-Element Domain Decomposition Approach for Parallel Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokhio, G. A.; Izzuddin, B. A.

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a new domain decomposition method for nonlinear finite element analysis introducing the concept of dual partition super-elements. The method extends ideas from the displacement frame method and is ideally suited for parallel nonlinear static/dynamic analysis of structural systems. In the new method, domain decomposition is realized by replacing one or more subdomains in a "parent system," each with a placeholder super-element, where the subdomains are processed separately as "child partitions," each wrapped by a dual super-element along the partition boundary. The analysis of the overall system, including the satisfaction of equilibrium and compatibility at all partition boundaries, is realized through direct communication between all pairs of placeholder and dual super-elements. The proposed method has particular advantages for matrix solution methods based on the frontal scheme, and can be readily implemented for existing finite element analysis programs to achieve parallelization on distributed memory systems with minimal intervention, thus overcoming memory bottlenecks typically faced in the analysis of large-scale problems. Several examples are presented in this article which demonstrate the computational benefits of the proposed parallel domain decomposition approach and its applicability to the nonlinear structural analysis of realistic structural systems.

  9. An adaptive control volume finite element method for simulation of multi-scale flow in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G.; Jackson, M.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase flow in porous media is of importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We present a novel control volume finite element method (CVFEM) to solve for multi-scale flow in heterogeneous geological formations. It employs a node centred control volume approach to discretize the saturation equation, while a control volume finite element method is applied for the pressure equation. We embed the discrete continuity equation into the pressure equation and assure that the continuity is exactly enforced. Anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to accurately model the fine grained features of multiphase flow. The adaptive algorithm uses a metric tensor field based on solution error estimates to locally control the size and shape of elements in the metric. Moreover, it uses metric advection between adaptive meshes in order to predict the future required density of mesh thereby reducing numerical dispersion at the saturation front. The scheme is capable of capturing multi-scale heterogeneity such as those in fractured porous media through the use of several constraints on the element size in different regions of porous media. We show the application of our method for simulation of flow in some challenging benchmark problems. For flow in fractured reservoirs, the scheme adapts the mesh as the flow penetrates through the fracture and the matrix. The constraints for the element size within the fracture are smaller by several orders of magnitude than the generated mesh within the matrix. We show that the scheme captures the key multi-scale features of flow while preserving the geometry. We demonstrate that mesh adaptation can be used to accurately simulate flow in heterogeneous porous media at low computational cost.

  10. Modeling Approach for Estimating Co-Produced Water Volumes and Saltwater Disposal Volumes in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Management of produced fluids has become an important issue in Oklahoma because large volumes of saltwater are co-produced with oil and gas, and disposed into saltwater disposal wells at high rates. Petroleum production increased from 2009-2015, especially in central and north-central Oklahoma where the Mississippian and Hunton zones were redeveloped using horizontal wells and dewatering techniques that have led to a disproportional increase in produced water volumes. Improved management of co-produced water, including desalination for beneficial reuse and decreased saltwater disposal volumes, is only possible if spatial and temporal trends can be defined and related to the producing zones. It is challenging to quantify the volumes of co-produced water by region or production zone because co-produced water volumes are generally not reported. Therefore, the goal of this research is to estimate co-produced water volumes for 2008-present with an approach that can be replicated as petroleum production shifts to other regions. Oil and gas production rates from subsurface zones were multiplied by ratios of H2O:oil and H2O:gas for the respective zones. Initial H2O:oil and H2O:gas ratios were adjusted/calibrated, by zone, to maximize correlation of county-scale produced H2O estimates versus saltwater disposal volumes from 2013-2015. These calibrated ratios were then used to compute saltwater disposal volumes from 2008-2012 because of apparent data gaps in reported saltwater disposal volumes during that timeframe. This research can be used to identify regions that have the greatest need for produced water treatment systems. The next step in management of produced fluids is to explore optimal energy-efficient strategies that reduce deleterious effects.

  11. Efficient volume preserving approach for skeleton-based implicit surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史红兵; 童若锋; 董金祥

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient way to preserve the volume of implicit surfaces generated by skeletons. Recursive subdivision is used to efficiently calculate the volume. The criterion for subdivision is obtained by using the property of density functions and treating different types of skeletons respectively to get accurate minimum and maximum distances from a cube to a skeleton. Compared with the criterion generated by other ways such as using traditional Interval Analysis, Affine Arithmetic, or Lipschitz condition, our approach is much better both in speed and accuracy.

  12. Morphological study of transpterional-insula approach using volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Linpei; Su, Lue; Sun, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yao, Jihang; Li, Youqiong; Luo, Qi

    2012-11-01

    This study describes the measurements of inferior circular insular sulcus (ICIS) and the shortest distance from ICIS to the temporal horn and determines the position of the incision, which does less harm to the temporal stem in the transpterional-insula approach using volume-rendering technique. Results of the research showed that one-third point over the anterior side of ICIS may be the ideal penetration point during operation. And there is no difference between 2 hemispheres (P ICIS from other Chinese researches demonstrated that volume rendering is a reliable method in insular research that enables mass measurements.

  13. Elements of a function analytic approach to probability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Roger Georges (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Red-Horse, John Robert

    2008-02-01

    We first provide a detailed motivation for using probability theory as a mathematical context in which to analyze engineering and scientific systems that possess uncertainties. We then present introductory notes on the function analytic approach to probabilistic analysis, emphasizing the connections to various classical deterministic mathematical analysis elements. Lastly, we describe how to use the approach as a means to augment deterministic analysis methods in a particular Hilbert space context, and thus enable a rigorous framework for commingling deterministic and probabilistic analysis tools in an application setting.

  14. Drug and Alcohol Studies (Volume 4: Policy approaches)

    OpenAIRE

    Macgregor, S.; Thom, B

    2014-01-01

    VOLUME FOUR: POLICY APPROACHES Preface Robert MacCoun and Peter Reuter The Varieties of Drug Control at the Dawn of the 21st Century Comparative Analysis of Alcohol Control Policies in 30 Countries Donald Brand et al A Comparative Study of 38 European Countries Limited Rationality and the Limits of Supply Reduction Jonathan Caulkins and Robert MacCoun The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy Craig Reinerman, Peter Cohen and Hendrien Kaal Cannabis in Amsterdam and San Francisco AIDS and Injecting ...

  15. ON THE FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT VERSION OF RITZ-VOLTERRA PROJECTION AND APPLICATIONS TO RELATED EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie Zhang; Yan-ping Lin; Robert J.Tait

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general error analysis framework for the finite volume element (FVE) approximation to the Ritz-Volterra projection, the Sobolev equations and parabolic integro-differential equations. The main idea in our paper is to consider the FVE methods as perturbations of standard finite element methods which enables us to derive the optimal L2 and H1 norm error estimates, and the L∞ and W1∞ norm error estimates by means of the time dependent Green functions. Our disc ussions also include elliptic and parabolic problems as the special cases.

  16. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Michael W.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2001-01-16

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of

  17. A Matlab library for solving quasi-static volume conduction problems using the boundary element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, M; Mäntynen, V; Nenonen, J

    2007-12-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is commonly used in the modeling of bioelectromagnetic phenomena. The Matlab language is increasingly popular among students and researchers, but there is no free, easy-to-use Matlab library for boundary element computations. We present a hands-on, freely available Matlab BEM source code for solving bioelectromagnetic volume conduction problems and any (quasi-)static potential problems that obey the Laplace equation. The basic principle of the BEM is presented and discretization of the surface integral equation for electric potential is worked through in detail. Contents and design of the library are described, and results of example computations in spherical volume conductors are validated against analytical solutions. Three application examples are also presented. Further information, source code for application examples, and information on obtaining the library are available in the WWW-page of the library: (http://biomed.tkk.fi/BEM).

  18. The American Experience with Pacification in Vietnam. Volume 2: Elements of Pacification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-03-01

    development with other US develop:.ent-l prograns. The notion of civic action--that is, the participacion cf military units in eccncirc and social ...INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES INTERNATIONAL AND SOCIAL STUDIES DIVISION 400 Army-Navy Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22202 DAHC 15 67 C 0011Li ARPA-20, Special...of action by US policymakers. Volume II examines in considerable detail the mejor elements of pacification: security; economic, political and social

  19. Discovery of regulatory elements is improved by a discriminatory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin; Winther, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    A major goal in post-genome biology is the complete mapping of the gene regulatory networks for every organism. Identification of regulatory elements is a prerequisite for realizing this ambitious goal. A common problem is finding regulatory patterns in promoters of a group of co-expressed genes...... present a new computational method for identifying transcription factor binding sites in promoters using a discriminatory approach with a large negative set encompassing a significant sample of the promoters from the relevant genome. The sequences are described by a probabilistic model and the most...

  20. Multi element synthetic aperture transmission using a frequency division approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    can therefore be used for flow imaging, unlike with Hadamard and Golay coding. The frequency division approach increases the SNR by a factor of N2 compared to conventional pulsed synthetic aperture imaging, provided that N transmission centers are used. Simulations and phantom measurements....... The transmitting elements are excited so that N virtual sources are formed. All sources are excited using one subset at a time. The signals can be separated by matched filtration, and the corresponding information is extracted. The individual source information is hence available in every emission and the method...

  1. Generalization techniques to reduce the number of volume elements for terrain effect calculations in fully analytical gravitational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Judit; Papp, Gabor; Kalmár, János; Szűcs, Eszter

    2017-04-01

    The available volumetric models of the crust of the Alps - Pannonian basin - Carpathians region and the 30 m x 30 m resolution DTM of Hungary contain several million and hundred million volume elements, respectively. Either rectangular prisms or polyhedrons can be used to discretize the density distribution inside these 3D structures. The calculation of the closed formulae given for the gravitational potential and its higher order derivatives, however, needs twice more runtime than that of the rectangular prism computations. Although the more detailed the better principle is generally accepted (or assumed) it is basically true only for errorless data. As soon as errors are present any calculation from the model is only a possible realization of the true gravitational field at the significance level determined by the errors. So if one really considers the reliability of input data (e.g. Moho depths, topographic heights) used in the calculations then sometimes the "less" can be equivalent to the "more" in statistical sense. As a consequence, the computational time can be significantly reduced by the optimization of the number of volume elements based on the accuracy estimates of the input data. New algorithms are proposed to minimize the number of model elements defined both in local and global coordinate systems. Common gravity field modeling programs generate optimized models for every computation points (dynamic approach), whereas the static approach provides only one optimized model for all computational points. The number of volume elements depends on a threshold value pre-defined by the error statistics of the input data. It represents the maximum difference allowed along the vertical direction Z between the initial and optimized model. Based on the static approach two different algorithms were developed. The grid-based algorithm starts with the maximum resolution polyhedral model defined on a uniform grid and generates a new polyhedral surface. The other

  2. A QR accelerated volume-to-surface boundary condition for finite element solution of eddy current problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D; Fasenfest, B; Rieben, R; Stowell, M

    2006-09-08

    We are concerned with the solution of time-dependent electromagnetic eddy current problems using a finite element formulation on three-dimensional unstructured meshes. We allow for multiple conducting regions, and our goal is to develop an efficient computational method that does not require a computational mesh of the air/vacuum regions. This requires a sophisticated global boundary condition specifying the total fields on the conductor boundaries. We propose a Biot-Savart law based volume-to-surface boundary condition to meet this requirement. This Biot-Savart approach is demonstrated to be very accurate. In addition, this approach can be accelerated via a low-rank QR approximation of the discretized Biot-Savart law.

  3. Convergence analysis of an upwind finite volume element method with Crouzeix-Raviart element for non-selfadjoint and indefinite problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongxing RUI; Chunjia BI

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we construct an upwind finite volume element scheme based on the Crouzeix-Raviart nonconforming element for nonselfadjoint elliptic problems. These problems often appear in dealing with flow in porous media. We establish the optimal order H1-norm error estimate. We also give the uniform convergence under minimal elliptic regularity assumption.

  4. Metallomics approach to changes in element concentration during differentiation from fibroblasts into adipocytes by element array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogra, Yasumitsu; Nagasaki, Shu; Yawata, Ayako; Anan, Yasumi; Hamada, Koichi; Mizutani, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to establish an element array analysis that involves the simultaneous detection of all elements in cells and the display of changes in element concentration before and after a cellular event. In this study, we demonstrated changes in element concentration during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 mouse fibroblasts into adipocytes. This metallomics approach yielded unique information of cellular response to physiological and toxicological events.

  5. A direct renormalization group approach for the excluded volume problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, S. L. A.; Chaves, C. M.

    1980-03-01

    We propose a position-space renormalization group approach for the excluded volume problem in a square lattice by considering “percolating” self-avoiding paths in a b×b cell, where b=2,3,4: Two ways of counting the paths are presented. The values obtained for the exponent v converge respectively to 0.731 and 0.720, close to the usually accepted value v=0.75. Comments on the relation between percolation and self-avoiding walks are made.

  6. Characterization of volume holographic optical elements recorded in Bayfol HX photopolymer for solar photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Sáez, Julia; Atencia, Jesús; Chemisana, Daniel; Collados, María-Victoria

    2016-03-21

    Volume Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) present interesting characteristics for photovoltaic applications as they can select spectrum for concentrating the target bandwidth and avoiding non-desired wavelengths, which can cause the decrease of the performance on the cell, for instance by overheating it. Volume HOEs have been recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer to test the suitability of this material for solar concentrating photovoltaic systems. The HOEs were recorded at 532 nm and provided a dynamic range, reaching close to 100% efficiency at 800 nm. The diffracted spectrum had a FWHM of 230 nm when illuminating at Bragg angle. These characteristics prove HOEs recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer are suitable for concentrating solar light onto photovoltaic cells sensitive to that wavelength range.

  7. BOUNDARY ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CONTACT PROBLEMS USING ARTIFICIAL BOUNDARY NODE APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bahattin KANBER; Ibrahim H. GUZELBEY; Ahmet ERKLI

    2003-01-01

    An improved version of the regular boundary element method, the artificial boundary node approach, is derived. A simple contact algorithm is designed and implemented into the direct boundary element, regular boundary element and artificial boundary node approaches. The exisiting and derived approaches are tested using some case studies. The results of the artificial boundary node approach are compared with those of the existing boundary element program, the regular element approach, ANSYS and analytical solution whenever possible. The results show the effectiveness of the artificial boundary node approach for a wider range of boundary offsets.

  8. Insights into the Biology of IRES Elements through Riboproteomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Pacheco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation initiation is a highly regulated process that exerts a strong influence on the posttranscriptional control of gene expression. Two alternative mechanisms govern translation initiation in eukaryotic mRNAs, the cap-dependent initiation mechanism operating in most mRNAs, and the internal ribosome entry site (IRES-dependent mechanism, first discovered in picornaviruses. IRES elements are highly structured RNA sequences that, in most instances, require specific proteins for recruitment of the translation machinery. Some of these proteins are eukaryotic initiation factors. In addition, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play a key role in internal initiation control. RBPs are pivotal regulators of gene expression in response to numerous stresses, including virus infection. This review discusses recent advances on riboproteomic approaches to identify IRES transacting factors (ITAFs and the relationship between RNA-protein interaction and IRES activity, highlighting the most relevant features on picornavirus and hepatitis C virus IRESs.

  9. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hookey, N.A. [Memorial Univ., Newfoundland (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  10. Alternating Direction Finite Volume Element Methods for Three-Dimensional Parabolic Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongke

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents alternating direction finite volume element methods for three-dimensional parabolic partial differential equations and gives four computational schemes, one is analogous to Douglas finite difference scheme with second-order splitting error, the other two schemes have third-order splitting error, and the last one is an extended LOD scheme. The L2 norm and H1 semi-norm error estimates are obtained for the first scheme and second one, respectively. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the methods.

  11. Effectiveness of the random sequential absorption algorithm in the analysis of volume elements with nanoplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontefisso, Alessandro; Zappalorto, Michele; Quaresimin, Marino

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a study of the Random Sequential Absorption (RSA) algorithm in the generation of nanoplatelet Volume Elements (VEs) is carried out. The effect of the algorithm input parameters on the reinforcement distribution is studied through the implementation of statistical tools, showing...... that the platelet distribution is systematically affected by these parameters. The consequence is that a parametric analysis of the VE input parameters may be biased by hidden differences in the filler distribution. The same statistical tools used in the analysis are implemented in a modified RSA algorithm...

  12. A finite element approach to x-ray optics design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, A. P.; Ferrero, C.; Guigay, J. P.; Mocella, V.

    2017-05-01

    Dynamical diffraction in a deformed (often bent) crystal is described by the Takagi equations 1 which, in general, have to be solved numerically on a regular 2-D grid of points representing a planar cross section of the crystal in which the diffraction of an incident X-ray wavefront occurs . Presently, the majority of numerical approaches are based on a finite difference solving scheme2-4 which can be easily implemented on a regular Cartesian grid but is not suitable for deformed meshes. In this case, the inner deformed crystal structure can be taken into account, but not the shape of the crystal surface if this differs substantially from a planar profile 5,6. Conversely, a finite element method (FEM) can be easily applied to a deformed mesh and serves very well to the purpose of modelling any incident wave on an arbitrarily shaped entrance surface 7 e.g. that of a bent crystal or a crystal submitted to a strong heat load 8-10. For instance, the cylindrical shape of the surface of a strongly bent crystal plate can easily be taken into account in a FEM calculation. Bent crystals are often used as focusing optical elements in Xray beamlines 11-13. In the following, we show the implementation of a general numerical framework for describing the propagation of X-rays inside a crystal based on the solution of the Takagi equations via the COMSOL Multiphysics FEM software package (www.comsol.com). A cylindrically bent crystal will be taken as an example to illustrate the capabilities of the new approach.

  13. Two-dimensional wood drying stress simulation using control-volume mixed finite element methods (CVFEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salinas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available  The work was aimed at simulating two-dimensional wood drying stress using the control-volume finite element method (CVFEM. Stress/strain was modeled by moisture content gradients regarding shrinkage and mechanical sorption in a cross-section of wood. CVFEM was implemented with triangular finite elements and lineal interpolation of the independent variable which were programmed in Fortran 90 language. The model was validated by contrasting results with similar ones available in the specialised literature. The present model’s results came from isothermal (20ºC drying of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides: two-dimensional distribution of stress/strain and water content, 40, 80, 130, 190 and 260 hour drying time and evolution of normal stress (2.5 <σ͓ ͓ < 1.2, MPa, from the interior to the exterior of wood. 

  14. Discontinuous finite volume element discretization for coupled flow-transport problems arising in models of sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Raimund; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    The sedimentation-consolidation and flow processes of a mixture of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers can be described by a nonlinear transport equation for the solids concentration coupled with the Stokes problem written in terms of the mixture flow velocity and the pressure field. Here both the viscosity and the forcing term depend on the local solids concentration. A semi-discrete discontinuous finite volume element (DFVE) scheme is proposed for this model. The numerical method is constructed on a baseline finite element family of linear discontinuous elements for the approximation of velocity components and concentration field, whereas the pressure is approximated by piecewise constant elements. The unique solvability of both the nonlinear continuous problem and the semi-discrete DFVE scheme is discussed, and optimal convergence estimates in several spatial norms are derived. Properties of the model and the predicted space accuracy of the proposed formulation are illustrated by detailed numerical examples, including flows under gravity with changing direction, a secondary settling tank in an axisymmetric setting, and batch sedimentation in a tilted cylindrical vessel.

  15. New Approach for Error Reduction in the Volume Penalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Iwakami-Nakano, Wakana; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Hattori, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The volume penalization method offers an efficient way to numerically simulate flows around complex-shaped bodies which move and/or deform in general. In this method a penalization term which has permeability eta and a mask function is added to a governing equation as a forcing term in order to impose different dynamics in solid and fluid regions. In this paper we investigate the accuracy of the volume penalization method in detail. We choose the one-dimensional Burgers' equation as a governing equation since it enables us extensive study and it has a nonlinear term similar to the Navier-Stokes equations. It is confirmed that the error which consists of the discretization/truncation error, the penalization error, the round-off error, and others has the same features as those in previous results when we use the standard definition of the mask function. As the number of grid points increases, the error converges to a non-zero constant which is equal to the penalization error. We propose a new approach for reduc...

  16. Multiphase flow through porous media: an adaptive control volume finite element formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Tollit, B.; Gorman, G.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate modeling of multiphase flow in porous media is of great importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We have developed a numerical scheme which employs an implicit pressure explicit saturation (IMPES) algorithm for the temporal discretization of the governing equations. The saturation equation is spatially discretized using a node centered control volume method on an unstructured finite element mesh. The face values are determined through an upwind scheme. The pressure equation is spatially discretized using a continuous control volume finite element method (CV-FEM) to achieve consistency with the discrete saturation equation. The numerical simulation is implemented in Fluidity, an open source and general purpose fluid simulator capable of solving a number of different governing equations for fluid flow and accompanying field equations on arbitrary unstructured meshes. The model is verified against the Buckley-Leverett problem where a quasi-analytical solution is available. We discuss the accuracy and the order of convergence of the scheme. We demonstrate the scheme for modeling multiphase flow in a synthetic heterogeneous porous medium along with the use of anisotropic mesh adaptivity to control local solution errors and increase computational efficiency. The adaptive method is also used to simulate two-phase flow in heap leaching, an industrial mining process, where the flow of the leaching solution is gravitationally dominated. Finally we describe the extension of the developed numerical scheme for simulation of flow in multiscale fractured porous media and its capability to model the multiscale characterization of flow in full scale.

  17. Frost Formation: Optimizing solutions under a finite volume approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrons, E.; Perez-Segarra, C. D.; Oliet, C.

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional transient formulation of the frost formation process is developed by means of a finite volume approach. Emphasis is put on the frost surface boundary condition as well as the wide range of empirical correlations related to the thermophysical and transport properties of frost. A study of the numerical solution is made, establishing the parameters that ensure grid independence. Attention is given to the algorithm, the discretised equations and the code optimization through dynamic relaxation techniques. A critical analysis of four cases is carried out by comparing solutions of several empirical models against tested experiments. As a result, a discussion on the performance of such parameters is started and a proposal of the most suitable models is presented.

  18. Finite element meshing approached as a global minimization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WITKOWSKI,WALTER R.; JUNG,JOSEPH; DOHRMANN,CLARK R.; LEUNG,VITUS J.

    2000-03-01

    The ability to generate a suitable finite element mesh in an automatic fashion is becoming the key to being able to automate the entire engineering analysis process. However, placing an all-hexahedron mesh in a general three-dimensional body continues to be an elusive goal. The approach investigated in this research is fundamentally different from any other that is known of by the authors. A physical analogy viewpoint is used to formulate the actual meshing problem which constructs a global mathematical description of the problem. The analogy used was that of minimizing the electrical potential of a system charged particles within a charged domain. The particles in the presented analogy represent duals to mesh elements (i.e., quads or hexes). Particle movement is governed by a mathematical functional which accounts for inter-particles repulsive, attractive and alignment forces. This functional is minimized to find the optimal location and orientation of each particle. After the particles are connected a mesh can be easily resolved. The mathematical description for this problem is as easy to formulate in three-dimensions as it is in two- or one-dimensions. The meshing algorithm was developed within CoMeT. It can solve the two-dimensional meshing problem for convex and concave geometries in a purely automated fashion. Investigation of the robustness of the technique has shown a success rate of approximately 99% for the two-dimensional geometries tested. Run times to mesh a 100 element complex geometry were typically in the 10 minute range. Efficiency of the technique is still an issue that needs to be addressed. Performance is an issue that is critical for most engineers generating meshes. It was not for this project. The primary focus of this work was to investigate and evaluate a meshing algorithm/philosophy with efficiency issues being secondary. The algorithm was also extended to mesh three-dimensional geometries. Unfortunately, only simple geometries were tested

  19. An edge element approach for dynamic micromagnetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottauscio, O.; Chiampi, M.; Manzin, A.

    2008-04-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional dynamic micromagnetic model, based on the Galerkin weak formulation, reconstructing magnetization by finite element edge vector shape functions. The demagnetizing filed is computed using a hybrid finite element boundary element method. The procedure is compared to analytical formulas and simulations performed with the NIST/OOMMF code, focusing on damping and precessional switching in magnetic thin films.

  20. Biomechanical simulation of thorax deformation using finite element approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Chen, Xian; Ohgi, Junji; Miura, Toshiro; Nakamoto, Akira; Matsumura, Chikanori; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2016-02-06

    The biomechanical simulation of the human respiratory system is expected to be a useful tool for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases. Because the deformation of the thorax significantly influences airflow in the lungs, we focused on simulating the thorax deformation by introducing contraction of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm, which are the main muscles responsible for the thorax deformation during breathing. We constructed a finite element model of the thorax, including the rib cage, intercostal muscles, and diaphragm. To reproduce the muscle contractions, we introduced the Hill-type transversely isotropic hyperelastic continuum skeletal muscle model, which allows the intercostal muscles and diaphragm to contract along the direction of the fibres with clinically measurable muscle activation and active force-length relationship. The anatomical fibre orientations of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm were introduced. Thorax deformation consists of movements of the ribs and diaphragm. By activating muscles, we were able to reproduce the pump-handle and bucket-handle motions for the ribs and the clinically observed motion for the diaphragm. In order to confirm the effectiveness of this approach, we simulated the thorax deformation during normal quiet breathing and compared the results with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images for verification. Thorax deformation can be simulated by modelling the respiratory muscles according to continuum mechanics and by introducing muscle contractions. The reproduction of representative motions of the ribs and diaphragm and the comparison of the thorax deformations during normal quiet breathing with 4D-CT images demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach. This work may provide a platform for establishing a computational mechanics model of the human respiratory system.

  1. Space-time adaptive ADER discontinuous Galerkin finite element schemes with a posteriori sub-cell finite volume limiting

    CERN Document Server

    Zanotti, Olindo; Dumbser, Michael; Hidalgo, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel arbitrary high order accurate discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method on space-time adaptive Cartesian meshes (AMR) for hyperbolic conservation laws in multiple space dimensions, using a high order \\aposteriori sub-cell ADER-WENO finite volume \\emph{limiter}. Notoriously, the original DG method produces strong oscillations in the presence of discontinuous solutions and several types of limiters have been introduced over the years to cope with this problem. Following the innovative idea recently proposed in \\cite{Dumbser2014}, the discrete solution within the troubled cells is \\textit{recomputed} by scattering the DG polynomial at the previous time step onto a suitable number of sub-cells along each direction. Relying on the robustness of classical finite volume WENO schemes, the sub-cell averages are recomputed and then gathered back into the DG polynomials over the main grid. In this paper this approach is implemented for the first time within a space-time adaptive ...

  2. The effects of intracranial volume adjustment approaches on multiple regional MRI volumes in healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eVoevodskaya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In neurodegeneration research, normalization of regional volumes by intracranial volume (ICV is important to estimate the extent of disease-driven atrophy. There is little agreement as to whether raw volumes, volume-to-ICV fractions or regional volumes from which the ICV factor has been regressed out should be used for volumetric brain imaging studies. Using multiple regional cortical and subcortical volumetric measures generated by Freesurfer (51 in total, the main aim of this study was to elucidate the implications of these adjustment approaches. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data were analyzed from two large cohorts, the population-based PIVUS cohort (N=406, all subjects age 75 and the Alzheimer disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI cohort (N=724. Further, we studied whether the chosen ICV normalization approach influenced the relationship between hippocampus and cognition in the three diagnostic groups of the ADNI cohort (Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy individuals. The ability of raw vs adjusted hippocampal volumes to predict diagnostic status was also assessed. In both cohorts raw volumes correlate positively with ICV, but do not scale directly proportionally with it. The correlation direction is reversed for all volume-to-ICV fractions, except the lateral and third ventricles. Most grey matter fractions are larger in females, while lateral ventricle fractions are greater in males. Residual correction effectively eliminated the correlation between the regional volumes and ICV and removed gender differences. The association between hippocampal volumes and cognition was not altered by ICV normalization. Comparing prediction of diagnostic status using the different approaches, small but significant differences were found. The choice of normalization approach should be carefully considered when designing a volumetric brain imaging study.

  3. An explicit finite volume element method for solving characteristic level set equation on triangular grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sutthisak Phongthanapanich; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2011-01-01

    Level set methods are widely used for predicting evolutions of complex free surface topologies,such as the crystal and crack growth,bubbles and droplets deformation,spilling and breaking waves,and two-phase flow phenomena.This paper presents a characteristic level set equation which is derived from the two-dimensional level set equation by using the characteristic-based scheme.An explicit finite volume element method is developed to discretize the equation on triangular grids.Several examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method for calculating interface evolutions in time.The proposed level set method is also coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase immiscible incompressible flow analysis with surface tension.The Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem is used to test and evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  4. Finite element approach for transient analysis of multibody systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Chin; Chang, Che-Wei; Housner, Jerrold M.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional, finite element based formulation for the transient dynamics of constrained multibody systems with trusslike configurations is presented. A convected coordinate system is used to define the rigid-body motion of individual elements in the system. Deformation of each element is defined relative to its convected coordinate system. The formulation is oriented toward joint-dominated structures. Through a series of sequential transformations, the joint degree of freedom is built into the equations of motion of the element to reduce geometric constraints. Based on the derivation, a general-purpose code has been developed. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of the code.

  5. Spherically symmetric volume elements as basis functions for image reconstructions in computed laminography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampert, Patrick; Vogelgesang, Jonas; Schorr, Christian; Maisl, Michael; Bogachev, Sviatoslav; Marniok, Nico; Louis, Alfred; Dahmen, Tim; Slusallek, Philipp

    2017-03-21

    Laminography is a tomographic technique that allows three-dimensional imaging of flat and elongated objects that stretch beyond the extent of a reconstruction volume. Laminography images can be reconstructed using iterative algorithms based on the Kaczmarz method. This study aims to develop and demonstrate a new reconstruction algorithm that may provide superior image reconstruction quality for this challenged imaging application. The images are initially represented using the coefficients over basis functions, which are typically piecewise constant functions (voxels). By replacing voxels with spherically symmetric volume elements (blobs) based on the generalized Kaiser-Bessel window functions, the images are reconstructed using this new adapted version of the algebraic image reconstruction technique. Band-limiting properties of blob functions are beneficial particular in the case of noisy projections and with only a limited number of available projections. Study showed that using blob basis functions improved full-width-at-half-maximum resolution from 10.2±1.0 to 9.9±0.9 (p functions, especially if noisy data is expected.

  6. Toxic Elements in Food: Occurrence, Binding, and Reduction Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, P.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Shakibazadeh, Sh

    2014-01-01

    Toxic elements such as mercury, arsenic, cadmium, and lead, sometimes called heavy metals, can diminish mental and central nervous system function; elicit damage to blood composition as well as the kidneys, lungs, and liver; and reduce energy levels. Food is considered one of the main routes...... of their entry into the human body. Numerous studies have been performed to examine the effects of common food processing procedures on the levels of toxic elements in food. While some studies have reported negative effects of processing, several have shown that processing practices may have a positive effect...... on the reduction of toxic elements in foodstuffs. A number of studies have also introduced protocols and suggested chemical agents that reduce the amount of toxic elements in the final food products. In this review, the reported methods employed for the reduction of toxic elements are discussed with particular...

  7. A Novel Approach to a Piezoelectric Sensing Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martinez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric materials have commonly been used in pressure and stress sensors; however, many designs consist of thin plate structures that produce small voltage signals when they are compressed or extended under a pressure field. This study used finite element methods to design a novel piezoelectric pressure sensor with a C-shaped piezoelectric element and determine if the voltage signal obtained during hydrostatic pressure application was enhanced compared to a standard thin plate piezoelectric element. The results of this study demonstrated how small deformations of this C-shaped sensor produced a large electrical signal output. It was also shown that the location of the electrodes for this sensor needs to be carefully chosen and that the electric potential distribution varies depending on the poling of the piezoelectric element. This study indicated that the utilization of piezoelectric materials of different shapes and geometries embedded in a polymer matrix for sensing applications has several advantages over thin plate solid piezoelectric structures.

  8. An Optimization-Based Approach to Injector Element Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. Kevin; Shyy, Wei; Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An injector optimization methodology, method i, is used to investigate optimal design points for gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) injector elements. A swirl coaxial element and an unlike impinging element (a fuel-oxidizer-fuel triplet) are used to facilitate the study. The elements are optimized in terms of design variables such as fuel pressure drop, APf, oxidizer pressure drop, deltaP(sub f), combustor length, L(sub comb), and full cone swirl angle, theta, (for the swirl element) or impingement half-angle, alpha, (for the impinging element) at a given mixture ratio and chamber pressure. Dependent variables such as energy release efficiency, ERE, wall heat flux, Q(sub w), injector heat flux, Q(sub inj), relative combustor weight, W(sub rel), and relative injector cost, C(sub rel), are calculated and then correlated with the design variables. An empirical design methodology is used to generate these responses for both element types. Method i is then used to generate response surfaces for each dependent variable for both types of elements. Desirability functions based on dependent variable constraints are created and used to facilitate development of composite response surfaces representing the five dependent variables in terms of the input variables. Three examples illustrating the utility and flexibility of method i are discussed in detail for each element type. First, joint response surfaces are constructed by sequentially adding dependent variables. Optimum designs are identified after addition of each variable and the effect each variable has on the element design is illustrated. This stepwise demonstration also highlights the importance of including variables such as weight and cost early in the design process. Secondly, using the composite response surface that includes all five dependent variables, unequal weights are assigned to emphasize certain variables relative to others. Here, method i is used to enable objective trade studies on design issues

  9. Aircraft wing structural design optimization based on automated finite element modelling and ground structure approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weizhu; Yue, Zhufeng; Li, Lei; Wang, Peiyan

    2016-01-01

    An optimization procedure combining an automated finite element modelling (AFEM) technique with a ground structure approach (GSA) is proposed for structural layout and sizing design of aircraft wings. The AFEM technique, based on CATIA VBA scripting and PCL programming, is used to generate models automatically considering the arrangement of inner systems. GSA is used for local structural topology optimization. The design procedure is applied to a high-aspect-ratio wing. The arrangement of the integral fuel tank, landing gear and control surfaces is considered. For the landing gear region, a non-conventional initial structural layout is adopted. The positions of components, the number of ribs and local topology in the wing box and landing gear region are optimized to obtain a minimum structural weight. Constraints include tank volume, strength, buckling and aeroelastic parameters. The results show that the combined approach leads to a greater weight saving, i.e. 26.5%, compared with three additional optimizations based on individual design approaches.

  10. A Finite Element Approach to Modeling Abrasive Wear Modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldman, M.; Heide, van der E.; Tinga, T.; Masen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Machine components operating in sandy environments will wear because of the abrasive interaction with sand particles. In this work, a method is derived to predict the amount of wear caused by such abrasive action, in order to improve the maintenance concept of the components. A finite element model

  11. Holistic Approach to the Periodic System of Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Trunov, N. N.

    2009-01-01

    For studying the objectivity and the quality of a given form of the Periodic system as a single whole we compare plots of functions presenting properties of elements in pairs of periods. Using mathematical statistics we introduce a dimensionless parameter which indicates high quality of the long form of the Periodic system.

  12. Finite Element Surface Registration Incorporating Curvature, Volume Preservation, and Statistical Model Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models.

  13. Extended volume and surface scatterometer for optical characterization of 3D-printed elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Florian; Uebeler, Denise; Weiß, Jürgen; Pescoller, Lukas; Weyer, Cornelia; Hahlweg, Cornelius

    2015-09-01

    The use of 3d printing technology seems to be a promising way for low cost prototyping, not only of mechanical, but also of optical components or systems. It is especially useful in applications where customized equipment repeatedly is subject to immediate destruction, as in experimental detonics and the like. Due to the nature of the 3D-printing process, there is a certain inner texture and therefore inhomogeneous optical behaviour to be taken into account, which also indicates mechanical anisotropy. Recent investigations are dedicated to quantification of optical properties of such printed bodies and derivation of corresponding optimization strategies for the printing process. Beside mounting, alignment and illumination means, also refractive and reflective elements are subject to investigation. The proposed measurement methods are based on an imaging nearfield scatterometer for combined volume and surface scatter measurements as proposed in previous papers. In continuation of last year's paper on the use of near field imaging, which basically is a reflective shadowgraph method, for characterization of glossy surfaces like printed matter or laminated material, further developments are discussed. The device has been extended for observation of photoelasticity effects and therefore homogeneity of polarization behaviour. A refined experimental set-up is introduced. Variation of plane of focus and incident angle are used for separation of various the images of the layers of the surface under test, cross and parallel polarization techniques are applied. Practical examples from current research studies are included.

  14. Development of a finite element firn densification model for converting volume changes to mass changes

    CERN Document Server

    Cummings, Evan; Brinkerhoff, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In regions where ice sheets are increasing in mass, there is a 50-200 m layer of old snow called firn which does not melt in the summer months. The density of firn tracks the transformation of snow into glacial ice at approximately 917 kg m^-3. The process of firn densification is important in at least two ways: 1) it can be a dominant component in the observed rate of change of the surface elevation, and 2) storage of liquid water in the lower density firn layer is now considered a critical component in the mass balance of ice sheets. If the rate of change of surface elevation can be equated with the rate of change in the mass of the ice sheet, we would have an excellent means of monitoring ice sheet mass balance. However, knowledge of firn densification rates is needed to make the inference of mass rate of change from volume rate of change. Several firn models have been created for areas without melt. We have reformulated these models with the finite-element software package FEniCS and integrated them with ...

  15. HIGH ACCURACY FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM OF SECOND ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王同科

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy finite volume element method is presented for two-point boundary value problem of second order ordinary differential equation, which differs fromthe high order generalized difference methods. It is proved that the method has optimal order er-ror estimate O(h3) in H1 norm. Finally, two examples show that the method is effective.

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY PROBLEM AND STUDY OF APPROACH BASED ON FINITE VOLUME METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Sherina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been aimed to carry out a study of peculiarities that arise in a numerical simulation of the electrical impedance tomography (EIT problem. Static EIT image reconstruction is sensitive to a measurement noise and approximation error. A special consideration has been given to reducing of the approximation error, which originates from numerical implementation drawbacks. This paper presents in detail two numerical approaches for solving EIT forward problem. The finite volume method (FVM on unstructured triangular mesh is introduced. In order to compare this approach, the finite element (FEM based forward solver was implemented, which has gained the most popularity among researchers. The calculated potential distribution with the assumed initial conductivity distribution has been compared to the analytical solution of a test Neumann boundary problem and to the results of problem simulation by means of ANSYS FLUENT commercial software. Two approaches to linearized EIT image reconstruction are discussed. Reconstruction of the conductivity distribution is an ill-posed problem, typically requiring a large amount of computation and resolved by minimization techniques. The objective function to be minimized is constructed of measured voltage and calculated boundary voltage on the electrodes. A classical modified Newton type iterative method and the stochastic differential evolution method are employed. A software package has been developed for the problem under investigation. Numerical tests were conducted on simulated data. The obtained results could be helpful to researches tackling the hardware and software issues for medical applications of EIT.

  17. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF CONCRETE PERFORMANCE USING FINITE ELEMENT APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Parjoko, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to understand the effect of applying several parameters: different axle load configuration, concrete properties, subgrade properties, slab thickness, joint characteristics, shoulder construction, bounded HMA overlay on concrete pavement, and bounded and unbounded CTB foundation over subgrade on the fatigue and erosion related distresses in concrete pavements. KENSLAB, an elaborate finite element program is used to determine the concrete pavement responses: stresses and deflect...

  18. CADDIS Volume 4. Data Analysis: Selecting an Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    An approach for selecting statistical analyses to inform causal analysis. Describes methods for determining whether test site conditions differ from reference expectations. Describes an approach for estimating stressor-response relationships.

  19. Price dynamics and trading volume: A semiparametric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierdijk, L.; Nijman, T.E.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the relation between price impact and trading volume for a sample of stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The parametric VAR-models that have been used in the literature impose strong proportionality and symmetry restrictions on the price impact of trades,

  20. A SECOND ORDER CONTROL-VOLUME FINITE-ELEMENT LEAST-SQUARES STRATEGY FOR SIMULATING DIFFUSION IN STRONGLY ANISOTROPIC MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jayantha Pasdunkorale A.; Ian W. Turner

    2005-01-01

    An unstructured mesh finite volume discretisation method for simulating diffusion in anisotropic media in two-dimensional space is discussed. This technique is considered as an extension of the fully implicit hybrid control-volume finite-element method and it retains the local continuity of the flux at the control volume faces. A least squares function reconstruction technique together with a new flux decomposition strategy is used to obtain an accurate flux approximation at the control volume face, ensuring that the overall accuracy of the spatial discretisation maintains second order. This paper highlights that the new technique coincides with the traditional shape function technique when the correction term is neglected and that it significantly increases the accuracy of the previous linear scheme on coarse meshes when applied to media that exhibit very strong to extreme anisotropy ratios. It is concluded that the method can be used on both regular and irregular meshes,and appears independent of the mesh quality.

  1. Research on producing high quality diffractive optical elements in volume at a low cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschner, Walter

    1997-11-01

    Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) can be utilized in a variety of possible applications in modern optical, as well as optoelectronic systems. The current roadblock for application of DOEs in consumer products is not the feasibility of the approach, as numerous applications have been successfully demonstrated. In order for the breakthrough to occur in industry, it is important to determine a convenient and cost-effective method for manufacturing DOEs. The industry will improve the design of their legacy systems and start including DOEs only when the performance improvement (which the utilization of DOEs achieves), can be purchased with a minimal amount of additional capital investment and cost-per-part. Therefore, the focus of this dissertation was to find a cost-effective method of fabricating large quantities of DOEs with currently available fabrication tools. Direct-write approaches were investigated to fabricate high-quality masters for a subsequent replication procedure based upon molding or casting. Electron-Beam Direct-Write was carried-out in a positive Novolac-based photo-resist which provides dry etch resistivity. Another focus of this development was to find a way to minimize Electron-Beam writing time for a given element. Proximity effect characterization and compensation has been carried-out in order to increase the fidelity of the pattern reproduction. A dry-etching procedure has been developed in order to transfer resist profiles into the substrate material. During this transfer step, the etch rates of resist and substrate material can be controlled; this in turn allows a choice of final feature depth in the substrate material (depending on refractive index and wavelength in use). Two Gray-Scale masking approaches were developed to allow the cost-effective mass fabrication of DOEs in a single optical exposure step. Thin film evaporation of Inconel achieves high-quality masks at a high price. High Energy Beam Sensitive Glass, the second mask material

  2. Finite Element Approach for Coupled Striplines Embedded in Dielectric Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N.O. Sadiku

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present finite element method (FEM to investigate the quasi-static analysis of two dimensional (2D shielded two coupled stripline structures for microelectronic devices.  In the proposed method, we specifically determine the values of capacitance per unit length and inductance per unit length of shielded two vertically coupled striplines and shielded two coupled striplines embedded in dielectric material.  Extensive simulation results are presented, and some comparative results are given by other methods and found them to be in excellent agreement. Furthermore, we determine the quasi-TEM spectral for the potential distribution of these shielded two coupled striplines.

  3. Heavy element stable isotope ratios: analytical approaches and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimizu, Masaharu; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Continuous developments in inorganic mass spectrometry techniques, including a combination of an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a magnetic sector-based mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple-collector array, have revolutionized the precision of isotope ratio measurements, and applications of inorganic mass spectrometry for biochemistry, geochemistry, and marine chemistry are beginning to appear on the horizon. Series of pioneering studies have revealed that natural stable isotope fractionations of many elements heavier than S (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ce, Nd, Mo, Cd, W, Tl, and U) are common on Earth, and it had been widely recognized that most physicochemical reactions or biochemical processes induce mass-dependent isotope fractionation. The variations in isotope ratios of the heavy elements can provide new insights into past and present biochemical and geochemical processes. To achieve this, the analytical community is actively solving problems such as spectral interference, mass discrimination drift, chemical separation and purification, and reduction of the contamination of analytes. This article describes data calibration and standardization protocols to allow interlaboratory comparisons or to maintain traceability of data, and basic principles of isotope fractionation in nature, together with high-selectivity and high-yield chemical separation and purification techniques for stable isotope studies.

  4. Laser therapy applying the differential approaches and biophotometrical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedova, F. M.; Akbarova, Ju. A.; Umarova, D. A.; Yudin, G. A.

    1995-04-01

    The aim of the present paper is the presentation of biophotometrical data obtained from various anatomic-topographical mouth areas to be used for the development of differential approaches to laser therapy in dentistry. Biophotometrical measurements were carried out using a portative biophotometer, as a portion of a multifunctional equipping system of laser therapy, acupuncture and biophotometry referred to as 'Aura-laser'. The results of biophotometrical measurements allow the implementation of differential approaches to laser therapy of parodontitis and mucous mouth tissue taking their clinic form and rate of disease into account.

  5. Volumes of Solids of Revolution. A Unified Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Morales, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to compute the volume of a solid of revolution as a double integral in a very simple way. Then, we see that the classical methods (disks and shells) are recovered if this double integral is computed by each of the two possible applications of Fubini's theorem. As a further application we also show how Pappus' theorem is obtained from our formula.

  6. MILP approaches to sustainable production and distribution of meal elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akkerman, Renzo; Wang, Yang; Grunow, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the production and distribution system for professionally prepared meals, in which a new innovative concept is applied. The concept aims to improve the sustainability of the system by distributing meal elements super-chilled in the conventional cold chain. Here, sustainability...... comprises economic, environmental and social aspects. The impacts on and trade-offs between the different dimensions of sustainability are discussed, and combined with aspect of product quality. Furthermore, we identify the important planning decisions in relation to production and distribution and organise...... these in a decision hierarchy. Based on these discussions, decision support models based on mixed-integer linear programming are developed for the planning tasks on the tactical level, including decision-making on packaging options and delivery structures. The resulting models can be used to support production...

  7. Then and Now: Approaches to Understanding Children's Literature in Two Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M Bani-Khair

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper investigates two main volumes taken from Children's Literature Association Quarterly; the earlier one is Vol. 11 published in 1986, and the other one, a more recent one, Vol. 32 published in 2007, as to understand the differences and similarities regarding the approaches used in the articles to understand Children's Literature in terms of its multifarious aspects such us, literary genres, styles, themes, and methodologies. Such kind of comparison yielded that those differences between those two volumes cover new thematic suggestions, new treatment and projection of characters, and strict scholarship which make the newer volume different in terms of approaches from the earlier one. The research also concluded that modern analytical perspectives are probably the most obvious transformations and changes in the second volume. Keywords: Volume, approach, childhood, construction, scholarship, transformation, modernism, historicism, analysis

  8. Elements of a new approach to time in Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Parisio, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a re-evaluation of the concept of time in non-relativistic quantum theory. We suggest a formalism in which time is changed into the status of an operator, and where expectation values of observables and the state of a quantum system are reworked. This approach leads us to an additional concept, given by a temporal probability distribution associated with the actual measurement of an observable.

  9. Multiscale approach for bone remodeling simulation based on finite element and neural network computation

    CERN Document Server

    Hambli, Ridha

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a multiscale hierarchical hybrid model based on finite element analysis and neural network computation to link mesoscopic scale (trabecular network level) and macroscopic (whole bone level) to simulate bone remodelling process. Because whole bone simulation considering the 3D trabecular level is time consuming, the finite element calculation is performed at macroscopic level and a trained neural network are employed as numerical devices for substituting the finite element code needed for the mesoscale prediction. The bone mechanical properties are updated at macroscopic scale depending on the morphological organization at the mesoscopic computed by the trained neural network. The digital image-based modeling technique using m-CT and voxel finite element mesh is used to capture 2 mm3 Representative Volume Elements at mesoscale level in a femur head. The input data for the artificial neural network are a set of bone material parameters, boundary conditions and the applied str...

  10. Dual-mixed finite elements for the three-field Stokes model as a finite volume method on staggered grids

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-06-09

    In this paper, a new three-field weak formulation for Stokes problems is developed, and from this, a dual-mixed finite element method is proposed on a rectangular mesh. In the proposed mixed methods, the components of stress tensor are approximated by piecewise constant functions or Q1 functions, while the velocity and pressure are discretized by the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas element and the piecewise constant functions, respectively. Using quadrature rules, we demonstrate that this scheme can be reduced into a finite volume method on staggered grid, which is extensively used in computational fluid mechanics and engineering.

  11. A FINITE-ELEMENTS APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF FUNCTIONAL ARCHITECTURE IN SKELETAL-MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OTTEN, E; HULLIGER, M

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model that simulates the mechanical processes inside a skeletal muscle under various conditions of muscle recruitment was formulated. The model is based on the finite-elements approach and simulates both contractile and passive elastic elements. Apart from the classic strategy of solv

  12. A FINITE-ELEMENTS APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF FUNCTIONAL ARCHITECTURE IN SKELETAL-MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OTTEN, E; HULLIGER, M

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model that simulates the mechanical processes inside a skeletal muscle under various conditions of muscle recruitment was formulated. The model is based on the finite-elements approach and simulates both contractile and passive elastic elements. Apart from the classic strategy of solv

  13. Matrix Elements of One- and Two-Body Operators in the Unitary Group Approach (II) - Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Lian-Rong; PAN Feng

    2001-01-01

    Simple analytical expressions for one- and two-body matrix elements in the unitary group approach to the configuration interaction problems of many-electron systems are obtained based on the previous results for general Un irreps.

  14. Biomechanical effects of bone cement volume on the endplates of augmented vertebral body: a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Liang; Chang Zhen; Xu Zhengwei; Liu Tuanjiang; He Baorong; Hao Dingjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that percutaneous vertebroplasty might alter vertebral stress transfer,leading to adjacent vertebral failure.However,no three-dimensional finite element study so far accounted for the stress distributions on different cement volumes.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress distributions on the endplate under different loading conditions after augmentation with various volumes of bone cement.Methods L2-L3 motion segment data were obtained from CT scans of the lumbar spine from a cadaver of a young man who had no abnormal findings on roentgenograms.Three-dimensional model of L2-L3 was established using Mimics software,and finite element model of L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) was established using Ansys10.0 software.For simulating percutaneous vertebral augmentation,polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was deposited into the bipedicle of the L2 vertebra.The percentage of PMMA volume varied between 15% and 30%.The stress distributions on the endplate of the augmented vertebral body were calculated under three different loading conditions.Results In general,the stress level monotonically increased with bone cement volume.Under each loading condition,the stress change on the L2 superior and inferior endplates in three kinds of finite element models shows monotonic increase.Compared with the stress-increasing region of the endplate,the central part of the L2 endplate was subject to the greatest stress under three kinds of loading conditions,especially on the superior endplate and under flexion.Conclusions The finite element models of FSU are useful to optimize the planning for vertebroplasty.The bone cement volume might have an influence on the endplate of the augmentation,especially the superior endplate.It should be noted that the optimization of bone cement volume is patient specific; the volume of the bone cement should be based on the size,body mineral density,and stiffness of the vertebrae of individual

  15. Coherent Beam Combining Element for Five 150-W Fiber Lasers by Volume Bragg Gratings in PTR Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    glasses,” Glass Science and Technology 75 C1 (2002) 73-90. 8. O.M. Efimov , L.B. Glebov, V.I. Smirnov, and L.N. Glebova, “Process for production of...high efficiency volume diffractive elements in photo-thermo-refractive glass,” U.S. Patent 6,586,141 (2003). 9. O.M. Efimov , L.B. Glebov, and V.I

  16. A generalized hybrid transfinite element computational approach for nonlinear/linear unified thermal/structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1987-01-01

    The present paper describes the development of a new hybrid computational approach for applicability for nonlinear/linear thermal structural analysis. The proposed transfinite element approach is a hybrid scheme as it combines the modeling versatility of contemporary finite elements in conjunction with transform methods and the classical Bubnov-Galerkin schemes. Applicability of the proposed formulations for nonlinear analysis is also developed. Several test cases are presented to include nonlinear/linear unified thermal-stress and thermal-stress wave propagations. Comparative results validate the fundamental capablities of the proposed hybrid transfinite element methodology.

  17. Study of Delamination and Buckling of Paper during the Creping Process using Finite Element Method -- A Cohesive Element Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swapnil Sheelkumar

    Paper variants such as paper napkins, tissue paper are manufactured by a process called as creping during which a paper adhesively bonded to a rotating drum is continuously scraped off by a blade. Resulting low density paper provides critical attributes such as fluid absorbency, softness, and stretchiness to the final paper product. The macroscopic effect of creping is the formation of fine ridges called as " crepes". The quality of the final product is characterized by the length of the crepes. The process of creping has been hypothesized to be a periodic sequence of delamination, buckling and post-buckling compression of paper. A quasi-static comparison of a two dimensional finite element model implementing surface based cohesive zone theory and a critical stress criteria based fracture model is presented. The adhesive being a critical part of creping is represented by a zero thickness cohesive layer in the cohesive model . A comparison of a 1-D analytical model implementing an energy release rate approach and a Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) quasi-static finite element model is presented. An experimental investigation to quantitatively determine the adhesive fracture toughness during creping is conducted by an energy based approach. The influence of drum speed and adhesive concentration on the adhesive fracture energy is analyzed and comparison with a dynamic finite element model is obtained.

  18. VOXEL-BASED APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING URBAN TREE VOLUME FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vonderach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of single trees and the determination of related parameters has been recognized in recent years, e.g. for forest inventories or management. For urban areas an increasing interest in the data acquisition of trees can be observed concerning aspects like urban climate, CO2 balance, and environmental protection. Urban trees differ significantly from natural systems with regard to the site conditions (e.g. technogenic soils, contaminants, lower groundwater level, regular disturbance, climate (increased temperature, reduced humidity and species composition and arrangement (habitus and health status and therefore allometric relations cannot be transferred from natural sites to urban areas. To overcome this problem an extended approach was developed for a fast and non-destructive extraction of branch volume, DBH (diameter at breast height and height of single trees from point clouds of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. For data acquisition, the trees were scanned with highest scan resolution from several (up to five positions located around the tree. The resulting point clouds (20 to 60 million points are analysed with an algorithm based on voxel (volume elements structure, leading to an appropriate data reduction. In a first step, two kinds of noise reduction are carried out: the elimination of isolated voxels as well as voxels with marginal point density. To obtain correct volume estimates, the voxels inside the stem and branches (interior voxels where voxels contain no laser points must be regarded. For this filling process, an easy and robust approach was developed based on a layer-wise (horizontal layers of the voxel structure intersection of four orthogonal viewing directions. However, this procedure also generates several erroneous "phantom" voxels, which have to be eliminated. For this purpose the previous approach was extended by a special region growing algorithm. In a final step the volume is determined layer-wise based on the

  19. Generalized Navier Boundary Condition for a Volume Of Fluid approach using a Finite-Volume method

    CERN Document Server

    Boelens, A M P

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an analytical Volume Of Fluid (VOF) implementation of the Generalized Navier Boundary Condition is presented based on the Brackbill surface tension model. The model is validated by simulations of droplets on a smooth surface in a planar geometry. Looking at the static behavior of the droplets, it is found that there is a good match between the droplet shape resolved in the simulations and the theoretically predicted shape for various values of the Young's angle. Evaluating the spreading of a droplet on a completely wetting surface, the Voinov-Tanner-Cox law ($\\theta \\propto \\text{Ca}^{1/3}$) can be observed. At later times scaling follows $r \\propto t^{1/2}$, suggesting spreading is limited by inertia. These observations are made without any fitting parameters except the slip length.

  20. Evaluating Volume Fractions of the Elements for Composite Laminates by Using Dielectric Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周胜; 储才元; 严灏景

    2001-01-01

    A series and parallel model for investigating the capacity of composite laminates and the relationship between the dielectric properties of the composites and its constituents are presented. Volume fractions of the constituents are considered in this study. The expression of the complex dielectric constants for evaluating volume fractions under discrete frequencies is established and the general solutions for the resultant linear simultaneous equations for system are also exploited.The results show that the high accuracy of proposed method is obtained.

  1. Volume-area scaling approach versus flowline model in glacier volume projections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radic, V.; Hock, Regine; Oerlemans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Volume–area scaling provides a practical alternative to ice-flow modelling to account for glacier size changes when modelling the future evolution of glaciers; however, uncertainties remain as to the validity of this approach under non-steady conditions. We address these uncertainties by deriving sc

  2. Orbital stress analysis, part V: systematic approach to validate a finite element model of a human orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-sukhun, Jehad; Penttilä, Heikki; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2012-05-01

    The progress in computer technology and the increased use of finite element analysis in the medical field by nonengineers and medical researchers lead us to believe that there is a need to develop a systematic approach to validate a finite element model (FEM), of a human orbit, that simulates part of the maxillofacial skeleton and to investigate the effects and the clinical significance of changing the geometry, boundary conditions, that is, muscle forces, and orthotropic material properties on the predictive outcome of an FEM of a human orbit. Forty-seven variables affecting the material properties, boundary conditions, and the geometry of an FEM of a human orbit including the globe were systematically changed, creating a number of FEMs of the orbit. The effects of the variations were quantified as differences in the principal strain magnitudes modeled by the original FEM (criterion standard), before the sensitivity analyses, and those generated by the changed FEMs. The material properties that had the biggest impact on the predicted principal strains were the shear moduli (up to 21%) and the absence of fatty tissue (up to 75%). The boundary condition properties that had the biggest impact on the predicted principal strains were the superior rectus muscle and canthal ligaments (up to 18% and 23%, respectively). Alterations to the geometry of the orbit, such as an increase in its volume, had the greatest effect on principal strain magnitudes (up to 52%). Changes in geometry, boundary conditions, and orthotropic material properties can induce significant changes in strain patterns. These values must therefore be chosen with care when using finite element modeling techniques. This study also highlights the importance of restoring the orbital fat and volume when reconstructing the orbital floor following a blunt injury. The possibility that the unrestored increase in the orbital volume and the resulting stresses may be a source of globe injuries, causing diplopia

  3. A novel approach to predict the excess volume of hydrocarbon mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkers, H. J.; Bosma, J. C.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores whether principles obtained for the packing of solid macroscopic particles can be applied to the study of excess volumes of liquid mixtures. The approach is applied to mixtures of 'pure' hydrocarbons, i.e. containing only C- and H-atoms. In this new approach a set of equations wa

  4. Automatic finite elements mesh generation from planar contours of the brain: an image driven 'blobby' approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bucki, M; Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of automatic mesh generation for finite elements modeling of anatomical organs for which a volumetric data set is available. In the first step a set of characteristic outlines of the organ is defined manually or automatically within the volume. The outlines define the "key frames" that will guide the procedure of surface reconstruction. Then, based on this information, and along with organ surface curvature information extracted from the volume data, a 3D scalar field is generated. This field allows a 3D reconstruction of the organ: as an iso-surface model, using a marching cubes algorithm; or as a 3D mesh, using a grid "immersion" technique, the field value being used as the outside/inside test. The final reconstruction respects the various topological changes that occur within the organ, such as holes and branching elements.

  5. A combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme for compressible two phase flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2014-06-28

    We propose and analyze a combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme on general meshes to simulate the two compressible phase flow in porous media. The diffusion term, which can be anisotropic and heterogeneous, is discretized by piecewise linear nonconforming triangular finite elements. The other terms are discretized by means of a cell-centered finite volume scheme on a dual mesh, where the dual volumes are constructed around the sides of the original mesh. The relative permeability of each phase is decentred according the sign of the velocity at the dual interface. This technique also ensures the validity of the discrete maximum principle for the saturation under a non restrictive shape regularity of the space mesh and the positiveness of all transmissibilities. Next, a priori estimates on the pressures and a function of the saturation that denote capillary terms are established. These stabilities results lead to some compactness arguments based on the use of the Kolmogorov compactness theorem, and allow us to derive the convergence of a subsequence of the sequence of approximate solutions to a weak solution of the continuous equations, provided the mesh size tends to zero. The proof is given for the complete system when the density of the each phase depends on its own pressure. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. A hybrid vertex-centered finite volume/element method for viscous incompressible flows on non-staggered unstructured meshes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gao; Ru-Xun Liu; Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid vertex-centered finite volume/finite element method for sol ution of the two dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids.An incremental pressure fractional step method is adopted to handle the velocity-pressure coupling.The velocity and the pressure are collocated at the node of the vertex-centered control volume which is formed by joining the centroid of cells sharing the common vertex.For the temporal integration of the momentum equations,an implicit second-order scheme is utilized to enhance the computational stability and eliminate the time step limit due to the diffusion term.The momentum equations are discretized by the vertex-centered finite volume method (FVM) and the pressure Poisson equation is solved by the Galerkin finite element method (FEM).The momentum interpolation is used to damp out the spurious pressure wiggles.The test case with analytical solutions demonstrates second-order accuracy of the current hybrid scheme in time and space for both velocity and pressure.The classic test cases,the lid-driven cavity flow,the skew cavity flow and the backward-facing step flow,show that numerical results are in good agreement with the published benchmark solutions.

  7. Mechanistic approach to multi-element isotope modeling of organic contaminant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a multi-element isotope modeling approach to simultaneously predict the evolution of different isotopes during the transformation of organic contaminants. The isotopic trends of different elements are explicitly simulated by tracking position-specific isotopologues that contain the isotopes located at fractionating positions. Our approach is self-consistent and provides a mechanistic description of different degradation pathways that accounts for the influence of both primary and secondary isotope effects during contaminant degradation. The method is particularly suited to quantitatively describe the isotopic evolution of relatively large organic contaminant molecules. For such compounds, an integrated approach, simultaneously considering all possible isotopologues, would be impractical due to the large number of isotopologues. We apply the proposed modeling approach to the degradation of toluene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and nitrobenzene observed in previous experimental studies. Our model successfully predicts the multi-element isotope data (both 2D and 3D), and accurately captures the distinct trends observed for different reaction pathways. The proposed approach provides an improved and mechanistic methodology to interpret multi-element isotope data and to predict the extent of multi-element isotope fractionation that goes beyond commonly applied modeling descriptions and simplified methods based on the ratio between bulk enrichment factors or on linear regression in dual-isotope plots.

  8. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series. Volume 1. Thermal Conductivity - Metallic Elements and Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    graduate level may also use it as a teaching tool to 401011111111111 Contents Foreword Vii Preface ix. Introduction to Volume I xiii Grouping of...34’The Calory and the g. Pages Joule in Thermodynamics and Thermochemistry ," Am. J. h. Year Phys., 12 (1), 1-7, 1944. •l -"e i 44a Numerical Data . - 4

  9. Broadband behavior of transmission volume holographic optical elements for solar concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañares-Palacios, Paula; Álvarez-Álvarez, Samuel; Marín-Sáez, Julia; Collados, María-Victoria; Chemisana, Daniel; Atencia, Jesús

    2015-06-01

    A ray tracing algorithm is developed to analyze the energy performance of transmission and phase volume holographic lenses that operate with broadband illumination. The agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical treatment has been tested. The model has been applied to analyze the optimum recording geometry for solar concentration applications.

  10. A Computational Approach for Automated Posturing of a Human Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    following: obtaining source geometries in the posture being tested, a so- called posturing “by hand” where geometries are moved to what “looks correct ...ARL-MR-0934• JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory A Computational Approach for Automated Posturing of a Human Finite ElementModel by Justin McKee...Automated Posturing of a Human Finite ElementModel by Justin McKee Bennett Aerospace, Inc., Cary, NC Adam Sokolow Weapons and Materials Research

  11. A new approach in cascade flow analysis using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskharone, E.; Hamed, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new approach in analyzing the potential flow past cascades and single airfoils using the finite element method is developed. In this analysis the circulation around the airfoil is not externally imposed but is directly computed in the numerical solution. Different finite element discretization patterns, orders of piecewise approximation, and grid sizes are used in the solution. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental measurements and exact solutions in cascades and single airfoils.

  12. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquin, P.

    2010-06-01

    Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 - 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs) [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction) of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1). The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa), a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the particulate

  13. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR. The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 – 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1. The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa, a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the

  14. Translating the common elements approach: social work's experiences in education, practice, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Richard P; Kolivoski, Karen M; Lindsey, Michael A; Lee, Bethany R; Collins, Kathryn S

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in mental health services is well under way and social work seeks to further its appropriate implementation in both specialty and nonspecialty mental health settings. The common elements approach is now recognized as demonstrating promise for use in a range of settings. This article discusses the attractiveness of the common elements approach and describes several efforts to integrate its content into social work education and to disseminate this approach into the field. Then the article presents research initiatives regarding two areas of nonspecialty mental health practice with children and families: (a) engaging clients in mental health services and (b) preventing the need for out-of-home placement for youth. Finally, we consider the challenges of the common elements framework for social work education and practice and future directions for research.

  15. Low-volume aluminum and aluminum / titanium nitride bilayer lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors for far-infrared astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Fyhrie, Adalyn; Wheeler, Jordan; Day, Peter K.; Eom, Byeong H.; Leduc, Henry G.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and characterization of low-volume, lumped-element aluminum kinetic inductance de- tectors for sensitive far-infrared astronomy observations. The lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors are comprised of meandered inductors that serve as radiation absorbers in parallel with interdigitated capacitors, forming high quality factor resonators. Low inductor volumes lead to low noise equivalent powers by raising quasiparticles densities, and hence responsivities, with respect to larger volumes. Low volumes are achieved with thin (20 nm), narrow (150 nm) inductors. The interdigitated capacitor architecture is designed to mitigate two-level system noise by lowering electric fields in the silicon substrate. Resonance frequencies are in the range of 190 to 500 MHz, with measured internal quality factors in excess of 1 x 105. In a prior incarnation, a titanium nitride layer on top of the aluminum served as a protective layer, but complicated the superconducting proper- ties. These results were reported previously. In the current incarnation, the aluminum layer is left bare with no titanium nitride over-layer. The results for these bare aluminum devices include a yield of 88%, frequency responsivity of 109 W-1, and noise equivalent power of 1 x 10-17 W Hz-1/2 for a 350μm array. There is no evidence for 1=f noise down to at least 200 mHz. The sensitivity is currently limited by white noise, very likely from stray light in the testbed; for this detector design, sensitivities limited by generation-recombination noise in a lower-background environment should be several orders of magnitude lower.

  16. Modified Method of Characteristics Combined with Finite Volume Element Methods for Incompressible Miscible Displacement Problems in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incompressible miscible displacement problem in porous media is modeled by a coupled system of two nonlinear partial differential equations, the pressure-velocity equation and the concentration equation. In this paper, we present a mixed finite volume element method (FVEM for the approximation of the pressure-velocity equation. Since modified method of characteristics (MMOC minimizes the grid orientation effect, for the approximation of the concentration equation, we apply a standard FVEM combined with MMOC. A priori error estimates in L∞(L2 norm are derived for velocity, pressure and concentration. Numerical results are presented to substantiate the validity of the theoretical results.

  17. A waveguide finite element and boundary element approach to calculating the sound radiated by railway and tram rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, C.-M.; Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Ryue, J.

    2009-04-01

    Engineering methods for modelling the generation of railway rolling noise are well established. However, these necessarily involve some simplifying assumptions to calculate the sound powers radiated by the wheel and the track. For the rail, this involves using an average vibration together with a radiation efficiency determined for a two-dimensional (2D) problem. In this paper, the sound radiation from a rail is calculated using a method based on a combination of waveguide finite elements and wavenumber boundary elements. This new method allows a number of the simplifying assumptions in the established methods to be avoided. It takes advantage of the 2D geometry of a rail to provide an efficient numerical approach but nevertheless takes into account the three-dimensional nature of the vibration and sound field and the infinite extent of the rail. The approach is used to study a conventional 'open' rail as well as an embedded tram rail of the type used for street running. In the former case it is shown that the conventional approach gives correct results and the complexity of the new method is mostly not necessary. However, for the embedded rail it is found that it is important to take into account the radiation from several wave types in the rail and embedding material. The damping effect of the embedding material on the rail vibration is directly taken into account and, for the example shown, causes the embedded rail to radiate less sound than the open rail above about 600 Hz. The free surface of the embedding material amplifies the sound radiation at some frequencies, while at other frequencies it moves out of phase with the rail and reduces the radiation efficiency. At low frequencies the radiation from the embedded rail resembles a line monopole source which produces greater power than the 'open' rail which forms a line dipole.

  18. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  19. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  20. A non-conformal finite element/finite volume scheme for the non-structured grid-based approximation of low Mach number flows; Un schema elements finis non-conformes/volumes finis pour l'approximation en maillages non-structures des ecoulements a faible nombre de Mach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansanay-Alex, G.

    2009-06-17

    The development of simulation codes aimed at a precise simulation of fires requires a precise approach of flame front phenomena by using very fine grids. The need to take different spatial scale into consideration leads to a local grid refinement and to a discretization with homogeneous grid for computing time and memory purposes. The author reports the approximation of the non-linear convection term, the scalar advection-diffusion in finite volumes, numerical simulations of a flow in a bent tube, of a three-dimensional laminar flame and of a low Mach number an-isotherm flow. Non conformal finite elements are also presented (Rannacher-Turek and Crouzeix-Raviart elements)

  1. Comparing geological and statistical approaches for element selection in sediment tracing research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; McMahon, Joe; Evrard, Olivier; Olley, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Elevated suspended sediment loads reduce reservoir capacity and significantly increase the cost of operating water treatment infrastructure, making the management of sediment supply to reservoirs of increasingly importance. Sediment fingerprinting techniques can be used to determine the relative contributions of different sources of sediment accumulating in reservoirs. The objective of this research is to compare geological and statistical approaches to element selection for sediment fingerprinting modelling. Time-integrated samplers (n=45) were used to obtain source samples from four major subcatchments flowing into the Baroon Pocket Dam in South East Queensland, Australia. The geochemistry of potential sources were compared to the geochemistry of sediment cores (n=12) sampled in the reservoir. The geochemical approach selected elements for modelling that provided expected, observed and statistical discrimination between sediment sources. Two statistical approaches selected elements for modelling with the Kruskal-Wallis H-test and Discriminatory Function Analysis (DFA). In particular, two different significance levels (0.05 & 0.35) for the DFA were included to investigate the importance of element selection on modelling results. A distribution model determined the relative contributions of different sources to sediment sampled in the Baroon Pocket Dam. Elemental discrimination was expected between one subcatchment (Obi Obi Creek) and the remaining subcatchments (Lexys, Falls and Bridge Creek). Six major elements were expected to provide discrimination. Of these six, only Fe2O3 and SiO2 provided expected, observed and statistical discrimination. Modelling results with this geological approach indicated 36% (+/- 9%) of sediment sampled in the reservoir cores were from mafic-derived sources and 64% (+/- 9%) were from felsic-derived sources. The geological and the first statistical approach (DFA0.05) differed by only 1% (σ 5%) for 5 out of 6 model groupings with only

  2. Numerical modelling in building thermo-aeraulics: from CFD modelling to an hybrid finite volume / zonal approach; Modelisation numerique de la thermoaeraulique du batiment: des modeles CFD a une approche hybride volumes finis / zonale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellivier, A.

    2004-05-15

    For 3D modelling of thermo-aeraulics in building using field codes, it is necessary to reduce the computing time in order to model increasingly larger volumes. The solution suggested in this study is to couple two modelling: a zonal approach and a CFD approach. The first part of the work that was carried out is the setting of a simplified CFD modelling. We propose rules for use of coarse grids, a constant effective viscosity law and adapted coefficients for heat exchange in the framework of building thermo-aeraulics. The second part of this work concerns the creation of fluid Macro-Elements and their coupling with a calculation of CFD finite volume type. Depending on the boundary conditions of the problem, a local description of the driving flow is proposed via the installation and use of semi-empirical evolution laws. The Macro-Elements is then inserted in CFD computation: the values of velocity calculated by the evolution laws are imposed on the CFD cells corresponding to the Macro-Element. We use these two approaches on five cases representative of thermo-aeraulics in buildings. The results are compared with experimental data and with traditional RANS simulations. We highlight the significant gain of time that our approach allows while preserving a good quality of numerical results. (author)

  3. A Hybrid 3D Learning-and-Interaction-based Segmentation Approach Applied on CT Liver Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Danciu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical volume segmentation in various imaging modalities using real 3D approaches (in contrast to slice-by-slice segmentation represents an actual trend. The increase in the acquisition resolution leads to large amount of data, requiring solutions to reduce the dimensionality of the segmentation problem. In this context, the real-time interaction with the large medical data volume represents another milestone. This paper addresses the twofold problem of the 3D segmentation applied to large data sets and also describes an intuitive neuro-fuzzy trained interaction method. We present a new hybrid semi-supervised 3D segmentation, for liver volumes obtained from computer tomography scans. This is a challenging medical volume segmentation task, due to the acquisition and inter-patient variability of the liver parenchyma. The proposed solution combines a learning-based segmentation stage (employing 3D discrete cosine transform and a probabilistic support vector machine classifier with a post-processing stage (automatic and manual segmentation refinement. Optionally, an optimization of the segmentation can be achieved by level sets, using as initialization the segmentation provided by the learning-based solution. The supervised segmentation is applied on elementary cubes in which the CT volume is decomposed by tilling, thus ensuring a significant reduction of the data to be classified by the support vector machine into liver/not liver. On real volumes, the proposed approach provides good segmentation accuracy, with a significant reduction in the computational complexity.

  4. A practical approach to extract symplectic transfer maps numerically for arbitrary magnetic elements

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a practical approach to extract the symplectic transfer maps for arbitrary magnetic beam-line elements. Beam motion in particle accelerators depends on linear and nonlinear magnetic fields of the beam-line elements. These elements are usually modeled as magnetic multipoles with constant field strengths in the longitudinal direction (i.e., hard-edge model) in accelerator design and modeling codes. For magnets with complicated structures such as insertion devices or fields with significant longitudinal variation effects, the simplified models may not be sufficient to char- acterize beam dynamics behaviors accurately. A numerical approach has been developed to extract symplectic transfer maps from particle trajectory tracking simulation that uses magnetic field data provided by three-dimensional magnetic field modeling codes or experimental measurements. The extracted transfer maps can be used in linear optics design and nonlinear dynamics optimization to achieve more realistic results.

  5. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  6. A new finite element approach for prediction of aerothermal loads - Progress in inviscid flow computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commercially available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  7. Test functions for three-dimensional control-volume mixed finite-element methods on irregular grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    2000-01-01

    Numerical methods based on unstructured grids, with irregular cells, usually require discrete shape functions to approximate the distribution of quantities across cells. For control-volume mixed finite-element methods, vector shape functions are used to approximate the distribution of velocities across cells and vector test functions are used to minimize the error associated with the numerical approximation scheme. For a logically cubic mesh, the lowest-order shape functions are chosen in a natural way to conserve intercell fluxes that vary linearly in logical space. Vector test functions, while somewhat restricted by the mapping into the logical reference cube, admit a wider class of possibilities. Ideally, an error minimization procedure to select the test function from an acceptable class of candidates would be the best procedure. Lacking such a procedure, we first investigate the effect of possible test functions on the pressure distribution over the control volume; specifically, we look for test functions that allow for the elimination of intermediate pressures on cell faces. From these results, we select three forms for the test function for use in a control-volume mixed method code and subject them to an error analysis for different forms of grid irregularity; errors are reported in terms of the discrete L2 norm of the velocity error. Of these three forms, one appears to produce optimal results for most forms of grid irregularity.

  8. Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srbislav S. Pajic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anatomy of frontal sinuses varies individually, from differences in volume and shape to a rare case when the sinuses are absent. However, there are scarce data related to influence of these variations on impact generated fracture pattern. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of frontal sinus volume on the stress distribution and fracture pattern in the frontal region. The study included four representative Finite Element models of the skull. Reference model was built on the basis of computed tomography scans of a human head with normally developed frontal sinuses. By modifying the reference model, three additional models were generated: a model without sinuses, with hypoplasic, and with hyperplasic sinuses. A 7.7 kN force was applied perpendicularly to the forehead of each model, in order to simulate a frontal impact. The results demonstrated that the distribution of impact stress in frontal region depends on the frontal sinus volume. The anterior sinus wall showed the highest fragility in case with hyperplasic sinuses, whereas posterior wall/inner plate showed more fragility in cases with hypoplasic and undeveloped sinuses. Well-developed frontal sinuses might, through absorption of the impact energy by anterior wall, protect the posterior wall and intracranial contents.

  9. A perturbation approach for geometrically nonlinear structural analysis using a general purpose finite element code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahman, T.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, a finite element based perturbation approach is presented for geometrically nonlinear analysis of thin-walled structures. Geometrically nonlinear static and dynamic analyses are essential for this class of structures. Nowadays nonlinear analysis of thin-walled shell structures is oft

  10. Improved Simulation of Subsurface Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs Using a Fully Discontinuous Control-Volume-Finite-Element Method, Implicit Timestepping and Dynamic Unstructured Mesh Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, P.; Jackson, M.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Adam, A.; Xie, Z.; Percival, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Within these volumes, termed geologic domains, the material properties are constant. A given model typically contains numerous such geologic domains. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization, in which an unstructured mesh adapts in space and time to key solution fields, such as pressure, velocity or saturation, whilst preserving the geometry of the geologic domains. Up-, cross- or down-scaling of material properties during mesh optimization is not required, as the properties are uniform within each geologic domain. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains such as fractures and mudstones, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at significantly lower computational cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods to model flow in highly heterogeneous porous media, in which CVs span boundaries between domains of contrasting material properties. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number.

  11. Then and Now: Approaches to Understanding Children's Literature in Two Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Khair, Baker M.; Khawaldeh, Imad M.

    2016-01-01

    This research paper investigates two main volumes taken from "Children's Literature Association Quarterly"; the earlier one is Vol. 11 published in 1986, and the other one, a more recent one, Vol. 32 published in 2007, as to understand the differences and similarities regarding the approaches used in the articles to understand Children's…

  12. A super-element approach for structural identification in time domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; ZHAO Xin

    2006-01-01

    For most time-domain identification methods,a complete measurement for unique identification results is required for structural responses.However,the number of transducers is commonly far less than the number of structural degrees of freedom (DOFs) in practical applications,and thus make the time-domain identification methods rarely feasible for practical systems.A super-element approach is proposed in this study to identify the structural parameters of a large-scale structure in the time domain.The most interesting feature of the proposed super-element approach is its divide-and-conquer ability,which can be applied to identify large-scale structures using a relatively small number of transducers.The super-element model used for time domain identification is first discussed in this study.Then a parameterization procedure based on the sensitivities of response forces is introduced to establish the identification equations of super-elements.Some principles are suggested on effective decomposing of the whole structure into super-elements for identification purposes.Numerical simulations are conducted at the end of this study.The numerical results show that all structural parameters can be identified using a relatively small number of transducers,and the computational time can also be greatly shortened.

  13. A multi-criteria approach to camera motion design for volume data animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Hsien; Zhang, Yubo; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2013-12-01

    We present an integrated camera motion design and path generation system for building volume data animations. Creating animations is an essential task in presenting complex scientific visualizations. Existing visualization systems use an established animation function based on keyframes selected by the user. This approach is limited in providing the optimal in-between views of the data. Alternatively, computer graphics and virtual reality camera motion planning is frequently focused on collision free movement in a virtual walkthrough. For semi-transparent, fuzzy, or blobby volume data the collision free objective becomes insufficient. Here, we provide a set of essential criteria focused on computing camera paths to establish effective animations of volume data. Our dynamic multi-criteria solver coupled with a force-directed routing algorithm enables rapid generation of camera paths. Once users review the resulting animation and evaluate the camera motion, they are able to determine how each criterion impacts path generation. In this paper, we demonstrate how incorporating this animation approach with an interactive volume visualization system reduces the effort in creating context-aware and coherent animations. This frees the user to focus on visualization tasks with the objective of gaining additional insight from the volume data.

  14. Iterative Fourier transform algorithm: different approaches to diffractive optical element design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeren, Marek; Richter, Ivan; Fiala, Pavel

    2002-10-01

    This contribution focuses on the study and comparison of different design approaches for designing phase-only diffractive optical elements (PDOEs) for different possible applications in laser beam shaping. Especially, new results and approaches, concerning the iterative Fourier transform algorithm, are analyzed, implemented, and compared. Namely, various approaches within the iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) are analyzed for the case of phase-only diffractive optical elements with quantizied phase levels (either binary or multilevel structures). First, the general scheme of the IFTA iterative approach with partial quantization is briefly presented and discussed. Then, the special assortment of the general IFTA scheme is given with respect to quantization constraint strategies. Based on such a special classification, the three practically interesting approaches are chosen, further-analyzed, and compared to eachother. The performance of these algorithms is compared in detail in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio characteristic developments with respect to the numberof iterations, for various input diffusive-type objects chose. Also, the performance is documented on the complex spectra developments for typical computer reconstruction results. The advantages and drawbacks of all approaches are discussed, and a brief guide on the choice of a particular approach for typical design tasks is given. Finally, the two ways of amplitude elimination within the design procedure are considered, namely the direct elimination and partial elimination of the amplitude of the complex hologram function.

  15. Robust Multiscale Modelling Of Two-Phase Steels On Heterogeneous Hardware Infrastructures By Using Statistically Similar Representative Volume Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauch Ł.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupled finite element multiscale simulations (FE2 require costly numerical procedures in both macro and micro scales. Attempts to improve numerical efficiency are focused mainly on two areas of development, i.e. parallelization/distribution of numerical procedures and simplification of virtual material representation. One of the representatives of both mentioned areas is the idea of Statistically Similar Representative Volume Element (SSRVE. It aims at the reduction of the number of finite elements in micro scale as well as at parallelization of the calculations in micro scale which can be performed without barriers. The simplification of computational domain is realized by transformation of sophisticated images of material microstructure into artificially created simple objects being characterized by similar features as their original equivalents. In existing solutions for two-phase steels SSRVE is created on the basis of the analysis of shape coefficients of hard phase in real microstructure and searching for a representative simple structure with similar shape coefficients. Optimization techniques were used to solve this task. In the present paper local strains and stresses are added to the cost function in optimization. Various forms of the objective function composed of different elements were investigated and used in the optimization procedure for the creation of the final SSRVE. The results are compared as far as the efficiency of the procedure and uniqueness of the solution are considered. The best objective function composed of shape coefficients, as well as of strains and stresses, was proposed. Examples of SSRVEs determined for the investigated two-phase steel using that objective function are demonstrated in the paper. Each step of SSRVE creation is investigated from computational efficiency point of view. The proposition of implementation of the whole computational procedure on modern High Performance Computing (HPC

  16. Precise segmentation of multiple organs in CT volumes using learning-based approach and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Zheng, Yefeng; Birkbeck, Neil; Zhang, Jingdan; Kohlberger, Timo; Tietjen, Christian; Boettger, Thomas; Duncan, James S; Zhou, S Kevin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method by incorporating information theory into the learning-based approach for automatic and accurate pelvic organ segmentation (including the prostate, bladder and rectum). We target 3D CT volumes that are generated using different scanning protocols (e.g., contrast and non-contrast, with and without implant in the prostate, various resolution and position), and the volumes come from largely diverse sources (e.g., diseased in different organs). Three key ingredients are combined to solve this challenging segmentation problem. First, marginal space learning (MSL) is applied to efficiently and effectively localize the multiple organs in the largely diverse CT volumes. Second, learning techniques, steerable features, are applied for robust boundary detection. This enables handling of highly heterogeneous texture pattern. Third, a novel information theoretic scheme is incorporated into the boundary inference process. The incorporation of the Jensen-Shannon divergence further drives the mesh to the best fit of the image, thus improves the segmentation performance. The proposed approach is tested on a challenging dataset containing 188 volumes from diverse sources. Our approach not only produces excellent segmentation accuracy, but also runs about eighty times faster than previous state-of-the-art solutions. The proposed method can be applied to CT images to provide visual guidance to physicians during the computer-aided diagnosis, treatment planning and image-guided radiotherapy to treat cancers in pelvic region.

  17. A risk management approach to double-shell tank waste volume versus storage capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Thurkow, T.J.; Fritz, R.L.; Nuhlestein, L.O.; Allen, M.R.; Stuart, R.J. [ARES Corp. (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A risk-based assessment of the overall waste volume versus double-shell tank storage capacity was conducted to develop fallback positions for projections where the waste volume was at a high risk of exceeding capacity. This study was initiated to provide that assessment. A working simulation model was the primary deliverable of this study. The model validates the approach and demonstrates that simulation analysis can provide a method of tracking uncertainties in available data, assessing probabilities, and serves as a tool to be used by management to determine the consequences of various off-normal occurrences.

  18. Hot and Dense Hadron Gas (HG): A New Excluded-volume approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, S K

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a thermodynamically consistent equation of state (EOS), based on excluded-volume approach, for a hot, dense hadron gas (HG). We calculate various thermodynamical quantities of HG and various hadron ratios and compare our model results with the results of other excluded-volume models and experimental data. We also calculate various transport coefficients such as $\\eta/s$ etc. and compare them with other HG model results. Furthermore, we test the validity of our model in getting the rapidity spectra of various hadrons and the effect of flow on them is investigated by matching our predictions with the experimental data.

  19. A finite element approach to self-consistent field theory calculations of multiblock polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, David M; Fredrickson, Glenn H; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory (SCFT) has proven to be a powerful tool for modeling equilibrium microstructures of soft materials, particularly for multiblock polymers. A very successful approach to numerically solving the SCFT set of equations is based on using a spectral approach. While widely successful, this approach has limitations especially in the context of current technologically relevant applications. These limitations include non-trivial approaches for modeling complex geometries, difficulties in extending to non-periodic domains, as well as non-trivial extensions for spatial adaptivity. As a viable alternative to spectral schemes, we develop a finite element formulation of the SCFT paradigm for calculating equilibrium polymer morphologies. We discuss the formulation and address implementation challenges that ensure accuracy and efficiency. We explore higher order chain contour steppers that are efficiently implemented with Richardson Extrapolation. This approach is highly scalable and suitable for s...

  20. Theoretical aspects of the internal element connectivity parameterization approach for topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Kim, Y.Y.; Langelaar, M.;

    2008-01-01

    . Therefore, it is important to interpolate link stiffness properly to obtain stably converging results. The main objective of this work is two-fold (1) the investigation of the relationship between the link stiffness and the stiffness of a domain-discretizing patch by using a discrete model and a homogenized......The internal element connectivity parameterization (I-ECP) method is an alternative approach to overcome numerical instabilities associated with low-stiffness element states in non-linear problems. In I-ECP, elements are connected by zero-length links while their link stiffness values are varied...... model and (2) the suggestion of link stiffness interpolation functions. The effects of link stiffness penalization on solution convergence are then tested with several numerical examples. The developed homogenized I-ECP model can also be used to physically interpret an intermediate design variable state....

  1. A surrogate approach to study the evolution of noncoding DNA elements that organize eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaak, Danielle; Bayes, Joshua J; Malik, Harmit S

    2009-01-01

    Comparative genomics provides a facile way to address issues of evolutionary constraint acting on different elements of the genome. However, several important DNA elements have not reaped the benefits of this new approach. Some have proved intractable to current day sequencing technology. These include centromeric and heterochromatic DNA, which are essential for chromosome segregation as well as gene regulation, but the highly repetitive nature of the DNA sequences in these regions make them difficult to assemble into longer contigs. Other sequences, like dosage compensation X chromosomal sites, origins of DNA replication, or heterochromatic sequences that encode piwi-associated RNAs, have proved difficult to study because they do not have recognizable DNA features that allow them to be described functionally or computationally. We have employed an alternate approach to the direct study of these DNA elements. By using proteins that specifically bind these noncoding DNAs as surrogates, we can indirectly assay the evolutionary constraints acting on these important DNA elements. We review the impact that such "surrogate strategies" have had on our understanding of the evolutionary constraints shaping centromeres, origins of DNA replication, and dosage compensation X chromosomal sites. These have begun to reveal that in contrast to the view that such structural DNA elements are either highly constrained (under purifying selection) or free to drift (under neutral evolution), some of them may instead be shaped by adaptive evolution and genetic conflicts (these are not mutually exclusive). These insights also help to explain why the same elements (e.g., centromeres and replication origins), which are so complex in some eukaryotic genomes, can be simple and well defined in other where similar conflicts do not exist.

  2. Volume-Point” heat conduction constructal optimization with entransy dissipation minimization objective based on rectangular element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    By taking equivalent thermal resistance, which reflects the average heat conduc- tion effect and is defined based on entransy dissipation, as optimization objective, the "volume to point" constructal problem of how to discharge the heat generated in a fixed volume to a heat sink on the border through relatively high conductive link is re-analyzed and re-optimized in this paper. The constructal shape of the control volume with the best average heat conduction effect is deduced. For the elemental area and the first order construct assembly, when the thermal current density in the high conductive link is linear with the length, the optimized shapes of assemble based on the minimization of entransy dissipation are the same as those based on minimization of maximum temperature difference, and the mean tem- perature difference is 2/3 of the maximum temperature difference. For the second and higher order construct assemblies, the thermal current densities in the high conductive link are not linear with the length, and the optimized shapes of assem- ble based on the minimization of entransy dissipation are different from those based on minimization of maximum temperature difference. For the same parame- ters, the constructs based on minimization of entransy dissipation and the con- structs based on minimization of maximum temperature difference are compared, and the results show that the constructs based on entransy dissipation can de- crease the mean temperature difference better than the constructs based on mini- mization of maximum temperature difference. But with the increase of the number of the order, the mean temperature difference does not always decrease, and there exist some fluctuations. Because the idea of entransy describes the heat transfer ability more suitably, all of the heat conduction constructal problems may be re-optimized based on it.

  3. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  4. Finite element methods for engineering sciences. Theoretical approach and problem solving techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaskalovic, J. [Ariel University Center of Samaria (Israel); Pierre and Marie Curie (Paris VI) Univ., 75 (France). Inst. Jean le Rond d' Alembert

    2008-07-01

    This self-tutorial offers a concise yet thorough grounding in the mathematics necessary for successfully applying FEMs to practical problems in science and engineering. The unique approach first summarizes and outlines the finite-element mathematics in general and then, in the second and major part, formulates problem examples that clearly demonstrate the techniques of functional analysis via numerous and diverse exercises. The solutions of the problems are given directly afterwards. Using this approach, the author motivates and encourages the reader to actively acquire the knowledge of finite- element methods instead of passively absorbing the material, as in most standard textbooks. The enlarged English-language edition, based on the original French, also contains a chapter on the approximation steps derived from the description of nature with differential equations and then applied to the specific model to be used. Furthermore, an introduction to tensor calculus using distribution theory offers further insight for readers with different mathematical backgrounds. (orig.)

  5. General and efficient parallel approach of finite element-boundary integral-multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Xiaomin; Sheng Xinqing

    2008-01-01

    A general and efficient parallel approach is proposed for the first time to parallelize the hybrid finite-element-boundary-integral-multi-level fast multipole algorithm (FE-BI-MLFMA). Among many algorithms of FE-BI-MLFMA, the decomposition algorithm (DA) is chosen as a basis for the parallelization of FE-BI-MLFMA because of its distinct numerical characteristics suitable for parallelization. On the basis of the DA, the parallelization of FE-BI-MLFMA is carried out by employing the parallelized multi-frontal method for the matrix from the finite-element method and the parallelized MLFMA for the matrix from the boundary integral method respectively. The programming and numerical experiments of the proposed parallel approach are carried out in the high perfor-mance computing platform CEMS-Liuhui. Numerical experiments demonstrate that FE-BI-MLFMA is efficiently parallelized and its computational capacity is greatly improved without losing accuracy, efficiency, and generality.

  6. Simulation of 3D parachute fluid-structure interaction based on nonlinear finite element method and preconditioning finite volume method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yuxin; Xia Jian

    2014-01-01

    A fluid–structure interaction method combining a nonlinear finite element algorithm with a preconditioning finite volume method is proposed in this paper to simulate parachute tran-sient dynamics. This method uses a three-dimensional membrane–cable fabric model to represent a parachute system at a highly folded configuration. The large shape change during parachute infla-tion is computed by the nonlinear Newton–Raphson iteration and the linear system equation is solved by the generalized minimal residual (GMRES) method. A membrane wrinkling algorithm is also utilized to evaluate the special uniaxial tension state of membrane elements on the parachute canopy. In order to avoid large time expenses during structural nonlinear iteration, the implicit Hil-ber–Hughes–Taylor (HHT) time integration method is employed. For the fluid dynamic simula-tions, the Roe and HLLC (Harten–Lax–van Leer contact) scheme has been modified and extended to compute flow problems at all speeds. The lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS) approximate factorization is applied to accelerate the numerical convergence speed. Finally, the test model of a highly folded C-9 parachute is simulated at a prescribed speed and the results show similar characteristics compared with experimental results and previous literature.

  7. Simulation of 3D parachute fluid–structure interaction based on nonlinear finite element method and preconditioning finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuxin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluid–structure interaction method combining a nonlinear finite element algorithm with a preconditioning finite volume method is proposed in this paper to simulate parachute transient dynamics. This method uses a three-dimensional membrane–cable fabric model to represent a parachute system at a highly folded configuration. The large shape change during parachute inflation is computed by the nonlinear Newton–Raphson iteration and the linear system equation is solved by the generalized minimal residual (GMRES method. A membrane wrinkling algorithm is also utilized to evaluate the special uniaxial tension state of membrane elements on the parachute canopy. In order to avoid large time expenses during structural nonlinear iteration, the implicit Hilber–Hughes–Taylor (HHT time integration method is employed. For the fluid dynamic simulations, the Roe and HLLC (Harten–Lax–van Leer contact scheme has been modified and extended to compute flow problems at all speeds. The lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS approximate factorization is applied to accelerate the numerical convergence speed. Finally, the test model of a highly folded C-9 parachute is simulated at a prescribed speed and the results show similar characteristics compared with experimental results and previous literature.

  8. Infill architecture: Design approaches for in-between buildings and 'bond' as integrative element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfirević Đorđe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to draw attention to the view that the two key elements in achieving good quality of architecture infill in immediate, current surroundings, are the selection of optimal creative method of infill architecture and adequate application of 'the bond' as integrative element, The success of achievement and the quality of architectural infill mainly depend on the assessment of various circumstances, but also on the professionalism, creativity, sensibility, and finally innovativeness of the architect, In order for the infill procedure to be carried out adequately, it is necessary to carry out the assessment of quality of the current surroundings that the object will be integrated into, and then to choose the creative approach that will allow the object to establish an optimal dialogue with its surroundings, On a wider scale, both theory and the practice differentiate thee main creative approaches to infill objects: amimetic approach (mimesis, bassociative approach and ccontrasting approach, Which of the stated approaches will be chosen depends primarily on the fact whether the existing physical structure into which the object is being infilled is 'distinct', 'specific' or 'indistinct', but it also depends on the inclination of the designer, 'The bond' is a term which in architecture denotes an element or zone of one object, but in some instances it can refer to the whole object which has been articulated in a specific way, with an aim of reaching the solution for the visual conflict as is often the case in situations when there is a clash between the existing objects and the newly designed or reconstructed object, This paper provides in-depth analysis of different types of bonds, such as 'direction as bond', 'cornice as bond', 'structure as bond', 'texture as bond' and 'material as bond', which indicate complexity and multiple layers of the designing process of object interpolation.

  9. A reciprocal space approach for locating symmetry elements in Patterson superposition maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrixson, T.

    1990-09-21

    A method for determining the location and possible existence of symmetry elements in Patterson superposition maps has been developed. A comparison of the original superposition map and a superposition map operated on by the symmetry element gives possible translations to the location of the symmetry element. A reciprocal space approach using structure factor-like quantities obtained from the Fourier transform of the superposition function is then used to determine the best'' location of the symmetry element. Constraints based upon the space group requirements are also used as a check on the locations. The locations of the symmetry elements are used to modify the Fourier transform coefficients of the superposition function to give an approximation of the structure factors, which are then refined using the EG relation. The analysis of several compounds using this method is presented. Reciprocal space techniques for locating multiple images in the superposition function are also presented, along with methods to remove the effect of multiple images in the Fourier transform coefficients of the superposition map. In addition, crystallographic studies of the extended chain structure of (NHC{sub 5}H{sub 5})SbI{sub 4} and of the twinning method of the orthorhombic form of the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} are presented. 54 refs.

  10. The implant neck: smooth or provided with retention elements. A biomechanical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, S

    1999-10-01

    A combined three-dimensional and axisymmetric finite element analysis was made of the effect upon the peak interfacial shear stress of providing an axially loaded mandibular dental implant with retention elements all the way up to the crest of the implant as opposed to a smooth neck. The effect of increased wall thickness of the implant and of using bi-cortical fixation as opposed to uni-cortical fixation was also studied. Retention elements at the implant neck were found to bring about a major decrease in the peak interfacial shear stress. Increased wall thickness and bi-cortical fixation also resulted in decreased peak interfacial shear stress but this effect was minor. The interpretation of this was that all these three measures increase the capacity of the implant to carry axial loads. Thus from a biomechanical viewpoint it appears to be advantageous to provide the neck of screw-shaped implants with retention elements, for example a rough surface of suitable micro-architecture and/or a micro-thread. It is furthermore suggested that retention elements at the implant neck will counteract marginal bone resorption in accordance with Wolff's law. This paper is a revision of: Hansson, S. (1997) Some steps to improve the capacity of dental implants to resist axial loads. In: Hansson, S., ed. Towards an optimized dental implant and implant bridge design: A biomechanical approach. Thesis. Göteborg: Chalmers University of Technology.

  11. Finite element modelling of woven composite failure modes at the mesoscopic scale: deterministic versus stochastic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roirand, Q.; Missoum-Benziane, D.; Thionnet, A.; Laiarinandrasana, L.

    2017-09-01

    Textile composites are composed of 3D complex architecture. To assess the durability of such engineering structures, the failure mechanisms must be highlighted. Examinations of the degradation have been carried out thanks to tomography. The present work addresses a numerical damage model dedicated to the simulation of the crack initiation and propagation at the scale of the warp yarns. For the 3D woven composites under study, loadings in tension and combined tension and bending were considered. Based on an erosion procedure of broken elements, the failure mechanisms have been modelled on 3D periodic cells by finite element calculations. The breakage of one element was determined using a failure criterion at the mesoscopic scale based on the yarn stress at failure. The results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for the two kinds of macroscopic loadings. The deterministic approach assumed a homogeneously distributed stress at failure all over the integration points in the meshes of woven composites. A stochastic approach was applied to a simple representative elementary periodic cell. The distribution of the Weibull stress at failure was assigned to the integration points using a Monte Carlo simulation. It was shown that this stochastic approach allowed more realistic failure simulations avoiding the idealised symmetry due to the deterministic modelling. In particular, the stochastic simulations performed have shown several variations of the stress as well as strain at failure and the failure modes of the yarn.

  12. Variance analysis for model updating with a finite element based subspace fitting approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Guillaume; Mevel, Laurent; Mencik, Jean-Mathieu; Serra, Roger; Döhler, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Recently, a subspace fitting approach has been proposed for vibration-based finite element model updating. The approach makes use of subspace-based system identification, where the extended observability matrix is estimated from vibration measurements. Finite element model updating is performed by correlating the model-based observability matrix with the estimated one, by using a single set of experimental data. Hence, the updated finite element model only reflects this single test case. However, estimates from vibration measurements are inherently exposed to uncertainty due to unknown excitation, measurement noise and finite data length. In this paper, a covariance estimation procedure for the updated model parameters is proposed, which propagates the data-related covariance to the updated model parameters by considering a first-order sensitivity analysis. In particular, this propagation is performed through each iteration step of the updating minimization problem, by taking into account the covariance between the updated parameters and the data-related quantities. Simulated vibration signals are used to demonstrate the accuracy and practicability of the derived expressions. Furthermore, an application is shown on experimental data of a beam.

  13. Strategies and approaches in plasmidome studies—uncovering plasmid diversity disregarding of linear elements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Julián R.; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María E.; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The term plasmid was originally coined for circular, extrachromosomal genetic elements. Today, plasmids are widely recognized not only as important factors facilitating genome restructuring but also as vehicles for the dissemination of beneficial characters within bacterial communities. Plasmid diversity has been uncovered by means of culture-dependent or -independent approaches, such as endogenous or exogenous plasmid isolation as well as PCR-based detection or transposon-aided capture, respectively. High-throughput-sequencing made possible to cover total plasmid populations in a given environment, i.e., the plasmidome, and allowed to address the quality and significance of self-replicating genetic elements. Since such efforts were and still are rather restricted to circular molecules, here we put equal emphasis on the linear plasmids which—despite their frequent occurrence in a large number of bacteria—are largely neglected in prevalent plasmidome conceptions. PMID:26074886

  14. Bioagent Sample Matching using Elemental Composition Data: an Approach to Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2006-04-21

    Sample matching is a fundamental capability that can have high probative value in a forensic context if proper validation studies are performed. In this report we discuss the potential utility of using the elemental composition of two bioagent samples to decide if they were produced in the same batch, or by the same process. Using guidance from the recent NRC study of bullet lead analysis and other sources, we develop a basic likelihood ratio framework for evaluating the evidentiary weight of elemental analysis data for sample matching. We define an objective metric for comparing two samples, and propose a method for constructing an unbiased population of test samples. We illustrate the basic methodology with some existing data on dry Bacillus thuringiensis preparations, and outline a comprehensive plan for experimental validation of this approach.

  15. [A general approach to the structural shape optimization using genetic algorithms and geometric design elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annicchiarico, W

    2001-01-01

    Structural optimization is an engineering field which deal with the improvement of existing solutions or even more find new solutions that are better than the previous ones under some selected criterion. Shape optimization is a research area in this field and it is involved in developing new methodologies to find better structural design based on the shape as resistant element, as for example solutions with the less stress concentration zones and made with the minimum amount of material. The goal of this doctoral dissertation is to present and discuss a general structural shape optimization methodology able to optimize several structural systems or mechanical devices. The approach presented herein is based on global search optimization tools such as Genetic Algorithms and geometric design elements by means of beta-splines curves and surfaces representation. Finally the great versatility of the developed tool is presented and discussed with an application example.

  16. Patterns of failure after the reduced volume approach for elective nodal irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Ki Ho; Lee, Jeong Eun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the patterns of nodal failure after radiotherapy (RT) with the reduced volume approach for elective neck nodal irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty-six NPC patients who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy with the reduced volume approach for ENI were reviewed. The ENI included retropharyngeal and level II lymph nodes, and only encompassed the echelon inferior to the involved level to eliminate the entire neck irradiation. Patients received either moderate hypofractionated intensity-modulated RT for a total of 72.6 Gy (49.5 Gy to elective nodal areas) or a conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal RT for a total of 68.4-72 Gy (39.6-45 Gy to elective nodal areas). Patterns of failure, locoregional control, and survival were analyzed. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 3 to 80 months). The out-of-field nodal failure when omitting ENI was none. Three patients developed neck recurrences (one in-field recurrence in the 72.6 Gy irradiated nodal area and two in the elective irradiated region of 39.6 Gy). Overall disease failure at any site developed in 11 patients (19.6%). Among these, there were six local failures (10.7%), three regional failures (5.4%), and five distant metastases (8.9%). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 87.1%, and the distant failure-free rate was 90.4%; disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years was 80% and 86.8%, respectively. No patient developed nodal failure in the omitted ENI site. Our investigation has demonstrated that the reduced volume approach for ENI appears to be a safe treatment approach in NPC.

  17. An Electric Field Volume Integral Equation Approach to Simulate Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Remis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an electric field volume integral equation approach to simulate surface plasmon propagation along metal/dielectric interfaces. Metallic objects embedded in homogeneous dielectric media are considered. Starting point is a so-called weak-form of the electric field integral equation. This form is discretized on a uniform tensor-product grid resulting in a system matrix whose action on a vector can be computed via the fast Fourier transform. The GMRES iterative solver is used to solve the discretized set of equations and numerical examples, illustrating surface plasmon propagation, are presented. The convergence rate of GMRES is discussed in terms of the spectrum of the system matrix and through numerical experiments we show how the eigenvalues of the discretized volume scattering operator are related to plasmon propagation and the medium parameters of a metallic object.

  18. Determination of the minimum size of a statistical representative volume element from a fibre-reinforced composite based on point pattern statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Brøndsted, Povl

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, Trias et al. [1] determined the minimum size of a statistical representative volume element (SRVE) of a unidirectional fibre-reinforced composite primarily based on numerical analyses of the stress/strain field. In continuation of this, the present study determines the minimum...

  19. Rayleigh-based, multi-element coral thermometry: A biomineralization approach to developing climate proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, G.A.; Cohen, A.L.; Wang, Z.; Crusius, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new approach to coral thermometry that deconvolves the influence of water temperature on skeleton composition from that of “vital effects”, and has the potential to provide estimates of growth temperatures that are accurate to within a few tenths of a degree Celsius from both tropical and cold-water corals. Our results provide support for a physico-chemical model of coral biomineralization, and imply that Mg2+ substitutes directly for Ca2+ in biogenic aragonite. Recent studies have identified Rayleigh fractionation as an important influence on the elemental composition of coral skeletons. Daily, seasonal and interannual variations in the amount of aragonite precipitated by corals from each “batch” of calcifying fluid can explain why the temperature dependencies of elemental ratios in coral skeleton differ from those of abiogenic aragonites, and are highly variable among individual corals. On the basis of this new insight into the origin of “vital effects” in coral skeleton, we developed a Rayleigh-based, multi-element approach to coral thermometry. Temperature is resolved from the Rayleigh fractionation signal by combining information from multiple element ratios (e.g., Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca) to produce a mathematically over-constrained system of Rayleigh equations. Unlike conventional coral thermometers, this approach does not rely on an initial calibration of coral skeletal composition to an instrumental temperature record. Rather, considering coral skeletogenesis as a biologically mediated, physico-chemical process provides a means to extract temperature information from the skeleton composition using the Rayleigh equation and a set of experimentally determined partition coefficients. Because this approach is based on a quantitative understanding of the mechanism that produces the “vital effect” it should be possible to apply it both across scleractinian species and to corals growing in vastly different environments. Where

  20. Stress analysis of composite spur gear using the finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayarangan, S.; Ganesan, N.

    1993-03-01

    Engineering components made of composite materials find increasing applications ranging from spacecraft to small instruments. Many types of gear pump use composite gears, however little literature is available on their use. In this paper results obtained by static stress analysis of composite gears using a three-dimensional finite element approach are presented. Performance of two orthotropic material gears are presented and compared with mild steel gear. From the results it is concluded that composite material such as graphite/epoxy can be thought of as a material for power transmission gears.

  1. A finite element approach to self-consistent field theory calculations of multiblock polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David M.; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2017-02-01

    Self-consistent field theory (SCFT) has proven to be a powerful tool for modeling equilibrium microstructures of soft materials, particularly for multiblock polymers. A very successful approach to numerically solving the SCFT set of equations is based on using a spectral approach. While widely successful, this approach has limitations especially in the context of current technologically relevant applications. These limitations include non-trivial approaches for modeling complex geometries, difficulties in extending to non-periodic domains, as well as non-trivial extensions for spatial adaptivity. As a viable alternative to spectral schemes, we develop a finite element formulation of the SCFT paradigm for calculating equilibrium polymer morphologies. We discuss the formulation and address implementation challenges that ensure accuracy and efficiency. We explore higher order chain contour steppers that are efficiently implemented with Richardson Extrapolation. This approach is highly scalable and suitable for systems with arbitrary shapes. We show spatial and temporal convergence and illustrate scaling on up to 2048 cores. Finally, we illustrate confinement effects for selected complex geometries. This has implications for materials design for nanoscale applications where dimensions are such that equilibrium morphologies dramatically differ from the bulk phases.

  2. Analysis of fibre waviness effect through homogenization approach for the prediction of effective thermal conductivities of FRP composite using finite element method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C MAHESH; K GOVINDARAJULU; V BALAKRISHNA MURTHY

    2016-06-01

    In this study, homogenization approach is proposed to analyse the fibre waviness in predicting the effective thermal conductivities of composite. Composites that have wavy fibre were analysed by finite element method toestablish equivalence between micro- and macro-mechanics principles, thereby, it is possible to minimize the computational efforts required to solve the problem through only micro-mechanics approach. In the present work, the influence of crest offset, wavy-span on the thermal conductivities of composite for different volume fractions and thermal conductivity mismatch ratios were also studied. It is observed that the homogenization results are in good agreement with minimal % error from those obtained through pure micro-mechanics approach at the cost of low computational facilities and less processing time for converged solutions.

  3. Enhanced phytoextraction of germanium and rare earth elements - a rhizosphere-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Germanium (Ge) and rare earth elements (REEs) are economically valuable raw materials that have become an integral part of our modern high tech society. While most of these elements are not actually rare in terms of general amounts in the earth's crust, they are rarely found in sufficient abundances in single locations for their mining to be economically viable. The average concentration of Ge in soils is estimated at 1.6 μg g-1. The REEs comprise a group of 16 elements including La, the group of lanthanides and Y that are abundant in the earth crust with concentrations varying from 35 μg g-1 (La), 40 μg g-1 (Nd), 6 μg g-1 (Gd) and 3.5 μg g-1 (Er) to 0.5 μg g-1 in Tm. Thus, a promising chance to improve supply of these elements could be phytomining. Unfortunately, bioavailability of Ge and REEs in soils appears to be low, in particular in neutral or alkaline soils. A sequential dissolution analysis of 120 soil samples taken from the A-horizons of soils in the area of Freiberg (Saxony, Germany) revealed that only 0.2% of total Ge and about 0.5% of La, Nd, Gd and Er of bulk concentrations were easily accessible by leaching with NH4-acetate (pH 7). Most of the investigated elements were bound to Fe-/Mn-oxides and silicates and were therefore only poorly available for plant uptake. Here we report an environmentally friendly approach for enhanced phytoextraction of Ge and REEs from soils using mixed cultures of plant species with efficient mechanisms for the acquisition of nutrients in the rhizosphere. The rhizosphere is characterized as the zone in soil sourrounding a plant root that consists of a gradient in chemical, physical and biological soil properties driven by rhizodeposits like carboxylates and protons. Some species like white lupin (Lupinus albus) are able to excrete large amounts of organic acid anions(predominantly citrate and malate) and show a particularly high potential for the acidification of the rhizosphere. In our experiments, mixed cultures

  4. A Novel Approach of Impulsive Signal Extraction for Early Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Aijun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fault signals of rolling element bearing are often characterized by the presence of periodic impulses, which are modulated high-frequency harmonic components. The features of early fault in rolling bearing are very weak, which are often masked by background noise. The impulsiveness of the vibration signal has affected the identification of characteristic frequency for the early fault detection of the bearing. In this paper, a novel approach based on morphological operators is presented for impulsive signal extraction of early fault in rolling element bearing. The combination Top-Hat (CTH is proposed to extract the impulsive signal and enhance the impulsiveness of the bearing fault signal, and the envelope analysis is applied to reveal the fault-related signatures. The impulsive extraction performance of the proposed CTH is compared with that of finite impulse response filter (FIR by analyzing the simulated bearing fault signals, and the result indicates that the CTH is more effective in extracting impulsive signals. The method is evaluated using real fault signals from defective bearings with early rolling element fault and early fault located on the outer race. The results show that the proposed method is able to enhance the impulsiveness of early bearing fault signals.

  5. An approach to parameter estimation for breast tumor by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, A.-qing; Yang, Hong-qin; Ye, Zhen; Su, Yi-ming; Xie, Shu-sen

    2009-02-01

    The temperature of human body on the surface of the skin depends on the metabolic activity, the blood flow, and the temperature of the surroundings. Any abnormality in the tissue, such as the presence of a tumor, alters the normal temperature on the skin surface due to increased metabolic activity of the tumor. Therefore, abnormal skin temperature profiles are an indication of diseases such as tumor or cancer. This study is to present an approach to detect the female breast tumor and its related parameter estimations by combination the finite element method with infrared thermography for the surface temperature profile. A 2D simplified breast embedded a tumor model based on the female breast anatomical structure and physiological characteristics was first established, and then finite element method was used to analyze the heat diffuse equation for the surface temperature profiles of the breast. The genetic optimization algorithm was used to estimate the tumor parameters such as depth, size and blood perfusion by minimizing a fitness function involving the temperature profiles simulated data by finite element method to the experimental data obtained by infrared thermography. This preliminary study shows it is possible to determine the depth and the heat generation rate of the breast tumor by using infrared thermography and the optimization analysis, which may play an important role in the female breast healthcare and diseases evaluation or early detection. In order to develop the proposed methodology to be used in clinical, more accurate anatomy 3D breast geometry should be considered in further investigations.

  6. Cadaveric validation of a finite element modeling approach for studying scapular notching in reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeswaran, Vijay N; Goetz, Jessica E; Rudert, M James; Hettrich, Carolyn M; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-09-06

    Cadaveric experiments were undertaken to validate a finite element (FE) modeling approach for studying impingement-related scapular notching in reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). The specific focus of the validation was contact at the site of impingement between the humeral polyethylene component and the inferior aspect of the scapula during an adduction motion. Lateralization of the RSA center of rotation was varied because it has been advocated clinically to reduce impingement and presumably decrease the risk of scapular notching. Tekscan sensors were utilized to directly measure contact stress at the impingement site, and FE was used to compute contact stresses. Favorable agreement was seen between physically measured and FE-computed impingement site location (within one sensing element of the Tekscan sensor) and contact loads (mean absolute difference of 14.9%). Contact stresses and contact areas were difficult to compare directly due to the disparate spatial resolutions of the Tekscan sensor and the FE model. FE-computed contact at the impingement site was highly focal, with a total contact area comparable to the area of an individual Tekscan sensing element. The good agreement between the physically measured and FE-computed contact data (i.e., contact load and location) support the use of FE modeling as a tool for computationally testing the efficacy of changing various surgical variables associated with RSA.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Tractor Trolley Axle by Using Finite Element Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Aloni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Tractor trolley or trailers are very popular and cheaper mode of goods transport in rural as well as urban area. But these trailers are manufactured in small scale to moderate scale industry. Especially in the small- and middle-scale agricultural machinery industry, insufficient use of new technology and new design features can cause problems such as breakdowns and failures during field operations. In Present work finite element analysis approach is used to modify existing rear axle of tractor trolley. Fatigue failure of the rear axle finite element model was predicted after the dynamic load was imposed on it. For analysis, a 6.0 ton 2 wheeler tractor trolley i.e. semitrailer manufactured by Awachat Industries Ltd., Wardha is selected. The finite element analysis of existing rear axle of tractor trolley revealed the stresses distribution on rear axle. So, an effort is made to modify the design of existing rear axle along with change of material so that advantage of weight reduction along with safe stress can be obtained.

  8. Spectral-finite element approach to present-time mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, N.; Martinec, Z.

    2005-12-01

    We present a spectral-finite element approach to the forward modelling of present-time mantle convection. The differential Stokes problem for an incompressible viscous flow in a spherical shell is reformulated in weak sense by means of a variational principle. The integral equations obtained are then parametrized by vector and tensor spherical harmonics in the angular direction and by piecewise linear finite elements over the radial direction. The solution is obtained using the Galerkin method, that leads to the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations. The earth-viscosity structure is described using a two-dimensional spherical grid, that allows us to treat various kinds of lateral variation, with viscosity contrasts of several order of magnitude. The method is first tested for the case of a one-dimensional viscosity structure. After prescribing the internal load in the form of a Dirac-delta, Green's functions for the surface topography, core topography and geoid are computed and compared with those obtained by solving the problem with the traditional matrix propagator technique. The approach is then applied to two different axisymmetric viscosity structures consisting either of one or two highly viscous cratonic bodies embedded in the upper mantle. We compute the corresponding Green's functions, showing and discussing the non-linear coupling of various spherical-harmonic modes, and the resulting angular dependence of the flow velocity.

  9. [Poetic motivation of material elements: new categories of analysis in the social-poetic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, C; Sobral, V

    1999-01-01

    Gauthier and Santos (1996) describes the socio-poetics as na approach of knowledge of human-being and society, a way for the production of knowledge by means of a variety of research practices and education that poetically transforms knowledge for better understanding. The creators of socio-poetics utilize as analysing categories the geo-mitic places, thus stimulating those who work with this approach to create new technics and life experiences in order to improve data production in the research group. Playing attention to this challenge and inspired in the concepts of Material Imagination Gaston Bachelard, C.G. Jung Active Imagination Technic and in the growth experiments of John Stevens's gestalt-therapy, we created the Technic of Material Elements, based in the images provoked by the 4 elements (water, earth fire and air). We concluded that this new technic favored the expression of unconscious or silenced contents that interfere in nurse care, thus allowing nurses to explore themselves creativity and to improved their professional practicing.

  10. Quality Assurance of Cancer Study Common Data Elements Using A Post-Coordination Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Prud'hommeaux, Eric; Tao, Cui; Weng, Chunhua; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Domain-specific common data elements (CDEs) are emerging as an effective approach to standards-based clinical research data storage and retrieval. A limiting factor, however, is the lack of robust automated quality assurance (QA) tools for the CDEs in clinical study domains. The objectives of the present study are to prototype and evaluate a QA tool for the study of cancer CDEs using a post-coordination approach. The study starts by integrating the NCI caDSR CDEs and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data dictionaries in a single Resource Description Framework (RDF) data store. We designed a compositional expression pattern based on the Data Element Concept model structure informed by ISO/IEC 11179, and developed a transformation tool that converts the pattern-based compositional expressions into the Web Ontology Language (OWL) syntax. Invoking reasoning and explanation services, we tested the system utilizing the CDEs extracted from two TCGA clinical cancer study domains. The system could automatically identify duplicate CDEs, and detect CDE modeling errors. In conclusion, compositional expressions not only enable reuse of existing ontology codes to define new domain concepts, but also provide an automated mechanism for QA of terminological annotations for CDEs.

  11. Optical tomography reconstruction algorithm with the finite element method: An optimal approach with regularization tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balima, O., E-mail: ofbalima@gmail.com [Département des Sciences Appliquées, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, 555 bd de l’Université, Chicoutimi, QC, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada); Favennec, Y. [LTN UMR CNRS 6607 – Polytech’ Nantes – La Chantrerie, Rue Christian Pauc, BP 50609 44 306 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Rousse, D. [Chaire de recherche industrielle en technologies de l’énergie et en efficacité énergétique (t3e), École de technologie supérieure, 201 Boul. Mgr, Bourget Lévis, QC, Canada G6V 6Z3 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •New strategies to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction through mesh and finite element parameterization. •Use of gradient filtering through an alternative inner product within the adjoint method. •An integral form of the cost function is used to make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. •Gradient-based algorithm with the adjoint method is used for the reconstruction. -- Abstract: Optical tomography is mathematically treated as a non-linear inverse problem where the optical properties of the probed medium are recovered through the minimization of the errors between the experimental measurements and their predictions with a numerical model at the locations of the detectors. According to the ill-posed behavior of the inverse problem, some regularization tools must be performed and the Tikhonov penalization type is the most commonly used in optical tomography applications. This paper introduces an optimized approach for optical tomography reconstruction with the finite element method. An integral form of the cost function is used to take into account the surfaces of the detectors and make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. Through a gradient-based algorithm where the adjoint method is used to compute the gradient of the cost function, an alternative inner product is employed for preconditioning the reconstruction algorithm. Moreover, appropriate re-parameterization of the optical properties is performed. These regularization strategies are compared with the classical Tikhonov penalization one. It is shown that both the re-parameterization and the use of the Sobolev cost function gradient are efficient for solving such an ill-posed inverse problem.

  12. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. Fate of trace elements in the SRC process. [Ph. D. Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, C.S.

    1980-09-01

    A study of the forms of trace elements occurring in Solvent Refined Coal has been performed by chemical separation of the Solvent Refined Coal based on differences in the functionality and molecular weight of the organic matrix. Analysis of the fractions separated for various trace elements has revealed associations of certain elements with other elements as well as with certain fractions. The analysis of Solvent Refined Coal I by these methods provided data on the distribution of Ti, V, Ca, S, Al, Mn, As, Se, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Sc, and Ga in the fractions generated. Because of the low trace element content of Solvent Refined Coal II only As, Se, and Cr could be detected in the silica fractions. Based on the distributions three different groups of elements have been based on the association of elements with each other and with certain fractions. The first group is composed of As, Se, and Cr associated with silica fractions of relatively low functionality; these elements have a high percent solubility in the starting Solvent Refined Coal II oil. The second group composed of Ti, V, and to a lesser extent a second form of Cr, is associated with fractions that have a high concentration of phenolic material and is probably present as phenoxide complexes. The third group composed of Fe, Ca, K, Al, and Mg is associated with the most functional fractions and is possibly present as humic acid type complexes or as submicron size particulates. The integration of chromatographic methods with trace element analysis of the fractions generated is capable of discerning the presence of different forms of the elements. The methods used are applicable to other important geologically occurring organic matter.

  13. Global Geochemical Variation on the Lunar Surface: A Three-Element Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, D. R.; Lawrence, D. J.; Vaniman, D.; Feldman, W. C.; Elphic, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Maurice, S.; Lucey, P. G.; Binder, A. B.

    1999-01-01

    We present a method for displaying the relative abundances of three important elements (Th, Fe, and Ti) on the same map projection of the lunar surface. Using Th-, Fe-, and Ti-elemental abundances from orbital geochemical data and assigning each element a primary color, a false-color map of the lunar surface was created. This approach is similar to the ternary diagram approach presented by Davis and Spudis with some important differences, discussed later. For the present maps, Th abundances were measured by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer(GRS).The new LPGRS low-altitude dataset was used in this analysis. Iron and Ti weight percentages were based on Clementine spectral reflectance data smoothed to the LP low altitude footprint. This method of presentation was designed to aid in the location and recognition of three principal lunar compositions: ferroan anorthosite (FAN), mare basalts (MB), and the Mg suite/ KREEP-rich rocks on the lunar surface, with special emphasis on the highlands and specific impact basins. In addition to the recognition of these endmember rock compositions, this method is an attempt to examine the relationship between elemental compositions that do not conform readily to previously accepted or observed endmember rocks in various specific regions of interest, including eastern highlands regions centered on 150 deg longitude, and a northern highlands Th-rich region observed. The LP low-altitude data has full width at half-maximum spatial resolution of about 40 km. The Clementine spectral reflectance datasets were adapted using an equal-area, gaussian smoothing routine to this footprint. In addition, these datasets, reported in weight percent of FeO and of Ti02, were adjusted to Fe and Ti weight percentages. Each dataset was then assigned one of the three primary colors: blue for Th, red for Fe, and green for Ti. For each element, the data range was normalized to represent the ratio of each point to the maximum in the dataset. (To

  14. Morphological study of surgical approach by superior temporal sulcus-temporal horn of lateral ventricle approach using volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Jia, Linpei; Dong, Yidian; Zhao, Hang; Liu, Haoyuan; Yang, Kerong; Li, Youqiong

    2014-03-01

    In this research, we acquired the length of the superior temporal sulcus, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, and the approach angle between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle measuring 98 specimens by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the point of the superior temporal sulcus, which is closest to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, aimed at finding out the best entrance point of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle and reducing the damage to optic radiation as well as other nerve fibers during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 3/5 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point, and there is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  15. Structured assessment approach: Version I. Applied demonstration of output results. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, 1.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility (HFCF) and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the third volume, Applied Demonstration of Output Results, of a four-volume document. It presents the outputs for each of the four levels of the SAA Version 1 computational package. Two types of outputs are discussed: detailed output findings and summary output tables. The summary output tables are used to aggregate the detailed output findings in a condensed form for NRC analyst consumption. Specific output results are presented for an HFCF, which is described in Volume II.

  16. Combining small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic approaches for assessing brain chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolhoff, Ann M; Nautiyal, Katherine M; Nemes, Peter; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Silver, Rae; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2013-03-19

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured changes in individual hippocampi from the mast cell mutant mouse strain, C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh). These mice have a naturally occurring mutation in the white spotting locus that causes reduced c-Kit receptor expression and an inability of mast cells to differentiate from their hematopoietic progenitors. Compared with their littermates, the mast cell-deficient mice have profound deficits in spatial learning, memory, and neurogenesis. A total of 18 distinct metabolites were identified in the hippocampus that discriminated between the C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh) and control mice. The combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression changes revealed a number of altered pathways. Importantly, results from both platforms indicated that multiple pathways are impacted, including amino acid metabolism, increasing the confidence in each approach. Because the CE-MS and expression profiling are both amenable to small-volume analysis, this integrated analysis is applicable to a range of volume-limited biological systems.

  17. Automated mass detection in contrast-enhanced CT colonography: an approach based on contrast and volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luboldt, W. [University Hospital Essen, Clinic and Policlinic of Angiology, Essen (Germany); Multiorgan Screening Foundation (Germany); Tryon, C. [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Kroll, M.; Vogl, T.J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Toussaint, T.L. [Multiorgan Screening Foundation (Germany); Holzer, K. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Hoepffner, N. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Gastroenterology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to design and test an algorithm for automating mass detection in contrast-enhanced CT colonography (CTC). Five patients with known colorectal masses underwent a pre-surgical contrast-enhanced (120 ml volume 1.6 g iodine/s injection rate, 60 s scan delay) CTC in high spatial resolution (16-slice CT: collimation: 16 x 0.75 mm, tablefeed: 24 mm/0.5 s, reconstruction increment: 0.5 mm). A CT-density- and volume-based algorithm searched for masses in the colonic wall, which was extracted before by segmenting and dilating the colonic air lumen and subtracting the inner air. A radiologist analyzed the detections and causes of false positives. All masses were detected, and false positives were easy to identify. Combining CT density with volume as a cut-off is a promising approach for automating mass detection that should be further refined and also tested in contrast-enhanced MR colonography. (orig.)

  18. A white matter lesion-filling approach to improve brain tissue volume measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Valverde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis white matter (WM lesions can affect brain tissue volume measurements of voxel-wise segmentation methods if these lesions are included in the segmentation process. Several authors have presented different techniques to improve brain tissue volume estimations by filling WM lesions before segmentation with intensities similar to those of WM. Here, we propose a new method to refill WM lesions, where contrary to similar approaches, lesion voxel intensities are replaced by random values of a normal distribution generated from the mean WM signal intensity of each two-dimensional slice. We test the performance of our method by estimating the deviation in tissue volume between a set of 30 T1-w 1.5 T and 30 T1-w 3 T images of healthy subjects and the same images where: WM lesions have been previously registered and afterwards replaced their voxel intensities to those between gray matter (GM and WM tissue. Tissue volume is computed independently using FAST and SPM8. When compared with the state-of-the-art methods, on 1.5 T data our method yields the lowest deviation in WM between original and filled images, independently of the segmentation method used. It also performs the lowest differences in GM when FAST is used and equals to the best method when SPM8 is employed. On 3 T data, our method also outperforms the state-of-the-art methods when FAST is used while performs similar to the best method when SPM8 is used. The proposed technique is currently available to researchers as a stand-alone program and as an SPM extension.

  19. The method of space-time and conservation element and solution element: A new approach for solving the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    1995-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new framework differs substantially in both concept and methodology from the well-established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods. It is conceptually simple and designed to overcome several key limitations of the above traditional methods. A two-level scheme for solving the convection-diffusion equation is constructed and used to illuminate the major differences between the present method and those previously mentioned. This explicit scheme, referred to as the a-mu scheme, has two independent marching variables.

  20. Performance optimization in mass production of volume holographic optical elements (vHOEs) using Bayfol HX photopolymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Fäcke, Thomas; Grote, Fabian; Hagen, Rainer; Hönel, Dennis; Koch, Eberhard; Rewitz, Christian; Walze, Günther; Wewer, Brita

    2017-05-01

    Volume Holographic Optical Elements (vHOEs) gained wide attention as optical combiners for the use in smart glasses and augmented reality (SG and AR, respectively) consumer electronics and automotive head-up display applications. The unique characteristics of these diffractive grating structures - being lightweight, thin and flat - make them perfectly suitable for use in integrated optical components like spectacle lenses and car windshields. While being transparent in Off-Bragg condition, they provide full color capability and adjustable diffraction efficiency. The instant developing photopolymer Bayfol® HX film provides an ideal technology platform to optimize the performance of vHOEs in a wide range of applications. Important for any commercialization are simple and robust mass production schemes. In this paper, we present an efficient and easy to control one-beam recording scheme to copy a so-called master vHOE in a step-and-repeat process. In this contact-copy scheme, Bayfol® HX film is laminated to a master stack before being exposed by a scanning laser line. Subsequently, the film is delaminated in a controlled fashion and bleached. We explain working principles of the one-beam copy concept, discuss the opto-mechanical construction and outline the downstream process of the installed vHOE replication line. Moreover, we focus on aspects like performance optimization of the copy vHOE, the bleaching process and the suitable choice of protective cover film in the re-lamination step, preparing the integration of the vHOE into the final device.

  1. A discontinuous finite element approach to cracking in coupled poro-elastic fluid flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Evans, O.; Ulven, O. I.; Sun, W.

    2016-12-01

    Reaction-driven cracking is a coupled process whereby fluid-induced reactions drive large volume changes in the host rock which produce stresses leading to crack propagation and failure. This in turn generates new surface area and fluid-flow pathways for subsequent reaction in a potentially self-sustaining system. This mechanism has has been proposed for the pervasive serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite, as well as applications to mineral carbon sequestration and hydrocarbon extraction. The key computational issue in this problem is implementing algorithms that adequately model the formation of discrete fractures. Here we present models using a discontinuous finite element method for modeling fracture formation (Radovitsky et al., 2011). Cracks are introduced along facets of the mesh by the relaxation of penalty parameters once a failure criterion is met. It is fully described in the weak form of the equations, requiring no modification of the underlying mesh structure and allowing fluid properties to be easily adjusted along cracked facets. To develop and test the method, we start by implementing the algorithm for the simplified Biot equations for poro-elasticity using the finite element model assembler TerraFERMA. We consider hydro-fracking around a borehole (Grassl et al., 2015), where elevated fluid pressure in the poro-elastic solid causes it to fail radially in tension. We investigate the effects of varying the Biot coefficient and adjusting the fluid transport properties in the vicinity of the crack and compare our results to related dual-graph models (Ulven & Sun, submitted). We discuss issues arising from this method, including the formation of null spaces and appropriate preconditioning and solution strategies. Initial results suggest that this method provides a promising way to incorporate cracking into our reactive fluid flow models and future work aims to integrate the mechanical and chemical aspects of this process.

  2. Showing their true colors: a practical approach to volume rendering from serial sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metscher Brian D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to more modern imaging methods, conventional light microscopy still offers a range of substantial advantages with regard to contrast options, accessible specimen size, and resolution. Currently, tomographic image data in particular is most commonly visualized in three dimensions using volume rendering. To date, this method has only very rarely been applied to image stacks taken from serial sections, whereas surface rendering is still the most prevalent method for presenting such data sets three-dimensionally. The aim of this study was to develop standard protocols for volume rendering of image stacks of serial sections, while retaining the benefits of light microscopy such as resolution and color information. Results Here we provide a set of protocols for acquiring high-resolution 3D images of diverse microscopic samples through volume rendering based on serial light microscopical sections using the 3D reconstruction software Amira (Visage Imaging Inc.. We overcome several technical obstacles and show that these renderings are comparable in quality and resolution to 3D visualizations using other methods. This practical approach for visualizing 3D micro-morphology in full color takes advantage of both the sub-micron resolution of light microscopy and the specificity of histological stains, by combining conventional histological sectioning techniques, digital image acquisition, three-dimensional image filtering, and 3D image manipulation and visualization technologies. Conclusions We show that this method can yield "true"-colored high-resolution 3D views of tissues as well as cellular and sub-cellular structures and thus represents a powerful tool for morphological, developmental, and comparative investigations. We conclude that the presented approach fills an important gap in the field of micro-anatomical 3D imaging and visualization methods by combining histological resolution and differentiation of details with

  3. Showing their true colors: a practical approach to volume rendering from serial sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Stephan; Schwaha, Thomas; Metscher, Brian D

    2010-04-21

    In comparison to more modern imaging methods, conventional light microscopy still offers a range of substantial advantages with regard to contrast options, accessible specimen size, and resolution. Currently, tomographic image data in particular is most commonly visualized in three dimensions using volume rendering. To date, this method has only very rarely been applied to image stacks taken from serial sections, whereas surface rendering is still the most prevalent method for presenting such data sets three-dimensionally. The aim of this study was to develop standard protocols for volume rendering of image stacks of serial sections, while retaining the benefits of light microscopy such as resolution and color information. Here we provide a set of protocols for acquiring high-resolution 3D images of diverse microscopic samples through volume rendering based on serial light microscopical sections using the 3D reconstruction software Amira (Visage Imaging Inc.). We overcome several technical obstacles and show that these renderings are comparable in quality and resolution to 3D visualizations using other methods. This practical approach for visualizing 3D micro-morphology in full color takes advantage of both the sub-micron resolution of light microscopy and the specificity of histological stains, by combining conventional histological sectioning techniques, digital image acquisition, three-dimensional image filtering, and 3D image manipulation and visualization technologies. We show that this method can yield "true"-colored high-resolution 3D views of tissues as well as cellular and sub-cellular structures and thus represents a powerful tool for morphological, developmental, and comparative investigations. We conclude that the presented approach fills an important gap in the field of micro-anatomical 3D imaging and visualization methods by combining histological resolution and differentiation of details with 3D rendering of whole tissue samples. We demonstrate the

  4. Can a partial volume edge effect reduction algorithm improve the repeatability of subject-specific finite element models of femurs obtained from CT data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Eran; Herblum, Ryan; Beek, Maarten; Joskowicz, Leo; Liebergall, Meir; Mosheiff, Rami; Whyne, Cari

    2014-01-01

    The reliability of patient-specific finite element (FE) modelling is dependent on the ability to provide repeatable analyses. Differences of inter-operator generated grids can produce variability in strain and stress readings at a desired location, which are magnified at the surface of the model as a result of the partial volume edge effects (PVEEs). In this study, a new approach is introduced based on an in-house developed algorithm which adjusts the location of the model's surface nodes to a consistent predefined threshold Hounsfield unit value. Three cadaveric human femora specimens were CT scanned, and surface models were created after a semi-automatic segmentation by three different experienced operators. A FE analysis was conducted for each model, with and without applying the surface-adjustment algorithm (a total of 18 models), implementing identical boundary conditions. Maximum principal strain and stress and spatial coordinates were probed at six equivalent surface nodes from the six generated models for each of the three specimens at locations commonly utilised for experimental strain guage measurement validation. A Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was conducted to determine inter-operator variability and the impact of the PVEE-adjustment algorithm. The average inter-operator difference in stress values was significantly reduced after applying the adjustment algorithm (before: 3.32 ± 4.35 MPa, after: 1.47 ± 1.77 MPa, p = 0.025). Strain values were found to be less sensitive to inter-operative variability (p = 0.286). In summary, the new approach as presented in this study may provide a means to improve the repeatability of subject-specific FE models of bone obtained from CT data.

  5. A moving control volume approach to computing hydrodynamic forces and torques on immersed bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia, Nishant; Johansen, Hans; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh

    2017-10-01

    We present a moving control volume (CV) approach to computing hydrodynamic forces and torques on complex geometries. The method requires surface and volumetric integrals over a simple and regular Cartesian box that moves with an arbitrary velocity to enclose the body at all times. The moving box is aligned with Cartesian grid faces, which makes the integral evaluation straightforward in an immersed boundary (IB) framework. Discontinuous and noisy derivatives of velocity and pressure at the fluid-structure interface are avoided and far-field (smooth) velocity and pressure information is used. We re-visit the approach to compute hydrodynamic forces and torques through force/torque balance equations in a Lagrangian frame that some of us took in a prior work (Bhalla et al., 2013 [13]). We prove the equivalence of the two approaches for IB methods, thanks to the use of Peskin's delta functions. Both approaches are able to suppress spurious force oscillations and are in excellent agreement, as expected theoretically. Test cases ranging from Stokes to high Reynolds number regimes are considered. We discuss regridding issues for the moving CV method in an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) context. The proposed moving CV method is not limited to a specific IB method and can also be used, for example, with embedded boundary methods.

  6. A Practical Approach to Governance and Optimization of Structured Data Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sarah A; Gesner, Emily; Morgan, Steven; Mar, Perry; Maviglia, Saverio; Colburn, Doreen; Tierney, Diana; Rocha, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Definition and configuration of clinical content in an enterprise-wide electronic health record (EHR) implementation is highly complex. Sharing of data definitions across applications within an EHR implementation project may be constrained by practical limitations, including time, tools, and expertise. However, maintaining rigor in an approach to data governance is important for sustainability and consistency. With this understanding, we have defined a practical approach for governance of structured data elements to optimize data definitions given limited resources. This approach includes a 10 step process: 1) identification of clinical topics, 2) creation of draft reference models for clinical topics, 3) scoring of downstream data needs for clinical topics, 4) prioritization of clinical topics, 5) validation of reference models for clinical topics, and 6) calculation of gap analyses of EHR compared against reference model, 7) communication of validated reference models across project members, 8) requested revisions to EHR based on gap analysis, 9) evaluation of usage of reference models across project, and 10) Monitoring for new evidence requiring revisions to reference model.

  7. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace vehicle Design (IPAD). Volume 5: Catalog of IPAD technical program elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, W. B. (Editor); Southall, J. W. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The catalog is presented of technical program elements which are required to support the design activities for a subsonic and supersonic commercial transport. Information for each element consists of usage and storage information, ownership, status and an abstract describing the purpose of the element.

  8. Finite Volume Element Predictor-corrector Method for a Class of Nonlinear Parabolic Systems%一类非线性抛物型方程组的有限体积元预估-校正方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高夫征

    2005-01-01

    A finite volume element predictor-correetor method for a class of nonlinear parabolic system of equations is presented and analyzed. Suboptimal L2 error estimate for the finite volume element predictor-corrector method is derived. A numerical experiment shows that the numerical results are consistent with theoretical analysis.

  9. Numerical Methods Application for Reinforced Concrete Elements-Theoretical Approach for Direct Stiffness Matrix Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Ciprian Catinas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed theoretical and practical investigation of the reinforced concrete elements is due to recent techniques and method that are implemented in the construction market. More over a theoretical study is a demand for a better and faster approach nowadays due to rapid development of the calculus technique. The paper above will present a study for implementing in a static calculus the direct stiffness matrix method in order capable to address phenomena related to different stages of loading, rapid change of cross section area and physical properties. The method is a demand due to the fact that in our days the FEM (Finite Element Method is the only alternative to such a calculus and FEM are considered as expensive methods from the time and calculus resources point of view. The main goal in such a method is to create the moment-curvature diagram in the cross section that is analyzed. The paper above will express some of the most important techniques and new ideas as well in order to create the moment curvature graphic in the cross sections considered.

  10. Fourier finite element modeling of light emission in waveguides: 2.5-dimensional FEM approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yangxin; Pardo, David; Chen, Yuntian

    2015-11-16

    We present a Fourier finite element modeling of light emission of dipolar emitters coupled to infinitely long waveguides. Due to the translational symmetry, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled waveguide-emitter system can be decomposed into a series of independent 2D problems (2.5D), which reduces the computational cost. Moreover, the reduced 2D problems can be extremely accurate, compared to its 3D counterpart. Our method can precisely quantify the total emission rates, as well as the fraction of emission rates into different modal channels for waveguides with arbitrary cross-sections. We compare our method with dyadic Green's function for the light emission in single mode metallic nanowire, which yields an excellent agreement. This method is applied in multi-mode waveguides, as well as multi-core waveguides. We further show that our method has the full capability of including dipole orientations, as illustrated via a rotating dipole, which leads to unidirectional excitation of guide modes. The 2.5D Finite Element Method (FEM) approach proposed here can be applied for various waveguides, thus it is useful to interface single-photon single-emitter in nano-structures, as well as for other scenarios involving coupled waveguide-emitters.

  11. Compositional analysis of multi-element magnetic nanoparticles with a combined NMR and TEM approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellesch, Markus; Hammerath, Franziska; Süß, Vicky; Haft, Marcel; Hampel, Silke; Wurmehl, Sabine; Büchner, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscale materials goes hand in hand with the challenge to reliably characterize the chemical compositions and structural features of nanosized objects in order to relate those to their physical properties. Despite efforts, the analysis of the chemical composition of individual multi-element nanoparticles remains challenging—from the technical point of view as well as from the point of view of measurement statistics. Here, we demonstrate that zero-field solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) complements local, single particle transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies with information on a large assembly of chemically complex nanoparticles. The combination of both experimental techniques gives information on the local composition and structure and provides an excellent measurement statistic through the corresponding NMR ensemble measurement. This analytical approach is applicable to many kinds of magnetic materials and therefore may prove very versatile in the future research of particulate magnetic nanomaterials.

  12. Discrete element modelling approach to assessment of granular properties in concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piet STROEVEN; Huan HE; Martijn STROEVEN

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the technological relevance of a concurrent algorithm-based discrete element modelling (DEM)system, HADES. This new system is the successor of SPACE that is limited to spherical grains only. It can realistically simulate the packing of arbitrary-shaped particles up to the fully compacted state. Generation of families of such particles, i.e., generally representing aggregate of fluvial origin and crushed rock, respectively, and the forming way of particulate structure are described.Similarly shaped particles are proposed for simulation of cement paste because of conformity with experimental results obtained by the X-ray tomography method. Technologically relevant territories inside and outside concrete technology are presently explored in this efficient, reliable, and economic way. Some results obtained by this DEM approach are presented.

  13. Measurement of spin correlation in tt production using a matrix element approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-07-15

    We determine the fraction of tt events with spin correlation, assuming that the spin of the top quark is either correlated with the spin of the top antiquark as predicted by the standard model or is uncorrelated. For the first time we use a matrix-element-based approach to study tt spin correlation. We use tt → W+ b W- b → ℓ+ νbℓ- ν b final states produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy sqrt(s)=1.96  TeV, where ℓ denotes an electron or a muon. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4  fb(-1) and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The result agrees with the standard model prediction. We exclude the hypothesis that the spins of the tt are uncorrelated at the 97.7% C.L.

  14. Schema volumes finis : Estimation d'erreur a posteriori hierarchique par elements finis mixtes. Resolution de problemes d'elasticite non-linearie

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    J.P. CROISILLEF. DUBOISJ.F. MAITREM. MOUSSAOUIA. REZGUIA.M. ZINEF. SIDOROFF; Part one is cocerned with numerical analysis. starting from a mixed finite element interpretation of basic finite volume (F.V.) schemes, a posteriori error estimation is analysed in the hirarchy of Raviart-Thomas elements. An explicit compatible estimator is given for these F.V. schemes.Part two introduces a family of F.V.. schemes of finite differences type, for a rectangular mesh and a more general structured one. ...

  15. Element of the Music Education in Orff-Schulwerk : Focusing on Five Volumes of Musik für Kinder

    OpenAIRE

    吉井, 也代里

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to support Orff’s education philosophy through analysis of a musical education element in Orff-Schulwerk as all-around education focusing on five volumes of Musik für Kinder and to consider Orff’s musical education view.   The analytic method divides the element which constitutes music into six items (1) melody, (2) ostinato, (3) basso ostinato, (4) harmony, (5) rhythm, (6) music style, and shows the feature of Orff’s educational work. Consideration is perfor...

  16. A bottom-up approach to estimating cost elements of REDD+ pilot projects in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merger Eduard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several previous global REDD+ cost studies have been conducted, demonstrating that payments for maintaining forest carbon stocks have significant potential to be a cost-effective mechanism for climate change mitigation. These studies have mostly followed highly aggregated top-down approaches without estimating the full range of REDD+ costs elements, thus underestimating the actual costs of REDD+. Based on three REDD+ pilot projects in Tanzania, representing an area of 327,825 ha, this study explicitly adopts a bottom-up approach to data assessment. By estimating opportunity, implementation, transaction and institutional costs of REDD+ we develop a practical and replicable methodological framework to consistently assess REDD+ cost elements. Results Based on historical land use change patterns, current region-specific economic conditions and carbon stocks, project-specific opportunity costs ranged between US$ -7.8 and 28.8 tCOxxxx for deforestation and forest degradation drivers such as agriculture, fuel wood production, unsustainable timber extraction and pasture expansion. The mean opportunity costs for the three projects ranged between US$ 10.1 – 12.5 tCO2. Implementation costs comprised between 89% and 95% of total project costs (excluding opportunity costs ranging between US$ 4.5 - 12.2 tCO2 for a period of 30 years. Transaction costs for measurement, reporting, verification (MRV, and other carbon market related compliance costs comprised a minor share, between US$ 0.21 - 1.46 tCO2. Similarly, the institutional costs comprised around 1% of total REDD+ costs in a range of US$ 0.06 – 0.11 tCO2. Conclusions The use of bottom-up approaches to estimate REDD+ economics by considering regional variations in economic conditions and carbon stocks has been shown to be an appropriate approach to provide policy and decision-makers robust economic information on REDD+. The assessment of opportunity costs is a crucial first step to

  17. A pyramid-based approach to visual exploration of a large volume of vehicle trajectory data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing SUN; Xiang LI

    2012-01-01

    Advances in positioning and wireless communicating technologies make it possible to collect large volumes of trajectory data of moving vehicles in a fast and convenient fashion.These data can be applied to traffic studies.Behind this application,a methodological issue that still requires particular attention is the way these data should be spatially visualized.Trajectory data physically consists of a large number of positioning points.With the dramatic increase of data volume,it becomes a challenge to display and explore these data.Existing commercial software often employs vector-based indexing structures to facilitate the display of a large volume of points,but their performance downgrades quickly when the number of points is very large,for example,tens of millions.In this paper,a pyramid-based approach is proposed.A pyramid method initially is invented to facilitate the display of raster images through the tradeoff between storage space and display time.A pyramid is a set of images at different levels with different resolutions.In this paper,we convert vector-based point data into raster data,and build a gridbased indexing structure in a 2D plane.Then,an image pyramid is built.Moreover,at the same level of a pyramid,image is segmented into mosaics with respect to the requirements of data storage and management.Algorithms or procedures on grid-based indexing structure,image pyramid,image segmentation,and visualization operations are given in this paper.A case study with taxi trajectory data in Shanghai is conducted.Results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the existing commercial software.

  18. Comparison study of some finite volume and finite element methods for the shallow water equations with bottom topography and friction terms

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria; Teschke, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    We present a comparison of two discretization methods for the shallow water equations, namely the finite volume method and the finite element scheme. A reliable model for practical interests includes terms modelling the bottom topography as well as the friction effects. The resulting equations belong to the class of systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations of first order with zero order source terms, the so-called balance laws. In order to approximate correctly steady equilibrium ...

  19. A numerical-statistical approach to determining the representative elementary volume (REV of cement paste for measuring diffusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete diffusivity is a function of its microstructure on many scales, ranging from nanometres to millimetres. Multi-scale techniques are therefore needed to model this parameter. Representative elementary volume (REV, in conjunction with the homogenization principle, is one of the most common multi-scale approaches. This study aimed to establish a procedure for establishing the REV required to determine cement paste diffusivity based on a three-step, numerical-statistical approach. First, several series of 3D cement paste microstructures were generated with HYMOSTRUC3D, a cement hydration and microstructure model, for different volumes of cement paste and w/c ratios ranging from 0.30 to 0.60. Second, the finite element method was used to simulate the diffusion of tritiated water through these microstructures. Effective cement paste diffusivity values for different REVs were obtained by applying Fick’s law. Finally, statistical analysis was used to find the fluctuation in effective diffusivity with cement paste volume, from which the REV was then determined. The conclusion drawn was that the REV for measuring diffusivity in cement paste is 100x100x100 μm3.

    La difusividad del hormigón depende de su microestructura a numerosas escalas, desde nanómetros hasta milímetros, por lo que se precisa de técnicas multiescala para representar este parámetro. Junto con el principio de homogeneización, uno de los métodos multiescala más habituales es el volumen elemental representativo (VER. El objeto de este estudio era establecer un procedimiento que permitiera determinar el VER necesario para calcular la difusividad de la pasta de cemento, basándose en un método numéricoestadístico que consta de tres etapas. Primero, se crearon varias series de microestructuras de pasta de cemento en 3D con HYMOSTRUC3D, un programa que permite crear un modelo de la hidratación y microestructura del cemento. Luego se empleó el método de

  20. [Exploration of research approaches of Chinese medicine's pharmacology based on "imprinting templates" (medical element) of supramolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fu-yuan; He, Hong; Deng, Kai-wen; Zhou, Yi-qun; Shi, Ji-lian; Liu, Wen-long; Yang, Yan-tao; Tang, Yu

    2015-11-01

    The paper, based on the previous publication as special impact of Chinese medicine theories on supramolcular chemistry, aims to analyze the natural origination for the Chinese medicine and to explain the special impact of "Qi chromatography" reaction on "imprinting templates" in supramolcular host of human being with Chinese medicine, in order to reveal the CM's properties of "medical element" with "imprinting templates" autonomisation generally took place in natural supramolecules, and also to discover that the CM's pharmacology are satisfied with its own approaches different form western pharmacology. It was decided, for CM's pharmacology guided by CM's theories, to "Qi chromatography" relations between the CM's ingredient groups and the meridian zang-fu viscera. The supramolcular chemistry played an all-through role in procession of making macro-regularities and special presentation on behavior of "Qi chromatography" impulse owning to the matching action of all kinds of ingredients on the meridian zang-fu viscera with similar "imprinting templates". The CM's pharmacology were guided by CM's theories, owing to its interpretation of supramolecular chemistry. The pharmacology was achieved to construct up completely on base of classical chemical single molecular bonds whereas the CM's pharmacology be configured to big building by way of "imprinting templates" as multi-weak bonds among "supramolecular society". CM's pharmacology was supramolcular pharmacology dealt with "molecular society" on the base of western pharmacology, and employed to double research approaches both math-physical quantitative representation on macroscope and qualitative analyses in microscope.

  1. A unidirectional approach for d-dimensional finite element methods for higher order on sparse grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bungartz, H.J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    In the last years, sparse grids have turned out to be a very interesting approach for the efficient iterative numerical solution of elliptic boundary value problems. In comparison to standard (full grid) discretization schemes, the number of grid points can be reduced significantly from O(N{sup d}) to O(N(log{sub 2}(N)){sup d-1}) in the d-dimensional case, whereas the accuracy of the approximation to the finite element solution is only slightly deteriorated: For piecewise d-linear basis functions, e. g., an accuracy of the order O(N{sup - 2}(log{sub 2}(N)){sup d-1}) with respect to the L{sub 2}-norm and of the order O(N{sup -1}) with respect to the energy norm has been shown. Furthermore, regular sparse grids can be extended in a very simple and natural manner to adaptive ones, which makes the hierarchical sparse grid concept applicable to problems that require adaptive grid refinement, too. An approach is presented for the Laplacian on a uinit domain in this paper.

  2. New approach to the perception of 3D shape based on veridicality, complexity, symmetry and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Sawada, Tadamasa; Li, Yunfeng; Kropatsch, Walter G; Steinman, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress towards understanding 3D shape perception made possible by appreciating the significant role that veridicality and complexity play in the natural visual environment. The ability to see objects as they really are "out there" is derived from the complexity inherent in the 3D object's shape. The importance of both veridicality and complexity was ignored in most prior research. Appreciating their importance made it possible to devise a computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from only one of its 2D images. This model uses a simplicity principle consisting of only four a priori constraints representing properties of 3D shapes, primarily their symmetry and volume. The model recovers 3D shapes from a single 2D image as well, and sometimes even better, than a human being. In the rare recoveries in which errors are observed, the errors made by the model and human subjects are very similar. The model makes no use of depth, surfaces or learning. Recent elaborations of this model include: (i) the recovery of the shapes of natural objects, including human and animal bodies with limbs in varying positions (ii) providing the model with two input images that allowed it to achieve virtually perfect shape constancy from almost all viewing directions. The review concludes with a comparison of some of the highlights of our novel, successful approach to the recovery of 3D shape from a 2D image with prior, less successful approaches.

  3. Atomic volume, atomic distances and chemical bonding in solid metallic elements; Atomvolumen, Atomabstaende und chemische Bindung in festen metallischen Elementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troemel, M.; Huebner, S. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2001-05-01

    Relationships between bond lengths and bond numbers and also between atomic volumes and valencies are derived and parameters for their calculation are given for the s-block, p-block, and d-block metals. From the atomic volumes under pressure, the valencies of three solid lanthanoids have been confirmed or redetermined: La 3; Ce 2, 3, and 4; Yb 2 and 3. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of delayed convergence in the three-noded Timoshenko beam element using the function space approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somenath Mukherjee; Gangan Prathap

    2002-10-01

    Despite satisfying only completeness and continuity requirements, elements often perform erroneously in a certain class of problems, called the locking situations, where they display spurious stress oscillations and enhanced stiffness properties. The function space approach that effectively substantiates the postulates of the field consistency paradigm is an efficient tool to reveal the fundamental cause of locking phenomena, and propose methods to eliminate this pathological problem. In this paper, we review the delayed convergence behaviour of three-noded Timoshenko beam elements using the rigorous function space approach. Explicit, closed form algebraic results for the element strains, stresses and errors have been derived using this method. The performance of the field-inconsistent three-noded Timoshenko beam element is compared with that of the field-inconsistent twonoded beam element. It is demonstrated that while the field-inconsistent two-noded linear element is prone to shear locking, the field-inconsistent three-noded element is not very vulnerable to this pathological problem, despite the resulting shear oscillations.

  5. Analysis of ground vibrations due to underground trains by 2.5D finite/infinite element approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiao-Hui Hung; Y. B. Yang

    2010-01-01

    The 2.5D finite/infinite element approach is adopted to study wave propagation problems caused by underground moving trains. The irregularities of the near field, including the tunnel structure and parts of the soil, are modeled by the finite elements, and the wave propagation properties of the far field extending to infinity are modeled by the infinite elements. One particular feature of the 2.5D approach is that it enables the computation of the three-dimensional response of the half-space, taking into account the load-moving effect, using only a two-dimensional profile. Although the 2.5D finite/infinite element approach shows a great advantage in studying the wave propagation caused by moving trains, attention should be given to the calculation aspects, such as the rules for mesh establishment, in order to avoid producing inaccurate or erroneous results. In this paper, some essential points for consideration in analysis are highlighted, along with techniques to enhance the speed of the calculations. All these observations should prove useful in making the 2.5D finite/infinite element approach an effective one.

  6. A novel approach to quantifying algal contributions to suspended organic matter from elemental composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Mayorga, E.; Richardson, D. C.; Newbold, J. D.; Bukaveckas, P. A.; Angradi, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitatively distinguishing allochthonous and autochthonous sources of organic matter (OM) transported by stream and river ecosystems has long been a challenge. Stable carbon isotope ratios of algal carbon are temporally and spatially variable in freshwaters and thus poorly constrain OM sources. Here we present a new quantitative approach to estimating algal contributions to suspended particulate OM, based on elemental signatures (%OC, %N) of three particle-type end-members (plant detritus, algae, and mineral-complexed OM). We then applied the mixing model analysis with Monte-Carlo error estimation to quantify the contributions of these three particle types to suspended OM at ~450 river sites in the US Great Rivers (Upper Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers), at over 100 sites in the Amazon River system and from ~600 samples from one site in the 3rd-order White Clay Creek in the SE Pennsylvania piedmont. We compare model results with measurements of stable isotopes, chlorophyll, nutrients and other variables at this extreme diversity sites with contrasting climate, land use and hydrological conditions. We find that algae typically contribute negligibly to OM in the Amazon but can be very important sources at many sites in the US Great Rivers, but site-specific exceptions to these overall trends can be very informative. In WCC, algal contributions vary seasonally. We then try to explain these differences as a function of differing basin-scale and landuse conditions.

  7. Finite element simulation of internal flows with heat transfer using a velocity correction approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Varaprasad Patnaik; Y T K Gowda; M S Ravisankar; P A Aswatha Narayana; K N Seetharamu

    2001-06-01

    This paper enumerates finite-element based prediction of internal flow problems, with heat transfer. The present numerical simulations employ a velocity correction algorithm, with a Galerkin weighted residual formulation. Two problems each in laminar and turbulent flow regimes are investigated, by solving full Navier-Stokes equations. Flow over a backward-facing step is studied with extensive validations. The robustness of the algorithm is demonstrated by solving a very complex problem viz. a disk and doughnut baffled heat exchanger, which has several obstructions in its flow path. The effect of wall conductivity in turbulent heat transfer is also studied by performing a conjugate analysis. Temporal evolution of flow in a channel due to circular, square and elliptic obstructions is investigated, to simulate the vortex dynamics. Flow past an in-line tube bank of a heat exchanger shell is numerically studied. Resulting heat and fluid flow patterns are analysed. Important design parameters of interest such as the Nusselt number, Strouhal number, skin friction coefficient, pressure drop etc. are obtained. It is successfully demonstrated that the velocity correction approach with a Galerkin weighted residual formulation is able to effectively simulate a wide range of fluid flow features.

  8. Common Elements Treatment Approach based on a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention: implementation in the Colombian Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gabriela Pacichana-Quinayáz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to the limited supply of mental health services for Afro-Colombian victims of violence, a Common Elements Treatment Approach (CETA intervention has been implemented in the Colombian Pacific. Given the importance of improvement in mental health interventions for this population, it is necessary to characterize this process. This article seeks to describe the implementation of CETA for Afro-Colombian victims of violence in Buenaventura and Quibdó, Colombia through case studieswith individual in-depth interviews with Lay Psychosocial Community Workers (LPCW, supervisors, and coordinators responsible for implementing CETA. From this six core categories were obtained: 1. Effect of armed conflict and poverty 2. Trauma severity 3. Perceived changes with CETA 4. Characteristics and LPCW’s performance 5. Afro-Colombian culturalapproach and 6. Strategies to promote users’ well-being.Colombian Pacific’s scenario implies several factors, such as the active armed conflict, economic crisis, and lack of mental health care resources, affecting the implementation process and the intervention effects. This implies the need to establish and strengthen partnerships between institutions in order to administer necessary mental health care for victims of violence in the Colombian Pacific.

  9. A NURBS-based finite element model applied to geometrically nonlinear elastodynamics using a corotational approach

    KAUST Repository

    Espath, L. F R

    2015-02-03

    A numerical model to deal with nonlinear elastodynamics involving large rotations within the framework of the finite element based on NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) basis is presented. A comprehensive kinematical description using a corotational approach and an orthogonal tensor given by the exact polar decomposition is adopted. The state equation is written in terms of corotational variables according to the hypoelastic theory, relating the Jaumann derivative of the Cauchy stress to the Eulerian strain rate.The generalized-α method (Gα) method and Generalized Energy-Momentum Method with an additional parameter (GEMM+ξ) are employed in order to obtain a stable and controllable dissipative time-stepping scheme with algorithmic conservative properties for nonlinear dynamic analyses.The main contribution is to show that the energy-momentum conservation properties and numerical stability may be improved once a NURBS-based FEM in the spatial discretization is used. Also it is shown that high continuity can postpone the numerical instability when GEMM+ξ with consistent mass is employed; likewise, increasing the continuity class yields a decrease in the numerical dissipation. A parametric study is carried out in order to show the stability and energy budget in terms of several properties such as continuity class, spectral radius and lumped as well as consistent mass matrices.

  10. Open-Ended Recursive Approach for the Calculation of Multiphoton Absorption Matrix Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Daniel H; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ringholm, Magnus; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-03-10

    We present an implementation of single residues for response functions to arbitrary order using a recursive approach. Explicit expressions in terms of density-matrix-based response theory for the single residues of the linear, quadratic, cubic, and quartic response functions are also presented. These residues correspond to one-, two-, three- and four-photon transition matrix elements. The newly developed code is used to calculate the one-, two-, three- and four-photon absorption cross sections of para-nitroaniline and para-nitroaminostilbene, making this the first treatment of four-photon absorption in the framework of response theory. We find that the calculated multiphoton absorption cross sections are not very sensitive to the size of the basis set as long as a reasonably large basis set with diffuse functions is used. The choice of exchange-correlation functional, however, significantly affects the calculated cross sections of both charge-transfer transitions and other transitions, in particular, for the larger para-nitroaminostilbene molecule. We therefore recommend the use of a range-separated exchange-correlation functional in combination with the augmented correlation-consistent double-ζ basis set aug-cc-pVDZ for the calculation of multiphoton absorption properties.

  11. Common Elements Treatment Approach based on a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention: implementation in the Colombian Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacichana-Quinayáz, Sara Gabriela; Osorio-Cuéllar, Gisel Viviana; Bonilla-Escobar, Francisco Javier; Fandiño-Losada, Andrés; Gutiérrez-Martínez, María Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Due to the limited supply of mental health services for Afro-Colombian victims of violence, a Common Elements Treatment Approach (CETA) intervention has been implemented in the Colombian Pacific. Given the importance of improvement in mental health interventions for this population, it is necessary to characterize this process. This article seeks to describe the implementation of CETA for Afro-Colombian victims of violence in Buenaventura and Quibdó, Colombia through case studieswith individual in-depth interviews with Lay Psychosocial Community Workers (LPCW), supervisors, and coordinators responsible for implementing CETA. From this six core categories were obtained: 1. Effect of armed conflict and poverty 2. Trauma severity 3. Perceived changes with CETA 4. Characteristics and LPCW's performance 5. Afro-Colombian culturalapproach and 6. Strategies to promote users' well-being.Colombian Pacific's scenario implies several factors, such as the active armed conflict, economic crisis, and lack of mental health care resources, affecting the implementation process and the intervention effects. This implies the need to establish and strengthen partnerships between institutions in order to administer necessary mental health care for victims of violence in the Colombian Pacific.

  12. Linking flood peak, flood volume and inundation extent: a DEM-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolho, Cédric; Furusho-Percot, Carina; Blaquière, Simon; Brettschneider, Marco; Andréassian, Vazken

    2017-04-01

    Traditionally, flood inundation maps are computed based on the Shallow Water Equations (SWE) in one or two dimensions, with various simplifications that have proved to give good results. However, the complexity of the SWEs often requires a numerical resolution which can need long computing time, as well as detailed cross section data: this often results in restricting these models to rather small areas abundant with high quality data. This, along with the necessity for fast inundation mapping, are the reason why rapid inundation models are being designed, working for (almost) any river with a minimum amount of data and, above all, easily available data. Our model tries to follow this path by using a 100m DEM over France from which are extracted a drainage network and the associated drainage areas. It is based on two pre-existing methods: (1) SHYREG (Arnaud et al.,2013), a regionalized approach used to calculate the 2-year and 10-year flood quantiles (used as approximated bankfull flow and maximum discharge, respectively) for each river pixel of the DEM (below a 10 000 km2 drainage area) and (2) SOCOSE (Mailhol,1980), which gives, amongst other things, an empirical formula of a characteristic flood duration (for each pixel) based on catchment area, average precipitation and temperature. An overflow volume for each river pixel is extracted from a triangular shaped synthetic hydrograph designed with SHYREG quantiles and SOCOSE flood duration. The volume is then spread from downstream to upstream one river pixel at a time. When the entire hydrographic network is processed, the model stops and generates a map of potential inundation area associated with the 10-year flood quantile. Our model can also be calibrated using past-events inundation maps by adjusting two parameters, one which modifies the overflow duration, and the other, equivalent to a minimum drainage area for river pixels to be flooded. Thus, in calibration on a sample of 42 basins, the first draft of the

  13. SAMPLING ARTIFACTS IN MEASUREMENT OF ELEMENTAL AND ORGANIC CARBON: LOW VOLUME SAMPLING IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were completed to determine the extent of artifacts from sampling elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) under sample conditions consistent with personal sampling. Two different types of experiments were completed; the first examined possible artifacts from oil...

  14. Test design description Volume 2, Part 1. IFR-1 metal fuel irradiation test (AK-181) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1986-06-01

    The IFR-1 Test, designated as the AK-181 Test Assembly, will be the first irradiation test of wire wrapped, sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The test is part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuels program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the Innovative Reactor Concepts Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). One subassembly, containing 169 fuel elements, will be irradiated for 600 full power days to achieve 10 at.% burnup. Three metal fuel alloys (U-10Zr, U-8Pu-10Zr) will be irradiated in D9 cladding tubes. The metal fuel elements have a fuel-smeared density of 75% and each contains five slugs. The enriched zone contains three slugs and is 36-in. long. One 6.5-in. long depleted uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) was loaded at each end of the enriched zone. the fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for wirewrapping and assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains relevant data on compositions, densities, dimensions and weights for the cast fuel slugs and completed fuel elements. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "Users` Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  15. Therapeutic elements in a self-management approach: experiences from group participation among people suffering from chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Bodil; Natvig, Gerd Karin; Dysvik, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a complex, multifaceted subjective experience that involves the whole person. Self-management is the dynamic and continuous process of adapting one's situation to the cognitive, behavioral, and emotional responses necessary to maintain a satisfactory quality of life. Approaches based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are described as appropriate in assisting people suffering from chronic pain because they challenge maladaptive beliefs and behaviors in relation to pain. This study aimed to explore patients' experiences of therapeutic elements from group participation in a chronic pain management program. A qualitative research design with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach was used. Six months after participation in the 8-week course, 34 participants formulated and submitted written reports based on open-ended questions related to their group participation and self-help achievement. These reports were analyzed by elements of qualitative content analysis. THE ANALYSIS RESULTED IN TWO SUBTHEMES: "The significance of active involvement in gaining new insight" and "The significance of community and group support." These were abstracted in the main theme: "Successful self-management is related to several significant contributions in the group." An active role with writing, self-revelation, and exchanges of thoughts and feelings in the group seemed to be the key tools for success. In addition, group support and access to other group members' experiences were significant therapeutic elements. We suggest that successful self-management requires knowledge of essential therapeutic elements. In a CBT-based group approach, such elements may offer an important health care contribution.

  16. Practical approaches to principal component analysis for simultaneously dealing with missing and censored elements in chemical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanimirova, I

    2013-09-24

    Multivariate chemical data often contain elements that are missing completely at random and the so-called left-censored elements whose values are only known to be below a definite threshold value (reporting limit). In the last several years, attention has been paid to developing methods for dealing with data containing missing elements and those that can handle data with missing elements and outliers. However, processing data with both missing and left-censored elements is still an ongoing problem. The aim of this work was to investigate which method is most suitable for handling left-censored and missing completely at random elements that are present simultaneously in chemical data by using a comparison of the generalized nonlinear iterative partial least squares (NIPALS(1)) algorithm that has been recently proposed, methods that include uncertainty information like maximum likelihood principal component analysis, MLPCA(2), and replacement methods. The results of the Monte Carlo simulation study for artificial and real data sets showed that substitution with half of the reporting limit can be used when the percentage of left-censored elements per variable is up to 30-40%. The generalized NIPALS algorithm is generally recommended for a large percentage of left-censored elements per variable and particularly when a large number of variables are censored. The expectation-maximization approach applied to data with censored elements substituted with half of the reporting limits can be a strategy for dealing with missing and left-censored elements in data, but if the converge criterion is not fulfilled, then the generalized NIPALS algorithm can be applied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A statistical approach to the initial volume problem in Single Particle Analysis by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorzano, C O S; Vargas, J; de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Otón, J; Álvarez-Cabrera, A L; Abrishami, V; Sesmero, E; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2015-03-01

    Cryo Electron Microscopy is a powerful Structural Biology technique, allowing the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules. In particular, the structural study of purified macromolecules -often referred as Single Particle Analysis(SPA)- is normally performed through an iterative process that needs a first estimation of the three-dimensional structure that is progressively refined using experimental data. It is well-known the local optimisation nature of this refinement, so that the initial choice of this first structure may substantially change the final result. Computational algorithms aiming to providing this first structure already exist. However, the question is far from settled and more robust algorithms are still needed so that the refinement process can be performed with sufficient guarantees. In this article we present a new algorithm that addresses the initial volume problem in SPA by setting it in a Weighted Least Squares framework and calculating the weights through a statistical approach based on the cumulative density function of different image similarity measures. We show that the new algorithm is significantly more robust than other state-of-the-art algorithms currently in use in the field. The algorithm is available as part of the software suite Xmipp (http://xmipp.cnb.csic.es) and Scipion (http://scipion.cnb.csic.es) under the name "Significant".

  18. An Adaptive Prediction-Based Approach to Lossless Compression of Floating-Point Volume Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fout, N; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we address the problem of lossless compression of scientific and medical floating-point volume data. We propose two prediction-based compression methods that share a common framework, which consists of a switched prediction scheme wherein the best predictor out of a preset group of linear predictors is selected. Such a scheme is able to adapt to different datasets as well as to varying statistics within the data. The first method, called APE (Adaptive Polynomial Encoder), uses a family of structured interpolating polynomials for prediction, while the second method, which we refer to as ACE (Adaptive Combined Encoder), combines predictors from previous work with the polynomial predictors to yield a more flexible, powerful encoder that is able to effectively decorrelate a wide range of data. In addition, in order to facilitate efficient visualization of compressed data, our scheme provides an option to partition floating-point values in such a way as to provide a progressive representation. We compare our two compressors to existing state-of-the-art lossless floating-point compressors for scientific data, with our data suite including both computer simulations and observational measurements. The results demonstrate that our polynomial predictor, APE, is comparable to previous approaches in terms of speed but achieves better compression rates on average. ACE, our combined predictor, while somewhat slower, is able to achieve the best compression rate on all datasets, with significantly better rates on most of the datasets.

  19. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  20. A New Approach to Sequence Analysis Exemplified by Identification of cis-Elements in Abscisic Acid Inducible Promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Hallin, Peter Fischer; Salomon, Jesper

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements in DNA promoters by computational approaches are a great help in genome-wide elucidation of signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and gene expression. However, to accomplish this has proven a difficult problem in computational genomics in part d...

  1. A consistent geochemical modelling approach for the leaching and reactive transport of major and trace elements in MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.J.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2008-01-01

    To improve the long-term environmental risk assessment of waste applications, a predictive "multi-surface" modelling approach has been developed to simultaneously predict the leaching and reactive transport of a broad range of major and trace elements (i.e., pH, Na, Al, Fe, Ca, SO4, Mg, Si, PO4, CO3

  2. A consistent geochemical modelling approach for the leaching and reactive transport of major and trace elements in MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.J.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2008-01-01

    To improve the long-term environmental risk assessment of waste applications, a predictive "multi-surface" modelling approach has been developed to simultaneously predict the leaching and reactive transport of a broad range of major and trace elements (i.e., pH, Na, Al, Fe, Ca, SO4, Mg, Si, PO4, CO3

  3. Predicting onset and withdrawal of Indian Summer Monsoon in 2016: results of Tipping elements approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Stolbova, Veronika; Kurths, Jurgen

    2017-04-01

    The monsoon is the season of rain caused by a global seasonal reverse in winds direction and a change in pressure distribution. The Southwest winds bring summer monsoon to India. The economy of India is able to maintain its GDP in the wake of a good monsoon. However, if monsoon gets delayed by even two weeks, it can spell disaster because the high population depending on agriculture - 70% of its people directly related to farming. Agriculture, in turn, is dependent on the monsoon. Although the rainy season happens annually between June and September, the time of monsoon season's onset and withdrawal varies within a month from year to year. The important feature of the monsoon is that it starts and ends suddenly. Hence, despite enormous progress having been made in predicting monsoon since 1886, it remains a significant scientific challenge. To make predictions of monsoon timing in 2016, we applied our recently developed method [1]. Our approach is based on a teleconnection between the Eastern Ghats (EG) and North Pakistan (NP) - Tipping Elements of Indian Summer Monsoon. Both our predictions - for monsoon onset and withdrawal - were made for the Eastern Ghats region (EG-20N,80E) in the central part of India, while the Indian Meteorological Department forecasts monsoon over Kerala - a state at the southern tip of the Indian subcontinent. Our prediction for monsoon onset was published on May 6-th, 2016 [2]. We predicted the monsoon arrival to the EG on the 13th of June with a deviation of +/-4 days. In fact, monsoon onset was on June 17-th, that was confirmed by information from meteorological stations located around the EG-region. Hence, our prediction of monsoon onset (made 40 days in advance) was correct. We delivered the prediction of monsoon withdrawal on July 27, 2016 [3], announcing the monsoon withdrawal from the EG on October 5-th with a deviation of +/-5 days. The actual monsoon withdrawal started on October 10-th when the relative humidity in the region

  4. An adaptive finite element approach to modelling sediment laden density currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, S.; Hill, J.; Allison, P. A.; Piggott, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling sediment-laden density currents at real-world scales is a challenging task. Here we present Fluidity, which uses dynamic adaptive re-meshing to reduce computational costs whilst maintaining sufficient resolution where and when it is required. This allows small-scale processes to be captured in large scale simulations. Density currents, also known as gravity or buoyancy currents, occur wherever two fluids with different densities meet. They can occur at scales of up to hundred kilometres in the ocean when continental shelves collapse. This process releases large quantities of sediment into the ocean which increase the bulk density of the fluid to form a density current. These currents can carry sediment hundreds of kilometres, at speeds of up to a hundred kilometres per hour, over the sea bed. They can be tsunamigenic and they have the potential to cause significant damage to submarine infrastructure, such as submarine telecommunications cables or oil and gas infrastructure. They are also a key process for movement of organic material into the depths of the ocean. Due to this, they play an important role in the global carbon cycle on the Earth, forming a significant component of the stratigraphic record, and their deposits can form useful sources of important hydrocarbons. Modelling large scale sediment laden density currents is a very challenging problem. Particles within the current are suspended by turbulence that occurs at length scales that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the size of the current. Models that resolve the vertical structure of the flow require a very large, highly resolved mesh, and substantial computing power to solve. Here, we verify our adaptive model by comparison with a set of laboratory experiments by Gladstone et al. [1998] on the propagation and sediment deposition of bidisperse gravity currents. Comparisons are also made with fixed mesh solutions, and it is shown that accuracy can be maintained with fewer elements

  5. Finite Element Approach for Analyses of Flanking Noise Transmission within Lightweight Panel Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens; Andersen, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns the analysis of noise transmission in a lightweight panel structure. The analysis is based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA) employing solid elements for the structure. The analysis focuses on flanking noise transmission in panel structures of finite size. A parametric study...

  6. Solution strategies for finite elements and finite volumes methods applied to flow and heat transfer problem in U-shaped geothermal exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Nadaniela; Giacomini, Josephin; Maponi, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Matter of this paper is the study of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer in a U-shaped heat exchanger. We propose a mathematical model that is formulated as a forced convection problem for incompressible and Newtonian fluids and results in the unsteady Navier-Stokes problem. In order to get a solution, we discretise the equations with both the Finite Elements Method and the Finite Volumes Method. These procedures give rise to a non-symmetric indefinite quadratic system of equations. Thus, three regularisation techniques are proposed to make approximations effective and ideas to compare their results are provided.

  7. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  8. A spatially adaptive grid-refinement approach for the finite element solution of the even-parity Boltzmann transport equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirza, Anwar M. [Department of Computer Science, National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, NUCES-FAST, A.K. Brohi Road, H-11, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: anwar.m.mirza@gmail.com; Iqbal, Shaukat [Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Ghulam Ishaq Khan (GIK) Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Topi-23460, Swabi (Pakistan)], E-mail: shaukat@giki.edu.pk; Rahman, Faizur [Department of Physics, Allama Iqbal Open University, H-8 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2007-07-15

    A spatially adaptive grid-refinement approach has been investigated to solve the even-parity Boltzmann transport equation. A residual based a posteriori error estimation scheme has been utilized for checking the approximate solutions for various finite element grids. The local particle balance has been considered as an error assessment criterion. To implement the adaptive approach, a computer program ADAFENT (adaptive finite elements for neutron transport) has been developed to solve the second order even-parity Boltzmann transport equation using K{sup +} variational principle for slab geometry. The program has a core K{sup +} module which employs Lagrange polynomials as spatial basis functions for the finite element formulation and Legendre polynomials for the directional dependence of the solution. The core module is called in by the adaptive grid generator to determine local gradients and residuals to explore the possibility of grid refinements in appropriate regions of the problem. The a posteriori error estimation scheme has been implemented in the outer grid refining iteration module. Numerical experiments indicate that local errors are large in regions where the flux gradients are large. A comparison of the spatially adaptive grid-refinement approach with that of uniform meshing approach for various benchmark cases confirms its superiority in greatly enhancing the accuracy of the solution without increasing the number of unknown coefficients. A reduction in the local errors of the order of 10{sup 2} has been achieved using the new approach in some cases.

  9. Quantum theory elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, David Robert

    1962-01-01

    Quantum Theory: A Treatise in Three Volumes, I: Elements focuses on the principles, methodologies, and approaches involved in quantum theory, including quantum mechanics, linear combinations, collisions, and transitions. The selection first elaborates on the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, exactly soluble bound state problems, and continuum. Discussions focus on delta function normalization, spherically symmetric potentials, rectangular potential wells, harmonic oscillators, spherically symmetrical potentials, Coulomb potential, axiomatic basis, consequences of first three postula

  10. A finite element approach for the dynamic analysis of joint-dominated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Wu, Shih-Chin

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method to model dynamic structural systems undergoing large rotations is presented. The dynamic systems are composed of rigid joint bodies and flexible beam elements. The configurations of these systems are subject to change due to the relative motion in the joints among interconnected elastic beams. A body fixed reference is defined for each joint body to describe the joint body's displacements. Using the finite element method and the kinematic relations between each flexible element and its corotational reference, the total displacement field of an element, which contains gross rigid as well as elastic effects, can be derived in terms of the translational and rotational displacements of the two end nodes. If one end of an element is hinged to a joint body, the joint body's displacements and the hinge degree of freedom at the end are used to represent the nodal displacements. This results in a highly coupled system of differential equations written in terms of hinge degrees of freedom as well as the rotational and translational displacements of joint bodies and element nodes.

  11. Evaluation of Essential and Toxic Element Concentrations in Buckwheat by Experimental and Chemometric Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Lian-xin; HUANG Yan-fei; LIU Yuan; ZHANG Zhi-feng; LU Lu-yang; ZHAO Gang

    2014-01-01

    The essential and toxic element concentrations in buckwheat were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). The concentration data were subjected to common chemometrics analyses, including correlation analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), to gain better understanding of the differences among the tested samples. Our results indicated that the essential and toxic element concentrations were not different between Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn and F. esculentum Moench. The element concentrations varied among buckwheat samples from different sources. Commercial tartary buckwheat tea contained several essential elements, thus, could be used as the source of essential elements. The detection of toxic heavy metals in commercial tartary buckwheat tea suggested that safety issue of such buckwheat products should be seriously concerned. Our results also revealed that the place of origin and the processing protocol of tartary buckwheat affected the element concentrations of the commercial form. The implications to the quality control and safety evaluation of buckwheat were extensively discussed.

  12. A new approach for volume reconstruction in TomoPIV with the alternating direction method of multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, Ioana; Herzet, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    We adapt and import into the TomoPIV scenery a fast algorithm for solving the volume reconstruction problem. Our approach is based on the reformulation of the volume reconstruction task as a constrained optimization problem and the resort to the ‘alternating directions method of multipliers’ (ADMM). The inherent primal-dual algorithm is summarized in this article to solve the optimization problem related to the TomoPIV. In particular, the general formulation of the volume reconstruction problem considered in this paper allows one to: (i) take explicitly into account the level of the noise affecting the data; (ii) account for both the nonnegativity and the sparsity of the solution. Experiments on a numerical TomoPIV benchmark show that the proposed framework is a serious contender for the state-of-the-art.

  13. 有限元离散区域的逼近性%On the Approaching Domain Obtained by Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹青松; 李永海

    2002-01-01

    The use of finite element method leads to replacing the initial domain byan approaching domain. Under some appropriate assumptions, we prove that thereexists a W1,+∞-diffeomorphism from theoriginal domain to the approaching domain.

  14. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    Automated fast (5-20 min) synovial membrane volume determination by MRI, based on pre-set post-gadolinium-DTPA enhancement thresholds, was evaluated as a substitute for a time-consuming (45-120 min), previously validated, manual segmentation method. Twenty-nine knees [rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 13...... or synovial membrane volume, e.g. no systematic errors were found. The inter-MRI variation, evaluated in three knees and three wrists, was higher than by manual segmentation, particularly due to sensitivity to malalignment artefacts. Examination of test objects proved the high accuracy of the general...... methodology for volume determinations (maximal error 6.3%). Preceded by the determination of reproducibility and the optimal threshold at the available MR unit, automated 'threshold' segmentation appears to be acceptable when changes rather than absolute values of synovial membrane volumes are most important...

  15. The influence of trading volume on market efficiency: The DCCA approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukpitak, Jessada; Hengpunya, Varagorn

    2016-09-01

    For a single market, the cross-correlation between market efficiency and trading volume, which is an indicator of market liquidity, is attentively analysed. The study begins with creating time series of market efficiency by applying time-varying Hurst exponent with one year sliding window to daily closing prices. The time series of trading volume corresponding to the same time period used for the market efficiency is derived from one year moving average of daily trading volume. Subsequently, the detrended cross-correlation coefficient is employed to quantify the degree of cross-correlation between the two time series. It was found that values of cross-correlation coefficient of all considered stock markets are close to 0 and are clearly out of range in which correlation being considered significant in almost every time scale. Obtained results show that the market liquidity in term of trading volume hardly has effect on the market efficiency.

  16. Validation of an entirely in vitro approach for rapid prototyping of DNA regulatory elements for synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, James; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    A bottleneck in our capacity to rationally and predictably engineer biological systems is the limited number of well-characterized genetic elements from which to build. Current characterization methods are tied to measurements in living systems, the transformation and culturing of which are inherently time-consuming. To address this, we have validated a completely in vitro approach for the characterization of DNA regulatory elements using Escherichia coli extract cell-free systems. Importantly, we demonstrate that characterization in cell-free systems correlates and is reflective of performance in vivo for the most frequently used DNA regulatory elements. Moreover, we devise a rapid and completely in vitro method to generate DNA templates for cell-free systems, bypassing the need for DNA template generation and amplification from living cells. This in vitro approach is significantly quicker than current characterization methods and is amenable to high-throughput techniques, providing a valuable tool for rapidly prototyping libraries of DNA regulatory elements for synthetic biology. PMID:23371936

  17. Interactive volume exploration of petascale microscopy data streams using a visualization-driven virtual memory approach

    KAUST Repository

    Hadwiger, Markus

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the first volume visualization system that scales to petascale volumes imaged as a continuous stream of high-resolution electron microscopy images. Our architecture scales to dense, anisotropic petascale volumes because it: (1) decouples construction of the 3D multi-resolution representation required for visualization from data acquisition, and (2) decouples sample access time during ray-casting from the size of the multi-resolution hierarchy. Our system is designed around a scalable multi-resolution virtual memory architecture that handles missing data naturally, does not pre-compute any 3D multi-resolution representation such as an octree, and can accept a constant stream of 2D image tiles from the microscopes. A novelty of our system design is that it is visualization-driven: we restrict most computations to the visible volume data. Leveraging the virtual memory architecture, missing data are detected during volume ray-casting as cache misses, which are propagated backwards for on-demand out-of-core processing. 3D blocks of volume data are only constructed from 2D microscope image tiles when they have actually been accessed during ray-casting. We extensively evaluate our system design choices with respect to scalability and performance, compare to previous best-of-breed systems, and illustrate the effectiveness of our system for real microscopy data from neuroscience. © 1995-2012 IEEE.

  18. Numerical Multilevel Upscaling for Incompressible Flow in Reservoir Simulation: An Element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe) Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Villa, Umberto; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2016-01-01

    We study the application of a finite element numerical upscaling technique to the incompressible two-phase porous media total velocity formulation. Specifically, an element agglomeration based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe) technique with improved approximation proper ties [37] is used, for the first...... discontinuous polynomial spaces, resulting in strong mass conservation for the upscaled systems. Due to the guaranteed approximation properties and the generic nature of the AMGe method, recursive multilevel upscaling is automatically obtained. Furthermore, this technique works for both structured...... that the proposed AMGe approach offers. Thus, the proposed approach can be seen as a rigorous bridge that merges the best properties of these two existing methods. The accuracy and stability of the studied multilevel AMGe upscaling technique is demonstrated on two challenging test cases....

  19. Numerical Multilevel Upscaling for Incompressible Flow in Reservoir Simulation: An Element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe) Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Villa, Umberto; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2017-01-01

    We study the application of a finite element numerical upscaling technique to the incompressible two-phase porous media total velocity formulation. Specifically, an element agglomeration based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe) technique with improved approximation proper ties [37] is used, for the first...... discontinuous polynomial spaces, resulting in strong mass conservation for the upscaled systems. Due to the guaranteed approximation properties and the generic nature of the AMGe method, recursive multilevel upscaling is automatically obtained. Furthermore, this technique works for both structured...... that the proposed AMGe approach offers. Thus, the proposed approach can be seen as a rigorous bridge that merges the best properties of these two existing methods. The accuracy and stability of the studied multilevel AMGe upscaling technique is demonstrated on two challenging test cases....

  20. New Approach for Near-Real-Time Measurement of Elemental Composition of Aerosol Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Prasoon; Kulkarni, Pramod; Birch, M. Eileen

    2015-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for making near-real-time measurement of elemental composition of aerosols using plasma spectroscopy. The method allows preconcentration of miniscule particle mass (pg to ng) directly from the sampled aerosol stream through electrostatic deposition of charged particles (30–900 nm) onto a flat-tip microneedle electrode. The collected material is subsequently ablated from the electrode and monitored by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Atomic emission spectra were collected using a broadband spectrometer with a wavelength range of 200–980 nm. A single-sensor delay time of 1.3 μs was used in the spectrometer for all elements to allow simultaneous measurement of multiple elements. The system was calibrated for various elements including Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Na, and Ti. The absolute mass detection limits for these elements were experimentally determined and found to be in the range of 0.018–5 ng. The electrostatic collection technique has many advantages over other substrate-based methods involving aerosol collection on a filter or its focused deposition using an aerodynamic lens. Because the particle mass is collected over a very small area that is smaller than the spatial extent of the laser-induced plasma, the entire mass is available for analysis. This considerably improves reliability of the calibration and enhances measurement accuracy and precision. Further, the aerosol collection technique involves very low pressure drop, thereby allowing higher sample flow rates with much smaller pumps—a desirable feature for portable instrumentation. Higher flow rates also make it feasible to measure trace element concentrations at part per trillion levels. Detection limits in the range of 18–670 ng m−3 can be achieved for most of the elements studied at a flow rate of 1.5 L min−1 with sampling times of 5 min. PMID:26692632

  1. New Approach for Near-Real-Time Measurement of Elemental Composition of Aerosol Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Prasoon; Kulkarni, Pramod; Birch, M Eileen

    A new approach has been developed for making near-real-time measurement of elemental composition of aerosols using plasma spectroscopy. The method allows preconcentration of miniscule particle mass (pg to ng) directly from the sampled aerosol stream through electrostatic deposition of charged particles (30-900 nm) onto a flat-tip microneedle electrode. The collected material is subsequently ablated from the electrode and monitored by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Atomic emission spectra were collected using a broadband spectrometer with a wavelength range of 200-980 nm. A single-sensor delay time of 1.3 μs was used in the spectrometer for all elements to allow simultaneous measurement of multiple elements. The system was calibrated for various elements including Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Na, and Ti. The absolute mass detection limits for these elements were experimentally determined and found to be in the range of 0.018-5 ng. The electrostatic collection technique has many advantages over other substrate-based methods involving aerosol collection on a filter or its focused deposition using an aerodynamic lens. Because the particle mass is collected over a very small area that is smaller than the spatial extent of the laser-induced plasma, the entire mass is available for analysis. This considerably improves reliability of the calibration and enhances measurement accuracy and precision. Further, the aerosol collection technique involves very low pressure drop, thereby allowing higher sample flow rates with much smaller pumps-a desirable feature for portable instrumentation. Higher flow rates also make it feasible to measure trace element concentrations at part per trillion levels. Detection limits in the range of 18-670 ng m(-3) can be achieved for most of the elements studied at a flow rate of 1.5 L min(-1) with sampling times of 5 min.

  2. Analytical approach using KS elements to near-earth orbit predictions including drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ram Krishnan

    1991-04-01

    An analytical theory for the motion of near-earth satellite orbits with the air drag effect is evolved in terms of the KS elements, using an analytical oblate exponential atmospheric density model. Due to the symmetry of the KS element equations, only one of the eight equations is integrated analytically to acquire the state vector at the close of each revolution. In the numerical studies performed, it is shown that after 100 revolutions, with a ballistic coefficient of 50, a maximum difference of 39 meters is found in the semimajor axis comparison for a very small eccentricity (0.001) instance having an initial perigee height of 391.425 km.

  3. A new approach to finite element modeling, analysis and post-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gil

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in both hardware and software have opened the door to a new generation of finite element modeling systems. INTERGRAPH CORP has combined an innovative programming concept with a stand alone workstation hardware platform to produce a new standard in finite element modeling called I/FEM. The system offers the COSMIC NASTRAN user full integration between design and analysis. I/FEM not only addresses the needs of the NASTRAN user of today, it also provides for continued evolution of the COSMIC NASTRAN product.

  4. An approach to probabilistic finite element analysis using a mixed-iterative formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, J. B.; Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for computing the response sensitivity of finite element problems based on a mixed-iterative formulation is proposed. This method does not involve explicit differentiation of the tangent stiffness array and can be used with formulations for which a consistent tangent stiffness is not readily available. The method has been successfully applied to probabilistic finite element analysis of problems using the proposed mixed formulation, and this exercise has provided valuable insights regarding the extension of the method to a more general class of problems to include material and geometric nonlinearities.

  5. An evaluation of a coupled microstructural approach for the analysis of functionally graded composites via the finite-element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Dunn, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    A comparison is presented between the predictions of the finite-element analysis and a recently developed higher-order theory for functionally graded materials subjected to a thorough-thickness temperature gradient. In contrast to existing micromechanical theories that utilize classical (i.e., uncoupled) homogenization schemes to calculate micro-level and macro-level stress and displacement fields in materials with uniform or nonuniform fiber spacing (i.e., functionally graded materials), the new theory explicitly couples the microstructural details with the macrostructure of the composite. Previous thermo-elastic analysis has demonstrated that such coupling is necessary when: the temperature gradient is large with respect to the dimension of the reinforcement; the characteristic dimension of the reinforcement is large relative to the global dimensions of the composite and the number of reinforcing fibers or inclusions is small. In these circumstances, the standard micromechanical analyses based on the concept of the representative volume element used to determine average composite properties produce questionable results. The comparison between the predictions of the finite-element method and the higher-order theory presented herein establish the theory's accuracy in predicting thermal and stress fields within composites with a finite number of fibers in the thickness direction subjected to a thorough-thickness thermal gradient.

  6. Multi-Resolution Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo Approach for System Identification with an Application to Finite-Element Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, G; Glaser, R E; Lee, C L; Nitao, J J; Hanley, W G

    2005-02-07

    Estimating unknown system configurations/parameters by combining system knowledge gained from a computer simulation model on one hand and from observed data on the other hand is challenging. An example of such inverse problem is detecting and localizing potential flaws or changes in a structure by using a finite-element model and measured vibration/displacement data. We propose a probabilistic approach based on Bayesian methodology. This approach does not only yield a single best-guess solution, but a posterior probability distribution over the parameter space. In addition, the Bayesian approach provides a natural framework to accommodate prior knowledge. A Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedure is proposed to generate samples from the posterior distribution (an ensemble of likely system configurations given the data). The MCMC procedure proposed explores the parameter space at different resolutions (scales), resulting in a more robust and efficient procedure. The large-scale exploration steps are carried out using coarser-resolution finite-element models, yielding a considerable decrease in computational time, which can be a crucial for large finite-element models. An application is given using synthetic displacement data from a simple cantilever beam with MCMC exploration carried out at three different resolutions.

  7. Two approaches to form antibacterial surface: Doping with bactericidal element and drug loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhorukova, I.V.; Sheveyko, A.N.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph.V. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Anisimova, N.Y.; Gloushankova, N.A.; Zhitnyak, I.Y. [N.N Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center of RAMS, Kashirskoe shosse 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Benesova, J. [Institute of Experimental Medicine of the ASCR, Vídenska 1083, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Institute of Biophysics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, V Uvalu 84, Prague 15006 (Czech Republic); Amler, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine of the ASCR, Vídenska 1083, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Shtansky, D.V., E-mail: shtansky@shs.misis.ru [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Bioactive materials with rate-controlled release of antibacterial agent. • Ag{sup +} ion release from TiCaPCON-Ag films depended on Ag content. • TiCaPCON-coated Ti network structure with blind pores loaded with co-amoxiclav. • Strong bactericidal effect of drug-loaded samples. • Antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces. - Abstract: Two approaches (surface doping with bactericidal element and loading of antibiotic into specially formed surface microcontainers) to the fabrication of antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces are described. A network structure with square-shaped blind pores of 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 3} for drug loading was obtained by selective laser sintering (SLS). The SLS-fabricated samples were loaded with 0.03, 0.3, 2.4, and 4 mg/cm{sup 2} of co-amoxiclav (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid). Ag-doped TiCaPCON films with 0.4, 1.2, and 4.0 at.% of Ag were obtained by co-sputtering of composite TiC{sub 0.5}-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and metallic Ag targets. The surface structure of SLS-prepared samples and cross-sectional morphology of TiCaPCON-Ag films were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The through-thickness of Ag distribution in the TiCaPCON-Ag films was obtained by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of Ag ion release in normal saline solution was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Bacterial activity of the samples was evaluated against S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and K. pneum. ozaenae using the agar diffusion test and photometric method by controlling the variation of optical density of the bacterial suspension over time. Cytocompatibility of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films was observed in vitro using chondrocytic and MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The viability and proliferation of chondrocytic cells were determined using the MTS assay and PicoGreen assay tests, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP

  8. Differentiating SIADH from Cerebral/Renal Salt Wasting: Failure of the Volume Approach and Need for a New Approach to Hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesaka, John K; Imbriano, Louis; Mattana, Joseph; Gallagher, Dympna; Bade, Naveen; Sharif, Sairah

    2014-12-08

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality. Its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are in a state of flux. It is evident that hyponatremic patients are symptomatic with a potential for serious consequences at sodium levels that were once considered trivial. The recommendation to treat virtually all hyponatremics exposes the need to resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma of deciding whether to water restrict a patient with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or administer salt and water to a renal salt waster. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of SIADH and renal salt wasting (RSW), and the difficulty in differentiating SIADH from RSW, and review the origin of the perceived rarity of RSW, as well as the value of determining fractional excretion of urate (FEurate) in differentiating both syndromes, the high prevalence of RSW which highlights the inadequacy of the volume approach to hyponatremia, the importance of changing cerebral salt wasting to RSW, and the proposal to eliminate reset osmostat as a subtype of SIADH, and finally propose a new algorithm to replace the outmoded volume approach by highlighting FEurate. This algorithm eliminates the need to assess the volume status with less reliance on determining urine sodium concentration, plasma renin, aldosterone and atrial/brain natriuretic peptide or the BUN to creatinine ratio.

  9. Differentiating SIADH from Cerebral/Renal Salt Wasting: Failure of the Volume Approach and Need for a New Approach to Hyponatremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Maesaka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality. Its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are in a state of flux. It is evident that hyponatremic patients are symptomatic with a potential for serious consequences at sodium levels that were once considered trivial. The recommendation to treat virtually all hyponatremics exposes the need to resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma of deciding whether to water restrict a patient with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH or administer salt and water to a renal salt waster. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of SIADH and renal salt wasting (RSW, and the difficulty in differentiating SIADH from RSW, and review the origin of the perceived rarity of RSW, as well as the value of determining fractional excretion of urate (FEurate in differentiating both syndromes, the high prevalence of RSW which highlights the inadequacy of the volume approach to hyponatremia, the importance of changing cerebral salt wasting to RSW, and the proposal to eliminate reset osmostat as a subtype of SIADH, and finally propose a new algorithm to replace the outmoded volume approach by highlighting FEurate. This algorithm eliminates the need to assess the volume status with less reliance on determining urine sodium concentration, plasma renin, aldosterone and atrial/brain natriuretic peptide or the BUN to creatinine ratio.

  10. Linearization of dynamic equations of flexible mechanisms - a finite element approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Ben

    1991-01-01

    A finite element based method is presented for evaluation of linearized dynamic equations of flexible mechanisms about a nominal trajectory. The coefficient matrices of the linearized equations of motion are evaluated as explicit analytical expressions involving mixed sets of generalized co-ordinate

  11. A Game-Based Approach to Learning the Idea of Chemical Elements and Their Periodic Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, José María; Blanco-López, Ángel; España-Ramos, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics and results of a teaching unit based on the use of educational games to learn the idea of chemical elements and their periodic classification in secondary education are analyzed. The method is aimed at Spanish students aged 15-16 and consists of 24 1-h sessions. The results obtained on implementing the teaching…

  12. A potential-of-mean-force approach for fracture mechanics of heterogeneous materials using the lattice element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubie, Hadrien; Radjaï, Farhang; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2017-08-01

    Fracture of heterogeneous materials has emerged as a critical issue in many engineering applications, ranging from subsurface energy to biomedical applications, and requires a rational framework that allows linking local fracture processes with global fracture descriptors such as the energy release rate, fracture energy and fracture toughness. This is achieved here by means of a local and a global potential-of-mean-force (PMF) inspired Lattice Element Method (LEM) approach. In the local approach, fracture-strength criteria derived from the effective interaction potentials between mass points are shown to exhibit a scaling commensurable with the energy dissipation of fracture processes. In the global PMF-approach, fracture is considered as a sequence of equilibrium states associated with minimum potential energy states analogous to Griffith's approach. It is found that this global approach has much in common with a Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) approach, in which mass points are randomly removed following a maximum dissipation criterion until the energy release rate reaches the fracture energy. The duality of the two approaches is illustrated through the application of the PMF-inspired LEM for fracture propagation in a homogeneous linear elastic solid using different means of evaluating the energy release rate. Finally, by application of the method to a textbook example of fracture propagation in a heterogeneous material, it is shown that the proposed PMF-inspired LEM approach captures some well-known toughening mechanisms related to fracture energy contrast, elasticity contrast and crack deflection in the considered two-phase layered composite material.

  13. Novel approach for quantitatively estimating element retention and material balances in soil profiles of recharge basins used for wastewater reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshel, Gil, E-mail: eshelgil@gmail.com [Soil Erosion Research Station, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, HaMaccabim Road, Rishon-Lezion. P.O.B. 30, Beit-Dagan, 50250 (Israel); Lin, Chunye [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xinjiekouwaidajie St., Beijing, 100875 (China); Banin, Amos [Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot (Israel)

    2015-01-01

    We investigated changes in element content and distribution in soil profiles in a study designed to monitor the geochemical changes accruing in soil due to long-term secondary effluent recharge, and its impact on the sustainability of the Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) system. Since the initial elemental contents of the soils at the studied site were not available, we reconstructed them using scandium (Sc) as a conservative tracer. By using this approach, we were able to produce a mass-balance for 18 elements and evaluate the geochemical changes resulting from 19 years of effluent recharge. This approach also provides a better understanding of the role of soils as an adsorption filter for the heavy metals contained in the effluent. The soil mass balance suggests 19 years of effluent recharge cause for a significant enrichment in Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Mg, K, Na, S and P contents in the upper 4 m of the soil profile. Combining the elements lode record during the 19 years suggest that Cr, Ni, and P inputs may not reach the groundwater (20 m deep), whereas the other elements may. Conversely, we found that 58, 60, and 30% of the initial content of Mn, Ca and Co respectively leached from the upper 2-m of the soil profile. These high percentages of Mn and Ca depletion from the basin soils may reduce the soil's ability to buffer decreases in redox potential pe and pH, respectively, which could initiate a reduction in the soil's holding capacity for heavy metals. - Highlights: • Sc proved as a reliable tracer for reconstructing the initial soil elemental contents. • Mass-balance for 18 elements resulting from 19 years of SAT operation is presented. • After 19 years of operation Cr, Ni, and P inputs may not reach the groundwater. • The inputs of other 15 elements may reach the groundwater. • 58, 60, 30% of initial soil content of Mn, Ca, Co res. leached from the upper 2-m.

  14. A multibody modelling approach to determine load sharing between passive elements of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouhossein, Alireza; Weisse, Bernhard; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2011-06-01

    The human spinal segment is an inherently complex structure, a combination of flexible and semi-rigid articulating elements stabilised by seven principal ligaments. An understanding of how mechanical loading is shared among these passive elements of the segment is required to estimate tissue failure stresses. A 3D rigid body model of the complete lumbar spine has been developed to facilitate the prediction of load sharing across the passive elements. In contrast to previous multibody models, this model includes a non-linear, six degrees of freedom intervertebral disc, facet bony articulations and all spinal ligaments. Predictions of segmental kinematics and facet joint forces, in response to pure moment loading (flexion-extension), were compared to published in vitro data. On inclusion of detailed representation of the disc and facets, the multibody model fully captures the non-linear flexibility response of the spinal segment, i.e. coupled motions and a mobile instantaneous centre of rotation. Predicted facet joint forces corresponded well with reported values. For the loading case considered, the model predicted that the ligaments are the main stabilising elements within the physiological motion range; however, the disc resists a greater proportion of the applied load as the spine is fully flexed. In extension, the facets and capsular ligaments provide the principal resistance. Overall patterns of load distribution to the spinal ligaments are in agreement with previous predictions; however, the current model highlights the important role of the intraspinous ligament in flexion and the potentially high risk of failure. Several important refinements to the multibody modelling of the passive elements of the spine have been described, and such an enhanced passive model can be easily integrated into a full musculoskeletal model for the prediction of spinal loading for a variety of daily activities.

  15. Discrete element modeling approach to porosimetry for durability risk estimation of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.; Le, N.L.B.; Stroeven, M.; Sluys, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduces a novel approach to porosimetry in virtual concrete, denoted as random node structuring (RNS). The fresh state of this particulate material is produced by the DEM system HADES. Hydration simulation is a hybrid approach making use of wellknown discretization and vector methods. P

  16. An Integrated Magnetic Circuit Model and Finite Element Model Approach to Magnetic Bearing Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Kenny, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    A code for designing magnetic bearings is described. The code generates curves from magnetic circuit equations relating important bearing performance parameters. Bearing parameters selected from the curves by a designer to meet the requirements of a particular application are input directly by the code into a three-dimensional finite element analysis preprocessor. This means that a three-dimensional computer model of the bearing being developed is immediately available for viewing. The finite element model solution can be used to show areas of magnetic saturation and make more accurate predictions of the bearing load capacity, current stiffness, position stiffness, and inductance than the magnetic circuit equations did at the start of the design process. In summary, the code combines one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling methods for designing magnetic bearings.

  17. Numerical techniques for the improved performance of a finite element approach to wind turbine aeroelastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.B. [Renewable Energy Systems Ltd., Hemel Hempstead (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    It is possible to compute the aeroelastic response of a horizontal axis wind turbine comprising; Structural: rotor substructure 144 dof, tower substructure 48 dof, induction, synchronous or variable speed, and gearbox. Aerodynamic: 3 blades (10 elements per blade), dynamic stall, and 6 different aerofoil types with combination of fixed or pitching elements. Control: stall or power regulation or speed control and shutdowns, wind shear, and tower shadow. Turbulence: 8 radial points, 32 circumferential, and 3 components. On a DEC Alpha Workstation the code will simulate the response inclose to real-time. As the code is presently formulated deflections from the initial starting point have to be small and therefore its ability to fully analyse very flexible structures is limited. (EG)

  18. A finite-element approach to evaluating the size effects of complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Li, Yang Fan; Zhou, Shiwei

    2016-12-01

    The size effects that reveal the dramatic changes of mechanical behaviour at nanoscales have traditionally been analysed for regular beam systems. Here, the method of using finite-element analysis is explored with the intention of evaluating the size effects for complex nanostructures. The surface elasticity theory and generalized Young-Laplace equation are integrated into a beam element to account for the size effects in classical Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories. Computational results match well with the theoretical predictions on the size effect for a cantilever beam and a cubic unit cell containing 24 horizontal/vertical ligaments. For a simply supported nanowire, it is found that the results are very close to the experimental data. With the assumption that nanoporous gold is composed of many randomly connected beams, for the first time, the size effect of such a complex structure is numerically determined.

  19. A new approach to dissolution testing by UV imaging and finite element simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Johan Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most dissolution testing systems rely on analyzing samples taken remotely from the dissolving sample surface at different time points with poor time resolution and therefore provide relatively unresolved temporally and spatially information on the dissolution process. In this study......, a flexible numerical model was combined with a novel UV imaging system, allowing monitoring of the dissolution process with sub second time resolution. METHODS: The dissolution process was monitored by both effluent collection and UV imaging of compacts of paracetamol. A finite element model (FEM) was used...... to characterize the UV imaging system. RESULTS: A finite element model of the UV imaging system was successfully built. The dissolution of paracetamol was studied by UV imaging and by analysis of the effluent. The dissolution rates obtained from the collected effluent were in good agreement with the numerical...

  20. Finite-volume corrections to the CP-odd nucleon matrix elements of the electromagnetic current from the QCD vacuum angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Akan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleon electric dipole moments originating from strong CP-violation are being calculated by several groups using lattice QCD. We revisit the finite volume corrections to the CP-odd nucleon matrix elements of the electromagnetic current, which can be related to the electric dipole moments in the continuum, in the framework of chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-leading order taking into account the breaking of Lorentz symmetry. A chiral extrapolation of the recent lattice results of both the neutron and proton electric dipole moments is performed, which results in dn=(−2.7±1.2×10−16eθ0 cm and dp=(2.1±1.2×10−16eθ0 cm.

  1. Computational Modeling Approaches for Studying Transverse Combustion Instability in a Multi-element Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Transverse Combustion Response," in AIAA JPC Conference, Denver, CO, AIAA Paper No. 2009-5490, 2009. [12] B. Pomeroy, J. Sisco, J. Eckstein and W...Anderson, "Characterization of Gas-Centered Swirl-Coaxial Injector Stability in a Subscale Multi-Element Combustor," in AIAA JPC Conference...Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Response at Full Scale Frequencies in a Subscale Combustor," in AIAA JPC Conference, Nashville, TN

  2. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread. PMID:22977102

  3. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomphrey, Richard J; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-12-07

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread.

  4. Manufacturing of 37-element fuel bundles for PHWR 540 - new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, U.K.; Sastry, V.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Rao, G.V.S.H.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. Atomic Energy, Government of India, Hyderabad (India)

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), established in early seventies, is a major industrial unit of Department of Atomic Energy. NFC is responsible for the supply of fuel bundles to all the 220 MWe PHWRs presently in operation. For supplying fuel bundles for the forthcoming 540 MWe PHWRs, NEC is dovetailing 37-element fuel bundle manufacturing facilities in the existing plants. In tune with the philosophy of self-reliance, emphasis is given to technology upgradation, higher customer satisfaction and application of modern quality control techniques. With the experience gained over the years in manufacturing 19-element fuel bundles, NEC has introduced resistance welding of appendages on fuel tubes prior to loading of UO{sub 2} pellets, use of bio-degradable cleaning agents, simple diagnostic tools for checking the equipment condition, on line monitoring of variables, built-in process control methods and total productive maintenance concepts in the new manufacturing facility. Simple material handling systems have been contemplated for handling of the fuel bundles. This paper highlights the flow-sheet adopted for the process, design features of critical equipment and the methodology for fabricating the 37-element fuel bundles, 'RIGHT FIRST TIME'. (author)

  5. FORECASTING CHINA'S FOREIGN TRADE VOLUME WITH A KERNEL-BASED HYBRID EC-ONOMETRIC-AI ENSEMBLE LEARNING APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lean YU; Shouyang WANG; Kin Keung LAI

    2008-01-01

    Due to the complexity of economic system and the interactive effects between all kinds of economic variables and foreign trade, it is not easy to predict foreign trade volume. However, the difficulty in predicting foreign trade volume is usually attributed to the limitation of many conventional forecasting models. To improve the prediction performance, the study proposes a novel kernel-based ensemble learning approach hybridizing econometric models and artificial intelligence (AI) models to predict China's foreign trade volume. In the proposed approach, an important econometric model, the co-integration-based error correction vector auto-regression (EC-VAR) model is first used to capture the impacts of all kinds of economic variables on Chinese foreign trade from a multivariate linear anal-ysis perspective. Then an artificial neural network (ANN) based EC-VAR model is used to capture the nonlinear effects of economic variables on foreign trade from the nonlinear viewpoint. Subsequently, for incorporating the effects of irregular events on foreign trade, the text mining and expert's judgmental adjustments are also integrated into the nonlinear ANN-based EC-VAR model. Finally, all kinds of economic variables, the outputs of linear and nonlinear EC-VAR models and judgmental adjustment model are used as input variables of a typical kernel-based support vector regression (SVR) for en-semble prediction purpose. For illustration, the proposed kernel-based ensemble learning methodology hybridizing econometric techniques and AI methods is applied to China's foreign trade volume predic-tion problem. Experimental results reveal that the hybrid econometric-AI ensemble learning approach can significantly improve the prediction performance over other linear and nonlinear models listed in this study.

  6. New Approach to Purging Monitoring Wells: Lower Flow Rates Reduce Required Purging Volumes and Sample Turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is generally accepted that monitoring wells must be purged to access formation water to obtain “representative” ground water quality samples. Historically anywhere from 3 to 5 well casing volumes have been removed prior to sample collection to evacuate the standing well water...

  7. TRADABLE CREDITS FOR STORM WATER VOLUME: AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR SUSTAINABLE URBAN WATERSHED MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increased storm water runoff rate and volume caused by urbanization, and their detrimental effects on stream habitat and morphology, is well documented. In most cases, current storm water management policies are focused on attenuating peak flow rates. While these policies may...

  8. Voxel-based approach to generate entire human metacarpal bone with microscopic architecture for finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C Y; Tsui, C P; Tang, Y M; Wei, L; Wong, C T; Lam, K W; Ip, W Y; Lu, W W J; Pang, M Y C

    2014-01-01

    With the development of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology, it is possible to construct three-dimensional (3D) models of human bone without destruction of samples and predict mechanical behavior of bone using finite element analysis (FEA). However, due to large number of elements required for constructing the FE models of entire bone, this demands a substantial computational effort and the analysis usually needs a high level of computer. In this article, a voxel-based approach for generation of FE models of entire bone with microscopic architecture from micro-CT image data is proposed. To enable the FE analyses of entire bone to be run even on a general personal computer, grayscale intensity thresholds were adopted to reduce the amount of elements. Human metacarpal bone (MCP) bone was used as an example for demonstrating the applicability of the proposed method. The micro-CT images of the MCP bone were combined and converted into 3D array of pixels. Dual grayscale intensity threshold parameters were used to distinguish the pixels of bone tissues from those of surrounding soft tissues and improve predictive accuracy for the FE analyses with different sizes of elements. The method of selecting an appropriate value of the second grayscale intensity threshold was also suggested to minimize the area error for the reconstructed cross-sections of a FE structure. Experimental results showed that the entire FE MCP bone with microscopic architecture could be modeled and analyzed on a personal computer with reasonable accuracy.

  9. Prediction of Currency Volume Issued in Taiwan Using a Hybrid Artificial Neural Network and Multiple Regression Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehjen E. Shao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the volume of currency issued by a country always affects its interest rate, price index, income levels, and many other important macroeconomic variables, the prediction of currency volume issued has attracted considerable attention in recent years. In contrast to the typical single-stage forecast model, this study proposes a hybrid forecasting approach to predict the volume of currency issued in Taiwan. The proposed hybrid models consist of artificial neural network (ANN and multiple regression (MR components. The MR component of the hybrid models is established for a selection of fewer explanatory variables, wherein the selected variables are of higher importance. The ANN component is then designed to generate forecasts based on those important explanatory variables. Subsequently, the model is used to analyze a real dataset of Taiwan's currency from 1996 to 2011 and twenty associated explanatory variables. The prediction results reveal that the proposed hybrid scheme exhibits superior forecasting performance for predicting the volume of currency issued in Taiwan.

  10. Elements of mathematical foundations for a numerical approach for weakly random homogenization problems

    CERN Document Server

    Anantharaman, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    This work is a follow-up to our previous work "A numerical approach related to defect-type theories for some weakly random problems in homogenization" (preprint available on this archive). It extends and complements, both theoretically and experimentally, the results presented there. Under consideration is the homogenization of a model of a weakly random heterogeneous material. The material consists of a reference periodic material randomly perturbed by another periodic material, so that its homogenized behavior is close to that of the reference material. We consider laws for the random perturbations more general than in our previous work cited above. We prove the validity of an asymptotic expansion in a certain class of settings. We also extend the formal approach introduced in our former work. Our perturbative approach shares common features with a defect-type theory of solid state physics. The computational efficiency of the approach is demonstrated.

  11. Implications of elevated CO2 on pelagic carbon fluxes in an Arctic mesocosm study - an elemental mass balance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, J.; Schulz, K. G.; Boxhammer, T.; Bellerby, R. G. J.; Büdenbender, J.; Engel, A.; Krug, S. A.; Ludwig, A.; Nachtigall, K.; Nondal, G.; Niehoff, B.; Silyakova, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies on the impacts of ocean acidification on pelagic communities have identified changes in carbon to nutrient dynamics with related shifts in elemental stoichiometry. In principle, mesocosm experiments provide the opportunity of determining temporal dynamics of all relevant carbon and nutrient pools and, thus, calculating elemental budgets. In practice, attempts to budget mesocosm enclosures are often hampered by uncertainties in some of the measured pools and fluxes, in particular due to uncertainties in constraining air-sea gas exchange, particle sinking, and wall growth. In an Arctic mesocosm study on ocean acidification applying KOSMOS (Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for future Ocean Simulation), all relevant element pools and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were measured, using an improved experimental design intended to narrow down the mentioned uncertainties. Water-column concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic matter were determined daily. New approaches for quantitative estimates of material sinking to the bottom of the mesocosms and gas exchange in 48 h temporal resolution as well as estimates of wall growth were developed to close the gaps in element budgets. However, losses elements from the budgets into a sum of insufficiently determined pools were detected, and are principally unavoidable in mesocosm investigation. The comparison of variability patterns of all single measured datasets revealed analytic precision to be the main issue in determination of budgets. Uncertainties in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen (DON) and particulate organic phosphorus (POP) were much higher than the summed error in determination of the same elements in all other pools. With estimates provided for all other major elemental pools, mass balance calculations could be used to infer the temporal development of DOC, DON and POP pools. Future elevated pCO2 was found to enhance net autotrophic community carbon uptake in two of

  12. Implications of elevated CO2 on pelagic carbon fluxes in an Arctic mesocosm study – an elemental mass balance approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Czerny

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the impacts of ocean acidification on pelagic communities have identified changes in carbon to nutrient dynamics with related shifts in elemental stoichiometry. In principle, mesocosm experiments provide the opportunity of determining temporal dynamics of all relevant carbon and nutrient pools and, thus, calculating elemental budgets. In practice, attempts to budget mesocosm enclosures are often hampered by uncertainties in some of the measured pools and fluxes, in particular due to uncertainties in constraining air–sea gas exchange, particle sinking, and wall growth. In an Arctic mesocosm study on ocean acidification applying KOSMOS (Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for future Ocean Simulation, all relevant element pools and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were measured, using an improved experimental design intended to narrow down the mentioned uncertainties. Water-column concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic matter were determined daily. New approaches for quantitative estimates of material sinking to the bottom of the mesocosms and gas exchange in 48 h temporal resolution as well as estimates of wall growth were developed to close the gaps in element budgets. However, losses elements from the budgets into a sum of insufficiently determined pools were detected, and are principally unavoidable in mesocosm investigation. The comparison of variability patterns of all single measured datasets revealed analytic precision to be the main issue in determination of budgets. Uncertainties in dissolved organic carbon (DOC, nitrogen (DON and particulate organic phosphorus (POP were much higher than the summed error in determination of the same elements in all other pools. With estimates provided for all other major elemental pools, mass balance calculations could be used to infer the temporal development of DOC, DON and POP pools. Future elevated pCO2 was found to enhance net autotrophic community carbon

  13. A volume-amending method to improve mass conservation of level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XiangYang; WANG YueFa; YU GengZhi; YANG Chao; MAO ZaiSha

    2008-01-01

    A volume-amending method is developed both to keep the level set function as an algebraic distance function and to preserve the bubble mass in a level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows with the significantly deformed free interface. After the traditional reinitialization procedure, a vol-ume-amending method is added for correcting the position of the interface according to mass loss/gain error until the mass error falls in the allowable range designated in advance. The level set approach with this volume-amending method incorporated has been validated by three test cases: the motion of a single axisymmetrical bubble or drop in liquid, the motion of a two-dimensional water drop falling through the air into a water pool, and the interactional motion of two buoyancy-driven three-dimensional deformable bubbles. The computational results with this volume-amending method in-corporated are in good agreement with the reported experimental data and the mass is well preserved in all cases.

  14. A volume-amending method to improve mass conservation of level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A volume-amending method is developed both to keep the level set function as an algebraic distance function and to preserve the bubble mass in a level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows with the significantly deformed free interface. After the traditional reinitialization procedure, a vol-ume-amending method is added for correcting the position of the interface according to mass loss/gain error until the mass error falls in the allowable range designated in advance. The level set approach with this volume-amending method incorporated has been validated by three test cases: the motion of a single axisymmetrical bubble or drop in liquid, the motion of a two-dimensional water drop falling through the air into a water pool, and the interactional motion of two buoyancy-driven three- dimensional deformable bubbles. The computational results with this volume-amending method in-corporated are in good agreement with the reported experimental data and the mass is well preserved in all cases.

  15. Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Automatic Volume Determination of Glioblastomas Based on Several Manual Expert Segmentations

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Kappus, Christoph; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is one of the highest malignant human neoplasms. During the course of disease, the evaluation of tumor volume is an essential part of the clinical follow-up. However, manual segmentation for acquisition of tumor volume is a time-consuming process. In this paper, a new approach for the automatic segmentation and volume determination of glioblastomas (glioblastoma multiforme) is presented and evaluated. The approach uses a user-defined seed point inside the glioma to set up a directed 3D graph. The nodes of the graph are obtained by sampling along rays that are sent through the surface points of a polyhedron. After the graph has been constructed, the minimal s-t cut is calculated to separate the glioblastoma from the background. For evaluation, 12 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data sets were manually segmented slice by slice, by neurosurgeons with several years of experience in the resection of gliomas. Afterwards, the manual se...

  16. Comparison between staggered grid finite-volume and edge-based finite-element modelling of geophysical electromagnetic data on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandari, Hormoz; Ansari, SeyedMasoud; Farquharson, Colin G.

    2017-03-01

    This study compares two finite-element (FE) and three finite-volume (FV) schemes which use unstructured tetrahedral grids for the modelling of electromagnetic (EM) data. All these schemes belong to a group of differential methods where the electric field is defined along the edges of the elements. The FE and FV schemes are based on both the EM-field and the potential formulations of Maxwell's equations. The EM-field FE scheme uses edge-based (vector) basis functions while the potential FE scheme uses vector and scalar basis functions. All the FV schemes use staggered tetrahedral-Voronoï grids. Three examples are used for comparisons in terms of accuracy and in terms of the computation resources required by generic iterative and direct solvers for solving the problems. Two of these examples represent survey scenarios with electric and magnetic sources and the results are compared with those from the literature while the third example is a comparison against analytical solutions for an electric dipole source. Exactly the same mesh is used for all examples to allow for direct comparison of the various schemes. The results show that while the FE and FV schemes are comparable in terms of accuracy and computation resources, the FE schemes are slightly more accurate but also more expensive than the FV schemes.

  17. Do pharmacological approaches that prevent opioid tolerance target different elements in the same regulatory machinery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Javier; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar

    2008-06-01

    In the nervous system, the interaction of opioids like heroin and morphine with the G protein-coupled Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) provokes the development of tolerance to these opioids, as well as physical dependence. Tolerance implies that higher doses of these drugs must be consumed in order to obtain an equivalent sensation, a situation that contributes notably to the social problems surrounding recreational opioid abuse. The mechanisms that promote opioid tolerance involve a series of adaptive changes in the MOR and in the post-receptor signalling elements. Pharmacological studies have consistently identified a number of signalling proteins relevant to morphine-induced tolerance, including the delta-opioid receptor (DOR), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), N-methyl-D-aspartate acid glutamate receptors (NMDAR), and regulators of G-signalling (RGS) proteins. Thus, it is feasible that these treatments which diminish morphine tolerance target distinct elements within the same regulatory machinery. In this scheme, the signals originated at the agonist-activated MORs would be recognised by elements such as the NMDARs, which in turn exert a negative feedback on MOR-evoked signalling. This process involves DOR regulation of MORs, MOR-induced activation of NMDARs (probably via the regulation of Src, recruiting PKC and Galpha subunits) and the NMDAR-mediated activation of CaMKII. The active CaMKII promotes the sequestering of morphine-activated Gbetagamma dimers by phosducin-like proteins (PhLP) and of Galpha subunits by RGS proteins and tolerance to opioids like morphine develops. Future efforts to study these phenomena should focus on fitting additional pieces into this puzzle in order to fully define the mechanism underlying the desensitization of MORs in neural cells.

  18. A Multi-Element Approach to Location Inference of Twitter: A Case for Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Laylavi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, Twitter has played a major role in real-world events—especially in the aftermath of disasters and catastrophic incidents, and has been increasingly becoming the first point of contact for users wishing to provide or seek information about such situations. The use of Twitter in emergency response and disaster management opens up avenues of research concerning different aspects of Twitter data quality, usefulness and credibility. A real challenge that has attracted substantial attention in the Twitter research community exists in the location inference of twitter data. Considering that less than 2% of tweets are geotagged, finding location inference methods that can go beyond the geotagging capability is undoubtedly the priority research area. This is especially true in terms of emergency response, where spatial aspects of information play an important role. This paper introduces a multi-elemental location inference method that puts the geotagging aside and tries to predict the location of tweets by exploiting the other inherently attached data elements. In this regard, textual content, users’ profile location and place labelling, as the main location-related elements, are taken into account. Location-name classes in three granularity levels are defined and employed to look up the location references from the location-associated elements. The inferred location of the finest granular level is assigned to a tweet, based on a novel location assignment rule. The location assigned by the location inference process is considered to be the inferred location of a tweet, and is compared with the geotagged coordinates as the ground truth of the study. The results show that this method is able to successfully infer the location of 87% of the tweets at the average distance error of 12.2 km and the median distance error of 4.5 km, which is a significant improvement compared with that of the current methods that can predict the location

  19. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  20. Children's exposure to harmful elements in toys and low-cost jewelry: characterizing risks and developing a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Mert; Zagury, Gerald J

    2014-04-30

    Contamination problem in jewelry and toys and children's exposure possibility have been previously demonstrated. For this study, risk from oral exposure has been characterized for highly contaminated metallic toys and jewelry ((MJ), n=16) considering three scenarios. Total and bioaccessible concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb were high in selected MJ. First scenario (ingestion of parts or pieces) caused unacceptable risk for eight items for Cd, Ni, and/or Pb (hazard index (HI)>1, up to 75, 5.8, and 43, respectively). HI for ingestion of scraped-off material scenario was always 1 in three samples (two for Cd, one for Ni). Risk characterization identified different potentially hazardous items compared to United States, Canadian, and European Union approaches. A comprehensive approach was also developed to deal with complexity and drawbacks caused by various toy/jewelry definitions, test methods, exposure scenarios, and elements considered in different regulatory approaches. It includes bioaccessible limits for eight priority elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Sb). Research is recommended on metals bioaccessibility determination in toys/jewelry, in vitro bioaccessibility test development, estimation of material ingestion rates and frequency, presence of hexavalent Cr and organic Sn, and assessment of prolonged exposure to MJ.

  1. Calculation of phonon dispersion in carbon nanotubes using a continuum-atomistic finite element approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Leamy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion calculations are presented for cylindrical carbon nanotubes using a manifold-based continuum-atomistic finite element formulation combined with Bloch analysis. The formulated finite elements allow any (n,m chiral nanotube, or mixed tubes formed by periodically-repeating heterojunctions, to be examined quickly and accurately using only three input parameters (radius, chiral angle, and unit cell length and a trivial structured mesh, thus avoiding the tedious geometry generation and energy minimization tasks associated with ab initio and lattice dynamics-based techniques. A critical assessment of the technique is pursued to determine the validity range of the resulting dispersion calculations, and to identify any dispersion anomalies. Two small anomalies in the dispersion curves are documented, which can be easily identified and therefore rectified. They include difficulty in achieving a zero energy point for the acoustic twisting phonon, and a branch veering in nanotubes with nonzero chiral angle. The twisting mode quickly restores its correct group velocity as wavenumber increases, while the branch veering is associated with a rapid exchange of eigenvectors at the veering point, which also lessens its impact. By taking into account the two noted anomalies, accurate predictions of acoustic and low-frequency optical branches can be achieved out to the midpoint of the first Brillouin zone.

  2. Piezoelectric materials selection for sensor applications using finite element and multiple attribute decision-making approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuruddh; Sharma, Anshul; Kumar, Rajeev; Vaish, Rahul; Chauhan, Vishal S.; Bowen, C. R.

    2015-03-01

    This paper examines the selection and performance evaluation of a variety of piezoelectric materials for cantilever-based sensor applications. The finite element analysis method is implemented to evaluate the relative importance of materials properties such as Young's Modulus (E), piezoelectric stress constants (e31), dielectric constant (ɛ) and Poisson's ratio (υ) for cantilever-based sensor applications. An analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to assign weights to the properties that are studied for the sensor structure under study. A technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) is used to rank the performance of the piezoelectric materials in the context of sensor voltage outputs. The ranking achieved by the TOPSIS analysis is in good agreement with the results obtained from finite element method simulation. The numerical simulations show that K0.5Na0.5NbO3-LiSbO3 (KNN-LS) materials family is important for sensor application. Young's modulus (E) is most influencing material's property followed by piezoelectric constant (e31), dielectric constant (ɛ) and Poisson's ratio (υ) for cantilever-based piezoelectric sensor applications.

  3. Application of the Recursive Finite Element Approach on 2D Periodic Structures under Harmonic Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Yassine

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency response function is a quantitative measure used in structural analysis and engineering design; hence, it is targeted for accuracy. For a large structure, a high number of substructures, also called cells, must be considered, which will lead to a high amount of computational time. In this paper, the recursive method, a finite element method, is used for computing the frequency response function, independent of the number of cells with much lesser time costs. The fundamental principle is eliminating the internal degrees of freedom that are at the interface between a cell and its succeeding one. The method is applied solely for free (no load nodes. Based on the boundary and interior degrees of freedom, the global dynamic stiffness matrix is computed by means of products and inverses resulting with a dimension the same as that for one cell. The recursive method is demonstrated on periodic structures (cranes and buildings under harmonic vibrations. The method yielded a satisfying time decrease with a maximum time ratio of 1 18 and a percentage difference of 19%, in comparison with the conventional finite element method. Close values were attained at low and very high frequencies; the analysis is supported for two types of materials (steel and plastic. The method maintained its efficiency with a high number of forces, excluding the case when all of the nodes are under loads.

  4. A new global approach using a network of piezoelectric elements and energy redistribution for enhanced vibration damping of smart structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Guyomar, Daniel; Richard, Claude

    2013-04-01

    A new global approach for improved vibration damping of smart structure, based on global energy redistribution by means of a network of piezoelectric elements is proposed. It is basically using semi-active Synchronized Switch Damping technique. SSD technique relies on a cumulative build-up of the voltage resulting from the continuous switching and it was shown that the performance is strongly related to this voltage. The increase of the piezoelectric voltage results in improvement of the damping performance. External voltage sources or improved switching sequences were previously designed to increase this voltage in the case of single piezoelectric element structure configurations. This paper deals with extended structure with many embedded piezoelectric elements. The proposed strategy consist of using an electric network made with non-linear component and switches in order to set up and control a low-loss energy transfer from source piezoelements extracting the vibration energy of the structure and oriented toward a given piezoelement in order to increase its operative energy for improving a given mode damping. This paper presents simulation of a clamped plate with four piezoelectric elements implemented in the Matlab/SimulinkTM environment and SimscapeTM library. The various simulation cases show the relationship between the damping performance on a given targeted mode and the established power flow. SSDD and SSDT are two proposed original networks. Performances are compared to the SSDI baseline. A damping increase of 18dB can be obtained even with a weakly coupled piezoelectric element in the multi-sine excitation case. This result proves the importance of new global non-linear multi-actuator strategies for improved vibration damping of extended smart structure.

  5. Crest lines extraction in volume 3D medical images : a multi-scale approach

    OpenAIRE

    Monga, Olivier; Lengagne, Richard; Deriche, Rachid

    1994-01-01

    Projet SYNTIM; Recently, we have shown that the differential properties of the surfaces represented by 3D volumic images can be recovered using their partial derivatives. For instance, the crest lines can be characterized by the first, second and third partial derivatives of the grey level function $I(x,y,z)$. In this paper, we show that~: - the computation of the partial derivatives of an image can be improved using recursive filters which approximate the Gaussian filter, - a multi-scale app...

  6. Combining Small-Volume Metabolomic and Transcriptomic Approaches for Assessing Brain Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Nemes, Peter; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Silver, Rae; Jonathan V. Sweedler

    2013-01-01

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry (CE–MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured chan...

  7. Sustainable development, tourism and territory. Previous elements towards a systemic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre TORRENTE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, tourism is one of the major challenges for many countries and territories. The balance of payments, an ever-increasing number of visitors and the significant development of the tourism offer clearly illustrate the booming trend in this sector. This macro-economic approach is often used by the organizations in charge of tourism, WTO for instance. Quantitative assessments which consider the satisfaction of customers’ needs as an end in itself have prevailed both in tourism development schemes and in prospective approaches since the sixties.

  8. A new approach to comprehensive quantification of linear landscape elements using biotope types on a regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Ulrike; Mewes, Melanie; Meyer, Burghard C.

    , are discontinuous; in contrast, only 20% of hedges are discontinuous. Using our innovative framework, comprehensive information about landscape elements can now be obtained for regional applications. This approach can be applied to other regions and is highly relevant for landscape planning, erosion control, protection of waters and preservation of biotopes and species.

  9. Toward understanding early Earth evolution: Prescription for approach from terrestrial noble gas and light element records in lunar soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ozima, Minoru; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Podosek, Frank A.; Miura, Yayoi N.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the almost total lack of geological record on the Earth's surface before 4 billion years ago, the history of the Earth during this period is still enigmatic. Here we describe a practical approach to tackle the formidable problems caused by this lack. We propose that examinations of lunar soils for light elements such as He, N, O, Ne, and Ar would shed a new light on this dark age in the Earth's history and resolve three of the most fundamental questions in earth science: the onset ...

  10. Elements improvement of system approach of new trademark for promotion according to the dependence product «price-quality»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Onyskiv

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic elements of competitiveness such as quality and price of a new product on market are explored and highlighted. The main principle which is used by commercial enterprises as marketing approach to promote a new trademark depending on price-quality has been grounded. Nine price sub-strategies that manufacturers use to achieve their marketing goals on the market have been considered. An effective pricing strategy for the new product depending on price-quality has been created. There are some methods of prices policy for new products depending on the level of their quality.

  11. Territorial community: a systematic approach to advance functions of individual elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Serohina

    2017-03-01

    It is established that in conditions of the administrative-territorial reform, is the need to change in the approach to the basic concepts, in particular, of the territorial communities category as well as of a new category of amalgamated territorial community. New categories need to be identifyed and be enshrined in the legal framework.

  12. Elements of a flexible approach for conceptual hydrological modeling: 2. Application and experimental insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavetski, D.; Fenicia, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this article's companion paper, flexible approaches for conceptual hydrological modeling at the catchment scale were motivated, and the SUPERFLEX framework, based on generic model components, was introduced. In this article, the SUPERFLEX framework and the “fixed structure” GR4H model (an hourly

  13. An Analysis of Certain Elements of an Audio-Tape Approach to Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Ronald Ernest

    This study was designed to determine the association between selected variables and an audio-tape approach to instruction. Fifty sophomore students enrolled in a physical anthropology course at Shoreline Community College (Washington) participated in an experimental instructional program that consisted of thirty-two audio-tapes and three optional…

  14. Correlating overrepresented upstream motifs to gene expression a computational approach to regulatory element discovery in eukaryotes

    CERN Document Server

    Caselle, M; Provero, P

    2002-01-01

    Gene regulation in eukaryotes is mainly effected through transcription factors binding to rather short recognition motifs generally located upstream of the coding region. We present a novel computational method to identify regulatory elements in the upstream region of eukaryotic genes. The genes are grouped in sets sharing an overrepresented short motif in their upstream sequence. For each set, the average expression level from a microarray experiment is determined: If this level is significantly higher or lower than the average taken over the whole genome, then the overerpresented motif shared by the genes in the set is likely to play a role in their regulation. The method was tested by applying it to the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using the publicly available results of a DNA microarray experiment, in which expression levels for virtually all the genes were measured during the diauxic shift from fermentation to respiration. Several known motifs were correctly identified, and a new candidate regulat...

  15. Finite element approach analysis for characteristics of electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Songsong

    2016-04-01

    The electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave, with the advantages of quickly detecting the defect and sensitivity to the defects, is widely used in non-destructive testing of thin sheet. In this paper, the directivity of sound field, Phase velocity, group velocity and particle displacement amplitude of Lamb wave are study based on finite element analysis method. The results show that, for 1mm aluminum, when the excitation frequency 0.64MHz, the displacement amplitude of A0 mode is minimum, and the displacement amplitude S0 mode is largest. Appropriate to increase the displacement amplitude of a mode, while reducing displacement amplitude of another mode, to achieve the excitation of a single mode Lamb wave. It is helpful to the Optimization of transducer parameters, the choice of Lamb wave modes and providing optimal excitation frequency.

  16. A novel approach to the island of stability of super-heavy elements search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieloch A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that the cross section for super-heavy nuclei production of Z > 118 is dropping into the region of tens of femto barns. This creates a serious limitation for the complete fusion technique that is used so far. Moreover, the available combinations of the neutron to proton ratio of stable projectiles and targets are quite limited and it can be difficult to reach the island of stability of super heavy elements using complete fusion reactions with stable projectiles. In this context, a new experimental investigation of mechanisms other than complete fusion of heavy nuclei and a novel experimental technique are invented for our search of super- and hyper-nuclei. This contribution is focused on that technique.

  17. An overset mesh approach for 3D mixed element high-order discretizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazell, Michael J.; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2016-10-01

    A parallel high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in an overset mesh framework. The DG solver has many capabilities including: hp-adaption, curved cells, support for hybrid, mixed-element meshes, and moving meshes. Combining these capabilities with overset grids allows the DG solver to be used in problems with bodies in relative motion and in a near-body off-body solver strategy. The overset implementation is constructed to preserve the design accuracy of the baseline DG discretization. Multiple simulations are carried out to validate the accuracy and performance of the overset DG solver. These simulations demonstrate the capability of the high-order DG solver to handle complex geometry and large scale parallel simulations in an overset framework.

  18. FINITE ELEMENT GALERKIN APPROACH FOR A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF ARTERIAL FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.C.Sharma(G.C.夏玛); Madhu Jain(马德胡·珍); Anil Kumar(阿尼尔·克乌玛)

    2001-01-01

    A finite element solution for the Navier-Stokes equations for steady flow through a double branched two dimensional section of three dimensional model of canine aorta is obtained. The numerical technique involves transformation of the physical coordinates to a curvilinear boundary fitted coordinate system. The shear stress at the wall is calculated for Reynolds number of 1000 with branch to main aortic flow rate ratio as a parameter. The results are compared with earlier works involving experimental data and it is observed that the results are very close to their solutions. This work in fact is an improvement of the work of Sharma and Kapoor (1995) in the sense that computations scheme is economic and Reynolds number is large.

  19. A Finite Element Method for Computation of Structural Intensity by the Normal Mode Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrić, L.; Pavić, G.

    1993-06-01

    A method for numerical computation of structural intensity in thin-walled structures is presented. The method is based on structural finite elements (beam, plate and shell type) enabling computation of real eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the undamped structure which then serve in evaluation of complex response. The distributed structural damping is taken into account by using the modal damping concept, while any localized damping is treated as an external loading, determined by use of impedance matching conditions and eigenproperties of the structure. Emphasis is given to aspects of accuracy of the results and efficiency of the numerical procedures used. High requirements on accuracy of the structural response (displacements and stresses) needed in intensity applications are satisfied by employing the "swept static solution", which effectively takes into account the influence of higher modes otherwise inaccessible to numerical computation. A comparison is made between the results obtained by using analytical methods and the proposed numerical procedure to demonstrate the validity of the method presented.

  20. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  1. Australopithecus anamensis: a finite-element approach to studying the functional adaptations of extinct hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Gabriele A; Shimizu, Daisuke; Jiang, Yong; Spears, Iain R

    2005-04-01

    Australopithecus anamensis is the stem species of all later hominins and exhibits the suite of characters traditionally associated with hominins, i.e., bipedal locomotion when on the ground, canine reduction, and thick-enameled teeth. The functional consequences of its thick enamel are, however, unclear. Without appropriate structural reinforcement, these thick-enameled teeth may be prone to failure. This article investigates the mechanical behavior of A. anamensis enamel and represents the first in a series that will attempt to determine the functional adaptations of hominin teeth. First, the microstructural arrangement of enamel prisms in A. anamensis teeth was reconstructed using recently developed software and was compared with that of extant hominoids. Second, a finite-element model of a block of enamel containing one cycle of prism deviation was reconstructed for Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and A. anamensis and the behavior of these tissues under compressive stress was determined. Despite similarities in enamel microstructure between A. anamensis and the African great apes, the structural arrangement of prismatic enamel in A. anamensis appears to be more effective in load dissipation under these compressive loads. The findings may imply that this hominin species was well adapted to puncture crushing and are in some respects contrary to expectations based on macromorphology of teeth. Taking together, information obtained from both finite-element analyses and dental macroanatomy leads us to suggest that A. anamensis was probably adapted for habitually consuming a hard-tough diet. However, additional tests are needed to understand the functional adaptations of A. anamensis teeth fully.

  2. Connecting the East and the West, the Local and the Universal: The Methodological Elements of a Transcultural Approach to Bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    From the outset, cross-cultural and transglobal bioethics has constituted a potent arena for a dynamic public discourse and academic debate alike. But prominent bioethical debates on such issues as the notion of common morality and a distinctive "Asian" bioethics in contrast to a "Western" one reveal some deeply rooted and still popular but seriously problematic methodological habits in approaching cultural differences, most notably, radically dichotomizing the East and the West, the local and the universal. In this paper, a "transcultural" approach to bioethics and cultural studies is proposed. It takes seriously the challenges offered by social sciences, anthropology in particular, towards the development of new methodologies for comparative and global bioethics. The key methodological elements of "transculturalism" include acknowledging the great internal plurality within every culture; highlighting the complexity of cultural differences; upholding the primacy of morality; incorporating a reflexive theory of social power; and promoting changes or progress towards shared and sometimes new moral values.

  3. A musculo-mechanical model of esophageal transport based on an immersed boundary-finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Wenjun; Griffith, Boyce E.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-11-01

    This work extends a fiber-based immersed boundary (IB) model of esophageal transport by incorporating a continuum model of the deformable esophageal wall. The continuum-based esophagus model adopts finite element approach that is capable of describing more complex and realistic material properties and geometries. The leakage from mismatch between Lagrangian and Eulerian meshes resulting from large deformations of the esophageal wall is avoided by careful choice of interaction points. The esophagus model, which is described as a multi-layered, fiber-reinforced nonlinear elastic material, is coupled to bolus and muscle-activation models using the IB approach to form the esophageal transport model. Cases of esophageal transport with different esophagus models are studied. Results on the transport characteristics, including pressure field and esophageal wall kinematics and stress, are analyzed and compared. Support from NIH grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 is gratefully acknowledged. BEG is supported by NSF award ACI 1460334.

  4. Framework and guidelines for implementing the co-management approach: volume I : context, concept and principles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop a common understanding of the co-management approach in fisheries management and to provide an overview of the various frameworks used for its implementation...

  5. APPROACH TO ESTIMATION OF THE MARKET VOLUME FOR COMPANIES OPERATING IN THE B2B SEGMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla B. Kochergina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the approach for estimating amount of alive enterprises inRussia. The main focus is on the way of detecting an business-active companiesusing the formal signs. The author proposes some signs for indicating of thebusiness activity. The developed model allows to clarify the amount of active enterprises in stages using those signs. The author provides the approach how to applythis model for different markets.

  6. Forecasting of exported volume for brazilian fruits by time series analysis: an arima/garch approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdinardo Moreira Barreto de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to offer econometric forecasting models to the Brazilian exported volume fruits, with a view to assisting the planning and production control, also motivated by the existence of a few published papers dealing with this issue. In this sense, it was used the ARIMA/GARCH models, considering, likewise, the occurrence of a multiplicative stochastic seasonality in these series. They were collected 300 observations of exported net weight (kg between Jan/1989 and Dec/2013 of the following fruits: pineapple, banana, orange, lemon, apple, papaya, mango, watermelon, melon and grape, which selection criteria was its importance in the exported basket fruit, because they represented 97% of total received dollars, and 99% of total volume sold in 2010, of a population about 28 kinds of exported fruits. The results showed that it was not only observed the existence of a 12 month multiplicative seasonality in banana and mango. On the other hand, they were identified two fruits groups: (1 those which are continuously exported, and (2 those which have export peaks. On the quality of the models, they were considered satisfactory for six of the ten fruits analyzed. On the volatility, it was seen a high persistence in banana and papaya series, pointing to the existence of a structural break in time series, which could be linked to the economic crises happened in the last 17 years.

  7. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudospectral/spectral-element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34 s down to 11 s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  8. Fourier finite element modeling of light emission in waveguides: 2.5-dimensional FEM approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ou, Yangxin; Chen, Yuntian

    2015-01-01

    We present a Fourier finite element modeling of light emission of dipolar emitters coupled to infinitely long waveguides. Due to the translational symmetry, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled waveguide-emitter system can be decomposed into a series of independent 2D problems (2.5D), which reduces the computational cost. Moreover, the reduced 2D problems can be extremely accurate, compared to its 3D counterpart. Our method can precisely quantify the total emission rates, as well as the fraction of emission rates into different modal channels for waveguides with arbitrary cross-sections. We compare our method with dyadic Green's function for the light emission in single mode metallic nanowire, which yields an excellent agreement. This method is applied in multi-mode waveguides, as well as multi-core waveguides. We further show that our method has the full capability of including dipole orientations, as illustrated via a rotating dipole, which leads to unidirectional excitation of guide modes. The 2.5D Finite El...

  9. Elements of a theory of social time.A Schützian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Sebald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses in the first place the Bergson’s pragmatic concept of time and successively the Husserl’s concept of time and the lifeworld to define their influences for Alfred Schutz whose considerations on time started from Henry Bergson’s philosophy of duration. The Austrian sociologist uses Husserl’s considerations on the inner-time consciousness as a complement of Bergson’s theory. It’s a well-know fact that time is a foundamental topic for Schutz expecially in his Fragments toward a Phenomenology of Music (1944. Schutz’s phenomenological research on music takes in to account the Bergsonian connection of mind and body, of (inner time and space and their theoretical characterizazion. The paper examines finally Ilja Srubar’s differentiation between constituted an produced time. Coming a conclusion the paper distinguishes analitically a multiplicity of forms of time and the types of mechanism for their formation trying to describe the kind of interrelations are to found between these different forms as necessary elements in order to conceive a sociological theory of time.

  10. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  11. Material Substitution For The Supporting Frame of Power Tiller With Finite Element Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midian Shite

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to its advantageouse characteristic, aluminum is considered to substitute the existing steel as material of the supporting frame of power tiller to meet the strength and environment concerns. The investigation was emphasized on the comparison of both material in view of stress and deformation. In this study, both experimental test and finite element (FE analysis were employed to meet the research concem.comparison between the experimental test and numerical analysis result indicated acceptable differnces of about 7-33% wich is lower than the previouse research. Substitution with aluminum was confirmed using material index that aluminum has better performance in strength and stiffness than that of steel by prescibing minimum better performance in strength and stiffness than that of steel by prescibing minimum weight. FE analysis result revealed that aluminum model was capable of sustaining loads about equal to the steel model. It was based on its maximum von Mises stress wich was insignificatly lower than the steel model. In term of strength characteristic, strength ratio of the aluminum model was higher than the steel model. Furthemore, the substitution also resulted in redistrubuting stress into wider area and mass reduction for about 36%.

  12. Fluorescence-enhanced optical spectroscopy using early arriving photons in transmission mode: a finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, Vianney; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Optical imaging of turbid media is a challenging problem mainly due to the scattering process that reduces image contrast and degrades spatial resolution. The development of fluorescent probes has recently improved the noninvasive optical technique. In this paper, we are interested in the time gating fluorescence signals. The diffusion approximation is used in order to describe the light propagation of a laser pulse in a turbid media that mimics breast like biological tissue. A numerical model based on a finite element method is proposed. Fluorescence time dependent numerical simulations are performed in order to compute time-gated intensities resulting from line scans across partially absorbing and scattering slab configurations. Optical properties of embedded objects are chosen to be the same as optical properties of breast tumor. Tacking into account two hidden objects, we investigate the lateral resolution aimed by fluorescence modality, and we also compared the results to thus obtained by photon propagation. Different widths of the time gate are computed and it is demonstrated that both lateral localization of one inclusion, and resolution of two inclusions, are enhanced when the time-gate width (▵t) is decreased. The overall computations confirm that fluorescent time-gating technique is very sensitive to local variations in optical properties that are due to breast-like tumors in turbid media.

  13. An ALE Finite Element Approach for Two-Phase Flow with Phase Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Erik; Anjos, Gustavo; Thome, John; Ltcm Team; Gesar Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, two-phase flow with phase change is investigated through the Finite Element Method (FEM) in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework. The equations are discretized on an unstructured mesh where the interface between the phases is explicitly defined as a sub-set of the mesh. The two-phase interface position is described by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The methodology proposed for computing the curvature leads to very accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational costs. Such a methodology can be employed to study accurately many two-phase flow and heat transfer problems in industry such as oil extraction and refinement, design of refrigeration systems, modelling of microfluidic and biological systems and efficient cooling of electronics for computational purposes. The latter is the principal aim of the present research. The numerical results are discussed and compared to analytical solutions and reference results, thereby revealing the capability of the proposed methodology as a platform for the study of two-phase flow with phase change.

  14. Approach to prevent locking in a spring-damper system by adaptive load redistribution with auxiliary kinematic guidance elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehb, Christopher M.; Platz, Roland; Melz, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    In many applications, kinematic structures are used to enable and disable degrees of freedom. The relative movement between a wheel and the body of a car or a landing gear and an aircraft fuselage are examples for a defined movement. In most cases, a spring-damper system determines the kinetic properties of the movement. However, unexpected high load peaks may lead to maximum displacements and maybe to locking. Thus, a hard clash between two rigid components may occur, causing acceleration peaks. This may have harmful effects for the whole system. For example a hard landing of an aircraft can result in locking the landing gear and thus damage the entire aircraft. In this paper, the potential of adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in a spring-damper system to prevent locking is investigated numerically. The aim is to provide additional forces in the auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in case of overloading the spring-damper system and thus to absorb some of the impact energy. To estimate the potential of the load redistribution in the spring-damper system, a numerical model of a two-mass oscillator is used, similar to a quarter-car-model. In numerical calculations, the reduction of the acceleration peaks of the masses with the adaptive approach is compared to the Acceleration peaks without the approach, or, respectively, when locking is not prevented. In addition, the required force of the adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements is calculated as a function of the masses of the system and the drop height, or, respectively, the impact energy.

  15. Multi-Element Behaviour Support as a Model for the Delivery of a Human Rights Based Approach for Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities and Behaviours that Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Christina

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the multi-element behaviour support (MEBS) model in meeting the rights of persons with intellectual disabilities and behaviours that challenge. It does this through explicitly linking the multi-element model to the guiding principles of a human rights based approach (HRBA) using a vignette to…

  16. Geometric Conversion Approach for the Numerical Evaluation of Hypersingular and Nearly Hypersingular Boundary Integrals over Curved Surface Boundary Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马杭

    2002-01-01

    With the aid of the properties of the hypersingular kernels,a geometric conversion approach was presented in this paper.The conversion leads to a general approach for the accurate and reliable numerical evaluation of the hypersingular surface boundary integrals encountered in a variety of applications with boundary element method.Based on the conversion,the hypersingularity in the boundary integrals could be lowered by one order,resulting in the simplification of the computer code.Moreover,an integral transformation was introduced to damp out the nearly singular behavior of the kernels by the distance function defined in the local polar coordinate system for the nearly hypersingular case.The approach is simple to use,which can be inserted readily to computer code,thus getting rid of the dull routine deduction of formulae before the numerical implementatins,as the expressions of these kernels are in general complicated.The numerical examples were gien in three-dimensional elasticity,verifying the effectiveness of the proposed approach,which makes it possible to observe numerically the behavior of the boundary integral values with hypersingular kernels across the boundary.

  17. Approaching a more Complete Picture of Rockfall Activity: Seismic and LiDAR Detection, Loaction and Volume Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Michael; Mohadjer, Solmaz; Turowski, Jens; Ehlers, Todd; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall activity in steep alpine landscapes is often difficult to survey due to its infrequent nature. Classic approaches are limited by temporal and spatial resolution. In contrast, seismic monitoring provides access to catchment-wide analysis of activity patterns in rockfall-dominated environments. The deglaciated U-shaped Lauterbrunnen Valley in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland, is a perfect example of such landscapes. It was instrumented with up to six broadband seismometers and repeatedly surveyed by terrestrial LiDAR to provide independent validation data. During August-October 2014 and April-June 2015 more than 23 (LiDAR) to hundred (seismic) events were detected. Their volumes range from conditions that control such processes in a comprehensive way. Taken together, the combined LiDAR and seismic monitoring approach provides high fidelity spatial and temporal resolution of individual events.

  18. A finite volume approach for the simulation of nonlinear dissipative acoustic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    A form of the conservation equations for fluid dynamics is presented, deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A CLAWPACK based, 2D finite volume method using the Roe linearization was implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. In order to validate the code, two different tests have been performed: one against a special Taylor shock-like analytic solution, the other against published results on a HIFU system, both with satisfactory results. The code is based on CLAWPACK and is written for parallel execution on a GPU, thus improving performance by a factor of over 60 when compared to the standard CLAWPACK code.

  19. A finite volume alternate direction implicit approach to modeling selective laser melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Mohanty, Sankhya

    2013-01-01

    is proposed for modeling single-layer and few-layers selective laser melting processes. The ADI technique is implemented and applied for two cases involving constant material properties and non-linear material behavior. The ADI FV method consume less time while having comparable accuracy with respect to 3D...... to accurately simulate the process, are constrained by either the size or scale of the model domain. A second challenging aspect involves the inclusion of non-linear material behavior into the 3D implicit FE models. An alternating direction implicit (ADI) method based on a finite volume (FV) formulation......Over the last decade, several studies have attempted to develop thermal models for analyzing the selective laser melting process with a vision to predict thermal stresses, microstructures and resulting mechanical properties of manufactured products. While a holistic model addressing all involved...

  20. A multiresolution image based approach for correction of partial volume effects in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussion, N; Hatt, M; Lamare, F; Bizais, Y; Turzo, A; Rest, C Cheze-Le; Visvikis, D [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Brest (France)

    2006-04-07

    Partial volume effects (PVEs) are consequences of the limited spatial resolution in emission tomography. They lead to a loss of signal in tissues of size similar to the point spread function and induce activity spillover between regions. Although PVE can be corrected for by using algorithms that provide the correct radioactivity concentration in a series of regions of interest (ROIs), so far little attention has been given to the possibility of creating improved images as a result of PVE correction. Potential advantages of PVE-corrected images include the ability to accurately delineate functional volumes as well as improving tumour-to-background ratio, resulting in an associated improvement in the analysis of response to therapy studies and diagnostic examinations, respectively. The objective of our study was therefore to develop a methodology for PVE correction not only to enable the accurate recuperation of activity concentrations, but also to generate PVE-corrected images. In the multiresolution analysis that we define here, details of a high-resolution image H (MRI or CT) are extracted, transformed and integrated in a low-resolution image L (PET or SPECT). A discrete wavelet transform of both H and L images is performed by using the 'a trous' algorithm, which allows the spatial frequencies (details, edges, textures) to be obtained easily at a level of resolution common to H and L. A model is then inferred to build the lacking details of L from the high-frequency details in H. The process was successfully tested on synthetic and simulated data, proving the ability to obtain accurately corrected images. Quantitative PVE correction was found to be comparable with a method considered as a reference but limited to ROI analyses. Visual improvement and quantitative correction were also obtained in two examples of clinical images, the first using a combined PET/CT scanner with a lymphoma patient and the second using a FDG brain PET and corresponding T1

  1. Shearing fluid-filled granular media: A coupled discrete element - continuous approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, L.; Aharonov, E.; Sparks, D.; Toussaint, R.; Marder, E.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid-filled granular layers are abundant in the Earth's shallow crust as saturated soils and poorly consolidated hillslope material, and as fluid-filled fault gouge layers. When such grains-fluid systems are subjected to excitation by the passage of seismic waves, tectonic loading, or gravitational loading they exhibit a highly non-trivial dynamical behavior that may lead to instabilities in the form of soil liquefaction, debris flow mobilization, and earthquakes. In order to study the basic coupled mechanics of fluid-filled granular media and the dynamical processes that are responsible for the emergence of instabilities we develop a model that couples granular dynamics (DEM) algorithm with a continuous Eulerian grid-based solver. The two components of the model represent the two phases (grains and fluid) in two different scales. Each grain is represented by a single element in the granular dynamics component, where grains interact by elastic collisions and frictional sliding. The compressible pore fluid is represented on a coarser Darcy scale grid that is super-imposed over the grains layer. The pore space geometry set by the evolving granular packing is used to define smooth porosity and permeability fields, and the individual grain velocities are interpolated to define a smooth field of a solid-fraction velocity. The porosity, permeability, and solid velocity fields are used in the continuous fluid grid-based solver to find pore fluid velocity and pressure. Pore fluid pressure gradients are interpolated back from the fluid grid to individual grains, where they enter the grains force balance equation as seepage forces. Boundary conditions are specified separately for the two phases. For the pore fluid we test two end-member drainage conditions: completely drained system (with infinite boundary permeability) and completely undrained system (with zero boundary permeability). For the grains, two-dimensional time dependent stress and velocity conditions are

  2. Talking and Testing: Discourse Approaches to the Assessment of Oral Proficiency. Studies in Bilingualism, Volume 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard, Ed.; He, Agnes Weiyun, Ed.

    Papers on second language oral proficiency testing include: "Language Proficiency Interviews: A Discourse Approach" (Agnes Weiyun He, Richard Young); "Re-Analyzing the OPI: How Much Does It Look Like Natural Conversation?" (Marysia Johnson, Andrea Tyler); "Evaluating Learner Interactional Skills: Conversation at the Micro Level" (Heidi…

  3. Performed Culture: An Approach to East Asian Language Pedagogy. Pathways to Advanced Skills Series, Volume 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Matthew; Warnick, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This book is a general introduction to the performed culture approach, which trains students how to express themselves in a way that native speakers of the target culture feel appropriate in given situations. Target readership includes Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language teachers and graduate students. Chapters of this book include: (1)…

  4. Mercury, trace elements and organic constituents in atmospheric fine particulate matter, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA: A combined approach to sampling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, A.; Engle, M.A.; Orem, W.H.; Bunnell, J.E.; Lerch, H.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Olson, M.L.; McCord, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Compliance with U.S. air quality regulatory standards for atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on meeting average 24 hour (35 ?? m-3) and yearly (15 ??g m-3) mass-per-unit-volume limits, regardless of PM2.5 composition. Whereas this presents a workable regulatory framework, information on particle composition is needed to assess the fate and transport of PM2.5 and determine potential environmental/human health impacts. To address these important non-regulatory issues an integrated approach is generally used that includes (1) field sampling of atmospheric particulate matter on filter media, using a size-limiting cyclone, or with no particle-size limitation; and (2) chemical extraction of exposed filters and analysis of separate particulate-bound fractions for total mercury, trace elements and organic constituents, utilising different USGS laboratories optimised for quantitative analysis of these substances. This combination of sampling and analysis allowed for a more detailed interpretation of PM2.5 sources and potential effects, compared to measurements of PM2.5 abundance alone. Results obtained using this combined approach are presented for a 2006 air sampling campaign in Shenandoah National Park (Virginia, USA) to assess sources of atmospheric contaminants and their potential impact on air quality in the Park. PM2.5 was collected at two sampling sites (Big Meadows and Pinnacles) separated by 13.6 km. At both sites, element concentrations in PM2.5 were low, consistent with remote or rural locations. However, element/Zr crustal abundance enrichment factors greater than 10, indicating anthropogenic input, were found for Hg, Se, S, Sb, Cd, Pb, Mo, Zn and Cu, listed in decreasing order of enrichment. Principal component analysis showed that four element associations accounted for 84% of the PM 2.5 trace element variation; these associations are interpreted to represent: (1) crustal sources (Al, REE); (2) coal combustion (Se, Sb), (3) metal production

  5. Mass production of volume holographic optical elements (vHOEs) using Bayfol® HX photopolymer film in a roll-to-roll copy process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Fäcke, Thomas; Grote, Fabian; Hagen, Rainer; Hönel, Dennis; Koch, Eberhard; Rewitz, Christian; Walze, Günther; Wewer, Brita

    2017-03-01

    Volume Holographic Optical Elements (vHOEs) gained wide attention as optical combiners for the use in augmented and virtual reality (AR and VR, respectively) consumer electronics and automotive head-up display applications. The unique characteristics of these diffractive grating structures - being lightweight, thin and flat - make them perfectly suitable for use in integrated optical components like spectacle lenses and car windshields. While being transparent in Off-Bragg condition, they provide full color capability and adjustable diffraction efficiency. The instant developing photopolymer Bayfol® HX film provides an ideal technology platform to optimize the performance of vHOEs in a wide range of applications. Important for any commercialization are simple and robust mass production schemes. In this paper, we present an efficient and easy to control one-beam recording scheme to copy a so-called master vHOE in a step-and-repeat process. In this contact-copy scheme, Bayfol® HX film is laminated to a master stack before being exposed by a scanning laser line. Subsequently, the film is delaminated in a controlled fashion and bleached. We explain working principles of the one-beam copy concept and discuss the mechanical construction of the installed vHOE replication line. Moreover, we treat aspects like master design, effects of vibration and suppression of noise gratings. Furthermore, digital vHOEs are introduced as master holograms. They enable new ways of optical design and paths to large scale vHOEs.

  6. Production of cosmogenic radionuclides at great depth: A multi element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braucher, R.; Merchel, S.; Borgomano, J.; Bourlès, D. L.

    2011-09-01

    For the last two decades, in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides are increasingly applied in Earth sciences to quantify surface processes. In parallel, significant reduction of the analytical uncertainties linked to advances in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allows more precise measurements. However, among all the published works on cosmogenic nuclides, only few studies are dedicated to a better understanding of their production systematic or to a better constrain of the physical parameters involved in their production. Thus, an approach to investigate in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl along a single 11-meter long core drilled from the surface and composed of carbonates and quartzose conglomerates has been launched. These measurements have been used to quantify muon-induced productions based on natural samples for each studied nuclide. Contrary to the current most oftenly used calculation of muon-induced production parameters which are based on irradiation experiments at discrete energies, productions based on natural samples are considering the entire energy range of particles reaching the ground surface. The evolution of 36Cl concentrations with depth needs to agree with those parameters deduced from 10Be and 26Al data. This is optimized when considering a fast muon-induced 36Cl production contribution and a spallation production rate at Sea Level High Latitude (SLHL) of (42.0 ± 2.0) atoms 36Cl·g·Ca - 1 ·a - 1 (1 sigma uncertainty).

  7. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  8. Understanding the acoustics of Papal Basilicas in Rome by means of a coupled-volumes approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    The paper investigates the acoustics of the four World-famous Papal Basilicas in Rome, namely Saint Peter's, St. John Lateran's, St. Paul's outside the Walls, and Saint Mary's Major. They are characterized by different dimensions, materials, and architectural features, as well as by a certain number of similarities. In addition, their complexity determines significant variation in their acoustics depending on the relative position of source and receivers. A detailed set of acoustic measurements was carried out in each church, using both spatial (B-format) and binaural microphones, and determining the standard ISO 3382 descriptors. The results are analyzed in relation to the architectural features, pointing out the differences observed in terms of listening experience. Finally, in order to explain some of the results found in energy-based parameters, the churches were analyzed as a system of acoustically coupled volumes. The latter explained most of the anomalies observed in the distribution of acoustic parameters, while showing at the same time that secondary spaces (aisles, chapels) play a different role depending on the amount of sound absorption located in the main nave.

  9. Narrow band SWIR hyperspectral imaging: a new approach based on volume Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, M.; Lessard, S.; Blais-Ouellette, S.

    2012-06-01

    Volume Bragg grating technology has enabled the development of a new type of staring hyperspectral camera. Based on Bragg Tunable filters, these hyperspectral cameras have both high spectral and spatial resolution, and significantly higher sensitivity than competing technologies like push broom spectrometer, liquid crystal tunable filters, or acousto-optic tunable filters. They are minimally sensitive to polarization and their spectral isolation can reach 106. Here we thus present an innovative tool to collect SWIR hyperspectral data with high spectral and spatial resolution. This new instrument is based on a 3nm bandwidth Bragg Tunable Filter, continuously tunable from 1.0um and 2.5um. Because high spectral resolution also means less light per channel, a low noise custom HgCdTe (MCT) camera was also developed to meet the requirement of the filter. The high speed capability of more than 300 fps and the low operating temperature of 200K (deep cooled option to 77K) allow full frame 500 spectral channel datacube acquisitions in minimal time. Basic principle of this imaging filter will be reviewed as well as the custom MCT camera performances. High resolution hyperspectral measurements will be demonstrated between 1.0um and 2.5um on different objects.

  10. A 2.5D finite element approach for predicting ground vibrations generated by vertical track irregularities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-cheng BIAN; Chang CHAO; Wan-feng JIN; Yun-min CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic responses of track structure and wave propagation in nearby ground vibration become significant when train operates on high speeds.A train-track-ground dynamic interaction analysis model based on the 2.5D finite element method is developed for the prediction of ground vibrations due to vertical track irregularities.The one-quarter car model is used to represent the train as lumped masses connected by springs.The embankment and the underlying ground are modeled by the 2.5D finite element approach to improve the computation efficiency.The Fourier transform is applied in the direction of train's movement to express the wave motion with a wave-number.The one-quarter car model is coupled into the global stiffness matrix describing the track-ground dynamic system with the displacement compatibility condition at the wheel-rail interface,including the irregularities on the track surface.Dynamic responses of the track and ground due to train's moving loads are obtained in the wave-number domain by solving the governing equation,using a conventional finite element procedure.The amplitude and wavelength are identified as two major parameters describing track irregularities.The irregularity amplitude has a direct impact on the vertical response for low-speed trains,both for short wavelength and long wavelength irregularities.Track irregularity with shorter wavelength can generate stronger track vibration both for low-speed and high-speed cases.For low-speed case,vibrations induced by track irregularities dominate far field responses.For high-speed case,the wavelength of track irregularities has very little effect on ground vibration at distances far from track center,and train's wheel axle weights becomes dominant.

  11. Numerical simulation of high-speed train induced ground vibrations using 2.5D finite element approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An efficient 2.5D finite element numerical modeling approach was developed to simulate wave motions generated in ground by high-speed train passages. Fourier transform with respect to the coordinate in the track direction was applied to re-ducing the three-dimensional dynamic problem to a plane strain problem which has been solved in a section perpendicular to the track direction. In this study, the track structure and supporting ballast layer were simplified as a composite Euler beam resting on the ground surface, while the ground with complicated geometry and physical properties was modeled by 2.5D quadrilateral elements. Wave dissipation into the far field was dealt with the transmitting boundary constructed with fre-quency-dependent dashpots. Three-dimensional responses of track structure and ground were obtained from the wavenumber expansion in the track direction. The simulated wave motions in ground were interpreted for train moving loads traveling at speeds below or above the critical velocity of a specific track-ground system. It is found that, in the soft ground area, the high-speed train operations can enter the transonic range, which can lead to resonances of the track structure and the sup-porting ground. The strong vibration will endanger the safe operations of high-speed train and accelerate the deterioration of railway structure.

  12. Numerical simulation of high-speed train induced ground vibrations using 2.5D finite element approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN XueCheng; OHEN YunMin; HU Ting

    2008-01-01

    An efficient 2.5D finite element numerical modeling approach was developed to simulate wave motions generated in ground by high-speed train passages.Fourier transform with respect to the coordinate in the track direction was applied to re-ducing the three-dimensional dynamic problem to a plane strain problem which has been solved in a section perpendicular to the track direction.In this study,the track structure and supporting ballast layer were simplified as a composite Euler beam resting on the ground surface,while the ground with complicated geometry and physical properties was modeled by 2.5D quadrilateral elements.Wave dissipation into the far field was dealt with the transmitting boundary constructed with fre-quency-dependent dashpots.Three-dimensional responses of track structure and ground were obtained from the wavenumber expansion in the track direction.The simulated wave motions in ground were interpreted for train moving loads traveling at speeds below or above the critical velocity of a specific track-ground system.It is found that,in the soft ground area,the high-speed train operations can enter the transonic range,which can lead to resonances of the track structure and the sup-porting ground.The strong vibration will endanger the safe operations of high-speed train and accelerate the deterioration of railway structure.

  13. A New Approach to Identify Optimal Properties of Shunting Elements for Maximum Damping of Structural Vibration Using Piezoelectric Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The use of shunted piezoelectric patches in reducing vibration and sound radiation of structures has several advantages over passive viscoelastic elements, e.g., lower weight with increased controllability. The performance of the piezoelectric patches depends on the shunting electronics that are designed to dissipate vibration energy through a resistive element. In past efforts most of the proposed tuning methods were based on modal properties of the structure. In these cases, the tuning applies only to one mode of interest and maximum tuning is limited to invariant points when based on den Hartog's invariant points concept. In this study, a design method based on the wave propagation approach is proposed. Optimal tuning is investigated depending on the dynamic and geometric properties that include effects from boundary conditions and position of the shunted piezoelectric patch relative to the structure. Active filters are proposed as shunting electronics to implement the tuning criteria. The developed tuning methods resulted in superior capabilities in minimizing structural vibration and noise radiation compared to other tuning methods. The tuned circuits are relatively insensitive to changes in modal properties and boundary conditions, and can applied to frequency ranges in which multiple modes have effects.

  14. Three-dimensional combined finite-discrete element approach for simulation of single layer powder compaction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈普庆; 夏伟; 周照耀; 朱权利; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The application of a combined finite-discrete element modeling approach to simulate the three-dimensional microscopic compaction behavior of single-layer metal powder system was described. The process was treated as a static problem, with kinematical component being neglected. Due to ill condition, Cholesky's method failed to solve the system equations, while conjugate gradient method was tried and yielded good results. Deformation of the particles was examined and compared with the results of physical modeling experiments. In both cases, the inner particles were deformed from sphere to polygonal column, with the edges turning from arc to straight line. The edge number of a particle was equal to the number of particles surrounding it. And the experiments show that the ductile metal particles can be densified only by their plastic deformation without the occurrence of rearrangement phenomenon.

  15. An Approach to the Use of Depth Cameras for Weed Volume Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Dorado, José; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Ribeiro, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The use of depth cameras in precision agriculture is increasing day by day. This type of sensor has been used for the plant structure characterization of several crops. However, the discrimination of small plants, such as weeds, is still a challenge within agricultural fields. Improvements in the new Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor can capture the details of plants. The use of a dual methodology using height selection and RGB (Red, Green, Blue) segmentation can separate crops, weeds, and soil. This paper explores the possibilities of this sensor by using Kinect Fusion algorithms to reconstruct 3D point clouds of weed-infested maize crops under real field conditions. The processed models showed good consistency among the 3D depth images and soil measurements obtained from the actual structural parameters. Maize plants were identified in the samples by height selection of the connected faces and showed a correlation of 0.77 with maize biomass. The lower height of the weeds made RGB recognition necessary to separate them from the soil microrelief of the samples, achieving a good correlation of 0.83 with weed biomass. In addition, weed density showed good correlation with volumetric measurements. The canonical discriminant analysis showed promising results for classification into monocots and dictos. These results suggest that estimating volume using the Kinect methodology can be a highly accurate method for crop status determination and weed detection. It offers several possibilities for the automation of agricultural processes by the construction of a new system integrating these sensors and the development of algorithms to properly process the information provided by them. PMID:27347972

  16. An Approach to the Use of Depth Cameras for Weed Volume Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio Andújar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of depth cameras in precision agriculture is increasing day by day. This type of sensor has been used for the plant structure characterization of several crops. However, the discrimination of small plants, such as weeds, is still a challenge within agricultural fields. Improvements in the new Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor can capture the details of plants. The use of a dual methodology using height selection and RGB (Red, Green, Blue segmentation can separate crops, weeds, and soil. This paper explores the possibilities of this sensor by using Kinect Fusion algorithms to reconstruct 3D point clouds of weed-infested maize crops under real field conditions. The processed models showed good consistency among the 3D depth images and soil measurements obtained from the actual structural parameters. Maize plants were identified in the samples by height selection of the connected faces and showed a correlation of 0.77 with maize biomass. The lower height of the weeds made RGB recognition necessary to separate them from the soil microrelief of the samples, achieving a good correlation of 0.83 with weed biomass. In addition, weed density showed good correlation with volumetric measurements. The canonical discriminant analysis showed promising results for classification into monocots and dictos. These results suggest that estimating volume using the Kinect methodology can be a highly accurate method for crop status determination and weed detection. It offers several possibilities for the automation of agricultural processes by the construction of a new system integrating these sensors and the development of algorithms to properly process the information provided by them.

  17. An Approach to the Use of Depth Cameras for Weed Volume Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Dorado, José; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Ribeiro, Angela

    2016-06-25

    The use of depth cameras in precision agriculture is increasing day by day. This type of sensor has been used for the plant structure characterization of several crops. However, the discrimination of small plants, such as weeds, is still a challenge within agricultural fields. Improvements in the new Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor can capture the details of plants. The use of a dual methodology using height selection and RGB (Red, Green, Blue) segmentation can separate crops, weeds, and soil. This paper explores the possibilities of this sensor by using Kinect Fusion algorithms to reconstruct 3D point clouds of weed-infested maize crops under real field conditions. The processed models showed good consistency among the 3D depth images and soil measurements obtained from the actual structural parameters. Maize plants were identified in the samples by height selection of the connected faces and showed a correlation of 0.77 with maize biomass. The lower height of the weeds made RGB recognition necessary to separate them from the soil microrelief of the samples, achieving a good correlation of 0.83 with weed biomass. In addition, weed density showed good correlation with volumetric measurements. The canonical discriminant analysis showed promising results for classification into monocots and dictos. These results suggest that estimating volume using the Kinect methodology can be a highly accurate method for crop status determination and weed detection. It offers several possibilities for the automation of agricultural processes by the construction of a new system integrating these sensors and the development of algorithms to properly process the information provided by them.

  18. Choroidal Mapping; a Novel Approach for Evaluating Choroidal Thickness and Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Noori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a limited number of non-invasive imaging techniques available for assessing the choroid, a structure that may be affected by a variety of retinal disorders or become primarily involved in conditions such as polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy and choroidal tumors. The introduction of enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT has provided the advantage of in vivo cross-sectional imaging of the choroid, similar to the retina, with standard commercially available spectraldomain OCT machines. In this article, we review this imaging technique and introduce choroidal mapping as a novel approach for obtaining accurate topographic and volumetric information on the choroid in normal and diseased states.

  19. 3D modeling of forces between magnet and HTS in a levitation system using new approach of the control volume method based on an unstructured grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloui, L., E-mail: lotfi.alloui@lgep.supelec.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Laboratoire de modelisation des systemes energetiques (LMSE), Universite de Biskra, 07000 Biskra (Algeria); Bouillault, F., E-mail: bouillault@lgep.supelec.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bernard, L., E-mail: laurent.bernardl@lgep.supelc.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris - LGEP, CNRS UMR 8507, Supelec, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Universite Paris Sud-Paris 11, Plateau de Moulon, 11 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Leveque, J., E-mail: jean.leveque@green.uhp-nancy.fr [Groupe de recherche en electronique et electrotechnique de Nancy, Universite Henry Poincare, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper we present new 3D numerical model to calculate the vertical and the guidance forces in high temperature superconductors taking into account the influence of the flux creep phenomena. In the suggested numerical model, we adopt a new approach of the control volume method. This approach is based on the use of an unstructured grid which can be used to model more complex geometries. A comparison of the control volume method results with experiments verifies the validity of this approach and the proposed numerical model. Based on this model, the levitation force's relaxation at different temperatures was also studied.

  20. Structured assessment approach version 1. License submittal document content and format for material control and accounting assessment. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, I.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the second volume, the License Submittal Document Content and Format for Material Control and Accounting Assessment, of a four-volume document. It presents the content and format of the LSD necessary for Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) assessment with the SAA Version 1. The LSD is designed to provide the necessary data input to perform all four stages of analyses associated with the SAA. A full-size but Hypothetical Fuel Cycle Facility (HFCF) is used as an example to illustrate the required input data content and data format and to illustrate the procedure for generating the LSD. Generation of the LSD is the responsibility of the nuclear facility licensee applicant.

  1. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Identification of problems and alternative approaches. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multi-disciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The final phase of the project focused on identification of the most significant human factors problems with respect to safe and effective operation of the teletherapy system and an identification and assessment of alternative approaches for resolving the problems. This report presents the findings of this final phase.

  2. A New Approach to Image-Based Estimation of Food Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Hassannejad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A balanced diet is the key to a healthy lifestyle and is crucial for preventing or dealing with many chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Therefore, monitoring diet can be an effective way of improving people’s health. However, manual reporting of food intake has been shown to be inaccurate and often impractical. This paper presents a new approach to food intake quantity estimation using image-based modeling. The modeling method consists of three steps: firstly, a short video of the food is taken by the user’s smartphone. From such a video, six frames are selected based on the pictures’ viewpoints as determined by the smartphone’s orientation sensors. Secondly, the user marks one of the frames to seed an interactive segmentation algorithm. Segmentation is based on a Gaussian Mixture Model alongside the graph-cut algorithm. Finally, a customized image-based modeling algorithm generates a point-cloud to model the food. At the same time, a stochastic object-detection method locates a checkerboard used as size/ground reference. The modeling algorithm is optimized such that the use of six input images still results in an acceptable computation cost. In our evaluation procedure, we achieved an average accuracy of 92 % on a test set that includes images of different kinds of pasta and bread, with an average processing time of about 23 s.

  3. A data-driven approach for modeling post-fire debris-flow volumes and their uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the novel application of genetic programming to evolve nonlinear post-fire debris-flow volume equations from variables associated with a data-driven conceptual model of the western United States. The search space is constrained using a multi-component objective function that simultaneously minimizes root-mean squared and unit errors for the evolution of fittest equations. An optimization technique is then used to estimate the limits of nonlinear prediction uncertainty associated with the debris-flow equations. In contrast to a published multiple linear regression three-variable equation, linking basin area with slopes greater or equal to 30 percent, burn severity characterized as area burned moderate plus high, and total storm rainfall, the data-driven approach discovers many nonlinear and several dimensionally consistent equations that are unbiased and have less prediction uncertainty. Of the nonlinear equations, the best performance (lowest prediction uncertainty) is achieved when using three variables: average basin slope, total burned area, and total storm rainfall. Further reduction in uncertainty is possible for the nonlinear equations when dimensional consistency is not a priority and by subsequently applying a gradient solver to the fittest solutions. The data-driven modeling approach can be applied to nonlinear multivariate problems in all fields of study. ?? 2011.

  4. Two Kinds of "Elements" and the Dialectic between Synthetic-deductive and Analytic-genetic Approaches in Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Hans-Georg

    1988-01-01

    Describes two kinds of elements in mathematics: Euclid's and Bourbaki's. Discusses some criticisms on the two concepts of elements from a philosophical, methodological, and didactical point of view. Suggests a complementarist view and several implications for mathematics education. (YP)

  5. Trace Element Analysis of Minerals in Magmatic-Hydrothermal Ores by Laser Ablation Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Approaches and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Cook

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS has rapidly established itself as the method of choice for generation of multi-element datasets for specific minerals, with broad applications in Earth science. Variation in absolute concentrations of different trace elements within common, widely distributed phases, such as pyrite, iron-oxides (magnetite and hematite, and key accessory minerals, such as apatite and titanite, can be particularly valuable for understanding processes of ore formation, and when trace element distributions vary systematically within a mineral system, for a vector approach in mineral exploration. LA-ICP-MS trace element data can assist in element deportment and geometallurgical studies, providing proof of which minerals host key elements of economic relevance, or elements that are deleterious to various metallurgical processes. This contribution reviews recent advances in LA-ICP-MS methodology, reference standards, the application of the method to new mineral matrices, outstanding analytical uncertainties that impact on the quality and usefulness of trace element data, and future applications of the technique. We illustrate how data interpretation is highly dependent on an adequate understanding of prevailing mineral textures, geological history, and in some cases, crystal structure.

  6. Virtual cellular manufacturing system based on resource element approach and analyzing its performance over different basic layouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Esmaeilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to present how choosing a suitable layout can improve the performance of virtual cellular manufacturing systems (VCMSs, especially minimizing the material flow between machines required by each family group. To present the efficacy of basic layouts on performances of VCMSs, a multi-objective mathematical model with a goal programming (GP approach is developed to generate VCMSs based on resource-elements (REs. The formulated model is coded in Lingo software and is run over functional and distributed arrangements of the same machines. The performance and the validity of the developed model are checked by a numerical example taken from the literature. The objective function of the mathematical model is measured for that example over two mentioned layout to compare the performance of the generated systems. Moreover, because of the material handling costs importance, material flows are measured to find the best option as a basic layout for VCMSs. To compare the performance of the generated system with the classical cellular manufacturing system (CMS, cell capacity utilization (CCU is employed as an independent criterion to evaluate each system. The result illustrates the priority of distributed layouts for generating RE-based VCMSs because of its flexibility, minimizing the objective function for the mathematical model, and smaller material flow by the components. In addition, the generated VCMSs outperforms the classical CMS from the CCU point of view.

  7. Colored grounds of gilt stucco surfaces as analyzed by a combined microscopic, spectroscopic and elemental analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansonetti, A; Striova, J; Biondelli, D; Castellucci, E M

    2010-08-01

    A survey of gilts applied to stucco surfaces that specifically focuses on the compositions of their colored grounds is reported. Gilt samples of a common geographical (Lombardy in Italy) and temporal provenance (17th-18th century) were studied in the form of polished cross-sections by optical and electron microscopy (SEM-EDS), micro-Raman (microRaman) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (microFTIR). Comparing samples with superimposed grounds and gilts enabled light to be shed on the choice of specific materials, their stratigraphic functions, decorative effects, and technological performances. Iron oxide pigments were found in the older grounds, sometimes in the presence of lead white (2PbCO(3).Pb(OH)(2)) or minium (Pb(3)O(4)). In more recent grounds, chrome yellow (PbCrO(4)), chrome orange (PbCrO(4).PbO), cinnabar (alpha-HgS) and barium white (BaSO(4)), invariably mixed with lead white, were encountered. Evidence for the use of organic mordants (colophony and wax, or siccative oil) was obtained by microFTIR. This combined microFTIR and microRaman spectroscopic and elemental (SEM-EDS) analytical approach enhances knowledge of the composition of gold grounds, their variability and their chronological evolution.

  8. Approach to improve beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system based on diffractive optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liying; Yu, Jianjie; Ma, Jing; Yang, Yuqiang; Li, Mi; Jiang, Yijun; Liu, Jianfeng; Han, Qiqi

    2009-04-13

    For inter-satellite optical communication transmitter with reflective telescope of two-mirrors on axis, a large mount of the transmitted energy will be blocked by central obscuration of the secondary mirror. In this paper, a novel scheme based on diffractive optical element (DOE) is introduced to avoid it. This scheme includes one diffractive beam shaper and another diffractive phase corrector, which can diffract the obscured part of transmitted beam into the domain unobscured by the secondary mirror. The proposed approach is firstly researched with a fixed obscuration ratio of 1/4. Numerical simulation shows that the emission efficiency of new figuration is 99.99%; the beam divergence from the novel inter-satellite optical communication transmitter is unchanged; and the peak intensity of receiver plane is increased about 31% compared with the typical configuration. Then the intensy patterns of receiver plane are analyzed with various obscuration ratio, the corresponding numerical modelling reveals that the intensity patterns with various obscuration ratio are nearly identical, but the amplify of relative peak intensity is getting down with the growth of obscuration ratio. This work can improve the beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system without affecting any other functionality.

  9. Detecting Near-Surface Ice Formation Over Time Using the Kennaugh Elements Approach From TerraSAR-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, L.

    2016-12-01

    The summer melting has increased substantially at higher elevations on the Canadian Arctic ice caps. The resulting meltwater percolates into the upper layers of snow and firn and then refreeze, building massive ice bodies. It seems likely that these within-firn ice bodies now limit meltwater penetration into the firn and may be creating a feedback whereby the fraction of melt that runs off to the ocean is increasing. Although changes in firn structure as presence of ice layers and ice bodies are well documented over the Devon ice cap, the firm has shown that it exerts a crucial role to predict more accurately the contribution of small ice caps to the sea level rise. However it is still challenging to assess the extent of these features within the shallow subsurface using ice cores and GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) data collected along a limited number of linear transects. Studying changes in the distribution of ice bodies' formation over time has the potential to provide information about how the growth of ice bodies in the firn is affecting the pattern of water flow in the firn layer. The objective is investigate the potential of Kennaugh Elements (KE) derived from x-band SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) for mapping the distribution and growth of large ice bodies within the firn and the evolution of their distribution over time. The evaluation of this method could reveal a new approach suitable for other glacierized regions that would reduce the costs and amount of field work for studying such properties.

  10. In situ assessment of phyto and zooavailability of trace elements: A complementary approach to chemical extraction procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauget, Benjamin; Faure, Olivier; Conord, Cyrille; Crini, Nadia; de Vaufleury, Annette

    2015-07-15

    For an accurate risk assessment of sites contaminated by trace elements (TE), measurements of bioavailability must be performed. This is routinely achieved using the standardized 0.01M CaCl2 method. However, the suitability of chemical extractions as proxies of bioavailability is questionable. We analyzed the correlations between chemically estimated TE bioavailability and TE actually accumulated by coupling plant and snails bioindicators. Results showed a better correlation between plant TE contents and CaCl2 fraction while total soil concentration better explained snail TE contents. However in both cases chemical measures were not suitable to predict TE accumulation and bioavailability. Considering the soil properties only improve the estimation of Cr, Ni and Pb accumulation by plants while for snails, TE contents in viscera were dependent both on soil and plant contents and soil properties. It highlights the complementarities of biomonitoring methods to assess bioavailability. This dual approach allows a "physiologically defined" evaluation of bioavailability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 2: Single-mode large deflection vibrations of beams and plates using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chuh

    1987-01-01

    A finite element method is presented for the large amplitude vibrations of complex structures that can be modelled with beam and rectangular plate elements subjected to harmonic excitation. Both inplane deformation and inertia are considered in the formulation. Derivation of the harmonic force and nonlinear stiffness matrices for a beam and a rectangular plate element are presented. Solution procedures and convergence characteristics of the finite element method are described. Nonlinear response to uniform and concentrated harmonic loadings and improved nonlinear free vibration results are presented for beams and rectangular plates of various boundary conditions.

  12. Reappraisal of the geothermal potential at Colli Albani volcano (Italy): a new approach to the volume method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, G.; De Benedetti, A. A.; Ramazzotti, P.; Bonamico, A.; Mattei, M.

    2012-04-01

    High enthalpy geothermal reservoirs are usually associated with fractured rocks. Secondary permeability is however difficult to be predicted thus making it difficult to locate the most productive volumes of the reservoirs. The calculation of the energetic potential in geothermal areas suffers of the large uncertainties associated with secondary permeability issues, facing the task of the interplay between stratification and fracturing on the anisotropic distribution of secondary permeability. The object of this work is the research and informatization of available data for the Colli Albani (Latium, Central Italy) geothermal system, in order to propose a qualitative approach and quantitative identification and description of geothermal systems, applied to the Colli Albani area as a case history. The identification of the rock volumes most promising in terms of industrial exploitation needs the definition of an evaluation matrix. The considered data can be placed in a three dimensional matrix with A axis that accounts for the modeling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data, and a B axis that accounts for the thermal modeling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are strongly influenced by the geological model therefore, as for the case of Colli Albani, there is certainly a lot of scope into revising existing geological reconstructions of the reservoirs in Central Italy and accordingly reconsidering the interpolation and modeling of both thermal and geophysical data. For the scope of this work, we have taken into account the maps descriptive the thermal structure and the deep distribution of the top of the geothermal reservoirs produced by ENEL and AGIP between the 1970s and 1990s for Cental Italy, and we have detailed the internal structure of the substrate, considering more recent direct and indirect data on the nature of the substratum. Finally, we discuss the implementation

  13. The hooked element in the pes of turtles (Testudines): a global approach to exploring primary and secondary homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Werneburg, Ingmar; Lyson, Tyler R

    2013-11-01

    The hooked element in the pes of turtles was historically identified by most palaeontologists and embryologists as a modified fifth metatarsal, and often used as evidence to unite turtles with other reptiles with a hooked element. Some recent embryological studies, however, revealed that this element might represent an enlarged fifth distal tarsal. We herein provide extensive new myological and developmental observations on the hooked element of turtles, and re-evaluate its primary and secondary homology using all available lines of evidence. Digital count and timing of development are uninformative. However, extensive myological, embryological and topological data are consistent with the hypothesis that the hooked element of turtles represents a fusion of the fifth distal tarsal with the fifth metatarsal, but that the fifth distal tarsal dominates the hooked element in pleurodiran turtles, whereas the fifth metatarsal dominates the hooked element of cryptodiran turtles. The term 'ansulate bone' is proposed to refer to hooked elements that result from the fusion of these two bones. The available phylogenetic and fossil data are currently insufficient to clarify the secondary homology of hooked elements within Reptilia.

  14. The hooked element in the pes of turtles (Testudines): a global approach to exploring primary and secondary homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Werneburg, Ingmar; Lyson, Tyler R

    2013-01-01

    The hooked element in the pes of turtles was historically identified by most palaeontologists and embryologists as a modified fifth metatarsal, and often used as evidence to unite turtles with other reptiles with a hooked element. Some recent embryological studies, however, revealed that this element might represent an enlarged fifth distal tarsal. We herein provide extensive new myological and developmental observations on the hooked element of turtles, and re-evaluate its primary and secondary homology using all available lines of evidence. Digital count and timing of development are uninformative. However, extensive myological, embryological and topological data are consistent with the hypothesis that the hooked element of turtles represents a fusion of the fifth distal tarsal with the fifth metatarsal, but that the fifth distal tarsal dominates the hooked element in pleurodiran turtles, whereas the fifth metatarsal dominates the hooked element of cryptodiran turtles. The term ‘ansulate bone’ is proposed to refer to hooked elements that result from the fusion of these two bones. The available phylogenetic and fossil data are currently insufficient to clarify the secondary homology of hooked elements within Reptilia. PMID:24102560

  15. An adaptive Lagrangian boundary element approach for three-dimensional transient free-surface Stokes flow as applied to extrusion, thermoforming, and rheometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayat, Roger E.; Genouvrier, Delphine

    2001-05-01

    An adaptive (Lagrangian) boundary element approach is proposed for the general three-dimensional simulation of confined free-surface Stokes flow. The method is stable as it includes remeshing capabilities of the deforming free surface and thus can handle large deformations. A simple algorithm is developed for mesh refinement of the deforming free-surface mesh. Smooth transition between large and small elements is achieved without significant degradation of the aspect ratio of the elements in the mesh. Several flow problems are presented to illustrate the utility of the approach, particularly as encountered in polymer processing and rheology. These problems illustrate the transient nature of the flow during the processes of extrusion and thermoforming, the elongation of a fluid sample in an extensional rheometer, and the coating of a sphere. Surface tension effects are also explored. Copyright

  16. Numerical Simulation of Particle Mixing in Dispersed Gas-Liquid-Solid Flows using a Combined Volume of Fluid and Discrete Particle Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, Niels G.; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a hybrid model is presented for the numerical simulation of gas-liquid-solid flows using a combined Volume Of Fluid (VOF) and Discrete Particle (DP) approach applied for respectively dispersed gas bubbles and solid particles present in the continuous liquid phase. The hard sphere DP mo

  17. Direct numerical simulation of particle mixing in dispersed gas-liquid-solid flows using a combined volume of fluid and discrete particle approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, Niels G.; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a hybrid model is presented for the numerical simulation of gas-liquid-solid flows using a combined Volume Of Fluid (VOF) and Discrete Particle (DP) approach applied for respectively dispersed gas bubbles and solid particles present in the continuous liquid phase. The hard sphere DP mo

  18. Component mode synthesis and large deflection vibration of complex structures. Volume 3: Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chuh; Shen, Mo-How

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear forced vibration of a beam was analyzed by the finite element method. Inplane (longitudinal) displacement and inertia (IDI) are considered in the formulation. By combining the finite element method and nonlinear theory, more realistic models of structural response are obtained more easily and faster.

  19. Exploring Differential Effects across Two Decoding Treatments on Item-Level Transfer in Children with Significant Word Reading Difficulties: A New Approach for Testing Intervention Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steacy, Laura M.; Elleman, Amy M.; Lovett, Maureen W.; Compton, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    In English, gains in decoding skill do not map directly onto increases in word reading. However, beyond the Self-Teaching Hypothesis, little is known about the transfer of decoding skills to word reading. In this study, we offer a new approach to testing specific decoding elements on transfer to word reading. To illustrate, we modeled word-reading…

  20. Exploring Differential Effects across Two Decoding Treatments on Item-Level Transfer in Children with Significant Word Reading Difficulties: A New Approach for Testing Intervention Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steacy, Laura M.; Elleman, Amy M.; Lovett, Maureen W.; Compton, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    In English, gains in decoding skill do not map directly onto increases in word reading. However, beyond the Self-Teaching Hypothesis, little is known about the transfer of decoding skills to word reading. In this study, we offer a new approach to testing specific decoding elements on transfer to word reading. To illustrate, we modeled word-reading…

  1. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  2. A kinetic approach to describe trace-element distribution between particles and solution in natural aquatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Urs P.; Li, Yuan-Hui; Santschi, Peter H.

    1984-07-01

    The partitioning of radioactive trace elements between seawater and particulate matter from surface sediments and sediment traps was investigated in laboratory experiments. For the elements Na, Zn, Se, Sr, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Th and Pa (group I) constant distribution coefficients ( Kd) were found after a few days of equilibration, whereas the elements Be, Mn, Co and Fe (group II) showed an increasing Kd over the whole time of observation of 108 days. The time dependence of Kd is described by an adsorption-desorption equilibrium (group I elements), followed by a lattice transport reaction step (group II elements). The reaction rate constants are compared to Mn oxidation rates and to adsorption rate constants derived from in situ measurements of the U/Th disequilibrium as available from literature.

  3. Predicting competitive adsorption behavior of major toxic anionic elements onto activated alumina: a speciation-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tingzhi; Guan, Xiaohong; Tang, Yulin; Gu, Guowei; Wang, Jianmin

    2010-04-15

    Toxic anionic elements such as arsenic, selenium, and vanadium often co-exist in groundwater. These elements may impact each other when adsorption methods are used to remove them. In this study, we investigated the competitive adsorption behavior of As(V), Se(IV), and V(V) onto activated alumina under different pH and surface loading conditions. Results indicated that these anionic elements interfered with each other during adsorption. A speciation-based model was developed to quantify the competitive adsorption behavior of these elements. This model could predict the adsorption data well over the pH range of 1.5-12 for various surface loading conditions, using the same set of adsorption constants obtained from single-sorbate systems. This model has great implications in accurately predicting the field capacity of activated alumina under various local water quality conditions when multiple competitive anionic elements are present.

  4. Predicting competitive adsorption behavior of major toxic anionic elements onto activated alumina: A speciation-based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Tingzhi [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Guan Xiaohong [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang Yulin [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Gu Guowei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang Jianmin, E-mail: wangjia@mst.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Toxic anionic elements such as arsenic, selenium, and vanadium often co-exist in groundwater. These elements may impact each other when adsorption methods are used to remove them. In this study, we investigated the competitive adsorption behavior of As(V), Se(IV), and V(V) onto activated alumina under different pH and surface loading conditions. Results indicated that these anionic elements interfered with each other during adsorption. A speciation-based model was developed to quantify the competitive adsorption behavior of these elements. This model could predict the adsorption data well over the pH range of 1.5-12 for various surface loading conditions, using the same set of adsorption constants obtained from single-sorbate systems. This model has great implications in accurately predicting the field capacity of activated alumina under various local water quality conditions when multiple competitive anionic elements are present.

  5. A Domain Decomposition Approach to Implementing Fault Slip in Finite-Element Models of Quasi-static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Aagaard, Brad T; Williams, Charles A

    2013-01-01

    We employ a domain decomposition approach with Lagrange multipliers to implement fault slip in a finite-element code, PyLith, for use in both quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation applications. This integrated approach to solving both quasi-static and dynamic simulations leverages common finite-element data structures and implementations of various boundary conditions, discretization schemes, and bulk and fault rheologies. We have developed a custom preconditioner for the Lagrange multiplier portion of the system of equations that provides excellent scalability with problem size compared to conventional additive Schwarz methods. We demonstrate application of this approach using benchmarks for both quasi-static viscoelastic deformation and dynamic spontaneous rupture propagation that verify the numerical implementation in PyLith.

  6. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: A free-volume scaled-particle approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Oversteegen, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc co

  7. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: A free-volume scaled-particle approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Oversteegen, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc

  8. A novel approach for acid mine drainage pollution biomonitoring using rare earth elements bioaccumulated in the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnail, Estefanía; Pérez-López, Rafael; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Nieto, José Miguel; DelValls, T Ángel

    2017-09-15

    Lanthanide series have been used as a record of the water-rock interaction and work as a tool for identifying impacts of acid mine drainage (lixiviate residue derived from sulphide oxidation). The application of North-American Shale Composite-normalized rare earth elements patterns to these minority elements allows determining the origin of the contamination. In the current study, geochemical patterns were applied to rare earth elements bioaccumulated in the soft tissue of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea after exposure to different acid mine drainage contaminated environments. Results show significant bioaccumulation of rare earth elements in soft tissue of the clam after 14 days of exposure to acid mine drainage contaminated sediment (ΣREE=1.3-8μg/gdw). Furthermore, it was possible to biomonitor different degrees of contamination based on rare earth elements in tissue. The pattern of this type of contamination describes a particular curve characterized by an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements; a homologous pattern (EMREE=0.90) has also been observed when applied NASC normalization in clam tissues. Results of lanthanides found in clams were contrasted with the paucity of toxicity studies, determining risk caused by light rare earth elements in the Odiel River close to the Estuary. The current study purposes the use of clam as an innovative "bio-tool" for the biogeochemical monitoring of pollution inputs that determines the acid mine drainage networks affection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Photoacoustic reflection artifact reduction using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound: comparison between plane-wave and element-by-element synthetic backpropagation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities constitute a major problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients from the skin and superficial optical absorbers traverse into the tissue and reflect off echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts cause difficulties in the interpretation of images and reduce contrast and imaging depth. We recently developed a method called PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to circumvent the problem of reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. We already demonstrated that the photoacoustic signals can be backpropagated using synthetic aperture pulse-echo data for identifying and reducing reflection artifacts in vivo. In this work, we propose an alternative variant of PAFUSion in which synthetic backpropagation of photoacoustic signals is based on multi-angled plane-wave ultrasound measurements. We implemented plane-wave and synthetic aperture PAFUSion in a handheld ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system and demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on a human finger using both approaches. Our results suggest that, while both approaches are equivalent in terms of artifact reduction efficiency, plane-wave PAFUSion requires less pulse echo acquisitions when the skin absorption is the main cause of reflection artifacts. PMID:28736669

  10. An integrated approach for risk object re-entry predictions in terms of KS elements and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. K.; Anil Kumar, A. K.; Xavier James Raj, M.

    strategy (Sharma & Anilkumar 2003) adopted for the re-entry prediction of the risk objects by estimating the ballistic coefficient based on the TLEs. The estimation of the ballistic coefficient Bn = m/(CDA), where CD is the drag coefficient, A is the reference area, and m is the mass of the object, is done by minimizing a cost function (variation in the re-entry prediction time) using Genetic algorithm. The KS element equations of motion are numerically integrated with a suitable integration step size with the 4th - order Runge-Kutta-Gill method till the end of the orbital life, by including the Earth's oblateness with J2 to J6 terms, and modelling the air drag forces through an analytical oblate diurnal atmosphere with the density scale height varying with altitude. Jacchia (1977) atmospheric model, which takes into consideration the epoch, daily solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic index (Ap) for computation of density and density scale height, is utilized. The basic feature of the present approach is that the model and measurement errors are accountable in terms of adjusting the ballistic coefficient and hence the estimated Bn is not the actual ballistic coefficient but an effective ballistic coefficient. It is demonstrated that the inaccuracies or deficiencies in the inputs, like F10.7 and Ap values, are absorbed in the estimated Bn. The details of the re-entry results based on this approach, utilizing the TLE of debris objects, US Sat No. 25947 and SROSS-C2 Satellite, which re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on 4th March 2000 and 12th July 2001, are provided. Details of the re-entry predictions with respect to the 4th and 5th IADC re-entry campaigns, related to COSMOS 1043 rocket body and COSMOS 389 satellite, which re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on 19 January 2002 and 24 November 2003, respectively, are described. The predicted re-entries were found to be all along quite close to the actual re-entry time, with quite less uncertainties bands on the predictions. A

  11. An integrated approach to seismic event location: 1. Evaluating how method of location affects the volume of groups of hypocenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Clifford A.

    1992-11-01

    When seismic events occur in spatially compact clusters, the volume and geometric characteristics of these clusters often provides information about the relative effectiveness of different location methods, or about physical processes occurring within the hypocentral region. This report defines and explains how to determine the convex polyhedron of minimum volume (CPMV) surrounding a set of points. We evaluate both single-event and joint hypocenter determination (JHD) relocations for three rather different clusters of seismic events: (1) nuclear explosions from Muroroa relocated using P and PKP phases reported by the ISC; (2) intermediate depth earthquakes near Bucaramanga, Colombia, relocated using P and PKP phases reported by the ISC; and (3) shallow earthquakes near Vanuatu (formerly, the New Hebrides), relocated using P and S phases from a local station network. This analysis demonstrates that different location methods markedly affect the volume of the CPMV, however, volumes for JHD relations are not always smaller than volumes for single-event relocations.

  12. Guidelines for terms related to chemical speciations and fractionation of elements : definitions, structural aspects, and methodological approaches (IUPAC Recommendations 2000)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Templeton, D.M.; Ariese, F.; Cornelis, R.; Danielsson, L.G.; Muntau, H.; Leeuwen, van H.P.; Lobínski, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of concepts related to speciation of elements, more particularly speciation analysis and chemical species. Fractionation is distinguished from speciation analysis, and a general outline of fractionation procedures is given. We propose a categorization of species accor

  13. A Comparison of Finite Element-Based Inversion Algorithms, Local Frequency Estimation, and Direct Inversion Approach Used in MRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Mohammad; Sahebjavaher, Ramin S; Rohling, Robert; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2017-08-01

    In quantitative elastography, maps of the mechanical properties of soft tissue, or elastograms, are calculated from the measured displacement data by solving an inverse problem. The model assumptions have a significant effect on elastograms. Motivated by the high sensitivity of imaging results to the model assumptions for in vivo magnetic resonance elastography of the prostate, we compared elastograms obtained with four different methods. Two finite-element method (FEM)-based methods developed by our group were compared with two other commonly used methods, local frequency estimator (LFE) and curl-based direct inversion (c-DI). All the methods assume a linear isotropic elastic model, but the methods vary in their assumptions, such as local homogeneity or incompressibility, and in the specific approach used. We report results using simulations, phantom, and ex vivo and in vivo data. The simulation and phantom studies show, for regions with an inclusion, that the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for the FEM methods is about three to five times higher than the CNR for the LFE and c-DI and the rms error is about half. The LFE method produces very smooth results (i.e., low CNR) and is fast. c-DI is faster than the FEM methods but it is only accurate in areas where elasticity variations are small. The artifacts resulting from the homogeneity assumption in c-DI is detrimental in regions with large variations. The ex vivo and in vivo results also show similar trends as the simulation and phantom studies. The c-FEM method is more sensitive to noise compared with the mixed-FEM due to higher orders derivatives. This is especially evident at lower frequencies, where the wave curvature is smaller and it is more prone to such error, causing a discrepancy in the absolute values between the mixed-FEM and c-FEM in our in vivo results. In general, the proposed FEMs use fewer simplifying assumptions and outperform the other methods but they are computationally more expensive.

  14. A biogeochemical approach to understanding the accumulation patterns of trace elements in three species of dragonfly larvae: evaluation as biomonitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla, Isela; Rodríguez-Liñares, Genma; Garrido, Josefina; Bendicho, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    The accumulation patterns of different trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) were studied in three species of dragonfly larvae (Cordulegaster boltoni, Boyeria irene and Onychogomphus uncatus). Additionally these species were assessed as potential biomonitors in a lotic ecosystem (Louro River, Spain). Element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in both dragonfly larvae and river sediments. The surface of the larvae was observed and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A desorption test was used to establish the percentage of element adsorbed into the exoskeleton. Field biomonitoring studies were made considering the first part of the river as a control area in relation to the second part, which was severely polluted by industrial and domestic activities. Upon application of principal component analysis (PCA), two different element groups were found in relation to element bioaccumulation. Cu, Cd and Zn were mainly associated with the inner part of the larvae. As, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were found on the outer body parts, related with deposition of oxyhydroxides in the hydrocycle. SEM revealed a layer of inorganic particles, similar in composition to fine bed sediments. Significant relations between the element content of this group and that of sediments at the sampling site were found. Differences in bioaccumulation for each of the three species, except for As, were observed. Dragonfly larvae revealed their ability to reflect environmental concentrations of As in freshwater media.

  15. A novel geotechnical/geostatistical approach for exploration and production of natural gas from multiple geologic strata, Phase 1. Volume 2, Geology and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.; Brunk, R.; Hawkins, L. [BDM Engineering Services Co., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    This research program has been designed to develop and verify a unique geostatistical approach for finding natural gas resources. The project has been conducted by Beckley College, Inc., and BDM Engineering Services Company (BDMESC) under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). This section, Volume II, contains a detailed discussion of the methodology used and the geological and production information collected and analyzed for this study. A companion document, Volume 1, provides an overview of the program, technique and results of the study. In combination, Volumes I and II cover the completion of the research undertaken under Phase I of this DOE project, which included the identification of five high-potential sites for natural gas production on the Eccles Quadrangle, Raleigh County, West Virginia. Each of these sites was selected for its excellent potential for gas production from both relatively shallow coalbeds and the deeper, conventional reservoir formations.

  16. A novel geotechnical/geostatistical approach for exploration and production of natural gas from multiple geologic strata, Phase 1. Volume 2, Geology and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.; Brunk, R.; Hawkins, L. [BDM Engineering Services Co., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    This research program has been designed to develop and verify a unique geostatistical approach for finding natural gas resources. The project has been conducted by Beckley College, Inc., and BDM Engineering Services Company (BDMESC) under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). This section, Volume II, contains a detailed discussion of the methodology used and the geological and production information collected and analyzed for this study. A companion document, Volume 1, provides an overview of the program, technique and results of the study. In combination, Volumes I and II cover the completion of the research undertaken under Phase I of this DOE project, which included the identification of five high-potential sites for natural gas production on the Eccles Quadrangle, Raleigh County, West Virginia. Each of these sites was selected for its excellent potential for gas production from both relatively shallow coalbeds and the deeper, conventional reservoir formations.

  17. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: A free-volume scaled-particle approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lekkerkerker, H. N. W.; Oversteegen, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc concentrations in systems now experimentally available. The gas–liquid equilibrium of the spheres becomes stable at comparable size ratios as with bimodal mixtures of spheres or mixtures of rods and ...

  18. The Volatility and condensation behaviour of elements in dependence of T and fO2: a novel experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Dingwell, Don B.

    2010-05-01

    The volatility of elements is one of the most important variables during geological processes on Earth: its impact ranges from daily out gassing of volcanic vents to catastrophic emissions during volcanic eruptions which might scale up to global impacts on our climate. Volatility played, however, already a major role during the formation of our solar system: the nebular gases and their element budget passed through an elemental fractionation process based on differences in the evaporation and condensation behaviour of matter within the solar nebula - the origin of all the planets within our solar system. Precise knowledge of the parameters controlling volatility as well as condensation of elements is still lacking. Whether an element behaves volatile or refractory depends highly on the temperature and oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions prevailing. To address this issue, we initiated a systematic study of the volatility of 18 volatile elements in respect to fO2 and temperature applying a modified mechanically assisted equilibration technique (MAE): Approx. 60 g of a haplobasaltic starting composition (An-Di) doped with up to 5000 ppm of volatile elements (Li, K, Na, Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl) was heated to run temperatures. To investigate the fO2 dependence 2 experiments at logfO2 = -11.3 (~ IW -0.5) and - 0,7 (pure air) at a constant temperature of 1300 °C were performed, while T dependence was investigated at 1300 and 1500 °C at constant fO2 in pure air. The original MAE technique was modified by two Al2O3 plates extending from the hot spot region up to the upper, cooler regions of the muffle tube. These plates function as condensation traps. The temperature profile of the entire setup including the Al2O3 plates under run conditions was calibrated prior to any run. Experiments lasted for up two weeks while experimental conditions were kept strictly constant and were monitored. Up to 46 samples were taken from the melt by time

  19. Recent approaches for the direct use of elemental sulfur in the synthesis and processing of advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeewoo; Pyun, Jeffrey; Char, Kookheon

    2015-03-09

    Elemental sulfur is an abundant and inexpensive material obtained as a by-product of natural-gas and petroleum refining operations. Recently, the need for the development of new energy-storage systems brought into light the potential of sulfur as a high-capacity cathode material in secondary batteries. Sulfur-containing materials were also shown to have useful IR optical properties. These developments coupled with growing environmental concerns related to the global production of excess elemental sulfur have led to a keen interest in its utilization as a feedstock in materials applications. This Minireview focuses on the recent developments on physical and chemical methods for directly processing elemental sulfur to produce functional composites and polymers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Assessing element distribution and speciation in a stream at abandoned Pb-Zn mining site by combining classical, in-situ DGT and modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanović, Dario; Pižeta, Ivanka; Vukosav, Petra; Kovács, Elza; Frančišković-Bilinski, Stanislav; Tamás, János

    2015-04-01

    The distribution and speciation of elements along a stream subjected to neutralised acid mine drainage (NAMD) effluent waters (Mátra Mountain, Hungary; Toka stream) were studied by a multi-methodological approach: dissolved and particulate fractions of elements were determined by HR-ICPMS, whereas speciation was carried out by DGT, supported by speciation modelling performed by Visual MINTEQ. Before the NAMD discharge, the Toka is considered as a pristine stream, with averages of dissolved concentrations of elements lower than world averages. A considerable increase of element concentrations caused by effluent water inflow is followed by a sharp or gradual concentration decrease. A large difference between total and dissolved concentrations was found for Fe, Al, Pb, Cu, Zn and As in effluent water and at the first downstream site, with high correlation factors between elements in particulate fraction, indicating their common behaviour, governed by the formation of ferri(hydr)oxides (co)precipitates. In-situ speciation by the DGT technique revealed that Zn, Cd, Ni, Co, Mn and U were predominantly present as a labile, potentially bioavailable fraction (>90%). The formation of strong complexes with dissolved organic matter (DOM) resulted in a relatively low DGT-labile concentration of Cu (42%), while low DGT-labile concentrations of Fe (5%) and Pb (12%) were presumably caused by their existence in colloidal (particulate) fraction which is not accessible to DGT. Except for Fe and Pb, a very good agreement between DGT-labile concentrations and those predicted by the applied speciation model was obtained, with an average correlation factor of 0.96. This study showed that the in-situ DGT technique in combination with model-predicted speciation and classical analysis of samples could provide a reasonable set of data for the assessment of the water quality status (WQS), as well as for the more general study of overall behaviour of the elements in natural waters subjected

  1. An high order Mixed Interpolation Tensorial Components (MITC) shell element approach for modeling the buckling behavior of delaminated composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaiotti, Marco; Rizzo, Cesare M.; Branner, Kim

    2014-01-01

    of composite laminates of wind turbine blades, results were found valuable for the marine industry as well, because similar laminates are used for the hull shell and stiffeners. Systematic calculations were carried out to assess the effects of an embedded delamination on the buckling load, varying the size...... and through thickness position of the delamination. Different finite element modeling strategies were considered and validated against the experimental results. The one applying the 9 nodes MITC shell elements was found matching the experimental data despite failure modes were different for the two...

  2. Matrix elements in the coupled-cluster approach - With application to low-lying states in Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ynnerman, Anders

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for evaluating matrix elements of an operator between wavefunctions in the coupled-cluster form. The use of the exponential ansatz leads to compact exponential expressions also for matrix elements. Algorithms are developed for summing all effects of one-particle clusters and certain chains of two-particle clusters (containing the well-known random-phase approximation as a subset). The treatment of one-particle perturbations in single valence states is investigated in detail. As examples the oscillator strength for the 2s-2p transition in Li as well as the hyperfine structure for the two states are studied and compared to earlier work.

  3. Single breath-hold 3D measurement of left atrial volume using compressed sensing cardiovascular magnetic resonance and a non-model-based reconstruction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulis, Orestis; Monney, Pierre; Bermano, Amit; Vaxman, Amir; Gotsman, Craig; Schwitter, Janine; Stuber, Matthias; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Schwitter, Juerg

    2015-06-11

    Left atrial (LA) dilatation is associated with a large variety of cardiac diseases. Current cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) strategies to measure LA volumes are based on multi-breath-hold multi-slice acquisitions, which are time-consuming and susceptible to misregistration. To develop a time-efficient single breath-hold 3D CMR acquisition and reconstruction method to precisely measure LA volumes and function. A highly accelerated compressed-sensing multi-slice cine sequence (CS-cineCMR) was combined with a non-model-based 3D reconstruction method to measure LA volumes with high temporal and spatial resolution during a single breath-hold. This approach was validated in LA phantoms of different shapes and applied in 3 patients. In addition, the influence of slice orientations on accuracy was evaluated in the LA phantoms for the new approach in comparison with a conventional model-based biplane area-length reconstruction. As a reference in patients, a self-navigated high-resolution whole-heart 3D dataset (3D-HR-CMR) was acquired during mid-diastole to yield accurate LA volumes. Phantom studies. LA volumes were accurately measured by CS-cineCMR with a mean difference of -4.73 ± 1.75 ml (-8.67 ± 3.54%, r2 = 0.94). For the new method the calculated volumes were not significantly different when different orientations of the CS-cineCMR slices were applied to cover the LA phantoms. Long-axis "aligned" vs "not aligned" with the phantom long-axis yielded similar differences vs the reference volume (-4.87 ± 1.73 ml vs. -4.45 ± 1.97 ml, p = 0.67) and short-axis "perpendicular" vs. "not-perpendicular" with the LA long-axis (-4.72 ± 1.66 ml vs. -4.75 ± 2.13 ml; p = 0.98). The conventional bi-plane area-length method was susceptible for slice orientations (p = 0.0085 for the interaction of "slice orientation" and "reconstruction technique", 2-way ANOVA for repeated measures). To use the 3D-HR-CMR as the reference for LA volumes

  4. The development and deployment of Common Data Elements for tissue banks for translational research in cancer – An emerging standard based approach for the Mesothelioma Virtual Tissue Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhat Ghada

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, and the increasing demands for biomarker validation studies have catalyzed changes in the landscape of cancer research, fueling the development of tissue banks for translational research. A result of this transformation is the need for sufficient quantities of clinically annotated and well-characterized biospecimens to support the growing needs of the cancer research community. Clinical annotation allows samples to be better matched to the research question at hand and ensures that experimental results are better understood and can be verified. To facilitate and standardize such annotation in bio-repositories, we have combined three accepted and complementary sets of data standards: the College of American Pathologists (CAP Cancer Checklists, the protocols recommended by the Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology (ADASP for pathology data, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registry (NAACCR elements for epidemiology, therapy and follow-up data. Combining these approaches creates a set of International Standards Organization (ISO – compliant Common Data Elements (CDEs for the mesothelioma tissue banking initiative supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Methods The purpose of the project is to develop a core set of data elements for annotating mesothelioma specimens, following standards established by the CAP checklist, ADASP cancer protocols, and the NAACCR elements. We have associated these elements with modeling architecture to enhance both syntactic and semantic interoperability. The system has a Java-based multi-tiered architecture based on Unified Modeling Language (UML. Results Common Data Elements were developed using controlled vocabulary, ontology and semantic modeling methodology. The CDEs for each case are of different types: demographic

  5. Numerical Investigation of Influence of In-Situ Stress Ratio, Injection Rate and Fluid Viscosity on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using a Distinct Element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is very useful for understanding the hydraulic fracturing mechanism. In this paper, we simulate the hydraulic fracturing using the distinct element approach, to investigate the effect of some critical parameters on hydraulic fracturing characteristics. The breakdown pressure obtained by the distinct element approach is consistent with the analytical solution. This indicates that the distinct element approach is feasible on modeling the hydraulic fracturing. We independently examine the influence of in-situ stress ratio, injection rate and fluid viscosity on hydraulic fracturing. We further emphasize the relationship between these three factors and their contributions to the hydraulic fracturing. With the increase of stress ratio, the fracture aperture increases almost linearly; with the increase of injection rate and fluid viscosity, the fracture aperture and breakdown pressure increase obviously. A low value of product of injection rate and fluid viscosity (i.e., Qμ will lead to narrow fracture aperture, low breakdown pressure, and complex or dispersional hydraulic fractures. A high value of Qμ would lead wide fracture aperture, high breakdown pressure, and simple hydraulic fractures (e.g., straight or wing shape. With low viscosity fluid, the hydraulic fracture geometry is not sensitive to stress ratio, and thus becomes a complex fracture network.

  6. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation. PMID:27648083

  7. Metallomics approach to trace element analysis in ustilago maydis using cellular fractionation, atomic absorption spectrometry, and size exclusion chromatography with ICP-MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Alma Hortensia Serafin; Kubachka, Kevin; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Corona, Felix Gutierrez; Yathavakilla, Santha K V; Caruso, Joseph A; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2005-06-29

    Huitlacoche is the ethnic name of the young fruiting bodies of Ustilago maydis, a common parasite of maize. In Mexico and other Latin American countries, this fungus has been traditionally appreciated as a local delicacy. In this work a metallomics approach was used with the determination of eight elements in huitlacoche by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry as one facet of this approach. The results obtained indicated relatively lower concentrations of commonly analyzed metals, as referred to the data reported for other mushroom types. This effect was ascribed to different accessibilities of elements, depending on fungus substrate (lower from plant than from soil). Subcellular fractionation was accomplished by centrifugation of cell homogenates suspended in Tris-HCl buffer. Recoveries of the fractionation procedure were in the range of 71-103%. For six elements (Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb), the mean relative contributions in cytosol, cell walls, and mixed membrane fraction were 50.7, 48.2, and 1.1% respectively. To attain the molecular weight distribution of compounds containing target elements as an additional aspect of the metallomics approach, the fungus extract (1% sodium dodecyl sulfate in Tris-HCl, 30 mmol L(-)(1), pH 7.0) was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography with UV and ICP-MS detection. With spectrophotometric detection (280 nm), the elution of high molecular weight compounds was observed in the form of one peak (MW > 10 kDa), and several lower peaks appeared at higher retention times (MW < 10 kDa). On ICP-MS chromatograms, a coelution of (59)Co, (63)Cu, (57)Fe, (202)Hg, (60)Ni, and (80)Se with the first peak on the UV chromatogram was clearly observed, indicating that a fraction of each element incorporated with high molecular weight compounds (12.7, 19.8, 33.7, 100, 19.4, and 45.8%, respectively, based on the peak area measurements). From a comparison of (80)Se and (33)S chromatograms (for sulfur analysis, the extract was obtained in

  8. Profiling Environmental Chemicals for Activity in the Antioxidant Response Element Signaling Pathway Using a High-Throughput Screening Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1 ABSTRACT 2 3 BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety 4 of diseases ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration, highlighti.ng the need to identify 5 chemicals that can induce this effect. The antioxidant response element (ARE)...

  9. Elemental analysis of tree leaves by total reflection X-ray fluorescence: New approaches for air quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Dalipi, Rogerta; Zacco, Annalisa; Federici, Stefania; Masperi, Matteo; Leonesio, Paolo; Bontempi, Elza; Depero, Laura E

    2017-03-22

    This work shows that total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a fast, easy and successful tool to determine the presence of potentially toxic elements in atmospheric aerosols precipitations on tree leaves. Leaves are collected in eleven parks of different geographical areas of the Brescia city, Northern Italy, for environmental monitoring purposes. Two sample preparation procedures are considered: microwave acid digestion and the novel SMART STORE method for direct analysis. The latter consists in sandwiching a portion of the leaf between two organic foils, metals free, to save it from contamination and material loss. Mass composition of macro, micro and trace elements is calculated for digested samples, while relative elemental amount are obtained from direct analysis. Washed and unwashed leaves have a different composition in terms of trace elements. Differentiation occurs according to Fe, Pb and Cu contributions, considered as most representative of air depositions, and probably related to anthropogenic sources. Direct analysis is more representative of the composition of air precipitations. Advantages and drawbacks of the presented methods of sample preparation and TXRF analysis are discussed. Results demonstrate that TXRF allows to perform accurate and precise quantitative analysis of digested samples. In addition, direct analysis of leaves may be used as a fast and simple method for screening in the nanograms range.

  10. Stanford-USGS shrimp-RG ion microprobe: A new approach to determining the distribution of trace elements in coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, A.; Wooden, J.L.; Persing, H.M.; Zielinski, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of Cr and other trace metals of environmental interest in a range of widely used U.S. coals was investigated using the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe . Using the oxygen ion source, concentrations of Cr (11 to 176 ppm), V (23 to 248 ppm), Mn (2 to 149 ppm), Ni (2 to 30 ppm), and 13 other elements were determined in illite/smectite, a group of clay minerals commonly present in coal. The results confirm previous indirect or semi-quantitative determinations indicating illite/smectite to be an important host of these metals. Calibration was achieved using doped aluminosilicate-glass synthetic standards and glasses prepared from USGS rock standards. Grains for analysis were identified optically, and confirmed by 1) precursory electron microprobe analysis and wavelength-dispersive compositional mapping, and 2) SHRIMP-RG major element data obtained concurrently with trace element results. Follow-up investigations will focus on the distribution of As and other elements that are more effectively ionized with the cesium primary beam currently being tested.

  11. A New, Effective and Low-Cost Three-Dimensional Approach for the Estimation of Upper-Limb Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Buffa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to validate a new procedure (SkanLab for the three-dimensional estimation of total arm volume. SkanLab is based on a single structured-light Kinect sensor (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA and on Skanect (Occipital, San Francisco, CA, USA and MeshLab (Visual Computing Lab, Pisa, Italy software. The volume of twelve plastic cylinders was measured using geometry, as the reference, water displacement and SkanLab techniques (two raters and repetitions. The right total arm volume of thirty adults was measured by water displacement (reference and SkanLab (two raters and repetitions. The bias and limits of agreement (LOA between techniques were determined using the Bland–Altman method. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and the standard error of measurement. The bias of SkanLab in measuring the cylinders volume was −21.9 mL (−5.7% (LOA: −62.0 to 18.2 mL; −18.1% to 6.7% and in measuring the volume of arms’ was −9.9 mL (−0.6% (LOA: −49.6 to 29.8 mL; −2.6% to 1.4%. SkanLab’s intra- and inter-rater reliabilities were very high (ICC >0.99. In conclusion, SkanLab is a fast, safe and low-cost method for assessing total arm volume, with high levels of accuracy and reliability. SkanLab represents a promising tool in clinical applications.

  12. Phase diagram of mixtures of hard colloidal spheres and discs: a free-volume scaled-particle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oversteegen, S M; Lekkerkerker, H N W

    2004-02-01

    Phase diagrams of mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with hard discs are calculated by means of the free-volume theory. The free-volume fraction available to the discs is determined from scaled-particle theory. The calculations show that depletion induced phase separation should occur at low disc concentrations in systems now experimentally available. The gas-liquid equilibrium of the spheres becomes stable at comparable size ratios as with bimodal mixtures of spheres or mixtures of rods and spheres. Introducing finite thickness of the platelets gives rise to a significant lowering of the fluid branch of the binodal. Copyright 2004 American Institute of Physics

  13. Development of an approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis of trace elements present in canine breast tumors by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozer, Thamara C.; Conceicao, Andre L.C.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Rocha, Anna S.S. da; Fagundes, Alana C.F.; Maciel, Karla F.R.; Pimentel, Gustavo R.O.; Badelli, Juliana C., E-mail: thamara.cozer@gmail.com, E-mail: alconceicao@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: anna@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: alanacarolinef@gmail.com, E-mail: karla_rimanski@hotmail.com, E-mail: g_rop@hotmail.com, E-mail: jubadellin@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Espectroscopia de Raio-X

    2015-07-01

    Studies performed with canines indicate that one of the main neoplasia which affect these animals are the breast tumors, representing from 25% to 50% of all kinds of tumors. Moreover, half of them are classified as malignant. In this sense, recent researches on humans have been associated the presence of certain trace elements with the development of breast neoplasia in those individuals. Then, as the breast tissue composition in canines is very similar to the humans, it is expected the same behavior. In this direction, a very effective technique to identify and to determinate trace elements concentration is the EDXRF. However, studies on this area are scarce in the literature. Therefore, in this work it was developed an approach to quantify the main trace elements present into these tumors with high sensitivity. For this purpose, it was determined calibration curves of standards samples diluted in water, with concentrations of Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn, ranging from 400mg/kg to 35mg/kg, from 20mg/kg to 2mg/kg, from 10mg/kg to 1mg/kg and from 100mg/kg to 10mg/kg, respectively. All calibration curves were linearly fitted and on basis in this behavior it was determined the sensitivity of our approach to quantify the concentration of the trace elements mentioned above. In addition, it is important to mention that studies in this area are of great potential, because EDXRF represents a quickly practical and non-destructive alternative to quantify trace elements. (author)

  14. Groundwater prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits: the merits of mineral-solution equilibria versus single element tracer methods. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanty, R.B.; Langmuir, D.; Chatham, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents the results of further research on the groundwater geochemistry of 96 well waters in two uraniferous aquifers in Texas and Wyoming, and is a continuation of the work presented by Chatham et al. (1981). In this study variations in concentrations of U, As, Mo, Se and V were compared with the saturation state of the groundwater with respect to mineral phases of these elements known or expected to occur in each area. The non-radiogenic trace elements exhibited strong redox dependence consistent with thermodynamic predictions, but their variations did not pinpoint existing uranium ore bodies, because of a shift in groundwater flow patterns since the time of ore emplacement. Saturation levels of trace element minerals such as realgar, native Se, and molybdenite showed broad anomalies around the ore-bearing areas, similar to patterns found for U minerals by Langmuir and Chatham (1980), and Chatham et al. (1981). The radiogenic elements Ra and Rn showed significant anomalies directly within the ore zones. Helium anomalies were displaced in the direction of groundwater flow, but by their magnitude and areal extent provided strong evidence for the existence of nearby uranium accumulations. Uranium isotope ratios showed no systematic variations within the two aquifers studied. Saturation maps for kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite and the zeolites analcime and clinoptilolite provided 1 to 2 km anomalies around the ore at the Texas site. Saturation values for the gangue minerals pyrite and calcite defined the redox interface and often suggested the position of probable uranium mineralization. When properly used, the groundwater geochemical concepts for exploration can accurately pinpoint uranium mineralization at a fraction of the cost of conventional methods that involve test drilling and geophysical and core logging.

  15. Effects of approach and injection volume on diffusion of mepivacaine hydrochloride during local analgesia of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claunch, Kevin M; Eggleston, Randy B; Baxter, Gary M

    2014-11-15

    To compare the effects of 2 approaches and 2 injection volumes on diffusion of mepivacaine hydrochloride for local analgesia of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve (DBLPN) in horses. Experimental study. 16 adult horses. Either 2 mL (low volume) or 8 mL (high volume) of mepivacaine hydrochloride-iohexol (50:50 mixture) was injected by means of 1 of 2 techniques to produce analgesia of the DBLPN. For technique 1, the needle was inserted 15 mm distal to the head of the fourth metatarsal bone and directed perpendicular to the limb. For technique 2, the needle was inserted 20 mm distal to the head of the fourth metatarsal bone and was directed in a proximodorsal direction. Lateromedial radiographs were obtained before and 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Radiographs were evaluated to determine the proximal and distal extent of diffusion of the contrast solution and presumably anesthetic agent and whether contrast agent appeared to be present in the tarsal sheath or tarsometatarsal joint. A high degree of variability in contrast solution diffusion was noted among injections. High-volume injections diffused significantly further proximally and distally than did low-volume injections. Contrast agent was documented within the tarsal sheath in 5 of 32 (16%) injections and within the tarsometatarsal joint in 2 of 32 (6%) injections. No significant difference was found for risk of inadvertent tarsal sheath or tarsometatarsal joint injection between the 2 techniques or the 2 volumes of anesthetic used. Mepivacaine diffused significantly further distally with technique 1 than with technique 2 but diffused significantly further proximally with technique 2 than with technique 1. For both techniques, diffusion in the distal but not the proximal direction significantly increased over time. Results indicated that the proximal and distal diffusion of the mepivacaine-iohexol solution was quite variable following either DBLPN nerve block technique.

  16. Engineered Micro-Objects as Scaffolding Elements in Cellular Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Tissue Engineering Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, A.M.; Schipper, D.; Arts, E.; Vrij, E.J.; Rivron, N.C.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Mittmann, K.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Moroni, L.; Truckenmuller, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    A material-based bottom-up approach is proposed towards an assembly of cells and engineered micro-objects at the macroscale. We show how shape, size and wettability of engineered micro-objects play an important role in the behavior of cells on these objects. This approach can, among other applicatio

  17. A Study of the Behavior and Micromechanical Modelling of Granular Soil. Volume 3. A Numerical Investigation of the Behavior of Granular Media Using Nonlinear Discrete Element Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-22

    Eisenberg 1987). Among other formulations, the existing models are based on the theories of elasticity, hypoelasticity , plasticity and viscoplasticity...AD-A238 158 AFOSR4R. 91 069.1 A STUDY OF THE BEHAVIOR AND MICROMECHANICAL MODELLING OF GRANULAR SOIL DTIC VOLUME mI ELECTIE A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION...Final 1/6/ 9-5/15/91 4. nU AN SUS"Ll5. FUNDING NUMBERS A Study of the Behavior and Micromechanical Modelling of Grant AFOSR-89-0350 Granular Soil PR

  18. Biomechanical investigation of thoracolumbar spine in different postures during ejection using a combined finite element and multi-body approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Tian, Shan; Wang, Lizhen; Fan, Jie; Liu, Songyang; Fan, Yubo

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the dynamic response of a multi-segment model of the thoracolumbar spine and determine how the sitting posture affects the response under the impact of ejection. A nonlinear finite element model of the thoracolumbar-pelvis complex (T9-S1) was developed and validated. A multi-body dynamic model of a pilot was also constructed so an ejection seat restraint system could be incorporated into the finite element model. The distribution of trunk mass on each vertebra was also considered in the model. Dynamics analysis showed that ejection impact induced obvious axial compression and anterior flexion of the spine, which may contribute to spinal injuries. Compared with a normal posture, the relaxed posture led to an increase in stress on the cortical wall, endplate, and intradiscal pressure of 43%, 10%, 13%, respectively, and accordingly increased the risk of inducing spinal injuries. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Generalized Roughness Effects on Turbulent Boundary Layer Heat Transfer. A Discrete Element Predictive Approach for Turbulent Flow Over Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    element u.-lei is readily applied to such flows. For lully developed flow V = 0, and U and H are functions of y only (i.e., J ■ U(y) and H ■ H(y...included, application of the basic momentum theorem yields T b |£| . / w+ Jb \\ T r ’dx’ I W < s,av where T is the average shear stress

  20. Lesson Plans for the Busy Librarian: A Standards Based Approach for the Elementary Library Media Center, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    The author designed this book, like Volume I of the set, to give elementary school librarians a quick, enjoyable way to coordinate with teachers to teach information literacy and literacy skills aligned with national standards. The chapters in the book include: (1) Kindergarten Lesson Plans; (2) First-Grade Lesson Plans; (3) Second-Grade Lesson…

  1. A principal component approach for predicting the stem volume in Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil using airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Alberto Silva; Carine Klauberg; Andrew T. Hudak; Lee A. Vierling; Veraldo Liesenberg; Samuel P. C. e Carvalho; Luiz C. E. Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Improving management practices in industrial forest plantations may increase production efficiencies, thereby reducing pressures on native tropical forests for meeting global pulp needs. This study aims to predict stem volume (V) in plantations of fast-growing Eucalyptus hybrid clones located in southeast Brazil using field plot and airborne Light Detection...

  2. Volume overload cleanup: An approach for on-line SPE-GC, GPC-GC, and GPC-SPE-GC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkdijk, H.; Mol, H.G.J.; Nagel, B. van der

    2007-01-01

    A new concept for cleanup, based on volume overloading of the cleanup column, has been developed for on-line coupling of gel permeation chromatography (GPC), solid-phase extraction (SPE), or both, to gas chromatography (GC). The principle is outlined and the applicability demonstrated by the determi

  3. New Evidences of Key Factors Involved in "Silent Stones" Etiopathogenesis and Trace Elements: Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Biochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalu, Simona; Popa, Adriana; Bratu, Ioan; Borodi, Gheorghe; Maghiar, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    The knowledge of the key factors involved in etiopathogenesis of the gallstone disease requires chemical, structural, and elemental composition analysis. The application of different complementary analytical techniques, both microscopic and spectroscopic, are aimed to provide a more comprehensive determination of the gallbladder calculi ultrastructure and trace element identification. High sensitivity techniques such as electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) along with biochemical analysis are used in a new attempt to investigate various factors which play a regulatory role in the pathogenesis of gallstones. The microstructure of different types of gallbladder stones has specific characteristics which are related to the elemental composition. The binding of metal ions with bile salts and bilirubin plays important roles in gallstone formation as revealed by FTIR spectrum of calcium bilirubinate complex in pigment gallstones. The EPR results demonstrated the generation of bilirubin free radicals and variation of its electronic structure and conjugation system in the skeleton of bilirubin molecule during complex formation. EPR spectra of pigment gallstones demonstrate the coexistence of four paramagnetic centers including stable bilirubin free radical, Mn2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ with distinct magnetic parameters and well-resolved hyperfine structure in the case of Mn2+ ions. The result confirms a macromolecular network structure with proteins and the formation of bilirubin-coordinated polymer. Bilirubin and bilirubinate free radical complexes may play an important role in pigment gallstone formation.

  4. Efficient embryo transfer in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) with a reduced transfer volume: a non-surgical approach with cryopreserved late-stage embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Motohashi, Hideyuki H; Kumon, Mami; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Okada, Hironori; Okada, Takashi; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    Among primates, the common marmoset is suitable for primate embryology research. Its small body size, however, has delayed the technical development of efficient embryo transfer. Furthermore, three factors have been determined to adversely affect the performance of marmoset embryo transfer: nonsurgical approaches, the use of cryopreserved embryos, and the use of late-stage embryos. Here we performed embryo transfer under conditions that included the above three factors and using either a small (1 μl or less) or a large volume (2-3 μl) of medium. The pregnancy and birth rates were 50% (5/10) and 27% (3/11), respectively, when using the large volume, and 80% (8/10) and 75% (9/12), respectively, when using the small volume. The latter scores exceed those of previous reports using comparable conditions. Thus, it appears that these three previously considered factors could be overcome, and we propose that reducing the transfer volume to 1 μl or less is essential for successful marmoset embryo transfer.

  5. Improving clinical outcomes among hemodialysis patients: a proposal for a "volume first" approach from the chief medical officers of US dialysis providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Daniel E; Brunelli, Steven M; Hunt, Abigail; Schiller, Brigitte; Glassock, Richard; Maddux, Frank W; Johnson, Douglas; Parker, Tom; Nissenson, Allen

    2014-11-01

    Addressing fluid intake and volume control requires alignment and coordination of patients, providers, dialysis facilities, and payers, potentially necessitating a "Volume First" approach. This article reports the consensus opinions achieved at the March 2013 symposium of the Chief Medical Officers of 14 of the largest dialysis providers in the United States. These opinions are based on broad experience among participants, but often reinforced by only observational and frequently retrospective studies, highlighting the lack of high-quality clinical trials in nephrology. Given the high morbidity and mortality rates among dialysis patients and the absence of sufficient trial data to guide most aspects of hemodialysis therapy, participants believed that immediate attempts to improve care based on quality improvement initiatives, physiologic principles, and clinical experiences are warranted until such time as rigorous clinical trial data become available. The following overarching consensus opinions emerged. (1) Extracellular fluid status should be a component of sufficient dialysis, such that approaching normalization of extracellular fluid volume should be a primary goal of dialysis care. (2) Fluid removal should be gradual and dialysis treatment duration should not routinely be less than 4 hours without justification based on individual patient factors. (3) Intradialytic sodium loading should be avoided by incorporating dialysate sodium concentrations set routinely in the range of 134-138 mEq/L, avoidance of routine use of sodium modeling, and avoidance of hypertonic saline solution. (4) Dietary counseling should emphasize sodium avoidance.

  6. Comparison of mineral element cycling under till and no-till practices: an experimental approach to agroecosystems analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinner, B R; Crossley, Jr, D A

    1980-08-01

    In this paper we give an overview of a research project which is attempting to integrate the approaches of agronomy and ecosystem ecology. We are attempting to apply methodologies and approaches of ecosystem study, in particular nutrient cycling, as a means of evaluating performance of agronomic systems. Specifically, we are comparing structure, function, and nutrient dynamics in a set of no-tillage and conventional plots.

  7. (η(4)-Butadiene)Sn(0) Complexes: A New Approach for Zero-Valent p-Block Elements Utilizing a Butadiene as a 4π-Electron Donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Takuya; Nakada, Marisa; Hamada, Jumpei; Guo, Jing Dong; Nagase, Shigeru; Saito, Masaichi

    2016-09-07

    Research on zero-valent p-block elements is a recent hot topic in synthetic and theoretical chemistry because of their novel electronic states having two lone pairs in both the s- and p-orbitals. It is considered that σ-donating ligands bearing large substituents are essential to stabilize these species. Herein, we propose a new approach using butadiene as a 4π-electron donor to stabilize zero-valent group 14 elements. During our study to explore the coordination chemistry of stannacyclopentadienyl ligands, unexpected products, in which the tin atom is coordinated by a butadiene in a η(4)-fashion, were obtained. Because butadiene is a neutral 4π-electron donating ligand, the formal oxidation number of the tin atoms of the products should be zero, which is supported by X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. A mechanism for the formation of the products is also described.

  8. Investigation of Drag Force on Fibres of Bonded Spherical Elements using a Coupled CFD-DEM Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anna Lyhne; Sørensen, Henrik; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup;

    2016-01-01

    are quantified. The drag coefficient on the resolved cylinder is compared to a CFD-DEM simulation of a flexible fiber made by a chain of bonded spherical discrete elements, using a free steam drag formulation on each particle. Based on the results, a drag force model can distinguish between the outermost...... can be modelled as a multi-rigid-body system using bonded spherical DEM particles. However, the flexible objects are not resolved by the CFD mesh, and therefore modelling of fluid forces on the flexible object becomes a key issue. This study investigates the modelling of fluid forces on a rigid fiber...

  9. Different Modelling Approaches to Coupling Wall and Floor Panels within a Dynamic Finite Element Model of a Lightweight Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiel, Nikolaj; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Niu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the increasing interest of constructing environmentally friendly lightweight buildings, analyses of vibrational and acoustical transmission in these buildings have become increasingly important. Structures where vibrational transmission may result in undesirable vibrations....... In this way a well-defined master geometry is present onto which all panels can be tied. But as the skeleton is an element itself, it will have a physical mass and a corresponding stiffness to be included in the linear system of equations. This means that the skeleton will influence the structure...

  10. Theoretical approach to study the effect of free volumes on the physical behavior of polymer stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, T.; Majumder, T. Pal

    2011-06-01

    It was clearly indicative that the polymer chains make a tremendous interaction with the tilt angle in case of a polymer stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (PSFLC). After suitable consideration of such interaction, we expanded the Landau free energy for a PSFLC system. We theoretically demonstrated the effect of free volumes, which expected to create bulk self-energy, on the physical functionalities of a PSFLC system. Then we obtained spontaneous polarization, tilt angle, rotational viscosity and dielectric constant strongly correlated with the assumed interactions. We also observed a shift of transition temperature highly influenced by this interaction between polymer network and liquid crystal molecules. A microscopical picture of this polymer-liquid crystal interaction is provided in view of the free volume charge density present in the composite system.

  11. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 1. Guideline approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1985-05-01

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. This volume includes specific recommendations for decision-making managers and site operators on how to use these guidelines. The more detailed discussions about the code selection approach are provided. 242 refs., 6 figs.

  12. The United States Remains Unprepared for Oil Import Disruptions. Volume II. Detailed Review of Current Emergency Programs and Alternative Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-29

    Conservation Act ERA Economic Regulatory Administration ERDO Emergency Reserve Drawdown Obligation ESS Emergency Sharing System ESSD Emergency Strategies and...a fraction of the base period volume. Each prime supplier (a refiner or wholesaler who first transports gasoline into a State) generally must use a...that State. Each prime supplier must set aside 5 percent of supply for this purpose. 1/See U.S. General Accounting Office, "Gasoline Allocation A Chaotic

  13. An artificial intelligence approach for modeling volume and fresh weight of callus - A case study of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Ali; Fadavi, Ali; Mortazavian, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-05-21

    Cumin (Cuminum cyminum Linn.) is valued for its aroma and its medicinal and therapeutic properties. A supervised feedforward artificial neural network (ANN) trained with back propagation algorithms, was applied to predict fresh weight and volume of Cuminum cyminum L. calli. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate input/output dependency of the eleven input parameters. Area, feret diameter, minor axis length, perimeter and weighted density parameters were chosen as input variables. Different training algorithms, transfer functions, number of hidden nodes and training iteration were studied to find out the optimum ANN structure. The network with conjugate gradient fletcher-reeves (CGF) algorithm, tangent sigmoid transfer function, 17 hidden nodes and 2000 training epochs was selected as the final ANN model. The final model was able to predict the fresh weight and volume of calli more precisely relative to multiple linear models. The results were confirmed by R(2)≥0.89, R(i)≥0.94 and T value ≥0.86. The results for both volume and fresh weight values showed that almost 90% of data had an acceptable absolute error of ±5%.

  14. Estimating the volume and age of water stored in global lakes using a geo-statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messager, Mathis Loïc; Lehner, Bernhard; Grill, Günther; Nedeva, Irena; Schmitt, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Lakes are key components of biogeochemical and ecological processes, thus knowledge about their distribution, volume and residence time is crucial in understanding their properties and interactions within the Earth system. However, global information is scarce and inconsistent across spatial scales and regions. Here we develop a geo-statistical model to estimate the volume of global lakes with a surface area of at least 10 ha based on the surrounding terrain information. Our spatially resolved database shows 1.42 million individual polygons of natural lakes with a total surface area of 2.67 × 106 km2 (1.8% of global land area), a total shoreline length of 7.2 × 106 km (about four times longer than the world's ocean coastline) and a total volume of 181.9 × 103 km3 (0.8% of total global non-frozen terrestrial water stocks). We also compute mean and median hydraulic residence times for all lakes to be 1,834 days and 456 days, respectively.

  15. Finite element model approach of a cylindrical lithium ion battery cell with a focus on minimization of the computational effort and short circuit prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffler, Marco; Sevarin, Alessio; Ellersdorfer, Christian; Heindl, Simon F.; Breitfuss, Christoph; Sinz, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    In this research, a parameterized beam-element-based mechanical modeling approach for cylindrical lithium ion batteries is developed. With the goal to use the cell model in entire vehicle crash simulations, focus of development is on minimizing the computational effort whilst simultaneously obtaining accurate mechanical behavior. The cylindrical cell shape is approximated by radial beams connected to each other in circumferential and longitudinal directions. The discrete beam formulation is used to define an anisotropic material behavior. An 18650 lithium ion cell model constructed in LS-Dyna is used to show the high degree of parameterization of the approach. A criterion which considers the positive pole deformation and the radial deformation of the cell is developed for short circuit prediction during simulation. An abuse testing program, consisting of radial crush, axial crush, and penetration is performed to evaluate the mechanical properties and internal short circuit behavior of a commercially available 18650 lithium cell. Additional 3-point-bending tests are performed to verify the approach objectively. By reducing the number of strength-related elements to 1600, a fast and accurate cell model can be created. Compared to typical cell models in technical literature, simulation time of a single cell load case can be reduced by approx. 90%.

  16. Discrete Element Modeling of Asphalt Concrete Cracking Using a User-defined Tlree-dimensional Micromechanical Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun; PAN Tongyan; HUANG Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    We established a user-defined micromechanical model using discrete element method (DEM) to investigate the cracking behavior of asphalt concrete (AC).Using the “Fish” language provided in the particle flow code in 3-Demensions (PFC3D),the air voids and mastics in asphalt concrete were realistically built as two distinct phases.With the irregular shape of individual aggregate particles modeled using a clump of spheres of different sizes,the three-dimensional (3D) discrete element model was able to account for aggregate gradation and fraction.Laboratory uniaxial complex modulus test and indirect tensile strength test were performed to obtain input material parameters for the numerical simulation.A set of the indirect tensile test were simulated to study the cracking behavior of AC at two levels of temperature,i e,-10 ℃ and 15 ℃.The predicted results of the numerical simulation were compared with laboratory experimental measurements.Results show that the 3D DEM model is able to predict accurately the fracture pattern of different asphalt mixtures.Based on the DEM model,the effects of air void content and aggregate volumetric fraction on the cracking behavior of asphalt concrete were evaluated.

  17. Experimental approach to the identification of element 107 as ekarhenium. I. Continuous gas-thermochromatographic isolation of radiorhenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domanov, V.P.; Khyubener, Z.; Shalaevskii, M.R.; Timokhin, S.N.; Petrov, D.V.; Zvara, I.

    The gas-thermochromatographic behavior has been studied for volatile oxygen-containing compounds of radiorhenium formed in an air atmosphere at various contents of water vapor. A procedure has been developed for the continuous thermochromatographic isolation of radiorhenium from the products of nuclear reactions under the action of heavy ions. It was shown that no more than 10/sup -5/ parts of ytterbium atoms, an analogue of the actinides and also hafnium and tantalum, analogous of elements 104 and 105, pass through into the thermogradient section of the column. It was found that under the conditions of the experiment rhenium forms an adsorption zone with center at a temperature of 100 +/- 20/sup 0/C. The estimated time of transport of atoms from the target did not exceed 3 sec and the carrying away of rhenium from the reaction chamber reached 80%. The developed procedure may be used for the rapid selective isolation of spontaneously fissile isotopes of element 107 as ekarhenium from the mixture of products with Zless than or equal to 107 from nuclear reactions.

  18. Estimating contemporary early life-history dispersal in an estuarine fish: integrating molecular and otolith elemental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, I R; Campana, S E; Bentzen, P

    2008-03-01

    Dispersal during the early life history of the anadromous rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, was examined using assignment testing and mixture analysis of multilocus genotypes and otolith elemental composition. Six spawning areas and associated estuarine nurseries were sampled throughout southeastern Newfoundland. Samples of adults and juveniles isolated by > 25 km displayed moderate genetic differentiation (F(ST) ~ 0.05), whereas nearby (nursery samples displayed low differentiation (F(ST) 80% self-assignment) with nearby runs self-assigning at rates between 50 % and 70%. Assignment and mixture analysis of juveniles using adult baselines indicated high local recruitment at several locations (70-90%). Nearby (estuaries at the head of St Mary's Bay showed mixtures of individuals (i.e. 20-40% assignment to adjacent spawning location). Laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry transects across otoliths of spawning adults of unknown dispersal history were used to estimate dispersal among estuaries across the first year of life. Single-element trends and multivariate discriminant function analysis (Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca) classified the majority of samples as estuarine suggesting limited movement between estuaries (juveniles evident in the genetic data at nearby sites and a lack of evidence of straying in the otolith data support a hypothesis of selective mortality of immigrants. If indeed selective mortality of immigrants reduces the survivorship of dispersers, estimates of dispersal in marine environments that neglect survival may significantly overestimate gene flow.

  19. A new approach to evaluate factors controlling elemental sediment–seawater distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) in coastal regions, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, Hyoe, E-mail: takata@kaiseiken.or.jp [Marine Ecology Research Institute, Central Laboratory, Onjuku, Chiba (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba City, Chiba (Japan); Aono, Tatsuo; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba City, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    In numerical models to simulate the dispersion of anthropogenic radionuclides in the marine environment, the sediment–seawater distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) for various elements is an important parameter. In coastal regions, K{sub d} values are largely dependent on hydrographic conditions and physicochemical characteristics of sediment. Here we report K{sub d} values for 36 elements (Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, I, Cs, rare earth elements, Pb, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U) in seawater and sediment samples from 19 Japanese coastal regions, and we examine the factors controlling the variability of these K{sub d} values by investigating their relationships to hydrographic conditions and sediment characteristics. There was large variability in K{sub d} values for Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Se, Cd, I, Pb and Th. Variations of K{sub d} for Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Pb and Th appear to be controlled by hydrographic conditions. Although K{sub d} values for Ni, Cu, Se, Cd and I depend mainly on grain size, organic matter content, and the concentrations of hydrous oxides/oxides of Fe and Mn in sediments, heterogeneity in the surface characteristics of sediment particles appears to hamper evaluation of the relative importance of these factors. Thus, we report a new approach to evaluate the factors contributing to variability in K{sub d} for an element. By this approach, we concluded that the K{sub d} values for Cu, Se, Cd and I are controlled by grain size and organic matter in sediments, and the K{sub d} value for Ni is dependent on grain size and on hydrous oxides/oxides of Fe and Mn. - Highlights: • K{sub d}s for 36 elements were determined in 19 Japanese coastal regions. • K{sub d}s for several elements appeared to be controlled by multiple factors in sediments. • We evaluated these factors based on physico-chemical characteristics of sediments.

  20. Children's exposure to harmful elements in toys and low-cost jewelry: Characterizing risks and developing a comprehensive approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guney, Mert; Zagury, Gerald J., E-mail: gerald.zagury@polymtl.ca

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Risk for children up to 3 years-old was characterized considering oral exposure. • Saliva mobilization, ingestion of parts and of scraped-off material were considered. • Ingestion of parts caused hazard index (HI) values >>for Cd, Ni, and Pb exposure. • HI were lower (but > for saliva mobilization and <1 for scraped material ingestion. • Comprehensive approach aims to deal with drawbacks of current toy safety approaches. - Abstract: Contamination problem in jewelry and toys and children's exposure possibility have been previously demonstrated. For this study, risk from oral exposure has been characterized for highly contaminated metallic toys and jewelry ((MJ), n = 16) considering three scenarios. Total and bioaccessible concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb were high in selected MJ. First scenario (ingestion of parts or pieces) caused unacceptable risk for eight items for Cd, Ni, and/or Pb (hazard index (HI) > 1, up to 75, 5.8, and 43, respectively). HI for ingestion of scraped-off material scenario was always <1. Finally, saliva mobilization scenario caused HI > 1 in three samples (two for Cd, one for Ni). Risk characterization identified different potentially hazardous items compared to United States, Canadian, and European Union approaches. A comprehensive approach was also developed to deal with complexity and drawbacks caused by various toy/jewelry definitions, test methods, exposure scenarios, and elements considered in different regulatory approaches. It includes bioaccessible limits for eight priority elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Sb). Research is recommended on metals bioaccessibility determination in toys/jewelry, in vitro bioaccessibility test development, estimation of material ingestion rates and frequency, presence of hexavalent Cr and organic Sn, and assessment of prolonged exposure to MJ.

  1. Finite element approach to study the behavior of fluid distribution in the dermal regions of human body due to thermal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Khanday

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a complex structure where the balance of mass and heat transport in all tissues is necessary for its normal functioning. The stabilities of intracellular and extracellular fluids are important physiological factors responsible for homoeostasis. To estimate the effects of thermal stress on the behavior of extracellular fluid concentration in human dermal regions, a mathematical model based on diffusion equation along with appropriate boundary conditions has been formulated. Atmospheric temperature, evaporation rate, moisture concentration and other factors affecting the fluid concentration were taken into account. The variational finite element approach has been employed to solve the model and the results were interpreted graphically.

  2. Different Modelling Approaches to Coupling Wall and Floor Panels within a Dynamic Finite Element Model of a Lightweight Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiel, Nikolaj; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Niu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the increasing interest of constructing environmentally friendly lightweight buildings, analyses of vibrational and acoustical transmission in these buildings have become increasingly important. Structures where vibrational transmission may result in undesirable vibrations....... With the number of modules in the three axial directions defined, wall and floor panels are constructed, placed and coupled in the global model. The core of this modular finite element model consists of connecting the different panels to each other in a rational manner, where the accuracy is as high as possible...... of a similar construction without a skeleton. These parameters are selected in a way where decoupled pseudo-modes of the skeleton are avoided, alongside the insignificant influence of the overall structure achieved with a low mass, small profile, and a relatively low Young's modulus, approximately 1...

  3. Liquid crystal free energy relaxation by a theoretically informed Monte Carlo method using a finite element quadrature approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-12-28

    A theoretically informed Monte Carlo method is proposed for Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals on the basis of theoretical representations in terms of coarse-grained free energy functionals. The free energy functional is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. A piecewise finite element discretization is used to approximate the alignment field, thereby providing an excellent geometrical representation of curved interfaces and accurate integration of the free energy. The method is suitable for situations where the free energy functional includes highly non-linear terms, including chirality or high-order deformation modes. The validity of the method is established by comparing the results of Monte Carlo simulations to traditional Ginzburg-Landau minimizations of the free energy using a finite difference scheme, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of simulations of chiral liquid crystal droplets with and without nanoparticle inclusions.

  4. Separation of Regional and Residual Components by Finite Element Analysis – A New Approach for Analysis of Water Level Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. SHARMA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trend surfaces are generally used in the study of water level data to understanding the causes and effects of various trend surfaces. In the present paper the separation of regional and residual components of water level data is attempted using a method based on the Finite Element Analysis techniques. The residual is obtained by calculating the difference between the computed value of the trend surface at a point and the value of observed actual surface at that point. If the trend surface is thought to be regional or large scale component representing the total aquifer then the residual value can be considered the local ore small scale component representing the local variations in the aquifer. Removal of the regional trend has the effect of isolating and emphasizing local components represented by the residual values. Various techniques have been proposed and are widely in use for the separation of regional and the residual components, specially for separating the geophysical data. But the main drawback of all these techniques is that the regional component, so computed, has always the remnance of the residual components. Hence, the regional and residual components do not give a clear picture of the variations. In the present paper a new technique is suggested, in which the regional and residual components are computed using finite element analysis technique. This technique requires the water level data at only eight or twelve points representing the aquifer boundaries for the computation of regional component. A case history is presented wherein the data from the literature is analyzed using the technique proposed. The paper gives the details of the method and its advantages over the other methods which are supported by its application on the field data.

  5. Approach of technical decision-making by element flow analysis and Monte-Carlo simulation of municipal solid waste stream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Bao-guo; SI Ji-tao; ZHAO Yan; WANG Hong-tao; HAO Ji-ming

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the procedure and methodology which can be used to select the optimal treatment and disposal technology of municipal solid waste (MSW), and to provide practical and effective technical support to policy-making, on the basis of study on solid waste management status and development trend in China and abroad. Focusing on various treatment and disposal technologies and processes of MSW, this study established a Monte-Carlo mathematical model of cost minimization for MSW handling subjected to environmental constraints. A new method of element stream (such as C, H, O, N, S) analysis in combination with economic stream analysis of MSW was developed. By following the streams of different treatment processes consisting of various techniques from generation, separation, transfer, transport, treatment, recycling and disposal of the wastes, the element constitution as well as its economic distribution in terms of possibility functions was identified. Every technique step was evaluated economically. The Mont-Carlo method was then conducted for model calibration. Sensitivity analysis was also carried out to identify the most sensitive factors. Model calibration indicated that landfill with power generation of landfill gas was economically the optimal technology at the present stage under the condition of more than 58% of C, H, O, N, S going to landfill. Whether or not to generate electricity was the most sensitive factor. If landfilling cost increases, MSW separation treatment was recommended by screening first followed with incinerating partially and composting partially with residue landfilling. The possibility of incineration model selection as the optimal technology was affected by the city scale. For big cities and metropolitans with large MSW generation, possibility for constructing large-scale incineration facilities increases, whereas, for middle and small cities, the effectiveness of incinerating waste decreases.

  6. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Volume Fraction of Ordered α2 Phase Precipitated in Ti-Al-Sn-Zr Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun ZHANG; Na PENG; Xinan WANG; LI Li; Qingjiang WANG

    2007-01-01

    An ideal method has been established for calculating the precipitation of α2 ordered phase in near-α titanium alloys based on the theory on the critical electron concentration for the precipitation of α 2 ordered phase in near-α titanium alloys. With complete precipitation of α2 phase in near-α titanium alloys, the alloys can be considered to be composed of two parts: (1) the α2 ordered phase with the stoichiometric atomic ratio of Ti3X; (2) the disorder solid solution with the critical composition in which the α2 ordered phase is just unable to precipitate. By using this method, the volume fractions of α2 ordered phase precipitated in Ti-Al, Ti-Sn,Ti-Al-Sn-Zr alloys with various Al, Sn and/or Zr contents have been calculated. The influences of Al and Sn on the precipitation of α2 ordered phase are discussed. The calculating results show substantial agreement with the experimental ones.

  7. 3D mechanical analysis of aeronautical plain bearings: Validation of a finite element model from measurement of displacement fields by digital volume correlation and optical scanning tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaneau, A.; Peyruseigt, F.; Mistou, S.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    On Airbus aircraft, spherical plain bearings are used on many components; in particular to link engine to pylon or pylon to wing. Design of bearings is based on contact pressure distribution on spherical surfaces. To determine this distribution, a 3D analysis of the mechanical behaviour of aeronautical plain bearing is presented in this paper. A numerical model has been built and validated from a comparison with 3D experimental measurements of kinematic components. For that, digital volume correlation (DVC) coupled with optical scanning tomography (OST) is employed to study the mechanical response of a plain bearing model made in epoxy resin. Experimental results have been compared with the ones obtained from the simulated model. This comparison enables us to study the influence of various boundary conditions to build the FE model. Some factors have been highlighted like the fitting behaviour which can radically change contact pressure distribution. This work shows the contribution of a representative mechanical environment to study precisely mechanical response of aeronautical plain bearings.

  8. Application of the Price-Volume Approach in Cases of Innovative Drugs Where Value-Based Pricing is Inadequate: Description of Real Experiences in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messori, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Several cases of expensive drugs designed for large patient populations (e.g. sofosbuvir) have raised a complex question in terms of drug pricing. Even assuming value-based pricing, the treatment with these drugs of all eligible patients would have an immense budgetary impact, which is unsustainable also for the richest countries. This raises the need to reduce the prices of these agents in comparison with those suggested by the value-based approach and to devise new pricing methods that can achieve this goal. The present study discusses in detail the following two methods: (i) The approach based on setting nation-wide budget thresholds for individual innovative agents in which a fixed proportion of the historical pharmaceutical expenditure represents the maximum budget attributable to an innovative treatment; (ii) The approach based on nation-wide price-volume agreements in which drug prices are progressively reduced as more patients receive the treatment. The first approach has been developed in the USA by the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review and has been applied to PCSK9 inhibitors (alirocumab and evolocumab). The second approach has been designed for the Italian market and has found a systematic application to manage the price of ranibizumab, sofosbuvir, and PCSK9 inhibitors. While, in the past, price-volume agreements have been applied only on an empirical basis (i.e. in the absence of any quantitative theoretical rule), more recently some explicit mathematical models have been described. The performance of these models is now being evaluated on the basis of the real-world experiences conducted in some European countries, especially Italy.

  9. A Short Interspersed Nuclear Element (SINE)-Based Real-Time PCR Approach to Detect and Quantify Porcine Component in Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Fang, Xin; Qiu, Haopu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Real-time PCR amplification of mitochondria gene could not be used for DNA quantification, and that of single copy DNA did not allow an ideal sensitivity. Moreover, cross-reactions among similar species were commonly observed in the published methods amplifying repetitive sequence, which hindered their further application. The purpose of this study was to establish a short interspersed nuclear element (SINE)-based real-time PCR approach having high specificity for species detection that could be used in DNA quantification. After massive screening of candidate Sus scrofa SINEs, one optimal combination of primers and probe was selected, which had no cross-reaction with other common meat species. LOD of the method was 44 fg DNA/reaction. Further, quantification tests showed this approach was practical in DNA estimation without tissue variance. Thus, this study provided a new tool for qualitative detection of porcine component, which could be promising in the QC of meat products.

  10. Modelling of Hybrid Materials and Interface Defects through Homogenization Approach for the Prediction of Effective Thermal Conductivity of FRP Composites Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element method is effectively used to homogenize the thermal conductivity of FRP composites consisting of hybrid materials and fibre-matrix debonds at some of the fibres. The homogenized result at microlevel is used to determine the property of the layer using macromechanics principles; thereby, it is possible to minimize the computational efforts required to solve the problem as in state through only micromechanics approach. The working of the proposed procedure is verified for three different problems: (i hybrid composite having two different fibres in alternate layers, (ii fibre-matrix interface debond in alternate layers, and (iii fibre-matrix interface debond at one fibre in a group of four fibres in one unit cell. It is observed that the results are in good agreement with those obtained through pure micro-mechanics approach.

  11. Elements of probability and statistics an introduction to probability with De Finetti’s approach and to Bayesian statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Biagini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to elementary probability and to Bayesian statistics using de Finetti's subjectivist approach. One of the features of this approach is that it does not require the introduction of sample space – a non-intrinsic concept that makes the treatment of elementary probability unnecessarily complicate – but introduces as fundamental the concept of random numbers directly related to their interpretation in applications. Events become a particular case of random numbers and probability a particular case of expectation when it is applied to events. The subjective evaluation of expectation and of conditional expectation is based on an economic choice of an acceptable bet or penalty. The properties of expectation and conditional expectation are derived by applying a coherence criterion that the evaluation has to follow. The book is suitable for all introductory courses in probability and statistics for students in Mathematics, Informatics, Engineering, and Physics.

  12. A contact detection algorithm for deformable tetrahedral geometries based on a novel approach for general simplices used in the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stühler, Sven; Fleissner, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We present an extended particle model for the discrete element method that on the one hand is tetrahedral in shape and on the other hand is capable to describe deformations. The deformations of the tetrahedral particles require a framework to interrelate the particle strains and resulting stresses. Hence, adaptations from the finite element method were used. This allows to link the two methods and to adequately describe material and simulation parameters separately in each scope. Due to the complexity arising of the non-spherical tetrahedral geometry, all possible contact combinations of vertices, edges, and surfaces must be considered by the used contact detection algorithm. The deformations of the particles make the contact evaluation even more challenging. Therefore, a robust contact detection algorithm based on an optimization approach that exploits temporal coherence is presented. This algorithm is suitable for general {R}^{{n}} simplices. An evaluation of the robustness of this algorithm is performed using a numerical example. In order to create complex geometries, bonds between these deformable particles are introduced. This coupling via the tetrahedra faces allows the simulation bonding of deformable bodies composed of several particles. Numerical examples are presented and validated with results that are obtained by the same simulation setup modeled with the finite element method. The intention of using these bonds is to be able to model fracture and material failure. Therefore, the bonds between the particles are not lasting and feature a release mechanism based on a predefined criterion.

  13. A Refractive-Diffractive Element Design for Resonant Scanner Angular Correction: The Symmetric Beam Retardation Approach (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-18

    in obtaining equation (A14) which included these terms to the 6th order in its derivation, we found the following relationship: t t t eB y eeB dt...A19) Following the same approach as before, the 4th order equation can be written as: t t t eB y eeB dt dn dt nd dt nd dt nd 2 1 0

  14. Investigation of difficult component effects on finite element model vibration prediction for the Bell AH-1G helicopter. Volume 1: Ground vibration test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompka, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS) program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Previous correlations of the AH-1G showed good agreement between NASTRAN and tests through 15 to 20 Hz, but poor agreement in the higher frequency range of 20 to 30 Hz. Thus, this effort emphasized the higher frequency airframe vibration response correlations and identified areas that need further R and T work. To conduct the investigations, selected difficult components (main rotor pylon, secondary structure, nonstructural doors/panels, landing gear, engine, fuel, etc.) were systematically removed to quantify their effects on overall vibratory response of the airframe. The entire effort was planned and documented, and the results reviewed by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the testing, analysis, and correlation exercise. In particular, secondary structure and damping had significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. Also, the nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomer mounts were significant on the low frequency pylon modes below main rotor 1p (5.4 Hz). The results of the ground vibration testing are presented.

  15. Investigation of difficult component effects on finite element model vibration prediction for the Bell AG-1G helicopter. Volume 2: Correlation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompka, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS) program, a series of ground vibration tests and NASTRAN finite element model (FEM) correlations were conducted on the Bell AH-1G helicopter gunship to investigate the effects of difficult components on the vibration response of the airframe. Previous correlations of the AG-1G showed good agreement between NASTRAN and tests through 15 to 20 Hz, but poor agreement in the higher frequency range of 20 to 30 Hz. Thus, this effort emphasized the higher frequency airframe vibration response correlations and identified areas that need further R and T work. To conduct the investigations, selected difficult components (main rotor pylon, secondary structure, nonstructural doors/panels, landing gear, engine, furl, etc.) were systematically removed to quantify their effects on overall vibratory response of the airframe. The entire effort was planned and documented, and the results reviewed by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the testing, analysis, and correlation exercise. In particular, secondary structure and damping had significant effects on the frequency response of the airframe above 15 Hz. Also, the nonlinear effects of thrust stiffening and elastomer mounts were significant on the low frequency pylon modes below main rotor 1p (5.4 Hz). The results of the NASTRAN FEM correlations are given.

  16. Terahertz metamaterials and systems based on rolled-up 3D elements: designs, technological approaches, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Victor Ya; Naumova, Elena V; Golod, Sergey V; Seleznev, Vladimir A; Bocharov, Andrey A; Kubarev, Vitaliy V

    2017-03-03

    Electromagnetic metamaterials opened the way to extraordinary manipulation of radiation. Terahertz (THz) and optical metamaterials are usually fabricated by traditional planar-patterning approaches, while the majority of practical applications require metamaterials with 3D resonators. Making arrays of precise 3D micro- and nanoresonators is still a challenging problem. Here we present a versatile set of approaches to fabrication of metamaterials with 3D resonators rolled-up from strained films, demonstrate novel THz metamaterials/systems, and show giant polarization rotation by several chiral metamaterials/systems. The polarization spectra of chiral metamaterials on semiconductor substrates exhibit ultrasharp quasiperiodic peaks. Application of 3D printing allowed assembling more complex systems, including the bianisotropic system with optimal microhelices, which showed an extreme polarization azimuth rotation of 85° with drop by 150° at a frequency shift of 0.4%. We refer the quasiperiodic peaks in the polarization spectra of metamaterial systems to the interplay of different resonances, including peculiar chiral waveguide resonance. Formed metamaterials cannot be made by any other presently available technology. All steps of presented fabrication approaches are parallel, IC-compatible and allow mass fabrication with scaling of rolled-up resonators up to visible frequencies. We anticipate that the rolled-up meta-atoms will be ideal building blocks for future generations of commercial metamaterials, devices and systems on their basis.

  17. A novel geotechnical/geostatistical approach for exploration and production of natural gas from multiple geologic strata, Phase 1. Volume 1, Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.; Brunk, R.; Hawkins, L. [BDM Engineering Services Co., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    This research program has been designed to develop and verify a unique geostatistical approach for finding natural gas resources. The research has been conducted by Beckley College, Inc. (Beckley) and BDM Engineering Services Company (BDMESC) under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Phase 1 of the project consisted of compiling and analyzing relevant geological and gas production information in selected areas of Raleigh County, West Virginia, ultimately narrowed to the Eccles, West Virginia, 7 {1/2} minute Quadrangle. The Phase 1 analysis identified key parameters contributing to the accumulation and production of natural gas in Raleigh County, developed analog models relating geological factors to gas production, and identified specific sites to test and verify the analysis methodologies by drilling. Based on the Phase 1 analysis, five sites have been identified with high potential for economic gas production. Phase 2 will consist of drilling, completing, and producing one or more wells at the sites identified in the Phase 1 analyses. The initial well is schedules to the drilled in April 1991. This report summarizes the results of the Phase 1 investigations. For clarity, the report has been prepared in two volumes. Volume 1 presents the Phase 1 overview; Volume 2 contains the detailed geological and production information collected and analyzed for this study.

  18. Comparison of Temporal Parameters of Swimming Rescue Elements When Performed Using Dolphin and Flutter Kick with Fins - Didactical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejman, Marek; Wiesner, Wojciech; Silakiewicz, Piotr; Klarowicz, Andrzej; Abraldes, J. Arturo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was an analysis of the time required to swim to a victim and tow them back to shore, while perfoming the flutter-kick and the dolphin-kick using fins. It has been hypothesized that using fins while using the dolphin-kick when swimming leads to reduced rescue time. Sixteen lifeguards took part in the study. The main tasks performed by them, were to approach and tow (double armpit) a dummy a distance of 50m while applying either the flutter-kick, or the dolphin-kick with fins. The analysis of the temporal parameters of both techniques of kicking demonstrates that, during the approach to the victim, neither the dolphin (tmean = 32.9s) or the flutter kick (tmean = 33.0s) were significantly faster than the other. However, when used for towing a victim the flutter kick (tmean = 47.1s) was significantly faster when compared to the dolphin-kick (tmean = 52.8s). An assessment of the level of technical skills in competitive swimming, and in approaching and towing the victim, were also conducted. Towing time was significantly correlated with the parameter that linked the temporal and technical dimensions of towing and swimming (difference between flutter kick towing time and dolphin-kick towing time, 100m medley time and the four swimming strokes evaluation). No similar interdependency has been discovered in flutter kick towing time. These findings suggest that the dolphin-kick is a more difficult skill to perform when towing the victim than the flutter-kick. Since the hypothesis stated was not confirmed, postulates were formulated on how to improve dolphin-kick technique with fins, in order to reduce swimming rescue time. Key points The source of reduction of swimming rescue time was researched. Time required to approach and to tow the victim while doing the flutter kick and the dolphin-kick with fins was analyzed. The propulsion generated by dolphin-kick did not make the approach and tow faster than the flutter kick. More difficult skill to realize of

  19. Seawater storage and element transfer associated with mantle serpentinization in magma-poor rifted margins: A quantitative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Victor Hugo G.; Manatschal, Gianreto; Karpoff, Anne Marie; Ulrich, Marc; Viana, Adriano R.

    2017-02-01

    Continental breakup in magma-poor rifted margins can develop, in some instances, after the formation of a wide exhumed domain that can be several hundreds of km wide. As exhumation of the continental mantle occurs serpentinization, due to seawater circulation, can extend as far down as 5-6 km, as observed in refraction seismic data. The impact caused by the process of serpentinization within the evolving ocean may have the potential to change: (i) seawater chemistry; (ii) sustain the evolution of primitive life; (iii) control depositional environments; and (iv) form weak zones preferentially used during the formation, reactivation and subduction of distal rifted margins. Based on geological observations, and geophysical and geochemical data from present-day and fossil zones of exhumed continental mantle, we present a first-order quantification showing that approximately 0.380 km3 of water per km2 can be stored in the mantle. Using simple methods, it can be shown that serpentinization may account for a significant loss of Si, Mg, Fe, Mn, Ca, Ni and Cr during serpentinization of mantle rocks. In particular during latest stages of rifting, when basins are often restricted and seaways are not yet connected, exhumation and the serpentinization of large areas of continental mantle may result in a major transfer of elements between the main Earth reservoirs, such as the mantle and seawater.

  20. A novel approach for computing glueball masses and matrix elements in Yang-Mills theories on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Della Morte, Michele

    2011-01-01

    We make use of the global symmetries of the Yang-Mills theory on the lattice to design a new computational strategy for extracting glueball masses and matrix elements which achieves an exponential reduction of the statistical error with respect to standard techniques. By generalizing our previous work on the parity symmetry, the partition function of the theory is decomposed into a sum of path integrals each giving the contribution from multiplets of states with fixed quantum numbers associated to parity, charge conjugation, translations, rotations and central conjugations Z_N^3. Ratios of path integrals and correlation functions can then be computed with a multi-level Monte Carlo integration scheme whose numerical cost, at a fixed statistical precision and at asymptotically large times, increases power-like with the time extent of the lattice. The strategy is implemented for the SU(3) Yang--Mills theory, and a full-fledged computation of the mass and multiplicity of the lightest glueball with vacuum quantum ...

  1. A novel approach for computing glueball masses and matrix elements in Yang-Mills theories on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Morte, Michele; Giusti, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    We make use of the global symmetries of the Yang-Mills theory on the lattice to design a new computational strategy for extracting glueball masses and matrix elements which achieves an exponential reduction of the statistical error with respect to standard techniques. By generalizing our previous work on the parity symmetry, the partition function of the theory is decomposed into a sum of path integrals each giving the contribution from multiplets of states with fixed quantum numbers associated to parity, charge conjugation, translations, rotations and central conjugations Z N 3. Ratios of path integrals and correlation functions can then be computed with a multi-level Monte Carlo integration scheme whose numerical cost, at a fixed statistical precision and at asymptotically large times, increases power-like with the time extent of the lattice. The strategy is implemented for the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory, and a full-fledged computation of the mass and multiplicity of the lightest glueball with vacuum quantum numbers is carried out at a lattice spacing of 0.17 fm.

  2. The effect of fixture neck design in a realistic model of dental implant: a finite element approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necchi, Silvia; Migliavacca, Francesco; Gastaldi, Dario; Pizzagalli, Manuela; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Weinstein, Roberto; Pietrabissa, Riccardo; Dubini, Gabriele

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an accurate finite element model able to reproduce a standard experimental set-up for the evaluation of mechanical failure of a dental implant system. The considered system is composed of a fixture, an abutment and a connecting screw. We analysed the behaviour of the implant system considering three different designs of the fixture, in order to establish which one provides the better mechanical behaviour. After the definition of the numerical models, loading conditions were selected in order to reproduce the same stress state found in previous mechanical failure tests. Preloading and functional loading conditions were simulated. The analysis of the numerical results shows that the structure yielding is due to the fixture neck plastic deformation, that increases the load eccentricity and then the bending stress on the connecting screw. Only slight differences were found between the three implant systems in the amount and distribution of stress. The model reproduces properly the implant systems and the experimental set-up. The goodness of the model can be summarised as: realistic geometrical structure, elastoplastic model for the material description, correct definition of the contacts and the existing tolerance among the different system components, reproduction of the preloading stress condition. The present study permitted to define a valid procedure for the realization of numerical models of implant systems.

  3. Using an optimization approach to design an insole for lowering plantar fascia stress--a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chun; Gung, Yih-Wen; Shih, Shih-Liang; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Yu, Chung-Huang; Chen, Chen-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    Plantar heel pain is a commonly encountered orthopedic problem and is most often caused by plantar fasciitis. In recent years, different shapes of insole have been used to treat plantar fasciitis. However, little research has been focused on the junction stress between the plantar fascia and the calcaneus when wearing different shapes of insole. Therefore, this study aimed to employ a finite element (FE) method to investigate the relationship between different shapes of insole and the junction stress, and accordingly design an optimal insole to lower fascia stress.A detailed 3D foot FE model was created using ANSYS 9.0 software. The FE model calculation was compared to the Pedar device measurements to validate the FE model. After the FE model validation, this study conducted parametric analysis of six different insoles and used optimization analysis to determine the optimal insole which minimized the junction stress between plantar fascia and calcaneus. This FE analysis found that the plantar fascia stress and peak pressure when using the optimal insole were lower by 14% and 38.9%, respectively, than those when using the flat insole. In addition, the stress variation in plantar fascia was associated with the different shapes of insole.

  4. Combined effects of grain size, flow volume and channel width on geophysical flow mobility: three-dimensional discrete element modeling of dry and dense flows of angular rock fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnoli, Bruno; Piersanti, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    We have carried out new three-dimensional numerical simulations by using a discrete element method (DEM) to study the mobility of dry granular flows of angular rock fragments. These simulations are relevant for geophysical flows such as rock avalanches and pyroclastic flows. The model is validated by previous laboratory experiments. We confirm that (1) the finer the grain size, the larger the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows; (2) the smaller the flow volume, the larger the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows and (3) the wider the channel, the larger the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows. The grain size effect is due to the fact that finer grain size flows dissipate intrinsically less energy. This volume effect is the opposite of that experienced by the flow fronts. The original contribution of this paper consists of providing a comparison of the mobility of granular flows in six channels with a different cross section each. This results in a new scaling parameter χ that has the product of grain size and the cubic root of flow volume as the numerator and the product of channel width and flow length as the denominator. The linear correlation between the reciprocal of mobility and parameter χ is statistically highly significant. Parameter χ confirms that the mobility of the center of mass of granular flows is an increasing function of the ratio of the number of fragments per unit of flow mass to the total number of fragments in the flow. These are two characteristic numbers of particles whose effect on mobility is scale invariant.

  5. COMPARISON OF TEMPORAL PARAMETERS OF SWIMMING RESCUE ELEMENTS WHEN PERFORMED USING DOLPHIN AND FLUTTER KICK WITH FINS - DIDACTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rejman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was an analysis of the time required to swim to a victim and tow them back to shore, while perfoming the flutter-kick and the dolphin-kick using fins. It has been hypothesized that using fins while using the dolphin-kick when swimming leads to reduced rescue time. Sixteen lifeguards took part in the study. The main tasks performed by them, were to approach and tow (double armpit a dummy a distance of 50m while applying either the flutter-kick, or the dolphin-kick with fins. The analysis of the temporal parameters of both techniques of kicking demonstrates that, during the approach to the victim, neither the dolphin (tmean = 32.9s or the flutter kick (tmean = 33.0s were significantly faster than the other. However, when used for towing a victim the flutter kick (tmean = 47.1s was significantly faster when compared to the dolphin-kick (tmean = 52.8s. An assessment of the level of technical skills in competitive swimming, and in approaching and towing the victim, were also conducted. Towing time was significantly correlated with the parameter that linked the temporal and technical dimensions of towing and swimming (difference between flutter kick towing time and dolphin-kick towing time, 100m medley time and the four swimming strokes evaluation. No similar interdependency has been discovered in flutter kick towing time. These findings suggest that the dolphin-kick is a more difficult skill to perform when towing the victim than the flutter-kick. Since the hypothesis stated was not confirmed, postulates were formulated on how to improve dolphin-kick technique with fins, in order to reduce swimming rescue time

  6. Comparison of temporal parameters of swimming rescue elements when performed using dolphin and flutter kick with fins - didactical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejman, Marek; Wiesner, Wojciech; Silakiewicz, Piotr; Klarowicz, Andrzej; Abraldes, J Arturo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was an analysis of the time required to swim to a victim and tow them back to shore, while perfoming the flutter-kick and the dolphin-kick using fins. It has been hypothesized that using fins while using the dolphin-kick when swimming leads to reduced rescue time. Sixteen lifeguards took part in the study. The main tasks performed by them, were to approach and tow (double armpit) a dummy a distance of 50m while applying either the flutter-kick, or the dolphin-kick with fins. The analysis of the temporal parameters of both techniques of kicking demonstrates that, during the approach to the victim, neither the dolphin (tmean = 32.9s) or the flutter kick (tmean = 33.0s) were significantly faster than the other. However, when used for towing a victim the flutter kick (tmean = 47.1s) was significantly faster when compared to the dolphin-kick (tmean = 52.8s). An assessment of the level of technical skills in competitive swimming, and in approaching and towing the victim, were also conducted. Towing time was significantly correlated with the parameter that linked the temporal and technical dimensions of towing and swimming (difference between flutter kick towing time and dolphin-kick towing time, 100m medley time and the four swimming strokes evaluation). No similar interdependency has been discovered in flutter kick towing time. These findings suggest that the dolphin-kick is a more difficult skill to perform when towing the victim than the flutter-kick. Since the hypothesis stated was not confirmed, postulates were formulated on how to improve dolphin-kick technique with fins, in order to reduce swimming rescue time.

  7. A new MODIS based approach for gas flared volumes estimation: the case of the Val d'Agri Oil Center (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacava, T.; Faruolo, M.; Coviello, I.; Filizzola, C.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2014-12-01

    Gas flaring is one of the most controversial energetic and environmental issues the Earth is facing, moreover contributing to the global warming and climate change. According to the World Bank, each year about 150 Billion Cubic Meter of gas are being flared globally, that is equivalent to the annual gas use of Italy and France combined. Besides, about 400 million tons of CO2 (representing about 1.2% of global CO2 emissions) are added annually into the atmosphere. Efforts to evaluate the impact of flaring on the surrounding environment are hampered by lack of official information on flare locations and volumes. Suitable satellite based techniques could offers a potential solution to this problem through the detection and subsequent mapping of flare locations as well as gas emissions estimation. In this paper a new methodological approach, based on the Robust Satellite Techniques (RST), a multi-temporal scheme of satellite data analysis, was developed to analyze and characterize the flaring activity of the largest Italian gas and oil pre-treatment plant (ENI-COVA) located in Val d'Agri (Basilicata) For this site, located in an anthropized area characterized by a large environmental complexity, flaring emissions are mainly related to emergency conditions (i.e. waste flaring), being the industrial process regulated by strict regional laws. With reference to the peculiar characteristics of COVA flaring, the RST approach was implemented on 13 years of EOS-MODIS (Earth Observing System - Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) infrared data to detect COVA-related thermal anomalies and to develop a regression model for gas flared volume estimation. The methodological approach, the whole processing chain and the preliminarily achieved results will be shown and discussed in this paper. In addition, the possible implementation of the proposed approach on the data acquired by the SUOMI NPP - VIIRS (National Polar-orbiting Partnership - Visible Infrared Imaging

  8. Investigation of Adaptive-threshold Approaches for Determining Area-Time Integrals from Satellite Infrared Data to Estimate Convective Rain Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; VonderHaar, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    The principal goal of this project is to establish relationships that would allow application of area-time integral (ATI) calculations based upon satellite data to estimate rainfall volumes. The research is being carried out as a collaborative effort between the two participating organizations, with the satellite data analysis to determine values for the ATIs being done primarily by the STC-METSAT scientists and the associated radar data analysis to determine the 'ground-truth' rainfall estimates being done primarily at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSM&T). Synthesis of the two separate kinds of data and investigation of the resulting rainfall-versus-ATI relationships is then carried out jointly. The research has been pursued using two different approaches, which for convenience can be designated as the 'fixed-threshold approach' and the 'adaptive-threshold approach'. In the former, an attempt is made to determine a single temperature threshold in the satellite infrared data that would yield ATI values for identifiable cloud clusters which are closely related to the corresponding rainfall amounts as determined by radar. Work on the second, or 'adaptive-threshold', approach for determining the satellite ATI values has explored two avenues: (1) attempt involved choosing IR thresholds to match the satellite ATI values with ones separately calculated from the radar data on a case basis; and (2) an attempt involved a striaghtforward screening analysis to determine the (fixed) offset that would lead to the strongest correlation and lowest standard error of estimate in the relationship between the satellite ATI values and the corresponding rainfall volumes.

  9. Implementation of an Electronic Circuit for SSSA Control Approach of a Plate Type Element and Experimental Match with a Feed-Forward Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viscardi Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of an active vibration control system is strictly correlated to the exact knowledge of the dynamic behavior of the system, of the excitation level and spectra and of the sensor and actuator’s specification. Only the correct management of these aspects may guarantee the correct choice of the control strategy and the relative performance. Within this paper, some preliminary activities aimed at the creation of a structurally simple, cheap and easily replaceable active control systems for metal panels are discussed. The final future aim is to control and to reduce noise, produced by vibrations of metal panels of the body of a car. The paper is focused on two points. The first one is the realization of an electronic circuit for Synchronized Shunted Switch Architecture (SSSA with the right dimensioning of the components to control the proposed test article, represented by a rectangular aluminum plate. The second one is a preliminary experimental study on the test article, in controlled laboratory conditions, to compare performances of two possible control approach: SSSA and a feed-forward control approach. This comparison would contribute to the future choice of the most suitable control architecture for the specific attenuation of structure-born noise related to an automotive floor structure under deterministic (engine and road-tyre interaction and stochastic (road-tyre interaction and aerodynamic forcing actions.

  10. Object localization within turbid slab media using time-resolved transillumination contrast functions: a finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, V.; L'Huillier, J. P.; Mansouri, C.

    2007-07-01

    In the last few years, the propagation of diffuse photons in scattering media has become an important field of interest. This is mainly due to the possibility offered by the low absorption of light in the range 700 to 900nm. Indeed, this property leads to a potential deep penetration. But a non negligible limitation appears: the scattering processes strongly reduce both the contrast and the resolution. In this paper, the time-dependent light propagation in highly scattering media containing an inclusion is solved by means of a finite element method, tacking into account Robin type air-tissue boundary conditions. This study is devoted to the depth localization of a tumor enclosed into a breast-like slab. The tissue is modeled by a rectangular meshed domain that mimics a breast compressed between two transparent plates. Cartesian coordinates are used in order to solve the time-dependent diffusion approximation. A short laser pulse of 1ps is considered. The transillumination technique is able to laterally detect the object when the source and detector are moved together on the same axis. In order to perform the localization of the inclusion in this study, the optical properties of the object were varied. Knowing the lateral position of the inclusion, we derive interesting temporal contrast functions based on the mean time of flight of photons. These functions allow to localize in depth the inclusion under the assumption that the object is very diffusing. To conclude, our study demonstrates the possibility to detect laterally and axially a tumor-like inclusion enclosed in breast-like tissues.

  11. Petroleum system elements within the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleogene sediments of Nigeria's inland basins: An integrated sequence stratigraphic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dim, Chidozie Izuchukwu Princeton; Onuoha, K. Mosto; Okeugo, Chukwudike Gabriel; Ozumba, Bertram Maduka

    2017-06-01

    Sequence stratigraphic studies have been carried out using subsurface well and 2D seismic data in the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleogene sediments of Anambra and proximal onshore section of Niger Delta Basin in the Southeastern Nigeria. The aim was to establish the stratigraphic framework for better understanding of the reservoir, source and seal rock presence and distribution in the basin. Thirteen stratigraphic bounding surfaces (consisting of six maximum flooding surfaces - MFSs and seven sequence boundaries - SBs) were recognized and calibrated using a newly modified chronostratigraphic chart. Stratigraphic surfaces were matched with corresponding foraminiferal and palynological biozones, aiding correlation across wells in this study. Well log sequence stratigraphic correlation reveals that stratal packages within the basin are segmented into six depositional sequences occurring from Late Cretaceous to Early Paleogene age. Generated gross depositional environment maps at various MFSs show that sediment packages deposited within shelfal to deep marine settings, reflect continuous rise and fall of sea levels within a regressive cycle. Each of these sequences consist of three system tracts (lowstand system tract - LST, transgressive system tract - TST and highstand system tract - HST) that are associated with mainly progradational and retrogradational sediment stacking patterns. Well correlation reveals that the sand and shale units of the LSTs, HSTs and TSTs, that constitute the reservoir and source/seal packages respectively are laterally continuous and thicken basinwards, due to structural influences. Result from interpretation of seismic section reveals the presence of hanging wall, footwall, horst block and collapsed crest structures. These structural features generally aid migration and offer entrapment mechanism for hydrocarbon accumulation. The combination of these reservoirs, sources, seals and trap elements form a good petroleum system that is viable

  12. An empirically-derived approach for investigating Health Information Technology: the Elementally Entangled Organisational Communication (EEOC framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiou Andrew

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the Elementally Entangled Organisational Communication (EEOC framework by drawing on a set of three case studies which assessed the impact of new Health Information Technology (HIT on a pathology service. The EEOC framework was empirically developed as a tool to tackle organisational communication challenges in the implementation and evaluation of health information systems. Methods The framework was synthesised from multiple research studies undertaken across a major metropolitan hospital pathology service during the period 2005 to 2008. These studies evaluated the impact of new HIT systems in pathology departments (Laboratory Information System and an Emergency Department (Computerised Provider Order Entry located in Sydney, Australia. Results Key dimensions of EEOC are illustrated by the following case studies: 1 the communication infrastructure between the Blood Bank and the ward for the coordination and distribution of blood products; 2 the organisational environment in the Clinical Chemistry and Haematology departments and their attempts to organise, plan and control the processing of laboratory specimens; and 3 the temporal make up of the organisation as revealed in changes to the way the Central Specimen Reception allocated, sequenced and synchronised work tasks. Conclusions The case studies not only highlight the pre-existing communication architecture within the organisation but also the constitutive role communication plays in the way organisations go about addressing their requirements. HIT implementation involves a mutual transformation of the organisation and the technology. This is a vital consideration because of the dangers associated with poor organisational planning and implementation of HIT, and the potential for unintended adverse consequences, workarounds and risks to the quality and safety of patient care. The EEOC framework aims to account for the complex

  13. A non-contacting approach for full field dynamic strain monitoring of rotating structures using the photogrammetry, finite element, and modal expansion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqersad, Javad

    Health monitoring of rotating structures such as wind turbines and helicopter rotors is generally performed using conventional sensors that provide a limited set of data at discrete locations near or on the hub. These sensors usually provide no data on the blades or interior locations where failures may occur. Within this work, an unique expansion algorithm was extended and combined with finite element (FE) modeling and an optical measurement technique to identify the dynamic strain in rotating structures. The merit of the approach is shown by using the approach to predict the dynamic strain on a small non-rotating and rotating wind turbine. A three-bladed wind turbine having 2.3-meter long blades was placed in a semi-built-in boundary condition using a hub, a machining chuck, and a steel block. A finite element model of the three wind turbine blades assembled to the hub was created and used to extract resonant frequencies and mode shapes. The FE model was validated and updated using experimental modal tests. For the non-rotating optical test, the turbine was excited using a sinusoidal excitation, a pluck test, arbitrary impacts on three blades, and random force excitations with a mechanical shaker. The response of the structure to the excitations was measured using three-dimensional point tracking. A pair of high-speed cameras was used to measure the displacement of optical targets on the structure when the blades were vibrating. The measured displacements at discrete locations were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the structure to extract the full-field dynamic strain. The results of the work show an excellent correlation between the strain predicted using the proposed approach and the strain measured with strain-gages for all of the three loading conditions. Similar to the non-rotating case, optical measurements were also preformed on a rotating wind turbine. The point tracking technique measured both rigid body displacement and flexible

  14. Wisconsin Inventor & Entrepreneur Clubs: Investment in an Innovative Approach to Entrepreneurship. Rural Research Report. Volume 20, Issue 1, Winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Research on entrepreneurship in rural areas has increasingly stressed the importance of a supportive environment and social networks in enhancing innovation. This report examines a novel approach to promoting entrepreneurship using regional Inventor & Entrepreneur (I&E) Clubs. A telephone survey of 21 I&E Clubs was completed to collect…

  15. Curriculum Assessment Using Artificial Neural Network and Support Vector Machine Modeling Approaches: A Case Study. IR Applications. Volume 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chau-Kuang

    2010-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) approaches have been on the cutting edge of science and technology for pattern recognition and data classification. In the ANN model, classification accuracy can be achieved by using the feed-forward of inputs, back-propagation of errors, and the adjustment of connection weights. In…

  16. Wisconsin Inventor & Entrepreneur Clubs: Investment in an Innovative Approach to Entrepreneurship. Rural Research Report. Volume 20, Issue 1, Winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Research on entrepreneurship in rural areas has increasingly stressed the importance of a supportive environment and social networks in enhancing innovation. This report examines a novel approach to promoting entrepreneurship using regional Inventor & Entrepreneur (I&E) Clubs. A telephone survey of 21 I&E Clubs was completed to collect information…

  17. New functionalities in abundant element oxides: ubiquitous element strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Hideo; Hayashi, Katsuro; Kamiya, Toshio; Atou, Toshiyuki; Susaki, Tomofumi

    2011-06-01

    While most ceramics are composed of ubiquitous elements (the ten most abundant elements within the Earth's crust), many advanced materials are based on rare elements. A 'rare-element crisis' is approaching owing to the imbalance between the limited supply of rare elements and the increasing demand. Therefore, we propose a 'ubiquitous element strategy' for materials research, which aims to apply abundant elements in a variety of innovative applications. Creation of innovative oxide materials and devices based on conventional ceramics is one specific challenge. This review describes the concept of ubiquitous element strategy and gives some highlights of our recent research on the synthesis of electronic, thermionic and structural materials using ubiquitous elements.

  18. Composite time-lapse computed tomography and micro finite element simulations: A new imaging approach for characterizing cement flows and mechanical benefits of vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Zderic, Ivan; Baur, Annick; Unholz, Cynthia; Eberli, Ursula; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2016-02-01

    Vertebroplasty has been shown to reinforce weak vertebral bodies and reduce fracture risks, yet cement leakage is a major problem that can cause severe complications. Since cement flow is nearly impossible to control during surgery, small volumes of cement are injected, but then mechanical benefits might be limited. A better understanding of cement flows within bone structure is required to further optimize vertebroplasty and bone augmentation in general. We developed a novel imaging method, composite time-lapse CT, to characterize cement flow during injection. In brief, composite-resolution time-lapse CT exploits the qualities of microCT and clinical CT. The method consists in overlaying low-resolution time-lapse CT scans acquired during injection onto pre-operative high-resolution microCT scans, generating composite-resolution time-lapse CT series of cement flow within bone. In this in vitro study, composite-resolution time-lapse CT was applied to eight intact and five artificially fractured cadaveric vertebrae during vertebroplasty. The time-lapse scans were acquired at one-milliliter cement injection steps until a total of 10 ml cement was injected. The composite-resolution series were then converted into micro finite element models to compute strains distribution under virtual axial loading. Relocation of strain energy density within bone structure was observed throughout the progression of the procedure. Interestingly, the normalized effect of cement injection on the overall stiffness of the vertebrae was similar between intact and fractured specimens, although at different orders of magnitude. In conclusion, composite time-lapse CT can picture cement flows during bone augmentation. The composite images can also be easily converted into finite element models to compute virtual strain distributions under loading at every step of an injection, providing deeper understanding on the biomechanics of vertebroplasty.

  19. ECOLOGICAL THERAPY AS CORRECTIONAL AND PEDAGOGICAL ELEMENT OF INTEGRATED APPROACH IN THE TREATMENT OF LOGONEUROSIS AMONG PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kalashnikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available . The aims of the publication are: to analyse domestic experience of education and training of preschool children with logoneurosis; to designate the causes and displays of this disease; to define the problems arising through organization of correctional work in preschool institution taking into account modern requirements of the Russian legislation and climatic features of regions; to present a possible version of the solution of these problems.Methods. The methods of theoretical analysis and generalization of scientific, methodical publications, and legislative base on a problem of correctional work on stuttering among preschool children are used.Results and scientific novelty. The authors’ program of additional education with the correctional elements «Ecotherapy for Children at the age of 5–7 years with Logoneurosis» developed by the staff of the Ecotherapy Laboratory of the Polar Alpine Botanical Garden – Institute named after N. A. Avrorin is described in the publication. The program complies with the modern requirements of Federal State Educational Standard of preschool education and is focused on tutors and speech language therapists of correctional groups and logocentres. In the course of mastering the program, a child by means of a game at once joins in search-investigative activity in the field of biology and ecology with visualization of an ultimate goal and obligatory practical material realization of results of work. From the point of view of medical expediency, the program has included the special breathing and relaxation exercises which are picked up for the lesson topic. The efficiency of a combination in correctional pedagogics of standard logopedic methods and the practise with nonconventional methods of art-, garden-, and animal-assisted therapy is confirmed. Special relevance of the proposed techniques and methods in the conditions of the Polar region (the region, wherein during the period of an exit from polar night

  20. Novel computational approach for studying ph effects, excluded volume and ion-ion correlations in electrical double layers around polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven

    , which are important details for proper description of EDL properties. In this thesis, we implement an efficient and accurate classical solvation density functional theory (CDSFT) for EDLs of spherical macroions and cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes. This approach extends the capabilities of mean field approximations by taking into account electrostatic ion-ion correlations, size asymmetry and excluded volume effects without compromising the computational cost. We apply the computational tool to study the structural and thermodynamic properties of the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA and spherical nanoparticles. We demonstrate that the presence of solvent molecules at experimental concentration and size values has a significant impact on the layering of ions. This layering directly influences the integrated charge and mean electrostatic potential in the diffuse region of the spherical electrical double layer (SEDL) and have a noticeable impact on the behavior of zeta potential (ZP). Recently, we have extended the aforementioned CSDFT to account for the charge-regulated mechanisms of the macroion surface on the structural and thermodynamic properties of spherical EDLs. In the approach, the CSDFT is combined with a surface complexation model to account for ion correlation and excluded volume effects on the surface titration of spherical macroions. We apply the proposed computational approach to describe the role that the ion size and solvent excluded volume play on the surface titration properties of silica nanoparticles. We analyze the effects of the nanoparticle size, pH and salt concentration of the aqueous solution on the nanoparticle's surface charge and zeta potential. The results reveal that surface charge density and zeta potential significantly depend on excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects as well as on pH for monovalent ion species at high salt concentrations. Overall, our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo

  1. Deciphering P-T-t Paths from Reaction Microstructures in Metamorphic Rocks: a New Approach by Means of Three-Dimensional Finite Element Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, R.; Marcuzzi, F.; Mazzoli, C.

    2008-12-01

    One of the main goals of metamorphic petrology is to obtain information on the variations of metamorphic P-T conditions during orogenesis (P-T-t paths). For this purpose petrologists are aware of the potentiality of studying reaction microstructures, although results are not always satisfactory as in most cases qualitative approaches, failing on the real meaning of specific microstructral relationships, are often adopted. Thus, the present research aimed to study the petrogenetic meaning of reaction microstructure in metamorphic rocks through the formulation of a new true three-dimensional finite-element model. For this purpose, different petrologically well studied metamorphic microstructural situations have been selected, in order to identify information, variables and constraints fundamental for the development of the model. A generalised finite-elements model (FEM) has been developed, applicable to any microstructural situation, independently on grain-size and distribution of minerals in the matrix, and able to also consider growth anisotropies, intracrystalline diffusion, pressure solution, and possibly anisotropy of the strain field. This model is based on a combination of the usual diffusion linear equations used in current irreversible thermodynamic models, providing constraints on absolute values of diffusion coefficients of chemical components, chemical potential gradients and time of reactions during metamorphism, starting from information on textural anisotropies observed in metamorphic rocks. In the model, parameterization is given by diffusion, convection and reaction coefficients of each chemical species within each finite element, which dimension is equal to the spatial resolution of the experimentally measured input data (i.e. SEM elemental maps). Thus, parameterization is able to describe locally heterogeneous reaction phenomena although based on a basically linear partial derivative differential model. Such a discretization of the continuum model

  2. Model estimation of cerebral hemodynamics between blood flow and volume changes: a data-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua-Liang; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Yi; Coca, Daniel; Li, Liang-Min; Mayhew, J E W; Billings, Stephen A

    2009-06-01

    It is well known that there is a dynamic relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). With increasing applications of functional MRI, where the blood oxygen-level-dependent signals are recorded, the understanding and accurate modeling of the hemodynamic relationship between CBF and CBV becomes increasingly important. This study presents an empirical and data-based modeling framework for model identification from CBF and CBV experimental data. It is shown that the relationship between the changes in CBF and CBV can be described using a parsimonious autoregressive with exogenous input model structure. It is observed that neither the ordinary least-squares (LS) method nor the classical total least-squares (TLS) method can produce accurate estimates from the original noisy CBF and CBV data. A regularized total least-squares (RTLS) method is thus introduced and extended to solve such an error-in-the-variables problem. Quantitative results show that the RTLS method works very well on the noisy CBF and CBV data. Finally, a combination of RTLS with a filtering method can lead to a parsimonious but very effective model that can characterize the relationship between the changes in CBF and CBV.

  3. A volume-preserving sharpening approach for the propagation of sharp phase boundaries in multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2011-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models that recover a macroscopic description of multiphase flow of immiscible liquids typically represent the boundaries between phases using a scalar function, the phase field, that varies smoothly over several grid points. Attempts to tune the model parameters to minimise the widths of these interfaces typically lead to the interfaces becoming fixed to the underlying grid instead of advecting with the fluid velocity. This phenomenon, known as lattice pinning, is strikingly similar to that associated with the numerical simulation of conservation laws coupled to stiff algebraic source terms. We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the model problem proposed by LeVeque and Yee (1990) [3] to study the latter phenomenon in the context of computational combustion, and offer a volume-conserving extension in multiple space dimensions. Inspired by the random projection method of Bao and Jin (2000) [1] we further generalise this formulation by introducing a uniformly distributed quasi-random variable into the term responsible for the sharpening of phase boundaries. This method is mass conserving, gives correct average propagation speeds over many timesteps, and is shown to significantly delay the onset of pinning as the interface width is reduced. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Speciation of rare earth elements in natural terrestrial waters: assessing the role of dissolved organic matter from the modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianwu; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2003-07-01

    Humic Ion-Binding Model V, which focuses on metal complexation with humic and fulvic acids, was modified to assess the role of dissolved natural organic matter in the speciation of rare earth elements (REEs) in natural terrestrial waters. Intrinsic equilibrium constants for cation-proton exchange with humic substances (i.e., p KMHA for type A sites, consisting mainly of carboxylic acids), required by the model for each REE, were initially estimated using linear free-energy relationships between the first hydrolysis constants and stability constants for REE metal complexation with lactic and acetic acid. p KMHA values were further refined by comparison of calculated Model V "fits" to published data sets describing complexation of Eu, Tb, and Dy with humic substances. A subroutine that allows for the simultaneous evaluation of REE complexation with inorganic ligands (e.g., Cl -, F -, OH -, SO 42-, CO 32-, PO 43-), incorporating recently determined stability constants for REE complexes with these ligands, was also linked to Model V. Humic Ion-Binding Model V's ability to predict REE speciation with natural organic matter in natural waters was evaluated by comparing model results to "speciation" data determined previously with ultrafiltration techniques (i.e., organic acid-rich waters of the Nsimi-Zoetele catchment, Cameroon; dilute, circumneutral-pH waters of the Tamagawa River, Japan, and the Kalix River, northern Sweden). The model predictions compare well with the ultrafiltration studies, especially for the heavy REEs in circumneutral-pH river waters. Subsequent application of the model to world average river water predicts that organic matter complexes are the dominant form of dissolved REEs in bulk river waters draining the continents. Holding major solute, minor solute, and REE concentrations of world average river water constant while varying pH, the model suggests that organic matter complexes would dominate La, Eu, and Lu speciation within the pH ranges of 5

  5. The concept of runoff elements as a basis of scale-free approach to runoff formation modelling - the experience of the model "Hydrograph" development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Yu. B.; Semenova, O.

    2009-04-01

    The concept of runoff elements used in proposed model as a base for calculating routine describing slope runoff transformation gives the opportunity to avoid the scale problem in hydrological modelling which, to our opinion, mainly refers to mathematical approaches (the framework of Navier-Stokes equations) widely used for description of water movement within the basin. River basin is a system of elementary watersheds of surface and underground ones of various layers. The topography of river basin surface conditionally can be presented by a system of the inclined surfaces each of them being an elementary slope. Within a surface elementary slope water flowing down is realized over non-channel rill system and within the underground elementary slope - over the underground drainage system. The elementary slopes and watersheds in their turn consist of a system of runoff elements - limited by micro-divides areas of the surface and underground elementary slopes and watersheds exposed with their open part to the slope non-channel or underground drainage system. Runoff elements are not the kind of idealization but they can be easily identified with the natural formations. Surface runoff elements depending on natural conditions but mainly on inclination can be measured from shares and ones up to tens of thousand square meters. Underground runoff elements can be much greater. For each runoff element there is a balance ratio (1) There is the unique nonlinear relation between W and outflow dischargeR: (2) Then, the corresponding equation of the outflow hydrograph from runoff elements of a given layer is the following: (3) Here R0 is the initial value of runoff R and S is the runoff rate (m3s-1); Δt is the computational time interval (sec) during which S is constant; a,b - hydraulic coefficients (which determine the conditions of outflow) with dimension m-3 and m3 s-1. In the general case, we assume that the number of runoff elements is proportional to the basin area F (m2

  6. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during the Biodegradation of 1,2-Dichloroethane: Potential for Pathway Identification Using a Multi-element (C, Cl, and H) Isotope Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hatijah Mortan, Siti; Yu, Rong; Rosell, Monica; Marco-Urrea, Ernest; Freedman, David L; Aravena, Ramon; Soler, Albert; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2017-09-19

    Even though multi-element isotope fractionation patterns provide crucial information with which to identify contaminant degradation pathways in the field, those involving hydrogen are still lacking for many halogenated groundwater contaminants and degradation pathways. This study investigates for the first time hydrogen isotope fractionation during both aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) using five microbial cultures. Transformation-associated isotope fractionation values (εbulk(H)) were -115 ± 18‰ (aerobic C-H bond oxidation), -34 ± 4‰ and -38 ± 4‰ (aerobic C-Cl bond cleavage via hydrolytic dehalogenation), and -57 ± 3‰ and -77 ± 9‰ (anaerobic C-Cl bond cleavage via reductive dihaloelimination). The dual-element C-H isotope approach (ΛC-H = Δδ(2)H/Δδ(13)C ≈ εbulk(H)/εbulk(C), where Δδ(2)H and Δδ(13)C are changes in isotope ratios during degradation) resulted in clearly different ΛC-H values: 28 ± 4 (oxidation), 0.7 ± 0.1 and 0.9 ± 0.1 (hydrolytic dehalogenation), and 1.76 ± 0.05 and 3.5 ± 0.1 (dihaloelimination). This result highlights the potential of this approach to identify 1,2-DCA degradation pathways in the field. In addition, distinct trends were also observed in a multi- (i.e., Δδ(2)H versus Δδ(37)Cl versus Δδ(13)C) isotope plot, which opens further possibilities for pathway identification in future field studies. This is crucial information to understand the mechanisms controlling natural attenuation of 1,2-DCA and to design appropriate strategies to enhance biodegradation.

  7. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  8. Predictors and outcomes of lead extraction requiring a bailout femoral approach: Data from 2 high-volume centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chami, Mikhael F; Merchant, Faisal M; Waheed, Anam; Khattak, Furqan; El-Khalil, Jad; Patel, Adarsh; Sayegh, Michael N; Desai, Yaanik; Leon, Angel R; Saba, Samir

    2017-04-01

    Lead extraction (LE) infrequently requires the use of the "bailout" femoral approach. Predictors and outcomes of femoral extraction are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine the predictors of need for femoral LE and its outcomes. Consecutive patients who underwent LE at our centers were identified. Baseline demographic characteristics, procedural outcomes, and clinical outcomes were ascertained by medical record review. Patients were stratified into 2 groups on the basis of the need for femoral extraction. A total of 1080 patients underwent LE, of whom 50 (4.63%) required femoral extraction. Patients requiring femoral extraction were more likely to have leads with longer dwell time (9.5 ± 6.0 years vs 5.7 ± 4.3 years; P extracted per procedure (2.0 ± 1.0 vs 1.7 ± 0.9; P = .003), and to have infection as an indication for extraction (72% vs 37.2%; P extraction group than in the nonfemoral group (58% and 76% vs 94.7% and 97.9 %, respectively; P extraction was needed in ~5% of LEs. Longer lead dwell time, higher number of leads extracted per procedure, and the presence of infection predicted the need for femoral extraction. Procedural success of femoral extraction was low, highlighting the fact that this approach is mostly used as a bailout strategy and thus selects for more challenging cases. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Flow Element Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Air distribution in ventilated rooms is a flow process that can be divided into different elements such as supply air jets, exhaust flows, thermal plumes, boundary layer flows, infiltration and gravity currents. These flow elements are isolated volumes where the air movement is controlled...... by a restricted number of parameters, and the air movement is fairly independent of the general flow in the enclosure. In many practical situations, the most convenient· method is to design the air distribution system using flow element theory....

  10. Morphologic Study of Superior Temporal Sulcus-Amygdaloid Body and Lateral Fissure-Amygdaloid Body Surgical Approach by Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuan; Ren, Bichen; Chang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jinnan; Li, Youqiong; Duan, Haobo; Cheng, Kailiang; Wang, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    In this research, 83 patients were measured by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering technique. The authors acquired the curve length of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure on the cerebral hemisphere, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the center of amygdaloid body separately, the vertical diameter, the transversal diameter, and the anteroposterior diameter of the amygdaloid body and the 2 approach angles between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the center of amygdaloid body and the shortest segment from lateral fissure to the center of the amygdaloid body. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the 2 points of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure, which are closest to the center of amygdaloid body, aimed at finding out the best entrance points of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the amygdaloid body and reducing the damage to the nerve fibers or blood vessels during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 1/4 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point and the point at the front side 1/3 of the lateral fissure. There is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  11. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, H; Steffensen, E; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2012-01-01

    technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose: To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC......, and glioblastomas. Results: rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r ¼ 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r ¼ 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated......-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods: Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and r...

  12. The effects of ultrasound guidance and neurostimulation on the minimum effective anesthetic volume of mepivacaine 1.5% required to block the sciatic nerve using the subgluteal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelli, Giorgio; Ghisi, Daniela; Fanelli, Andrea; Ortu, Andrea; Moschini, Elisa; Berti, Marco; Ziegler, Stefanie; Fanelli, Guido

    2009-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ultrasound (US) guidance may reduce the minimum effective anesthetic volume (MEAV(50)) of 1.5% mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve with a subgluteal approach compared with neurostimulation (NS). After premedication and single-injection femoral nerve block, 60 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block with either NS (n = 30) or US (n = 30). In the US group, the sciatic nerve was localized between the ischial tuberosity and the greater trochanter. In the NS group, the appropriate muscular response (foot plantar flexion or inversion) was elicited (1.5 mA, 2 Hz, 0.1 ms) and maintained to mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve compared with NS.

  13. Finite element analysis of grain-matrix micro-cracking in shale within the context of a multiscale modeling approach for fracture (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, R. A.; Yu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The paper models grain-scale micro-cracking in shale at grain-matrix interfaces, assuming constituents are composed of quart silt grains and compacted clay matrix for a typical shale. The influence of grain-matrix-grain interaction on micro-crack patterns is investigated. Elasto-plastic pressure-sensitive cohesive-surface models are inserted at grain-matrix interfaces and intra-clay-matrix finite element facets, while a bulk elasto-plasticity model with bifurcation is employed for the clay matrix to compare to the intra-clay-matrix cohesive-surface model. Numerical examples are presented under two-dimensional plane strain condition at small strains. A procedure is proposed to upscale grain-scale micro-cracking to predict macro-fracture nucleation and propagation in shale and other bound particulate materials. It is shown that using cohesive surface elements (CSEs) at all finite element facets in the clay matrix mesh to simulate micro-cracking in the clay matrix leads to mesh-dependent results. Using CSEs at grain-clay-matrix interfaces is physical and not mesh dependent. We also considered using bulk pressure-sensitive elasto-plasticity with bifurcation condition within the clay matrix to attempt to predict onset of localization around grains in the simulations. It was encouraging to see that for both the single grain and multiple grain simulations, the finite element region in the clay matrix meshes where bifurcation was first detected around the grains was nearly the same. This gives us confidence that once a proper post-bifurcation constitutive model is implemented within an embedded discontinuity formulation, micro-cracking nucleation and propagation at the grain-scale in shale can be properly simulated, which will provide the basis for up-scaling to macro-cracks within a multiscale method for fracture in shale. Other items to address in future research are: (i) include transverse isotropy (elastic and plastic) for the bulk clay matrix elasto-plasticity model

  14. Multi-Disciplinary Approaches to Intelligently Sharing Large-Volumes of Real-Time Sensor Data During Natural Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart E Middleton

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe our knowledge-based service architecture for multi-risk environmental decision-support, capable of handling geo-distributed heterogeneous real-time data sources. Data sources include tide gauges, buoys, seismic sensors, satellites, earthquake alerts, Web 2.0 feeds to crowd source 'unconventional' measurements, and simulations of Tsunami wave propagation. Our system of systems multi-bus architecture provides a scalable and high performance messaging backbone. We are overcoming semantic interoperability between heterogeneous datasets by using a self-describing 'plug-in' data source approach. As crises develop we can agilely steer the processing server and adapt data fusion and mining algorithm configurations in real-time.

  15. Methodological approaches to planar and volumetric scintigraphic imaging of small volume targets with high spatial resolution and sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Biologia Molecular], e-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.br; Braga, J. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica; Correa, R. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Ciencia Espacial e Atmosferica; Leite, J.P. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia, Psiquiatria e Psicologia Medica; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica

    2009-08-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a non-invasive imaging technique, which provides information reporting the functional states of tissues. SPECT imaging has been used as a diagnostic tool in several human disorders and can be used in animal models of diseases for physiopathological, genomic and drug discovery studies. However, most of the experimental models used in research involve rodents, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller in linear dimensions than man. Consequently, images of targets obtained with conventional gamma-cameras and collimators have poor spatial resolution and statistical quality. We review the methodological approaches developed in recent years in order to obtain images of small targets with good spatial resolution and sensitivity. Multi pinhole, coded mask- and slit-based collimators are presented as alternative approaches to improve image quality. In combination with appropriate decoding algorithms, these collimators permit a significant reduction of the time needed to register the projections used to make 3-D representations of the volumetric distribution of target's radiotracers. Simultaneously, they can be used to minimize artifacts and blurring arising when single pinhole collimators are used. Representation images are presented, which illustrate the use of these collimators. We also comment on the use of coded masks to attain tomographic resolution with a single projection, as discussed by some investigators since their introduction to obtain near-field images. We conclude this review by showing that the use of appropriate hardware and software tools adapted to conventional gamma-cameras can be of great help in obtaining relevant functional information in experiments using small animals. (author)

  16. A Chiral-Bag Approach to Static Interaction between Two Baryons ---A Numerical Study with Use of the Finite Element Method---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, S.; Tamagaki, R.; Tatsumi, T.; Yoro, S.

    1990-12-01

    Static interaction between two spherical chiral bags is studied in a numerical way. In order to get the solutions of the confined quark states and the outside chiral-field which should satisfy the boundary conditions at both bag surfaces in the chiral bag model, the finite element method is utilized as numerical procedure. We extract the static interaction by calculating the energy change as the two bags approach from large separation to contact distance. Results obtained for three typical configurations indicate that such an approach is workable: We can see that the asymptotic behavior gives the OPEP-tail, and some nonperturbative effects are noticeable in the intermediate region. Although the deviation of the interaction energy from the OPEP value is not so remarkable beyond the pion Compton wavelength due to the cancellation between the energy change of the quark system and that of the chiral field, there arises a significant deviation of the quark wave function and the chiral field from those of the hedgehog solution in the single-baryon case. The procedure in numerical calculations adopted in this paper is explained in detail.

  17. The 13C-excess: a new dual-element stable isotopic approach for detrending the effects of evaporation on lake carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, T. W.; Oze, C.

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotope-based proxy methods enhance our ability to interpret paleohydrology, paleoelevation, climate change, and biogeochemical cycles. In ancient carbonate lakes, these methods often require that the unmodified isotopic composition of meteoric water, or local carbon reservoirs, or both, are recorded by authigenic minerals. Surprisingly, these critical assumptions have not been tested across wide-ranging environmental contexts. Here, we show that globally distributed Quaternary lake carbonate oxygen isotope compositions are not strongly, nor significantly, correlated with local meteoric-derived water compositions due to the modification of in-flow waters following entry into the lake environment. These modifications are largely caused by surface water evaporation, and can result in dubious reconstructions of ancient hydrological conditions and water source effects such as the strength of prevailing air-mass trajectory, >3km errors in paleoelevation estimates, unrealistic shifts in lake water temperature, and misleading interpretations of local carbon cycle conditions if not accounted for. However, our analysis suggests that positive shifts in surface water δ18O are accompanied by similar magnitude shifts in δ13C-DIC during lake residence. This positive co-variation in δ18O and δ13C may be used to detrend lake carbonate compositions for the effects of surface water evaporation using a parameter we define here as the '13C-excess'. This approach uses the isotopic covariant trend between in-flow waters and lake waters, rather than lacustrine covariation alone, to better constrain ancient meteoric-derived water compositions. To demonstrate the potential strength of the 13C-excess approach over single element methods, we compare the paleoelevation estimates derived from lake carbonate compositions using both approaches. When Tibetan lakes are excluded from the dataset, 13C-excess values are significantly correlated with mean up-slope hypsometric altitude with

  18. The PAVE (peeling-assisted volume-enhancing) lift: A retrospective 6-year clinical analysis of a combined approach for facial rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Kai Oliver; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Jaminet, Patrick; Gonser, Phillipp

    2016-08-01

    The peeling-assisted volume-enhancing (PAVE) lift is a single-stage approach that combines superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) plication techniques with fat grafting and different peeling agents. To evaluate the safety of this approach, we analyzed the records of 159 patients who underwent surgery between 2008 and 2014. The percentage of complications observed was not higher than values reported in the literature for each treatment entity: surgical facelift: n=3 haematomas (1.89 %), n=2; temporary apraxia of the mandibular branch (1.26%); fat transfer: minor asymmetry in n = 5 cases (3.14%); peeling: temporary hyperpigmentation in trichloroacetic acid (n = 5; 3.8%) and phenol peels (n = 4; 3.1%), permanent hypopigmentation (n = 6; 5.6%), formation of skin miliae persisting longer than 2 to 3 months (n = 5; 4.6%) and prolonged erythema (n = 3; 0.28%) in phenol peels. The single-stage use of chemical peels, autologous fat transfer, and surgical rhytidectomy was safe.

  19. Generalized Partial Volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Sporring, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV). Their theoret......Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV...

  20. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....